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Sample records for directional wave buoy

  1. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  2. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lamb, Bradford [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Prudell, Joseph [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hammagren, Erik [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-08-22

    This Project aims to satisfy objectives of the DOE’s Water Power Program by completing a system detailed design (SDD) and other important activities in the first phase of a utility-scale grid-connected ocean wave energy demonstration. In early 2012, Columbia Power (CPwr) had determined that further cost and performance optimization was necessary in order to commercialize its StingRAY wave energy converter (WEC). CPwr’s progress toward commercialization, and the requisite technology development path, were focused on transitioning toward a commercial-scale demonstration. This path required significant investment to be successful, and the justification for this investment required improved annual energy production (AEP) and lower capital costs. Engineering solutions were developed to address these technical and cost challenges, incorporated into a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE), and then adapted to form the technical content and statement of project objectives of the resulting Project (DE-EE0005930). Through Project cost-sharing and technical collaboration between DOE and CPwr, and technical collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and other Project partners, we have demonstrated experimentally that these conceptual improvements have merit and made significant progress towards a certified WEC system design at a selected and contracted deployment site at the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) at the Marine Corps Base in Oahu, HI (MCBH).

  3. Determination of wave direction using an orbital following buoy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Almeida, A.M.; Vaithiyanathan, R.; Vethamony, P.

    Software has been developed in FORTRAN language using a personal computer for the determination of wave direction from time series measurements of heave, pitch and roll of an orbital following buoy. The method of digital band pass filtering describ...

  4. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  5. Buoy-Rope-Drum Wave Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsen Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A buoy-rope-drum wave power system is a new type of floating oscillating buoy wave power device, which absorbs energy from waves by buoy-rope-drum device. Based on the linear deep water wave theory and pure resistive load, with cylinder buoy as an example, the research sets up the theoretical model of direct-drive buoy-rope-drum wave power efficiency and analyzes the influence of the mass and load of the system on its generating efficiency. It points out the two main categories of the efficient buoy-rope-drum wave power system: light thin type and resonance type, and optimal designs of their major parameters are carried out on the basis of the above theoretical model of generating efficiency.

  6. Dynamic analysis of propulsion mechanism directly driven by wave energy for marine mobile buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenjiang; Zheng, Zhongqiang; Yang, Xiaoguang; Chang, Zongyu

    2016-07-01

    Marine mobile buoy(MMB) have many potential applications in the maritime industry and ocean science. Great progress has been made, however the technology in this area is far from maturity in theory and faced with many difficulties in application. A dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism is very necessary for optimizing the parameters of the MMB, especially with consideration of hydrodynamic force. The principle of wave-driven propulsion mechanism is briefly introduced. To set a theory foundation for study on the MMB, a dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism of the MMB is obtained. The responses of the motion of the platform and the hydrofoil are obtained by using a numerical integration method to solve the ordinary differential equations. A simplified form of the motion equations is reached by omitting terms with high order small values. The relationship among the heave motion of the buoy, stiffness of the elastic components, and the forward speed can be obtained by using these simplified equations. The dynamic analysis show the following: The angle of displacement of foil is fairly small with the biggest value around 0.3 rad; The speed of mobile buoy and the angle of hydrofoil increased gradually with the increase of heave motion of buoy; The relationship among heaven motion, stiffness and attack angle is that heave motion leads to the angle change of foil whereas the item of speed or push function is determined by vertical velocity and angle, therefore, the heave motion and stiffness can affect the motion of buoy significantly if the size of hydrofoil is kept constant. The proposed model is provided to optimize the parameters of the MMB and a foundation is laid for improving the performance of the MMB.

  7. Directional wave and temperature data from seven buoys at Point Reyes, CA, 1996-2002 (NODC Accession 0000760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave data were collected from 7 buoys in Point Reyes, California, from 06 December 1996 to 25 July 2002. Data were collected as part of the Coastal Data Information...

  8. Directional wave and temperature data from nine buoys in Gray's Harbor, Washington, 1994-2002 (NODC Accession 0000756)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave data were collected from 9 buoys in Grays Harbor, Washington, from 01 January 1994 to 24 July 2002. Data were collected as part of the Coastal Data Information...

  9. Study of the directional spectrum of ocean waves using array, buoy and radar measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.

    Phase/time/path difference (PTPD) methods of Esteva [1977] and Borgman [1974] with two modifications, viz., true phase and coherence proposed in this thesis, have for the first time been successfully used for computing wave direction as a function...

  10. Significant Wave Heights, Periods, and Directions, and Air and Sea Temperature Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Diamond Head, Oahu during March-April 2000 (NODC Accession 0000475)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A directional waverider buoy located about one nautical mile south of Diamond Head, Oahu, provided an approximately 10-day time series of wave characteristics and...

  11. Measurement of Near-Surface Salinity, Temperature and Directional Wave Spectra using a Novel Wave-Following, Lagrangian Surface Contact Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Results from a surface contact drifter buoy which measures near-surface conductivity ( 10 cm depth), sea state characteristics and near-surface water temperature ( 2 cm depth) are described. This light (righting. It has a small above-surface profile and low windage, resulting in near-Lagrangian drift characteristics. It is autonomous, with low power requirements and solar panel battery recharging. Onboard sensors include an inductive toroidal conductivity probe for salinity measurement, a nine-degrees-of-freedom motion package for derivation of directional wave spectra and a thermocouple for water temperature measurement. Data retrieval for expendable, ocean-going operation uses an onboard Argos transmitter. Scientific results as well as data processing algorithms are presented from laboratory and field experiments which support qualification of buoy platform measurements. These include sensor calibration experiments, longer-term dock-side biofouling experiments during 2013-2014 and a series of short-duration ocean deployments in the Gulf Stream in 2014. In addition, a treatment method will be described which appears to minimize the effects of biofouling on the inductive conductivity probe when in coastal surface waters. Due to its low cost and ease of deployment, scores, perhaps hundreds of these novel instruments could be deployed from ships or aircraft during process studies or to provide surface validation for satellite-based measurements, particularly in high precipitation regions.

  12. System for Monitoring, Determining, and Reporting Directional Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves in Near Realtime from a Moored Buoy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A moored buoy floating at the ocean surface and anchored to the seafloor precisely measures acceleration, pitch, roll, and Earth's magnetic flux field of the buoy...

  13. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion. Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  14. Response of surface buoy moorings in steady and wave flows

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; SanilKumar, V.

    A numerical model has been developed to evaluate the dynamics of surface buoy mooring systems under wave and current loading. System tension response and variation of tension in the mooring line at various depths have been evaluated for deep water...

  15. Directional wave and temperature data from seven buoys at Harvest, CA, 1995-2002 (NODC Accession 0000766)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  16. Directional wave and temperature data from six buoys at Diablo Canyon, CA, 1997-2002 (NODC Accession 0000761)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  17. Extreme Wave Analysis by Integrating Model and Wave Buoy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Dentale

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the extreme values of significant wave height (HS, generally described by the HS return period TR function HS(TR and by its confidence intervals, is a necessity in many branches of coastal science and engineering. The availability of indirect wave data generated by global and regional wind and wave model chains have brought radical changes to the estimation procedures of such probability distribution—weather and wave modeling systems are routinely run all over the world, and HS time series for each grid point are produced and published after assimilation (analysis of the ground truth. However, while the sources of such indirect data are numerous, and generally of good quality, many aspects of their procedures are hidden to the users, who cannot evaluate the reliability and the limits of the HS(TR deriving from such data. In order to provide a simple engineering tool to evaluate the probability of extreme sea-states as well as the quality of such estimates, we propose here a procedure based on integrating HS time series generated by model chains with those recorded by wave buoys in the same area.

  18. Numerical study of hydrodynamic behavior and conversion efficiency of a two-buoy wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cen; Zhang, Yong-liang

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we propose a two-buoy wave energy converter composed of a heaving semi-submerged cylindrical buoy, a fixed submerged cylindrical buoy and a power take-off (PTO) system, and investigate the effect of the fixed submerged buoy on the hydrodynamics of the heaving semi-submerged buoy based on the three-dimensional potential theory. And the dynamic response of the semi-submerged buoy and the wave energy conversion efficiency of the converter are analyzed. The difference of the hydrodynamics and the wave energy conversion efficiency of a semi-submerged buoy converter with and without a fixed submerged buoy is discussed. It is revealed that the influence of the fixed submerged buoy on the exciting wave force, the added mass, the radiation damping coefficient and the wave energy conversion efficiency can be significant with a considerable variation, depending on the vertical distance between the heaving semi-submerged buoy and the fixed submerged buoy, the diameter ratio of the fixed submerged buoy to the heaving semi-submerged buoy and the water depth.

  19. Directional wave and temperature data from five wave-rider buoys at locations along the California coast, 2003-01 to 2003-12 (NODC Accession 0001306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  20. Directional wave and temperature data from eight wave-rider buoys at locations along the California coast, 2002-06 to 2003-12 (NODC Accession 0001298)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  1. Comparison of heaving buoy and oscillating flap wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Mohd Aftar; Green, David A.; Metcalfe, Andrew V.; Najafian, G.

    2013-04-01

    Waves offer an attractive source of renewable energy, with relatively low environmental impact, for communities reasonably close to the sea. Two types of simple wave energy converters (WEC), the heaving buoy WEC and the oscillating flap WEC, are studied. Both WECs are considered as simple energy converters because they can be modelled, to a first approximation, as single degree of freedom linear dynamic systems. In this study, we estimate the response of both WECs to typical wave inputs; wave height for the buoy and corresponding wave surge for the flap, using spectral methods. A nonlinear model of the oscillating flap WEC that includes the drag force, modelled by the Morison equation is also considered. The response to a surge input is estimated by discrete time simulation (DTS), using central difference approximations to derivatives. This is compared with the response of the linear model obtained by DTS and also validated using the spectral method. Bendat's nonlinear system identification (BNLSI) technique was used to analyze the nonlinear dynamic system since the spectral analysis was only suitable for linear dynamic system. The effects of including the nonlinear term are quantified.

  2. Modeling long period swell in Southern California: Practical boundary conditions from buoy observations and global wave model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S. C.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Guza, R. T.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate, unbiased, high-resolution (in space and time) nearshore wave predictions are needed to drive models of beach erosion, coastal flooding, and alongshore transport of sediment, biota and pollutants. On highly sheltered shorelines, wave predictions are sensitive to the directions of onshore propagating waves, and nearshore model prediction error is often dominated by uncertainty in offshore boundary conditions. Offshore islands and shoals, and coastline curvature, create complex sheltering patterns over the 250km span of southern California (SC) shoreline. Here, regional wave model skill in SC was compared for different offshore boundary conditions created using offshore buoy observations and global wave model hindcasts (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Wave Watch 3, WW3). Spectral ray-tracing methods were used to transform incident offshore swell (0.04-0.09Hz) energy at high directional resolution (1-deg). Model skill is assessed for predictions (wave height, direction, and alongshore radiation stress) at 16 nearshore buoy sites between 2000 and 2009. Model skill using buoy-derived boundary conditions is higher than with WW3-derived boundary conditions. Buoy-driven nearshore model results are similar with various assumptions about the true offshore directional distribution (maximum entropy, Bayesian direct, and 2nd derivative smoothness). Two methods combining offshore buoy observations with WW3 predictions in the offshore boundary condition did not improve nearshore skill above buoy-only methods. A case example at Oceanside harbor shows strong sensitivity of alongshore sediment transport predictions to different offshore boundary conditions. Despite this uncertainty in alongshore transport magnitude, alongshore gradients in transport (e.g. the location of model accretion and erosion zones) are determined by the local bathymetry, and are similar for all predictions.

  3. Real-time directional wave data collection

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.; Pednekar, P.S.

    The wave measurements carried out along the east and west coasts off India at 13 locations using the directional waverider buoys are referred in this paper. The total number of buoy days are 4501 and out of which the data collected are 4218 days...

  4. A Wave Power Device with Pendulum Based on Ocean Monitoring Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hui; Guan, Wanchun; Wan, Xiaozheng; Li, Xuanqun; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Shixuan

    2018-01-01

    The ocean monitoring buoy usually exploits solar energy for power supply. In order to improve power supply capacity, this paper proposes a wave power device according to the structure and moving character of buoy. The wave power device composes of pendulum mechanism that converts wave energy into mechanical energy and energy storage mechanism where the mechanical energy is transferred quantitatively to generator. The hydrodynamic equation for the motion of buoy system with generator devise is established based on the potential flow theory, and then the characteristics of pendulum motion and energy conversion properties are analysed. The results of this research show that the proposed wave power devise is able to efficiently and periodically convert wave energy into power, and increasing the stiffness of energy storage spring is benefit for enhancing the power supply capacity of the buoy. This study provides a theory reference for the development of technology on wave power generator for ocean monitoring buoy.

  5. Buoy observations of the influence of swell on wind waves in the open ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Violante-Carvalho, N.; Robinson, I.S. [University of Southampton (United Kingdom). Oceanography Centre; Ocampo-Torres, F.J. [CICESE, Ensenada (Mexico). Dpto. de Oceanografia Fisica

    2004-04-01

    The influence of longer (swell) on shorter, wind sea waves is examined using an extensive database of directional buoy measurements obtained from a heave-pitch-roll buoy moored in deep water in the South Atlantic. This data set is unique for such an investigation due to the ubiquitous presence of a young swell component propagating closely in direction and frequency with the wind sea, as well as a longer, opposing swell. Our results show, within the statistical limits of the regressions obtained from our analysis when compared to measurements in swell free environments, that there is no obvious influence of swell on wind sea growth. For operational purposes in ocean engineering this means that power-laws from fetch limited situations describing the wind sea growth can be applied in more realistic situations in the open sea when swell is present. (author)

  6. Coherent Wave Measurement Buoy Arrays to Support Wave Energy Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, F.; Chang, G.; Jones, C.; Janssen, T. T.; Barney, P.; Roberts, J.

    2016-02-01

    Wave energy is the most abundant form of hydrokinetic energy in the United States and wave energy converters (WECs) are being developed to extract the maximum possible power from the prevailing wave climate. However, maximum wave energy capture is currently limited by the narrow banded frequency response of WECs as well as extended protective shutdown requirements during periods of large waves. These limitations must be overcome in order to maximize energy extraction, thus significantly decreasing the cost of wave energy and making it a viable energy source. Techno-economic studies of several WEC devices have shown significant potential to improve wave energy capture efficiency through operational control strategies that incorporate real-time information about local surface wave motions. Integral Consulting Inc., with ARPA-E support, is partnering with Sandia National Laboratories and Spoondrift LLC to develop a coherent array of wave-measuring devices to relay and enable the prediction of wave-resolved surface dynamics at a WEC location ahead of real time. This capability will provide necessary information to optimize power production of WECs through control strategies, thereby allowing for a single WEC design to perform more effectively across a wide range of wave environments. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000514.

  7. The wave buoy analogy - estimating high-frequency wave excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2008-01-01

    of sea state parameters — influence of filtering. Ocean Engineering 2007;34:1797–810.], where time series of ship responses were generated from a known wave spectrum for the purpose of the inverse process — the estimation of the underlying wave excitations. Similar response generations and vice versa...

  8. Directional wave and temperature data from three buoys at Santa Monica, CA, Harvest, CA, and Point Dume, CA, 2002-01 to 2003-06 (NODC Accession 0001060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  9. Directional wave and temperature data from three buoys at San Nicolas Island, San Pedro and Dana Point, CA, 2002-01 to 2003-06 (NODC Accession 0001064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  10. Directional wave and temperature data from thirteen buoys at San Nicolas Island, Dana Point and Oceanside, CA, 1997-2002 (NODC Accession 0000774)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  11. Directional wave and temperature data from three buoys at Grays Harbor, WA, Pt. Reyes, CA, and Diablo Canyon, CA, 2002 - 2003 (NODC Accession 0001058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  12. Directional wave and temperature data from ten buoys at Santa Monica Bay, Point Dume and San Pedro, CA, 1998 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0000767)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  13. Directional wave and temperature data from sixteen buoys at Point Loma, Point La Jolla, Torrey Pines Inner and Torrey Pines Outer, CA, 1995 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0000775)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  14. Wave parameters comparisons between High Frequency (HF) radar system and an in situ buoy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Agostinho, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Ferrer, Macu; Fernandes, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The coastal zone is an important area for the development of maritime countries, either in terms of recreation, energy exploitation, weather forecasting or national security. Field measurements are in the basis of understanding how coastal and oceanic processes occur. Most processes occur over long timescales and over large spatial ranges, like the variation of mean sea level. These processes also involve a variety of factors such as waves, winds, tides, storm surges, currents, etc., that cause huge interference on such phenomena. Measurement of waves have been carried out using different techniques. The instruments used to measure wave parameters can be very different, i.e. buoys, ship base equipment like sonar and satellites. Each equipment has its own advantage and disadvantage depending on the study subject. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behaviour of a different technology available and presently adopted in wave measurement. In the past few years the measurement of waves using High Frequency (HF) Radars has had several developments. Such a method is already established as a powerful tool for measuring the pattern of surface current, but its use in wave measurements, especially in the dual arrangement is recent. Measurement of the backscatter of HF radar wave provides the raw dataset which is analyzed to give directional data of surface elevation at each range cell. Buoys and radars have advantages, disadvantages and its accuracy is discussed in this presentation. A major advantage with HF radar systems is that they are unaffected by weather, clouds or changing ocean conditions. The HF radar system is a very useful tool for the measurement of waves over a wide area with real-time observation, but it still lacks a method to check its accuracy. The primary goal of this study was to show how the HF radar system responds to high energetic variations when compared to wave buoy data. The bulk wave parameters used (significant wave height, period and

  15. Analysis of Floating Buoy of a Wave Power Generating Jack-Up Platform Haiyuan 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Date Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the performance of floating buoys of a wave power generating jack-up platform called Haiyuan 1, in order to work out the optimum designed draft and hydraulic pressure. The performance of the buoy, especially its delivered power, is an important issue in designing oscillating buoy wave energy converter. In this case, major factors affect the performance including incident wave, designed draft, and hydraulic pressure on the buoy. To find out the relationship among design draft, hydraulic pressure, and delivered power, the key point is to precisely estimate wave induced motion of the buoy. Three-dimensional theory and time domain method based on potential theory were adopted in the paper. Unlike ship and other floating structures, motion of wave energy converter (WEC buoy in wave will be weakened because of energy take-off, which will cause significant draft changing with time. Thus, draft changing should be taken into consideration as well. In addition, green water problem occurs more frequently than that in ship and other floating structures and also might the reduce delivered power. Therefore, green water problem will also be taken into account when choosing the optimum designed draft and hydraulic pressure. The calculation indicates that the optimum designed draft is 0.935 m, while the optimum designed hydraulic pressure is 30 kN.

  16. Buoy and Generator Interaction with Ocean Waves: Studies of a Wave Energy Conversion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroth, Simon

    2011-07-01

    On March 13th, 2006, the Div. of Electricity at Uppsala Univ. deployed its first wave energy converter, L1, in the ocean southwest of Lysekil. L1 consisted of a buoy at the surface, connected through a line to a linear generator on the seabed. Since the deployment, continuous investigations of how L1 works in the waves have been conducted, and several additional wave energy converters have been deployed. This thesis is based on ten publications, which focus on different aspects of the interaction between wave, buoy, and generator. In order to evaluate different measurement systems, the motion of the buoy was measured optically and using accelerometers, and compared to measurements of the motion of the movable part of the generator - the translator. These measurements were found to correlate well. Simulations of buoy and translator motion were found to match the measured values. The variation of performance of L1 with changing water levels, wave heights, and spectral shapes was also investigated. Performance is here defined as the ratio of absorbed power to incoming power. It was found that the performance decreases for large wave heights. This is in accordance with the theoretical predictions, since the area for which the stator and the translator overlap decreases for large translator motions. Shifting water levels were predicted to have the same effect, but this could not be seen as clearly. The width of the wave energy spectrum has been proposed by some as a factor that also affects the performance of a wave energy converter, for a set wave height and period. Therefore the relation between performance and several different parameters for spectral width was investigated. It was found that some of the parameters were in fact correlated to performance, but that the correlation was not very strong. As a background on ocean measurements in wave energy, a thorough literature review was conducted. It turns out that the Lysekil project is one of quite few projects that

  17. Quantifying Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Environment Using Measurements From A Small Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION ENVIRONMENT USING MEASUREMENTS FROM A SMALL BUOY by Andrew E. Sweeney June 2017 Thesis Advisor: Qing Wang...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QUANTIFYING ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION ENVIRONMENT USING MEASUREMENTS FROM A...the Coupled Air Sea Processes and Electromagnetic (EM) ducting Research (CASPER), to understand air-sea interaction processes and their representation

  18. On theory and simulation of heaving-buoy wave-energy converters with control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidsmoen, H.

    1995-12-01

    Heaving-buoy wave-energy converters with control were studied. The buoy is small compared to the wavelength. The resonance bandwidth is then narrow and the energy conversion in irregular waves can be significantly increased if the oscillatory motion of the device can be actively controlled, and the power output from the converter will vary less with time than the wave power transport. A system of two concentric cylinders of the same radius, oscillating in heave only, is analysed in the frequency-domain. The mathematical model can be used to study a tight-moored buoy, as well as a buoy reacting against a submerged body. The knowledge of the frequency-domain hydrodynamic parameters is used to develop frequency-domain and time-domain mathematical models of heaving-buoy wave energy converters. The main emphasis is on using control to maximize the energy production and to protect the machinery of the wave-energy converter in very large waves. Three different methods are used to study control. (1) In the frequency-domain explicit analytical expressions for the optimum oscillation are found, assuming a continuous sinusoidal control force, and from these expressions the optimum time-domain oscillation can be determined. (2) The second method uses optimal control theory, using a control variable as the instrument for the optimisation. Unlike the first method, this method can include non-linearities. But this method gives numerical time series for the state variables and the control variable rather than analytical expressions for the optimum oscillation. (3) The third method is time-domain simulation. Non-linear forces are included, but the method only gives the response of the system to a given incident wave. How the different methods can be used to develop real-time control is discussed. Simulations are performed for a tight-moored heaving-buoy converter with a high-pressure hydraulic system for energy production and motion control. 147 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs.

  19. A wave parameters and directional spectrum analysis for extreme winds

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya Ramírez, Rubén Darío; Osorio Arias, Andres Fernando; Ortiz Royero, Juan Carlos; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    In this research a comparison between two of the most popular ocean wave models, WAVEWATCH III™ and SWAN, was performed using data from hurricane Katrina in the Gulf of Mexico. The numerical simulation of sea surface directional wave spectrum and other wave parameters for several parameter- izations and its relation with the drag coefficient was carried out. The simulated data were compared with in-situ NOAA buoy data. For most of the buoys, WAVEWATCH III™ presented the best statistical compar...

  20. A maximum power point tracking algorithm for buoy-rope-drum wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. Q.; Zhang, X. C.; Zhou, Y.; Cui, Z. C.; Zhu, L. S.

    2016-08-01

    The maximum power point tracking control is the key link to improve the energy conversion efficiency of wave energy converters (WEC). This paper presents a novel variable step size Perturb and Observe maximum power point tracking algorithm with a power classification standard for control of a buoy-rope-drum WEC. The algorithm and simulation model of the buoy-rope-drum WEC are presented in details, as well as simulation experiment results. The results show that the algorithm tracks the maximum power point of the WEC fast and accurately.

  1. Comparison of ERA-Interim waves with buoy data in the eastern Arabian Sea during high waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shanas, P.R.; SanilKumar, V.

    at two locations in eastern Arabian Sea One location is a deep water location and another one is a shallow water location The comparison of significant wave height (SWH) between ERA dataset and buoy data at both the locations shows good correlation...

  2. Review of 5kW wave energy LOPF buoy design study and test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia

    The purpose of this project was to document the mechanical power production against a target power curve of a 5kW grid connected wave energy buoy in Nissum Bredning at Helligsø. This test site is typically used for open sea testing of scale 1:10 devices in irregular waves. In order to better adapt...... to the moderate wave height, the buoy was down sized by a factor of 3 and a new lower target power curve for the buoy was agreed to. Downsizing the project also had the advantage that it is more cost effective and fast to experiment with small wave energy devices than with big devices, at an early development...... stage, in line with the TRL and four phases development (proof of concept, design and feasibility study, field trials and half or full‐scale trials) promoted by AAU and supported by the marine renewable energy sector. To complement this, the IEC 114 standards define 3 stages of testing (1=small scale...

  3. Model Predictive Control of Buoy Type Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen N.; Sichani, Mahdi T.; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    by forcing this condition. In the paper the theoretical framework for this principal is shown. The optimal controller requires information of the sea state for infinite horizon which is not applicable. Model Predictive Controllers (MPC) can have finite horizon which crosses out this requirement....... This approach is then taken into account and an MPC controller is designed for a model wave energy converter and implemented on a numerical example. Further, the power outtake of this controller is compared to the optimal controller as an indicator of the performance of the designed controller....

  4. Variation of wave directional spread parameters along the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.

    through a directional wave spectrum, which represents distribution of wave energies over various wave frequencies and directions. Most widely practiced technique for directional data collection involves use of the floating buoys. The data analysis.... Estimation of directional spectra from the maximum entropy principle, Proceedings 5th International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering, Tokyo, Japan 1986; vol. I: 80-85. [6] Kuik AJ, Vledder G, Holthuijsen LH. A method for the routine...

  5. Analytical Study on an Oscillating Buoy Wave Energy Converter Integrated into a Fixed Box-Type Breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanlie Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An oscillating buoy wave energy converter (WEC integrated to an existing box-type breakwater is introduced in this study. The buoy is installed on the existing breakwater and designed to be much smaller than the breakwater in scale, aiming to reduce the construction cost of the WEC. The oscillating buoy works as a heave-type WEC in front of the breakwater towards the incident waves. A power take-off (PTO system is installed on the topside of the breakwater to harvest the kinetic energy (in heave mode of the floating buoy. The hydrodynamic performance of this system is studied analytically based on linear potential-flow theory. Effects of the geometrical parameters on the reflection and transmission coefficients and the capture width ratio (CWR of the system are investigated. Results show that the maximum efficiency of the energy extraction can reach 80% or even higher. Compared with the isolated box-type breakwater, the reflection coefficient can be effectively decreased by using this oscillating buoy WEC, with unchanged transmission coefficient. Thus, the possibility of capturing the wave energy with the oscillating buoy WEC integrated into breakwaters is shown.

  6. Selection of the optimum combination of responses for Wave Buoy Analogy - An approach based on local sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2016-01-01

    One method to estimate the wave spectrum onboard ships is to use measured ship responses. In this method, known also as Wave Buoy Analogy, amongst various responses that are available from sensor measurements, a couple of responses (at least three) are usually utilized. Selec-tion of the best com...

  7. Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Waimea Bay, North Shore, Oahu during December 2001 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through various funding channels, the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (UH) has maintained a Datawell Directional Waverider Buoy roughly 5 km...

  8. Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Kailua Bay, Windward Oahu, Hawaii during August 2000 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through various funding channels, the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (UH) has maintained a Datawell Mark 2 Directional Waverider Buoy roughly...

  9. Directional wave and temperature data from five buoys at Oceanside offshore, Point Loma, Point La Jolla, Torrey Pines outer and Torrey Pines inner, CA, 2002-01 to 2003-06 (NODC Accession 0001072)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  10. Directional wave and temperature data from four buoys at Grays Harbor, WA and Point Reyes, Harvest and Diablo Canyon, CA, 2003-01 to 2003-12 (NODC Accession 0001291)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  11. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami for over 12 years. The idea was that a buoy equipped with a GPS antenna and placed offshore may be an effective way of monitoring tsunami before its arrival to the coast and to give warning to the coastal residents. The key technology for the system is real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. We have successfully developed the system; we have detected tsunamis of about 10cm in height for three large earthquakes, namely, the 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.4), the 26 September 2003 Tokachi earthquake (Mw8.3) and the 5 September 2004 earthquake (Mw7.4). The developed GPS buoy system is also capable of monitoring sea waves that are mainly caused by winds. Only the difference between tsunami and sea waves is their frequency range and can be segregated each other by a simple filtering technique. Given the success of GPS buoy experiments, the system has been adopted as a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information system for Port and HArborS (NOWPHAS) by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan. They have established more than eight GPS buoys along the Japanese coasts and the system has been operated by the Port and Airport Research Institute. As a future scope, we are now planning to implement some other additional facilities for the GPS buoy system. The first application is a so-called GPS/Acoustic system for monitoring ocean bottom crustal deformation. The system requires acoustic waves to detect ocean bottom reference position, which is the geometrical center of an array of transponders, by measuring distances between a position at the sea surface (vessel) and ocean bottom equipments to return the received sonic wave. The position of the vessel is measured using GPS. The system was first proposed by a research group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in early 1980's. The system was extensively developed by Japanese researchers and is now capable of detecting ocean

  12. Spatial structure of directional wave spectra in hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Osuna, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of the wave field during hurricane conditions is studied using the National Data Buoy Center directional wave buoy data set from the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. The buoy information, comprising the directional wave spectra during the passage of several hurricanes, was referenced to the center of the hurricane using the path of the hurricane, the propagation velocity, and the radius of the maximum winds. The directional wave spectra were partitioned into their main components to quantify the energy corresponding to the observed wave systems and to distinguish between wind-sea and swell. The findings are consistent with those found using remote sensing data (e.g., Scanning Radar Altimeter data). Based on the previous work, the highest waves are found in the right forward quadrant of the hurricane, where the spectral shape tends to become uni-modal, in the vicinity of the region of maximum winds. More complex spectral shapes are observed in distant regions at the front of and in the rear quadrants of the hurricane, where there is a tendency of the spectra to become bi- and tri-modal. The dominant waves generally propagate at significant angles to the wind direction, except in the regions next to the maximum winds of the right quadrants. Evidence of waves generated by concentric eyewalls associated with secondary maximum winds was also found. The frequency spectra display some of the characteristics of the JONSWAP spectrum adjusted by Young (J Geophys Res 111:8020, 2006); however, at the spectral peak, the similarity with the Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum is clear. These results establish the basis for the use in assessing the ability of numerical models to simulate the wave field in hurricanes.

  13. Novel ocean energy permanent magnet linear generator buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, K.; Agamloh, E.B.; Jouanne, A. von; Wallace, A.K.; Prudell, J.; Kimble, K.; Aills, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schacher, A. [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3211 (United States); Chan, P.; Sweeny, B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3211 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    This paper describes the research, design, construction and prototype testing process of a novel ocean energy direct drive permanent magnet linear generator buoy. The buoy employs the vertical component of the motion of ocean waves to power a linear generator. The generator consists of a permanent magnet field system (mounted on the central translator shaft) and an armature, in which the power is generated (mounted on the buoy). The translator shaft is anchored to the sea floor, and the buoy/floater moves armature coils relative to the permanent magnet translator to induce voltages. The electrical and mechanical structures of the buoy generator are provided, along with performance characteristics, including voltage, current and developed power. (author)

  14. Directional spectrum of ocean waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Gouveia, A; Nagarajan, R.

    This paper describes a methodology for obtaining the directional spectrum of ocean waves from time series measurement of wave elevation at several gauges arranged in linear or polygonal arrays. Results of simulated studies using sinusoidal wave...

  15. Comparison of gridded multi-mission and along-track mono-mission satellite altimetry wave heights with in situ near-shore buoy data.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shanas, P.R.; SanilKumar, V.; Hithin, N.K.

    and studied the validity of these observations against ship-reported and buoy data. Many studies have been undertaken on how best to use the data available from satellite observation systems in wave models (Mastenbroek, 1994; Young and Glowacki, 1996... Sea wave model. Journal of Geophysical Research 10, 5829–5849. Young, I.R., 1994. Global ocean wave statistics obtained from satellite observations. Applied Ocean Research 16, 235-248. Young, I.R., Glowacki, T.J., 1996. Assimilation of altimeter...

  16. Estimation of directional wave spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    Directional properties of ocean waves are of great economic interest. The knowledge of wave directionality is important for the design of maritime structures and offshore operations. Two main aspects are considered for this study for the data...

  17. Historic and ongoing buoy wave measurements, time series, spectral analysis, and other parameters (sea surface temperature, air temperature and pressure, wind speed and direction), worldwide, mostly US coastal, from November 1975 through present, from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contain raw and processed values concerning wave size and direction, energy spectral data (both original and processed), and, where available, sea surface...

  18. Directional Bias of TAO Daily Buoy Wind Vectors in the Central Equatorial Pacific Ocean from November 2008 to January 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Peng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article documents a systematic bias in surface wind directions between the TAO buoy measurements at 0°, 170°W and the ECMWF analysis and forecasts. This bias was of the order 10° and persisted from November 2008 to January 2010, which was consistent with a post-recovery calibration drift in the anemometer vane. Unfortunately, the calibration drift was too time-variant to be used to correct the data so the quality flag for this deployment was adjusted to reflect low data quality. The primary purpose of this paper is to inform users in the modelling and remote-sensing community about this systematic, persistent wind directional bias, which will allow users to make an educated decision on using the data and be aware of its potential impact to their downstream product quality. The uncovering of this bias and its source demonstrates the importance of continuous scientific oversight and effective user-data provider communication in stewarding scientific data. It also suggests the need for improvement in the ability of buoy data quality control procedures of the TAO and ECMWF systems to detect future wind directional systematic biases such as the one described here.

  19. Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-02-01 to 1979-05-03 (NODC Accession 7900247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from February 1, 1978...

  20. Estimation of wave directional spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deo, M.C.; Gondane, D.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    One of the useful measures of waves directional spreading at a given location is the directional spreading parameter. This paper presents a new approach to arrive at its characteristic value using the computational technique of Artificial Neural...

  1. Directional wave measurements and modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; Bhat, S.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    Some of the results obtained from analysis of the monsoon directional wave data measured over 4 years in shallow waters off the west coast of India are presented. The directional spectrum computed from the time series data seems to indicate...

  2. Development of a virtual wave buoy system for the Port of Cape Town, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rossouw, Marius

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The Port of Cape Town is located in Table Bay on the south-west coast of South Africa. Since the port experiences advese weather conditions, especially during the winter period, the monitoring of marine weather and wave conditions forms an integral...

  3. Parametric estimation in the wave buoy analogy - an elaborated approach based on energy considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2014-01-01

    the ship’s wave-induced responses based on different statistical inferences including parametric and non-parametric approaches. This paper considers a concept to improve the estimate obtained by the parametric method for sea state estimation. The idea is illustrated by an analysis made on full-scale...

  4. Directional Wave Spectra Observed During Intense Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, C. O.; Potter, H.; Lund, B.; Tamura, H.; Graber, H. C.

    2018-02-01

    Two deep-sea moorings were deployed 780 km off the coast of southern Taiwan for 4-5 months during the 2010 typhoon season. Directional wave spectra, wind speed and direction, and momentum fluxes were recorded on two Extreme Air-Sea Interaction buoys during the close passage of Severe Tropical Storm Dianmu and three tropical cyclones (TCs): Typhoon Fanapi, Super Typhoon Megi, and Typhoon Chaba. Conditions sampled include significant wave heights up to 11 m and wind speeds up to 26 m s-1. Details varied for large-scale spectral structure in frequency and direction but were mostly bimodal. The modes were generally composed of a swell system emanating from the most intense storm region and local wind-seas. The peak systems were consistently young, meaning actively forced by winds, when the storms were close. During the peaks of the most intense passages—Chaba at the northern mooring and Megi at the southern—the bimodal seas coalesced. During Chaba, the swell and wind-sea coupling directed the high frequency waves and the wind stress away from the wind direction. A spectral wave model was able reproduce many of the macrofeatures of the directional spectra.

  5. Verification of model wave heights with long-term moored buoy data: Application to wave field over the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Samiksha, S.V.; Polnikov, V.G.; Vethamony, P.; Rashmi, R.; Pogarskii, F.; Sudheesh, K.

    . Res. 106(C6), 11659-11676 Babanin, A.V., 2011. Breaking and Dissipation of Ocean Surface Waves. Book, Cambridge University Press, 480p Banner, M. L., Gemmrich, J. R., and Farmer, D. M., 2002. Multiscale measurements of ocean wave breaking...

  6. Wave directional spectrum from array measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Sarma, Y; Menon, H.B.

    Using the method of Esteva (1976, 1977), whcih assumes that at the frequency band the waves approach from just a single "mean" wave direction, wave direction has been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated as a function of frequency...

  7. Temperature profile and current speed/direction data from ADCP, XBT, buoy, and CTD casts in the Northwest Pacific Ocean from 01 March 1989 to 01 June 1995 (NODC Accession 0000031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and current speed/direction data were collected using ADCP, XBT, buoy, and CTD casts in the Northwest Pacific Ocean from 01 March 1989 to 01 June...

  8. Characteristics of waves off Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; AshokKumar, K.; Anand, N.M.

    Directional wave measurements were carried out using Datawell directional waverider buoy off Goa along west coast of India during the south west monsoon period in 1996 and the results are presented. Theoretical joint distribution of wave height...

  9. Directional Validation of Wave Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    motivators: I) the desire to make the problem more solution is simply to use only variables directly Cx- manageable via frequency-wise integration of direc...ViaW()2 + bi(f), where . = j F(f) d. The calculation in reverse is a, = in, cosO , and b, = ni, sinf0 . Note that if we choose f, andf2 as values close...34). The use of a broader band of frequencies makes the metric more stable, but CALCULATION OF MEAN WAVE DIRECTION AND increases the risk that two

  10. Variations in return value estimate of ocean surface waves - a study based on measured buoy data and ERA-Interim reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed Naseef, T.; Sanil Kumar, V.

    2017-10-01

    An assessment of extreme wave characteristics during the design of marine facilities not only helps to ensure their safety but also assess the economic aspects. In this study, return levels of significant wave height (Hs) for different periods are estimated using the generalized extreme value distribution (GEV) and generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) based on the Waverider buoy data spanning 8 years and the ERA-Interim reanalysis data spanning 38 years. The analysis is carried out for wind-sea, swell and total Hs separately for buoy data. Seasonality of the prevailing wave climate is also considered in the analysis to provide return levels for short-term activities in the location. The study shows that the initial distribution method (IDM) underestimates return levels compared to GPD. The maximum return levels estimated by the GPD corresponding to 100 years are 5.10 m for the monsoon season (JJAS), 2.66 m for the pre-monsoon season (FMAM) and 4.28 m for the post-monsoon season (ONDJ). The intercomparison of return levels by block maxima (annual, seasonal and monthly maxima) and the r-largest method for GEV theory shows that the maximum return level for 100 years is 7.20 m in the r-largest series followed by monthly maxima (6.02 m) and annual maxima (AM) (5.66 m) series. The analysis is also carried out to understand the sensitivity of the number of observations for the GEV annual maxima estimates. It indicates that the variations in the standard deviation of the series caused by changes in the number of observations are positively correlated with the return level estimates. The 100-year return level results of Hs using the GEV method are comparable for short-term (2008 to 2016) buoy data (4.18 m) and long-term (1979 to 2016) ERA-Interim shallow data (4.39 m). The 6 h interval data tend to miss high values of Hs, and hence there is a significant difference in the 100-year return level Hs obtained using 6 h interval data compared to data at 0.5 h interval. The

  11. Fully nonlinear time-domain simulation of a backward bent duct buoy floating wave energy converter using an acceleration potential method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Rok Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A floating Oscillating Water Column (OWC wave energy converter, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB, was simulated using a state-of-the-art, two-dimensional, fully-nonlinear Numerical Wave Tank (NWT technique. The hydrodynamic performance of the floating OWC device was evaluated in the time domain. The acceleration potential method, with a full-updated kernel matrix calculation associated with a mode decomposition scheme, was implemented to obtain accurate estimates of the hydrodynamic force and displacement of a freely floating BBDB. The developed NWT was based on the potential theory and the boundary element method with constant panels on the boundaries. The mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian (MEL approach was employed to capture the nonlinear free surfaces inside the chamber that interacted with a pneumatic pressure, induced by the time-varying airflow velocity at the air duct. A special viscous damping was applied to the chamber free surface to represent the viscous energy loss due to the BBDB's shape and motions. The viscous damping coefficient was properly selected using a comparison of the experimental data. The calculated surface elevation, inside and outside the chamber, with a tuned viscous damping correlated reasonably well with the experimental data for various incident wave conditions. The conservation of the total wave energy in the computational domain was confirmed over the entire range of wave frequencies.

  12. On the Optimization of Point Absorber Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Sjökvist

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A point absorbing wave energy converter (WEC is a complicated dynamical system. A semi-submerged buoy drives a power take-off device (PTO, which acts as a linear or non-linear damper of the WEC system. The buoy motion depends on the buoy geometry and dimensions, the mass of the moving parts of the system and on the damping force from the generator. The electromagnetic damping in the generator depends on both the generator specifications, the connected load and the buoy velocity. In this paper a velocity ratio has been used to study how the geometric parameters buoy draft and radius, assuming constant generator damping coefficient, affects the motion and the energy absorption of a WEC. It have been concluded that an optimal buoy geometry can be identified for a specific generator damping. The simulated WEC performance have been compared with experimental values from two WECs with similar generators but different buoys. Conclusions have been drawn about their behaviour.

  13. WAVE DIRECTION and Other Data from GILLISS from 19740903 to 19740918 (NODC Accession 7601715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean wave property data collected from the SAIL Pitch-roll Buoy as part of the 1974 Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) project that was part of the Global...

  14. Sensor Buoy System for Monitoring Renewable Marine Energy Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Emilio; Quiles, Eduardo; Correcher, Antonio; Morant, Francisco

    2018-03-22

    In this paper we present a multi-sensor floating system designed to monitor marine energy parameters, in order to sample wind, wave, and marine current energy resources. For this purpose, a set of dedicated sensors to measure the height and period of the waves, wind, and marine current intensity and direction have been selected and installed in the system. The floating device incorporates wind and marine current turbines for renewable energy self-consumption and to carry out complementary studies on the stability of such a system. The feasibility, safety, sensor communications, and buoy stability of the floating device have been successfully checked in real operating conditions.

  15. Wave hindcast studies using SWAN nested in WAVEWATCH III - comparison with measured nearshore buoy data off Karwar, eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amrutha, M.M.; SanilKumar, V.; Sandhya, K.G.; Nair, T.M.B; Rathod, J.L.

    Waves in the nearshore waters (~15 m water-depth) of eastern Arabian Sea were simulated using SWAN nested in WAVEWATCH III (WW3) for the year 2014. The sensitivity of the numerical wave model WW3 towards different source term (ST) packages...

  16. General Analysis of Directional Ocean Wave Data from Heave Pitch Roll Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald M. Wiberg

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many practical applications of lattice form recursive linear least square algorithms (called lattices for short in signal processing, communications, and control systems. The goal of this tutorial is to help practicing engineers to decide if lattices are appropriate for their particular projects.

  17. Application of Soft Computing Tools for Wave Prediction at Specific Locations in the Arabian Sea Using Moored Buoy Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vimala

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of design and operational values of significant wave heights is perhaps the single most important input needed in ocean engineering studies. Conventionally such information is obtained using classical statistical analysis and stochastic methods. As the causative variables are innumerable and underlying physics is too complicated, the results obtained from the numerical models may not always be very satisfactory. Soft computing tools like Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Adaptive Network based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS may therefore be useful to predict significant wave heights in some situations. The study is aimed at forecasting of significant wave height values in real time over a period of 24hrs at certain locations in Indian seas using the models of ANN and ANFIS. The data for the work were collected by National Institute of Ocean Technology, Chennai. It was found that the predictions of wave heights can be done by both methods with equal efficiency and satisfaction.

  18. Power Production Analysis of the OE Buoy WEC for the CORES Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    This report describes the analysis performed on the OE Buoy for the CORES project by the wave energy group at Aalborg University, Denmark. OE Buoy is a type of Oscillating Water Column (OWC) wave energy converter as part of the CORES project. This type of device is one of the most developed...... to extract energy from the ocean (1). Typically, a Wells turbine is used for the Power Take Off (PTO) for OWCs. The Wells turbine has the advantage that it is self-rectifying – with the ability to operate with either direction of airflow, which changes during each cycle of the wave. This type of turbine...... which a total of 39 hours of power production data was collected. A data acquisition system was used to sample the sensors on board and the generator shaft power time-series data was used in the analysis here. A wave-rider buoy, located at the site of OE Buoy and operated by the Marine Institute Ireland...

  19. Design wave estimation considering directional distribution of waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C

    .elsevier.com/locate/oceaneng Technical Note Design wave estimation considering directional distribution of waves V. Sanil Kumar a,C3 , M.C. Deo b a OceanEngineeringDivision,NationalInstituteofOceanography,Donapaula,Goa-403004,India b Civil... of Physical Oceanography Norway, Report method for the routine 18, 1020–1034. ocean waves. Division of No. UR-80-09, 187 p. analysis of pitch and roll Conference on Coastal Engineering, 1. ASCE, Taiwan, pp. 136–149. Deo, M.C., Burrows, R., 1986. Extreme wave...

  20. Calculating buoy response for a wave energy converter—A comparison of two computational methods and experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Sjökvist

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available When designing a wave power plant, reliable and fast simulation tools are required. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD software provides high accuracy but with a very high computational cost, and in operational, moderate sea states, linear potential flow theories may be sufficient to model the hydrodynamics. In this paper, a model is built in COMSOL Multiphysics to solve for the hydrodynamic parameters of a point-absorbing wave energy device. The results are compared with a linear model where the hydrodynamical parameters are computed using WAMIT, and to experimental results from the Lysekil research site. The agreement with experimental data is good for both numerical models.

  1. Design of Buoys for Mounting Wind Turbines at Exposed Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Beytullah; Çelıkkol, Barbaros; Swift, Robinson

    2018-04-01

    In this study, two designs for a buoy capable of supporting a 10 kW wind turbine and its tower were developed to operate at the University of New Hampshire's Center of Ocean Renewable Energy testing site located off the Isles of Shoals, New Hampshire. The buoys are to be moored by a catenary chain system. To evaluate wave response, two Froude-scaled models were constructed, tested, and compared at the Ocean Engineering wave tank at the University of New Hampshire. These buoys have been implemented and compared with wave tank measurements of the spar displacement at a reference elevation 2.44 m above the mean water level.

  2. Trend analysis of the wave storminess: the wave direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Prat, M.; Sierra, J. P.; Mösso, C.; Sánchez-Arcilla, A.

    2009-09-01

    Climate change has an important role in the current scientific research because of its possible future negative consequences. Concerning the climate change in the coastal engineering field, the apparent sea level rise is one of the key parameters as well as the wave height and the wave direction temporal variations. According to the IPCC (2007), during the last century the sea level has been increasing with a mean rate of 1.7 ± 0.5 mm/yr. However, at local/regional scale the tendency significantly differs from the global trend since the local pressure and wind field variations become more relevant. This appears to be particularly significant in semi-enclosed areas in the Mediterranean Sea (Cushman-Roisin et al., 2001). Even though the existing unsolved questions related to the sea level rise, the uncertainty concerning the wave height is even larger, in which stormy conditions are especially important because they are closely related to processes such as coastal erosion, flooding, etc. Therefore, it is necessary to identify possible existing tendencies of storm related parameters. In many studies, only the maximum wave height and storm duration are analysed, remaining the wave direction in a second term. Note that a possible rotation of the mean wave direction may involve severe consequences since most beach and harbour defence structures have been designed assuming a constant predominant wave incidence. Liste et al. (2004) illustrated this fact with an example in which a rotation of only 2 degrees of the mean energy flux vector could produce a beach retreat of 20 m. Another possible consequence would be a decrease of the harbour operability: increased frequency of storms in the same direction as the harbour entrance orientation would influence the navigability. The present study, which focuses in the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean Sea), aims to improve the present knowledge of the wave storminess variations at regional scale, specially focusing on the wave

  3. Data from a directional waverider buoy off Waimea Bay, North Shore, Oahu during December 2001 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  4. Development of drifting buoys

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.; Peshwe, V.B.; Tengali, S.

    transmeters. This paper discusses the design aspects and performance characteristics of these buoys presenting a small fraction of the considerable data set acquired. The requiremnts for further inclusion of certain sensors and hardware are described...

