WorldWideScience

Sample records for directional spectrum waves

  1. Directional spectrum of ocean waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Gouveia, A.D.; Nagarajan, R.

    fields are described. For these sinusoidal wave fields, analysis of both linear and polygonal arrays consistently yielded accurate directions, in contrast with the limited success of Pawka (1974) in case of linear arrays and Esteva (1976, 1977) in case...

  2. Wave directional spectrum from array measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Using the method of Esteva (1976, 1977), whcih assumes that at the frequency band the waves approach from just a single "mean" wave direction, wave direction has been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated as a function of frequency...

  3. Satellite-based RAR performance simulation for measuring directional ocean wave spectrum based on SAR inversion spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Lin; MAO Zhihua; HUANG Haiqing; GONG Fang

    2010-01-01

    Some missions have been carried out to measure wave directional spectrum by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and airborne real aperture radar (RAR) at a low incidence. Both them have their own advantages and limitations. Scientists hope that SAR and satellite-based RAR can complement each other for the research on wave properties in the future. For this study, the authors aim to simulate the satellite-based RAR system to validate performance for measuring the directional wave spectrum. The principal measurements are introduced and the simulation methods based on the one developed by Hauser are adopted and slightly modified. To enhance the authenticity of input spectrum and the wave spectrum measuring consistency for SAR and satellite-based RAR, the wave height spectrum inversed from Envisat ASAR data by cross spectrum technology is used as the input spectrum of the simulation system. In the process of simulation, the sea surface, backscattering signal, modulation spectrum and the estimated wave height spectrum are simulated in each look direction. Directional wave spectrum are measured based on the simulated observations from 0° to 360~. From the estimated wave spectrum, it has an 180° ambiguity like SAR, but it has no special high wave number cut off in all the direction. Finally, the estimated spectrum is compared with the input one in terms of the dominant wave wavelength, direction and SWH and the results are promising. The simulation shows that satellite-based RAR should be capable of measuring the directional wave properties. Moreover, it indicates satellite-based RAR basically can measure waves that SAR can measure.

  4. Parameterized first-guess spectrum method for retrieving directional spectrum of swell-dominated waves and huge waves from SAR images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A method to retrieve ocean wave spectra from SAR images, named Parameterized First-guess Spectrum Method (PFSM), was proposed after interpretation of the theory to ocean wave imaging and analysis of the drawbacks of the retrieving model generally used. In this method, with additional information and satellite parameters, the separating wave-number is first calculated to determine the maximum wave-number beyond which the linear relation can be used. The separating wave-number can be calculated using the additional information on wind velocity and parameters of SAR satellite. And then the SAR spectrum can be divided into SAR spectrum of wind wave and of swell according to the result of separating wave-number. The portion of SAR spectrum generated by wind wave, is used to search for the most suitable parameters of ocean wind wave spectrum, including propagation direction of ocean wave, phase speed of dominating wave and the angle spreading coefficient. The swell spectrum is acquired by directly inversing the linear relation of ocean wave spectrum to SAR spectrum given the portion of SAR spectrum generated by swell. We used the proposed method to retrieve the ocean wave spectrum from ERS-SAR data from the South China Sea and compared the result with altimeter data. The agreement indicates that the PFSM is reliable.

  5. ESTIMATION OF DIRECTIONAL SPECTRUM AND REFLECTED COEFFICIENT OF INCIDENT AND REFLECTED WAVE IN PHASE-LOCKED WAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Li-min; YU Zhi-liang; YUAN Qun-zhe; YU Yu-xiu

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses and compares the property of the Modified Bayesian Directional spectrum analysis Method (MBDM) and the Modified Maximum Likelihood Method (MMLM) that can be used to estimate directional spectrum and reflected coefficient of phase-locked wave field overlapped by multi-directional irregular incident and reflected waves.The numerical test verifies the results under different wave conditions, different measurement systems, and different reflection features.The computation speed and stability of the two methods is also compared.The analysis addresses that the MBDM is better than the MMLM for directional spectrum estimating, while the MMLM is better than the MBDM for reflected coefficient estimation and calculating speed and stability.