  5. An Optimal Control Method for Maximizing the Efficiency of Direct Drive Ocean Wave Energy Extraction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongxian; Yu, Haitao; Wen, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The goal of direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system is to convert ocean wave energy into electricity. The problem explored in this paper is the design and optimal control for the direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system. An optimal control method based on internal model proportion integration differentiation (IM-PID) is proposed in this paper though most of ocean wave energy extraction systems are optimized by the structure, weight, and material. With this control method, the heavy speed of outer heavy buoy of the energy extraction system is in resonance with incident wave, and the system efficiency is largely improved. Validity of the proposed optimal control method is verified in both regular and irregular ocean waves, and it is shown that IM-PID control method is optimal in that it maximizes the energy conversion efficiency. In addition, the anti-interference ability of IM-PID control method has been assessed, and the results show that the IM-PID control method has good robustness, high precision, and strong anti-interference ability. PMID:25152913

  6. An optimal control method for maximizing the efficiency of direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongxian; Yu, Haitao; Wen, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The goal of direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system is to convert ocean wave energy into electricity. The problem explored in this paper is the design and optimal control for the direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system. An optimal control method based on internal model proportion integration differentiation (IM-PID) is proposed in this paper though most of ocean wave energy extraction systems are optimized by the structure, weight, and material. With this control method, the heavy speed of outer heavy buoy of the energy extraction system is in resonance with incident wave, and the system efficiency is largely improved. Validity of the proposed optimal control method is verified in both regular and irregular ocean waves, and it is shown that IM-PID control method is optimal in that it maximizes the energy conversion efficiency. In addition, the anti-interference ability of IM-PID control method has been assessed, and the results show that the IM-PID control method has good robustness, high precision, and strong anti-interference ability.

  7. The direct wave-drive thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Matthew Solomon

    A propulsion concept relying on the direct, steady-state acceleration of a plasma by an inductive wave-launching antenna is presented. By operating inductively in steady state, a Direct Wave-Drive Thruster avoids drawbacks associated with electrode erosion and pulsed acceleration. The generalized relations for the scaling of thrust and efficiency with the antenna current are derived analytically; thrust is shown to scale with current squared, and efficiency is shown to increase with increasing current or power. Two specific configurations are modeled to determine nondimensional parameters governing the antenna-plasma coupling: an annular antenna pushing against a finite-conductivity plasma, and a linear antenna targeting the magnetosonic wave. Calculations from the model show that total thrust improves for increasing excitation frequencies, wavenumbers, plasma densities, and device sizes. To demonstrate the magnetosonic wave as an ideal candidate to drive a DWDT, it is shown to be capable of carrying substantial momentum and able to drive a variable specific impulse. The magnetosonic wave-driven mass flow is compared to mass transport due to thermal effects and cross-field diffusion in order to derive critical power requirements that ensure the thruster channel is dominated by wave dynamics. A proof-of-concept experiment is constructed that consists of a separate plasma source, a confining magnetic field, and a wave-launching antenna. The scaling of the increase of exhaust velocity is analytically modeled and is dependent on a nondimensional characteristic wavenumber that is proportional to the excitation frequency and plasma density and inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength. Experimental validation of the derived scaling behavior is carried out using a Mach probe to measure the flow velocity in the plume. Increases in exhaust velocity are measured as the antenna current increases for varying excitation frequencies and applied magnetic field

  8. A study of the optimum draft of multiple resonance power buoys for maximizing electric power production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To maximize electric power production using wave energy extractions from resonance power buoys, the maximum motion displacement spectra of the buoys can primarily be obtained under a given wave condition. In this study, wave spectra observed in shoaling water were formulated. Target resonance frequencies were established from the arithmetic means of modal frequency bands and the peak frequencies. The motion characteristics of the circular cylindrical power buoys with corresponding drafts were then calculated using numerical models without considering PTO damping force. Results showed that the heave motions of the power buoys in shoaling waters with insufficient drafts produced greater amplification effects than those in deep seas with sufficient drafts.

  9. Future directions in standing-wave photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alexander X., E-mail: axgray@temple.edu

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Probing magnetic properties at the buried interface with SW-MCD. • Probing electronic structure at the buried interface with resonant SW-XPS and SW-HAXPES. • Probing momentum-resolved electronic structure at a buried interface with SWARPES. • Adding depth resolution to photoemission microscopy with standing-wave excitation. • Standing-wave localization, total reflection and waveguide effects. - Abstract: Over the past decade, standing-wave photoemission (SW-XPS) has evolved into a powerful and versatile non-destructive technique for probing element-specific electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of buried layers and interfaces with sub-nanometer depth resolution. In this article, I will discuss several promising future directions in this emergent field stemming from experimental and theoretical studies wherein SW-XPS is combined with other X-ray techniques, such as magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES), angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), and photoemission microscopy (PEEM), adding extra dimensions to the measurement and thus widening the scope of scientific and technological questions accessible via the use of standing waves. I will further discuss examples of recently developed methods for X-ray standing-wave data analysis, which yield layer-resolved matrix-element-weighted densities of states at interfaces as well as Ångstrom-level changes in periodicity of synthetic superlattices. Finally, I will explore the possibility of localizing the standing waves near the surface and within a buried layer by the use of aperiodic superlattices, total reflection, and X-ray waveguide effects.

  10. Future directions in standing-wave photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, Alexander X.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Probing magnetic properties at the buried interface with SW-MCD. • Probing electronic structure at the buried interface with resonant SW-XPS and SW-HAXPES. • Probing momentum-resolved electronic structure at a buried interface with SWARPES. • Adding depth resolution to photoemission microscopy with standing-wave excitation. • Standing-wave localization, total reflection and waveguide effects. - Abstract: Over the past decade, standing-wave photoemission (SW-XPS) has evolved into a powerful and versatile non-destructive technique for probing element-specific electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of buried layers and interfaces with sub-nanometer depth resolution. In this article, I will discuss several promising future directions in this emergent field stemming from experimental and theoretical studies wherein SW-XPS is combined with other X-ray techniques, such as magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES), angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), and photoemission microscopy (PEEM), adding extra dimensions to the measurement and thus widening the scope of scientific and technological questions accessible via the use of standing waves. I will further discuss examples of recently developed methods for X-ray standing-wave data analysis, which yield layer-resolved matrix-element-weighted densities of states at interfaces as well as Ångstrom-level changes in periodicity of synthetic superlattices. Finally, I will explore the possibility of localizing the standing waves near the surface and within a buried layer by the use of aperiodic superlattices, total reflection, and X-ray waveguide effects

  11. Shallow Water Optical Water Quality Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles

    1998-01-01

    This NASA grant was funded as a result of an unsolicited proposal submission to Kennedy Space Center. The proposal proposed the development and testing of a shallow water optical water quality buoy. The buoy is meant to work in shallow aquatic systems (ponds, rivers, lagoons, and semi-enclosed water areas where strong wind wave action is not a major environmental During the project period of three years, a demonstration of the buoy was conducted. The last demonstration during the project period was held in November, 1996 when the buoy was demonstrated as being totally operational with no tethered communications line. During the last year of the project the buoy was made to be solar operated by large gel cell batteries. Fund limitations did not permit the batteries in metal enclosures as hoped for higher wind conditions, however the system used to date has worked continuously for in- situ operation of over 18 months continuous deployment. The system needs to have maintenance and somewhat continuous operational attention since various components have limited lifetime ages. For example, within the last six months the onboard computer has had to be repaired as it did approximately 6 months after deployment. The spectrograph had to be repaired and costs for repairs was covered by KB Science since no ftmds were available for this purpose after the grant expired. Most recently the computer web page server failed and it is currently being repaired by KB Science. In addition, the cell phone operation is currently being ftmded by Dr. Bostater in order to maintain the system's operation. The above points need to be made to allow NASA to understand that like any sophisticated measuring system in a lab or in the field, necessary funding and maintenance is needed to insure the system's operational state and to obtain quality factor. The proposal stated that the project was based upon the integration of a proprietary and confidential sensor and probe design that was developed by

  12. NDBC Standard Meteorological Buoy Data, 1970-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) distributes meteorological data from moored buoys maintained by NDBC and others. Moored buoys are the weather sentinels of the...

  13. Estimation of directional sea wave spectra from radar images. A Mediterranean Sea case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsini, G.; Grasso, R.; Manara, G.; Monorchio, A.

    2001-01-01

    An inversion technique for estimating sea wave directional spectra from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is applied to a set of ERS-1 data relevant to selected Mediterranean areas. The approach followed is based on the analytical definition of the transform which maps the sea wave spectrum onto the corresponding SAR image spectrum. The solution of the inverse problem is determined through a numerical procedure which minimises a proper functional. A suitable iterative scheme is adopted, involving the use of the above transform. Although widely applied to the ocean case, the method has not been yet extensively tested widely applied to the ocean case, the method has not been yet extensively tested in smaller scale basins, as for instance the Mediterranean sea. The results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the numerical procedure discussed for retrieving the sea wave spectrum from SAR images. This work provides new experimental data relevant to the Mediterranean Sea, discusses the results obtained by the above inversion technique and compares them with buoy derived sea truth measurements

  14. CURRENT DIRECTION, ICE - MOVEMENT - DIRECTION and other data from DRIFTING BUOY in the World-Wide Distribution from 1990-01-01 to 1991-03-31 (NODC Accession 9100102)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting Buoy Data from the Canadian Data Center, submitted by Mr. Jean Gagron, Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada in GF-3 format for...

  15. Rip current monitoring using GPS buoy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, DongSeob; Kim, InHo; Kang, DongSoo

    2014-05-01

    The occurrence of rip current in the Haeundae beach, which is one of the most famous beaches in South Korea, has been threatening beach-goers security in summer season annually. Many coastal scientists have been investigating rip currents by using field observations and measurements, laboratory measurements and wave tank experiments, and computer and numerical modeling. Rip current velocity is intermittent and may rapidly increase within minutes due to larger incoming wave groups or nearshore circulation instabilities. It is important to understand that changes in rip current velocity occur in response to changes in incoming wave height and period as well as changes in water level. GPS buoys have been used to acquire sea level change data, atmospheric parameters and other oceanic variables in sea for the purposes of vertical datum determination, tide correction, radar altimeter calibration, ocean environment and marine pollution monitoring. Therefore, we adopted GPS buoy system for an experiment which is to investigate rip current velocity; it is sporadic and may quickly upsurge within minutes due to larger arriving wave groups or nearshore flow uncertainties. In this study, for high accurate positioning of buy equipment, a Satellite Based Argumentation System DGPS data logger was deployed to investigate within floating object, and it can be acquired three-dimensional coordinate or geodetic position of buoy with continuous NMEA-0183 protocol during 24 hours. The wave height measured by in-situ hydrometer in a cross-shore array clearly increased before and after occurrence of rip current, and wave period also was lengthened around an event. These results show that wave height and period correlate reasonably well with long-shore current interaction in the Haeundae beach. Additionally, current meter data and GPS buoy data showed that rip current velocities, about 0.2 m/s, may become dangerously strong under specific conditions. Acknowledgement This research was

  16. Buoy Dynamics in Subsurface Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Guillen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to find the tension acting on a line that anchors a buoy submerged just beneath the surface of the ocean. Since the problem statement only gives the geometric shapes and dimensions of the buoy, we must use calculus to find its volume and surface area through integration of the volumes and surfaces of revolution formed by the specific parts of the buoy along an axis. The volume and surface area determine the buoyancy force and force of gravity, the two forces acting on the buoy that affect the tension in the line. After calculating this data, we were able to conclude that the tension affecting the line would be approximately 78 kN if the buoy was made of 1% carbon steel with a thickness of 6.35 mm. This problem is useful in several engineering disciplines.

  17. Comparative study on spreading function for directional wave spectra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    -dimensional wave energy S(f) and the directional spreading function D(f, theta). This paper reviews various spreading functions proposed in the past for estimating the directional wave energy and presents their application to the Indian wave condition. It is found...

  18. Directional wave spectra off southeast coast of Tamil Nadu

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; Gowthaman, R.

    directional spreading. A well established way to describe the energy content in an irregular wind generated surface wave assumes superposition of linear waves and the two dimensional energy spectrum can be conveniently expressed as a product of the one...

  19. MONITORING HIGH-FREQUENCY OCEAN SIGNALS USING LOW-COST GNSS/IMU BUOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-L. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In oceans there are different ocean signals covering the multi-frequencies including tsunami, meteotsunami, storm surge, as sea level change, and currents. These signals have the direct and significant impact on the economy and life of human-beings. Therefore, measuring ocean signals accurately becomes more and more important and necessary. Nowadays, there are many techniques and methods commonly used for monitoring oceans, but each has its limitation. For example, tide gauges only measure sea level relative to benchmarks and are disturbed unevenly, and satellite altimeter measurements are not continuous and inaccurate near coastal oceans. In addition, high-frequency ocean signals such as tsunami and meteotsunami cannot be sufficiently detected by 6-minutes tide gauge measurements or 10-day sampled altimetry data. Moreover, traditional accelerometer buoy is heavy, expensive and the low-frequency noise caused by the instrument is unavoidable. In this study, a small, low-cost and self-assembly autonomous Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU that independently collects continuous acceleration and angular velocity data is mounted on a GNSS buoy to provide the positions and tilts of the moving buoy. The main idea is to integrate the Differential GNSS (DGNSS or Precise Point Positioning (PPP solutions with IMU data, and then evaluate the performance by comparing with in situ tide gauges. The validation experiments conducted in the NCKU Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory showed that GNSS and IMU both can detect the simulated regular wave frequency and height, and the field experiments in the Anping Harbor, Tainan, Taiwan showed that the low-cost GNSS buoy has an excellent ability to observe significant wave heights in amplitude and frequency.

  20. Estimation of wave directional spreading in shallow water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; Chandramohan, P.

    loads on offshore structures, long- term estimation of waves and estimation of sediment transport. According to the principle of superposition of linear waves, the sea state is com- posed of a large number of individual wave components, each having a..., who were involved in the data collection programme. NIO Contribution number 2569. References Benoit, M., 1992. Practical comparative performance survey of methods used for estimating directional wave spectra from heave–pitch–roll data. Proceedings...

  1. Evaluating the Effectiveness of DART® Buoy Networks Based on Forecast Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Donald B.; Denbo, Donald W.; Gica, Edison; Huang, Paul Y.; Mofjeld, Harold O.; Spillane, Michael C.; Titov, Vasily V.

    2018-03-01

    A performance measure for a DART® tsunami buoy network has been developed. DART® buoys are used to detect tsunamis, but the full potential of the data they collect is realized through accurate forecasts of inundations caused by the tsunamis. The performance measure assesses how well the network achieves its full potential through a statistical analysis of simulated forecasts of wave amplitudes outside an impact site and a consideration of how much the forecasts are degraded in accuracy when one or more buoys are inoperative. The analysis uses simulated tsunami amplitude time series collected at each buoy from selected source segments in the Short-term Inundation Forecast for Tsunamis database and involves a set for 1000 forecasts for each buoy/segment pair at sites just offshore of selected impact communities. Random error-producing scatter in the time series is induced by uncertainties in the source location, addition of real oceanic noise, and imperfect tidal removal. Comparison with an error-free standard leads to root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for DART® buoys located near a subduction zone. The RMSEs indicate which buoy provides the best forecast (lowest RMSE) for sections of the zone, under a warning-time constraint for the forecasts of 3 h. The analysis also shows how the forecasts are degraded (larger minimum RMSE among the remaining buoys) when one or more buoys become inoperative. The RMSEs provide a way to assess array augmentation or redesign such as moving buoys to more optimal locations. Examples are shown for buoys off the Aleutian Islands and off the West Coast of South America for impact sites at Hilo HI and along the US West Coast (Crescent City CA and Port San Luis CA, USA). A simple measure (coded green, yellow or red) of the current status of the network's ability to deliver accurate forecasts is proposed to flag the urgency of buoy repair.

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of DART® Buoy Networks Based on Forecast Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Donald B.; Denbo, Donald W.; Gica, Edison; Huang, Paul Y.; Mofjeld, Harold O.; Spillane, Michael C.; Titov, Vasily V.

    2018-04-01

    A performance measure for a DART® tsunami buoy network has been developed. DART® buoys are used to detect tsunamis, but the full potential of the data they collect is realized through accurate forecasts of inundations caused by the tsunamis. The performance measure assesses how well the network achieves its full potential through a statistical analysis of simulated forecasts of wave amplitudes outside an impact site and a consideration of how much the forecasts are degraded in accuracy when one or more buoys are inoperative. The analysis uses simulated tsunami amplitude time series collected at each buoy from selected source segments in the Short-term Inundation Forecast for Tsunamis database and involves a set for 1000 forecasts for each buoy/segment pair at sites just offshore of selected impact communities. Random error-producing scatter in the time series is induced by uncertainties in the source location, addition of real oceanic noise, and imperfect tidal removal. Comparison with an error-free standard leads to root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for DART® buoys located near a subduction zone. The RMSEs indicate which buoy provides the best forecast (lowest RMSE) for sections of the zone, under a warning-time constraint for the forecasts of 3 h. The analysis also shows how the forecasts are degraded (larger minimum RMSE among the remaining buoys) when one or more buoys become inoperative. The RMSEs provide a way to assess array augmentation or redesign such as moving buoys to more optimal locations. Examples are shown for buoys off the Aleutian Islands and off the West Coast of South America for impact sites at Hilo HI and along the US West Coast (Crescent City CA and Port San Luis CA, USA). A simple measure (coded green, yellow or red) of the current status of the network's ability to deliver accurate forecasts is proposed to flag the urgency of buoy repair.

  3. A Floating Ocean Energy Conversion Device and Numerical Study on Buoy Shape and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyin Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wave and current energy can be harnessed in the East China Sea and South China Sea; however, both areas are subject to high frequencies of typhoon events. To improve the safety of the ocean energy conversion device, a Floating Ocean Energy Conversion Device (FOECD with a single mooring system is proposed, which can be towed to avoid severe ocean conditions or for regular maintenance. In this paper, the structure of the FOECD is introduced, and it includes a catamaran platform, an oscillating buoy part, a current turbine blade, hydraulic energy storage and an electrical generation part. The numerical study models the large catamaran platform as a single, large buoy, while the four floating buoys were modeled simply as small buoys. Theoretical models on wave energy power capture and efficiency were established. To improve the suitability of the buoy for use in the FOECD and its power harvesting capability, a numerical simulation of the four buoy geometries was undertaken. The shape profiles examined in this paper are cylindrical, turbinate (V-shaped and U-shaped cone with cylinder, and combined cylinder-hemisphere buoys. Simulation results reveal that the suitability of a turbinate buoy is the best of the four types. Further simulation models were carried out by adjusting the tip radius of the turbinate buoy. Three performance criteria including suitability, power harvesting capability and energy capture efficiency were analyzed. It reveals that the turbinate buoy has almost the same power harvesting capabilities and energy capture efficiency, while its suitability is far better than that of a cylindrical buoy.

  4. Directional nonlinear guided wave mixing: Case study of counter-propagating shear horizontal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanian, Mostafa; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2018-04-01

    While much nonlinear ultrasonics research has been conducted on higher harmonic generation, wave mixing provides the potential for sensitive measurements of incipient damage unencumbered by instrumentation nonlinearity. Studies of nonlinear ultrasonic wave mixing, both collinear and noncollinear, for bulk waves have shown the robust capability of wave mixing for early damage detection. One merit of bulk wave mixing lies in their non-dispersive nature, but guided waves enable inspection of otherwise inaccessible material and a variety of mixing options. Co-directional guided wave mixing was studied previously, but arbitrary direction guided wave mixing has not been addressed until recently. Wave vector analysis is applied to study variable mixing angles to find wave mode triplets (two primary waves and a secondary wave) resulting in the phase matching condition. As a case study, counter-propagating Shear Horizontal (SH) guided wave mixing is analyzed. SH wave interactions generate a secondary Lamb wave mode that is readily receivable. Reception of the secondary Lamb wave mode is compared for an angle beam transducer, an air coupled transducer, and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Results from the angle beam and air coupled transducers are quite consistent, while the LDV measurement is plagued by variability issues.

  5. Numerical modelling of the HAB Energy Buoy: Stage 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurniawan, Adi

    This report presents the results of the first stage of the project "Numerical modelling of the HAB Energy Buoy". The objectives of this stage are to develop a numerical model of the HAB Energy Buoy, a self-reacting wave energy device consisting of two heaving bodies, and to investigate a number...... and a summary of the main findings is presented. A numerical model of the HAB Energy Buoy has been developed in the frequency domain using two alternative formulations of the equations of motion. The model is capable of predicting the power capture, motion response, and power take-off loads of the device...... configuration are imposed to give a more realistic prediction of the power capture and help ensure a fair comparison. Recommendations with regard to the HAB design are finally suggested....

  6. On the direct observability of quantum waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selleri, F.

    1984-01-01

    Fundamental experiments on the dual nature of atomic entities can be interpreted in terms of ''empty'' waves not carrying energy and momentum. Similar points of view were advanced in famous papers by Einstein, de Broglie, Bohr, and Born. Recent proposals could lead to experimental tests of this idea, using low intensity photon beams, thanks to modern experimental apparatus. (author)

  7. Trend analysis of wave storminess: wave direction and its impact on harbour agitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Casas-Prat

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the context of wave climate variability, long-term alterations in the wave storminess pattern of the Catalan coast (northwestern Mediterranean Sea are analysed in terms of wave energy content and wave direction, on the basis of wave hindcast data (from 44-year time series. In general, no significant temporal trends are found for annual mean and maximum energy. However, the same analysis carried out separately for different wave directions reveals a remarkable increase in the storm energy of events from the south, which is partly due to a rise in the annual percentage of such storms. A case study of Tarragona Port (on the southern Catalan coast highlights the importance of including changes in wave direction in the study of potential impacts of climate change. In particular, an increase in the frequency of storms from the south leads to greater agitation inside the Port.

  8. Real-time current, wave, temperature, salinity, and meteorological data from Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System (GoMOOS) buoys, 11/30/2003 - 12/7/2003 (NODC Accession 0001259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System (GoMOOS) collected real-time data with buoy-mounted instruments (e.g., accelerometers and Acoustic Doppler Current...

  9. Mooring Line for an Oceanographic Buoy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A mooring line for an oceanographic buoy system includes four sections. The first section is a protected cable that is connectable to the buoy. The second section is...

  10. Heaving buoys, point absorbers and arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falnes, Johannes; Hals, Jørgen

    2012-01-28

    Absorption of wave energy may be considered as a phenomenon of interference between incident and radiated waves generated by an oscillating object; a wave-energy converter (WEC) that displaces water. If a WEC is very small in comparison with one wavelength, it is classified as a point absorber (PA); otherwise, as a 'quasi-point absorber'. The latter may be a dipole-mode radiator, for instance an immersed body oscillating in the surge mode or pitch mode, while a PA is so small that it should preferably be a source-mode radiator, for instance a heaving semi-submerged buoy. The power take-off capacity, the WEC's maximum swept volume and preferably also its full physical volume should be reasonably matched to the wave climate. To discuss this matter, two different upper bounds for absorbed power are applied in a 'Budal diagram'. It appears that, for a single WEC unit, a power capacity of only about 0.3 MW matches well to a typical offshore wave climate, and the full physical volume has, unfortunately, to be significantly larger than the swept volume, unless phase control is used. An example of a phase-controlled PA is presented. For a sizeable wave-power plant, an array consisting of hundreds, or even thousands, of mass-produced WEC units is required.

  11. On Validation of Directional Wave Predictions: Review and Discussion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, W. E; Wang, David W

    2006-01-01

    This report consists of supplementary materials for an article, accepted for publication in the "Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology," dealing with directional wave model validation by the same authors...

  12. Data from a directional waverider buoy off Kailua Bay, Windward Oahu during 2000-08 to 2004-07 (NODC Accession 0001660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves along the coastlines of the United States, with a strong emphasis on our...

  13. Directional bending wave propagation in periodically perforated plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Manktelow, Kevin; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We report on the investigation of wave propagation in a periodically perforated plate. A unit cell with double-C perforations is selected as a test article suitable to investigate two-dimensional dispersion characteristics, group velocities, and internal resonances. A numerical model, formulated...... using Mindlin plate elements, is developed to predict relevant wave characteristics such as dispersion, and group velocity variation as a function of frequency and direction of propagation. Experimental tests are conducted through a scanning laser vibrometer, which provides full wave field information...... for the design of phononic waveguides with directional and internal resonant characteristics....

  14. Surface acoustic waves voltage controlled directional coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, G.; Griffel, G.; Yanilov, E.; Ruschin, S.; Seidman, A.; Croitoru, N.

    1988-10-01

    An important condition for the development of surface wave integrated-acoustic devices is the ability to guide and control the propagation of the acoustic energy. This can be implemented by deposition of metallic "loading" channels on an anisotropic piezoelectric substrate. Deposition of such two parallel channels causes an effective coupling of acoustic energy from one channel to the other. A basic requirement for this coupling effect is the existence of the two basic modes: a symmetrical and a nonsymmetrical one. A mode map that shows the number of sustained modes as a function of the device parameters (i.e., channel width; distance between channels; material velocity; and acoustical exciting frequency) is presented. This kind of map can help significantly in the design process of such a device. In this paper we devise an advanced acoustical "Y" coupler with the ability to control its effective coupling by an externally applied voltage, thereby causing modulation of the output intensities of the signals.

  15. Extreme coastal erosion enhanced by anomalous extratropical storm wave direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Mitchell D; Turner, Ian L; Kinsela, Michael A; Middleton, Jason H; Mumford, Peter J; Splinter, Kristen D; Phillips, Matthew S; Simmons, Joshua A; Hanslow, David J; Short, Andrew D

    2017-07-20

    Extratropical cyclones (ETCs) are the primary driver of large-scale episodic beach erosion along coastlines in temperate regions. However, key drivers of the magnitude and regional variability in rapid morphological changes caused by ETCs at the coast remain poorly understood. Here we analyze an unprecedented dataset of high-resolution regional-scale morphological response to an ETC that impacted southeast Australia, and evaluate the new observations within the context of an existing long-term coastal monitoring program. This ETC was characterized by moderate intensity (for this regional setting) deepwater wave heights, but an anomalous wave direction approximately 45 degrees more counter-clockwise than average. The magnitude of measured beach volume change was the largest in four decades at the long-term monitoring site and, at the regional scale, commensurate with that observed due to extreme North Atlantic hurricanes. Spatial variability in morphological response across the study region was predominantly controlled by alongshore gradients in storm wave energy flux and local coastline alignment relative to storm wave direction. We attribute the severity of coastal erosion observed due to this ETC primarily to its anomalous wave direction, and call for greater research on the impacts of changing storm wave directionality in addition to projected future changes in wave heights.

  16. Multi-directional random wave interaction with an array of cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Xinran; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the linear theory of wave interaction with an array of circular bottom-mounted vertical cylinders, systematic calculations are made to investigate the effects of the wave directionality on wave loads in short-crested seas. The multi-directional waves are specified using a discrete form...... of the Mitsuyasu-type spreading function. The time series of multi-directional wave loads, including both the wave run-up and wave force, can be simulated. The effect of wave directionality on the wave run-up and wave loading on the cylinders is investigated. For multi-directional waves, as the distribution...

  17. Uni-directional waves over slowly varying bottom, part II: Deformation of travelling waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudjaprasetya, S.R.; Pudjaprasetya, S.R.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    1996-01-01

    A new Korteweg-de Vries type of equation for uni-directional waves over slowly varying bottom has been derived in Part I. The equation retains the Hamiltonian structure of the underlying complete set of equations for surface waves. For flat bottom it reduces to the standard Korteweg-de Vries

  18. On phase and ray directions of magnetosonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, I.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of phase speed for the 'slow' and 'fast' magnetosonic waves is well documented in the literature. Not so well documented is the behavior of the ray direction and its relation to the phase direction - indeed the author has not found the ray behavior recorded in most of the standard plasma physics texts. This situation is rectified and some of the curiosities associated with the direction of the 'slow' ray relative to the direction of the 'slow' phase wave are pointed out. These calculations have been performed as a necessary basis for discussion of phase and ray evolution of magnetosonic waves in differentially shearing plasmas, which subject is the topic of a later paper. (Auth.)

  19. Evolution of offshore wind waves tracked by surface drifters with a point-positioning GPS sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, K.

    2009-12-01

    Wind-generated waves have been recognized as one of the most important factors of the sea surface roughness which plays crucial roles in various air-sea interactions such as energy, momentum, heat and gas exchanges. At the same time, wind waves with extreme wave heights representatively called as freak or rogue waves have been a matter of great concern for many people involved in shipping, fishing, constracting, surfing and other marine activities, because such extreme waves frequently affect on the marine activities and sometimes cause serious disasters. Nevertheless, investigations of actual conditions for the evolution of wind waves in the offshore region are less and sparse in contrast to dense monitoring networks in the coastal regions because of difficulty of offshore observation with high accuracy. Recently accurate in situ observation of offshore wind waves is getting possible at low cost owing to a wave height and direction sensor developed by Harigae et al. (2004) by installing a point-positioning GPS receiver on a surface drifting buoy. The point-positioning GPS sensor can extract three dimensional movements of the buoy excited by ocean waves with minimizing effects of GPS point-positioning errors through the use of a high-pass filter. Two drifting buoys equipped with the GPS-based wave sensor charged by solar cells were drifted in the western North Pacific and one of them continued to observe wind waves during 16 months from Sep. 2007. The RMSE of the GPS-based wave sensor was less than 10cm in significant wave height and about 1s in significant wave period in comparison with other sensors, i.e. accelerometers installed on drifting buoys of Japan Meteorological Agency, ultrasonic sensors placed at the Hiratsuka observation station of the University of Tokyo and altimeter of the JASON-1. The GPS-based wave buoys enabled us to detect freak waves defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. The observation conducted by the

  20. Shear Alfven wave excitation by direct antenna coupling and fast wave resonant mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    Antenna coupling to the shear Alfven wave by both direct excitation and fast wave resonant mode conversion is modelled analytically for a plasma with a one dimensional linear density gradient. We demonstrate the existence of a shear Alfven mode excited directly by the antenna. For localised antennas, this mode propagates as a guided beam along the steady magnetic field lines intersecting the antenna. Shear Alfven wave excitation by resonant mode conversion of a fast wave near the Alfven resonance layer is also demonstrated and we prove that energy is conserved in this process. We compare the efficiency of these two mechanisms of shear Alfven wave excitation and present a simple analytical formula giving the ratio of the coupled powers. Finally, we discuss the interpretation of some experimental results. 45 refs., 7 figs

  1. Direct detection of the inflationary gravitational-wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Kamionkowski, Marc; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-01-01

    Inflation generically predicts a stochastic background of gravitational waves over a broad range of frequencies, from those accessible with cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, to those accessible directly with gravitational-wave detectors, like NASA's Big-Bang Observer (BBO) or Japan's Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observer (DECIGO), both currently under study. Here we investigate the detectability of the inflationary gravitational-wave background at BBO/DECIGO frequencies. To do so, we survey a range of slow-roll inflationary models consistent with constraints from the CMB and large-scale structure (LSS). We go beyond the usual assumption of power-law power spectra, which may break down given the 16 orders of magnitude in frequency between the CMB and direct detection, and solve instead the inflationary dynamics for four classes of inflaton potentials. Direct detection is possible in a variety of inflationary models, although probably not in any in which the gravitational-wave signal does not appear in the CMB polarization. However, direct detection by BBO/DECIGO can help discriminate between inflationary models that have the same slow-roll parameters at CMB/LSS scales

  2. Characteristics of offshore extreme wind-waves detected by surface drifters with a low-cost GPS wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Kosei

    Wind-generated waves have been recognized as one of the most important factors of the sea surface roughness which plays crucial roles in various air-sea interactions such as energy, mo-mentum, heat and gas exchanges. At the same time, wind waves with extreme wave heights representatively called as freak or rogue waves have been a matter of great concern for many people involved in shipping, fishing, constracting, surfing and other marine activities, because such extreme waves frequently affect on the marine activities and sometimes cause serious dis-asters. Nevertheless, investigations of actual conditions for the evolution of wind waves in the offshore region are less and sparse in contrast to dense monitoring networks in the coastal re-gions because of difficulty of offshore observation with high accuracy. Recently accurate in situ observation of offshore wind waves is getting possible at low cost owing to a wave height and di-rection sensor developed by Harigae et al. (2004) by installing a point-positioning GPS receiver on a surface drifting buoy. The point-positioning GPS sensor can extract three dimensional movements of the buoy excited by ocean waves with minimizing effects of GPS point-positioning errors through the use of a high-pass filter. Two drifting buoys equipped with the GPS-based wave sensor charged by solar cells were drifted in the western North Pacific and one of them continued to observe wind waves during 16 months from Sep. 2007. The RMSE of the GPS-based wave sensor was less than 10cm in significant wave height and about 1s in significant wave period in comparison with other sensors, i.e. accelerometers installed on drifting buoys of Japan Meteorological Agency, ultrasonic sensors placed at the Hiratsuka observation station of the University of Tokyo and altimeter of the JASON-1. The GPS-based wave buoys enabled us to detect freak waves defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. The observation conducted by

  3. Control strategies to optimise power output in heave buoy energy convertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Zarim, M A U A; Sharip, R M

    2013-01-01

    Wave energy converter (WEC) designs are always discussed in order to obtain an optimum design to generate the power from the wave. Output power from wave energy converter can be improved by controlling the oscillation in order to acquire the interaction between the WEC and the incident wave.The purpose of this research is to study the heave buoys in the interest to generate an optimum power output by optimising the phase control and amplitude in order to maximise the active power. In line with the real aims of this study which investigate the theory and function and hence optimise the power generation of heave buoys as renewable energy sources, the condition that influence the heave buoy must be understand in which to propose the control strategies that can be use to control parameters to obtain optimum power output. However, this research is in an early stage, and further analysis and technical development is require

  4. NODC Standard Product: NOAA Marine environmental buoy database 1993 with Updates (19 disc set) (NCEI Accession 0095199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This set of CD-ROMs holds marine meteorological, oceanographic, and wave spectra data collected by moored buoys and C-MAN (Coastal-Marine Automated Network) stations...

  5. Direct measurement technique for shock wave velocity with irradiation drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng; Peng Xiaoshi; Liu Shenye; Jiang Xiaohua; Ding Yongkun

    2011-01-01

    According to the ionization mechanism of transparent material under super high pressure, the direct diagnosis method of shock wave has been analyzed. With the Drude free electron model, the reflectivity difference of shock wave front under different pressures was analyzed. The blank effect in the detector was studied, which is caused by the X-ray ionization of transparent material, after analyzing the reflectivity data in space-time scale. The experiment shows that the beginning point and duration of blank effect are consistent with the start point and duration of laser pulse, respectively. And the reflectivity of shock wave front is about 35% when the shock velocity is 32 km/s. The reason and solution for blank effect was presented. The formula to calculate the shock wave velocity in transparent material was also deduced and verified. (authors)

  6. Congratulations on the direct detection of gravitational waves

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    This week saw the announcement of an extraordinary physics result: the first direct detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, which includes the GEO team, and the Virgo Collaboration, using the twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington, USA.   Albert Einstein predicted gravitational waves in a paper published 100 years ago in 1916. They are a natural consequence of the theory of general relativity, which describes the workings of gravity and was published a few months earlier. Until now, they have remained elusive. Gravitational waves are tiny ripples in space-time produced by violent gravitational phenomena. Because the fractional change in the space-time geometry can be at the level of 10-21 or smaller, extremely sophisticated, high-sensitivity instruments are needed to detect them. Recently, the Advanced LIGO detector increased its sensitivity by alm...

  7. Loading/unloading buoy. Laste/lossebye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breivik, K.; Smedal, A.; Syvertsen, K.

    1994-07-04

    The invention relates to a buoy for use in loading or unloading of a flowable medium, especially oil. The buoy is at its lower end arranged for connection to at least one transfer line and further being arranged to be introduced into a submerged downwardly open receiving space in a floating vessel. The buoy forms in operation a transfer connection between the transfer line and a tube system on the vessel. The buoy comprises an outer buoyancy member arranged for releasable locking to the receiving space of the vessel by means of a locking mechanism arranged therein, and centrally in the outer member a rotatably mounted member which forms a passage for medium and at its ends is arranged for connection to the transfer line and the tube system on the vessel, respectively. The buoy at its upper end is connected to a means for hoisting and introducing the buoy into the receiving space of the vessel. 8 figs.

  8. Determination of wave direction from linear and polygonal arrays

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Gouveia, A; Nagarajan, R.

    documentation of Borgman (1974) in case of linear arrays; and the second issue being the failure of Esteva (1976, 1977) to correctly determine wave directions over the design range 25 to 7 sec of his polygonal array. This paper presents requisite documentation...

  9. Dynamics of directional coupling underlying spike-wave discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sysoeva, M.V.; Luttjohann, A.K.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Sysoev, I.V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Spike and wave discharges (SWDs), generated within cortico-thalamo-cortical networks, are the electroencephalographic biomarker of absence epilepsy. The current work aims to identify mechanisms of SWD initiation, maintenance and termination by the analyses of dynamics and directionality of

  10. Third-order theory for multi-directional irregular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2012-01-01

    A new third-order solution for multi-directional irregular water waves in finite water depth is presented. The solution includes explicit expressions for the surface elevation, the amplitude dispersion and the vertical variation of the velocity potential. Expressions for the velocity potential at...

  11. IPAB Antarctic Drifting Buoy Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) International Programme for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB), through participating research organizations in various countries,...

  12. Long-term wave climate at DanWEC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetu, Amélie; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    andthe current network of sensors are also presented. The numerical model used toobtain the 35 years hindcast data is introduced together with its validation againstbuoy-measured data and with the description of the dataset utilised for thelong-term climate definition. The recommendations from [IEC 62600...... buoys are continuously recorded and the data is analysed on a quarterly basis. The directional wave measuring buoys were first installed in March 2015. As two years is not sufficient for long-term wave climate definition, modelled data was more appropriate for the task. Thelong-term wave climate around...... Hanstholm is defined in the present report using the hindcast data from the MIKE 21 Spectral Wave model provided by DHI, one of the partners of the project. Before the actual wave climate definition, a description of the site includinglocation and bathymetry is included. The historical wave data of the area...

  13. Evidence that grey seals (Halichoerus grypus use above-water vision to locate baited buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Fjälling

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishing gear in the Baltic is often raided by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus. The seals remove the fish and damage the nets, or entangle themselves and drown. In order to develop ways of mitigating the seals-fisheries conflict, it is important to know exactly how the seals locate the fishing gear. A field experiment was conducted in order to clarify whether seals use their vision above water to do this. Bait (herring; Clupea harengus was attached to the anchor lines of buoys of the type that is commonly used to mark the position of fishing gear. In all, 643 buoys were set. Some of the buoys (210 were also fitted with camera traps. Weather data were collected from official weather stations nearby. Bait loss (mean 18% was significantly correlated with buoy size (P = 0.002 and wind speed (P = 0.04. There was a significant association between bait loss and seal observations near the buoys (P = 0.05. Five photos of grey seals were obtained from the camera traps. No fish-eating birds, such as cormorants or mergansers, were ever observed near the buoys or caught on camera. It was concluded that a main cause of missing bait was scavenging by grey seals, and that they did use above-water vision to locate the buoys. It was also concluded that wind strength (i.e. wave action contributed tothe bait loss. The camera trap buoys had a somewhat lower bait loss than the other buoys (P = 0.054, which was attributed to a scaring effect. Neither the number of seal observations nor the bait loss differed significantly between the 2 study areas in the experiment (P = 0.43 and P = 0.83, respectively. Bait loss was not affected by the buoy colour (red, white, or grey; P = 0.87. We suggest that the findings of this experiment could be put into practice in a seal-disturbed area by deploying a number of decoy buoys, or by hiding live buoys below the surface of the water. This would increase the cost of foraging for the seals, and hence discourage them from exploiting

  14. Modeling and Simulation of a Wave Energy Converter INWAVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Kwan Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available INGINE Inc. developed its own wave energy converter (WEC named INWAVE and has currently installed three prototype modules in Jeju Island, Korea. This device is an on-shore-type WEC that consists of a buoy, pulleys fixed to the sea-floor and a power take off module (PTO. Three ropes are moored tightly on the bottom of the buoy and connected to the PTO via the pulleys, which are moving back and forth according to the motion of the buoy. Since the device can harness wave energy from all six degrees of movement of the buoy, it is possible to extract energy efficiently even under low energy density conditions provided in the coastal areas. In the PTO module, the ratchet gears convert the reciprocating movement of the rope drum into a uni-directional rotation and determine the transmission of power from the relation of the angular velocities between the rope drum and the generator. In this process, the discontinuity of the power transmission occurs and causes the modeling divergence. Therefore, we introduce the concept of the virtual torsion spring in order to prevent the impact error in the ratchet gear module, thereby completing the PTO modeling. In this paper, we deal with dynamic analysis in the time domain, based on Newtonian mechanics and linear wave theory. We derive the combined dynamics of the buoy and PTO modules via geometric relation between the buoy and mooring ropes, then suggest the ratchet gear mechanism with the virtual torsion spring element to reduce the dynamic errors during the phase transitions. Time domain simulation is carried out under irregular waves that reflect the actual wave states of the installation area, and we evaluate the theoretical performance using the capture width ratio.

  15. Design of a Low-cost Oil Spill Tracking Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Hu, X.; Yu, F.; Dong, S.; Chen, G.

    2017-12-01

    As the rapid development of oil exploitation and transportation, oil spill accidents, such as Prestige oil spill, Gulf of Mexico oil spill accident and so on, happened frequently in recent years which would result in long-term damage to the environment and human life. It would be helpful for rescue operation if we can locate the oil slick diffusion area in real time. Equipped with GNSS system, current tracking buoys(CTB), such as Lagrangian drifting buoy, Surface Velocity Program (SVP) drifter, iSLDMB (Iridium self locating datum marker buoy) and Argosphere buoy, have been used as oil tracking buoy in oil slick observation and as validation tools for oil spill simulation. However, surface wind could affect the movement of oil slick, which couldn't be reflected by CTB, thus the oil spill tracking performance is limited. Here, we proposed an novel oil spill tracking buoy (OSTB) which has a low cost of less than $140 and is equipped with Beidou positioning module and sails to track oil slick. Based on hydrodynamic equilibrium model and ocean dynamic analysis, the wind sails and water sails are designed to be adjustable according to different marine conditions to improve tracking efficiency. Quick release device is designed to assure easy deployment from air or ship. Sea experiment was carried out in Jiaozhou Bay, Northern China. OSTB, SVP, iSLDMB, Argosphere buoy and a piece of oil-simulated rubber sheet were deployed at the same time. Meanwhile, oil spill simulation model GNOME (general NOAA operational modeling environment) was configured with the wind and current field, which were collected by an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) mounted with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) and wind speed and direction sensors. Experimental results show that the OSTB has better relevance with rubber sheet and GNOME simulation results, which validate the oil tracking ability of OSTB. With low cost and easy deployment, OSTB provides an effective way for oil spill numerical

  16. Directionality and spread of shallow water waves along the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anoop, T.R.

    , at http://www.cdc.noaa.gov/. 4 Results and discussions 4.1 Wave directional spreading For long-crested waves, the value of directional width is 0◦, and as the waves become short-crested, the value increases and the wave directional spreading increases...

  17. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gricius, Gediminas; Drungilas, Darius; Andziulis, Arunas; Dzemydiene, Dale; Voznak, Miroslav; Kurmis, Mindaugas; Jakovlev, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys), which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  18. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Gricius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys, which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  19. Incident Wave Climate at the OWC Pico Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Crom, I.; Cabrera Bermejo, H.; Pecher, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to retrieve the incident wave information that coincides with former Pico plant operation periods. The recent implementation of a directional pressure sensor for wave measurement as well as the recovery of the data gathered by a directional wave rider buoy allowed embarkin...... on the validation of two different models by using both wave measurements: a model for wave propagation (SWAN) and an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). This paper, as a first step of a comprehensive study, leads to several recommendations to improve both methodologies in future works....

  20. Estimation of excitation forces for wave energy converters control using pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkhalik, O.; Zou, S.; Robinett, R.; Bacelli, G.; Wilson, D.

    2017-08-01

    Most control algorithms of wave energy converters require prediction of wave elevation or excitation force for a short future horizon, to compute the control in an optimal sense. This paper presents an approach that requires the estimation of the excitation force and its derivatives at present time with no need for prediction. An extended Kalman filter is implemented to estimate the excitation force. The measurements in this approach are selected to be the pressures at discrete points on the buoy surface, in addition to the buoy heave position. The pressures on the buoy surface are more directly related to the excitation force on the buoy as opposed to wave elevation in front of the buoy. These pressure measurements are also more accurate and easier to obtain. A singular arc control is implemented to compute the steady-state control using the estimated excitation force. The estimated excitation force is expressed in the Laplace domain and substituted in the control, before the latter is transformed to the time domain. Numerical simulations are presented for a Bretschneider wave case study.

  1. Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E; Haller, Merrick C; Ozkan-Haller, H Tuba

    2013-01-26

    This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys' that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate

  2. Physical measurements of breaking wave impact on a floating wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Martyn R.; Greaves, Deborah M.; Raby, Alison

    2013-04-01

    Marine energy converter must both efficiently extract energy in small to moderate seas and also successfully survive storms and potential collisions. Extreme loads on devices are therefore an important consideration in their design process. X-MED is a SuperGen UKCMER project and is a collaboration between the Universities of Manchester, Edinburgh and Plymouth and the Scottish Association for Marine Sciences. Its objective is to extend the knowledge of extreme loads due to waves, currents, flotsam and mammal impacts. Plymouth Universities contribution to the X-MED project involves measuring the loading and response of a taut moored floating body due to steep and breaking wave impacts, in both long crested and directional sea states. These measurements are then to be reproduced in STAR-CCM+, a commercial volume of fluid CFD solver, so as to develop techniques to predict the wave loading on wave energy converters. The measurements presented here were conducted in Plymouth Universities newly opened COAST laboratories 35m long, 15.5m wide and 3m deep ocean basin. A 0.5m diameter taut moored hemispherical buoy was used to represent a floating wave energy device or support structure. The changes in the buoys 6 degree of freedom motion and mooring loads are presented due to focused breaking wave impacts, with the breaking point of the wave changed relative to the buoy.

  3. Direct-current nanogenerator driven by ultrasonic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong; Song, Jinhui; Liu, Jin; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2007-04-06

    We have developed a nanowire nanogenerator that is driven by an ultrasonic wave to produce continuous direct-current output. The nanogenerator was fabricated with vertically aligned zinc oxide nanowire arrays that were placed beneath a zigzag metal electrode with a small gap. The wave drives the electrode up and down to bend and/or vibrate the nanowires. A piezoelectric-semiconducting coupling process converts mechanical energy into electricity. The zigzag electrode acts as an array of parallel integrated metal tips that simultaneously and continuously create, collect, and output electricity from all of the nanowires. The approach presents an adaptable, mobile, and cost-effective technology for harvesting energy from the environment, and it offers a potential solution for powering nanodevices and nanosystems.

  4. Thermal Cracking in Westerly Granite Monitored Using Direct Wave Velocity, Coda Wave Interferometry, and Acoustic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, L.; Lengliné, O.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Schmittbuhl, J.

    2018-03-01

    To monitor both the permanent (thermal microcracking) and the nonpermanent (thermo-elastic) effects of temperature on Westerly Granite, we combine acoustic emission monitoring and ultrasonic velocity measurements at ambient pressure during three heating and cooling cycles to a maximum temperature of 450°C. For the velocity measurements we use both P wave direct traveltime and coda wave interferometry techniques, the latter being more sensitive to changes in S wave velocity. During the first cycle, we observe a high acoustic emission rate and large—and mostly permanent—apparent reductions in velocity with temperature (P wave velocity is reduced by 50% of the initial value at 450°C, and 40% upon cooling). Our measurements are indicative of extensive thermal microcracking during the first cycle, predominantly during the heating phase. During the second cycle we observe further—but reduced—microcracking, and less still during the third cycle, where the apparent decrease in velocity with temperature is near reversible (at 450°C, the P wave velocity is decreased by roughly 10% of the initial velocity). Our results, relevant for thermally dynamic environments such as geothermal reservoirs, highlight the value of performing measurements of rock properties under in situ temperature conditions.

  5. The Direct Digital Modulation of Traveling Wave Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhamohan, Ranjan S.