  6. Wave Reflection Coefficient Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞聿修; 邵利民; 柳淑学

    2003-01-01

    The wave reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and directional spectrum for concrete face slope breakwaters and rubble mound breakwaters are investigated through physical model tests in the present study. The reflection coefficients of oblique irregular waves are analyzed by the Modified Two-Point Method (MTPM) proposed by the authors. The results show that the wave reflection coefficient decreases with increasing wave frequency and incident angle or decreasing structure slope. The reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and its variation with Iribarren number are given in this paper. The paper also suggests an empirical 3-dimensional reflection coefficient spectrum, i.e. reflection coefficient directional spectrum, which can be used to illustrate quantitatively the variation of reflection coefficient with the incident angle and the Iribarren number for oblique irregular waves.

  7. Evolution of a Directional Wave Spectrum in a 3D Marginal Ice Zone with Random Floe Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, F.; Squire, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through a realistic marginal ice zone (MIZ), where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by coherent conservative wave scattering effects. Field experiments conducted by Wadhams et al. (1986) in the Greenland Sea generated important data on wave attenuation in the MIZ and, particularly, on whether the wave spectrum spreads directionally or collimates with distance from the ice edge. The data suggest that angular isotropy, arising from multiple scattering by ice floes, occurs close to the edge and thenceforth dominates wave propagation throughout the MIZ. Although several attempts have been made to replicate this finding theoretically, including by the use of numerical models, none have confronted this problem in a 3D MIZ with fully randomised floe distribution properties. We construct such a model by subdividing the discontinuous ice cover into adjacent infinite slabs of finite width parallel to the ice edge. Each slab contains an arbitrary (but finite) number of circular ice floes with randomly distributed properties. Ice floes are modeled as thin elastic plates with uniform thickness and finite draught. We consider a directional wave spectrum with harmonic time dependence incident on the MIZ from the open ocean, defined as a continuous superposition of plane waves traveling at different angles. The scattering problem within each slab is then solved using Graf's interaction theory for an arbitrary incident directional plane wave spectrum. Using an appropriate integral representation of the Hankel function of the first kind (see Cincotti et al., 1993), we map the outgoing circular wave field from each floe on the slab boundaries into a directional spectrum of plane waves, which characterizes the slab reflected and transmitted fields. Discretizing the angular spectrum, we can obtain a scattering matrix for each slab. Standard recursive

  8. Directional spectrum of ocean waves from array measurements using phase/time/path difference methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Wave direction has for the first time been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated from array measurements using the phase/time/path difference (PTPD) methods of Esteva in case of polygonal arrays and Borgman in case of linear arrays...

  9. Directional wave measurements and modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; Bhat, S.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    Some of the results obtained from analysis of the monsoon directional wave data measured over 4 years in shallow waters off the west coast of India are presented. The directional spectrum computed from the time series data seems to indicate...

  10. Study of the directional spectrum of ocean waves using array, buoy and radar measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.

    to install capacitance gauges unless they are pile driven or mounted on spar buoys. Also at larger depths, the wave signal at the bottom mounted pressure gauges is attenuated as a function of wave period (frequency), the attenuation being greater for smaller...

  11. Observation of Phillips' spectrum in Faraday waves

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of the Phillips' spectrum of gravity surface waves driven by a horizontally moving wave maker interacting with Faraday waves. We measure the temporal fluctuations of the surface wave amplitude at a given location and we show that, for a wide range of forcing parameters, they display a power-law spectrum that greatly differs from the one predicted by the WT theory but coincides with Phillips' spectrum for gravity waves. We compute the probability density function of the local surface height increments, which show that they change strongly across time scales. The structure functions of these increments are shown to display power-laws as a function of the time lag, with exponents that are not linear with the order of the structure function, thus showing that the wave field is intermittent. We argue that the origin of this scale-invariant intermittent spectrum is the Faraday wave pattern breakup due to its advection by the propagating gravity waves, which can be related directly to the P...

  12. Vertical coherence and forward scattering from the sea surface and the relation to the directional wave spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Peter H; Plant, William J; Dall'Osto, David R

    2013-09-01

    Results of an experiment to measure vertical spatial coherence from acoustic paths interacting once with the sea surface but at perpendicular azimuth angles are presented. The measurements were part of the Shallow Water 2006 program that took place off the coast of New Jersey in August 2006. An acoustic source, frequency range 6-20 kHz, was deployed at depth 40 m, and signals were recorded on a 1.4 m long vertical line array centered at depth 25 m and positioned at range 200 m. The vertical array consisted of four omni-directional hydrophones and vertical coherences were computed between pairs of these hydrophones. Measurements were made over four source-receiver bearing angles separated by 90°, during which sea surface conditions remained stable and characterized by a root-mean-square wave height of 0.17 m and a mixture of swell and wind waves. Vertical coherences show a statistically significant difference depending on source-receiver bearing when the acoustic frequency is less than about 12 kHz, with results tending to fade at higher frequencies. This paper presents field observations and comparisons of these observations with two modeling approaches, one based on bistatic forward scattering and the other on a rough surface parabolic wave equation utilizing synthetic sea surfaces.

  13. Millimeter Wave Spectrum of Nitromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushin, V.

    2016-06-01

    A new study of the millimeter wave spectrum of nitromethane CH_3NO_2 is reported. The new measurements covering the frequency range from 49 GHz to 236 GHz have been carried out using spectrometer in IRA NASU (Ukraine). The transitions belonging to the m ≤ 8 torsional states have been analyzed using the RAM36 program, which has been modified for this study to take into account the quadrupole hyperfine structure due to presence of the nitrogen atom. The dataset consisting of 5838 microwave line frequencies and including transitions with J up to 50 was fit using a model consisting of 93 parameters and weighted root-mean-square deviation of 0.89 has been achieved. In the talk the details of this new study will be discussed. V. Ilyushin, Z. Kisiel, L. Pszczólkowski, H. Mäder, J. T. Hougen J. Mol. Spectrosc. 259 (2010) 26-38.

  14. On the Spectrum Width of Wind Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李陆平; 黄培基

    2001-01-01

    Based on the universal expression of wind wave spectra, four commonly used definitions of the spectrum width arere-examined. The results show that the non-dimensional spectrum width can measure the width of non-dimensionalspectra but it does not reflect the developing state of the spectra. The dimensional spectrum width expresses the degree ofconcentration of wave energy of the spectrum in the process of wind wave growth. Tests show that the spectrum widthpresented by Wen et al. can objectively measure the degree of concentration of wave energy of the spectrum, reflect thestate of wind wave growth, and provides a better result for practical application. The rules for definition of the spectrumwidth are discussed.

  15. Estimation of directional wave spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    Directional properties of ocean waves are of great economic interest. The knowledge of wave directionality is important for the design of maritime structures and offshore operations. Two main aspects are considered for this study for the data...

  16. The plane wave spectrum representation of electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Clemmow, P C

    1966-01-01

    The Plane Wave Spectrum Representation of Electromagnetic Fields presents the theory of the electromagnetic field with emphasis to the plane wave. This book explains how fundamental electromagnetic fields can be represented by the superstition of plane waves traveling in different directions. Organized into two parts encompassing eight chapters, this book starts with an overview of the methods whereby plane wave spectrum representation can be used in attacking different characteristic problems belonging to the theories of radiation, diffraction, and propagation. This book then discusses the co

  17. Directional wave spectra off southeast coast of Tamil Nadu

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; Gowthaman, R.

    directional spreading. A well established way to describe the energy content in an irregular wind generated surface wave assumes superposition of linear waves and the two dimensional energy spectrum can be conveniently expressed as a product of the one...

  18. The equilibrium classical scatter spectrum of waves

    CERN Document Server

    Guruprasad, V

    2016-01-01

    Regardless of the unspecific notions of photons as light complexes, radiation bundles or wave packets, the radiation from a single state transition is at most a single continuous wave train that starts and ends with the transition. The radiation equilibrium spectrum must be the superposition sum of the spectra of such wave trains. A classical equipartition of wave trains cannot diverge since they would be finite in number, whereas standing wave modes are by definition infinite, which had doomed Rayleigh's theory, and concern only the total radiation. Wave trains are the microscopic entities of radiation interacting with matter, that correspond to molecules in kinetic theory. Their quantization came from matter transitions in Einstein's 1917 derivation of Planck's law. The spectral scatter of wave trains by Doppler shifts, which cause the wavelength displacements in Wien's law used for the frequency dependence in Einstein's derivation, is shown to yield the shape of the Planck spectrum. A Lorentz transform pro...