    2004-01-01

    Traveling wave tube (TWT) technology, first described by Rudolf Kompfner in the early 1940s, has been a key component of space missions from the earliest communication satellites in the 1960s to the Cassini probe today. TWTs are essentially signal amplifiers that have the special capability of operating at microwave frequencies. The microwave frequency range, which spans from approximately 500 MHz to 300 GHz, is shared by many technologies including cellular phones, satellite television, space communication, and radar. TWT devices are superior in reliability, weight, and efficiency to solid-state amplifiers at the high power and frequency levels required for most space missions. TWTs have three main components -an electron gun, slow wave structure, and collector. The electron gun generates an electron beam that moves along the length of the tube axis, inside of the slow wave circuit. At the same time, the inputted signal is slowed by its travel through the coils of the helical slow wave circuit. The interaction of the electron beam and this slowed signal produces a transfer of kinetic energy to the signal, and in turn, amplification. At the end of its travel, the spent electron beam moves into the collector where its remaining energy is dissipated as heat or harnessed for reuse. TWTs can easily produce gains in the tens of decibels, numbers that are suitable for space missions. To date, however, TWTs have typically operated at fixed levels of gain. This gain is determined by various, unchanging, physical factors of the tube. Traditionally, to achieve varying gain, an input signal s amplitude has had to first be modulated by a separate device before being fed into the TWT. This is not always desirable, as significant distortion can occur in certain situations. My mentor, Mr. Dale Force, has proposed an innovative solution to this problem called direct digital modulation . The testing and implementation of this solution is the focus of my summer internship. The

  6. FOULING ORGANISMS OF BUOYS WITHIN MAKHACHKALA SEAPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Imachova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is investigated biofouling buoys within Makhachkala seaport. Seasonal dynamics of development of community, structure species and trophic structure is revealed. It is established vertical zonality in distribution of fouling.

  7. Directional radiative cooling thermal compensation for gravitational wave interferometer mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justin Kamp, Carl [Department of Chemical Reaction Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goteborg (Sweden)], E-mail: carl.kamp@chalmers.se; Kawamura, Hinata [Yokoyama Junior High School, Sanda, Hachioji, Tokyo 193-0832 (Japan); Passaquieti, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Universita' di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); DeSalvo, Riccardo [LIGO Observatories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-08-21

    The concept of utilizing directional radiative cooling to correct the problem of thermal lensing in the mirrors of the LIGO/VIRGO gravitational wave detectors has been shown and has prospects for future use. Two different designs utilizing this concept, referred to as the baffled and parabolic mirror solutions, have been proposed with different means of controlling the cooling power. The technique takes advantage of the power naturally radiated by the mirror surfaces at room temperature to prevent their heating by the powerful stored laser beams. The baffled solution has been simulated via COMSOL Multiphysics as a design tool. Finally, the parabolic mirror concept was experimentally validated with the results falling in close agreement with theoretical cooling calculations. The technique of directional radiative thermal correction can be reversed to image heat rings on the mirrors periphery to remotely and dynamically correct their radius of curvature without subjecting the mirror to relevant perturbations.

  8. Bayesian inference of earthquake parameters from buoy data using a polynomial chaos-based surrogate

    KAUST Repository

    Giraldi, Loic; Le Maî tre, Olivier P.; Mandli, Kyle T.; Dawson, Clint N.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Knio, Omar

    2017-01-01

    on polynomial chaos expansion to construct a surrogate model of the wave height at the buoy location. A correlated noise model is first proposed in order to represent the discrepancy between the computational model and the data. This step is necessary, as a

  9. Directional Emission from Dielectric Leaky-Wave Nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Manuel; Hildebrandt, Andre; Schlickriede, Christian; Gharib, Kimia; Zentgraf, Thomas; Förstner, Jens; Linden, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    An important source of innovation in nanophotonics is the idea to scale down known radio wave technologies to the optical regime. One thoroughly investigated example of this approach are metallic nanoantennas which employ plasmonic resonances to couple localized emitters to selected far-field modes. While metals can be treated as perfect conductors in the microwave regime, their response becomes Drude-like at optical frequencies. Thus, plasmonic nanoantennas are inherently lossy. Moreover, their resonant nature requires precise control of the antenna geometry. A promising way to circumvent these problems is the use of broadband nanoantennas made from low-loss dielectric materials. Here, we report on highly directional emission from active dielectric leaky-wave nanoantennas made of Hafnium dioxide. Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots deposited in the nanoantenna feed gap serve as a local light source. The emission patterns of active nanoantennas with different sizes are measured by Fourier imaging. We find for all antenna sizes a highly directional emission, underlining the broadband operation of our design.

  10. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  11. Wave Energy, Lever Operated Pivoting Float LOPF Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia

    The fully instrumented Resen Waves Lever Operated Pivoting Float LOPF wave energy buoy model has gone through the first stage of testing in regular waves in scale 1:25 of the North Sea wave conditions, in the 3D deep wave basin at the Hydraulic and Coastal Engineering Laboratory of Aalborg...... University in Denmark. The model size was 60cm W x 90cm L x 21cm H. The 60 cm width pointed towards the wave front. The LOPF buoy is characterized by a simple mechanical design with few moving parts and direct electrical output and it is taut moored to the sea bed, so all forces are referenced to the seabed...... for maximum energy output in regular as well as irregular waves. During storms the buoy pivots and streamlines itself to minimize loads on the mooring line. A conservative estimate shows that a full scale system for North Sea conditions has a float size width of 15 m that will, with 60% generator efficiency...

  12. Versatile directional searches for gravitational waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Zhu, X.-J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Wang, J. B.; Tiburzi, C.; Manchester, R. N.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wen, L.; You, X.

    2016-02-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straightforward technique by which a PTA can be `phased-up' to form time series of the two polarization modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodelled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power from any direction. For the lines of sight to several nearby massive galaxy clusters, we carry out a more detailed search for GW bursts with memory, which are distinct signatures of SMBHB mergers. In all cases, we find that the data are consistent with noise.

  13. Directional wave measurements off Navinal, Gulf of Kachchh, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; KrishnaKumar, V.; Suryanarayana, A.; Antony, M.K.; Swamy, G.N.

    .54 m respectively. Though large wave heights of the order of 3 to 4m exist elsewhere along the west coast of India during these seasons, Navinal seems to be a less wave active zone because of its geographical location. Maximum wave energy is centred...

  14. Analysis of wave directional spreading using neural networks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deo, M.C.; Gondane, D.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    describes how a representative spreading parameter could be arrived at from easily available wave parameters such as significant wave height and average zero-cross wave period, using the technique of neural networks. It is shown that training of the network...

  15. Boring and Sealing Rock with Directed Energy Millimeter-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H. H.; Oglesby, K.

    2015-12-01

    Millimeter-wave directed energy is being investigated to penetrate into deep crystalline basement rock formations to lower well costs and to melt rocks, metals, and other additives to seal wells for applications that include nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy. Laboratory tests have established that intense millimeter-wave (MMW) beams > 1 kW/cm2 can melt and/ or vaporize hard crystalline rocks. In principle this will make it possible to create open boreholes and a method to seal them with a glass/ceramic liner and plug formed from the original rock or with other materials. A 10 kW, 28 GHz commercial (CPI) gyrotron system with a launched beam diameter of about 32 mm was used to heat basalt, granite, limestone, and sandstone specimens to temperatures over 2500 °C to create melts and holes. A calibrated 137 GHz radiometer view, collinear with the heating beam, monitored real time peak rock temperature. A water load surrounding the rock test specimen primarily monitored unabsorbed power at 28 GHz. Power balance analysis of the laboratory observations shows that the temperature rise is limited by radiative heat loss, which would be expected to be trapped in a borehole. The analysis also indicates that the emissivity (absorption efficiency) in the radiated infrared range is lower than the emissivity at 28 GHz, giving the MMW frequency range an important advantage for rock melting. Strength tests on one granite type indicated that heating the rock initially weakens it, but with exposure to higher temperatures the resolidified black glassy product regains strength. Basalt was the easiest to melt and penetrate, if a melt leak path was provided, because of its low viscosity. Full beam holes up to about 50 mm diameter (diffraction increased beam size) were achieved through 30 mm thick basalt and granite specimens. Laboratory experiments to form a seal in an existing hole have also been carried out by melting rock and a simulated steel casing.

  16. Oceanographic measurements from the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Texas Automated Buoy System contains daily oceanographic measurements from seven buoys off the Texas coast from Brownsville to Sabine. The Texas General Land...

  17. IABP Drifting Buoy Pressure, Temperature, Position, and Interpolated Ice Velocity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) maintains a network of drifting buoys to provide meteorological and oceanographic data for real-time operational...

  18. Springing Response Due to Directional Wave Field Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the wave-induced high-frequency bending moment response of ships, denoted springing. The aim is to predict measured severe springing responses in a large bulk carrier. It is shown that the most important springing contribution is due to the resultant second order excitation...... in multidirectional sea. The incident pressure field from the second order bidirectional wave field is derived, including the non-linear cross-coupling terms between the two wave systems (e.g. wind driven waves and swell). The resulting effect of the super-harmonic cross-coupling interaction terms on the springing...... response is discussed. An example with opposing waves is given, representing probably the 'worst' case for energy exchange between the wave systems. Theoretical predictions of standard deviation of wave- and springing-induced stress amidships are compared with full-scale measurements for a bulk carrier....

  19. Direct measurement of the plasma response to electrostatic ion waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfaty, M.; DeSouza-Machado, S.; Skiff, F.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma wave-wave and wave-particle interactions are studied in a linear magnetized plasma. The relatively quiet plasma is produced by an argon gas-discharge. The plasma density is n e ≅ 10 9 cm -3 and the electron/ion temperatures are T e ≅ 5eV and T i = 0.05eV. A grid and a four ring antenna, both mounted on a scanning carriage, are used to launch electrostatic ion waves in the plasma. Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements of both the linear and the nonlinear plasma response to the wave fields are presented. The Vlasov-Poisson equations are used to explain the measured zero, first and second order terms of the ion distribution function in the presence of wave fields. In addition to the broadening (heating) of the ion distribution as the authors increase the wave amplitudes, induced plasma flows are observed both along and across the magnetic field

  20. United States Naval Academy Polar Science Program's Visual Arctic Observing Buoys; The IceGoat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. E.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Nghiem, S. V.; Rigor, I.; Valentic, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Naval Academy Oceanography Department currently has a curriculum based Polar Science Program (USNA PSP). Within the PSP there is an Arctic Buoy Program (ABP) student research component that will include the design, build, testing and deployment of Arctic Buoys. Establishing an active, field-research program in Polar Science will greatly enhance Midshipman education and research, as well as introduce future Naval Officers to the Arctic environment. The Oceanography Department has engaged the USNA Ocean Engineering, Systems Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, and Computer Science Departments and developed a USNA Visual Arctic Observing Buoy, IceGoat1, which was designed, built, and deployed by midshipmen. The experience gained through Polar field studies and data derived from these buoys will be used to enhance course materials and laboratories and will also be used directly in Midshipman independent research projects. The USNA PSP successfully deployed IceGoat1 during the BROMEX 2012 field campaign out of Barrow, AK in March 2012. This buoy reports near real-time observation of Air Temperature, Sea Temperature, Atmospheric Pressure, Position and Images from 2 mounted webcams. The importance of this unique type of buoy being inserted into the U.S. Interagency Arctic Buoy Program and the International Arctic Buoy Programme (USIABP/IABP) array is cross validating satellite observations of sea ice cover in the Arctic with the buoys webcams. We also propose to develop multiple sensor packages for the IceGoat to include a more robust weather suite, and a passive acoustic hydrophone. Remote cameras on buoys have provided crucial qualitative information that complements the quantitative measurements of geophysical parameters. For example, the mechanical anemometers on the IABP Polar Arctic Weather Station at the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) have at times reported zero winds speeds, and inspection of the images from the NPEO cameras have showed

  1. Dynamic selection of ship responses for estimation of on-site directional wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Storhaug, Gaute

    2012-01-01

    -estimate of the wave spectrum is suggested. The selection method needs to be robust for what reason a parameterised uni-directional, two-parameter wave spectrum is treated. The parameters included are the zero up-crossing period, the significant wave height and the main wave direction relative to the ship’s heading...... with the best overall agreement are selected for the actual estimation of the directional wave spectrum. The transfer functions for the ship responses can be determined using different computational methods such as striptheory, 3D panel codes, closed form expressions or model tests. The uncertainty associated......Knowledge of the wave environment in which a ship is operating is crucial for most on-board decision support systems. Previous research has shown that the directional wave spectrum can be estimated by the use of measured global ship responses and a set of transfer functions determined...

  2. Quantum analysis of the direct measurement of light waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldanha, Pablo L

    2014-01-01

    In a beautiful experiment performed about a decade ago, Goulielmakis et al (2004 Science 305 1267–69) made a direct measurement of the electric field of light waves. However, they used a laser source to produce the light field, whose quantum state has a null expectation value for the electric field operator, so how was it possible to measure this electric field? Here we present a quantum treatment for the f:2f interferometer used to calibrate the carrier–envelope phase of the light pulses in the experiment. We show how the special nonlinear features of the f:2f interferometer can change the quantum state of the electromagnetic field inside the laser cavity to a state with a definite oscillating electric field, explaining how the ‘classical’ electromagnetic field emerges in the experiment. We discuss that this experiment was, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of an absolute coherent superposition of different photon number states in the optical regime. (paper)

  3. Transverse wave propagation in [ab0] direction of silicon single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Sang Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Se Ho; Kim, Young H. [Applied Acoustics Lab, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The speed and oscillation directions of elastic waves propagating in the [ab0] direction of a silicon single crystal were obtained by solving Christoffel's equation. It was found that the quasi waves propagate in the off-principal axis, and hence, the directions of the phase and group velocities are not the same. The maximum deviation of the two directions was 7.2 degree angle. Two modes of the pure transverse waves propagate in the [110] direction with different speeds, and hence, two peaks were observed in the pulse echo signal. The amplitude ratio of the two peaks was dependent on the initial oscillating direction of the incident wave. The pure and quasi-transverse waves propagate in the [210] direction, and the oscillation directions of these waves are perpendicular to each other. The skewing angle of the quasi wave was calculated as 7.14 degree angle, and it was measured as 9.76 degree angle. The amplitude decomposition in the [210] direction was similar to that in the [110] direction, since the oscillation directions of these waves are perpendicular to each other. These results offer useful information in measuring the crystal orientation of the silicon single crystal.

  4. Pacific Ocean buoy temperature date - TAO/TRITON database & National Buoy Data Center database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pacific Ocean buoy temperature data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Carbone, F., M. Landis, C.N. Gencarelli, A. Naccarato, F. Sprovieri,...

  5. Directional Absorption of Parameterized Mountain Waves and Its Influence on the Wave Momentum Transport in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Tang, Ying; Wang, Yuan; Xue, Ming

    2018-03-01

    The directional absorption of mountain waves in the Northern Hemisphere is assessed by examination of horizontal wind rotation using the 2.5° × 2.5° European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim reanalysis between 2011 and 2016. In the deep layer of troposphere and stratosphere, the horizontal wind rotates by more than 120° all over the Northern Hemisphere primary mountainous areas, with the rotation mainly occurring in the troposphere (stratosphere) of lower (middle to high) latitudes. The rotation of tropospheric wind increases markedly in summer over the Tibetan Plateau and Iranian Plateau, due to the influence of Asian summer monsoonal circulation. The influence of directional absorption of mountain waves on the mountain wave momentum transport is also studied using a new parameterization scheme of orographic gravity wave drag (OGWD) which accounts for the effect of directional wind shear. Owing to the directional absorption, the wave momentum flux is attenuated by more than 50% in the troposphere of lower latitudes, producing considerable orographic gravity wave lift which is normal to the mean wind. Compared with the OGWD produced in traditional schemes assuming a unidirectional wind profile, the OGWD in the new scheme is suppressed in the lower stratosphere but enhanced in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. This is because the directional absorption of mountain waves in the troposphere reduces the wave amplitude in the stratosphere. Consequently, mountain waves are prone to break at higher altitudes, which favors the production of stronger OGWD given the decrease of air density with height.

  6. Direct excitation of a high frequency wave by a low frequency wave in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayasu

    1993-01-01

    A new mechanism is presented of an excitation of a high frequency wave by a low frequency wave in a plasma. This mechanism works when the low frequency wave varies in time in a manner deviated from a usual periodic motion with a constant amplitude. The conversion rate is usually not large but the conversion is done without time delay after the variation of the low frequency wave. The Manley Rowe relation in the usual sense does not hold in this mechanism. This mechanism can excite also waves with same or lower frequencies. (author)

  7. Drifting buoy data collected by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) in oceans world-wide from 1984-05-01 to 1998-10-27

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains drifting buoy data collected from May 1984 through October 1998 from buoys deployed by the National Data Buoy Center, Stennis Space Center,...

  8. Experimental results of rectification and filtration from an offshore wave energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, C.; Staalberg, M.; Thorburn, K.; Leijon, M. [Swedish Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion, Division for Electricity Research, Department of Engineering Science, Uppsala University, Box 534, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Lejerskog, E. [Seabased Industry AB, Dag Hammarskjoelds vaeg 52b, 75183 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-05-15

    The present paper presents results from a wave energy conversion that is based on a direct drive linear generator. The linear generator is placed on the seabed and connected to a buoy via a rope. Thereby, the natural wave motion is transferred to the translator by the buoy motion. When using direct drive generators, voltage and current output will have varying frequency and varying amplitude and the power must be converted before a grid connection. The electrical system is therefore an important part to study in the complete conversion system from wave energy to grid connected power. This paper will bring up the first steps in the conversion: rectification and filtration of the power. Both simulation studies and offshore experiments have been made. The results indicate that this kind of system works in a satisfactory way and a smooth DC power can be achieved with one linear generator. (author)

  9. Wave-particle energy exchange directly observed in a kinetic Alfvén-branch wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J; F-Viñas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C; Boardsen, Scott A; Avanov, Levon A; Bellan, Paul M; Schwartz, Steven J; Lavraud, Benoit; Coffey, Victoria N; Chandler, Michael O; Saito, Yoshifumi; Paterson, William R; Fuselier, Stephen A; Ergun, Robert E; Strangeway, Robert J; Russell, Christopher T; Giles, Barbara L; Pollock, Craig J; Torbert, Roy B; Burch, James L

    2017-03-31

    Alfvén waves are fundamental plasma wave modes that permeate the universe. At small kinetic scales, they provide a critical mechanism for the transfer of energy between electromagnetic fields and charged particles. These waves are important not only in planetary magnetospheres, heliospheres and astrophysical systems but also in laboratory plasma experiments and fusion reactors. Through measurement of charged particles and electromagnetic fields with NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we utilize Earth's magnetosphere as a plasma physics laboratory. Here we confirm the conservative energy exchange between the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the charged particles that comprise an undamped kinetic Alfvén wave. Electrons confined between adjacent wave peaks may have contributed to saturation of damping effects via nonlinear particle trapping. The investigation of these detailed wave dynamics has been unexplored territory in experimental plasma physics and is only recently enabled by high-resolution MMS observations.

  10. Wave-Particle Energy Exchange Directly Observed in a Kinetic Alfven-Branch Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; F-Vinas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C.; Boardsen, Scott A. (Inventor); Avanov, Levon A.; Bellan, Paul M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Lavraud, Benoit; Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Alfven waves are fundamental plasma wave modes that permeate the universe. At small kinetic scales they provide a critical mechanism for the transfer of energy between electromagnetic fields and charged particles. These waves are important not only in planetary magnetospheres, heliospheres, and astrophysical systems, but also in laboratory plasma experiments and fusion reactors. Through measurement of charged particles and electromagnetic fields with NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we utilize Earths magnetosphere as a plasma physics laboratory. Here we confirm the conservative energy exchange between the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the charged particles that comprise an undamped kinetic Alfven wave. Electrons confined between adjacent wave peaks may have contributed to saturation of damping effects via non-linear particle trapping. The investigation of these detailed wave dynamics has been unexplored territory in experimental plasma physics and is only recently enabled by high-resolution MMS observations.

  11. Numerical simulation of multi-directional random wave transformation in a yacht port

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qiaoling; Dong, Sheng; Zhao, Xizeng; Zhang, Guowei

    2012-09-01

    This paper extends a prediction model for multi-directional random wave transformation based on an energy balance equation by Mase with the consideration of wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection and breaking. This numerical model is improved by 1) introducing Wen's frequency spectrum and Mitsuyasu's directional function, which are more suitable to the coastal area of China; 2) considering energy dissipation caused by bottom friction, which ensures more accurate results for large-scale and shallow water areas; 3) taking into account a non-linear dispersion relation. Predictions using the extended wave model are carried out to study the feasibility of constructing the Ai Hua yacht port in Qingdao, China, with a comparison between two port layouts in design. Wave fields inside the port for different incident wave directions, water levels and return periods are simulated, and then two kinds of parameters are calculated to evaluate the wave conditions for the two layouts. Analyses show that Layout I is better than Layout II. Calculation results also show that the harbor will be calm for different wave directions under the design water level. On the contrary, the wave conditions do not wholly meet the requirements of a yacht port for ship berthing under the extreme water level. For safety consideration, the elevation of the breakwater might need to be properly increased to prevent wave overtopping under such water level. The extended numerical simulation model may provide an effective approach to computing wave heights in a harbor.

  12. The June 2016 Australian East Coast Low: Importance of Wave Direction for Coastal Erosion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Mortlock

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In June 2016, an unusual East Coast Low storm affected some 2000 km of the eastern seaboard of Australia bringing heavy rain, strong winds and powerful wave conditions. While wave heights offshore of Sydney were not exceptional, nearshore wave conditions were such that beaches experienced some of the worst erosion in 40 years. Hydrodynamic modelling of wave and current behaviour as well as contemporaneous sand transport shows the east to north-east storm wave direction to be the major determinant of erosion magnitude. This arises because of reduced energy attenuation across the continental shelf and the focussing of wave energy on coastal sections not equilibrated with such wave exposure under the prevailing south-easterly wave climate. Narrabeen–Collaroy, a well-known erosion hot spot on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, is shown to be particularly vulnerable to storms from this direction because the destructive erosion potential is amplified by the influence of the local embayment geometry. We demonstrate the magnified erosion response that occurs when there is bi-directionality between an extreme wave event and preceding modal conditions and the importance of considering wave direction in extreme value analyses.

  13. Wave Energy from the North Sea: Experiences from the Lysekil Research Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijon, Mats; Boström, Cecilia; Danielsson, Oskar; Gustafsson, Stefan; Haikonen, Kalle; Langhamer, Olivia; Strömstedt, Erland; Stålberg, Magnus; Sundberg, Jan; Svensson, Olle; Tyrberg, Simon; Waters, Rafael

    2008-05-01

    This paper provides a status update on the development of the Swedish wave energy research area located close to Lysekil on the Swedish West coast. The Lysekil project is run by the Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion at Uppsala University. The project was started in 2004 and currently has permission to run until the end of 2013. During this time period 10 grid-connected wave energy converters, 30 buoys for studies on environmental impact, and a surveillance tower for monitoring the interaction between waves and converters will be installed and studied. To date the research area holds one complete wave energy converter connected to a measuring station on shore via a sea cable, a Wave Rider™ buoy for wave measurements, 25 buoys for studies on environmental impact, and a surveillance tower. The wave energy converter is based on a linear synchronous generator which is placed on the sea bed and driven by a heaving point absorber at the ocean surface. The converter is directly driven, i.e. it has no gearbox or other mechanical or hydraulic conversion system. This results in a simple and robust mechanical system, but also in a somewhat more complicated electrical system.

  14. A traveling wave direct energy converter for a D-3He fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Katayama, H.; Miyawaki, F.; Tajima, T.

    1994-01-01

    A concept of a traveling wave direct energy converter (TWDEC) is developed for 14.7-MeV fusion protons based on the principle of a backward wave oscillator. Separation of fusion protons from thermal ions is accomplished by using ExB ion drift. Energy conversion rate up to 0.87 is attained by applying three-stage modulation of the proton beam. A one-dimensional particle-circuit code is developed to examine self-excitation of the traveling wave and its stability under loading. Electrostatic wave with a fixed frequency is excited spontaneously, and stability of the wave is ensured under loading. (author)

  15. Aeroacoustic directivity via wave-packet analysis of mean or base flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edstrand, Adam; Schmid, Peter; Cattafesta, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Noise pollution is an ever-increasing problem in society, and knowledge of the directivity patterns of the sound radiation is required for prediction and control. Directivity is frequently determined through costly numerical simulations of the flow field combined with an acoustic analogy. We introduce a new computationally efficient method of finding directivity for a given mean or base flow field using wave-packet analysis (Trefethen, PRSA 2005). Wave-packet analysis approximates the eigenvalue spectrum with spectral accuracy by modeling the eigenfunctions as wave packets. With the wave packets determined, we then follow the method of Obrist (JFM, 2009), which uses Lighthill's acoustic analogy to determine the far-field sound radiation and directivity of wave-packet modes. We apply this method to a canonical jet flow (Gudmundsson and Colonius, JFM 2011) and determine the directivity of potentially unstable wave packets. Furthermore, we generalize the method to consider a three-dimensional flow field of a trailing vortex wake. In summary, we approximate the disturbances as wave packets and extract the directivity from the wave-packet approximation in a fraction of the time of standard aeroacoustic solvers. ONR Grant N00014-15-1-2403.

  16. Direct excitation of resonant torsional Alfven waves by footpoint motions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruderman, M. S.; Berghmans, D.; Goossens, M.; Poedts, S.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper studies the heating of coronal loops by linear resonant Alfven waves that are excited by the motions of the photospheric footpoints of the magnetic field lines. The analysis is restricted to torsionally polarised footpoint motions in an axially symmetric system so that only

  17. Fatigue Life Prediction of the Keel Structure of a Tsunami Buoy Using Spectral Fatigue Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Yustiawan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One  of  the  components  of  the  Indonesia  Tsunami  Early  Warning  System  (InaTEWS  is  a  surface  buoy.  The  surface buoy  is  exposed  to  dynamic  and  random  loadings  while  operating  at  sea,  particularly  due  to  waves.  Because  of  the cyclic  nature  of  the  wave  load,  this  may  result  in  a fatigue  damage  of  the  keel  structure,  which  connects  the  mooring line  with  the  buoy  hull.  The  operating  location  of  the buoy  is  off  the  Java  South  Coast  at  the  coordinate (10.3998  S, 108.3417  E. To  determine  the  stress  transfer  function, model  tests  were  performed,  measuring  the  buoy  motions  and the stress at the mooring line. A spectral fatigue analysis method is applied for the purpose of estimating the fatigue life of the keel structure. Utilizing the  model-test results, the S-N curve obtained in a previous study and the  wave data at the buoy location, it is found that the fatigue life of the keel structure is approximately 11 years.

  18. Wave directional spreading at shallow and intermediate depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.

    . The spectrum computed from measured data shows that Scott spectrum approximates the observations in a fairly satisfactory way. A comparative study was carried out based on the directional spectrum estimated from Fourier coefficients and the model directional...

  19. Scalable Directed Self-Assembly Using Ultrasound Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-04

    the practical implementation of ultrasound DSA as a manufacturing technique requires linking the transducer arrangement and settings that generate ...function generator (Tektronix, AFG 3102), amplified by a 45 dB 50 W RF power amplifier (Electronic Navigation Industries, 440LA). Cross-linking of the...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We aim to understand how ultrasound waves can be used to create organized patterns of nanoparticles in a host medium such

  20. Design and Experiment Analysis of a Direct-Drive Wave Energy Converter with a Linear Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Zhang; Haitao Yu; Zhenchuan Shi

    2018-01-01

    Coastal waves are an abundant nonpolluting and renewable energy source. A wave energy converter (WEC) must be designed for efficient and steady operation in highly energetic ocean environments. A direct-drive wave energy conversion (D-DWEC) system with a tubular permanent magnet linear generator (TPMLG) on a wind and solar photovoltaic complementary energy generation platform is proposed to improve the conversion efficiency and reduce the complexity and device volume of WECs. The operating pr...

  1. A Rational Procedure for Determination of Directional Individual Design Wave Heights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sterndorff, M.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2001-01-01

    For code-based LRFD and for reliability-based assessment of offshore structures such as steel platforms it is essential that consistent directional and omnidirectional probability distributions for the maximum significant wave height, the maximum individual wave height, and the maximum individual...

  2. EXACT SOLITARY WAVE SOLUTIONS TO A CLASS OF NONLINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS USING DIRECT ALGEBRAIC METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Using direct algebraic method,exact solitary wave solutions are performed for a class of third order nonlinear dispersive disipative partial differential equations. These solutions are obtained under certain conditions for the relationship between the coefficients of the equation. The exact solitary waves of this class are rational functions of real exponentials of kink-type solutions.

  3. Mathematical model of snake-type multi-directional wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muarif; Halfiani, Vera; Rusdiana, Siti; Munzir, Said; Ramli, Marwan

    2018-01-01

    Research on extreme wave generation is one intensive research on water wave study because the fact that the occurrence of this wave in the ocean can cause serious damage to the ships and offshore structures. One method to be used to generate the wave is self-correcting. This method controls the signal on the wavemakers in a wave tank. Some studies also consider the nonlinear wave generation in a wave tank by using numerical approach. Study on wave generation is essential in the effectiveness and efficiency of offshore structure model testing before it can be operated in the ocean. Generally, there are two types of wavemakers implemented in the hydrodynamic laboratory, piston-type and flap-type. The flap-type is preferred to conduct a testing to a ship in deep water. Single flap wavemaker has been explained in many studies yet snake-type wavemaker (has more than one flap) is still a case needed to be examined. Hence, the formulation in controlling the wavemaker need to be precisely analyzed such that the given input can generate the desired wave in the space-limited wave tank. By applying the same analogy and methodhology as the previous study, this article represents multi-directional wave generation by implementing snake-type wavemakers.

  4. Direct Calculation of the Scattering Amplitude Without Partial Wave Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shertzer, J.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two new developments in scattering theory are reported. We show, in a practical way, how one can calculate the full scattering amplitude without invoking a partial wave expansion. First, the integral expression for the scattering amplitude f(theta) is simplified by an analytic integration over the azimuthal angle. Second, the full scattering wavefunction which appears in the integral expression for f(theta) is obtained by solving the Schrodinger equation with the finite element method (FEM). As an example, we calculate electron scattering from the Hartree potential. With minimal computational effort, we obtain accurate and stable results for the scattering amplitude.

  5. Poynting vector and wave vector directions of equatorial chorus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolík, Ondřej; Breuillard, H.; Li, W.; Le Contel, O.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 12 (2016), s. 11912-11928 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31899S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15304 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : whistler-mode waves * Earth 's inner magnetosphere * Van Allen probes * plasmaspheric hiss * magnetic reconnection * outer magnetosphere * source region * emissions * propagation * THEMIS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2016

  6. 3-component beamforming analysis of ambient seismic noise field for Love and Rayleigh wave source directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, Carina; Hadziioannou, Céline

    2014-05-01

    Our knowledge about common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves observed in the microseism band of the ambient seismic noise field is still limited, including the understanding of source locations and source mechanisms. Multi-component array methods are suitable to address this issue. In this work we use a 3-component beamforming algorithm to obtain source directions and polarization states of the ambient seismic noise field within the primary and secondary microseism bands recorded at the Gräfenberg array in southern Germany. The method allows to distinguish between different polarized waves present in the seismic noise field and estimates Love and Rayleigh wave source directions and their seasonal variations using one year of array data. We find mainly coinciding directions for the strongest acting sources of both wave types at the primary microseism and different source directions at the secondary microseism.

  7. Directional spectrum of ocean waves from array measurements using phase/time/path difference methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Wave direction has for the first time been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated from array measurements using the phase/time/path difference (PTPD) methods of Esteva in case of polygonal arrays and Borgman in case of linear arrays...

  8. An improvement of the GPS buoy system for detecting tsunami at far offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kawaguchi, K.; Koshimura, S.; Matsushita, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for detecting a tsunami before its arrival at coasts and thereby mitigating tsunami disaster. The system was first deployed in 1997 for a short period in the Sagami bay, south of Tokyo, for basic experiments, and then deployed off Ofunato city, northeastern part of Japan, for the period 2001-2004. The system was then established at about 13km south of Cape Muroto, southwestern part of Japan, since 2004. Five tsunamis of about 10cm have been observed in these systems, including 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.3), 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3), 2004 Off Kii Peninsula earthquake (Mw7.4), 2010 Chile earthquake (Mw8.8), and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0). These experiments clearly showed that GPS buoy is capable of detecting tsunami with a few centimeter accuracy and can be monitored in near real time by applying an appropriate filter, real-time data transmission using radio and dissemination of obtained records of sea surface height changes through internet. Considering that the system is a powerful tool to monitor sea surface variations due to wind as well as tsunami, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism implemented the system in a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information network for Ports and HArbourS (NOWPHAS) system and deployed the system at 15 sites along the coasts around the Japanese Islands. The system detected the tsunami due to the 11th March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with higher than 6m of tsunami height at the site Off South Iwate (Kamaishi). The Japan Meteorological Agency that was monitoring the record updated the level of the tsunami warning to the greatest value due to the result. Currently, the GPS buoy system uses a RTK-GPS which requires a land base for obtaining precise location of the buoy by a baseline analysis. This algorithm limits the distance of the buoy to, at most, 20km from the coast as the accuracy of positioning gets much worse as the baseline distance becomes longer

  9. A Numerical Implementation of a Nonlinear Mild Slope Model for Shoaling Directional Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Davis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the numerical implementation of a phase-resolving, nonlinear spectral model for shoaling directional waves over a mild sloping beach with straight parallel isobaths. The model accounts for non-linear, quadratic (triad wave interactions as well as shoaling and refraction. The model integrates the coupled, nonlinear hyperbolic evolution equations that describe the transformation of the complex Fourier amplitudes of the deep-water directional wave field. Because typical directional wave spectra (observed or produced by deep-water forecasting models such as WAVEWATCH III™ do not contain phase information, individual realizations are generated by associating a random phase to each Fourier mode. The approach provides a natural extension to the deep-water spectral wave models, and has the advantage of fully describing the shoaling wave stochastic process, i.e., the evolution of both the variance and higher order statistics (phase correlations, the latter related to the evolution of the wave shape. The numerical implementation (a Fortran 95/2003 code includes unidirectional (shore-perpendicular propagation as a special case. Interoperability, both with post-processing programs (e.g., MATLAB/Tecplot 360 and future model coupling (e.g., offshore wave conditions from WAVEWATCH III™, is promoted by using NetCDF-4/HD5 formatted output files. The capabilities of the model are demonstrated using a JONSWAP spectrum with a cos2s directional distribution, for shore-perpendicular and oblique propagation. The simulated wave transformation under combined shoaling, refraction and nonlinear interactions shows the expected generation of directional harmonics of the spectral peak and of infragravity (frequency <0.05 Hz waves. Current development efforts focus on analytic testing, development of additional physics modules essential for applications and validation with laboratory and field observations.

  10. High frequency monitoring of the coastal marine environment using the MAREL buoy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, S; Guillou, J; Tréguer, P; Woerther, P; Delauney, L; Follenfant, E; Gontier, O; Hamon, M; Leilde, B; Masson, A; Tartu, C; Vuillemin, R

    2004-06-01

    The MAREL Iroise data buoy provides physico-chemical measurements acquired in surface marine water in continuous and autonomous mode. The water is pumped 1.5 m from below the surface through a sampling pipe and flows through the measuring cell located in the floating structure. Technological innovations implemented inside the measuring cell atop the buoy allow a continuous cleaning of the sensor, while injection of chloride ions into the circuit prevents biological fouling. Specific sensors for temperature, salinity, oxygen and fluorescence investigated in this paper have been evaluated to guarantee measurement precision over a 3 month period. A bi-directional link under Internet TCP-IP protocols is used for data, alarms and remote-control transmissions with the land-based data centre. Herein, we present a 29 month record for 4 parameters measured using a MAREL buoy moored in a coastal environment (Iroise Sea, Brest, France). The accuracy of the data provided by the buoy is assessed by comparison with measurements of sea water weekly sampled at the same site as part of SOMLIT (Service d'Observation du Milieu LIToral), the French network for monitoring of the coastal environment. Some particular events (impact of intensive fresh water discharges, dynamics of a fast phytoplankton bloom) are also presented, demonstrating the worth of monitoring a highly variable environment with a high frequency continuous reliable system.

  11. Grating-assisted surface acoustic wave directional couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, G.; Griffel, G.; Seidman, A.; Croitoru, N.

    1991-07-01

    Physical properties of novel grating-assisted Y directional couplers are examined using the coupled-mode theory. A general formalism for the analysis of the lateral perturbed directional coupler properties is presented. Explicit expressions for waveguide key parameters such as coupling length, grating period, and other structural characterizations, are obtained. The influence of other physical properties such as time and frequency response or cutoff conditions are also analyzed. A plane grating-assisted directional coupler is presented and examined as a basic component in the integrated acoustic technology.

  12. The directional propagation characteristics of elastic wave in two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jihong; Yu, Dianlong; Wang Gang; Zhao Honggang; Liu Yaozong; Wen Xisen

    2007-01-01

    The directional propagation characteristics of elastic wave during pass bands in two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals are analyzed by using the lumped-mass method to yield the phase constant surface. The directions and regions of wave propagation in phononic crystals for certain frequencies during pass bands are predicted with the iso-frequency contour lines of the phase constant surface, which are then validated with the harmonic responses of a finite two-dimensional thin plate phononic crystals with 16x16 unit cells. These results are useful for controlling the wave propagation in the pass bands of phononic crystals

  13. Slip heterogeneity, body-wave spectra, and directivity of earthquake ruptures

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, P.; Herrero, A.

    1994-01-01

    We present a broadband kinematic model based on a self-similar k-square distribution of the coseismic slip, with an instantaneous rise-time and a constant rupture velocity. The phase of the slip spectrum at high wave number is random. This model generates an ?-squared body-wave radiation, and a particular directivity factor C2d scaling the amplitude of the body-wave spectra, where Cd is the standard directivity factor. Considering the source models with a propagating pulse and a finite rise-t...

  14. Worldwide Buoy Technology Survey. Volume 1. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    1522.2.9.3 The Remearch Instituite Netherlands (3tARIN) 155 2.2.9.4 Marine Analytics .. .. .. .. L.2.9.5 D&"a Sipyards . 157 2.2.10 Norway 2 .2-1.1 ~Ticn Plat...dependents who are in financial distress and a deep sea pilotage authority. It is not a governmental organization but it was created by an act of...hoisting power (t) 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 f FIGURE 2-35 JAPAN’S BUOY jI 91 objectives, financial cutbacks, etc. which is impacting their services. Among

  15. An evaluation of directional analysis techniques for multidirectional, partially reflected waves .1. numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilic, C; Chadwick, A; Helm-Petersen, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    , non-phased locked methods are more appropriate. In this paper, the accuracy of two non-phased locked methods of directional analysis, the maximum likelihood method (MLM) and the Bayesian directional method (BDM) have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical simulations for the case...... of multidirectional waves with partial reflections. It is shown that the results are influenced by the ratio of distance from the reflector (L) to the length of the time series (S) used in the spectral analysis. Both methods are found to be capable of determining the incident and reflective wave fields when US > 0......Recent studies of advanced directional analysis techniques have mainly centred on incident wave fields. In the study of coastal structures, however, partially reflective wave fields are commonly present. In the near structure field, phase locked methods can be successfully applied. In the far field...

  16. The November 2011 irruption of buoy barnacles Dosima fascicularis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buoy barnacles not uncommonly strand in the region attached to feathers, plastic litter and other small objects, but the 2011 irruption saw exceptional numbers of unusually large colonies (average 23.5 individuals; SD 18.5), most of ... Buoy barnacles were first observed at sea off the Cape Peninsula on 2 November 2011.

  17. Wave Energy Converters : An experimental approach to onshore testing, deployments and offshore monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ulvgård, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    The wave energy converter (WEC) concept developed at Uppsala University consists of a point absorbing buoy, directly connected to a permanent magnet linear generator. Since 2006, over a dozen full scale WECs have been deployed at the Lysekil Research Site, on the west coast of Sweden. Beyond the development of the WEC concept itself, the full scale approach enables, and requires, experimental and multidisciplinary research within several peripheral areas, such as instrumentation, offshore ope...

  18. Real time wave measurements and wave hindcasting in deep waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    Deep water waves off Karwar (lat. 14~'45.1'N, long. 73~'34.8'E) at 75 m water depth pertaining to peak monsoon period have been measured using a Datawell waverider buoy. Measured wave data show that the significant wave height (Hs) predominantly...

  19. Influence of hurricane wind field in the structure of directional wave spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Osuna, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Extensive field measurements of wind waves in deep waters in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, have been analyzed to describe the spatial structure of directional wave spectra during hurricane conditions. Following Esquivel-Trava et al. (2015) this analysis was made for minor hurricanes (categories 1 and 2) and major hurricanes (categories 3, 4 and 5). In both cases the directionality of the energy wave spectrum is similar in all quadrants. Some differences are observed however, and they are associated with the presence and the shape of swell energy in each quadrant. Three numerical experiments using the spectral wave prediction model SWAN were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. The aim of the experiments is to evaluate the effect of the translation speed of the hurricane and the presence of concentric eye walls, on both the wave growth process and the shape of the directional wave spectrum. The HRD wind field of Hurricane Dean on August 20 at 7:30 was propagated at two different velocities (5 and 10 m/s). An idealized concentric eye wall (a Gaussian function that evolve in time along a path in the form of an Archimedean spiral) was imposed to the wind field. The white-capping formulation of Westhuysen et al. (2007) was selected. The wave model represents fairly well the directionality of the energy and the shape of the directional spectra in the hurricane domain. The model results indicate that the forward movement of the storm influences the development of the waves, consistent with field observations. This work has been supported by CONACYT scholarship 164510 and projects RugDisMar (155793), CB-2011-01-168173 and the Department of Physical Oceanography of CICESE. References Esquivel-Trava, B., Ocampo-Torres, F. J., & Osuna, P. (2015). Spatial structure of directional wave spectra in hurricanes. Ocean Dynam., 65(1), 65-76. doi:10.1007/s10236-014-0791-9 Van der

  20. Dependence of Whistler-mode Wave Induced Electron Precipitation on k-vector Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.; Bortnik, J.

    2007-12-01

    a range of initial wave normal angles. We conclude that whistler-mode waves with highly oblique wave normal angles may be more effective than previously believed at precipitating > 1 MeV electrons, despite the dependence of the scattering coefficients on wave normal direction.

  1. Influence of hurricane wind field in the structure of directional wave spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; García-Nava, Hector; Osuna, Pedro; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Three numerical experiments using the spectral wave prediction model SWAN were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. One particular objective is to evaluate the effect of the translation speed of the hurricane and the presence of concentric eye walls, on both the wave growth process and the shape of the directional wave spectrum. The HRD wind field of Hurricane Dean on August 20 at 7:30 was propagated at two different velocities (5 and 10 m/s). An idealized concentric eye wall (a Gaussian function that evolve in time along a path in the form of an Archimedean spiral) was imposed to the wind field. The white-capping formulation of Westhuysen et al. (2007) was selected. The wave model represents fairly well the directionality of the energy and the shape of the directional spectra in the hurricane domain. The model results indicate that the forward movement of the storm influences the development of the waves, consistent with field observations. Additionally the same experiments were carried out using the Wave Watch III model with the source terms formulation proposed by Ardhuin et al., 2010, with the aim of making comparisons between the physical processes that represent each formulation, and the latest results will be addressed. References Ardhuin, F., Rogers, E., Babanin, A. V., Filipot, J.-F., Magne, R., Roland, A., van der Westhuysen, A., et al. (2010). Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 40(9), 1917-1941. doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1 Van der Westhuysen, A. J., Zijlema, M., & Battjes, J. A. (2007). Nonlinear saturation-based whitecapping dissipation in SWAN for deep and shallow water. Coast. Eng., 54(2), 151-170. doi:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2006.08.006

  2. Performance of a direct drive hydro turbine for wave power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y-H; Kim, C-G [Division of Mechanical and Information Engineering, Korea Maritime University Dongsam-dong 1, Youngdo-ku, Busan, 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Y-D; Kim, I-S [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mokpo National University Muan-ro 560, Chunggye-myun, Jeonnam, 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y-C, E-mail: lyh@hhu.ac.k [R and D Institute, Shinhan Precision Co. Ltd. Gomo-ri 313, Jinle-myun, Kimhae, 621-881 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Clean and renewable energy technologies using ocean energy give us non-polluting alternatives to fossil-fueled power plants as a countermeasure against the global warming and growing demand for electrical energy. Among the ocean energy resources, wave power takes a growing interest because of its enormous amount of potential energy in the world. Therefore, various types of wave power system to capture the energy of ocean waves have been developed. However, suitable turbine type is not normalized yet because of relatively low efficiency of the turbine systems. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of a newly developed direct drive hydro turbine (DDT), which will be built in a caisson for wave power plant. Experiment and CFD analysis are conducted to clarify the turbine performance and internal flow characteristics. The results show that the DDT obtains fairly good turbine efficiency in both cases of with wave and no wave conditions. As the turbine performance is influenced considerably by the wave condition, designed point of the turbine should be determined according to the wave condition at an expected installation site. Most of the output power generates at the runner passage of the Stage 2.

  3. DIPOLE COLLAPSE AND DYNAMO WAVES IN GLOBAL DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel [MAG (ENS/IPGP), LRA, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Petitdemange, Ludovic, E-mail: martin@schrinner.eu [Previously at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. (Germany)

    2012-06-20

    Magnetic fields of low-mass stars and planets are thought to originate from self-excited dynamo action in their convective interiors. Observations reveal a variety of field topologies ranging from large-scale, axial dipoles to more structured magnetic fields. In this article, we investigate more than 70 three-dimensional, self-consistent dynamo models in the Boussinesq approximation obtained by direct numerical simulations. The control parameters, the aspect ratio, and the mechanical boundary conditions have been varied to build up this sample of models. Both strongly dipolar and multipolar models have been obtained. We show that these dynamo regimes in general can be distinguished by the ratio of a typical convective length scale to the Rossby radius. Models with a predominantly dipolar magnetic field were obtained, if the convective length scale is at least an order of magnitude larger than the Rossby radius. Moreover, we highlight the role of the strong shear associated with the geostrophic zonal flow for models with stress-free boundary conditions. In this case the above transition disappears and is replaced by a region of bistability for which dipolar and multipolar dynamos coexist. We interpret our results in terms of dynamo eigenmodes using the so-called test-field method. We can thus show that models in the dipolar regime are characterized by an isolated 'single mode'. Competing overtones become significant as the boundary to multipolar dynamos is approached. We discuss how these findings relate to previous models and to observations.

  4. Incorporating fault zone head wave and direct wave secondary arrival times into seismic tomography: Application at Parkfield, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennington, Ninfa L.; Thurber, Clifford; Peng, Zhigang; Zhang, Haijiang; Zhao, Peng

    2013-03-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) P wave velocity (Vp) model of the Parkfield region that utilizes existing P wave arrival time data, including fault zone head waves (FZHWs), and data from direct wave secondary arrivals (DWSAs). The first-arrival and DWSA travel times are obtained as the global- and local-minimum travel time paths, respectively. The inclusion of FZHWs and DWSAs results in as much as a 5% and a 10% increase in the across-fault velocity contrast, respectively, for the Vp model at Parkfield relative to that of Thurber et al. [2006]. Viewed along strike, three pronounced velocity contrast regions are observed: a pair of strong positive velocity contrasts (SW fast), one NW of the 1966 Parkfield earthquake hypocenter and the other SE of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake hypocenter, and a strong negative velocity contrast (NE fast) between the two hypocenters. The negative velocity contrast partially to entirely encompasses peak coseismic slip estimated in several slip models for the 2004 earthquake, suggesting that the negative velocity contrast played a part in defining the rupture patch of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Following Ampuero and Ben-Zion (2008), the pattern of velocity contrasts is consistent with the observed bilateral rupture propagation for the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Although the velocity contrasts also suggest bilateral rupture propagation for the 1966 Parkfield earthquake, the fault is creeping to the NW here, i.e., exhibiting velocity-strengthening behavior. Thus, it is not surprising that rupture propagated only SE during this event.

  5. Wave energy, lever operated pivoting float LOPF study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margheritini, L.

    2012-11-01

    The fully instrumented Resen Waves Lever Operated Pivoting Float LOPF wave energy buoy model has gone through the first stage of testing in regular waves in scale 1:25 of the North Sea wave conditions, in the 3D deep wave basin at the Hydraulic and Coastal Engineering Laboratory of Aalborg University in Denmark. The model size was 60cm W x 90cm L x 21cm H. The 60 cm width pointed towards the wave front. The LOPF buoy is characterized by a simple mechanical design with few moving parts and direct electrical output and it is taut moored to the sea bed, so all forces are referenced to the seabed for maximum energy output in regular as well as irregular waves. During storms the buoy pivots and streamlines itself to minimize loads on the mooring line. A conservative estimate shows that a full scale system for North Sea conditions has a float size width of 15 m that will, with 60% generator efficiency, produce 610 MWh/y (609.497 kWh/y) with an average power output of 69.6 kW, which requires a generator capacity of 700 kW. It is expected the generator efficiency can be increased to 90% in the future. More specific calculations (from EnergiNet) show that with one generator of 695 kW the expected power production is 585 MWh/y; with a generator of 250 kW and 100 kW, the expected power production is 481 MWh/y and 182 MWh/y respectively. In addition there are several areas for future improvements for increased power production. (Author)

  6. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  7. Note on the directional properties of meter-scale gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peureux, Charles; Benetazzo, Alvise; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2018-01-01

    The directional distribution of the energy of young waves is bimodal for frequencies above twice the peak frequency; i.e., their directional distribution exhibits two peaks in different directions and a minimum between. Here we analyze in detail a typical case measured with a peak frequency fp = 0.18 Hz and a wind speed of 10.7 m s-1 using a stereo-video system. This technique allows for the separation of free waves from the spectrum of the sea-surface elevation. The latter indeed tend to reduce the contrast between the two peaks and the background. The directional distribution for a given wavenumber is nearly symmetric, with the angle distance between the two peaks growing with frequency, reaching 150° at 35 times the peak wavenumber kp and increasing up to 45 kp. When considering only free waves, the lobe ratio, the ratio of oblique peak energy density over energy in the wind direction, increases linearly with the non-dimensional wavenumber k/kp, up to a value of 6 at k/kp ≃ 22, and possibly more for shorter components. These observations extend to shorter components' previous measurements, and have important consequences for wave properties sensitive to the directional distribution, such as surface slopes, Stokes drift or microseism sources.