  19. Cross Ripples and Wave Directional Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheel, R. A.; Hay, A. E.

    2006-12-01

    Cross ripples are a 3-dimensional bed state composed of two sets of ripples with different orientations: one set of smaller wavelength (4-10 cm) ripples residing within the troughs of a larger wavelength (30-50 cm) set. Cross ripples occur at intermediate wave energies. In contrast, at slightly higher energies the bed undergoes a transition to a highly 2-dimensional linear transition rippled state. In this study, the characteristics of the wave directional spectra during the occurrences of these 2- and 3-dimensional bed states are compared. The rotary fanbeam sonar record from SandyDuck97 shows that cross ripples and linear transition ripples occurred in approximately 11% and 42% of the sonar images respectively. Wave directional spectra are calculated with the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method from collocated measurements of pressure and horizontal velocity. Using the sonar record and wave directional spectra the correlation between bimodal wave directional spectra and the occurrence of the two distinct ripple types is examined and compared. Since ripple crest alignment is typically orthogonal to the direction of wave propagation, one possible creation mechanism for cross ripples is a bidirectional wave field. We find that bimodality of the wave spectrum, neither in direction nor in frequency, is unique to the occurrence of cross ripples.

  20. Observation of Phillips's spectrum in Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Gustavo; Falcon, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    We consider the problem of wave turbulence generated by singularities from an experimental point of view. We study a system of Faraday waves interacting with waves generated by a wave-maker driven with a random forcing. We measure the temporal fluctuations of the surface wave amplitude at a given location and we show that for a wide range of forcing parameters the surface height displays a power-law spectra that greatly differs from the one predicted by the WT theory. In the capillary region the power spectrum turns out to be proportional to f-5, which we believe is due to singularities moving across the system. Proyecto Postdoctorado Fondecyt Nro 3160032.

  1. A multimodal wave spectrum-based approach for statistical downscaling of local wave climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegermiller, Christie; Antolinez, Jose A A; Rueda, Ana C; Camus, Paula; Perez, Jorge; Erikson, Li; Barnard, Patrick; Mendez, Fernando J.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of wave climate by bulk wave parameters is insufficient for many coastal studies, including those focused on assessing coastal hazards and long-term wave climate influences on coastal evolution. This issue is particularly relevant for studies using statistical downscaling of atmospheric fields to local wave conditions, which are often multimodal in large ocean basins (e.g. the Pacific). Swell may be generated in vastly different wave generation regions, yielding complex wave spectra that are inadequately represented by a single set of bulk wave parameters. Furthermore, the relationship between atmospheric systems and local wave conditions is complicated by variations in arrival time of wave groups from different parts of the basin. Here, we address these two challenges by improving upon the spatiotemporal definition of the atmospheric predictor used in statistical downscaling of local wave climate. The improved methodology separates the local wave spectrum into “wave families,” defined by spectral peaks and discrete generation regions, and relates atmospheric conditions in distant regions of the ocean basin to local wave conditions by incorporating travel times computed from effective energy flux across the ocean basin. When applied to locations with multimodal wave spectra, including Southern California and Trujillo, Peru, the new methodology improves the ability of the statistical model to project significant wave height, peak period, and direction for each wave family, retaining more information from the full wave spectrum. This work is the base of statistical downscaling by weather types, which has recently been applied to coastal flooding and morphodynamic applications.

  2. Estimation of wave directional spreading

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deo, M.C.; Gondane, D.S.; SanilKumar, V.

    One of the useful measures of waves directional spreading at a given location is the directional spreading parameter. This paper presents a new approach to arrive at its characteristic value using the computational technique of Artificial Neural...

  3. Spectrum pooling in MnWave Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccardi, Federico; Shokri-Ghadikolaei, Hossein; Fodor, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    the benefit of coordination among networks of different operators, study the impact of beamforming at both base stations and user terminals, and analyze the pooling performance at different frequency carriers. We also discuss the enabling spectrum mechanisms, architectures, and protocols required to make...... spectrum pooling work in real networks. Our initial results show that, from a technical perspective, spectrum pooling at mmWave has the potential to use the resources more efficiently than traditional exclusive spectrum allocation to a single operator. However, further studies are needed in order to reach...... a thorough understanding of this matter, and we hope that this article will help stimulate further research in this area....

  4. Directional Ocean Wave Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    rpecra. Dil terent wkas e wind forecasts and thle adecomn of water \\ aport for the models used tl the toreca~st icenters arid anah’.ed at The release of...Goda, Y., "On Wave Groups," in An International Conference on the Be-4 Watson , K. MI., and West, B. J., "A Transport Equation Desciption of Non- honiour

  5. Cause of winter gravity wave spectrum saturation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yongfu; XU; Jiyao

    2005-01-01

    This paper utilizes horizontal velocity measurements observed from 19 chaff rockets and nearly simultaneous temperature measurements collected from 19 falling sphere rockets to study the cause of winter gravity wave spectrum saturation. Results suggest that strong horizontal velocity shears larger than 0.04 s-1 are observed to be present at various heights near the winter mesopause. On one single chaff rocket flight, an extremely strong horizontal velocity shear as high as 0.33 s-1 is observed at 87.4 km and is believed to be the strongest value ever measured in the mesosphere. These strong horizontal velocity shears, together with Brunt-V(a)is(a)l(a) frequency squared obtained from the temperature profile, act collectively to yield two dynamical instability regions of Richardson number smaller than 1/4, suggesting that the saturated gravity wave spectrum observed by the chaff rockets in winter is a result of dynamical instability.

  6. Using Kinect to Measure Wave Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, J.; Loose, B.; Lovely, A.

    2012-12-01

    Gas exchange at the air-sea interface is enhanced by aqueous turbulence generated by capillary-gravity waves, affecting the absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide by the ocean. The mean squared wave slope of these waves correlates strongly with the gas transfer velocity. To measure the energy in capillary-gravity waves, this project aims to use the Microsoft Xbox Kinect to measure the short period wave spectrum. Kinect is an input device for the Xbox 360 with an infrared laser and camera that can be used to map objects at high frequency and spatial resolution, similar to a LiDAR sensor. For air-sea gas exchange, we are interested in the short period gravity waves with a wavenumber of 40 to 100 radians per meter. We have successfully recorded data from Kinect at a sample rate of 30 Hz with 640x480 pixel resolution, consistent with the manufacturer specifications for its scanning capabilities. At 0.5 m distance from the surface, this yields a nominal resolution of approximately 0.7 mm with a theoretical vertical precision of 0.24 mm and a practical 1 σ noise level of 0.91 mm. We have found that Kinect has some limitations in its ability to detect the air-water interface. Clean water proved to be a weaker reflector for the Kinect IR source, whereas a relatively strong signal can be received for liquids with a high concentration of suspended solids. Colloids such as milk and Ca(OH)2 in water proved more suitable media from which height and wave spectra were detectable. Moreover, we will show results from monochromatic as well as wind-wave laboratory studies. With the wave field measurements from Kinect, gas transfer velocities at the air-sea interface can be determined.

  7. Full spectrum millimeter-wave modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, Julien; Yao, Peng; Shi, Shouyuan; Zablocki, Alicia; Harrity, Charles; Martin, Richard D; Schuetz, Christopher A; Prather, Dennis W

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the development of new lithium niobate electro-optic modulator designs and material processing techniques have contributed to support the increasing need for faster optical networks by considerably extending the operational bandwidth of modulators. In an effort to provide higher bandwidths for future generations of networks, we have developed a lithium niobate electro-optic phase modulator based on a coplanar waveguide ridged structure that operates up to 300 GHz. By thinning the lithium niobate substrate down to less than 39 µm, we are able to eliminate substrate modes and observe optical sidebands over the full millimeter-wave spectrum.

  8. Gaze Direction Detection in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgeot d'Arc, Baudouin; Delorme, Richard; Zalla, Tiziana; Lefebvre, Aline; Amsellem, Frédérique; Moukawane, Sanaa; Letellier, Laurence; Leboyer, Marion; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Ramus, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Detecting where our partners direct their gaze is an important aspect of social interaction. An atypical gaze processing has been reported in autism. However, it remains controversial whether children and adults with autism spectrum disorder interpret indirect gaze direction with typical accuracy. This study investigated whether the detection of…

  9. Wave groups in uni-directional surface-wave models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groesen, van E.