  8. Note on the directional properties of meter-scale gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Peureux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The directional distribution of the energy of young waves is bimodal for frequencies above twice the peak frequency; i.e., their directional distribution exhibits two peaks in different directions and a minimum between. Here we analyze in detail a typical case measured with a peak frequency fp = 0.18 Hz and a wind speed of 10.7 m s−1 using a stereo-video system. This technique allows for the separation of free waves from the spectrum of the sea-surface elevation. The latter indeed tend to reduce the contrast between the two peaks and the background. The directional distribution for a given wavenumber is nearly symmetric, with the angle distance between the two peaks growing with frequency, reaching 150° at 35 times the peak wavenumber kp and increasing up to 45 kp. When considering only free waves, the lobe ratio, the ratio of oblique peak energy density over energy in the wind direction, increases linearly with the non-dimensional wavenumber k∕kp, up to a value of 6 at k∕kp ≃ 22, and possibly more for shorter components. These observations extend to shorter components' previous measurements, and have important consequences for wave properties sensitive to the directional distribution, such as surface slopes, Stokes drift or microseism sources.

  9. Saildrone fleet could help replace aging buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voosen, Paul

    2018-03-01

    In April, two semiautonomous drones, developed by Saildrone, a marine tech startup based in Alameda, California, in close collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Washington, D.C., are set to return from an 8-month tour of the Pacific Ocean. This the first scientific test for the drones, which are powered only by the wind and sun, in the Pacific Ocean. The voyage is an important step in showing that such drones, carrying 15 different sensors, could help replace an aging and expensive array of buoys that are the main way scientists sniff out signs of climate-disrupting El Niño events. If successful, scientists envision fleets of similar drones spreading across the ocean, inviting thoughts of what it could be like to do oceanography without a ship.

  10. Direct fragmentation of quarkonia including Fermi motion using light-cone wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobary, M.A. Gomshi [Razi University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kermanshah (Iran); A.E.O.I., Center for Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran (Iran); Javadi, B. [Razi University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kermanshah (Iran)

    2005-07-01

    We investigate the effect of Fermi motion on the direct fragmentation of the J/{psi} and {upsilon} states employing a light-cone wave function. Consistent with such a wave function we set up the kinematics of a heavy quark fragmenting into quarkonia such that the Fermi motion of the constituents splits into a longitudinal as well as a transverse direction and thus calculate the fragmentation functions for these states. In the framework of our investigation, we estimate that the fragmentation probabilities of J/{psi} and {upsilon} may increase at least up to 14 percent when including this degree of freedom. (orig.)

  11. In-situ Measurements of the Direction of Propagation of Pump Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, H. G.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Leyser, T.; Siefring, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    In the course of an experiment to modify the ionosphere, the direction of pump wave propagation is affected by density gradients in the horizontal and vertical directions, fundamentally affecting wave-energy transport. Horizontal gradients on various scales may await a modification attempt as a preexisting state of the ionosphere and/or be changed by the deposition of heater radio-frequency energy. In the results from the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) in the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP), we have recorded on the order of 100 flights over ionospheric heaters revealing a variety of processes that high-frequency pump waves experience in the ionosphere. E-POP flies on the Canadian satellite CASSIOPE in an elliptic (320 x 1400 km), highly-inclined (81°) orbit. High frequency measurements have been/are being made near SPEAR, HAARP, Sura, EISCAT Heating and Arecibo. Electromagnetic waves from ground-based heaters are detected by the two, orthogonal, 6-m dipoles on the RRI. The high input impedance of the RRI means that the dipoles act as voltage probes, from which the electric field of incoming waves can be simply computed. When combined with cold-magnetoplasma electric-field theory, the relationship of voltages on the two orthogonal dipoles is used to deduce the direction of arrival of an incoming wave in three dimensions. We illustrate the technique by its application to analysis of signals from different transmitters. These results show a variety of pump-wave propagation directions, indicating the complexity of density structure within which modification might take place. Such complexity illustrates the importance of three-dimensional models of density in the vicinity of modification.

  12. Direction dependent Love and Rayleigh wave noise characteristics using multiple arrays across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, Carina; Perleth, Magdalena; Hadziioannou, Celine

    2016-04-01

    Seismic noise has become an important signal source for tomography and monitoring purposes. Better understanding of the noise field characteristics is crucial to further improve noise applications. Our knowledge about common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves in the microseism band is still limited. This applies in particular for constraints on source locations and source mechanisms of Love waves. Here, 3-component beamforming is used to distinguish between the different polarized wave types in the primary and secondary microseism noise field recorded at several arrays across Europe. We compare characteristics of Love and Rayleigh wave noise, such as source directions and frequency content. Further, Love to Rayleigh wave ratios are measured and a dependence on direction is found, especially in the primary microseism band. Estimates of the kinetic energy density ratios propose a dominance of coherent Love waves in the primary, but not in the secondary microseism band. The seasonality of the noise field characteristics is examined by using a full year of data in 2013 and is found to be stable.

  13. Real Time Wave Forecasting Using Wind Time History and Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Kambekar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The significant wave height and average wave period form an essential input for operational activities in ocean and coastal areas. Such information is important in issuing appropriate warnings to people planning any construction or instillation works in the oceanic environment. Many countries over the world routinely collect wave and wind data through a network of wave rider buoys. The data collecting agencies transmit the resulting information online to their registered users through an internet or a web-based system. Operational wave forecasts in addition to the measured data are also made and supplied online to the users. This paper discusses operational wave forecasting in real time mode at locations where wind rather than wave data are continuously recorded. It is based on the time series modeling and incorporates an artificial intelligence technique of genetic programming. The significant wave height and average wave period values are forecasted over a period of 96 hr in future from the observations of wind speed and directions extending to a similar time scale in the past. Wind measurements made by floating buoys at eight different locations around India over a period varying from 1.5 yr to 9.0 yr were considered. The platform of Matlab and C++ was used to develop a graphical user interface that will extend an internet based user-friendly access of the forecasts to any registered user of the data dissemination authority.

  14. First Direct Observation of Runaway-Electron-Driven Whistler Waves in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, D. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Du, X. D.; Thome, K. E.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Collins, C.; Lvovskiy, A.; Moyer, R. A.; Austin, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Liu, C.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lau, C.

    2018-04-01

    DIII-D experiments at low density (ne˜1019 m-3 ) have directly measured whistler waves in the 100-200 MHz range excited by multi-MeV runaway electrons. Whistler activity is correlated with runaway intensity (hard x-ray emission level), occurs in novel discrete frequency bands, and exhibits nonlinear limit-cycle-like behavior. The measured frequencies scale with the magnetic field strength and electron density as expected from the whistler dispersion relation. The modes are stabilized with increasing magnetic field, which is consistent with wave-particle resonance mechanisms. The mode amplitudes show intermittent time variations correlated with changes in the electron cyclotron emission that follow predator-prey cycles. These can be interpreted as wave-induced pitch angle scattering of moderate energy runaways. The tokamak runaway-whistler mechanisms have parallels to whistler phenomena in ionospheric plasmas. The observations also open new directions for the modeling and active control of runaway electrons in tokamaks.

  15. Strong Measurements Give a Better Direct Measurement of the Quantum Wave Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Dequal, Daniele

    2016-01-29

    Weak measurements have thus far been considered instrumental in the so-called direct measurement of the quantum wave function [4J. S. Lundeen, Nature (London) 474, 188 (2011).]. Here we show that a direct measurement of the wave function can be obtained by using measurements of arbitrary strength. In particular, in the case of strong measurements, i.e., those in which the coupling between the system and the measuring apparatus is maximum, we compared the precision and the accuracy of the two methods, by showing that strong measurements outperform weak measurements in both for arbitrary quantum states in most cases. We also give the exact expression of the difference between the original and reconstructed wave function obtained by the weak measurement approach; this will allow one to define the range of applicability of such a method.

  16. Deciphering inflation with gravitational waves: Cosmic microwave background polarization vs direct detection with laser interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-01-01

    A detection of the primordial gravitational wave background is considered to be the 'smoking-gun' evidence for inflation. While superhorizon waves are probed with cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, the relic background will be studied with laser interferometers. The long lever arm spanned by the two techniques improves constraints on the inflationary potential and validation of consistency relations expected under inflation. If gravitational waves with a tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio greater than 0.01 are detected by the CMB, then a direct-detection experiment with a sensitivity consistent with current concept studies should be pursued vigorously. If no primordial tensors are detected by the CMB, a direct-detection experiment to understand the simplest form of inflation must have a sensitivity improved by two to 3 orders of magnitude over current plans

  17. An overview of a moored ocean data buoy programme

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.

    This paper addresses the rationale. history, strategy and management techniques used in the developmcnt of NIO oceanographic data buoy programme. The system is used for short term as well as long term oceanographic observations. The technical...

  18. Oceansat-2 and RAMA buoy winds: A comparison

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rate Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model analysis over the data sparse oceanic region. Sea ... Among the three tropical oceans, Pacific, Atlantic ..... which obviously causes bias. ... side, and will increase mean buoy winds relative.

  19. Variations in wave direction estimated using first and second order Fourier coefficients

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anand, N.M.

    to the peak frequency are used in practice. In the present study, comparison is made on wave directions estimated based on first and second order Fourier coefficients using data collected at four locations in the west and east coasts of India. Study shows...

  20. The North Atlantic Oscillation Influence on the Wave Regime in Portugal: An Extreme Wave Event Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    picture at 22/00Z.............50 x Figure 24. Case 5 – wave parameters........................51 Figure 25. Evolution of energy density (arrow...equation or energy balance equation: . in nl ds F v F S S S S t ∂ + ∇ = ≡ + + ∂ r (1) where ( , ; , )F f x tθ r is the two dimensional...collected from an offshore directional Seawatch buoy, in the vicinity of Cape Silleiro, Rayo Silleiro 19 (“E1”), (Figure 3), was provided by the

  1. Progress Towards the Development of a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter for Aneutronic Fusion Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, A. G.; Chap, A.; Wolinsky, J.; Scott, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    A coordinated experimental and theory/simulation effort has been carried out to investigate the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC), a scheme that has been proposed in the past for the direct conversion into electricity of the kinetic energy of an ion beam generated from fusion reactions. This effort has been focused in particular on the TWDEC process in the high density beam regime, thus accounting for the ion beam expansion due to its space charge.

  2. Model Predictive Control of Buoy Type Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    by forcing this condition. In the paper the theoretical framework for this principal is shown. The optimal controller requires information of the sea state for infinite horizon which is not applicable. Model Predictive Controllers (MPC) can have finite horizon which crosses out this requirement....... This approach is then taken into account and an MPC controller is designed for a model WEC and implemented on a numerical example. Further, the power outtake of this controller is compared to the optimal controller as an indicator of the performance of the designed controller....

  3. Wave modelling for the North Indian Ocean using MSMR analysed winds

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Sudheesh, K.; Rupali, S.P.; Babu, M.T.; Jayakumar, S.; Saran, A; Basu, S.K.; Kumar, R.; Sarkar, A

    prediction when NCMRWF winds blended with MSMR winds are utilised in the wave model. A comparison between buoy and TOPEX wave heights of May 2000 at 4 buoy locations provides a good match, showing the merit of using altimeter data, wherever it is difficult...

  4. Bi-directional ultrasonic wave coupling to FBGs in continuously bonded optical fiber sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Junghyun; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2017-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are typically spot-bonded onto the surface of a structure to detect ultrasonic waves in laboratory demonstrations. However, to protect the rest of the optical fiber from any environmental damage during real applications, bonding the entire length of fiber, called continuous bonding, is commonly done. In this paper, we investigate the impact of continuously bonding FBGs on the measured Lamb wave signal. In theory, the ultrasonic wave signal can bi-directionally transfer between the optical fiber and the plate at any adhered location, which could potentially produce output signal distortion for the continuous bonding case. Therefore, an experiment is performed to investigate the plate-to-fiber and fiber-to-plate signal transfer, from which the signal coupling coefficient of each case is theoretically estimated based on the experimental data. We demonstrate that the two coupling coefficients are comparable, with the plate-to-fiber case approximately 19% larger than the fiber-to-plate case. Finally, the signal waveform and arrival time of the output FBG responses are compared between the continuous and spot bonding cases. The results indicate that the resulting Lamb wave signal output is only that directly detected at the FBG location; however, a slight difference in signal waveform is observed between the two bonding configurations. This paper demonstrates the practicality of using continuously bonded FBGs for ultrasonic wave detection in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications.

  5. Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves from Advanced LIGO's First Observing Run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Ananyeva, A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Appert, S; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Avila-Alvarez, A; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Beer, C; Bejger, M; Belahcene, I; Belgin, M; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Billman, C R; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Biscoveanu, A S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackman, J; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bohe, A; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T A; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campbell, W; Canepa, M; Cannon, K C; Cao, H; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, H-P; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Chmiel, T; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, A J K; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Cocchieri, C; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conti, L; Cooper, S J; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, E; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Covas, P B; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cullen, T J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dasgupta, A; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Davis, D; Daw, E J; Day, B; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devenson, J; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Doctor, Z; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorrington, I; Douglas, R; Dovale Álvarez, M; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R C; Etienne, Z; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Fauchon-Jones, E J; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Fernández Galiana, A; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Forsyth, S S; Fournier, J-D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fries, E M; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H; Gadre, B U; Gaebel, S M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gayathri, V; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghonge, S; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Henry, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Junker, J; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J C; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W; Kim, Y-M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kirchhoff, R; Kissel, J S; Klein, B; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koch, P; Koehlenbeck, S M; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Krämer, C; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lang, R N; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lanza, R K; Lartaux-Vollard, A; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lehmann, J; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Liu, J; Lockerbie, N A; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macfoy, S; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martynov, D V; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matas, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGrath, C; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, A; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Muniz, E A M; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Napier, K; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Neri, M; Nery, M; Neunzert, A; Newport, J M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Noack, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pace, A E; Page, J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perez, C J; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Pratt, J W W; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Qiu, S; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Scheuer, J; Schlassa, S; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Schwalbe, S G; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Setyawati, Y; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T J; Shahriar, M S; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, B; Smith, J R; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Spencer, A P; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strigin, S E; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, D; Tápai, M; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tippens, T; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Trinastic, J; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Tso, R; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Varma, V; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Venugopalan, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Viets, A D; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Watchi, J; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whiting, B F; Whittle, C; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wu, G; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, T; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, S J; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2017-03-24

    We employ gravitational-wave radiometry to map the stochastic gravitational wave background expected from a variety of contributing mechanisms and test the assumption of isotropy using data from the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory's (aLIGO) first observing run. We also search for persistent gravitational waves from point sources with only minimal assumptions over the 20-1726 Hz frequency band. Finding no evidence of gravitational waves from either point sources or a stochastic background, we set limits at 90% confidence. For broadband point sources, we report upper limits on the gravitational wave energy flux per unit frequency in the range F_{α,Θ}(f)<(0.1-56)×10^{-8}    erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} Hz^{-1}(f/25  Hz)^{α-1} depending on the sky location Θ and the spectral power index α. For extended sources, we report upper limits on the fractional gravitational wave energy density required to close the Universe of Ω(f,Θ)<(0.39-7.6)×10^{-8}  sr^{-1}(f/25  Hz)^{α} depending on Θ and α. Directed searches for narrowband gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting objects (Scorpius X-1, Supernova 1987 A, and the Galactic Center) yield median frequency-dependent limits on strain amplitude of h_{0}<(6.7,5.5,  and  7.0)×10^{-25}, respectively, at the most sensitive detector frequencies between 130-175 Hz. This represents a mean improvement of a factor of 2 across the band compared to previous searches of this kind for these sky locations, considering the different quantities of strain constrained in each case.

  6. A wave model test bed study for wave energy resource characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Neary, Vincent S.; Wang, Taiping; Gunawan, Budi; Dallman, Annie R.; Wu, Wei-Cheng

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a test bed study conducted to evaluate best practices in wave modeling to characterize energy resources. The model test bed off the central Oregon Coast was selected because of the high wave energy and available measured data at the site. Two third-generation spectral wave models, SWAN and WWIII, were evaluated. A four-level nested-grid approach—from global to test bed scale—was employed. Model skills were assessed using a set of model performance metrics based on comparing six simulated wave resource parameters to observations from a wave buoy inside the test bed. Both WWIII and SWAN performed well at the test bed site and exhibited similar modeling skills. The ST4 package with WWIII, which represents better physics for wave growth and dissipation, out-performed ST2 physics and improved wave power density and significant wave height predictions. However, ST4 physics tended to overpredict the wave energy period. The newly developed ST6 physics did not improve the overall model skill for predicting the six wave resource parameters. Sensitivity analysis using different wave frequencies and direction resolutions indicated the model results were not sensitive to spectral resolutions at the test bed site, likely due to the absence of complex bathymetric and geometric features.

  7. Real time wave forecasting using wind time history and numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pooja; Deo, M. C.; Latha, G.; Rajendran, V.

    Operational activities in the ocean like planning for structural repairs or fishing expeditions require real time prediction of waves over typical time duration of say a few hours. Such predictions can be made by using a numerical model or a time series model employing continuously recorded waves. This paper presents another option to do so and it is based on a different time series approach in which the input is in the form of preceding wind speed and wind direction observations. This would be useful for those stations where the costly wave buoys are not deployed and instead only meteorological buoys measuring wind are moored. The technique employs alternative artificial intelligence approaches of an artificial neural network (ANN), genetic programming (GP) and model tree (MT) to carry out the time series modeling of wind to obtain waves. Wind observations at four offshore sites along the east coast of India were used. For calibration purpose the wave data was generated using a numerical model. The predicted waves obtained using the proposed time series models when compared with the numerically generated waves showed good resemblance in terms of the selected error criteria. Large differences across the chosen techniques of ANN, GP, MT were not noticed. Wave hindcasting at the same time step and the predictions over shorter lead times were better than the predictions over longer lead times. The proposed method is a cost effective and convenient option when a site-specific information is desired.

  8. Jovian electron bursts: Correlation with the interplanetary field direction and hydromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.J.; Tsurutani, B.T.; Chenette, D.L.; Conlon, T.F.; Simpson, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    The bursts of relativistic electrons detected on Pioneer 10 upstream from Jupiter and within 400r/subj/ of the planet have been found to be correlated with the interplanetary magnetic field. In the three examples upon which this study is based, during the month prior to the Pioneer 10 encounter, electrons with energies between 3 and 6 MeV escaping from Jupiter's magnetosphere were observed only when the interplanetary magnetic field was along the Jupiter-spacecraft line. In addition, large-amplitude interplanetary waves with characteristic periods of 10 min were observed and found to be well correlated with intervals during which the field was along the Jupiter-spacecraft line. Abrupt changes in the field away from the preferred direction caused equally abrupt terminations of the waves with an accompanying reduction in the electron flux. These results are consistent with propagation of the electrons from Jupiter to Pioneer along, rather than across, the magnetic field lines. The direction of the interplanetary magnetic field is apparently not affected by the electron bursts or by other particles from Jupiter. The average Parker spiral direction is clear with no enhancement in the Jupiter-spacecraft direction. Two alternative possibilities are considered for the origin of the waves. If they were generated near Jupiter, they would have to propagate to the spacecraft in the whistler mode. The expected attenuation of these waves over distances of several hundred r/subj/ an their long travel times make this explanation unattractive. Alternatively, hydromagnetic wave generation by Jovian charged particles, presumably the relativistic electrons themselves, as they travel upstream, appears to be an attractive explanation

  9. Synthesis of Directional Sources Using Wave Field Synthesis, Possibilities, and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corteel E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of directional sources using wave field synthesis is described. The proposed formulation relies on an ensemble of elementary directivity functions based on a subset of spherical harmonics. These can be combined to create and manipulate directivity characteristics of the synthesized virtual sources. The WFS formulation introduces artifacts in the synthesized sound field for both ideal and real loudspeakers. These artifacts can be partly compensated for using dedicated equalization techniques. A multichannel equalization technique is shown to provide accurate results thus enabling for the manipulation of directional sources with limited reconstruction artifacts. Applications of directional sources to the control of the direct sound field and the interaction with the listening room are discussed.

  10. Direct detection of lower hybrid wave using a reflectometer on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S.; Dominguez, A.; Marmar, E.; Parker, R.; Kramer, G. J.

    2010-10-01

    The possibility of directly detecting a density perturbation produced by lower hybrid (LH) waves using a reflectometer is presented. We investigate the microwave scattering of reflectometer probe beams by a model density fluctuation produced by short wavelength LH waves in an Alcator C-Mod experimental condition. In the O-mode case, the maximum response of phase measurement is found to occur when the density perturbation is approximately centimeters in front of the antenna, where Bragg scattering condition is satisfied. In the X-mode case, the phase measurement is predicted to be more sensitive to the density fluctuation close to the cut-off layer. A feasibility test was carried out using a 50 GHz O-mode reflectometer on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, and positive results including the detection of 4.6 GHz pump wave and parametric decay instabilities were obtained.

  11. A performance study on a direct drive hydro turbine for wave energy converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Do; Kim, Chang Goo; Kim, You Taek; Lee, Young Ho; Song, Jung Il

    2010-01-01

    Clean and renewable energy technologies using ocean energy give us non-polluting alternatives to fossil-fueled power plants as a countermeasure against global warming and growing demand for electrical energy. Among the ocean energy resources, wave power takes a growing interest because of its enormous amount of potential energy in the world. Therefore, various types of wave power systems to capture the energy of ocean waves have been developed. However, a suitable turbine type is not yet normalized because of relatively low efficiency of the turbine systems. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of a newly developed direct drive hydro turbine (DDT), which will be built in a caisson for a wave power plant. Experiment and CFD analysis are conducted to clarify the turbine performance and internal flow characteristics. The results show that the DDT obtains fairly good turbine efficiency in cases with and without wave conditions. Most of the output power is generated at the runner passage of Stage 2. Relatively larger amount of the decreased tangential velocity at Stage 2 produces more angular momentum than that at Stage 1 and thus, the larger angular momentum at the Stage 2 makes a greater contribution to the generation of total output power in comparison with that at Stage 1. Large vortex existing in the upper-left region of the runner passage forms a large recirculation region in the runner passage, and the recirculating flow consumes the output power at Region 2

  12. A performance study on a direct drive hydro turbine for wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Do [Mokpo National University, Muan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Goo; Kim, You Taek; Lee, Young Ho [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jung Il [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Clean and renewable energy technologies using ocean energy give us non-polluting alternatives to fossil-fueled power plants as a countermeasure against global warming and growing demand for electrical energy. Among the ocean energy resources, wave power takes a growing interest because of its enormous amount of potential energy in the world. Therefore, various types of wave power systems to capture the energy of ocean waves have been developed. However, a suitable turbine type is not yet normalized because of relatively low efficiency of the turbine systems. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of a newly developed direct drive hydro turbine (DDT), which will be built in a caisson for a wave power plant. Experiment and CFD analysis are conducted to clarify the turbine performance and internal flow characteristics. The results show that the DDT obtains fairly good turbine efficiency in cases with and without wave conditions. Most of the output power is generated at the runner passage of Stage 2. Relatively larger amount of the decreased tangential velocity at Stage 2 produces more angular momentum than that at Stage 1 and thus, the larger angular momentum at the Stage 2 makes a greater contribution to the generation of total output power in comparison with that at Stage 1. Large vortex existing in the upper-left region of the runner passage forms a large recirculation region in the runner passage, and the recirculating flow consumes the output power at Region 2

  13. Autonomous Ice Mass Balance Buoys for Seasonal Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, J. D.; Planck, C.; Perovich, D. K.; Parno, J. T.; Elder, B. C.; Richter-Menge, J.; Polashenski, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    The ice mass-balance represents the integration of all surface and ocean heat fluxes and attributing the impact of these forcing fluxes on the ice cover can be accomplished by increasing temporal and spatial measurements. Mass balance information can be used to understand the ongoing changes in the Arctic sea ice cover and to improve predictions of future ice conditions. Thinner seasonal ice in the Arctic necessitates the deployment of Autonomous Ice Mass Balance buoys (IMB's) capable of long-term, in situ data collection in both ice and open ocean. Seasonal IMB's (SIMB's) are free floating IMB's that allow data collection in thick ice, thin ice, during times of transition, and even open water. The newest generation of SIMB aims to increase the number of reliable IMB's in the Arctic by leveraging inexpensive commercial-grade instrumentation when combined with specially developed monitoring hardware. Monitoring tasks are handled by a custom, expandable data logger that provides low-cost flexibility for integrating a large range of instrumentation. The SIMB features ultrasonic sensors for direct measurement of both snow depth and ice thickness and a digital temperature chain (DTC) for temperature measurements every 2cm through both snow and ice. Air temperature and pressure, along with GPS data complete the Arctic picture. Additionally, the new SIMB is more compact to maximize deployment opportunities from multiple types of platforms.

  14. Bayesian inference of earthquake parameters from buoy data using a polynomial chaos-based surrogate

    KAUST Repository

    Giraldi, Loic

    2017-04-07

    This work addresses the estimation of the parameters of an earthquake model by the consequent tsunami, with an application to the Chile 2010 event. We are particularly interested in the Bayesian inference of the location, the orientation, and the slip of an Okada-based model of the earthquake ocean floor displacement. The tsunami numerical model is based on the GeoClaw software while the observational data is provided by a single DARTⓇ buoy. We propose in this paper a methodology based on polynomial chaos expansion to construct a surrogate model of the wave height at the buoy location. A correlated noise model is first proposed in order to represent the discrepancy between the computational model and the data. This step is necessary, as a classical independent Gaussian noise is shown to be unsuitable for modeling the error, and to prevent convergence of the Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler. Second, the polynomial chaos model is subsequently improved to handle the variability of the arrival time of the wave, using a preconditioned non-intrusive spectral method. Finally, the construction of a reduced model dedicated to Bayesian inference is proposed. Numerical results are presented and discussed.

  15. Automatic picking of direct P, S seismic phases and fault zone head waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Z. E.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We develop a set of algorithms for automatic detection and picking of direct P and S waves, as well as fault zone head waves (FZHW), generated by earthquakes on faults that separate different lithologies and recorded by local seismic networks. The S-wave picks are performed using polarization analysis and related filters to remove P-wave energy from the seismograms, and utilize STA/LTA and kurtosis detectors in tandem to lock on the phase arrival. The early portions of P waveforms are processed with STA/LTA, kurtosis and skewness detectors for possible first-arriving FZHW. Identification and picking of direct P and FZHW is performed by a multistage algorithm that accounts for basic characteristics (motion polarities, time difference, sharpness and amplitudes) of the two phases. The algorithm is shown to perform well on synthetic seismograms produced by a model with a velocity contrast across the fault, and observed data generated by earthquakes along the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault and the Hayward fault. The developed techniques can be used for systematic processing of large seismic waveform data sets recorded near major faults.

  16. Feasibility of Traveling Wave Direct Energy Conversion of Fission Reaction Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, A. G.; George, J. A.; Miley, G. H.; Scott, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Fission fragment direct energy conversion has been considered in the past for the purpose of increasing nuclear power plant efficiency and for advanced space propulsion. Since the fragments carry electric charge (typically in the order of 20 e) and have 100 MeV-range kinetic energy, techniques utilizing very high-voltage DC electrodes have been considered. This study is focused on a different approach: the kinetic energy of the charged fission fragments is converted into alternating current by means of a traveling wave coupling scheme (Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter, TWDEC), thereby not requiring the utilization of high voltage technology. A preliminary feasibility analysis of the concept is introduced based on a conceptual level study and on a particle simulation model of the beam dynamics.

  17. Method for the Direct Solve of the Many-Body Schrödinger Wave Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerke, Jonathan; Tymczak, C. J.; Poirier, Bill

    We report on theoretical and computational developments towards a computationally efficient direct solve of the many-body Schrödinger wave equation for electronic systems. This methodology relies on two recent developments pioneered by the authors: 1) the development of a Cardinal Sine basis for electronic structure calculations; and 2) the development of a highly efficient and compact representation of multidimensional functions using the Canonical tensor rank representation developed by Belykin et. al. which we have adapted to electronic structure problems. We then show several relevant examples of the utility and accuracy of this methodology, scaling with system size, and relevant convergence issues of the methodology. Method for the Direct Solve of the Many-Body Schrödinger Wave Equation.

  18. Transcranial direct current stimulation in refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep: a controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Edina T; Terney, Daniella; Atkins, Mary D

    2011-01-01

    Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) decreases cortical excitability. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether cathodal tDCS could interrupt the continuous epileptiform activity. Five patients with focal, refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep were...... recruited. Cathodal tDCS and sham stimulation were applied to the epileptic focus, before sleep (1 mA; 20 min). Cathodal tDCS did not reduce the spike-index in any of the patients....

  19. A Waveguide Antenna with an Extended Angular Range for Remote Steering of Wave-Beam Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, D. I.; Denisov, G. G.

    2018-03-01

    A new method for increasing the angular range of a waveguide antenna for remote steering of the wave-beam direction in thermonuclear-fusion experimental setups with plasma magnetic confinement is proposed. Characteristics for large beam inclination angles can be improved using the synthesized nonuniform waveguide profile. For small angles, the characteristics remain invariable, the waveguide profile differs only slightly from the regular shape, and can be fit to limited waveguide-channel sizes.

  20. Directional waverider buoy in Indian waters - Experiences of NIO

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.

    , receiving/ recording unit, NIO's experience in mooring, deployment and retrieval operations etc. The paper also highlights various operational problems during the data collection programme. Suggestions and conclusions pertaining to operation, maintenance etc...

  1. Evolution of double white dwarf binaries undergoing direct-impact accretion: Implications for gravitational wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kyle; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2017-01-01

    For close double white dwarf binaries, the mass-transfer phenomenon known as direct-impact accretion (when the mass transfer stream impacts the accretor directly rather than forming a disc) may play a pivotal role in the long-term evolution of the systems. In this analysis, we explore the long-term evolution of white dwarf binaries accreting through direct-impact and explore implications of such systems to gravitational wave astronomy. We cover a broad range of parameter space which includes initial component masses and the strength of tidal coupling, and show that these systems, which lie firmly within the LISA frequency range, show strong negative chirps which can last as long as several million years. Detections of double white dwarf systems in the direct-impact phase by detectors such as LISA would provide astronomers with unique ways of probing the physics governing close compact object binaries.

  2. Improvement of tsunami detection in timeseries data of GPS buoys with the Continuous Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Y.; Takagawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    The observation data of GPS buoys which are installed in the offshore of Japan are used for monitoring not only waves but also tsunamis in Japan. The real-time data was successfully used to upgrade the tsunami warnings just after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Huge tsunamis can be easily detected because the signal-noise ratio is high enough, but moderate tsunami is not. GPS data sometimes include the error waveforms like tsunamis because of changing accuracy by the number and the position of GPS satellites. To distinguish the true tsunami waveforms from pseudo-tsunami ones is important for tsunami detection. In this research, a method to reduce misdetections of tsunami in the observation data of GPS buoys and to increase the efficiency of tsunami detection was developed.Firstly, the error waveforms were extracted by using the indexes of position dilution of precision, reliability of GPS satellite positioning and satellite number for calculation. Then, the output from this procedure was used for the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyze the time-frequency characteristics of error waveforms and real tsunami waveforms.We found that the error waveforms tended to appear when the accuracy of GPS buoys positioning was low. By extracting these waveforms, it was possible to decrease about 43% error waveforms without the reduction of the tsunami detection rate. Moreover, we found that the amplitudes of power spectra obtained from the error waveforms and real tsunamis were similar in the component of long period (4-65 minutes), on the other hand, the amplitude in the component of short period (< 1 minute) obtained from the error waveforms was significantly larger than that of the real tsunami waveforms. By thresholding of the short-period component, further extraction of error waveforms became possible without a significant reduction of tsunami detection rate.

  3. Design and Experiment Analysis of a Direct-Drive Wave Energy Converter with a Linear Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Coastal waves are an abundant nonpolluting and renewable energy source. A wave energy converter (WEC must be designed for efficient and steady operation in highly energetic ocean environments. A direct-drive wave energy conversion (D-DWEC system with a tubular permanent magnet linear generator (TPMLG on a wind and solar photovoltaic complementary energy generation platform is proposed to improve the conversion efficiency and reduce the complexity and device volume of WECs. The operating principle of D-DWECs is introduced, and detailed analyses of the proposed D-DWEC’s floater system, wave force characteristics, and conversion efficiency conducted using computational fluid dynamics are presented. A TPMLG with an asymmetric slot structure is designed to increase the output electric power, and detailed analyses of the magnetic field distribution, detent force characteristics, and no-load and load performances conducted using finite element analysis are discussed. The TPMLG with an asymmetric slot, which produces the same power as the TPMLG with a symmetric slot, has one fifth detent force of the latter. An experiment system with a prototype of the TPMLG with a symmetric slot is used to test the simulation results. The experiment and analysis results agree well. Therefore, the proposed D-DWEC fulfills the requirements of WEC systems.

  4. Banks of templates for directed searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarski, Andrzej; Jaranowski, Piotr; Pietka, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for directed searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning neutron stars in our Galaxy in data being collected by currently operating interferometric detectors. We thus assume that the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky is known, but we do not assume that the wave's frequency and its derivatives are a priori known. In the construction we employ a simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a polynomial function of time. All our template banks enable usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood F-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank. We study and employ the dependence of the grid's construction on the choice of the position of the observational interval with respect to the origin of time axis. We also study the usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithms with nonstandard frequency resolutions achieved by zero padding or folding the data. In the case of the gravitational-wave signal with one spin-down parameter included we have found grids with covering thicknesses which are only 0.1-16% larger than the thickness of the optimal 2-dimensional hexagonal covering.

  5. Evolution of a Directional Wave Spectrum in a 3D Marginal Ice Zone with Random Floe Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, F.; Squire, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through a realistic marginal ice zone (MIZ), where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by coherent conservative wave scattering effects. Field experiments conducted by Wadhams et al. (1986) in the Greenland Sea generated important data on wave attenuation in the MIZ and, particularly, on whether the wave spectrum spreads directionally or collimates with distance from the ice edge. The data suggest that angular isotropy, arising from multiple scattering by ice floes, occurs close to the edge and thenceforth dominates wave propagation throughout the MIZ. Although several attempts have been made to replicate this finding theoretically, including by the use of numerical models, none have confronted this problem in a 3D MIZ with fully randomised floe distribution properties. We construct such a model by subdividing the discontinuous ice cover into adjacent infinite slabs of finite width parallel to the ice edge. Each slab contains an arbitrary (but finite) number of circular ice floes with randomly distributed properties. Ice floes are modeled as thin elastic plates with uniform thickness and finite draught. We consider a directional wave spectrum with harmonic time dependence incident on the MIZ from the open ocean, defined as a continuous superposition of plane waves traveling at different angles. The scattering problem within each slab is then solved using Graf's interaction theory for an arbitrary incident directional plane wave spectrum. Using an appropriate integral representation of the Hankel function of the first kind (see Cincotti et al., 1993), we map the outgoing circular wave field from each floe on the slab boundaries into a directional spectrum of plane waves, which characterizes the slab reflected and transmitted fields. Discretizing the angular spectrum, we can obtain a scattering matrix for each slab. Standard recursive

  6. Directional Acoustic Wave Manipulation by a Porpoise via Multiphase Forehead Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Xianyan; Cao, Wenwu; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2017-12-01

    Porpoises are small-toothed whales, and they can produce directional acoustic waves to detect and track prey with high resolution and a wide field of view. Their sound-source sizes are rather small in comparison with the wavelength so that beam control should be difficult according to textbook sonar theories. Here, we demonstrate that the multiphase material structure in a porpoise's forehead is the key to manipulating the directional acoustic field. Computed tomography (CT) derives the multiphase (bone-air-tissue) complex, tissue experiments obtain the density and sound-velocity multiphase gradient distributions, and acoustic fields and beam formation are numerically simulated. The results suggest the control of wave propagations and sound-beam formations is realized by cooperation of the whole forehead's tissues and structures. The melon size significantly impacts the side lobes of the beam and slightly influences the main beams, while the orientation of the vestibular sac mainly adjusts the main beams. By compressing the forehead complex, the sound beam can be expanded for near view. The porpoise's biosonar allows effective wave manipulations for its omnidirectional sound source, which can help the future development of miniaturized biomimetic projectors in underwater sonar, medical ultrasonography, and other ultrasonic imaging applications.

  7. A test-bed modeling study for wave resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Neary, V. S.; Wang, T.; Gunawan, B.; Dallman, A.

    2016-02-01

    Hindcasts from phase-averaged wave models are commonly used to estimate standard statistics used in wave energy resource assessments. However, the research community and wave energy converter industry is lacking a well-documented and consistent modeling approach for conducting these resource assessments at different phases of WEC project development, and at different spatial scales, e.g., from small-scale pilot study to large-scale commercial deployment. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate current wave model codes, as well as limitations and knowledge gaps for predicting sea states, in order to establish best wave modeling practices, and to identify future research needs to improve wave prediction for resource assessment. This paper presents the first phase of an on-going modeling study to address these concerns. The modeling study is being conducted at a test-bed site off the Central Oregon Coast using two of the most widely-used third-generation wave models - WaveWatchIII and SWAN. A nested-grid modeling approach, with domain dimension ranging from global to regional scales, was used to provide wave spectral boundary condition to a local scale model domain, which has a spatial dimension around 60km by 60km and a grid resolution of 250m - 300m. Model results simulated by WaveWatchIII and SWAN in a structured-grid framework are compared to NOAA wave buoy data for the six wave parameters, including omnidirectional wave power, significant wave height, energy period, spectral width, direction of maximum directionally resolved wave power, and directionality coefficient. Model performance and computational efficiency are evaluated, and the best practices for wave resource assessments are discussed, based on a set of standard error statistics and model run times.

  8. Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator; Downie, Bruce [Project Manager

    2013-10-21

    Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large‐scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high‐voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon‐based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take‐off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take‐off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

  9. Meteorological buoy measurements in the Iceland Sea, 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nína Petersen, Guðrún

    2017-10-01

    The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) conducted meteorological buoy measurements in the central Iceland Sea in the time period 2007-2009, specifically in the northern Dreki area on the southern segment of the Jan Mayen Ridge. Due to difficulties in deployment and operations, in situ measurements in this region are sparse. Here the buoy, deployment and measurements are described with the aim of giving a future user of the data set information that is as comprehensive as possible. The data set has been quality-checked, suspect data removed and the data set made publicly available from PANGAEA Data Publisher (PANGAEA.876206" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.876206).

  10. Spiral-shaped piezoelectric sensors for Lamb waves direction of arrival (DoA) estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, L.; Testoni, N.; Marzani, A.

    2018-04-01

    A novel strategy to design piezoelectric sensors suited for direction of arrival (DoA) estimation of incoming Lamb waves is presented in this work. The designed sensor is composed by two piezoelectric patches (P1, P2) bonded on the structure to be inspected. In particular, by exploiting the Radon transform, the proposed procedure computes the shape of P2 given the shape of P1 so that the difference in time of arrival (DToA) of the Lamb waves at the two patches is linearly related to the DoA while being agnostic of the waveguide dispersion curves. With a dedicated processing procedure, the waveforms acquired from the two electrodes and digitized can be used to retrieve the DoA information. Numerical and experimental results show that DoA estimation performed by means of the proposed shaped transducers is extremely robust.

  11. Performance evaluation of compounding and directional beamforming techniques for carotid strain imaging using plane wave transmissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hendrik H.G.; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    2014-01-01

    Carotid strain imaging in 3D is not possible with conventional focused imaging, because the frame rate is too low. Plane wave ultrasound provides sufficiently high frame rates, albeit at t he cost of image quality, especially in the off - axis direction due to the lack of focusing . Multiple...... techniques have been developed to cope with the low off - axis image quality when performing 2D (and in future 3D) motion estimation: cross correlation with directional beamforming (with or without RF (coherent) compounding) and displacement compounding. This study compares the precision of these techniques...... with RF compounding and 2D displacement compounding with θ = ~20 ° per formed equally and best with a relative root - mean - squared error of ~2% with respect to the analytical solution . The mean and standard deviation of the estimated motion direction for 2D displacement compounding with θ = 20 ° was 0...

  12. Satellite-tracked drifting buoy observations in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Michael, G.S.

    two buoys moved north and the third moved south. Over the open sea regime the buoys moved with a speed of approximately 30 cm/s at an angle of about 35 degrees to the left of the wind. The overall tendencies seen in the buoy drift are similar to those...

  13. Development of a bi-directional standing wave linear piezoelectric actuator with four driving feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingxiang; Shi, Shengjun; Li, Chunhong; Chen, Weishan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Junkao

    2018-03-01

    A bi-directional standing wave linear piezoelectric ultrasonic actuator with four driving feet is proposed in this work. Two sandwich type transducers operated in longitudinal-bending hybrid modes are set parallelly. The working mode of the transducer is not simple hybrid vibrations of a longitudinal one and a bending one, but a special coupling vibration mode contained both longitudinal and bending components. Two transducers with the same structure and unsymmetrical boundary conditions are set parallelly to accomplish the bi-directional driving: the first transducer can push the runner forward, while the other one produces the backward driving. In the experiments, two voltages with different amplitudes are applied on the two transducers, respectively: the one with higher voltage serves as the actuator, whereas the other one applied with lower voltage is used to reduce the frictional force. The prototype achieves maximum no-load speed and thrust force of 244 mm/s and 9.8 N. This work gives a new idea for the construction of standing wave piezoelectric ultrasonic actuator with bi-directional driving ability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C., E-mail: C.Mateo-Segura@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  15. Wave steering effects in anisotropic composite structures: Direct calculation of the energy skew angle through a finite element scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulos, D

    2017-01-01

    A systematic expression quantifying the wave energy skewing phenomenon as a function of the mechanical characteristics of a non-isotropic structure is derived in this study. A structure of arbitrary anisotropy, layering and geometric complexity is modelled through Finite Elements (FEs) coupled to a periodic structure wave scheme. A generic approach for efficiently computing the angular sensitivity of the wave slowness for each wave type, direction and frequency is presented. The approach does not involve any finite differentiation scheme and is therefore computationally efficient and not prone to the associated numerical errors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ASSIMILATION OF REAL-TIME DEEP SEA BUOY DATA FOR TSUNAMI FORECASTING ALONG THAILAND’S ANDAMAN COASTLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seree Supharatid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami enhanced the necessity for a tsunami early warning system for countries bordering the Indian Ocean, including Thailand. This paper describes the assimilation of real-time deep sea buoy data for tsunami forecasting along Thailand’s Andaman coastline. Firstly, the numerical simulation (by the linear and non-linear shallow water equations was carried out for hypothetical cases of tsunamigenic earthquakes with epicenters located in the Andaman micro plate. Outputs of the numerical model are tsunami arrival times and the maximum wave height that can be expected at 58 selected communities along Thailand Andaman coastline and two locations of DART buoys in the Indian Ocean. Secondly, a “neural” network model (GRNN was developed to access the data from the numerical computations for subsequent construction of a tsunami database that can be displayed on a web-based system. This database can be updated with the integration from two DART buoys and from several GRNN models.

  17. UpTempO Buoys for Understanding and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    warming and fall cooling, and interannually as sea ice retreats and the warming season lengthens . The effort is a contribution to the multi-investigator...trajectory through late September, and time series of buoy thermistors (upper) and the 4 m depth salinity sensor time series (lower). Various stages in

  18. Assessment of wave energy resources in Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Cheung, Kwok Fai; Chen, Yi-Leng

    2011-01-01

    Hawaii is subject to direct approach of swells from distant storms as well as seas generated by trade winds passing through the islands. The archipelago creates a localized weather system that modifies the wave energy resources from the far field. We implement a nested computational grid along the major Hawaiian Islands in the global WaveWatch3 (WW3) model and utilize the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model to provide high-resolution mesoscale wind forcing over the Hawaii region. Two hindcast case studies representative of the year-round conditions provide a quantitative assessment of the regional wind and wave patterns as well as the wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain. These events of approximately two weeks each have a range of wind speeds, ground swells, and wind waves for validation of the model system with satellite and buoy measurements. The results demonstrate the wave energy potential in Hawaii waters. While the episodic swell events have enormous power reaching 60 kW/m, the wind waves, augmented by the local weather, provide a consistent energy resource of 15-25 kW/m throughout the year. (author)

  19. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral

  20. Nearshore Processes, Currents and Directional Wave Spectra Monitoring Using Coherent and Non-coherent Imaging Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trizna, D.; Hathaway, K.

    2007-05-01

    Two new radar systems have been developed for real-time measurement of near-shore processes, and results are presented for measurements of ocean wave spectra, near-shore sand bar structure, and ocean currents. The first is a non-coherent radar based on a modified version of the Sitex radar family, with a data acquisition system designed around an ISR digital receiver card. The card operates in a PC computer with inputs from a Sitex radar modified for extraction of analogue signals for digitization. Using a 9' antenna and 25 kW transmit power system, data were collected during 2007 at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF), Duck, NC during winter and spring of 2007. The directional wave spectrum measurements made are based on using a sequence of 64 to 640 antenna rotations to form a snapshot series of radar images of propagating waves. A square window is extracted from each image, typically 64 x 64 pixels at 3-m resolution. Then ten sets of 64 windows are submitted to a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform process to generate radar image spectra in the frequency-wavenumber space. The relation between the radar image spectral intensity and wave spectral intensity derived from the FRF pressure gauge array was used for a test set of data, in order to establish a modulation transfer function (MTF) for each frequency component. For 640 rotations, 10 of such spectra are averaged for improved statistics. The wave spectrum so generated was compared for extended data sets beyond those used to establish the MTF, and those results are presented here. Some differences between the radar and pressure sensor data that are observed are found to be due to the influence of the wind field, as the radar echo image weakens for light winds. A model is developed to account for such an effect to improve the radar estimate of the directional wave spectrum. The radar ocean wave imagery is severely influenced only by extremely heavy rain-fall rates, so that

  1. Wave energy conversion utilizing vertical motion of water in the array of water chambers aligned in the direction of wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesayoshi Hadano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As a new technical approach, wave energy converter by using vertical motion of water in the multiple water chambers were developed to realize actual wave power generation as eco-environmental renewable energy. And practical use of wave energy converter was actually to require the following conditions: (1 setting up of the relevant device and its application to wave power generation in case that severe wave loading is avoided; (2 workability in installation and maintenance operations; (3 high energy conversion potential; and (4 low cost. In this system, neither the wall(s of the chambers nor the energy conversion device(s are exposed to the impulsive load due to water wave. Also since this system is profitable when set along the jetty or along a long floating body, installation and maintenance are done without difficulty and the cost is reduced. In this paper, we describe the system which consists of a float, a shaft connected with another shaft, a rack and pinion arrangement, a ratchet mechanism, and rotary type generator(s. Then, we present the dynamics model for evaluating the output electric power, and the results of numerical calculation including the effect of the phase shift of up/down motion of the water in the array of water chambers aligned along the direction of wave propagation.

  2. Study of mode-converted and directly-excited ion Bernstein waves by CO2 laser scattering in Alcator C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Y.; Fiore, C.L.; McDermott, F.S.; Moody, J.D.; Porkolab, M.; Shepard, T.; Squire, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mode-converted and directly excited ion Bernstein waves (IBW) were studied using CO 2 laser scattering in the Alcator C tokamak. During the ICRF fast wave heating experiments, mode-converted IBW was observed on the high-field side of the resonance in both second harmonic and minority heating regimes. By comparing the relative scattered powers from the two antennas separated by 180 0 toroidally, an increased toroidal wave damping with increasing density was inferred. In the IBW heating experiments, optimum direct excitation is obtained when an ion-cyclotron harmonic layer is located just behind the antenna. Wave absorption at the ω = 3Ω/sub D/ = 1.5Ω/sub H/ layer was directly observed. Edge ion heating was inferred from the IBW dispersion when this absorption layer was located in the plasma periphery, which may be responsible for the observed improvement in particle confinement

  3. Direct Measurements of Energy Transfer between Hot Protons and He+ via EMIC Waves Observed by MMS in the Outer Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, N.; Kitahara, M.; Shoji, M.; Miyoshi, Y.; Hasegawa, H.; Nakamura, S.; Katoh, Y.; Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Gershman, D. J.; Vinas, A. F.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Paterson, W.; Pollock, C. J.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Burch, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions have been suggested to play a crucial role in energy transfer in collisionless space plasmas in which the motion of charged particles is controlled by electromagnetic fields. Using an electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave event observed by MMS, we investigate energy transfer between ions and EMIC waves via cyclotron type interactions. To directly detect energy exchange between ions and EMIC waves, we apply the Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer (WPIA) method that is to calculate the dot product between the wave electric field (Ewave) and ion current perpendicular to the background magnetic field (j). In the cases of resonance, this current is called the resonant current. Near the beginning of the wave event, 15-second averages of j • Ewave reached -0.3 pW/m3 for ions with energies of 14-30 keV and pitch angles of 33.25°-78.75°. The negative value in this pitch angle range indicates that the perpendicular energy of ions was being transferred to the EMIC waves propagating toward Southern higher latitudes at the MMS location by cyclotron resonance. Ion data show non-gyrotropic distributions around the resonance velocity, and that is consistent with the nonlinear trapping of protons by the wave and formation of an electromagnetic proton hole. Near the beginning of the same wave event, strongly phase bunched He+ up to 2 keV with pitch angles slightly larger than 90° were also detected. A positive j • Ewave for the phase bunched He+ indicates that the He+ was being accelerated by the electric field of the EMIC waves. The observed feature of He+ ions is consistent with non-resonant interaction with the wave but is inconsistent with cyclotron resonance. Significantly non-gyrotropic distributions observed in this event demonstrate that different particle populations can strongly couple through wave-particle interactions in the collisionless plasma.

  4. Harnessing Alternative Energy Sources to Enhance the Design of a Wave Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Wave energy has the power to replace a non-renewable source of electricity for a home near the ocean. I built a small-scale wave generator capable of producing approximately 5 volts of electricity. The generator is an array of 16 small generators, each consisting of 200 feet of copper wire, 12 magnets, and a buoy. I tested my design in the Pacific Ocean and was able to power a string of lights I had attached to the generator. While the waves in the ocean moved my buoys, my design was powered by the vertical motion of the waves. My generator was hit with significant horizontal wave motion, and I realized I wasn't taking advantage of that direction of motion. To make my generator produce more electricity, I experimented with capturing the energy of the horizontal motion of water and incorporated that into my generator design. My generator, installed in the ocean, is also exposed to sun and wind, and I am exploring the potential of solar and wind energy collection in my design to increase the electricity output. Once I have maximized my electricity output, I would like to explore scaling up my design.

  5. Parameter estimation method that directly compares gravitational wave observations to numerical relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Boyle, M.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, T.; Clark, J. A.; Demos, N.; Fong, H.; Healy, J.; Hemberger, D. A.; Hinder, I.; Jani, K.; Khamesra, B.; Kidder, L. E.; Kumar, P.; Laguna, P.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Ossokine, S.; Pfeiffer, H.; Scheel, M. A.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.

    2017-11-01

    We present and assess a Bayesian method to interpret gravitational wave signals from binary black holes. Our method directly compares gravitational wave data to numerical relativity (NR) simulations. In this study, we present a detailed investigation of the systematic and statistical parameter estimation errors of this method. This procedure bypasses approximations used in semianalytical models for compact binary coalescence. In this work, we use the full posterior parameter distribution for only generic nonprecessing binaries, drawing inferences away from the set of NR simulations used, via interpolation of a single scalar quantity (the marginalized log likelihood, ln L ) evaluated by comparing data to nonprecessing binary black hole simulations. We also compare the data to generic simulations, and discuss the effectiveness of this procedure for generic sources. We specifically assess the impact of higher order modes, repeating our interpretation with both l ≤2 as well as l ≤3 harmonic modes. Using the l ≤3 higher modes, we gain more information from the signal and can better constrain the parameters of the gravitational wave signal. We assess and quantify several sources of systematic error that our procedure could introduce, including simulation resolution and duration; most are negligible. We show through examples that our method can recover the parameters for equal mass, zero spin, GW150914-like, and unequal mass, precessing spin sources. Our study of this new parameter estimation method demonstrates that we can quantify and understand the systematic and statistical error. This method allows us to use higher order modes from numerical relativity simulations to better constrain the black hole binary parameters.

  6. Optimally setting up directed searches for continuous gravitational waves in Advanced LIGO O1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jing; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Krishnan, Badri; Prix, Reinhard; Beer, Christian; Zhu, Sylvia J.; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Bock, Oliver; Machenschalk, Bernd

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we design a search for continuous gravitational waves from three supernova remnants: Vela Jr., Cassiopeia A (Cas A) and G347.3. These systems might harbor rapidly rotating neutron stars emitting quasiperiodic gravitational radiation detectable by the advanced LIGO detectors. Our search is designed to use the volunteer computing project Einstein@Home for a few months and assumes the sensitivity and duty cycles of the advanced LIGO detectors during their first science run. For all three supernova remnants, the sky positions of their central compact objects are well known but the frequency and spin-down rates of the neutron stars are unknown which makes the searches computationally limited. In a previous paper we have proposed a general framework for deciding on what target we should spend computational resources and in what proportion, what frequency and spin-down ranges we should search for every target, and with what search setup. Here we further expand this framework and apply it to design a search directed at detecting continuous gravitational wave signals from the most promising three supernova remnants identified as such in the previous work. Our optimization procedure yields broad frequency and spin-down searches for all three objects, at an unprecedented level of sensitivity: The smallest detectable gravitational wave strain h0 for Cas A is expected to be 2 times smaller than the most sensitive upper limits published to date, and our proposed search, which was set up and ran on the volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, covers a much larger frequency range.

  7. Multiscale climate emulator of multimodal wave spectra: MUSCLE-spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Ana; Hegermiller, Christie A.; Antolinez, Jose A. A.; Camus, Paula; Vitousek, Sean; Ruggiero, Peter; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Tomás, Antonio; Mendez, Fernando J.

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of multimodal directional wave spectra is important for many offshore and coastal applications, such as marine forecasting, coastal hazard assessment, and design of offshore wave energy farms and coastal structures. However, the multivariate and multiscale nature of wave climate variability makes this complex problem tractable using computationally expensive numerical models. So far, the skill of statistical-downscaling model-based parametric (unimodal) wave conditions is limited in large ocean basins such as the Pacific. The recent availability of long-term directional spectral data from buoys and wave hindcast models allows for development of stochastic models that include multimodal sea-state parameters. This work introduces a statistical downscaling framework based on weather types to predict multimodal wave spectra (e.g., significant wave height, mean wave period, and mean wave direction from different storm systems, including sea and swells) from large-scale atmospheric pressure fields. For each weather type, variables of interest are modeled using the categorical distribution for the sea-state type, the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution for wave height and wave period, a multivariate Gaussian copula for the interdependence between variables, and a Markov chain model for the chronology of daily weather types. We apply the model to the southern California coast, where local seas and swells from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres contribute to the multimodal wave spectrum. This work allows attribution of particular extreme multimodal wave events to specific atmospheric conditions, expanding knowledge of time-dependent, climate-driven offshore and coastal sea-state conditions that have a significant influence on local nearshore processes, coastal morphology, and flood hazards.

  8. Mixing of two co-directional Rayleigh surface waves in a nonlinear elastic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlock, Merlin B; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    The mixing of two co-directional, initially monochromatic Rayleigh surface waves in an isotropic, homogeneous, and nonlinear elastic solid is investigated using analytical, finite element method, and experimental approaches. The analytical investigations show that while the horizontal velocity component can form a shock wave, the vertical velocity component can form a pulse independent of the specific ratios of the fundamental frequencies and amplitudes that are mixed. This analytical model is then used to simulate the development of the fundamentals, second harmonics, and the sum and difference frequency components over the propagation distance. The analytical model is further extended to include diffraction effects in the parabolic approximation. Finally, the frequency and amplitude ratios of the fundamentals are identified which provide maximum amplitudes of the second harmonics as well as of the sum and difference frequency components, to help guide effective material characterization; this approach should make it possible to measure the acoustic nonlinearity of a solid not only with the second harmonics, but also with the sum and difference frequency components. Results of the analytical investigations are then confirmed using the finite element method and the experimental feasibility of the proposed technique is validated for an aluminum specimen.

  9. Evaluation of the numerical wave model (SWAN) for wave simulation in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpınar, Adem; van Vledder, Gerbrant Ph.; Kömürcü, Murat İhsan; Özger, Mehmet

    2012-12-01

    This study summaries the implementation of the SWAN model forced by the ECMWF ERA Interim dataset reanalyzed 10 m winds over the Black Sea which will be used to study the wind-wave climate and wave energy potential in the region, and its verification. The SWAN model results were compared with directional buoy measurements at three locations along the north and south coasts of the Black Sea, parametric model results based on the JONSWAP growth relations, and the results of previous studies. The SWAN model has been applied in a third generation and non-stationary mode with spherical coordinates. The linear and exponential growth from wind input, depth-induced wave breaking, bottom friction, whitecapping, four-wave (for deep water) and triad-wave (for shallow water) nonlinear interactions have been activated in the simulations. The results of this study indicate that agreement between simulated and observed wave parameters is satisfactory and it is slightly more accurate than the results of the previous studies. However, it still has lower estimates for the maximum values of both wave parameters. These lower estimates are probably due to too low wind speeds in the applied ECMWF wind fields, which is probably caused by orographic effects, and due to the relatively course resolution in time and space of the ECMWF (ERA-Interim) wind fields for the Black Sea.

  10. An analysis of JET fast-wave heating and current drive experiments directly related to ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, V P; Eriksson, L; Gormezano, C; Jacquinot, J; Kaye, A; Start, D F.H. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The ITER fast-wave system is required to serve a variety of purposes, in particular, plasma heating to ignition, current profile and burn control and eventually, in conjunction with other schemes, a central non-inductive current drive (CD) for the steady-state operation of ITER. The ICRF heating and current drive data that has been obtained in JET are analyzed in terms of dimensionless parameters, with a view to ascertaining its direct relevance to key ITER requirements. The analysis is then used to identify areas both in physics and technological aspects of ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and CD that require further experimentation in ITER-relevant devices such as JET to establish the required data base. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs.

  11. An analysis of JET fast-wave heating and current drive experiments directly related to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Eriksson, L.; Gormezano, C.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A.; Start, D.F.H.

    1994-01-01

    The ITER fast-wave system is required to serve a variety of purposes, in particular, plasma heating to ignition, current profile and burn control and eventually, in conjunction with other schemes, a central non-inductive current drive (CD) for the steady-state operation of ITER. The ICRF heating and current drive data that has been obtained in JET are analyzed in terms of dimensionless parameters, with a view to ascertaining its direct relevance to key ITER requirements. The analysis is then used to identify areas both in physics and technological aspects of ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and CD that require further experimentation in ITER-relevant devices such as JET to establish the required data base. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs

  12. Direct path from microscopic mechanics to Debye shielding, Landau damping and wave-particle interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escande, D F; Elskens, Yves; Doveil, F

    2015-01-01

    The derivation of Debye shielding and Landau damping from the N-body description of plasmas is performed directly by using Newton’s second law for the N-body system. This is done in a few steps with elementary calculations using standard tools of calculus and no probabilistic setting. Unexpectedly, Debye shielding is encountered together with Landau damping. This approach is shown to be justified in the one-dimensional case when the number of particles in a Debye sphere becomes large. The theory is extended to accommodate a correct description of trapping and chaos due to Langmuir waves. On top of their well-known production of collisional transport, the repulsive deflections of electrons are shown to produce shielding, in such a way that each particle is shielded by all other ones, while keeping in uninterrupted motion. (paper)

  13. Direct measurement of density oscillation induced by a radio-frequency wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T.; Ejiri, A.; Shimada, Y.; Oosako, T.; Tsujimura, J.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H.

    2007-01-01

    An O-mode reflectometer at a frequency of 25.85 GHz was applied to plasmas heated by the high harmonic fast wave (21 MHz) in the TST-2 spherical tokamak. An oscillation in the phase of the reflected microwave in the rf range was observed directly for the first time. In TST-2, the rf (250 kW) induced density oscillation depends mainly on the poloidal rf electric field, which is estimated to be about 0.2 kV/m rms by the reflectometer measurement. Sideband peaks separated in frequency by ion cyclotron harmonics from 21 MHz, and peaks at ion cyclotron harmonics which are suggested to be quasimodes generated by parametric decay, were detected

  14. Wave packet methods for the direct calculation of energy-transfer moments in molecular collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, K.S.; Schatz, G.C.; Balint-Kurti, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a new wave packet based theory for the direct calculation of energy-transfer moments in molecular collision processes. This theory does not contain any explicit reference to final state information associated with the collision dynamics, thereby avoiding the need for determining vibration-rotation bound states (other than the initial state) for the molecules undergoing collision and also avoiding the calculation of state-to-state transition probabilities. The theory applies to energy-transfer moments of any order, and it generates moments for a wide range of translational energies in a single calculation. Two applications of the theory are made that demonstrate its viability; one is to collinear He + H 2 and the other to collinear He + CS 2 (with two active vibrational modes in CS 2 ). The results of these applications agree well with earlier results based on explicit calculation of transition probabilities

  15. Direct AC–AC grid interface converter for ocean wave energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.M.; Chan, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel power grid interface converter for ocean wave energy system. • Unlike conventional approach, generator output is directly converted into fixed frequency AC for synchronous connection. • High conversion efficient and power quality could be achieved. - Abstract: Ocean wave energy is very promising. However, existing systems are using rectifying circuits to convert variable voltage and variable frequency output of electric generator into DC voltage and then use grid-tied inverter to connect to the power grid. Such arrangement will not only reduce the overall efficient but also increase the cost of the system. A direct AC–AC converter is a desirable solution. In this paper, a six-switch AC–AC converter has been proposed as a single phase grid-connected interface. New switching scheme has been derived for the converter such that the virtual input AC–DC conversion and the output DC–AC conversion can be decoupled. State-space averaging model and pulse width modulation scheme have been derived for the converter. As the input and the output operations can be decoupled, two independent controllers have been designed to handle the input AC–DC regulation and the output DC–AC regulation. The proposed scheme demands for two separate duty ratios and novel switching scheme has been derived to realize the combined duty ratios in one switching cycle. Power regulation, harmonics elimination and power factor correction control algorithms have also been derived for the converter when it is connected to the supply grid. Experimental results of a small scale model are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed switching and control schemes

  16. Effect of higher order nonlinearity, directionality and finite water depth on wave statistics: Comparison of field data and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Leandro; Monbaliu, Jaak; Onorato, Miguel; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    This research is focused on the study of nonlinear evolution of irregular wave fields in water of arbitrary depth by comparing field measurements and numerical simulations.It is now well accepted that modulational instability, known as one of the main mechanisms for the formation of rogue waves, induces strong departures from Gaussian statistics. However, whereas non-Gaussian properties are remarkable when wave fields follow one direction of propagation over an infinite water depth, wave statistics only weakly deviate from Gaussianity when waves spread over a range of different directions. Over finite water depth, furthermore, wave instability attenuates overall and eventually vanishes for relative water depths as low as kh=1.36 (where k is the wavenumber of the dominant waves and h the water depth). Recent experimental results, nonetheless, seem to indicate that oblique perturbations are capable of triggering and sustaining modulational instability even if khthe aim of this research is to understand whether the combined effect of directionality and finite water depth has a significant effect on wave statistics and particularly on the occurrence of extremes. For this purpose, numerical experiments have been performed solving the Euler equation of motion with the Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM) and compared with data of short crested wave fields for different sea states observed at the Lake George (Australia). A comparative analysis of the statistical properties (i.e. density function of the surface elevation and its statistical moments skewness and kurtosis) between simulations and in-situ data provides a confrontation between the numerical developments and real observations in field conditions.

  17. Meteorological buoy measurements in the Iceland Sea, 2007–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Petersen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO conducted meteorological buoy measurements in the central Iceland Sea in the time period 2007–2009, specifically in the northern Dreki area on the southern segment of the Jan Mayen Ridge. Due to difficulties in deployment and operations, in situ measurements in this region are sparse. Here the buoy, deployment and measurements are described with the aim of giving a future user of the data set information that is as comprehensive as possible. The data set has been quality-checked, suspect data removed and the data set made publicly available from PANGAEA Data Publisher (https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.876206.

  18. Study of hydrodynamic characteristics of a Sharp Eagle wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-qun; Sheng, Song-wei; You, Ya-ge; Huang, Zhen-xin; Wang, Wen-sheng

    2017-06-01

    According to Newton's Second Law and the microwave theory, mechanical analysis of multiple buoys which form Sharp Eagle wave energy converter (WEC) is carried out. The movements of every buoy in three modes couple each other when they are affected with incident waves. Based on the above, mechanical models of the WEC are established, which are concerned with fluid forces, damping forces, hinge forces, and so on. Hydrodynamic parameters of one buoy are obtained by taking the other moving buoy as boundary conditions. Then, by taking those hydrodynamic parameters into the mechanical models, the optimum external damping and optimal capture width ratio are calculated out. Under the condition of the optimum external damping, a plenty of data are obtained, such as the displacements amplitude of each buoy in three modes (sway, heave, pitch), damping forces, hinge forces, and speed of the hydraulic cylinder. Research results provide theoretical references and basis for Sharp Eagle WECs in the design and manufacture.

  19. A loading/unloading buoy; Laste/losseboeye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breivik, K.; Smedal, A.; Syvertsen, K.

    1994-10-10

    The invention relates to a buoy design for use in the offshore loading or unloading of crude oil in particular. The buoy comprises an outer buoyancy member arranged to be introduced and secured in a submerged downwardly open receiving space in a floating vessel, and a central member which is rotatably mounted in the outer member and is intended for anchoring to the sea bed and arranged for passage of medium between a transfer line which, in operation, is coupled to the lower end of the central member and a tube system on the vessel. The central member is provided with a lower extension body having an outer peripheral portion abutting on and essentially corresponding to the outer periphery of the adjacent end of the outer buoyancy member, and having a lower portion which is downwardly tapering from the outer peripheral portion. A number of fastening means for fastening of the upper ends of anchoring lines for anchoring of the buoy are fastened at intervals along the periphery of the outer peripheral portion of the extension body, and the extension body comprises at least one buoyancy chamber for buoyancy or ballast material. 6 figs.

  20. A brute-force spectral approach for wave estimation using measured vessel motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik D.; Brodtkorb, Astrid H.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2018-01-01

    , and the procedure is simple in its mathematical formulation. The actual formulation is extending another recent work by including vessel advance speed and short-crested seas. Due to its simplicity, the procedure is computationally efficient, providing wave spectrum estimates in the order of a few seconds......The article introduces a spectral procedure for sea state estimation based on measurements of motion responses of a ship in a short-crested seaway. The procedure relies fundamentally on the wave buoy analogy, but the wave spectrum estimate is obtained in a direct - brute-force - approach......, and the estimation procedure will therefore be appealing to applications related to realtime, onboard control and decision support systems for safe and efficient marine operations. The procedure's performance is evaluated by use of numerical simulation of motion measurements, and it is shown that accurate wave...

  1. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han; Guo, Bowen; Hanafy, Sherif; Lin, Fan-Chi; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps

  2. Experiments to Improve Power Conversion Parameters in a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeno, Hiromasa; Kiriyama, Yuusuke; Yasaka, Yasuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study of direct power conversion for D- 3 He fusion is presented. In a small-scale simulator of direct energy converter, which is based on a principle of deceleration of 14.7MeV protons by traveling wave field, a new structure of an external transmission circuit in experiment is proposed for the purpose of enhancement of deceleration electrode voltages. A prototype circuit was designed and constructed, resulting improvement of voltage amplitude in an order of magnitude. A more practical circuit, in which inductor elements were manufactured by using coaxial cables, was also constructed and tested. An excitation of the third harmonic frequency with a significant amplitude was observed. The cause of this problem is attributed to the modulated ion beam which has a third harmonic component and fact that the inductance of the element nonlinearly depends on frequency. This problem is serious for a practical scale energy converter, and a careful design of the circuit could avoid the problem

  3. 60-GHz Millimeter-wave Over Fiber with Directly Modulated Dual-mode Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2016-01-01

    A directly modulated dual-mode laser diode (DMLD) with third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) suppression is proposed for a 60-GHz millimeter-wave over fiber (MMWoF) architecture, enabling new fiber-wireless communication access to cover 4-km single-mode-fiber (SMF) and 3-m wireless 16-QAM OFDM transmissions. By dual-mode injection-locking, the throughput degradation of the DMLD is mitigated with saturation effect to reduce its threshold, IMD3 power and relative intensity noise to 7.7 mA, −85 dBm and −110.4 dBc/Hz, respectively, providing huge spurious-free dynamic range of 85.8 dB/Hz2/3. This operation suppresses the noise floor of the DMLD carried QPSK-OFDM spectrum by 5 dB. The optical receiving power is optimized to restrict the power fading effect for improving the bit error rate to 1.9 × 10−3 and the receiving power penalty to 1.1 dB. Such DMLD based hybrid architecture for 60-GHz MMW fiber-wireless access can directly cover the current optical and wireless networks for next-generation indoor and short-reach mobile communications. PMID:27297267

  4. John porter lecture: waves of protest--direct action, deliberation, and diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lesley

    2015-02-01

    The book Direct Action, Deliberation and Diffusion: Collective Action After the WTO Protests in Seattle argues that the process of diffusion is dependent on social processes in the receiving context. The most important in social movements is an egalitarian and reflexive deliberation among diverse actors. The book traces the direct action tactics associated with the Seattle protests against the World Trade Organization in 1999 and how these spread to activists in Toronto and New York City. It shows how the structure of the political field, racial and class inequalities, identity boundaries, and organizational and conversational dynamics limited deliberation among activists, and thus limited the diffusion of the Seattle tactics. By constraining the spread of the Seattle tactics, this slowed the global justice movement's wave of protest. In this paper, I explore the application of and implications of this model of protest tactic diffusion to the recent Idle No More mobilizations. © 2015 Canadian Sociological Association/La Société canadienne de sociologie.

  5. Communicating Wave Energy: An Active Learning Experience for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trongnghia; Hou, Gene; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted an education project to communicate the wave energy concept to high school students. A virtual reality system that combines both hardware and software is developed in this project to simulate the buoy-wave interaction. This first-of-its-kind wave energy unit is portable and physics-based, allowing students to conduct a number of…

  6. The incorporation of fault zone head wave and direct wave secondary arrival times and arrival polarizations into seismic tomography: Application to the Parkfield, California area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennington, N. L.; Thurber, C. H.; Peng, Z.; Zhao, P.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D P-wave velocity (Vp) model of the Parkfield region that utilizes existing P-wave arrival time data, including fault zone head waves (FZHW), plus new data from direct wave secondary arrivals (DWSA). The first-arrival and DWSA travel times are obtained as the global and local minimum travel time paths, respectively. The inclusion of DWSA results in as much as a 10% increase in the across-fault velocity contrast for the Vp model at Parkfield relative to Thurber et al. (2006). Viewed along strike, three pronounced velocity contrast regions are observed: a pair of strong positive velocity contrasts (SW fast), one NW of the 1966 Parkfield hypocenter and the other SE of the 2004 Parkfield hypocenter, and a strong negative velocity contrast (NE fast) between the two hypocenters. The negative velocity contrast partially to entirely encompasses peak coseismic slip estimated in several slip models for the 2004 earthquake, suggesting that the negative velocity contrast played a part in defining the rupture patch of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We expand on this work by modifying our seismic tomography algorithm to incorporate arrival polarizations (azimuths). Synthetic tests will be presented to demonstrate the improvements in velocity structure when arrival polarizations are incorporated. These tests will compare the synthetic model recovered when FZHW/DWSA arrivals as well as existing P-wave arrival time data are inverted to that recovered with the same dataset with the inclusion of arrival polarizations. We plan to extend this work to carry out a full scale seismic tomography/relocation inversion at Parkfield, CA utilizing arrival polarizations from all first-P arrivals, and FZHW/DWSA arrivals as well as existing P-wave arrival time data. This effort requires the determination of polarization data for all P-waves and FZHW's at Parkfield. To this end, we use changes in the arrival azimuth from fault normal to source-receiver direction to identify FZHW and

  7. Spatial and temporal variations of wave energy in the nearshore waters of the central west coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrutha, M. M.; Sanil Kumar, V.

    2016-12-01

    Assessment of wave power potential at different water depths and time is required for identifying a wave power plant location. This study examines the variation in wave power off the central west coast of India at water depths of 30, 9 and 5 m based on waverider buoy measured wave data. The study shows a significant reduction ( ˜ 10 to 27 %) in wave power at 9 m water depth compared to 30 m and the wave power available at 5 m water depth is 20 to 23 % less than that at 9 m. At 9 m depth, the seasonal mean value of the wave power varied from 1.6 kW m-1 in the post-monsoon period (ONDJ) to 15.2 kW m-1 in the Indian summer monsoon (JJAS) period. During the Indian summer monsoon period, the variation of wave power in a day is up to 32 kW m-1. At 9 m water depth, the mean annual wave power is 6 kW m-1 and interannual variations up to 19.3 % are observed during 2009-2014. High wave energy ( > 20 kW m-1) at the study area is essentially from the directional sector 245-270° and also 75 % of the total annual wave energy is from this narrow directional sector, which is advantageous while aligning the wave energy converter.

  8. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  9. Moball-Buoy Network: A Near-Real-Time Ground-Truth Distributed Monitoring System to Map Ice, Weather, Chemical Species, and Radiations, in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, F.; Shahabi, C.; Burdick, J.; Rais-Zadeh, M.; Menemenlis, D.

    2014-12-01

    The work had been funded by NASA HQ's office of Cryospheric Sciences Program. Recent observations of the Arctic have shown that sea ice has diminished drastically, consequently impacting the environment in the Arctic and beyond. Certain factors such as atmospheric anomalies, wind forces, temperature increase, and change in the distribution of cold and warm waters contribute to the sea ice reduction. However current measurement capabilities lack the accuracy, temporal sampling, and spatial coverage required to effectively quantify each contributing factor and to identify other missing factors. Addressing the need for new measurement capabilities for the new Arctic regime, we propose a game-changing in-situ Arctic-wide Distributed Mobile Monitoring system called Moball-buoy Network. Moball-buoy Network consists of a number of wind-propelled self-powered inflatable spheres referred to as Moball-buoys. The Moball-buoys are self-powered. They use their novel mechanical control and energy harvesting system to use the abundance of wind in the Arctic for their controlled mobility and energy harvesting. They are equipped with an array of low-power low-mass sensors and micro devices able to measure a wide range of environmental factors such as the ice conditions, chemical species wind vector patterns, cloud coverage, air temperature and pressure, electromagnetic fields, surface and subsurface water conditions, short- and long-wave radiations, bathymetry, and anthropogenic factors such as pollutions. The stop-and-go motion capability, using their novel mechanics, and the heads up cooperation control strategy at the core of the proposed distributed system enable the sensor network to be reconfigured dynamically according to the priority of the parameters to be monitored. The large number of Moball-buoys with their ground-based, sea-based, satellite and peer-to-peer communication capabilities would constitute a wireless mesh network that provides an interface for a global

  10. Multi-directional plasmonic surface-wave splitters with full bandwidth isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    We present a multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter with full bandwidth isolation experimentally based on coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. In contrast to conventional plasmonic surface-wave frequency splitters with polaritonic dispersion relations that overlap at low frequencies, this multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter based on coupled defect surface modes can split different frequency bands into different waveguide branches without bandwidth overlap. Transmission spectra and near-field imaging measurements have been implemented in the microwave frequencies to verify the performance of the multidirectional plasmonic surface-wave splitter. This surface wave structure can be used as a plasmonic wavelength-division multiplexer that may find potential applications in the surface-wave integrated circuits from microwave to terahertz frequencies.

  11. Directional asymmetry of the nonlinear wave phenomena in a three-dimensional granular phononic crystal under gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Gusev, V

    2014-08-01

    We report the experimental observation of the gravity-induced asymmetry for the nonlinear transformation of acoustic waves in a noncohesive granular phononic crystal. Because of the gravity, the contact precompression increases with depth inducing space variations of not only the linear and nonlinear elastic moduli but also of the acoustic wave dissipation. We show experimentally and explain theoretically that, in contrast to symmetric propagation of linear waves, the amplitude of the nonlinearly self-demodulated wave depends on whether the propagation of the waves is in the direction of the gravity or in the opposite direction. Among the observed nonlinear processes, we report frequency mixing of the two transverse-rotational modes belonging to the optical band of vibrations and propagating with negative phase velocities, which results in the excitation of a longitudinal wave belonging to the acoustic band of vibrations and propagating with positive phase velocity. We show that the measurements of the gravity-induced asymmetry in the nonlinear acoustic phenomena can be used to compare the in-depth distributions of the contact nonlinearity and of acoustic absorption.

  12. Experimental study of deceleration process of traveling wave direct energy converter for advanced fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeno, Hormasa; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Takada, Kousuke; Yasaka, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Advanced fusion is attractive in the view point of utilization of high efficiency direct energy conversion from fusion produced ions. Deuterium-helium-3 reaction is the most possible, however, the energy of created fast proton is so enormous that conventional electro-static converters cannot be applied. Use of a traveling wave direct energy converter (TWDEC), the principle of which was inverse process of a linear accelerator, was proposed for recovering energy of the fast protons. In order to realize the TWDEC, the authors are continuing experimental study by employing a small-scale simulator. A TWDEC consists of a modulator and a decelerator. Fast proton beam extracted from a reactor is introduced in the modulator where radio frequency (RF) electrostatic field modulate the beam velocity, and hence, the protons are bunched and density-modulated in the downstream. The density-modulated protons flow into the decelerator where a number of electrodes connected to a transmission circuit are axially aligned. The flowing protons induce RF current which creates RF traveling voltage on the electrodes. The RF traveling field between aligned electrodes decelerates the protons, thus their energy is recovered into RF power. In this paper, deceleration process of TWDEC is experimentally examined. In our experimental simulator, because of the small beam current, the induced potential, i.e. the deceleration field is so weak that the beam cannot be decelerated. Thus, we examined the process by dividing into two: one was induction of the deceleration field by the modulated beam, which was called as passive decelerator. The other was energy recovery through interaction between the deceleration field and the modulated beam. In this latter experiment, the deceleration field was supplied externally, and we called this as active decelerator. As for the active decelerator mode, we performed higher beam energy experiment than previous one. As the beam energy increases, the divergence of

  13. Directional and dynamic modulation of the optical emission of an individual GaAs nanowire using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Jörg B; Rudolph, Daniel; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Koblmüller, Gregor; Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J

    2011-04-13

    We report on optical experiments performed on individual GaAs nanowires and the manipulation of their temporal emission characteristics using a surface acoustic wave. We find a pronounced, characteristic suppression of the emission intensity for the surface acoustic wave propagation aligned with the axis of the nanowire. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this quenching is dynamical as it shows a pronounced modulation as the local phase of the surface acoustic wave is tuned. These effects are strongly reduced for a surface acoustic wave applied in the direction perpendicular to the axis of the nanowire due to their inherent one-dimensional geometry. We resolve a fully dynamic modulation of the nanowire emission up to 678 MHz not limited by the physical properties of the nanowires.

  14. Characterization of the Deep Water Surface Wave Variability in the California Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas Bôas, Ana B.; Gille, Sarah T.; Mazloff, Matthew R.; Cornuelle, Bruce D.

    2017-11-01

    Surface waves are crucial for the dynamics of the upper ocean not only because they mediate exchanges of momentum, heat, energy, and gases between the ocean and the atmosphere, but also because they determine the sea state. The surface wave field in a given region is set by the combination of local and remote forcing. The present work characterizes the seasonal variability of the deep water surface wave field in the California Current region, as retrieved from over two decades of satellite altimetry data combined with wave buoys and wave model hindcast (WaveWatch III). In particular, the extent to which the local wind modulates the variability of the significant wave height, peak period, and peak direction is assessed. During spring/summer, regional-scale wind events of up to 10 m/s are the dominant forcing for waves off the California coast, leading to relatively short-period waves (8-10 s) that come predominantly from the north-northwest. The wave climatology throughout the California Current region shows average significant wave heights exceeding 2 m during most of the year, which may have implications for the planning and retrieval methods of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission.

  15. Waves energy comes to surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guezel, J.Ch.

    2006-01-01

    The wave- or thalasso-energy, potentially as promising as wind energy, have started to develop in Europe. Great Britain has already a good experience in this domain but France shows also ambitions in this beginning industry with several projects in progress. This article makes an overview of the existing tide-, current- and wave-powered generators: tide mills, underwater hydro-turbines, immersed linear generators, air-compression systems, buoy systems, etc. (J.S.)

  16. One- and Two-dimensional Solitary Wave States in the Nonlinear Kramers Equation with Movement Direction as a Variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishibashi, Kazuya

    2018-06-01

    We study self-propelled particles by direct numerical simulation of the nonlinear Kramers equation for self-propelled particles. In our previous paper, we studied self-propelled particles with velocity variables in one dimension. In this paper, we consider another model in which each particle exhibits directional motion. The movement direction is expressed with a variable ϕ. We show that one-dimensional solitary wave states appear in direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear Kramers equation in one- and two-dimensional systems, which is a generalization of our previous result. Furthermore, we find two-dimensionally localized states in the case that each self-propelled particle exhibits rotational motion. The center of mass of the two-dimensionally localized state exhibits circular motion, which implies collective rotating motion. Finally, we consider a simple one-dimensional model equation to qualitatively understand the formation of the solitary wave state.

  17. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.

  18. A unified explanation for dark matter and electroweak baryogenesis with direct detection and gravitational wave signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chala, Mikael; Nardini, Germano; Sobolev, Ivan; Moscow State Univ.

    2016-05-01

    A minimal extension of the Standard Model that provides both a dark matter candidate and a strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) consists of two additional Lorentz and gauge singlets. In this paper we work out a composite Higgs version of this scenario, based on the coset SO(7)/SO(6). We show that by embedding the elementary fermions in appropriate representations of SO(7), all dominant interactions are described by only three free effective parameters. Within the model dependencies of the embedding, the theory predicts one of the singlets to be stable and responsible for the observed dark matter abundance. At the same time, the second singlet introduces new CP-violation phases and triggers a strong first-order EWPT, making electroweak baryogenesis feasible. It turns out that this scenario does not conflict with current observations and it is promising for solving the dark matter and baryon asymmetry puzzles. The tight predictions of the model will be accessible at the forthcoming dark matter direct detection and gravitational wave experiments.

  19. Directional limits on persistent gravitational waves using LIGO S5 science data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aronsson, M; Arun, K G; Aso, Y; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Belletoile, A; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bigotta, S; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Boccara, C; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Budzyński, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coulon, J-P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Davier, M; Davies, G; Davis, A; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Devanka, P; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Paolo Emilio, M; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dueck, J; Dumas, J-C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J-D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gholami, I; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hall, P; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J-F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hoyland, D; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, H; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Krause, T; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kullman, J; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Lundgren, A D; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Mak, C; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D J A; Meadors, G; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menéndez, D F; Mercer, R A; Merill, L; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mino, Y; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreau, J; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Morioka, T; Mors, K; Mosca, S; Moscatelli, V; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Nash, T; Nawrodt, R; Nelson, J; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G H; Oldenburg, R G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Pardi, S; Pareja, M; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pathak, D; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Penn, S; Peralta, C; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Postiglione, F; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radke, T; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Rankins, B; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, P; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Röver, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Sakosky, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Santostasi, G; Saraf, S; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Satterthwaite, M; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Singer, A; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Speirits, F C; Sperandio, L; Stein, A J; Stein, L C; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szokoly, G P; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thüring, A; Titsler, C; Tokmakov, K V; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Trummer, J; Tseng, K; Turner, L; Ugolini, D; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vaishnav, B; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Veltkamp, C; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Villar, A E; Vinet, J-Y; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Wei, P; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Willke, B; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, K; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Yvert, M; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2011-12-30

    The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as stochastic backgrounds. We perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for pointlike sources and one for arbitrary extended sources. Finding no evidence to support the detection of GWs, we present 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper-limit maps of GW strain power with typical values between 2-20×10(-50)  strain(2) Hz(-1) and 5-35×10(-49)  strain(2) Hz(-1) sr(-1) for pointlike and extended sources, respectively. The latter result is the first of its kind. We also set 90% C.L. limits on the narrow-band root-mean-square GW strain from interesting targets including Sco X-1, SN 1987A and the Galactic center as low as ≈7×10(-25) in the most sensitive frequency range near 160 Hz.

  20. A New Omni-Directional EMAT for Ultrasonic Lamb Wave Tomography Imaging of Metallic Plate Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songling Huang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new omni-directional electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT for the ultrasonic Lamb wave (ULW tomography imaging (TI of defects in metallic plates. The proposed EMAT is composed of a permanent magnet and a coil with a contra-flexure structure. This new EMAT coil structure is used for omni-directional ULW transmission and reception and ULW TI for the first time. The theoretical background and the working principles of this EMAT are presented and analyzed. The experimental results of its use on a 3 mm thick aluminum plate indicate that the EMAT with a contra-flexure coil (CFC can transmit and receive a pure single A0 mode ULW with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Thus, the extraction of the projection data used for ULW TI may be performed accurately. The circumferential consistency of the projection data is only slightly influenced by the distortion of the eddy current field that is induced by the new CFC with an irregular shape. When the new EMAT array is used for ULW TI using the cross-hole method and SIRT arithmetic, a desirable imaging quality can be achieved, and the estimated size of an artificial corrosion defect agreed well with its actual value. The relation between the reconstruction resolution and the number of the new EMATs used is analyzed. More TI experiments are carried out when the aluminum plate defect is in two different locations relative to the EMAT array, for the further investigation of the performances of the new EMATs.

  1. Probing pre-inflationary anisotropy with directional variations in the gravitational wave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, Yu; Niiyama, Yuki; Sendouda, Yuuiti, E-mail: furuya@tap.st.hirosaki-u.ac.jp, E-mail: niiyama@tap.st.hirosaki-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sendouda@hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3 Bunkyocho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis on a primordial gravitational-wave background amplified during a Kasner-like pre-inflationary phase allowing for general triaxial anisotropies. It is found that the predicted angular distribution map of gravitational-wave intensity on large scales exhibits topologically distinctive patterns according to the degree of the pre-inflationary anisotropy, thereby serving as a potential probe for the pre-inflationary early universe with future all-sky observations of gravitational waves. We also derive an observational limit on the amplitude of such anisotropic gravitational waves from the B -mode polarisation of the cosmic microwave background.

  2. Direct observation of a 'devil's staircase' in wave-particle interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro; Elskens, Yves

    2006-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of a 'devil's staircase' in a time-dependent system considered as a paradigm for the transition to large-scale chaos in the universality class of Hamiltonian systems. A test electron beam is used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a traveling wave tube (TWT). A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the interaction line. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a 'devil's staircase' behavior for increasing excitation amplitude, due to the nonlinear forcing by the second wave on the pendulum-like motion of a charged particle in one electrostatic wave

  3. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinpyo Hong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG, mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine’s motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT, the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  4. Determining slack tide with a GPS receiver on an anchored buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, M.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Tiberius, C. C. J. M.; Luxemburg, W. M. J.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present a novel method to determine the time of occurrence of tidal slack with a GPS receiver mounted on an anchored buoy commonly used to delineate shipping lanes in estuaries and tidal channels. Slack tide occurs when the tide changes direction from ebb to flood flow or from flood to ebb. The determination of this point in time is not only useful for shipping and salvaging, it is also important information for calibrating tidal models, for determining the maximum salt intrusion and for the further refinement of the theory on tidal propagation. The accuracy of the timing is well within 10 min and the method - able to operate in real time - is relatively cheap and easy to implement on a permanent basis or in short field campaigns.

  5. Prospects for direct detection of inflationary gravitational waves by next generation interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Chiba, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2011-01-01

    We study the potential impact of detecting the inflationary gravitational wave background by the future space-based gravitational wave detectors, such as DECIGO and BBO. The signal-to-noise ratio of each experiment is calculated for chaotic/natural/hybrid inflation models by using the precise predictions of the gravitational wave spectrum based on numerical calculations. We investigate the dependence of each inflation model on the reheating temperature which influences the amplitude and shape of the spectrum, and find that the gravitational waves could be detected for chaotic/natural inflation models with high reheating temperature. From the detection of the gravitational waves, a lower bound on the reheating temperature could be obtained. The implications of this lower bound on the reheating temperature for particle physics are also discussed.

  6. Statistics for long irregular wave run-up on a plane beach from direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Senichev, Dmitry; Dutykh, Denys

    2017-04-01

    Very often for global and transoceanic events, due to the initial wave transformation, refraction, diffraction and multiple reflections from coastal topography and underwater bathymetry, the tsunami approaches the beach as a very long wave train, which can be considered as an irregular wave field. The prediction of possible flooding and properties of the water flow on the coast in this case should be done statistically taking into account the formation of extreme (rogue) tsunami wave on a beach. When it comes to tsunami run-up on a beach, the most used mathematical model is the nonlinear shallow water model. For a beach of constant slope, the nonlinear shallow water equations have rigorous analytical solution, which substantially simplifies the mathematical formulation. In (Didenkulova et al. 2011) we used this solution to study statistical characteristics of the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline and its horizontal velocity. The influence of the wave nonlinearity was approached by considering modifications of probability distribution of the moving shoreline and its horizontal velocity for waves of different amplitudes. It was shown that wave nonlinearity did not affect the probability distribution of the velocity of the moving shoreline, while the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline was affected substantially demonstrating the longer duration of coastal floods with an increase in the wave nonlinearity. However, this analysis did not take into account the actual transformation of irregular wave field offshore to oscillations of the moving shoreline on a slopping beach. In this study we would like to cover this gap by means of extensive numerical simulations. The modeling is performed in the framework of nonlinear shallow water equations, which are solved using a modern shock-capturing finite volume method. Although the shallow water model does not pursue the wave breaking and bore formation in a general sense (including the water surface

  7. Oceanographic temperature and salinity measurements collected using drifting buoys in the Arctic Ocean from 2003 to 2006 (NODC Accession 0014672)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic temperature and salinity measurements collected using drifting buoys in the Arctic Ocean. Data from JAMSTEC drifting buoys which were deployed both as...

  8. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  9. Drifting buoy data observed during 1985 through 1989 and assembled by the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC) for Drifting Buoy Data (NODC Accession 9100057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and meteorological data were collected from drifting buoys from a World-Wide distribution from 2 January 1985 to 31 December 1989. Data were processed by...

  10. Drifting buoy data observed during 1992 and assembled by the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC) for Drifting Buoy Data (NODC Accession 9300091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and meteorological data were collected from drifting buoys from a World-Wide distribution from 01 January 1992 to 31 December 1992. Data were processed by...

  11. 33 CFR 149.321 - How many ring life buoys must be on each deepwater port?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How many ring life buoys must be on each deepwater port? 149.321 Section 149.321 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment Manned Deepwater Port Requirements § 149.321 How many ring life buoys must be...

  12. Wave and Wind Model Performance Metrics Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J. K.; Wang, D. W.

    2016-02-01

    Continual improvements and upgrades of Navy ocean wave and wind models are essential to the assurance of battlespace environment predictability of ocean surface wave and surf conditions in support of Naval global operations. Thus, constant verification and validation of model performance is equally essential to assure the progress of model developments and maintain confidence in the predictions. Global and regional scale model evaluations may require large areas and long periods of time. For observational data to compare against, altimeter winds and waves along the tracks from past and current operational satellites as well as moored/drifting buoys can be used for global and regional coverage. Using data and model runs in previous trials such as the planned experiment, the Dynamics of the Adriatic in Real Time (DART), we demonstrated the use of accumulated altimeter wind and wave data over several years to obtain an objective evaluation of the performance the SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) model running in the Adriatic Sea. The assessment provided detailed performance of wind and wave models by using cell-averaged statistical variables maps with spatial statistics including slope, correlation, and scatter index to summarize model performance. Such a methodology is easily generalized to other regions and at global scales. Operational technology currently used by subject matter experts evaluating the Navy Coastal Ocean Model and the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model can be expanded to evaluate wave and wind models using tools developed for ArcMAP, a GIS application developed by ESRI. Recent inclusion of altimeter and buoy data into a format through the Naval Oceanographic Office's (NAVOCEANO) quality control system and the netCDF standards applicable to all model output makes it possible for the fusion of these data and direct model verification. Also, procedures were developed for the accumulation of match-ups of modelled and observed parameters to form a data base

  13. Assessment of wave modeling results with buoy and altimeter deep water waves for a summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sudheesh, K.; Vethamony, P.; Babu, M.T.; Jayakumar, S.

    32G99G97G112G97G98G105G108G105G116G121G46G32G87G97G118G101G32G104G101G105G103G104G116G115G44G32G105G110G32G103G101G110G101G114G97G108G44G32G97G114G101G32G104G105G103G104G101G114 G105G110G32G116G104G101G32G65G114G97G98G105G97G110G32G83G101G97G32G116G... 32G97G108G108G32G108G111G99G97G116G105G111G110G115G32G40G70G105G103G46G32G54G41G46 G67G111G109G112G97G114G105G115G111G110G32G111G102G32G83G87G72G115G32G102G114G111G109G32G109G111G100G101G108G32G97G110G100G32G84G79G80G69G88G32G102G111G114G32G116G104G...

  14. Evolution Strategies with Optimal Covariance Matrix Update Applied to Sustainable Wave Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez Arbonès, Dídac

    plants requires large financial investments. A common type of wave energy plants are buoy farms. These farms consist of a group of buoys moored to the sea floor. The buoys capture the movement of the waves and pump hydraulic fluid onshore, where a turbine generates power. Constructive and destructive...... power modelling, gradient information is not available and one has to resort to derivative-free optimization methods. Furthermore, not all possible buoy configurations can be implemented. The daily operation of wave energy plants introduces constraints on the layouts that can be achieved in practice......Modern society depends heavily on fossil fuels. We rely on this source of energy for everything, from food and clothing production to daily transportation. Even the Internet is mostly powered by these sources of energy. This reliance has led us to a high-risk situation where all that we take...

  15. Longshore transport based on directional waves along north Tamilnadu Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jena, B.K.; Chandramohan, P.; SanilKumar, V.

    the coastline tends to be a nodal drift regime. The temporary rise in wave activities during the cyclonic days often increases the southerly drift, which partly gets deposited in the Palk Bay and causes deficit for the northerly drift...

  16. Horizontal velocities and propagation directions of gravity waves in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chum, Jaroslav; Šindelářová, Tereza; Laštovička, Jan; Hruška, František; Burešová, Dalia; Baše, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A11322/1-A11322/13 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/1367; GA ČR GA205/09/1253 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100420901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Ionosphere * gravity waves * wave propagation * remote sensing Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  17. Drag Coefficient Comparisons Between Observed and Model Simulated Directional Wave Spectra Under Hurricane Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    the Wave Model (WAM; Hasselmann t al., 1988 ), and Simulating Waves Nearshore ( SWAN ; Booij et al., 999...of the circle represents the maximum wind speed of the hurricane. The black lines in the vicinity of the hurricane track represent the aircraft...contour maps and black contour lines for the model spec- ra at the same location. Then, the model spectra energy exceeds RA pk are plotted as

  18. Residual stress measurement with focused acoustic waves and direct comparison with X-ray diffraction stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathish, Shamachary; Moran, Thomas J.; Martin, Richard W.; Reibel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The technique of measuring small changes in acoustic wave velocity due to external or internal stress has been used for quantitative determination of residual stress in materials during the last decade. Application of similar methodology with focused acoustic waves leads to residual stress measurement with spatial resolution of a few millimeters to a few microns. The high spatial resolution residual stress measurement required development of new methodologies in both the design of acoustic lenses and the instrumentation for acoustic wave velocity determination. This paper presents two new methodologies developed for the measurement of residual stress with spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The design of new type of acoustic lens for achieving higher spatial resolution in residual stress measurement is introduced. Development of instrumentation for high precision local surface wave velocity measurement will be presented. Residual stresses measured around a crack tip in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V using a focused beam will be compared with X-ray diffraction measurements performed on the same region of the sample. Results of residual stress measurements along a direction perpendicular to the electron beam weld in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V, determined using focused acoustic waves and X-ray diffraction technique, are also presented. The spatial resolution and penetration depth of X-rays and focused acoustic beams with reference to residual stress measurements are discussed

  19. Automatic identification of fault zone head waves and direct P waves and its application in the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    Fault zone head waves (FZHWs) are observed along major strike-slip faults and can provide high-resolution imaging of fault interface properties at seismogenic depth. In this paper, we present a new method to automatically detect FZHWs and pick direct P waves secondary arrivals (DWSAs). The algorithm identifies FZHWs by computing the amplitude ratios between the potential FZHWs and DSWAs. The polarities, polarizations and characteristic periods of FZHWs and DSWAs are then used to refine the picks or evaluate the pick quality. We apply the method to the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault where FZHWs have been identified before by manual picks. We compare results from automatically and manually picked arrivals and find general agreement between them. The obtained velocity contrast at Parkfield is generally 5-10 per cent near Middle Mountain while it decreases below 5 per cent near Gold Hill. We also find many FZHWs recorded by the stations within 1 km of the background seismicity (i.e. the Southwest Fracture Zone) that have not been reported before. These FZHWs could be generated within a relatively wide low velocity zone sandwiched between the fast Salinian block on the southwest side and the slow Franciscan Mélange on the northeast side. Station FROB on the southwest (fast) side also recorded a small portion of weak precursory signals before sharp P waves. However, the polarities of weak signals are consistent with the right-lateral strike-slip mechanisms, suggesting that they are unlikely genuine FZHW signals.