    1998-01-01

    Uni-directional wave models are used to study wave groups that appear in wave tanks of hydrodynamic laboratories; characteristic for waves in such tanks is that the wave length is rather small, comparable to the depth of the layer. In second-order theory, the resulting Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) eq

  10. Wave decomposition phenomenon and spectrum evolution over submerged bars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Benxia; YU Xiping

    2009-01-01

    Wave decomposition phenomenon and spectrum evolution over submerged bars are investigated by a previously developed numerical model. First, the computed free surface displacements of regular waves at various locations are compared with the available experimental data to confirm the validity of the numerical model, and satisfactory agreements are obtained. In addition, variations of decomposition characteristics with incident wave parameters and the change of energy spectrum for regular waves are also studied. Then the spectrum evolution of irregular waves over submerged bars, as well as the influence of incident peak wave period and the steepness of the front slope of the bar on spectrum evolution, is investigated. Wave decomposition and spectral shape are found to be significantly influenced by the incident wave conditions. When the upslope of the bar becomes 1:2, the length of the slope becomes shorter and will not benefit the generation of high frequency energy, so spectrum evolution is not significant.

  11. Wave-spectrum of domino-system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzev, Mikhail; Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    In [1, 2] we proposed a mathematical model of recently identified shear rupture mechanism. This model gives the simplest description of the fan-mechanism and demonstrates that the fan-head represents a self-unbalancing the domino-structure. The domino-structure plays an essential role in determination of rock instability at failure and causes spontaneous rupture development. In the framework of the proposed model it is possible to understand how shear rupture mechanism can provide propagation of faults through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength of pre-existing faults. Mathematical model of the domino-structure is described by the system of coupled inverted pendulums. The case of small linear oscillations in a vicinity of the stable equilibrium position is studied and described in the literature [3]. In particular, the wave spectrum is calculated exactly. In our work we considered the mathematical 1D model of the weak coupling inverted pendulums. The corresponding equations for a finite number of pendulums are obtained. We calculated the wave spectrum for the case of linear interaction between pendulums. It was found that there is the critical value of a parameter separating different modes of the wave behavior. This parameter is linked with the dimensionless interaction parameter. If the value of the parameter is less than the critical one we have oscillatory process. In other case the wave spectrum contains exponentially growing contributions and the domino-system is unstable. The asymptotic formula for the critical value with respect to N is proposed in the work. It is shown that the critical value decreases monotonically with respect to N. This investigation was supported by the Russian Scientific Foundation (grant no. 14-11-00079). References [1] Tarasov, B.G., Guzev, M.A., 2013. New insight into the nature of size dependence and the lower limit of rock strength. Proceedings 8th International

  12. Bandwidth Scale for Frequency Spectrum of Sea Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 孙孚; 钱成春; 邓拥军

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that energy spectrum bandwidth should be able to reflect the degree of energy concentration. However, the commonly used bandwidth factors defined by Longuet-Higgins could not fit the concept satisfactorily. A new kind of spectrum bandwidth scale factor with a clear physical meaning is given in the present paper and a constant is obtained which reveals the intrinsic characteristics of sea waves. Thereby a universal relationship between significant wave height of sea waves and spectrum bandwidth is established.

  13. Direct measurement of light waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulielmakis, E; Uiberacker, M; Kienberger, R; Baltuska, A; Yakovlev, V; Scrinzi, A; Westerwalbesloh, Th; Kleineberg, U; Heinzmann, U; Drescher, M; Krausz, F

    2004-08-27

    The electromagnetic field of visible light performs approximately 10(15) oscillations per second. Although many instruments are sensitive to the amplitude and frequency (or wavelength) of these oscillations, they cannot access the light field itself. We directly observed how the field built up and disappeared in a short, few-cycle pulse of visible laser light by probing the variation of the field strength with a 250-attosecond electron burst. Our apparatus allows complete characterization of few-cycle waves of visible, ultraviolet, and/or infrared light, thereby providing the possibility for controlled and reproducible synthesis of ultrabroadband light waveforms.