  20. New high accuracy super stable alternating direction implicit methods for two and three dimensional hyperbolic damped wave equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report new three level implicit super stable methods of order two in time and four in space for the solution of hyperbolic damped wave equations in one, two and three space dimensions subject to given appropriate initial and Dirichlet boundary conditions. We use uniform grid points both in time and space directions. Our methods behave like fourth order accurate, when grid size in time-direction is directly proportional to the square of grid size in space-direction. The proposed methods are super stable. The resulting system of algebraic equations is solved by the Gauss elimination method. We discuss new alternating direction implicit (ADI methods for two and three dimensional problems. Numerical results and the graphical representation of numerical solution are presented to illustrate the accuracy of the proposed methods.

  1. Direct Determination of Wavenumbers of ULF Waves Using the Cluster Multipoint and Multicomponent Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Escoubet, C.; Santolik, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2013-12-01

    The wavenumber is a key parameter to understand the physics of the interactions between the electromagnetic waves and the ionized particles in space plasmas. Search-coil magnetometers and electric antennas measure time series of both magnetic and electric field fluctuations, respectively. The fleet of four Cluster spacecraft made possible to determine the full wave vector and even to differentiate the waves present at the same frequency in the spacecraft frame through various techniques: k-filtering analysis, wave telescope, phase differentiating method. However the fleet configuration (inter-spacecraft separation, tetrahedron elongation and planarity) limit the possibilities to use these techniques. From single spacecraft measurements, assumptions concerning the wave mode -and thus, concerning the physical processes- are usually required to derive the corresponding wavenumber. Using three orthogonal magnetic components and two electric antennas, it is possible to estimate n/Z where n is the refractive index and Z the transfer function of the interface between the plasma and the electric antennas. For ULF waves we assume Z=1 and we thus obtain the wavenumber. We test this hypothesis on a case where the spacecraft are in a close configuration in the distant cusp region and where we are able to apply the k-filtering analysis, too. The results obtained by multispacecraft and multicomponents analysis are close to each other and permit us to precise the value of Z. We test this procedure on several events (in various regions of the magnetosphere) in order to get more precise wave number measurements from the single spacecraft analysis. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2010-1) under grant agreement n. 284520 (MAARBLE).

  2. Multi-Wave and Hybrid Imaging Techniques: A New Direction for Nondestructive Testing and Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the state-of-the-art multi-wave and hybrid imaging techniques in the field of nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring were comprehensively reviewed. A new direction for assessment and health monitoring of various structures by capitalizing the advantages of those imaging methods was discussed. Although sharing similar system configurations, the imaging physics and principles of multi-wave phenomena and hybrid imaging methods are inherently different. After a brief introduction of nondestructive evaluation (NDE , structure health monitoring (SHM and their related challenges, several recent advances that have significantly extended imaging methods from laboratory development into practical applications were summarized, followed by conclusions and discussion on future directions.

  3. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalewski, Markus, E-mail: mkowalew@uci.edu; Mukamel, Shaul, E-mail: smukamel@uci.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C—H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings.

  4. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C—H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings

  5. Wave energy resource of Brazil: An analysis from 35 years of ERA-Interim reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Alex Maurício

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a characterization of the wave power resource and an analysis of the wave power output for three (AquaBuoy, Pelamis and Wave Dragon) different wave energy converters (WEC) over the Brazilian offshore. To do so it used a 35 years reanalysis database from the ERA-Interim project. Annual and seasonal statistical analyzes of significant height and energy period were performed, and the directional variability of the incident waves were evaluated. The wave power resource was characterized in terms of the statistical parameters of mean, maximum, 95th percentile and standard deviation, and in terms of the temporal variability coefficients COV, SV e MV. From these analyses, the total annual wave power resource available over the Brazilian offshore was estimated in 89.97 GW, with largest mean wave power of 20.63 kW/m in the southernmost part of the study area. The analysis of the three WEC was based in the annual wave energy output and in the capacity factor. The higher capacity factor was 21.85% for Pelamis device at the southern region of the study area. PMID:28817731

  6. Wave energy resource of Brazil: An analysis from 35 years of ERA-Interim reanalysis data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, Rafael Luz; Araújo, Alex Maurício

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a characterization of the wave power resource and an analysis of the wave power output for three (AquaBuoy, Pelamis and Wave Dragon) different wave energy converters (WEC) over the Brazilian offshore. To do so it used a 35 years reanalysis database from the ERA-Interim project. Annual and seasonal statistical analyzes of significant height and energy period were performed, and the directional variability of the incident waves were evaluated. The wave power resource was characterized in terms of the statistical parameters of mean, maximum, 95th percentile and standard deviation, and in terms of the temporal variability coefficients COV, SV e MV. From these analyses, the total annual wave power resource available over the Brazilian offshore was estimated in 89.97 GW, with largest mean wave power of 20.63 kW/m in the southernmost part of the study area. The analysis of the three WEC was based in the annual wave energy output and in the capacity factor. The higher capacity factor was 21.85% for Pelamis device at the southern region of the study area.

  7. Wave energy resource of Brazil: An analysis from 35 years of ERA-Interim reanalysis data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luz Espindola

    Full Text Available This paper presents a characterization of the wave power resource and an analysis of the wave power output for three (AquaBuoy, Pelamis and Wave Dragon different wave energy converters (WEC over the Brazilian offshore. To do so it used a 35 years reanalysis database from the ERA-Interim project. Annual and seasonal statistical analyzes of significant height and energy period were performed, and the directional variability of the incident waves were evaluated. The wave power resource was characterized in terms of the statistical parameters of mean, maximum, 95th percentile and standard deviation, and in terms of the temporal variability coefficients COV, SV e MV. From these analyses, the total annual wave power resource available over the Brazilian offshore was estimated in 89.97 GW, with largest mean wave power of 20.63 kW/m in the southernmost part of the study area. The analysis of the three WEC was based in the annual wave energy output and in the capacity factor. The higher capacity factor was 21.85% for Pelamis device at the southern region of the study area.

  8. Ocean Wave Parameters Retrieval from Sentinel-1 SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizeng Shao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a semi-empirical algorithm for significant wave height (Hs and mean wave period (Tmw retrieval from C-band VV-polarization Sentinel-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery is presented. We develop a semi-empirical function for Hs retrieval, which describes the relation between Hs and cutoff wavelength, radar incidence angle, and wave propagation direction relative to radar look direction. Additionally, Tmw can be also calculated through Hs and cutoff wavelength by using another empirical function. We collected 106 C-band stripmap mode Sentinel-1 SAR images in VV-polarization and wave measurements from in situ buoys. There are a total of 150 matchup points. We used 93 matchups to tune the coefficients of the semi-empirical algorithm and the rest 57 matchups for validation. The comparison shows a 0.69 m root mean square error (RMSE of Hs with a 18.6% of scatter index (SI and 1.98 s RMSE of Tmw with a 24.8% of SI. Results indicate that the algorithm is suitable for wave parameters retrieval from Sentinel-1 SAR data.

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with a half-sine wave pulse elicits direction-specific effects in human motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Delvendahl, Igor; Pechmann, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) commonly uses so-called monophasic pulses where the initial rapidly changing current flow is followed by a critically dampened return current. It has been shown that a monophasic TMS pulse preferentially excites different cortical circuits in the human motor...... hand area (M1-HAND), if the induced tissue current has a posterior-to-anterior (PA) or anterior-to-posterior (AP) direction. Here we tested whether similar direction-specific effects could be elicited in M1-HAND using TMS pulses with a half-sine wave configuration....

  10. Polarisation independent bi-directional four wave mixing for mid span spectral inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Buxens, Alvaro A.; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov

    1999-01-01

    Polarisation independent Four Wave Mixing in a Semiconductor Optical Amplifier used for Mid Span Spectral Inversion (MSSI) is implemented and introduce only 0.9 dB penalty compared to polarisation dependent MSSI. The polarisation dependence in receiver sensitivity is 1 dB.......Polarisation independent Four Wave Mixing in a Semiconductor Optical Amplifier used for Mid Span Spectral Inversion (MSSI) is implemented and introduce only 0.9 dB penalty compared to polarisation dependent MSSI. The polarisation dependence in receiver sensitivity is 1 dB....

  11. Toward detection of marine vehicles on horizon from buoy camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fefilatyev, Sergiy; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Langebrake, Lawrence

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a new technique for automatic detection of marine vehicles in open sea from a buoy camera system using computer vision approach. Users of such system include border guards, military, port safety and flow management, sanctuary protection personnel. The system is intended to work autonomously, taking images of the surrounding ocean surface and analyzing them on the subject of presence of marine vehicles. The goal of the system is to detect an approximate window around the ship and prepare the small image for transmission and human evaluation. The proposed computer vision-based algorithm combines horizon detection method with edge detection and post-processing. The dataset of 100 images is used to evaluate the performance of proposed technique. We discuss promising results of ship detection and suggest necessary improvements for achieving better performance.

  12. Impact of Generator Stroke Length on Energy Production for a Direct Drive Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Lysekil wave energy converter (WEC, developed by the wave energy research group of Uppsala University, has evolved through a variety of mechanical designs since the first prototype was installed in 2006. The hundreds of engineering decisions made throughout the design processes have been based on a combination of theory, know-how from previous experiments, and educated guesses. One key parameter in the design of the WECs linear generator is the stroke length. A long stroke requires a taller WEC with associated economical and mechanical challenges, but a short stroke limits the power production. The 2-m stroke of the current WECs has been an educated guess for the Swedish wave climate, though the consequences of this choice on energy absorption have not been studied. When the WEC technology is considered for international waters, with larger waves and challenges of energy absorption and survivability, the subject of stroke length becomes even more relevant. This paper studies the impact of generator stroke length on energy absorption for three sites off the coasts of Sweden, Chile and Scotland. 2-m, 4-m, and unlimited stroke are considered. Power matrices for the studied WEC prototype are presented for each of the studied stroke lengths. Presented results quantify the losses incurred by a limited stroke. The results indicate that a 2-m stroke length is likely to be a good choice for Sweden, but 4-m is likely to be necessary in more energetic international waters.

  13. Direct Time Domain Numerical Analysis of Transient Behavior of a VLFS during Unsteady External Loads in Wave Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient response of the VLFS subjected to arbitrary external load is systematically investigated by a direct time domain modal expansion method, in which the BEM solutions based on time domain Kelvin sources are used for hydrodynamic forces. In the analysis, the time domain free-surface Green functions with sufficient accuracy are rapidly evaluated in finite water depth by the interpolation-tabulation method, and the boundary integral equation with a quarter VLFS model is established taking advantage of symmetry of flow field and structure. The validity of the present method is verified by comparing with the time histories of vertical displacements of the VLFS during a mass drop and airplane landing and takeoff in still water conditions, respectively. Then the developed numerical scheme is used in wave conditions to study the combined action taking into account the mass drop/airplane landing/takeoff loads as well as incident wave action. It is found that the elevation of structural waves due to mass drop load can be significantly changed near the impact region, while the vertical motion of runway in wave conditions is dominant as compared with that only generated by airplane.

  14. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  15. Solid waves and acoustic emission first phase: Problems direct and inverse and equations elasto dynamics fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2002-07-01

    The present work is the first of a series of three memoirs briefs, destinadas to revise the classic theoretical foundations that allow to understand the generation,la diffusion and the detection of the elastic waves in those been accustomed to from the point of view of the mechanics of the means continuos. The study is faced in the mark of the non destructive rehearsals, emphasizing aspects related with the rehearsals based on the acoustic emission of the material defects

  16. Direct Measurement of the Electron Bernstein Wave Absorption and Current Drive at the WEGA Stellarator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laqua, H.; Marsen, S.; Otte, M.; Podoba, Y.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 16 (2007), s. 280-280 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics/49th./. Orlando , Florida, 12.11.2007-16.11.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Conversion * Emission * Tokamaks * Electron Bernstein waves * Simulation * NSTX Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/DPP07/Content/901

  17. Characteristics of inertial currents observed in offshore wave records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmrich, J.; Garrett, C.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that ambient currents can change the amplitude, direction and frequency of ocean surface waves. Regions with persistent strong currents, such as the Agulhas current off the east coast of South Africa, are known as areas of extreme waves, and wave height modulations of up to 50% observed in the shallow North Sea have been linked to tidal currents. In the open ocean, inertial currents, while intermittent, are typically the most energetic currents with speeds up to 0.5 m/s, and can interact with the surface wave field to create wave modulation, though this has not previously been reported. We use long records of significant wave heights from buoy observations in the northeast Pacific and show evidence of significant modulation at frequencies that are slightly higher than the local inertial frequency. Quite apart from the relevance to surface waves, this result can provide a consistent and independent measurement, over a wide range of latitudes, of the frequency blue-shift, the strength and intermittency of ocean surface inertial currents. Near-inertial waves constitute the most energetic portion of the internal wave band and play a significant role in deep ocean mixing. So far, observational data on near-surface inertial currents has tended to come from short records that do not permit the reliable determination of the frequency blue-shift, though this is an important factor affecting the energy flux from the surface into deeper waters. Long records from routine wave height observations are widely available and could help to shed new light globally on the blue-shift and on the characteristics of inertial currents.

  18. Advanced Direct-Drive Generator for Improved Availability of Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Power Generation Systems Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englebretson, Steven [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Ouyang, Wen [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Tschida, Colin [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Carr, Joseph [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Ramanan, V.R. [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Johnson, Matthew [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Gardner, Matthew [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Toliyat, Hamid [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Staby, Bill [Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Chertok, Allan [Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Hazra, Samir [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Bhattacharya, Subhashish [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States)

    2017-05-13

    This report summarizes the activities conducted under the DOE-EERE funded project DE-EE0006400, where ABB Inc. (ABB), in collaboration with Texas A&M’s Advanced Electric Machines & Power Electronics (EMPE) Lab and Resolute Marine Energy (RME) designed, derisked, developed, and demonstrated a novel magnetically geared electrical generator for direct-drive, low-speed, high torque MHK applications The project objective was to investigate a novel and compact direct-drive electric generator and its system aspects that would enable elimination of hydraulic components in the Power Take-Off (PTO) of a Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) system with an oscillating wave surge converter (OWSC), thereby improving the availability of the MHK system. The scope of this project was limited to the development and dry lab demonstration of a low speed generator to enable future direct drive MHK systems.

  19. Power Generation Using Mechanical Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Chandrasekaran

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean wave energy plays a significant role in meeting the growing demand of electric power. Economic, environmental, and technical advantages of wave energy set it apart from other renewable energy resources. Present study describes a newly proposed Mechanical Wave Energy Converter (MEWC that is employed to harness heave motion of floating buoy to generate power. Focus is on the conceptual development of the device, illustrating details of component level analysis. Employed methodology has many advantages such as i simple and easy fabrication; ii easy to control the operations during rough weather; and iii low failure rate during normal sea conditions. Experimental investigations carried out on the scaled model of MWEC show better performance and its capability to generate power at higher efficiency in regular wave fields. Design Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA shows rare failure rates for all components except the floating buoy.

  20. Hardware design of a submerged buoy system based on electromagnetic inductive coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Dalei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly introduces the hardware design of a new type of ocean buoy for multi-scale marine dynamic process. The buoy system can collect a number of real-time marine environment data and then transmit all the data back to the landing site through wireless module. The authors mainly designed the hardware circuit of the buoy system, including data collection system, data communication system, data storage system. Due to the buoy system will complete the marine observation work continuously for at least a month, so we add the low power consumption function which can realize the intermittent work for the data collection system. This paper also introduces the electromagnetic induction coupling technology of underwater sensors, the sea surface communication network technology, etc. The system can also extends to the ecological regional anomaly monitoring and the early warning of disaster weather.

  1. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 04 (WQB-04): Hilo Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  2. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy KN (WQB-KN): Kilo Nalu, Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  3. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 03 (WQB-03): Kiholo Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  4. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy AW (WQB-AW): Ala Wai, Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  5. NODC Standard Format Drifting Buoy (F156) Data (1975-1994) (NODC Accession 0014200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data type contains time series ocean circulation data determined by tracking the movement of drifting buoys, drogues or other instrumented devices. Movement is...

  6. Physical and optical data collected from drifting buoys between May 1993 - December 1996 (NODC Accession 0000586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling and downwelling irradiances were collected from surface optical drifter buoys off the California coast (NE Pacific limit-180) from 05 May 1993 to 06...

  7. NODC Standard Product: NOAA Marine environmental buoy database Webdisc (7 disc set) (NCEI Accession 0090141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This CD-ROM set contains the historic archive of meteorological and oceanographic data collected by moored buoys and C-MAN stations operated by the NOAA National...

  8. A study of wave forces on an offshore platform by direct CFD and Morison equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang D.

    2015-01-01

    The next step is the presentation of 3D multiphase RANS simulation of the wind-turbine platform in single-harmonic regular waves. Simulation results from full 3D simulation will be compared to the results from Morison’s equation. We are motivated by the challenges of a floating platform which has complex underwater geometry (e.g. tethered semi-submersible. In cases like this, our hypothesis is that Morison’s equation will result in inaccurate prediction of forces, due to the limitations of 2D coefficients of simple geometries, and that 3D multiphase RANS CFD will be required to generate reliable predictions of platform loads and motions.

  9. Time-dependent wave-packet study of the direct low-energy dissociative recombination of HD+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orel, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    Wave-packet methods involving the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation have been used with great success in the calculation of cross sections for dissociative recombination of molecular ions by electron impact in the high energy region where the ''boomerang'' model [L. Dube and A. Herzenberg, Phys. Rev. A 11, 1314 (1975)] is valid. We extend this method to study low-energy dissociative recombination where this approximation is no longer appropriate. We apply the method to the ''direct'' low-energy dissociative recombination of HD + . Our results are in excellent agreement with calculations using the multichannel quantum defect method. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  10. Examination of the protective roles of helmet/faceshield and directionality for human head under blast waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvghad-Moghaddam, Hesam; Jazi, Mehdi Salimi; Rezaei, Asghar; Karami, Ghodrat; Ziejewski, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to delineate the efficacy of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as ballistic faceshields and advanced combat helmets, in the case of a blast. The propagations of blast waves and their interactions with an unprotected head, a helmeted one, and a fully protected finite element head model (FEHM) were modeled. The biomechanical parameters of the brain were recorded when the FEHM was exposed to shockwaves from the front, back, top, and bottom. The directional dependent tissue response of the brain and the variable efficiency of PPE with respect to the blast orientation were two major results of this study.

  11. Monstrous ocean waves during typhoon Krosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Liu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of ocean wave time series data recorded from a discus buoy deployed near northeast Taiwan in western Pacific that was operating during the passage of Typhoon Krosa on 6 October 2007. The maximum trough-to-crest wave height was measured to be 32.3 m, which could be the largest Hmax ever recorded.

  12. Rancang Bangun Maximum Power Point Tracking pada Panel Photovoltaic Berbasis Logika Fuzzy di Buoy Weather Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Prima Juliansyah Putra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu aplikasi yang sering digunakan dalam bidang energi terbarukan adalah panel photovoltaic. Panel ini memiliki prinsip kerja berdasarkan efek photovoltaic dimana lempengan logam akan menghasilkan energi listrik apabila diberi intensitas cahaya. Untuk menghasilkan daya keluaran panel yang maksimal, maka diperlukan suatu algoritma yang biasa disebut Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT.MPPT yang diterapkan pada sistem photovoltaic berfungsi untuk mengatur nilai tegangan keluaran panel sehingga titik ker-janya beroperasi pada kondisi maksimal. Algoritma MPPT pada panel ini telah dilakukan dengan menggunakan logika fuzzy melalui mikrokontroler Arduino Uno sebagai pem-bangkit sinyal Pulse Width Modulation (PWM yang akan dikirimkan menuju DC-DC Buck Boost Converter. Keluaran dari buck boost converterakan dihubungkan secara langsung dengan buoy weather station untuk menyuplai energi listrik tiap komponen yang berada di dalamnya. Untuk menguji performansi dari algoritma MPPT yang telah dirancang, maka sistem akan diuji menggunakan variasi beban antara metode direct-coupled dengan MPPT menggunakan logika fuzzy. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa MPPT dengan logika fuzzy dapat menghasilkan daya maksimum daripada direct-coupled. Pada sistem panel photovoltaic ini memiliki range efisiensi 33.07589 % hingga 74.25743 %. Daya mak-simal dapat dicapai oleh sistem untuk tiap variasi beban dan efisiensi maksimal dapat dicapai pada beban 20 Ohm dari hasil pengujian sistem MPPT.

  13. Ion cyclotron waves: Direct compariosn between ground-based measurements and observations in the source region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perraut, S.; Gendrin, R.; Roux, A.; de Villedary, C.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of ion cyclotron waves (ICW's) were performed on GEOS spacecraft and in the vicinity of their magnetic footprints with the French Mobile station. The detailed comparison between the two sets of data shown that while ICW's having F + gyrofrequency at the equator, generally propagate to the ground, only 50% of those generated above F/sub He/ can reach the ground station. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with the conclusions that Rauch and Roux [1982] drew on the basis of measurements reported by Young et al 1981]. In an He + -rich plasma, ICW's with F>F/sub He/ suffer a reflection where the frequency locally matches the local bi-ion hybrid frequency. We extend the calculations of Rauch and Roux and calculate, as a function of the He + concentration, the tunneling of ICW's through the stopband induced by the presence of minor He + ions. It is shown that the transmission coefficient strongly depends upon the wave frequency for a given He + abundance ratio. The results obtained are shown to be supported by existing observations

  14. On the retrieval of significant wave heights from spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar using the Max-Planck Institut algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante-Carvalho, Nelson

    2005-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) onboard satellites is the only source of directional wave spectra with continuous and global coverage. Millions of SAR Wave Mode (SWM) imagettes have been acquired since the launch in the early 1990's of the first European Remote Sensing Satellite ERS-1 and its successors ERS-2 and ENVISAT, which has opened up many possibilities specially for wave data assimilation purposes. The main aim of data assimilation is to improve the forecasting introducing available observations into the modeling procedures in order to minimize the differences between model estimates and measurements. However there are limitations in the retrieval of the directional spectrum from SAR images due to nonlinearities in the mapping mechanism. The Max-Planck Institut (MPI) scheme, the first proposed and most widely used algorithm to retrieve directional wave spectra from SAR images, is employed to compare significant wave heights retrieved from ERS-1 SAR against buoy measurements and against the WAM wave model. It is shown that for periods shorter than 12 seconds the WAM model performs better than the MPI, despite the fact that the model is used as first guess to the MPI method, that is the retrieval is deteriorating the first guess. For periods longer than 12 seconds, the part of the spectrum that is directly measured by SAR, the performance of the MPI scheme is at least as good as the WAM model.

  15. Multi-directional emission and detection of spin waves propagating in yttrium iron garnet with wavelengths down to about 100 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maendl, Stefan; Grundler, Dirk

    2018-05-01

    We performed broadband spin-wave spectroscopy on 200 nm thick yttrium iron garnet containing arrays of partially embedded magnetic nanodisks. Using integrated coplanar waveguides (CPWs), we studied the excitation and transmission of spin waves depending on the presence of nanomagnet arrays of different lateral extensions. By means of the grating coupler effect, we excited spin waves propagating in multiple lateral directions with wavelengths down to 111 nm. They exhibited group velocities of up to 1 km/s. Detection of such short-wavelength spin waves was possible only in symmetrically designed emitter/detector configurations, not with a bare CPW. We report spin waves propagating between grating couplers under oblique angles exhibiting a wave vector component parallel to the CPW. The effective propagation distance amounted to about 80 μm. Such transmission signals were not addressed before and substantiate the versatility of the grating coupler effect for implementing nanomagnonic circuits.

  16. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Foroughi Abari, Farzad; Mann, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both...... leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift...... has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2....

  17. Observations and modeling of the elastogravity signals preceding direct seismic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Martin; Ampuero, Jean Paul; Juhel, Kévin; Bernard, Pascal; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Barsuglia, Matteo

    2017-12-01

    After an earthquake, the earliest deformation signals are not expected to be carried by the fastest (P) elastic waves but by the speed-of-light changes of the gravitational field. However, these perturbations are weak and, so far, their detection has not been accurate enough to fully understand their origins and to use them for a highly valuable rapid estimate of the earthquake magnitude. We show that gravity perturbations are particularly well observed with broadband seismometers at distances between 1000 and 2000 kilometers from the source of the 2011, moment magnitude 9.1, Tohoku earthquake. We can accurately model them by a new formalism, taking into account both the gravity changes and the gravity-induced motion. These prompt elastogravity signals open the window for minute time-scale magnitude determination for great earthquakes.

  18. Fast Plane Wave 2-D Vector Flow Imaging Using Transverse Oscillation and Directional Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2017-01-01

    load, which is 4.6 times larger than for TO and seven times smaller than for conventional DB. Steered plane wave transmissions are employed for high frame rate imaging, and parabolic flow with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s is simulated in straight vessels at beamto- flow angles from 45 to 90. The TO......-DB method estimates the angle with a bias and standard deviation (SD) less than 2, and the SD of the velocity magnitude is less than 2%. When using only TO, the SD of the angle ranges from 2 to 17 and for the velocity magnitude up to 7%. Bias of the velocity magnitude is within 2% for TO and slightly larger...

  19. Direct determination of molybdenum in seawater by adsorption cathodic stripping square-wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Mierzwa, J; Lan, C R

    2000-06-30

    A reliable and very sensitive procedure for the determination of trace levels of molybdenum in seawater is proposed. The complex of molybdenum with 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) is analyzed by cathodic stripping square-wave voltammetry based on the adsorption collection onto a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). This procedure of molybdenum determination was found to be more favorable than differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry because of inherently faster scan rate and much better linearity obtained through the one-peak (instead of one-of-two peaks) calibration. The variation of polarographic peak and peak current with a pH, adsorption time, adsorption potential, and some instrumental parameters such as scan rate and pulse height were optimized. The alteration of polarographic wave and its likely mechanism are also discussed. The relationship between peak current and molybdenum concentration is linear up to 150 mug l(-1). Under the optimal analytical conditions, the determination limit of 0.5 mug l(-1) Mo was reached after 60 s of the stirred collection. The estimated detection limit is better than 0.1 mug l(-1) of Mo. The applicability of this method to analysis of seawater was assessed by the determination of molybdenum in two certified reference seawater samples (CASS-2 and NASS-2) and the comparison of the analytical results for real seawater samples (study on a vertical distribution of Mo in the seawater column) with the results obtained by Zeeman-corrected electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (Zeeman ETAAS). A good agreement between two used methods of molybdenum determination was obtained.

  20. Assimilation of Wave Imaging Radar Observations for Real-time Wave-by-Wave Forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Alexandra [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Haller, Merrick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Civil & Construction Engineering; Walker, David [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lynett, Pat [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    forecasting in real-time, as the GPU-based wave model backbone was very computationally efficient. The data assimilation algorithm was developed on a polar grid domain in order to match the sampling characteristics of the observation system (wave imaging marine radar). For verification purposes, a substantial set of synthetic wave data (i.e. forward runs of the wave model) were generated to be used as ground truth for comparison to the reconstructions and forecasts produced by Wavecast. For these synthetic cases, Wavecast demonstrated very good accuracy, for example, typical forecast correlation coefficients were between 0.84-0.95 when compared to the input data. Dependencies on shadowing, observational noise, and forecast horizon were also identified. During the second year of the project, a short field deployment was conducted in order to assess forecast accuracy under field conditions. For this, a radar was installed on a fishing vessel and observations were collected at the South Energy Test Site (SETS) off the coast of Newport, OR. At the SETS site, simultaneous in situ wave observations were also available owing to an ongoing field project funded separately. Unfortunately, the position and heading information that was available for the fishing vessel were not of sufficient accuracy in order to validate the forecast in a phase-resolving sense. Instead, a spectral comparison was made between the Wavecast forecast and the data from the in situ wave buoy. Although the wave and wind conditions during the field test were complex, the comparison showed a promising reconstruction of the wave spectral shape, where both peaks in the bimodal spectrum were represented. However, the total reconstructed spectral energy (across all directions and frequencies) was limited to 44% of the observed spectrum. Overall, wave-by-wave forecasting using a data assimilation approach based on wave imaging radar observations and a physics-based wave model shows promise for short-term phase

  1. DIRECTED SEARCHES FOR BROADBAND EXTENDED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE EMISSION IN NEARBY ENERGETIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M., E-mail: mvp@sejong.ac.kr [Room 614, Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong Gwangin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-10

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are factories of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. SNe Ib/c stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and they have a branching ratio of about 1% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein the accretion of fall-back matter down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) offers a window into broadband extended gravitational wave emission (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time–frequency space by time-sliced matched filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse-grained searches followed by high-resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse-grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br (z = 0.002339) using a bank of up to 64,000 templates of one-second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events with signal-to-noise ratios > 6 from the LIGO L1 and H1 detectors reduces the total to a few events of interest. Lacking any further properties reflecting a common excitation by broadband gravitational radiation, we disregarded these as spurious. This new pipeline may be used to systematically search for long-duration chirps in nearby CC-SNe from robotic optical transient surveys using embarrassingly parallel computing.

  2. Numerical study of the direct pressure effect of acoustic waves in planar premixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H. [BTU Cottbus, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); Jimenez, C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Recently the unsteady response of 1-D premixed flames to acoustic pressure waves for the range of frequencies below and above the inverse of the flame transit time was investigated experimentally using OH chemiluminescence Wangher (2008). They compared the frequency dependence of the measured response to the prediction of an analytical model proposed by Clavin et al. (1990), derived from the standard flame model (one-step Arrhenius kinetics) and to a similar model proposed by McIntosh (1991). Discrepancies between the experimental results and the model led to the conclusion that the standard model does not provide an adequate description of the unsteady response of real flames and that it is necessary to investigate more realistic chemical models. Here we follow exactly this suggestion and perform numerical studies of the response of lean methane flames using different reaction mechanisms. We find that the global flame response obtained with both detailed chemistry (GRI3.0) and a reduced multi-step model by Peters (1996) lies slightly above the predictions of the analytical model, but is close to experimental results. We additionally used an irreversible one-step Arrhenius reaction model and show the effect of the pressure dependence of the global reaction rate in the flame response. Our results suggest first that the current models have to be extended to capture the amplitude and phase results of the detailed mechanisms, and second that the correlation between the heat release and the measured OH* chemiluminescence should be studied deeper. (author)

  3. Predictability of Wave Energy and Electricity Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chozas, Julia Fernandez

    2012-01-01

    The articlw addresses an important challenge ahead the integration of the electricity generated by wave energy conversion technologies into the electric grid. Particularly, it looks into the role of wave energy within the day-ahead electricity market. For that the predictability of the theoretical...... power outputs of three wave energy technologies in the Danish North Sea are examined. The simultaneous and co-located forecast and buoy-measured wave parameters at Hanstholm, Denmark, during a non-consecutive autumn and winter 3-month period form the basis of the investigation. The objective...

  4. Direct measurements of mean Reynolds stress and ripple roughness in the presence of energetic forcing by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Malcolm; Trowbridge, John; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Jones, Katie R.; Traykovski, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Direct covariance observations of the mean flow Reynolds stress and sonar images of the seafloor collected on a wave‐exposed inner continental shelf demonstrate that the drag exerted by the seabed on the overlying flow is consistent with boundary layer models for wave‐current interaction, provided that the orientation and anisotropy of the bed roughness are appropriately quantified. Large spatial and temporal variations in drag result from nonequilibrium ripple dynamics, ripple anisotropy, and the orientation of the ripples relative to the current. At a location in coarse sand characterized by large two‐dimensional orbital ripples, the observed drag shows a strong dependence on the relative orientation of the mean current to the ripple crests. At a contrasting location in fine sand, where more isotropic sub‐orbital ripples are observed, the sensitivity of the current to the orientation of the ripples is reduced. Further, at the coarse site under conditions when the currents are parallel to the ripple crests and the wave orbital diameter is smaller than the wavelength of the relic orbital ripples, the flow becomes hydraulically smooth. This transition is not observed at the fine site, where the observed wave orbital diameter is always greater than the wavelength of the observed sub‐orbital ripples. Paradoxically, the dominant along‐shelf flows often experience lower drag at the coarse site than at the fine site, despite the larger ripples, highlighting the complex dynamics controlling drag in wave‐exposed environments with heterogeneous roughness.

  5. Design and Analysis of a Linear Hybrid Excitation Flux-Switching Generator for Direct Drive Wave Energy Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear generators have the advantage of a simple structure of the secondary, which is suitable for the application of wave energy conversion. Based on the vernier hybrid machines (VHMs, widely used for direct drive wave energy converters, this paper proposes a novel hybrid excitation flux-switching generator (LHEFSG, which can effectively improve the performance of this kind of generators. DC hybrid excitation windings and multitooth structure were used in the proposed generator to increase the magnetic energy and overcome the disadvantages of easily irreversible demagnetization of VHMs. Firstly, the operation principle and structure of the proposed generator are introduced. Secondly, by using the finite element method, the no-load performance of the proposed generator is analyzed and composed with ones of conventional VHM. In addition, the on-load performance of the proposed generator is obtained by finite element analysis (FEA. A dislocation of pole alignments method is implemented to reduce the cogging force. Lastly, a prototype of the linear flux-switching generator is used to verify the correctness of FEA results. All the results validate that the proposed generator has better performance than its counterparts.

  6. Bistable direction switching in an off-axis pumped continuous wave ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, R. Sohrab; Lawandy, N. M.

    1988-01-01

    A report is presented of the observation of hysteretic bistable direction switching in a single-mode CW ruby laser system. This effect is only observed when the pump beam which is focused into the ruby rod is misaligned with respect to the rod end faces. At low pump powers, the ruby lases in a mode nearly collinear with the pump axis. At a higher pump power the ruby switches to a mode that is collinear with the rod end faces and preserves the original polarization. The effect is large enough to switch the beam by an angle equal to twice the diffraction angle. The observations show that under steady-state pumping, a CW ruby laser can exhibit bistable operation in its output direction and power. A calculation using the heat equation with two concentric cylinders with one as a heat source (pump laser) and the outer wall of the other held at 77 K, gives an increase in core temperature of about 0.01 K. Therefore, the increase in temperature is not large enough to change the index of refraction to account for such large macroscopic effects.

  7. Global modelling of direct and indirect effects of sea spray aerosol using a source function encapsulating wave state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-I. Partanen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed parameterizations for the sea spray aerosol source flux, encapsulating wave state, and its organic fraction were incorporated into the aerosol–climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to investigate the direct and indirect radiative effects of sea spray aerosol particles. Our simulated global sea salt emission of 805 Tg yr−1 (uncertainty range 378–1233 Tg yr−1 was much lower than typically found in previous studies. Modelled sea salt and sodium ion concentrations agreed relatively well with measurements in the smaller size ranges at Mace Head (annual normalized mean model bias −13% for particles with vacuum aerodynamic diameter Dva Da Da Da −2, in contrast to previous studies. This positive effect was ascribed to the tendency of sea salt aerosol to suppress both the in-cloud supersaturation and the formation of cloud condensation nuclei from sulfate. These effects can be accounted for only in models with sufficiently detailed aerosol microphysics and physics-based parameterizations of cloud activation. However, due to a strong negative direct effect, the simulated effective radiative forcing (total radiative effect was −0.2 W m−2. The simulated radiative effects of the primary marine organic emissions were small, with a direct effect of 0.03 W m−2 and an indirect effect of −0.07 W m−2.

  8. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temporal, M., E-mail: mauro.temporal@hotmail.com [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan and CNRS, 61 Av. du President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Canaud, B. [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Garbett, W. J. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ramis, R. [ETSI Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  9. Efficient continuous-wave 1112 nm Nd:YAG laser operation under direct diode pumping at 885 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J; Dai, X J; Zhang, L; Wu, X D

    2013-01-01

    We report compact diode-end-pumped continuous-wave laser operation at 1112 nm under 885 nm diode-direct pumping for the first time. On the basis of the R 2 →Y 6 transition in a conventional Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) single crystal, the maximum output power of 12.5 W is achieved, with an optical to optical efficiency of 46.6% and a slope efficiency of 52.9%. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest output at 1112 nm generated by a diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG laser. Furthermore, it is the highest optical to optical efficiency ever reported for 1112 nm Nd:YAG lasers. The short term power stability is ∼0.32% at 12.0 W output. (letter)

  10. Detuned resonances of Tollmien-Schlichting waves in an airfoil boundary layer: Experiment, theory, and direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würz, W.; Sartorius, D.; Kloker, M.; Borodulin, V. I.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Smorodsky, B. V.

    2012-09-01

    Transition prediction in two-dimensional laminar boundary layers developing on airfoil sections at subsonic speeds and very low turbulence levels is still a challenge. The commonly used semi-empirical prediction tools are mainly based on linear stability theory and do not account for nonlinear effects present unavoidably starting with certain stages of transition. One reason is the lack of systematic investigations of the weakly nonlinear stages of transition, especially of the strongest interactions of the instability modes predominant in non-self-similar boundary layers. The present paper is devoted to the detailed experimental, numerical, and theoretical study of weakly nonlinear subharmonic resonances of Tollmien-Schlichting waves in an airfoil boundary layer, representing main candidates for the strongest mechanism of these initial nonlinear stages. The experimental approach is based on phase-locked hot-wire measurements under controlled disturbance conditions using a new disturbance source being capable to produce well-defined, complex wave compositions in a wide range of streamwise and spanwise wave numbers. The tests were performed in a low-turbulence wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of Re = 0.7 × 106. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) were utilized to provide a detailed comparison for the test cases. The results of weakly nonlinear theory (WNT) enabled a profound understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms observed in the experiments and DNS. The data obtained in experiment, DNS and WNT agree basically and provide a high degree of reliability of the results. Interactions occurring between components of various initial frequency-wavenumber spectra of instability waves are investigated by systematic variation of parameters. It is shown that frequency-detuned and spanwise-wavenumber-detuned subharmonic-type resonant interactions have an extremely large spectral width. Similar to results obtained for self-similar base flows it is found that the

  11. Spatial and temporal variations of wave energy in the nearshore waters of the central west coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Amrutha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of wave power potential at different water depths and time is required for identifying a wave power plant location. This study examines the variation in wave power off the central west coast of India at water depths of 30, 9 and 5 m based on waverider buoy measured wave data. The study shows a significant reduction ( ∼  10 to 27 % in wave power at 9 m water depth compared to 30 m and the wave power available at 5 m water depth is 20 to 23 % less than that at 9 m. At 9 m depth, the seasonal mean value of the wave power varied from 1.6 kW m−1 in the post-monsoon period (ONDJ to 15.2 kW m−1 in the Indian summer monsoon (JJAS period. During the Indian summer monsoon period, the variation of wave power in a day is up to 32 kW m−1. At 9 m water depth, the mean annual wave power is 6 kW m−1 and interannual variations up to 19.3 % are observed during 2009–2014. High wave energy ( >  20 kW m−1 at the study area is essentially from the directional sector 245–270° and also 75 % of the total annual wave energy is from this narrow directional sector, which is advantageous while aligning the wave energy converter.

  12. Directionality Effects of Aligned Wind and Wave Loads on a Y-Shape Semi-Submersible Floating Wind Turbine under Rated Operational Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengtao Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Y-shape (triangular semi-submersible foundation has been adopted by most of the built full-scale floating wind turbines, such as Windfloat, Fukushima Mirai and Shimpuu. Considering the non-fully-symmetrical shape and met-ocean condition, the foundation laying angle relative to wind/wave directions will not only influence the downtime and power efficiency of the floating turbine, but also the strength and fatigue safety of the whole structure. However, the dynamic responses induced by various aligned wind and wave load directions have scarcely been investigated comparatively before. In our study, the directionality effects are investigated by means of combined wind and wave tests and coupled multi-body simulations. By comparing the measured data in three load directions, it is found that the differences of platform motions are mainly derived from the wave loads and larger pitch motion can always be observed in one of the directions. To make certain the mechanism underlying the observed phenomena, a coupled multi-body dynamic model of the floating wind turbine is established and validated. The numerical results demonstrate that the second-order hydrodynamic forces contribute greatly to the directionality distinctions for surge and pitch, and the first-order hydrodynamic forces determine the variations of tower base bending moments and nacelle accelerations. These findings indicate the directionality effects should be predetermined comprehensively before installation at sea, which is important for the operation and maintenance of the Y-shape floating wind turbines.

  13. HF Radar Observations of Current, Wave and Wind Parameters in the South Australian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleditch, A.; Cosoli, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Australian Coastal Ocean Radar Network (ACORN) has been measuring metocean parameters from an array of HF radar systems since 2007. Current, wave and wind measurements from a WERA phased-array radar system in the South Australian Gulf are evaluated using current meter, wave buoy and weather station data over a 12-month period. The spatial and temporal scales of the radar deployment have been configured for the measurement of surface currents from the first order backscatter spectra. Quality control procedures are applied to the radar currents that relate to the geometric configurations, statistical properties, and diagnostic variables provided by the analysis software. Wave measurements are obtained through an iterative inversion algorithm that provides an estimate of the directional frequency spectrum. The standard static configurations and data sampling strategies are not optimised for waves and so additional signal processing steps need to be implemented in order to provide reliable estimates. These techniques are currently only applied in offline mode but a real-time approach is in development. Improvements in the quality of extracted wave data are found through increased averaging of the raw radar data but the impact of temporal non-stationarity and spatial inhomogeneities in the WERA measurement region needs to be taken into account. Validations of wind direction data from a weather station on Neptune Island show the potential of using HF radar to combat the spread of bushfires in South Australia.

  14. Optimal Configurations of Wave Energy Converter Arrays with a Floating Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wanchao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An array of floating point-absorbing wave energy converters (WECs is usually employed for extracting efficiently ocean wave energy. For deep water environment, it is more feasible and convenient to connect the absorbers array with a floating body, such as a semi-submersible bottom-moored disk, whose function is to act as the virtual seabed. In the present work, an array of identical floating symmetrically distributed cylinders in a coaxial moored disk as a wave energy device is proposed The power take-off (PTO system in the wave energy device is assumed to be composed of a linear/nonlinear damper activated by the buoys heaving motion. Hydrodynamic analysis of the examined floating system is implemented in frequency domain. Hydrodynamic interferences between the oscillating bodies are accounted for in the corresponding coupled equations. The array layouts under the constraint of the disk, incidence wave directions, separating distance between the absorbers and the PTO damping are considered to optimize this kind of WECs. Numerical results with regular waves are presented and discussed for the axisymmetric system utilizing heave mode with these interaction factors, in terms of a specific numbers of cylinders and expected power production.

  15. US program in anchored data buoy and the other fixed observation platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, J. C.

    The NOAA Data Buoy Office (NOBO) develops and operates moored buoys in all U.S. coastal and offshore waters from New England to Hawaii (including the Great Lakes) to provide real-time environmental measurements in data-sparse areas for the National Weather Service and other public and private users. The NOBO also has a program for development, deployment, and operation of drifting buoys, which provide environmental measurements in the South Atlantic and Pacific from Chili to Australia and in the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, NOBO develops, deploys, and operates special purpose environmental measuring systems for other government agencies, particularly for petroleum-related purposes, and has an engineering development effort in procuring new and improved sensor and communications systems.

  16. Upper mantle velocity structure beneath Italy from direct and secondary P-wave teleseismic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. De Gori

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available High-quality teleseismic data digitally recorded by the National Seismic Network during 1988-1995 have been analysed to tomographically reconstruct the aspherical velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Italian region. To improve the quality and the reliability of the tomographic images, both direct (P, PKPdf and secondary (pP,sP,PcP,PP,PKPbc,PKPab travel-time data were used in the inversion. Over 7000 relative residuals were computed with respect to the IASP91 Earth velocity model and inverted using a modified version of the ACH technique. Incorporation of data of secondary phases resulted in a significant improvement of the sampling of the target volume and of the spatial resolution of the heterogeneous zones. The tomographic images show that most of the lateral variations in the velocity field are confined in the first ~250 km of depth. Strong low velocity anomalies are found beneath the Po plain, Tuscany and Eastern Sicily in the depth range between 35 and 85 km. High velocity anomalies dominate the upper mantle beneath the Central-Western Alps, Northern-Central Apennines and Southern Tyrrhenian sea at lithospheric depths between 85 and 150 km. At greater depth, positive anomalies are still observed below the northernmost part of the Apenninic chain and Southern Tyrrhenian sea. Deeper anomalies present in the 3D velocity model computed by inverting only the first arrivals dataset, generally appear less pronounced in the new tomographic reconstructions. We interpret this as the result of the ray sampling improvement on the reduction of the vertical smearing effects.

  17. Direct Quantum Dynamics Using Grid-Based Wave Function Propagation and Machine-Learned Potential Energy Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richings, Gareth W; Habershon, Scott

    2017-09-12

    We describe a method for performing nuclear quantum dynamics calculations using standard, grid-based algorithms, including the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method, where the potential energy surface (PES) is calculated "on-the-fly". The method of Gaussian process regression (GPR) is used to construct a global representation of the PES using values of the energy at points distributed in molecular configuration space during the course of the wavepacket propagation. We demonstrate this direct dynamics approach for both an analytical PES function describing 3-dimensional proton transfer dynamics in malonaldehyde and for 2- and 6-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations of proton transfer in salicylaldimine. In the case of salicylaldimine we also perform calculations in which the PES is constructed using Hartree-Fock calculations through an interface to an ab initio electronic structure code. In all cases, the results of the quantum dynamics simulations are in excellent agreement with previous simulations of both systems yet do not require prior fitting of a PES at any stage. Our approach (implemented in a development version of the Quantics package) opens a route to performing accurate quantum dynamics simulations via wave function propagation of many-dimensional molecular systems in a direct and efficient manner.

  18. Real-time and on-demand buoy observation system for tsunami and crustal displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Ochi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Imano, M.; Hino, R.

    2017-12-01

    We develop real-time and on-demand buoy observation system for tsunami and crustal displacement. It is indispensable for observation of crustal displacement to understand changes of stress field related to future large earthquakes. The current status of the observation is carried out by using a vessel with an interval of a few times per a year. When a large earthquake occurs, however, we need dense or on-demand observation of the crustal displacement to grasp nature of the slow slip after the rupture. Therefore, we constructed buoy system with a buoy station, wire-end station, seafloor unit and acoustic transponders for crustal displacement, and we installed a pressure sensor on the seafloor unit and GNSS system on the buoy in addition to measurement of e distance between the buoy and the seafloor acoustic transponders. Tsunami is evaluated using GNSS data and pressure data sent from seafloor. Observation error of the GNSS is about 10 cm. The crustal displacement is estimated using pressure sensor for vertical and acoustic measurement for horizontal. Using current slack ratio of 1.58, the observation error for the measurement of the crustal displacement is about 10 cm. We repeated three times sea trials and confirmed the data acquisition with high data quality, mooring without dredging anchor in the strong sea current with a speed of 5.5 knots. Current issues to be resolved we face are removing noises on the acoustic data transmission, data transmission between the buoy and wire-end stations, electrical consumption on the buoy station and large observation error on the crustal displacement due to large slack ratio. We consider the change of the acoustic transmission for pressure data, replace of a GNSS data logger with large electrical consumption, and reduce of the slack ratio, and search method to reduce resistance of the buoy on the sea water. In this presentation, we introduce the current status of the technical development and tsunami waveforms recorded on our

  19. Perspective on direct conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1963-10-15

    The objective of direct conversion is high electrical output for minimum total cost, and not always high conversion efficiency. The wide range of techniques embracing cryogenics and hot plasma derives from the special requirements of source, environment, and application. Sources include solar and other radiation, nuclear fission and fusion, chemical energy, and heat. Environments and applications range from space vehicles to submarines and from giant power networks to isolated buoys and pocket devices. (auth)

  20. A methodology for spectral wave model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, S. A.; Edwards, K. L.; Rogers, W. E.

    2017-12-01

    Model evaluation is accomplished by comparing bulk parameters (e.g., significant wave height, energy period, and mean square slope (MSS)) calculated from the model energy spectra with those calculated from buoy energy spectra. Quality control of the observed data and choice of the frequency range from which the bulk parameters are calculated are critical steps in ensuring the validity of the model-data comparison. The compared frequency range of each observation and the analogous model output must be identical, and the optimal frequency range depends in part on the reliability of the observed spectra. National Data Buoy Center 3-m discus buoy spectra are unreliable above 0.3 Hz due to a non-optimal buoy response function correction. As such, the upper end of the spectrum should not be included when comparing a model to these data. Bioufouling of Waverider buoys must be detected, as it can harm the hydrodynamic response of the buoy at high frequencies, thereby rendering the upper part of the spectrum unsuitable for comparison. An important consideration is that the intentional exclusion of high frequency energy from a validation due to data quality concerns (above) can have major implications for validation exercises, especially for parameters such as the third and fourth moments of the spectrum (related to Stokes drift and MSS, respectively); final conclusions can be strongly altered. We demonstrate this by comparing outcomes with and without the exclusion, in a case where a Waverider buoy is believed to be free of biofouling. Determination of the appropriate frequency range is not limited to the observed spectra. Model evaluation involves considering whether all relevant frequencies are included. Guidance to make this decision is based on analysis of observed spectra. Two model frequency lower limits were considered. Energy in the observed spectrum below the model lower limit was calculated for each. For locations where long swell is a component of the wave

  1. An autonomous drifting buoy system for long term pCO2 observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Fujiki, T.; Wakita, M.; Azetsu-Scott, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have been carried out around the world to understand what happens to carbon dioxide (CO2) once it is emitted into the atmosphere, and how it relates to long-term climate change. However, the sea surface pCO2 observations on volunteer observation ships and research vessels concentrated in the North Atlantic and North Pacific. To assess the spatial and temporal variations of surface pCO2 in the global ocean, new automated pCO2 sensor which can be used in platform systems such as buoys or moorings is strongly desired. We have been developing the small drifting buoy system (diameter 250-340 mm, length 470 mm, weight 15 kg) for pCO2 measurement, with the support of the Japan EOS Promotion Program (JEPP), the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The objective is to provide simplified, automated measurements of pCO2 over all the world's oceans, an essential factor in understanding how the ocean responds to climate change. The measurement principle for the pCO2 sensor is based on spectrophotometry (e.g. Lefèvre et al., 1993; Degrandpre et al., 1995). The CO2 in the surrounding seawater equilibrates with the indicator solution across the gas permeable membranes. The equilibration process causes a change of pH in the indicator solution, which results in the change of optical absorbance. The pCO2 is calculated from the optical absorbance of the pH indicator solution equilibrated with CO2 in seawater through a gas permeable membrane. In our analytical system, we used an amorphous fluoropolymer tubing form of AF-2400 by DuPontTM for the gas permeable membrane due to its high gas permeability coefficients. The measurement system of the sensor consisted mainly of a LED light source, optical fibers, a CCD detector, and a downsized PC. The measured data were transmitted to the laboratory by satellite communication (Argos system). In the laboratory experiment, we obtained a high response time (less than 2 minutes) and a precision

  2. On propagating direction of ring current proton ULF waves observed by ATS 6 at 6.6 R/sub e/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, S.; Konradi, A.; Fritz, T.A.

    1977-01-01

    From June 11 to September 16, 1974, the NOAA low-energy proton detector on board the ATS 6 satellite observed 71 cases of ultralow-frequency oscillations of proton flux intensities. The oscillation periods varied from 40 s to 6 min, and the events were observed most frequently during moderate geomagnetic conditions. The flux oscillations occurred at various local times, yet almost two thirds of the events were detected in the near-dusk region of the magentosphere. For a majority of the events in this set a substantial phase shift in flux oscillation was detected between different energy channels and/or between two oppositely oriented detector telescopes. The phase shift is mainly due to the finite gyroradius effect of the protons gyrating in the geomagnetic field. By examining this finite gyroradius effect on the perturbed particle distribution function associated with the wave in a nonuniform magnetic field we are able to determine the propagation direction of the wave from particle observations made by a single spacecraft. Although the type of wave and its excitation mechanism can only be conjectured at the present time, it is concluded that the wave propagates in the westward direction with a phase velocity of about 13 km/s. Furthermore, it also has a very small phase velocity approx.0.15 km/s propagating toward the earth. If the wave had been traveling 1 hour or so before it was observed near the dusk magnetosphere, it might have originated in the dark magnetosphere in associating with some changes in geophysical conditions. The statistical correlation between the times of the observed wave events and the onsets of the auroral magnetic bays indicates that although they seldom occurred simultaneously, 80% of the waves were observed within 1 hour of the bay onset. Therefore it is concluded that the condition of the magnetosphere after a substorm is favorable for the occurrence of the ring current proton ultralow-frequency waves

  3. Generating synthetic wave climates for coastal modelling: a linear mixed modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C.; Lark, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical coastline morphological evolution models require wave climate properties to drive morphological change through time. Wave climate properties (typically wave height, period and direction) may be temporally fixed, culled from real wave buoy data, or allowed to vary in some way defined by a Gaussian or other pdf. However, to examine sensitivity of coastline morphologies to wave climate change, it seems desirable to be able to modify wave climate time series from a current to some new state along a trajectory, but in a way consistent with, or initially conditioned by, the properties of existing data, or to generate fully synthetic data sets with realistic time series properties. For example, mean or significant wave height time series may have underlying periodicities, as revealed in numerous analyses of wave data. Our motivation is to develop a simple methodology to generate synthetic wave climate time series that can change in some stochastic way through time. We wish to use such time series in a coastline evolution model to test sensitivities of coastal landforms to changes in wave climate over decadal and centennial scales. We have worked initially on time series of significant wave height, based on data from a Waverider III buoy located off the coast of Yorkshire, England. The statistical framework for the simulation is the linear mixed model. The target variable, perhaps after transformation (Box-Cox), is modelled as a multivariate Gaussian, the mean modelled as a function of a fixed effect, and two random components, one of which is independently and identically distributed (iid) and the second of which is temporally correlated. The model was fitted to the data by likelihood methods. We considered the option of a periodic mean, the period either fixed (e.g. at 12 months) or estimated from the data. We considered two possible correlation structures for the second random effect. In one the correlation decays exponentially with time. In the second

  4. Directional Ocean Wave Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    thle The basin is also equipped with a 50-rn-wide hydraulic Wasesc~an-menasured spec\\trum., Pitch ndroll motions AA C D Figure 5. Results of Tydeman...LDescnption and Mfodetling of IVieraonal Seas. Danish Hydraulic Institute rnd Danish Maritime Institute. Copenhagen, pp. 0-5-1 V-5-17 (1984). ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...iins oý 1 eak k II V. I" a t’A1101` icnt the large circles with inrscribed crssesý. lihe grL)wrd fracks Radar (kcaiw VOac~eoicc s.ha~k,,in, this on

  5. Wave farm impact on the beach profile: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Abanades, J; Greaves, D; Iglesias, G

    2014-01-01

    If wave energy is to become a fully-fledged renewable, its environmental impacts must be fully understood. The objective of the present work is to examine the impact of a wave farm on the beach profile through a case study. The methodology is based on two coupled numerical models: a nearshore wave propagation model and a morphodynamic model, which are run in two scenarios, both with and without the wave farm. Wave data from a nearby coastal buoy are used to prescribe the boundary conditions. ...

  6. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Austin, M. E. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Torino (Italy); Porkolab, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Turco, F. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-02-12

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ∼2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  7. A Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) for Fusion Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chap, Andrew; Tarditi, Alfonso G.; Scott, John H.

    2013-01-01

    A Particle-in-cell simulation model has been developed to study the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) applied to the conversion of charged fusion products into electricity. In this model the availability of a beam of collimated fusion products is assumed; the simulation is focused on the conversion of the beam kinetic energy into alternating current (AC) electric power. The model is electrostatic, as the electro-dynamics of the relatively slow ions can be treated in the quasistatic approximation. A two-dimensional, axisymmetric (radial-axial coordinates) geometry is considered. Ion beam particles are injected on one end and travel along the axis through ring-shaped electrodes with externally applied time-varying voltages, thus modulating the beam by forming a sinusoidal pattern in the beam density. Further downstream, the modulated beam passes through another set of ring electrodes, now electrically oating. The modulated beam induces a time alternating potential di erence between adjacent electrodes. Power can be drawn from the electrodes by connecting a resistive load. As energy is dissipated in the load, a corresponding drop in beam energy is measured. The simulation encapsulates the TWDEC process by reproducing the time-dependent transfer of energy and the particle deceleration due to the electric eld phase time variations.

  8. SimLabel: a graphical user interface to simulate continuous wave EPR spectra from site-directed spin labeling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, E; Le Breton, N; Martinho, M; Mileo, E; Belle, V

    2017-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) combined with continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique to reveal, at the residue level, structural transitions in proteins. SDSL-EPR is based on the selective grafting of a paramagnetic label on the protein under study, followed by cw EPR analysis. To extract valuable quantitative information from SDSL-EPR spectra and thus give reliable interpretation on biological system dynamics, numerical simulations of the spectra are required. Such spectral simulations can be carried out by coding in MATLAB using functions from the EasySpin toolbox. For non-expert users of MATLAB, this could be a complex task or even impede the use of such simulation tool. We developed a graphical user interface called SimLabel dedicated to run cw EPR spectra simulations particularly coming from SDSL-EPR experiments. Simlabel provides an intuitive way to visualize, simulate, and fit such cw EPR spectra. An example of SDSL-EPR spectra simulation concerning the study of an intrinsically disordered region undergoing a local induced folding is described and discussed. We believe that this new tool will help the users to rapidly obtain reliable simulated spectra and hence facilitate the interpretation of their results. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Investigation of the relationship between hurricane waves and extreme runup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. M.; Stockdon, H. F.

    2006-12-01

    In addition to storm surge, the elevation of wave-induced runup plays a significant role in forcing geomorphic change during extreme storms. Empirical formulations for extreme runup, defined as the 2% exceedence level, are dependent on some measure of significant offshore wave height. Accurate prediction of extreme runup, particularly during hurricanes when wave heights are large, depends on selecting the most appropriate measure of wave height that provides energy to the nearshore system. Using measurements from deep-water wave buoys results in an overprediction of runup elevation. Under storm forcing these large waves dissipate across the shelf through friction, whitecapping and depth-limited breaking before reaching the beach and forcing swash processes. The use of a local, shallow water wave height has been shown to provide a more accurate estimate of extreme runup elevation (Stockdon, et. al. 2006); however, a specific definition of this local wave height has yet to be defined. Using observations of nearshore waves from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility (FRF) in Duck, NC during Hurricane Isabel, the most relevant measure of wave height for use in empirical runup parameterizations was examined. Spatial and temporal variability of the hurricane wave field, which made landfall on September 18, 2003, were modeled using SWAN. Comparisons with wave data from FRF gages and deep-water buoys operated by NOAA's National Data Buoy Center were used for model calibration. Various measures of local wave height (breaking, dissipation-based, etc.) were extracted from the model domain and used as input to the runup parameterizations. Video based observations of runup collected at the FRF during the storm were used to ground truth modeled values. Assessment of the most appropriate measure of wave height can be extended over a large area through comparisons to observations of storm- induced geomorphic change.

  10. Buoy observation for typhoon in southeast of Taiwan during summers of 2015 and 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C. Y.; Yang, Y. J.; Chang, M. H.; Chang, H. I.; Jan, S.; Wei, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    The western North Pacific is the most active area for the typhoon in the world, and typhoon caused disasters in this area. The marine observations are very important for the typhoon prediction. National Taiwan University (NTU) was developed a real-time data buoy system for typhoon observation. This buoy not only collected meteorological data, but also measured the temperature and salinity profiles of ocean's upper 500 m. The buoys, NTU1 and NTU2, were moored about 375 km and 175 km, respectively, from the southernmost tip of Taiwan. In summer of 2015, NTU1 buoy equipped with temperature and humidity probes, wind sensor, pyranometer, barometer, conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorders, and temperature-pressure recorders. In summer of 2016, NTU1 and NTU2 buoys installed more instruments, such as rain gauge, net radiometer, and current meter, etc. During the observation period, there were three typhoons (Chan-hom, Soudler, and Goni) in 2015 and one typhoon (Nepartak) in 2016 approached buoy. Goni passed south and west side of NTU1 and the air pressure dropped around 25 hPa. Nepartak passed north side of NTU1 and south side of NTU2. The minimum distance between center of typhoon and NTU1 and NTU2 were about 11.48 km and 4.85 km, respectively. The NTU2 buoy recorded a maximum wind gust of 44 m/s, thickness of mixed layer increased to 120 m, and sea-surface temperature dropped 3 °C. In addition, the typhoon induced the near inertial internal motion for a couple of days. Applied the in-situ data to derive the net heat flux and its variations were from 600 W/m2 to -1000W/m2 during typhoon period. It indicate that the ocean provide energy to typhoon around this area. Moreover, the sum of sensible and latent heat flux calculated from observation data was 4.5 times than satellite-based products.

  11. Field evaluation of remote wind sensing technologies: Shore-based and buoy mounted LIDAR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, Thomas [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-03

    In developing a national energy strategy, the United States has a number of objectives, including increasing economic growth, improving environmental quality, and enhancing national energy security. Wind power contributes to these objectives through the deployment of clean, affordable and reliable domestic energy. To achieve U.S. wind generation objectives, the Wind and Water Power Program within the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) instituted the U.S. Offshore Wind: Removing Market Barriers Program in FY 2011. Accurate and comprehensive information on offshore wind resource characteristics across a range of spatial and temporal scales is one market barrier that needs to be addressed through advanced research in remote sensing technologies. There is a pressing need for reliable offshore wind-speed measurements to assess the availability of the potential wind energy resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring spatial variability in the offshore wind resource that may impact the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components and to provide a verification program to validate the “bankability” of the output of these alternative technologies for use by finance institutions for the financing of offshore wind farm construction. The application of emerging remote sensing technologies is viewed as a means to cost-effectively meet the data needs of the offshore wind industry. In particular, scanning and buoy mounted LIDAR have been proposed as a means to obtain accurate offshore wind data at multiple locations without the high cost and regulatory hurdles associated with the construction of offshore meteorological towers. However; before these remote sensing technologies can be accepted the validity of the measured data must be evaluated to ensure their accuracy. The proposed research will establish a unique coastal ocean test-bed in the Mid-Atlantic for

  12. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: effect of moisture, product type, and material direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangping Han; Qinglin Wu; Xiping Wang

    2006-01-01

    The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave velocity (SWV), bending stiffness. and bending strength of commercial oriented strandboard, plywood. particleboard. and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave verocity decreased in general with increases in panel moisture content (MC). At a given MC level. SWV varied with panel type and...

  13. Directional waves simulated for a severe cyclone and a typical monsoon season in the north Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Kumar, B.P.; Sudheesh, K.

    in terms of source functions using the basic energy balance equation. The cyclone waves are simulated over an area of 1000 km sup(2) which includes the location (off Pondicherry), where wave data is available for comparison. The wind input to the model...

  14. Optimization and Annual Average Power Predictions of a Backward Bent Duct Buoy Oscillating Water Column Device Using the Wells Turbine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Christopher S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Willits, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fontaine, Arnold A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This Technical Report presents work completed by The Applied Research Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University, in conjunction with Sandia National Labs, on the optimization of the power conversion chain (PCC) design to maximize the Average Annual Electric Power (AAEP) output of an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device. The design consists of two independent stages. First, the design of a floating OWC, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), and second the design of the PCC. The pneumatic power output of the BBDB in random waves is optimized through the use of a hydrodynamically coupled, linear, frequency-domain, performance model that links the oscillating structure to internal air-pressure fluctuations. The PCC optimization is centered on the selection and sizing of a Wells Turbine and electric power generation equipment. The optimization of the PCC involves the following variables: the type of Wells Turbine (fixed or variable pitched, with and without guide vanes), the radius of the turbine, the optimal vent pressure, the sizing of the power electronics, and number of turbines. Also included in this Technical Report are further details on how rotor thrust and torque are estimated, along with further details on the type of variable frequency drive selected.

  15. A locking mechanism for securing a loading buoy to a vessel. Lsemekanisme for fastgjring av en lastebye til et farty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breivik, K.; Smedal, A.

    1994-07-04

    The invention relates to a locking mechanism for securing a loading/unloading buoy on a vessel. The buoy is of the type to be introduced into a submerged downwardly open receiving space in the vessel, and to be fastened in a releasable manner in the receiving space. The mechanism comprises hydraulically actuated locking elements, mounted about horizontal axes at the sides of the receiving space, to pivot between the locking and releasing positions, the buoy having a peripheral collar having a downwards facing abutment edge for engagement with the locking elements in the locking position thereof. 6 figs.

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Waves Interacting with a Shock Wave in a Quasi-1D Convergent-Divergent Nozzle Using an Unstructured Finite Volume Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trong T.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a very small amplitude acoustic wave interacting with a shock wave in a quasi-1D convergent-divergent nozzle is performed using an unstructured finite volume algorithm with a piece-wise linear, least square reconstruction, Roe flux difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. First, the spatial accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated for steady flows with and without the normal shock by running the simulation with a sequence of successively finer meshes. Then the accuracy of the Roe flux difference splitting near the sonic transition point is examined for different reconstruction schemes. Finally, the unsteady numerical solutions with the acoustic perturbation are presented and compared with linear theory results.

  17. Characteristics of pressure wave in common rail fuel injection system of high-speed direct injection diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Herfatmanesh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The latest generation of high-pressure common rail equipment now provides diesel engines possibility to apply as many as eight separate injection pulses within the engine cycle for reducing emissions and for smoothing combustion. With these complicated injection arrangements, optimizations of operating parameters for various driving conditions are considerably difficult, particularly when integrating fuel injection parameters with other operating parameters such as exhaust gas recirculation rate and boost pressure together for evaluating calibration results. Understanding the detailed effects of fuel injection parameters upon combustion characteristics and emission formation is therefore particularly critical. In this article, the results and discussion of experimental investigations on a high-speed direct injection light-duty diesel engine test bed are presented for evaluating and analyzing the effects of main adjustable parameters of the fuel injection system on all regulated emission gases and torque performance. Main injection timing, rail pressure, pilot amount, and particularly pilot timing have been examined. The results show that optimization of each of those adjustable parameters is beneficial for emission reduction and torque improvement under different operating conditions. By exploring the variation in the interval between the pilot injection and the main injection, it is found that the pressure wave in the common rail has a significant influence on the subsequent injection. This suggests that special attentions must be paid for adjusting pilot timing or any injection interval when multi-injection is used. With analyzing the fuel amount oscillation of the subsequent injections to pilot separation, it demonstrates that the frequency of regular oscillations of the actual fuel amount or the injection pulse width with the variation in pilot separation is always the same for a specified fuel injection system, regardless of engine speed

  18. Performance of arrays of direct-driven wave energy converters under optimal power take-off damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the total power converted by a wave energy farm is influenced by the hydrodynamic interactions between wave energy converters, especially when they are close to each other. Therefore, to improve the performance of a wave energy farm, the hydrodynamic interaction between converters must be considered, which can be influenced by the power take-off damping of individual converters. In this paper, the performance of arrays of wave energy converters under optimal hydrodynamic interaction and power take-off damping is investigated. This is achieved by coordinating the power take-off damping of individual converters, resulting in optimal hydrodynamic interaction as well as higher production of time-averaged power converted by the farm. Physical constraints on motion amplitudes are considered in the solution, which is required for the practical implementation of wave energy converters. Results indicate that the natural frequency of a wave energy converter under optimal damping will not vary with sea states, but the production performance of a wave energy farm can be improved significantly while satisfying the motion constraints.

  19. Performance of arrays of direct-driven wave energy converters under optimal power take-off damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liguo; Engström, Jens; Leijon, Mats; Isberg, Jan

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the total power converted by a wave energy farm is influenced by the hydrodynamic interactions between wave energy converters, especially when they are close to each other. Therefore, to improve the performance of a wave energy farm, the hydrodynamic interaction between converters must be considered, which can be influenced by the power take-off damping of individual converters. In this paper, the performance of arrays of wave energy converters under optimal hydrodynamic interaction and power take-off damping is investigated. This is achieved by coordinating the power take-off damping of individual converters, resulting in optimal hydrodynamic interaction as well as higher production of time-averaged power converted by the farm. Physical constraints on motion amplitudes are considered in the solution, which is required for the practical implementation of wave energy converters. Results indicate that the natural frequency of a wave energy converter under optimal damping will not vary with sea states, but the production performance of a wave energy farm can be improved significantly while satisfying the motion constraints.

  20. Designing a point-absorber wave energy converter for the Mediterranean Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archetti, Renata; Moreno Miquel, Adria; Antonini, Alessandro; Passoni, Giuseppe; Bozzi, Silvia; Gruosso, Giambattista; Scarpa, Francesca; Bizzozero, Federica; Giassi, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to assess the potential for wave energy production in the Italian seas by the deployment of arrays of heaving point absorbers, specifically optimized for mild climates. We model a single-body WEC, consisting of a cylindrical heaving buoy, attached to a linear electric generator placed on the seabed. The model includes both hydrodynamic and electromechanical forces. The results show that the best buoy-generator configuration at the selected sites (Alghero and Mazara del Vallo) is given by a 6 to 10 kW device and with a buoy with diameter between 4 and 5 m. This device can be brought to resonance, increasing the performances, by adding a submerged sphere. These results are encouraging and enlarge the perspective on wave energy production in the Italian seas. [it

  1. Drifting and moored buoy data observed during 2015 and assembled by the Global Data Assembly Center for Drifting Buoy Data (formerly Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC)), Canada (NCEI Accession 0156004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Buoy data is available in real time to platform operators via telecommunications providers and distributed on the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) of the World...

  2. Meteorological, oceanographic, and buoy data from JAMSTEC from five drifting buoys, named J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter) in the Arctic Ocean from 2000 to 2003 (NODC Accession 0002201)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1999, JAMSTEC and MetOcean Data System Ltd. developed a new drifting buoy, named J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter), to conduct long-term observations in the...

  3. Receiver Signal to Noise Ratios for IPDA Lidars Using Sine-wave and Pulsed Laser Modulation and Direct Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    seeder lasers, one on-line and one offline that are intensity modulated by two different frequency sine-waves signals before being amplified by a common laser amplifier. The receiver uses narrowband amplitude demodulation, or lock-in, Signal processing at the given laser modulation frequencies [3,4]. The laser transmitter operates in a quasi CW mode with the peak power equal to twice the average power. The on-line and off-line lasers can be transmitted at the same time without interference. Another direct detection technique uses a low duty cycle pulsed laser modulation [5,6] with the laser wavelengths alternating between on-line and off-line on successive pulses. The receiver uses time resolved detection and can also provide simultaneous target range measurement. With a lower laser duty cycle it requires a much higher peak laser power for the same average power.

  4. Hanalei Bay, Kauai tide, and directional current and wave data, June-September 2006 (NODC Accession 0067695)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — High-resolution measurements of waves, currents, water levels, temperature, salinity and turbidity were made in Hanalei Bay, Kauai, Hawaii during the summer of 2006....

  5. WAVE DIRECTION and Other Data from FIXED STATIONS From Coastal Waters of California from 19750313 to 19750525 (NODC Accession 9400044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The accession contains Wave Surface Data collected in Coastal Waters of California between March 13, 1975 and May 25, 1975. Water surface elevation data was...

  6. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator; Dufera, Hiz [Project Manager; Montagna, Deb [Business Point of Contact

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  7. Scaling observations of surface waves in the Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Smith

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rapidly changing Arctic sea ice cover affects surface wave growth across all scales. Here, in situ measurements of waves, observed from freely-drifting buoys during the 2014 open water season, are interpreted using open water distances determined from satellite ice products and wind forcing time series measured in situ with the buoys. A significant portion of the wave observations were found to be limited by open water distance (fetch when the wind duration was sufficient for the conditions to be considered stationary. The scaling of wave energy and frequency with open water distance demonstrated the indirect effects of ice cover on regional wave evolution. Waves in partial ice cover could be similarly categorized as distance-limited by applying the same open water scaling to determine an ‘effective fetch’. The process of local wave generation in ice appeared to be a strong function of the ice concentration, wherein the ice cover severely reduces the effective fetch. The wave field in the Beaufort Sea is thus a function of the sea ice both locally, where wave growth primarily occurs in the open water between floes, and regionally, where the ice edge may provide a more classic fetch limitation. Observations of waves in recent years may be indicative of an emerging trend in the Arctic Ocean, where we will observe increasing wave energy with decreasing sea ice extent.

  8. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From World-Wide Distribution from 19910101 to 19910331 (NODC Accession 9100101)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting Buoy Data from the Canadian Data Center, submitted by Mr. Gerald P Lesblam, Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada in GF-3 format...

  9. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From World-Wide Distribution from 19781122 to 19810113 (NODC Accession 8600071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 359 Drifting Surface Buoys were deployed in the Southern Hemisphere oceans from November 22, 1978 to January 13, 1981 as part of the First Global Atmospheric...

  10. Nearshore waves and longshore sediment transport along Rameshwaram Island off the east coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam Gowthaman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wave-induced Longshore Sediment Transport (LST play an important role in the dynamics of the Dhanushkodi sandspit located southeast of Rameshwaram. The LST along the Dhanushkodi coast is studied based on data collected simultaneously in Gulf of Mannar (GoM and Palk Bay (PB using directional waverider buoys. The numerical model REF/DIF1 was used to calculate the nearshore waves and the LST rate was estimated using three different formulae. The model validation was done based on the measured nearshore waves using InterOcean S4DW. Numerical model LITPACK was also used for simulating non-cohesive sediment transport and the LITLINE module was used to study the shoreline evolution over 5 years. Low net annual LST along PB (~0.01 × 106 m3 compared to the GoM region (0.3 × 106 m3 were due to the weak waves. Accretion in the region led to growth of the Dhanushkodi sandspit by 65 m during the period 2010-2015.

  11. Oceanographic Multisensor Buoy Based on Low Cost Sensors for Posidonia Meadows Monitoring in Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are some underwater areas with high ecological interest that should be monitored. Posidonia and seagrasses exert considerable work in protecting the coastline from erosion. In these areas, many animals and organisms live and find the grassland food and the protection against predators. It is considered a bioindicator of the quality of coastal marine waters. It is important to monitor them and maintain these ecological communities as clean as possible. In this paper, we present an oceanographic buoy for Posidonia meadows monitoring. It is based on a set of low cost sensors which are able to collect data from water such as salinity, temperature, and turbidity and from the weather as temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall, among others. The system is mounted in a buoy which keeps it isolated to possible oxidation problems. Data gathered are processed using a microcontroller. Finally the buoy is connected with a base station placed on the mainland through a wireless connection using a FlyPort module. The network performance is checked in order to ensure that no delays will be generated on the data transmission. This proposal could be used to monitor other areas with special ecological interest and for monitoring and supervising aquaculture activities.

  12. Evaluation of HY-2A Scatterometer Wind Vectors Using Data from Buoys, ERA-Interim and ASCAT during 2012–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Xing

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The first Chinese operational Ku-band scatterometer on board Haiyang-2A (HY-2A, launched in August 2011, is designed for monitoring the global ocean surface wind. This study estimates the quality of the near-real-time (NRT retrieval wind speed and wind direction from the HY-2A scatterometer for 36 months from 2012 to 2014. We employed three types of sea-surface wind data from oceanic moored buoys operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC and the Tropical Atmospheric Ocean project (TAO, the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-Interim, and the advanced scatterometer (ASCAT to calculate the error statistics including mean bias, root mean square error (RMSE, and standard deviation. In addition, the rain effects on the retrieval winds were investigated using collocated Climate Prediction Center morphing method (CMORPH precipitation data. All data were collocated with the HY-2A scatterometer wind data for comparison. The quality performances of the HY-2A NRT wind vectors data (especially the wind speeds were satisfactory throughout the service period. The RMSEs of the HY-2A wind speeds relative to the NDBC, TAO, ERA-Interim, and ASCAT data were 1.94, 1.73, 2.25, and 1.62 m·s−1, respectively. The corresponding RMSEs of the wind direction were 46.63°, 43.11°, 39.93°, and 47.47°, respectively. The HY-2A scatterometer overestimated low wind speeds, especially under rainy conditions. Rain exerted a diminishing effect on the wind speed retrievals with increasing wind speed, but its effect on wind direction was robust at low and moderate wind speeds. Relative to the TAO buoy data, the RMSEs without rain effect were reduced to 1.2 m·s−1 and 39.68° for the wind speed direction, respectively, regardless of wind speed. By investigating the objective laws between rain and the retrieval winds from HY-2A, we could improve the quality of wind retrievals through future studies.

  13. Mechanical design and modeling of a single-piston pump for the novel power take-off system of a wave energy converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vakis, Antonis I.; Anagnostopoulos, John S.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-pump, multi-piston power take-off wave energy converter ((MPPTO)-P-2 WEC) has been proposed for use with a novel renewable energy harvester termed the Ocean Grazer. The (MPPTO)-P-2 WEC utilizes wave motion to pump via buoys connected to pistons working fluid within a closed circuit and store

  14. Trends of wave height and period in the Central Arabian Sea from 1996 to 2012: A study based on satellite altimeter data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hithin, N.K.; SanilKumar, V.; Shanas, P.R.

    The variability of annual maximum and annual mean significant wave height (SWH) and wave period in the Central Arabian Sea is studied using satellite altimeter data from 1996 to 2012 at a deep water (water depth~3500 m) buoy location (15.5°N, 69...

  15. Breaking Waves on the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendeman, Michael S.

    equilibrium range waves and normalizing by the wave directional spread. Meanwhile, correlation of W with turbulent dissipation measurements is significantly worse, which may be due to uncertainty in the measurements or bias related to micro-breaking waves. Finally, phase-resolved, three-dimensional, measurements of the whitecaps were made from a new ship-based stereo video system. Comparison with concurrent buoy measurements indicate that the stereo data accurately reproduces the wave statistics, including the frequency spectra. The whitecaps are characterized by transient and spatially localized regions of extreme surface gradients, rather than large crest-to-trough steepnesses. It was found that whitecaps were around 10 times more likely to have extreme slopes, and 50% of the observed extreme surface slopes were in the vicinity of the breaking waves. The maximum whitecap slopes show good agreement with the Stokes 120 degree limiting crest geometry, and the whitecap crest loses much of its maximum steepness shortly after the onset of breaking. The whitecap phase speeds are consistently less than the linear or weakly nonlinear predicted phase speed, which indicate the effect of narrow-band wave groups, despite the broad-band wave spectra.

  16. Wave climate change, coastline response and hazard prediction in New South Wales, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, Ian D.; Verdon, Danielle; Cowell, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Considerable research effort has been directed towards understanding and the gross prediction of shoreline response to sea level rise (eg. Cowell ef a/. 2003a, b). In contrast, synoptic prediction of changes in the planform configuration of shorelines in response to changes in wind and wave climates over many decades has been limited by the lack of geohistorical data on shoreline alignment evolution and long time series of wave climate. This paper presents new data sets on monthly mean wave direction variability based on: a. Waverider buoy data; b. a reconstruction of monthly mid-shelf wave direction, 1877 to 2002 AD from historical MSLP data (Goodwin 2005); and c. a multi-decadal reconstruction of wave direction, in association with the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode of climate variability, covering the past millennium. A model of coastline response to the wave climate variability is presented for northern and central New South Wales (NSW) for decadal to multi-decadal time scales, and is based on instrumental and geohistorical data. The sensitivity of the coastline position and alignment, and beach state to mean and extreme wave climate changes is demonstrated (e.g. Goodwin et al. 2006). State changes in geometric shoreline alignment rotation, sand volume (progradation/recession) for NSW and mean wave direction, are shown to be in agreement with the low-frequency change in Pacific-wide climate. Synoptic typing of climate patterns using Self Organised Mapping methods is used to downscale CSIRO GCM output for this century. The synoptic types are correlated to instrumental wave climate data and coastal behaviour. The shifts in downscaled synoptic types for 2030 and 2070 AD are then used as the basis for predicting mean wave climate changes, coastal behaviour and hazards along the NSW coastline. The associated coastal hazards relate to the definition of coastal land loss through rising sea levels and shoreline

  17. Complete wave-vector directions of electromagnetic emissions: Application to INTERBALL-2 measurements in the nightside auroral zone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Lefeuvre, F.; Parrot, M.; Rauch, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 106, - (2001), s. 13,191-13,201 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/01/1064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : auroral kilometric radiation * wave propagation * analysis techniques Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.609, year: 2001

  18. Method and system for connecting a loading buoy to a floating vessel. Fremgangsmte og system for tilkopling av en lastebye til et flytende farty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breivik, K.; Kleppest, H.; Smedal, A.

    1994-07-04

    The invention deals with a method and a system for connecting a submerged loading/unloading buoy to a submerged receiving space in a floating vessel, for transfer of a medium, especially oil, to or from the vessel, wherein the buoy is anchored to the sea bed and is connected to a transfer line for medium. According to one variant of the method, a sink line is lowered from the vessel through the receiving space, an auxiliary buoy being attached to the sink line end, possible via an additional line, and the auxiliary buoy being caused to come to the water surface. A suitably marked pick-up line, which is connected to the buoy, is taken up and connected to the sink line, whereafter the vessel by a positioning means is moved into position above the submerged buoy and said lines are pulled up through the receiving space, so that the buoy is hoisted up and moved to a locking position therein, whereafter the buoy is locked in place in the receiving space. The vessel is provided with a hoisting means to hoist up said lines and the buoy, and also with a service shaft connecting the receiving space to the deck of the vessel. 9 figs.

  19. Wave Resource Characterization Using an Unstructured Grid Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Cheng Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a modeling study conducted on the central Oregon coast for wave resource characterization, using the unstructured grid Simulating WAve Nearshore (SWAN model coupled with a nested grid WAVEWATCH III® (WWIII model. The flexibility of models with various spatial resolutions and the effects of open boundary conditions simulated by a nested grid WWIII model with different physics packages were evaluated. The model results demonstrate the advantage of the unstructured grid-modeling approach for flexible model resolution and good model skills in simulating the six wave resource parameters recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission in comparison to the observed data in Year 2009 at National Data Buoy Center Buoy 46050. Notably, spectral analysis indicates that the ST4 physics package improves upon the ST2 physics package’s ability to predict wave power density for large waves, which is important for wave resource assessment, load calculation of devices, and risk management. In addition, bivariate distributions show that the simulated sea state of maximum occurrence with the ST4 physics package matched the observed data better than with the ST2 physics package. This study demonstrated that the unstructured grid wave modeling approach, driven by regional nested grid WWIII outputs along with the ST4 physics package, can efficiently provide accurate wave hindcasts to support wave resource characterization. Our study also suggests that wind effects need to be considered if the dimension of the model domain is greater than approximately 100 km, or O (102 km.

  20. Application of Fourier elastodynamics to direct and inverse problems for the scattering of elastic waves from flaws near surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.M.; Fertig, K.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In order to inspect flaws which lie too close to the surface a Fourier elastodynamic formalism is proposed which enables one to decompose the elastodynamic system into separately charterizable parts by means of planes perpendicular to the z-axis. The process can be represented by a generalized transfer function relating the near-field scattered waves to the waves incident on a slab of material containing the flaw. The Fourier elastodynamics are applied to the characterization of the total scattering process involving a flaw at various distances from a plastic-water interface. An abbreviated discussion of Fourier elastodynamics is presented, and the results specialized to the case of spherical voids and inclusions bear an interface. Finally, the computational results for several ranges of temporal frequency and for a sequence of values of the distance from the flaw center to the interface are discussed

  1. Direct observation of competition between superconductivity and charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity often emerges in the proximity of, or in competition with, symmetry-breaking ground states such as antiferromagnetism or charge density waves (CDW). A number of materials in the cuprate family, which includes the high transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors, show spin...... and charge density wave order. Thus a fundamental question is to what extent do these ordered states exist for compositions close to optimal for superconductivity. Here we use high-energy X-ray diffraction to show that a CDW develops at zero field in the normal state of superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.67 (Tc= 67 K......). This sample has a hole doping of 0.12 per copper and a well-ordered oxygen chain superstructure. Below Tc, the application of a magnetic field suppresses superconductivity and enhances the CDW. Hence, the CDW and superconductivity in this typical high-Tc material are competing orders with similar energy...

  2. Direct observation of the lattice precursor of the metal-to-insulator transition in V2O3 thin films by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kündel, J.; Pontiller, P.; Müller, C.; Obermeier, G.; Liu, Z.; Nateprov, A. A.; Hörner, A.; Wixforth, A.; Horn, S.; Tidecks, R.

    2013-03-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line is used to study the metal-to-insulator (MI) transition of V2O3 thin films deposited on a piezoelectric LiNbO3 substrate. Effects contributing to the sound velocity shift of the SAW which are caused by elastic properties of the lattice of the V2O3 films when changing the temperature are separated from those originating from the electrical conductivity. For this purpose the electric field accompanying the elastic wave of the SAW has been shielded by growing the V2O3 film on a thin metallic Cr interlayer (coated with Cr2O3), covering the piezoelectric substrate. Thus, the recently discovered lattice precursor of the MI transition can be directly observed in the experiments, and its fine structure can be investigated.

  3. Numerical simulation and analysis of electromagnetic-wave absorption of a plasma slab created by a direct-current discharge with gridded anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengxun; Tian, Ruihuan; Eliseev, S. I.; Bekasov, V. S.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present investigation of a direct-current discharge with a gridded anode from the point of view of using it as a means of creating plasma coating that could efficiently absorb incident electromagnetic (EM) waves. A single discharge cell consists of two parallel plates, one of which (anode) is gridded. Electrons emitted from the cathode surface are accelerated in the short interelectrode gap and are injected into the post-anode space, where they lose acquired energy on ionization and create plasma. Numerical simulations were used to investigate the discharge structure and obtain spatial distributions of plasma density in the post-anode space. The numerical model of the discharge was based on a simple hybrid approach which takes into account non-local ionization by fast electrons streaming from the cathode sheath. Specially formulated transparency boundary conditions allowed performing simulations in 1D. Simulations were carried out in air at pressures of 10 Torr and higher. Analysis of the discharge structure and discharge formation is presented. It is shown that using cathode materials with lower secondary emission coefficients can allow increasing the thickness of plasma slabs for the same discharge current, which can potentially enhance EM wave absorption. Spatial distributions of electron density obtained during simulations were used to calculate attenuation of an incident EM wave propagating perpendicularly to the plasma slab boundary. It is shown that plasma created by means of a DC discharge with a gridded anode can efficiently absorb EM waves in the low frequency range (6-40 GHz). Increasing gas pressure results in a broader range of wave frequencies (up to 500 GHz) where a considerable attenuation is observed.

  4. Statistical Analysis of Wave Climate Data Using Mixed Distributions and Extreme Wave Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of various aspects of the wave climate at a wave energy test site is essential for the development of reliable and efficient wave energy conversion technology. This paper presents studies of the wave climate based on nine years of wave observations from the 2005–2013 period measured with a wave measurement buoy at the Lysekil wave energy test site located off the west coast of Sweden. A detailed analysis of the wave statistics is investigated to reveal the characteristics of the wave climate at this specific test site. The long-term extreme waves are estimated from applying the Peak over Threshold (POT method on the measured wave data. The significant wave height and the maximum wave height at the test site for different return periods are also compared. In this study, a new approach using a mixed-distribution model is proposed to describe the long-term behavior of the significant wave height and it shows an impressive goodness of fit to wave data from the test site. The mixed-distribution model is also applied to measured wave data from four other sites and it provides an illustration of the general applicability of the proposed model. The methodologies used in this paper can be applied to general wave climate analysis of wave energy test sites to estimate extreme waves for the survivability assessment of wave energy converters and characterize the long wave climate to forecast the wave energy resource of the test sites and the energy production of the wave energy converters.

  5. Projected wave conditions in the Eastern North Pacific under the influence of two CMIP5 climate scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Li H.; Hegermiller, Christie; Barnard, Patrick; Ruggiero, Peter; van Ormondt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hindcast and 21st century winds, simulated by General Circulation Models (GCMs), were used to drive global- and regional-scale spectral wind-wave generation models in the Pacific Ocean Basin to assess future wave conditions along the margins of the North American west coast and Hawaiian Islands. Three-hourly winds simulated by four separate GCMs were used to generate an ensemble of wave conditions for a recent historical time-period (1976–2005) and projections for the mid and latter parts of the 21st century under two radiative forcing scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5), as defined by the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) experiments. Comparisons of results from historical simulations with wave buoy and ERA-Interim wave reanalysis data indicate acceptable model performance of wave heights, periods, and directions, giving credence to generating projections. Mean and extreme wave heights are projected to decrease along much of the North American west coast. Extreme wave heights are projected to decrease south of ∼50°N and increase to the north, whereas extreme wave periods are projected to mostly increase. Incident wave directions associated with extreme wave heights are projected to rotate clockwise at the eastern end of the Aleutian Islands and counterclockwise offshore of Southern California. Local spatial patterns of the changing wave climate are similar under the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios, but stronger magnitudes of change are projected under RCP 8.5. Findings of this study are similar to previous work using CMIP3 GCMs that indicates decreasing mean and extreme wave conditions in the Eastern North Pacific, but differ from other studies with respect to magnitude and local patterns of change. This study contributes toward a larger ensemble of global and regional climate projections needed to better assess uncertainty of potential future wave climate change, and provides model boundary conditions for assessing the impacts of

  6. Effects of Damping Plate and Taut Line System on Mooring Stability of Small Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocean wave energy can be used for electricity supply to ocean data acquisition buoys. A heaving buoy wave energy converter is designed and the damping plate and taut line system are used to provide the mooring stability for better operating conditions. The potential flow assumption is employed for wave generation and fluid structure interactions, which are processed by the commercial software AQWA. Effects of damping plate diameter and taut line linking style with clump and seabed weights on reduction of displacements in 6 degrees of freedom are numerically studied under different operating wave conditions. Tensile forces on taut lines of optimized mooring system are tested to satisfy the national code for wire rope utilization.

  7. A Study on Parametric Wave Estimation Based on Measured Ship Motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Iseki, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics of the param......The paper studies parametric wave estimation based on the ‘wave buoy analogy’, and data and results obtained from the training ship Shioji-maru are compared with estimates of the sea states obtained from other measurements and observations. Furthermore, the estimating characteristics...... of the parametric model are discussed by considering the results of a similar estimation concept based on Bayesian modelling. The purpose of the latter comparison is not to favour the one estimation approach to the other but rather to highlight some of the advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches....

  8. Rancang Bangun Instrumen Sistem Buoy Menggunakan A-Wsn Protokol Zigbee Untuk Pengamatan Ekosistem Pesisir (Development of Buoy System Instrument using A-WSN ZigBee Protocol for Coastal Ecosystem Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acta Withamana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Luasnya perairan dan lingkungan laut yang tidak bersahabat menimbulkan tantangan tersendiri untuk diobservasi. Aktivitas observasi secara konvensional di laut, yang menggunakan kapal sebagai wahana bergerak, membutuhkan biaya yang tinggi dan tidak efisien untuk memperoleh resolusi spasial dan temporal yang diinginkan. Buoy tertambat telah lama digunakan sebagai salah satu pilihan untuk aktivitas observasi laut. Namun ukuran yang besar dari rancangan buoy yang ada pada umumnya tidak cocok untuk pengamatan ekosistem pesisir. Perkembangan teknologi semikonduktor yang pesat melahirkan konsep wireless sensor network (WSN. Komunikasi protokol ZigBee memiliki kelebihan penggunaan energi yang efisien dan kemudahan pemasangan. Riset ini dilakukan untuk mengembangkan instrumen buoy tertambat dan menguji apakah WSN dapat diaplikasikan di wilayah pesisir. Buoy tertambat yang dikembangkan memiliki kinerja yang baik dan stabil sebagai wahana instrumen. Kinerja jaringan ZigBee menunjukan tingkat keberhasilan pengiriman data sebesar 100% pada uji coba statis. Menggunakan empat buah baterai NiMH, instrumen ini dapat bekerja selama kurang lebih 39 jam untuk coordinator dan router, serta 89 jam untuk end device. Pengujian di lapangan menunjukan hasil terburuk sebesar 84.94% keberhasilan pengiriman data pada E1, dan hasil terbaik sebesar 100% keberhasilan pengiriman data pada R1 dan E3. Data suhu permukaan laut yang diterima juga dapat menggambarkan sebaran suhu permukaan di Pulau Panggang. Hasil penelitian memberikan gambaran bahwa Instrumen Sistem Buoy Menggunakan A-Wsn Protokol Zigbee sangat berpotensi untuk digunakan dalam pengamatan ekosistem pesisir. Kata kunci: instrumen, buoy tertambat, ZigBee, suhu permukaan laut, observasi pesisir   Ocean observation has become a challenge due to its vast and rough condition. The conventional observation, for example using ship as a mobile platform, is very expensive and inefficient to obtain desired spatial and temporal

  9. Current direction, wind wave spectra, and CTD data from moored current meter and CTD casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1982-09-15 to 1983-09-15 (NODC Accession 8500148)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, wind wave spectra, and CTD data were collected using moored current meter and CTD casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 3, 1982 to September...

  10. Current direction, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, benthic organisms, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 18 October 1977 to 01 May 1979 (NODC Accession 7900270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, zooplankton, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the...

  11. Current direction, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-01-12 to 1980-06-01 (NODC Accession 8000465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, benthic organisms, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments from the CAPT JACK and...

  12. Current direction, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-10-11 to 1980-03-19 (NODC Accession 8000368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments from the CAPT JACK and EXCELLENCE in the...

  13. Current direction, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-02-07 to 1982-11-01 (NODC Accession 8300055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of...

  14. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1978-06-28 to 1978-12-31 (NODC Accession 7900128)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 28, 1978 to December 31,...

  15. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1977-12-22 to 1978-07-01 (NODC Accession 7900123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 22, 1977 to October...

  16. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 1977-02-02 to 1979-01-31 (NODC Accession 7900144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, salinity, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from February 2, 1978 to January 31,...

  17. Current direction, wind wave spectra, phytoplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1977-09-24 to 1981-05-31 (NODC Accession 8100612)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, wind wave spectra, phytoplankton, temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  18. Current direction, wind wave spectra, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1977-09-24 to 1981-08-31 (NODC Accession 8100681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, phytoplankton, zooplankton, wind wave spectra, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in...

  19. CD147 regulates cancer migration via direct interaction with Annexin A2 and DOCK3-β-catenin-WAVE2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hong-Yong; Wang, Shi-Jie; Miao, Ji-Yu; Fu, Zhi-Guang; Feng, Fei; Wu, Jiao; Yang, Xiang-Min; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2016-02-02

    The acquisition of inappropriate migratory feature is crucial for tumor metastasis. It has been suggested that CD147 and Annexin A2 are involved in regulating tumor cell movement, while the regulatory mechanisms are far from clear. In this study, we demonstrated that CD147 physically interacted with the N-terminal domain of Annexin A2 and decreased Annexin A2 phosphorylation on tyrosine 23. In vitro kinase assay showed that the I domain of CD147 was indispensable for CD147-mediated downregulation of Annexin A2 phosphorylation by Src. Furthermore, we determined that p-Annexin A2 promoted the expression of dedicator of cytokinesis 3 (DOCK3) and DOCK3 blocked β-catenin nuclear translocation, resulting in inhibition of β-catenin signaling. In addition, DOCK3 inhibited lamellipodium dynamics and tumor cell movement. Also, we found that β-catenin signaling increased WAVE2 expression. Therefore, DOCK3 was characterized as a negative regulator of WAVE2 expression via inhibiting β-catenin signaling. Our study provides the first evidence that CD147 promotes tumor cell movement and metastasis via direct interaction with Annexin A2 and DOCK3-β-catenin-WAVE2 signaling axis.