  14. SPECTRUM OF DIRECTED KIRKMAN PACKING DESIGNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangYan; DuBeiliang

    2003-01-01

    The problem studied in this article is the directed Kirkman packing, the resolvable directed packing which requires all blocks to be of size three except that ,each resolution class should contain either one block of size two(when v=2(mod 3)) or one block of size four (when v=l (mod 3)). A directed Kirkman packing design DKPD(v) is a resolvable directed packing of a v-set by the maximum possible number of resolution classes of this type. This article investigates the spectrum of DKPD(v) and it is found that it contains all positive integers v≥3 and v≠5,6.

  15. Study of the relationship between non-dimensional roughness length and wave age, effected by wave directionality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Naoya Suzuki; Naoto Ebuchi; Chaofang Zhao; Isao Watabe; Yasuhiro Sugimori

    2002-09-01

    Relationship between the non-dimensional roughness length and inverse of wave age has been discussed without consideration of wave directions, though wind wave field consists of various directional component waves. In this study we observe wave heights by an array of four wave gauges at the Hiratsuka Tower of (Independent Administrative Institution) National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), Japan, and discuss the effect of wave directionality. As a result, the data sets were classified into two different groups according to the directional wave spectrum distribution. In case 1 only swell and wind waves exist and in case 2 there exist wave components from several directions. It is shown that the case of multiple- directional component waves (case 2) may affect the non-dimensional roughness length and friction velocity.

  16. Direct sequence spread spectrum CDMA in shared spectrum applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Donald L.; Milstein, Laurence B.; Pickholtz, Raymond L.; Miller, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Personal Communication Network (PCN) is an entirely wireless communication system with the capability of assessing the wired telephone system to reach anyone processing only a wired telephone. It is expected to compete with the existing mobile cellular system which connects directly to the wired telephone system. While many PCN systems employ TDMA technology, the PCN system described here uses Broadband CDMA (BCDMA(sup SM)) which is capable of sharing the spectrum with other users and which is extremely resistant to fading caused by multipath.

  17. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  18. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  19. Wave directional spreading from point field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, M. L.; Venugopal, V.; Borthwick, A. G. L.

    2017-04-01

    Ocean waves have multidirectional components. Most wave measurements are taken at a single point, and so fail to capture information about the relative directions of the wave components directly. Conventional means of directional estimation require a minimum of three concurrent time series of measurements at different spatial locations in order to derive information on local directional wave spreading. Here, the relationship between wave nonlinearity and directionality is utilized to estimate local spreading without the need for multiple concurrent measurements, following Adcock & Taylor (Adcock & Taylor 2009 Proc. R. Soc. A 465, 3361-3381. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2009.0031)), with the assumption that directional spreading is frequency independent. The method is applied to measurements recorded at the North Alwyn platform in the northern North Sea, and the results compared against estimates of wave spreading by conventional measurement methods and hindcast data. Records containing freak waves were excluded. It is found that the method provides accurate estimates of wave spreading over a range of conditions experienced at North Alwyn, despite the noisy chaotic signals that characterize such ocean wave data. The results provide further confirmation that Adcock and Taylor's method is applicable to metocean data and has considerable future promise as a technique to recover estimates of wave spreading from single point wave measurement devices.

  20. Averaged two-dimensional low-frequency wave spectrum of wind waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimura, A.

    1984-01-01

    This report deals with second order, two-dimensional low frequency waves induced by the non-linear interactions of the first order component waves in a two-dimensional short wave field. The convolution to calculate the averaged two-dimensional low frequency wave spectrum is developed. Any given two-

  1. On the spectrum of pp-wave matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nakwoo E-mail: kim@aei.mpg.de; Plefka, Jan E-mail: plefka@aei.mpg.de

    2002-11-04

    We study the spectrum of the recently proposed matrix model of DLCQ M-theory in a parallel plane (pp)-wave background. In contrast to matrix theory in a flat background this model contains mass terms, which lift the flat directions of the potential and renders its spectrum discrete. The supersymmetry algebra of the model groups the energy eigenstates into supermultiplets, whose members differ by fixed amounts of energy in great similarity to the representation of supersymmetry in AdS spaces. There is a unique and exact zero-energy ground state along with a multitude of long and short multiplets of excited states. For large masses the quantum mechanical model may be treated perturbatively and we study the leading order energy shifts of the first excited states up to level two. Most interestingly we uncover a protected short multiplet at level two, whose energies do not receive perturbative corrections. Moreover, we conjecture the existence of an infinite series of similar protected multiplets in the pp-wave matrix model.