  20. Study on the influence of the distance to shore for a wave energy farm operating in the central part of the Portuguese nearshore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Eugen; Onea, Florin

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nearshore impact of the wave farm (significant wave height fields and wave vectors). Conditions for a wave farm operating at 7 km from the shore, where: (a) average conditions for total time; (b) average conditions for winter time; (c) high energy non storm conditions. (MA) – Moderate absoption, (HA) – High absorption. - Highlights: • The coastal influence of a generic wave farm is assessed. • The target area is located in the central part of Portugal. • The wave decay down wave the farm is evaluated. • The impact on the coastal circulation is also assessed. - Abstract: The objective of the present work is to assess the coastal impact induced by a generic wave farm operating in the central part of the Portuguese continental coastal environment, south of Lisbon. In order to identify better the most relevant wave patterns in the target area, two data sets were processed and analyzed. The first is represented by the ‘in situ’ measurements provided by the Sines buoy, which operates in the immediate vicinity south of the target area, and the second consists in the wave data coming from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, in a point located offshore close to the target area. Three scenarios were considered for the numerical simulations that were carried out with a computational framework combining a wave and a circulation model. A generic wave farm was defined in the computational domain considering various distances from the shore: 1 km, 4 km and 7 km, respectively. In the first part of the work, the down-wave effect of the farm was evaluated taking into account the local wave characteristics in the target area and analyzing various wave parameters, as for example the wave power, wave height and mean wave direction. In the second part of the work, the influence of the farm on the nearshore circulation was also assessed. Based on the results of the present work it can be concluded that the nearshore impact of such a

  1. Predicting Output Power for Nearshore Wave Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henock Mamo Deberneh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy harvested from a Wave Energy Converter (WEC varies greatly with the location of its installation. Determining an optimal location that can result in maximum output power is therefore critical. In this paper, we present a novel approach to predicting the output power of a nearshore WEC by characterizing ocean waves using floating buoys. We monitored the movement of the buoys using an Arduino-based data collection module, including a gyro-accelerometer sensor and a wireless transceiver. The collected data were utilized to train and test prediction models. The models were developed using machine learning algorithms: SVM, RF and ANN. The results of the experiments showed that measurements from the data collection module can yield a reliable predictor of output power. Furthermore, we found that the predictors work better when the regressors are combined with a classifier. The accuracy of the proposed prediction model suggests that it could be extremely useful in both locating optimal placement for wave energy harvesting plants and designing the shape of the buoys used by them.

  2. Meteorological and other data from moored buoys in Prince William Sound (Gulf of Alaska) in support of the Sound Ecosystem Analysis (SEAS) project from 08 October 1991 to 16 December 1998 (NODC Accession 0000482)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Meteorological and other data were collected from Prince William Sound (Gulf of Alaska) from moored buoys from 08 October 1991 to 16 December 1998. Buoys are part of...

  3. Wave direction and other data from fixed platform from TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19931027 to 19950531 (NODC Accession 9500087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains two Wave Energy (wave height and wave period) Data files from Hawaiian coast (Kahului and Mauai islands) collected in TOGA Area - Pacific (30...

  4. WAVE DIRECTION and Other Data from FIXED PLATFORM From North Pacific Ocean and Others from 19810817 to 19940323 (NODC Accession 9400105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains Wave Energy (wave height and wave period) Data from Hawaiian coast collected over 13 years in North Pacific Ocean, NE Pacific (limit-180)....

  5. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA. 165.812 Section 165.812 Navigation..., Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA. (a) Location. Within the Lower Mississippi... Lower Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones...

  6. Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind recorders from AIRCRAFT and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean and other locations as part of the Seasonal Response of the Equatorial Atlantic Experiment/Français Océan et Climat dans l'Atlantique Equatorial (SEQUAL/FOCAL) project from 1980-01-25 to 1985-12-18 (NODC Accession 8700111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data were collected from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind...

  7. An Adaptive Allocation Algorithm Using Directional CSMA/CA over mmWave Wireless Personal Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunhee Park

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Directional antennas have the considerable benefits of higher antenna gain, long transmission distance and spatial reuse compared to omni-antennas. To support a directional antenna, IEEE 802.15.3c specifies a high data transmission rate and short frequency range communication based on the characteristics of 60GHz band. However, the contention-based protocol of IEEE 802.15.3c may cause channel collisions and throughput degradation as the number of stations in the network increases. In order to resolve this problem and reduce channel access latency, we propose an adaptive allocation algorithm in which the contention window size for optimal transmission probability is derived after the directional information has been obtained by means of AP control procedures. Extensive simulations demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the existing channel access scheme in IEEE 802.15.3c wireless personal area networks under different situations, especially when the number of contending stations is large.

  8. Wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, wave energy spectra, significant wave height, dominant wave period and direction, peak wave period and direction, currents, temperature, conductivity, pressure, sigma-theta, river level, sonar readings, and backscatter data collected at Myrtle Beach in the North Atlantic Ocean from instruments deployed on MOORINGS using platforms NOAA Ship NANCY FOSTER and RV DAN MOORE from 2003-10-01 to 2004-05-01 (NODC Accession 0066109)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These bottom current, wave and associated observations were collected as part of a larger study to understand the physical processes that control the transport of...

  9. Quantifying the Benefits of Combining Offshore Wind and Wave Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoutenburg, E.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2009-12-01

    For many locations the offshore wind resource and the wave energy resource are collocated, which suggests a natural synergy if both technologies are combined into one offshore marine renewable energy plant. Initial meteorological assessments of the western coast of the United States suggest only a weak correlation in power levels of wind and wave energy at any given hour associated with the large ocean basin wave dynamics and storm systems of the North Pacific. This finding indicates that combining the two power sources could reduce the variability in electric power output from a combined wind and wave offshore plant. A combined plant is modeled with offshore wind turbines and Pelamis wave energy converters with wind and wave data from meteorological buoys operated by the US National Buoy Data Center off the coast of California, Oregon, and Washington. This study will present results of quantifying the benefits of combining wind and wave energy for the electrical power system to facilitate increased renewable energy penetration to support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, and air and water pollution associated with conventional fossil fuel power plants.

  10. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the Brine Disposal project from 1979-10-01 to 1980-01-01 (NODC Accession 8000049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 01 October 1979 to 01 January 1980. Data were collected by the National Data Buoy...

  11. Detailed Study of Closed Stator Slots for a Direct-Driven Synchronous Permanent Magnet Linear Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Lejerskog

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze how a permanent magnet linear generator for wave power behaves when the stator slots are closed. The usual design of stator geometry is to use open slots to maintain a low magnetic leakage flux between the stator teeth. By doing this, harmonics are induced in the magnetic flux density in the air-gap due to slotting. The closed slots are designed to cause saturation, to keep the permeability low. This reduces the slot harmonics in the magnetic flux density, but will also increase the flux leakage between the stator teeth. An analytical model has been created to study the flux through the closed slots and the result compared with finite element simulations. The outcome shows a reduction of the cogging force and a reduction of the harmonics of the magnetic flux density in the air-gap. It also shows a small increase of the total magnetic flux entering the stator and an increased magnetic flux leakage through the closed slots.

  12. Direct Radiative Effect of Mineral Dust on the Development of African Easterly Wave in Late Summer, 2003-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Zhang, Kai; Shi, Jainn Jong; Matsui, Toshihisa; Arking, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Episodic events of both Saharan dust outbreaks and African Easterly Waves (AEWs) are observed to move westward over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between the warm, dry, and dusty Saharan Air Layer (SAL) on the nearby storms has been the subject of considerable debate. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate the radiative effect of dust on the development of AEWs during August and September, the months of maximum tropical cyclone activity, in years 2003-2007. The simulations show that dust radiative forcing enhances the convective instability of the environment. As a result, most AEWs intensify in the presence of a dust layer. The Lorenz energy cycle analysis reveals that the dust radiative forcing enhances the condensational heating, which elevates the zonal and eddy available potential energy. In turn, available potential energy is effectively converted to eddy kinetic energy, in which local convective overturning plays the primary role. The magnitude of the intensification effect depends on the initial environmental conditions, including moisture, baroclinity, and the depth of the boundary layer. We conclude that dust radiative forcing, albeit small, serves as a catalyst to promote local convection that facilitates AEW development.

  13. Assessing the Wave Energy Potential of Jamaica, a Greater Antilles Island, through Dynamic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, A. P., Jr.; Dorville, J. F. M.; Taylor, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Globally wave energy has been on the rise as a result of the impacts of climate change and continuous fluctuation in oil prices. The water's inertia provides waves with greater stability than that of other renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Jamaica is part of the Greater Antilles Arc and has over 1000 km of coast line with an abundance of shallow water approximately 80% within a 50km band. This configuration provides a wealth of sites for wave exploitation even in minimal wave energy conditions. Aside from harnessing the oceans waves converters can be viewed as a tool for protection of coastal areas against natural marine occurrences. Jamica has done extensive studies where solar, hydro and wind resouces are concerned. However, there has been no studies done to date on the country's wave energy resources.The aim of this study is to bridge this gap by characterizing Jamaica's wave energy resources generating in a half-closed Caribbean Sea using data available from: buoys, altimetric satellite, and numerical model. Available data has been used to assess the available resource on the coastal area for the last 12 years. Statistical analysis of the available energy is determined using the sea state (Hs, Tp and Dir) and the atmospheric forcing (10m-wind, atmospheric pressure, sea-air temperature) relating to the season.The chain of dynamical model is presented (WW3-SWAN-SWASH), allowing for the tracking of the propagation of the wave energy from an offshore region to nearshore zone along with their interaction with areas of shallow depth. This will provide a better assessment of the energy and the quality of the waves closer to the electrical grid.Climate prediction is used to estimate the sea state and wave energy exploitable up to 2100. An analysis of the possible usage of the available coastal resource up to 2100. The main results present small but exploitable resources with seasonal variability in the energy available but not wave direction.

  14. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarrieta, Maitane; Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy N.; Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere–ocean–wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor’Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor’easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor’Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  15. Effects of Deep Water Source-Sink Terms in 3rd generation Wave Model SWAN using different wind data in Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirezci, Cagil; Ozyurt Tarakcioglu, Gulizar

    2016-04-01

    Coastal development in Black Sea has increased in recent years. Therefore, careful monitoring of the storms and verification of numerical tools with reliable data has become important. Previous studies by Kirezci and Ozyurt (2015) investigated extreme events in Black Sea using different wind datasets (NCEP's CFSR and ECMWF's operational datasets) and different numerical tools (SWAN and Wavewatch III). These studies showed that significant effect to results is caused by the deep water source-sink terms (wave growth by wind, deep water dissipation of wave energy (whitecapping) and deep water non-linear wave-wave interactions). According to Timmermans(2015), uncertainty about wind forcing and the process of nonlinear wave-wave interactions are found to be dominant in numerical wave modelling. Therefore, in this study deep water source and sink term solution approaches of 3rd generation numerical tool (SWAN model) are tested, validated and compared using the selected extreme storms in Black Sea. 45 different storms and storm like events observed in Black Sea between years 1994-1999 are selected to use in the models. The storm selection depends on the instrumental wave data (significant wave heights, mean wave period and mean wave direction) obtained in NATO-TU Waves project by the deep water buoy measurements at Hopa, Sinop, Gelendzhik, and wind data (mean and peak wind speeds, storm durations) of the regarding events. 2 different wave growth by wind with the corresponding deep water dissipation terms and 3 different wave -wave interaction terms of SWAN model are used in this study. Wave growth by wind consist of two parts, linear growth which is explained by Cavaleri and Malanotte-Rizzoli(1981),and dominant exponential growth. There are two methods in SWAN model for exponential growth of wave, first one by Snyder et al. (1981), rescaled in terms of friction velocity by Komen et. al (1984) which is derived using driving wind speed at 10m elevation with related drag

  16. Continuous-wave operation and 10-Gb/s direct modulation of InAsP/InP sub-wavelength nanowire laser on silicon photonic crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Takiguchi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated sub-wavelength (∼111 nm diameter single nanowire (NW continuous wave (CW lasers on silicon photonic crystal in the telecom-band with direct modulation at 10 Gb/s by optical pumping at cryogenic temperatures. To estimate the small signal response and pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS modulation of our CW lasers, we employed a new signal detection technique that employs a superconducting single photon detector and a time-correlated single photon counting module. The results showed that our NW laser was unambiguously modulated at above 10 Gb/s and an open eye pattern was obtained. This is the first demonstration of a telecom-band CW NW laser with high-speed PRBS modulation.

  17. πN → πN and KN → KN low energy data and partial wave analyses recent results and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.L.

    1975-07-01

    This review deals with πN → πN and KN → KN physics below about 3 GeV/c. An attempt is made to convey the state of the art, and to point out what appear to be promising directions for future research. The situation as of about one year ago is summarized in the 1974 Review of Particle Properties and in London conference talks so more recent developments are considered. A comprehensive survey of πN → πN data between the Δ region and 3 GeV/c is given. Problems associated with spin-rotation experiments are discussed, and the current πN → πN partial wave analyses. I = 1 and I = 0 KN → KN analyses, respectively, are considered

  18. Method for deploying and recovering a wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundon, Timothy R

    2017-05-23

    A system for transporting a buoy and a heave plate. The system includes a buoy and a heave plate. An outer surface of the buoy has a first geometrical shape. A surface of the heave plate has a geometrical shape complementary to the first geometrical shape of the buoy. The complementary shapes of the buoy and the heave plate facilitate coupling of the heave plate to the outer surface of the buoy in a transport mode.

  19. Numerical Simulation of 3-D Wave Crests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dingyong; ZHANG Hanyuan

    2003-01-01

    A clear definition of 3-D wave crest and a description of the procedures to detect the boundary of wave crest are presented in the paper. By using random wave theory and directional wave spectrum, a MATLAB-platformed program is designed to simulate random wave crests for various directional spectral conditions in deep water. Statistics of wave crests with different directional spreading parameters and different directional functions are obtained and discussed.

  20. Wave power for La Isla Bonita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, G.; Carballo, R. [Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Hydraulic Eng., EPS, Campus Univ. s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    The island of La Palma (Spain), dubbed La Isla Bonita for its beauty, is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in the Atlantic Ocean. The island's authorities are aiming for energy self-sufficiency based on wave energy and other renewables. In this research its wave resource is investigated using a 44-years hindcast dataset obtained through numerical modelling and validated with wave buoy records. First, its distribution around La Palma is studied. Significant variations are found, with the largest resource occurring off the north and northwest coasts; the northwest presents operational advantages (proximity to a port). Second, the seasonal variations in this area are studied. Wave energy is provided essentially by powerful NNW-NW swells in winter and autumn, by less energetic NNE-N waves in summer and spring. Finally, the resource is characterised in terms of sea states; it is found that the bulk of the energy is provided by waves between 9.5 s and 13.5 s of energy period and 1.5 m and 3.5 m of significant wave height, so the selection of the Wave Energy Converters to be installed should guarantee maximum efficiency in these ranges. (author)

  1. Assimilation of radar altimeter data in numerical wave models: an impact study in two different wave climate regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Emmanouil

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available An operational assimilation system incorporating significant wave height observations in high resolution numerical wave models is studied and evaluated. In particular, altimeter satellite data provided by the European Space Agency (ESA-ENVISAT are assimilated in the wave model WAM which operates in two different wave climate areas: the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. The first is a wind-sea dominated area while in the second, swell is the principal part of the sea state, a fact that seriously affects the performance of the assimilation scheme. A detailed study of the different impact is presented and the resulting forecasts are evaluated against available buoy and satellite observations. The corresponding results show a considerable improvement in wave forecasting for the Indian Ocean while in the Mediterranean Sea the assimilation impact is restricted to isolated areas.

  2. Ocean waves monitor system by inland microseisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L. C.; Bouchette, F.; Chang, E. T. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Microseisms are continuous ground oscillations which have been wildly introduced for decades. It is well known that the microseismicity in the frequency band from 0.05 to about 1 Hz partly results from ocean waves, which has been first explained by Longuet-Higgins [1950]. The generation mechanism for such a microseismicity is based on nonlinear wave-wave interactions which drive pressure pulses within the seafloor. The resulting ground pressure fluctuations yield ground oscillations at a double frequency (DF) with respect to that of current ocean waves. In order to understand the characteristics of DF microseisms associated with different wave sources, we aim to analyze and interpret the spectra of DF microseisms by using the simple spectrum method [Rabinovich, 1997] at various inland seismometer along the Taiwan coast. This is the first monitoring system of ocean waves observed by inland seismometers in Taiwan. The method is applied to identify wave sources by estimating the spectral ratios of wave induced microseisms associated with local winds and typhoons to background spectra. Microseism amplitudes above 0.2 Hz show a good correlation with wind-driven waves near the coast. Comparison of microseism band between 0.1 and 0.2 Hz with buoys in the deep sea shows a strong correlation of seismic amplitude with storm generated waves, implying that such energy portion originates in remote regions. Results indicate that microseisms observed at inland sites can be a potential tool for the tracking of typhoon displacements and the monitoring of extreme ocean waves in real time. Real- time Microseism-Ocean Waves Monitoring Website (http://mwave.droppages.com/) Reference Rabinovich, A. B. (1997) "Spectral analysis of tsunami waves: Separation of source and topography effects," J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 102, p. 12,663-12,676. Longuet-Higgins, M.S. (1950) "A theory of origin of microseisms," Philos. Trans. R. Soc., A. 243, pp. 1-35.

  3. Meteorological and surface water observations from the Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy System from 2007-04-25 to 2016-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0159578)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Meteorological and surface water observations from the Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy System. Ten stations are located from the mouth of the Susquehanna river near...

  4. Temperature, salinity, and other data from buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993 (NODC Accession 9800040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993. Data were collected by the...

  5. A system for rotatably mounting a vessel to a loading buoy. System for dreibar tilkopling av et flytende farty til en lastebye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breivik, K.; Smedal, A.; Syvertsen, K.

    1994-07-04

    The invention relates to a system for rotatable mounting of a floating vessel to a submerged loading/unloading buoy which is anchored to the sea bed. The buoy is adapted to be introduced into and fastened in a releasable manner in a submerged downwardly open receiving space in the vessel, and is during operation connected to at least one transfer line and forming a transfer connection between this line and a tube system on the vessel. The buoy comprises an outer member which is arranged to be rigidly fastened in the receiving space, and a central inner member which is rotatably mounted in the outer member, so that the vessel is able to turn about the central member when the buoy is fastened in the receiving space. Further, the upper end of the central member is connected to the tube system of the vessel through a swivel means and through at least one flexible joint means respectively. 3 figs.

  6. Temperature data from buoy casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from 01 August 1928 to 04 September 1932 (NODC Accession 0000242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature data were collected using buoy casts from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from August 1, 1928 to September 4, 1932 in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were...

  7. Water temperature, salinity, and surface meteorology measurements collected from the Tropical Moored Buoys Array in the equatorial oceans from November 1977 to March 2017. (NODC Accession 0078936)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array Program is a multi-national effort to provide data in real-time for climate research and forecasting. Major components include...

  8. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and pressure measurements collected using moored buoy in the Indian Ocean from 2001-2006 (NODC Accession 0002733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements in the Equatorial Indian from 2001 to 2006 from the TRITON (TRIANGLE TRANS-OCEAN BUOY NETWORK); JAPAN AGENCY FOR MARINE-EARTH...

  9. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19921208 to 19930719 (NODC Accession 9500059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The drifting buoy data set in this accession was collected from TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) in Equatorial Pacific, North of Australia as part of Tropical...

  10. Photoelectrocatalytic decomposition of ethylene using TiO2/activated carbon fiber electrode with applied pulsed direct current square-wave potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Sheng-ying; Zheng, Sen-hong; Song, Xian-liang; Luo, Shu-can

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ethylene was decomposed by a photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) process. • A pulsed direct current square-wave (PDCSW) potential was applied to the PEC cell. • An electrode of TiO 2 or modified TiO 2 and activated carbon fiber (ACF) was used. • TiO 2 /ACF photocatalyst electrodes were modified by gamma radiolysis. • Efficiencies of the PEC process were higher than those of the process using DC. - Abstract: Removing ethylene (C 2 H 4 ) from the atmosphere of storage facilities for fruits and vegetable is one of the main challenges in their postharvest handling for maximizing their freshness, quality, and shelf life. In this study, we investigated the photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) degradation of ethylene gas by applying a pulsed direct current DC square-wave (PDCSW) potential and by using a Nafion-based PEC cell. The cell utilized a titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) photocatalyst or γ-irradiated TiO 2 (TiO 2 * ) loaded on activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a photoelectrode. The apparent rate constant of a pseudo-first-order reaction (K) was used to describe the PEC degradation of ethylene. Parameters of the potential applied to the PEC cell in a reactor that affect the degradation efficiency in terms of the K value were studied. These parameters were frequency, duty cycle, and voltage. Ethylene degradation by application of a constant PDCSW potential to the PEC electrode of either TiO 2 /ACF cell or TiO 2 * /ACF cell enhanced the efficiency of photocatalytic degradation and PEC degradation. Gamma irradiation of TiO 2 in the electrode and the applied PDCSW potential synergistically increased the K value. Independent variables (frequency, duty cycle, and voltage) of the PEC cell fabricated from TiO 2 subjected 20 kGy γ radiation were optimized to maximize the K value by using response surface methodology with quadratic rotation–orthogonal composite experimental design. Optimized conditions were as follows: 358.36 Hz frequency, 55.79% duty cycle, and 64.65 V

  11. A perspective on direct conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W. B.

    1963-10-15

    As flowing energy, electricity is sought for its versatility. Its generation from some other flow or release of energy without mechanical power, or even sometimes heat, as intermediary is called direct conversion. The objective is high electrical output for minimum total cost and not always high conversion efficiency. The wide range of techniques embracing cryogenics and hot plasma derives from the special requirements of source, environment and application. Sources include solar and other radiation, nuclear fission and fusion, chemical energy and heat. Environments and applications range from space vehicles to submarines and from giant power networks to isolated buoys and pocket devices. (author)

  12. A perspective on direct conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1963-10-01

    As flowing energy, electricity is sought for its versatility. Its generation from some other flow or release of energy without mechanical power, or even sometimes heat, as intermediary is called direct conversion. The objective is high electrical output for minimum total cost and not always high conversion efficiency. The wide range of techniques embracing cryogenics and hot plasma derives from the special requirements of source, environment and application. Sources include solar and other radiation, nuclear fission and fusion, chemical energy and heat. Environments and applications range from space vehicles to submarines and from giant power networks to isolated buoys and pocket devices. (author)

  13. Traveling wave laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; Kidder, R.E.; Biehl, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for generating a traveling wave laser pulse of almost unlimited energy content wherein a gain medium is pumped into a traveling wave mode, the traveling wave moving at essentially the velocity of light to generate an amplifying region or zone which moves through the medium at the velocity of light in the presence of directed stimulating radiation, thereby generating a traveling coherent, directed radiation pulse moving with the amplification zone through the gain medium. (U.S.)

  14. Design, optimization and numerical modelling of a novel floating pendulum wave energy converter with tide adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Da-hai; Chen, Ying; Liang, Hui; Tan, Ming; Li, Wei; Ma, Xian-dong

    2017-10-01

    A novel floating pendulum wave energy converter (WEC) with the ability of tide adaptation is designed and presented in this paper. Aiming to a high efficiency, the buoy's hydrodynamic shape is optimized by enumeration and comparison. Furthermore, in order to keep the buoy's well-designed leading edge always facing the incoming wave straightly, a novel transmission mechanism is then adopted, which is called the tidal adaptation mechanism in this paper. Time domain numerical models of a floating pendulum WEC with or without tide adaptation mechanism are built to compare their performance on various water levels. When comparing these two WECs in terms of their average output based on the linear passive control strategy, the output power of WEC with the tide adaptation mechanism is much steadier with the change of the water level and always larger than that without the tide adaptation mechanism.

  15. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Moschella, U; Fre, P

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are a hot topic and promise to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology, and theoretical physics. Technological developments have led us to the brink of their direct observation, which could become a reality in the coming years. The direct observation of GWs will open an entirely new field: GW astronomy. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of previously unseen phenomena, such as the coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), the fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big-bang relics, and the new and unexpected.With a wide range of contributions by leading scientists in the field, Gravitational Waves covers topics such as the basics of GWs, various advanced topics, GW detectors, astrophysics of GW sources, numerical applications, and several recent theoretical developments. The material is written at a level suitable for postgraduate students entering the field.

  16. Real-time monitoring of methanol concentration using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor for direct methanol fuel cell without reference liquid measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kyosuke; Nozawa, Takuya; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for sensors that continuously measure liquid concentrations and detect abnormalities in liquid environments. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied for the continuous monitoring of liquid concentrations. As the SH-SAW sensor functions using the relative measurement method, it normally needs a reference at each measurement. However, if the sensor is installed in a liquid flow cell, it is difficult to measure a reference liquid. Therefore, it is important to establish an estimation method for liquid concentrations using the SH-SAW sensor without requiring a reference measurement. In this study, the SH-SAW sensor is installed in a direct methanol fuel cell to monitor the methanol concentration. The estimated concentration is compared with a conventional density meter. Moreover, the effect of formic acid is examined. When the fuel temperature is higher than 70 °C, it is necessary to consider the influence of liquid conductivity. Here, an estimation method for these cases is also proposed.

  17. Modification of wind-wave model WAM and its verification against buoy data in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Polnikov, V.G.; Samiksha, V.; Rashmi, R.; Pogarskii, F.; Sudheesh, K.; Vethamony, P.

    0 . 5 . 1 6 0 5 / 7 6 3 8 9 - . / 9 : 6 3 - 3 5 / 0 4 ; 8 9 < 0 1 0 2 3 4 0 . 5 3 = 3 0 5 ; 4 > ? . @ / 3 4 3 0 5 4 A 9 0 5 / 0 3 5 . 2 9 3 5 B C D E F G C H I J K L M I N O P F G Q R O I J S I T O Q R P F I T U I B C V O W Q G F F I X Y I N Z [ R... \\ \\ Q R I ] ^ I J \\ _ R O P C E ` I B a R \\ [ \\ _ O F D Q C b _ R \\ Q C Z W c \\ b Z E c _ F C E Q O W \\ Q _ F D D O c _ F H \\ W \\ Q \\ O W c R Q Z d e \\ c _ Q I O E [ C E \\ C b _ R \\ P \\ _ R C [ Q _ C V O Z V \\ _ R \\ f \\ W b C W P O E c \\ C b E Z P \\ W F...

  18. Assessment of the Great Lakes Marine Renewable Energy Resources: Characterizing Lake Erie Surge, Seiche and Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadzadeh, A.; Hashemi, M. R.

    2016-02-01

    Lake Erie, the fourth largest in surface area, smallest in volume and shallowest among the Great Lakes is approximately 400 km long and 90 km wide. Short term lake level variations are due to storm surge generated by high winds and moving pressure systems over the lake mainly in the southwest-northeast direction, along the lakes longitudinal axis. The historical wave data from three active offshore buoys shows that significant wave height can exceed 5 m in the eastern and central basins. The long-term lake level data show that storm surge can reach up to 3 m in eastern Lake Erie. Owing its shallow depth, Lake Erie frequently experiences seiching motions, the low frequency oscillations that are initiated by storm surge. The seiches whose first mode of oscillations has a period of nearly 14.2 hours can last from several hours to days. In this study, the Lake Erie potential for power generation, primarily using storm surge and seiche and also waves are assessed. Given the cyclic lake level variations due to storm-induced seiching, a concept similar to that of tidal range development is utilized to assess the potential of storm surge and seiche energy harvesting mechanisms for power generation. In addition, wave energy resources of the Lake is characterized -. To achieve these objectives, the following steps are taken : (1) Frequency of occurrence for extreme storm surge and wave events is determined using extreme value analysis such as Peak-Over-Threshold method for the long-term water level and wave data; (2) Spatial and temporal variations of wave height, storm surge and seiche are characterized. The characterization is carried out using the wave and storm surge outputs from numerical simulation of a number of historical extreme events. The coupled ADCIRC and SWAN model is utilized for the modeling; (3) Assessment of the potentials for marine renewable power generation in Lake Erie is made. The approach can be extended to the other lakes in the Great Lakes region.

  19. Applications to marine disaster prevention spilled oil and gas tracking buoy system

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent results of the research project funded by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (No. 23226017) from FY 2011 to FY 2015 on an autonomous spilled oil and gas tracking buoy system and its applications to marine disaster prevention systems from a scientific point of view. This book spotlights research on marine disaster prevention systems related to incidents involving oil tankers and offshore platforms, approaching these problems from new scientific and technological perspectives. The most essential aspect of this book is the development of a deep-sea underwater robot for real-time monitoring of blowout behavior of oil and gas from the seabed and of a new type of autonomous surface vehicle for real-time tracking and monitoring of oil spill spread and drift on the sea surface using an oil sensor. The mission of these robots is to provide the simulation models for gas and oil blowouts or spilled oil drifting on the sea surface w...

  20. On the dynamics of a novel ocean wave energy converter

    KAUST Repository

    Orazov, B.

    2010-11-01

    Buoy-type ocean wave energy converters are designed to exhibit resonant responses when subject to excitation by ocean waves. A novel excitation scheme is proposed which has the potential to improve the energy harvesting capabilities of these converters. The scheme uses the incident waves to modulate the mass of the device in a manner which amplifies its resonant response. To illustrate the novel excitation scheme, a simple one-degree of freedom model is developed for the wave energy converter. This model has the form of a switched linear system. After the stability regime of this system has been established, the model is then used to show that the excitation scheme improves the power harvesting capabilities by 2565 percent even when amplitude restrictions are present. It is also demonstrated that the sensitivity of the device\\'s power harvesting capabilities to changes in damping becomes much smaller when the novel excitation scheme is used. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preliminary wave and hydrostatic pressure data collected from moored directional wave gauges in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the LATEX project from 19920825 to 19920826 (NODC Accession 9400018)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data is a special submission to NODC containing wave data during Hurricane Andrew August 25-26, 1992. This data file contains 24 bursts spaced at 2 hour...

  2. Traveling wave laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; Kidder, R.E.; Biehl, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    The invention broadly involves a method and means for generating a traveling wave laser pulse and is basically analogous to a single pass light amplifier system. However, the invention provides a traveling wave laser pulse of almost unlimited energy content, wherein a gain medium is pumped in a traveling wave mode, the traveling wave moving at essentially the velocity of light to generate an amplifying region or zone which moves through the medium at the velocity of light in the presence of directed stimulating radiation, thereby generating a traveling coherent, directed radiation pulse moving with the amplification zone through the gain medium. (U.S.)

  3. Identification of wind fields for wave modeling near Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Sashikant; Balan Sobhana, Sandeepan; Panchang, Vijay

    2016-04-01

    Due to the development of coastal and offshore infrastructure in and around the Arabian Gulf, a large semi-enclosed sea, knowledge of met-ocean factors like prevailing wind systems, wind generated waves, and currents etc. are of great importance. Primarily it is important to identify the wind fields that are used as forcing functions for wave and circulation models for hindcasting and forecasting purposes. The present study investigates the effects of using two sources of wind-fields on the modeling of wind-waves in the Arabian Gulf, in particular near the coastal regions of Qatar. Two wind sources are considered here, those obtained from ECMWF and those generated by us using the WRF model. The wave model SWAN was first forced with the 6 hourly ERA Interim daily winds (from ECMWF) having spatial resolution of 0.125°. For the second option, wind fields were generated by us using the mesoscale wind model (WRF) with a high spatial resolution (0.1°) at every 30 minute intervals. The simulations were carried out for a period of two months (7th October-7th December, 2015) during which measurements were available from two moored buoys (deployed and operated by the Qatar Meteorological Department), one in the north of Qatar ("Qatar North", in water depth of 58.7 m) and other in the south ("Shiraouh Island", in water depth of 16.64 m). This period included a high-sea event on 11-12th of October, recorded by the two buoys where the significant wave heights (Hs) reached as high as 2.9 m (i.e. max wave height H ~ 5.22 m) and 1.9 (max wave height H ~ 3.4 m) respectively. Model results were compared with the data for this period. The scatter index (SI) of the Hs simulated using the WRF wind fields and the observed Hs was found to be about 30% and 32% for the two buoys (total period). The observed Hs were generally reproduced but there was consistent underestimation. (Maximum 27% for the high-sea event). For the Hs obtained with ERA interim wind fields, the underestimation was

  4. Investigation on the possibility of extracting wave energy from the Texas coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haces-Fernandez, Francisco

    Due to the great and growing demand of energy consumption in the Texas Coast area, the generation of electricity from ocean waves is considered very important. The combination of the wave energy with offshore wind power is explored as a way to increase power output, obtain synergies, maximize the utilization of assigned marine zones and reduce variability. Previously literature has assessed the wave energy generation, combined with wind in different geographic locations such as California, Ireland and the Azores Island. In this research project, the electric power generation from ocean waves on the Texas Coast was investigated, assessing its potential from the meteorological data provided by five buoys from National Data Buoy Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, considering the Pelamis 750 kW Wave Energy Converter (WEC) and the Vesta V90 3 MW Wind Turbine. The power output from wave energy was calculated for the year 2006 using Matlab, and the results in several locations were considered acceptable in terms of total power output, but with a high temporal variability. To reduce its variability, wave energy was combined with wind energy, obtaining a significant reduction on the coefficient of variation on the power output. A Matlab based interface was created to calculate power output and its variability considering data from longer periods of time.

  5. Final Report for Project: Impacts of stratification and non-equilibrium winds and waves on hub-height winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Edward G. [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-07-14

    This project used a combination of turbulence-resolving large-eddy simulations, single-column modeling (where turbulence is parameterized), and currently available observations to improve, assess, and develop a parameterization of the impact of non-equilibrium wave states and stratification on the buoy-observed winds to establish reliable wind data at the turbine hub-height level. Analysis of turbulence-resolving simulations and observations illuminates the non-linear coupling between the atmosphere and the undulating sea surface. This analysis guides modification of existing boundary layer parameterizations to include wave influences for upward extrapolation of surface-based observations through the turbine layer. Our surface roughness modifications account for the interaction between stratification and the effects of swell’s amplitude and wavelength as well as swell’s relative motion with respect to the mean wind direction. The single-column version of the open source Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model (Skamarock et al., 2008) serves as our platform to test our proposed planetary boundary layer parameterization modifications that account for wave effects on marine atmospheric boundary layer flows. WRF has been widely adopted for wind resource analysis and forecasting. The single column version is particularly suitable to development, analysis, and testing of new boundary layer parameterizations. We utilize WRF’s single-column version to verify and validate our proposed modifications to the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer parameterization (Nakanishi and Niino, 2004). We explore the implications of our modifications for two-way coupling between WRF and wave models (e.g.,Wavewatch III). The newly implemented parameterization accounting for marine atmospheric boundary layer-wave coupling is then tested in three-dimensional WRF simulations at grid sizes near 1 km. These simulations identify the behavior of simulated winds at the

  6. Capillary waves in slow motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Tolan, Metin; Press, Werner; Madsen, Anders; Gruebel, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Capillary wave dynamics on glycerol surfaces has been investigated by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy performed at grazing angles. The measurements show that thermally activated capillary wave motion is slowed down exponentially when the sample is cooled below 273 K. This finding directly reflects the freezing of the surface waves. The wave-number dependence of the measured time constants is in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions for overdamped capillary waves

  7. Influence of material selection on the structural behavior of a wave energy converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândida M. S. P. Malça

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the world energy demand has raised significantly. Concerning this fact, wave energy should be considered as a valid alternative for electricity production. Devices suitable to harness this kind of renewable energy source and convert it into electricity are not yet commercially competitive. This paper is focused on the selection and analysis of different types of elastic materials and their influence on the structural behavior of a wave energy converter (WEC. After a brief characterization of the device, a tridimensional computer aided design (3D CAD numerical model was built and several finite element analyses (FEA were performed through a commercial finite element code. The main components of the WEC, namely the buoy, supporting cables and hydraulic cylinder were simulated assuming different materials. The software used needs, among other parameters, the magnitude of the resultant hydrodynamic forces acting upon the floating buoy obtained from a WEC time domain simulator (TDS which was built based on the WEC dynamic model previously developed. The Von Mises stress gradients and displacement fields determined by the FEA demonstrated that, regardless of the WEC component, the materials with low Young's modulus seems to be unsuitable for this kind of application. The same is valid for the material yield strength since materials with a higher yield strength lead to a better structural behavior of WEC components because lower stress and displacement values were obtained. The developed 3D CAD numerical model showed to be suitable to analyze different combinations of structural conditions. They could depend of different combinations of buoy position and resultant hydrodynamic forces acting upon the buoy, function of the specific sea wave parameters found on the deployment site.

  8. Electrical Systems for Wave Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, Cecilia

    2011-07-01

    Wave energy is a renewable energy source with a large potential to contribute to the world's electricity production. There exist several technologies on how to convert the energy in the ocean waves into electric energy. The wave energy converter (WEC) presented in this thesis is based on a linear synchronous generator. The generator is placed on the seabed and driven by a point absorbing buoy on the ocean surface. Instead of having one large unit, several smaller units are interconnected to increase the total installed power. To convert and interconnect the power from the generators, marine substations are used. The marine substations are placed on the seabed and convert the fluctuating AC from the generators into an AC suitable for grid connection. The work presented in the thesis focuses on the first steps in the electric energy conversion, converting the voltage out from the generators into DC, which have an impact on the WEC's ability to absorb and produce power. The purpose has been to investigate how the generator will operate when it is subjected to different load cases and to obtain guidelines on how future systems could be improved. Offshore experiments and simulations have been done on full scale generators connected to four different loads, i.e. one linear resistive load and three different non-linear loads representing different cases for grid connected WECs. The results show that the power can be controlled and optimized by choosing a suitable system for the WEC. It is not obvious which kind of system is the most preferable, since there are many different parameters that have an impact on the system performance, such as the size of the buoy, how the generator is designed, the number of WECs, the highest allowed complexity of the system, costs and so on. Therefore, the design of the electrical system should preferably be carried out in parallel with the design of the WEC in order to achieve an efficient system

  9. Wave reflections from breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, William S.

    1994-01-01

    A new method is presented for estimating the reflection of a random, multi-directional sea from a coastal structure. The technique is applicable to an array of wave gauges of arbitrary geometry deployed seaward of the reflector. An expansion for small oblique wave incidence angles is used to derive an approximate relationship between measured array cross-spectra and a small number of parameters that describe the incident wave properties and the reflectivity of the structure. Model tests with ...

  10. Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects.

  11. The climatology of the Red Sea - part 2: the waves

    KAUST Repository

    Langodan, Sabique

    2017-05-09

    The wave climatology of the Red Sea is described based on a 30-year hindcast generated using WAVEWATCH III configured on a 5-km resolution grid and forced by Red Sea reanalysis surface winds from the advanced Weather Research and Forecasting model. The wave simulations have been validated using buoy and altimeter data. The four main wind systems in the Red Sea characterize the corresponding wave climatology. The dominant ones are the two opposite wave systems with different genesis, propagating along the axis of the basin. The highest waves are generated at the centre of the Red Sea as a consequence of the strong seasonal winds blowing from the Tokar Gap on the African side. There is a general long-term trend toward lowering the values of the significant wave height over the whole basin, with a decreasing rate depending on the genesis of the individual systems.

  12. The first demonstration of a microbial fuel cell as a viable power supply: Powering a meteorological buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tender, Leonard M.; Gray, Sam A.; Groveman, Ethan; Lowy, Daniel A.; Kauffman, Peter; Melhado, Julio; Tyce, Robert C.; Flynn, Darren; Petrecca, Rose; Dobarro, Joe

    2008-05-01

    Here we describe the first demonstration of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) as a practical alternative to batteries for a low-power consuming application. The specific application reported is a meteorological buoy (ca. 18-mW average consumption) that measures air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and water temperature, and that is configured for real-time line-of-sight RF telemetry of data. The specific type of MFC utilized in this demonstration is the benthic microbial fuel cell (BMFC). The BMFC operates on the bottom of marine environments, where it oxidizes organic matter residing in oxygen depleted sediment with oxygen in overlying water. It is maintenance free, does not deplete (i.e., will run indefinitely), and is sufficiently powerful to operate a wide range of low-power marine-deployed scientific instruments normally powered by batteries. Two prototype BMFCs used to power the buoy are described. The first was deployed in the Potomac River in Washington, DC, USA. It had a mass of 230 kg, a volume of 1.3 m3, and sustained 24 mW (energy equivalent of ca. 16 alkaline D-cells per year at 25 °C). Although not practical due to high cost and extensive in-water manipulation required to deploy, it established the precedence that a fully functional scientific instrument could derive all of its power from a BMFC. It also provided valuable lessons for developing a second, more practical BMFC that was subsequently used to power the buoy in a salt marsh near Tuckerton, NJ, USA. The second version BMFC has a mass of 16 kg, a volume of 0.03 m3, sustains ca. 36 mW (energy equivalent of ca. 26 alkaline D-cells per year at 25 °C), and can be deployed by a single person from a small craft with minimum or no in-water manipulation. This BMFC is being further developed to reduce cost and enable greater power output by electrically connecting multiple units in parallel. Use of this BMFC powering the meteorological buoy highlights the potential impact of BMFCs to enable long

  13. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  14. Output characteristics of floating type wave power generator system using a ball screw; Fuyugata nejishiki haryoku hatsuden sochi no shutsuryoku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, T; Omata, K [Meiji University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    A floating type wave power generator system using a ball screw is proposed. Output characteristics are simulated on the supposition of its employment aboard a navigational aid buoy. The relative linear movement produced by waves between the main body and float is transmitted via a load column to a ball nut and is converted into a rotary movement of a threaded shaft engaging the ball nut. Attached to the bottom end of the threaded shaft is a one-way clutch which connects to the generator axle when the relative velocity between the float and main body is positive. The simulation was conducted for a wave activated power generation buoy, 2.6m in outer diameter, 4.5m in length, and 6000kg in total mass. The buoy generated a mechanical output of 340kW when exposed to a sinusoidal wave 2.5 seconds in period and 40cm in wave height. A tank test was performed using a reduced scale model consisting of a ball screw, bicycle dynamo, and float, with the main body being 318mm in diameter and 833mm in length, when an average output of 4.51W was obtained at 60% efficiency. The results of the experiment agreed in some degree with the results of calculation, verifying the righteousness of the theoretical formula. 3 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. A comparison of dynamical and statistical downscaling methods for regional wave climate projections along French coastlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugel, Amélie; Menendez, Melisa; Benoit, Michel; Mattarolo, Giovanni; Mendez, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Wave climate forecasting is a major issue for numerous marine and coastal related activities, such as offshore industries, flooding risks assessment and wave energy resource evaluation, among others. Generally, there are two main ways to predict the impacts of the climate change on the wave climate at regional scale: the dynamical and the statistical downscaling of GCM (Global Climate Model). In this study, both methods have been applied on the French coast (Atlantic , English Channel and North Sea shoreline) under three climate change scenarios (A1B, A2, B1) simulated with the GCM ARPEGE-CLIMAT, from Météo-France (AR4, IPCC). The aim of the work is to characterise the wave climatology of the 21st century and compare the statistical and dynamical methods pointing out advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The statistical downscaling method proposed by the Environmental Hydraulics Institute of Cantabria (Spain) has been applied (Menendez et al., 2011). At a particular location, the sea-state climate (Predictand Y) is defined as a function, Y=f(X), of several atmospheric circulation patterns (Predictor X). Assuming these climate associations between predictor and predictand are stationary, the statistical approach has been used to project the future wave conditions with reference to the GCM. The statistical relations between predictor and predictand have been established over 31 years, from 1979 to 2009. The predictor is built as the 3-days-averaged squared sea level pressure gradient from the hourly CFSR database (Climate Forecast System Reanalysis, http://cfs.ncep.noaa.gov/cfsr/). The predictand has been extracted from the 31-years hindcast sea-state database ANEMOC-2 performed with the 3G spectral wave model TOMAWAC (Benoit et al., 1996), developed at EDF R&D LNHE and Saint-Venant Laboratory for Hydraulics and forced by the CFSR 10m wind field. Significant wave height, peak period and mean wave direction have been extracted with an hourly-resolution at

  16. Temperature profile and other data collected using moored buoy in the Pacific Ocean (30-N to 30-S) as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment (IDOE/NORPAX) project from 06 November 1977 to 24 March 1978 (NODC Accession 8200053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Air pressure, current, wind and temperature time series data were collected from moored buoys from TOGA Area in Pacific (30 N to 30 S). Buoy data from the equatorial...

  17. A Temporal Assessment of Barrier Island Vulnerability to Extreme Wave Events, Virginia Coast Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, D. J.; Moore, L. J.; Doran, K. J.; Stockdon, H. F.

    2010-12-01

    Barrier island vulnerability to storm-generated waves is directly related to interactions between shoreface morphology and surf-zone dynamics. During storms, the seaward-most dune often limits the landward extent of wave energy; however, if maximum wave run-up exceeds the elevation of the top of the dune, overwash or inundation may occur. The ‘Storm Impact Scale’ presented by Sallenger (2000) classifies barrier beach vulnerability to individual storm events based on the elevation of the frontal dune crest and toe relative to maximum wave run-up. Changes to the dune and beachface can occur over a range of time scales, altering local vulnerability to extreme waves from storms, even as a storm is occurring. As sea level continues to rise, barrier beaches will become increasingly vulnerable to overwash and inundation from a greater number of storms. Our objective is to assess temporal trends in barrier island vulnerability while also exploring island-chain-wide response and recovery from two notably different storm events (Nor’Ida and Hurricane Bonnie) along the undeveloped barrier islands of the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR). We compare shoreline position and elevations of the frontal dune crest (DHIGH) and dune toe (DLOW) across four lidar data sets collected between 1998-2010. Observed significant wave height and period from the National Data Buoy Center and the Duck, NC Field Research Facility for the time period between 1985 and 2009 are classified to represent one-year, five-year, and ten-year storm events that serve as the basis for comparison of island vulnerability through time to a range of storm severity. Initial results reveal significant spatial and temporal variation in barrier island vulnerability to storms throughout the VCR. Despite the range of variability, all three beach features (i.e., shoreline position, DHIGH and DLOW), have moved landward indicating large-scale, widespread migration, or narrowing, of VCR barrier island landforms over the

  18. Observational evidence from direct current measurements for propagation of remotely forced waves on the shelf off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Amol, P.; Shankar, D.; Aparna, S.G.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Fernando, V.; Shetye, S.R.; Mukherjee, A.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Khalap, S.; Satelkar, N.P.

    local response that masks the effect of remote forcing. Forced wave calculations using CTW theory show that remote forcing of the WICC is present at all times, but is most striking when the local winds are weak, as during March–April. The CTW...

  19. Long-Term Observations of Atmospheric CO2, O3 and BrO over the Transitioning Arctic Ocean Pack-ice: The O-Buoy Chemical Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrai, P.

    2016-02-01

    Autonomous, sea ice-tethered O-Buoys have been deployed (2009-2016) across the Arctic sea ice for long-term atmospheric measurements (http://www.o-buoy.org). O-Buoys (15) provide in-situ concentrations of three sentinel atmospheric chemicals, ozone, CO2 and BrO, as well as meteorological parameters and imagery, over the frozen ocean. O-Buoys were designed to transmit daily data over a period of 2 years while deployed in sea ice, as part of automated ice-drifting stations that include snow/ice measurement systems (e.g. Ice Mass Balance buoys) and oceanographic measurements (e.g. Ice Tethered Profilers). Seasonal changes in Arctic atmospheric chemistry are influenced by changes in the characteristics and presence of the sea ice vs. open water as well as air mass trajectories, especially during the winter-spring and summer-fall transitions when sea ice is melting and freezing, respectively. The O-Buoy Chemical Network provides the unique opportunity to observe these transition periods in real-time with high temporal resolution, and to compare them with those collected on land-based monitoring stations located. Due to the logistical challenges of measurements over the Arctic Ocean region, most long term, in-situ observations of atmospheric chemistry have been made at coastal or island sites around the periphery of the Arctic Ocean, leaving large spatial and temporal gaps that O-Buoys overcome. Advances in floatation, communications, power management, and sensor hardware have been made to overcome the challenges of diminished Arctic sea ice. O-Buoy data provide insights into enhanced seasonal, interannual and spatial variability in atmospheric composition, atmospheric boundary layer control on the amount of halogen activation, enhancement of the atmospheric CO2 signal over the more variable and porous pack ice, and to develop an integrated picture of the coupled ocean/ice/atmosphere system. As part of the Arctic Observing Network, we provide data to the community (www.aoncadis.org).

  20. On radio frequency wave induced radial transport and wave helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzilka, V.

    1992-09-01

    Expressions for wave induced radial transport are derived allowing simple estimates. The transport is enhanced due to the presence of poloidal magnetostatic field and in the vicinity of the ion cyclotron resonance. The direction of the wave induced transport depends also on the wave polarization. (author) 19 refs