  2. Physical Investigation of Directional Wave Focusing and Breaking Waves in Wave Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-xue; Keyyong HONG

    2005-01-01

    An experimental scheme for the generation of directional focusing waves in a wave basin is established in this paper. The effects of the directional range, frequency width and center frequency on the wave focusing are studied. The distribution of maximum amplitude and the evolution of time series and spectra during wave packet propagation and the variation of water surface parameters are extensively investigated. The results reveal that the characteristics of focusing waves are significantly influenced by wave directionality and that the breaking criteria for directional waves are distinctly different from those for unidirectional waves.

  3. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  4. Dependence of chaotic diffusion on wave phase spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueheng; Xiang, Nong; Li, Dehui; Chen, Jiale; Fan, Peifeng

    2017-09-01

    The chaotic diffusion in velocity space has been studied by numerically solving the motion equation of charged particles in the wave field with different kinds of wave phase spectra and analytically calculating the correlation functions. It is found that the diffusion in velocity space strongly depends on the wave phase spectrum. For the periodic spectrum with two different phases, the small relative phase makes the diffusion deviate from the quasi-linear one even for an arbitrarily large overlap parameter. The quasi-linear approximation is valid when the overlap parameter is large for the spectrum in which the wave phases of any group of three neighboring waves are different. The quasi-linear threshold can be much larger than the one of the zero phased standard mapping.

  5. The research on typhoon wave spectrum in northwestern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongyuan; Cao, Xuefeng; Wen, Xianhua; Shi, Maochong; Zhao, Dongliang; Guo, Peifang

    2017-02-01

    Based upon the one-year wind wave measurement data, collected from the South China Sea (SCS) at coordinates 20° 36.298'N, 110°45.433'E. by Acoustic Wave And Current (AWAC), we analyzed the wave characteristics and concluded that the most common wave direction was E and the second most common direction was ENE, the mean and the maximum values of significant height was 1.2 m and 4.36 m, respectively. The mean period was 4.0 s. We also evaluated the wave spectrums under conditions existing in three typhoons: Rumbi, Jeti and Utor. We found that unimodal spectrums occurred more often than others, and the maximum spectrum peak was 30.7911 m2 s. The minimum peak frequency was 0.0625 Hz, and the mean peak frequency was 0.126 Hz. The wave period is important for the design of marine structures, especially the position of peak frequency had a great influence on the stress calculation. Spectral analysis showed that the values of peak frequency distributed between 0.063 Hz and 0.217 Hz, with the mean value 0.114 Hz. We fit the normalized spectrum with 6 theoretical spectral models, out of which, the Wen spectrum, JONSWAP spectrum and Wallops spectrum were proved to give the best fit. What distinguished the Wen Spectrum from the rest was that it does not rely on the measured spectrum for parameter estimation. Hence, we recommend that the Wen spectrum should be widely used in marine construction.

  6. Spatial structure of directional wave spectra in hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Osuna, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of the wave field during hurricane conditions is studied using the National Data Buoy Center directional wave buoy data set from the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. The buoy information, comprising the directional wave spectra during the passage of several hurricanes, was referenced to the center of the hurricane using the path of the hurricane, the propagation velocity, and the radius of the maximum winds. The directional wave spectra were partitioned into their main components to quantify the energy corresponding to the observed wave systems and to distinguish between wind-sea and swell. The findings are consistent with those found using remote sensing data (e.g., Scanning Radar Altimeter data). Based on the previous work, the highest waves are found in the right forward quadrant of the hurricane, where the spectral shape tends to become uni-modal, in the vicinity of the region of maximum winds. More complex spectral shapes are observed in distant regions at the front of and in the rear quadrants of the hurricane, where there is a tendency of the spectra to become bi- and tri-modal. The dominant waves generally propagate at significant angles to the wind direction, except in the regions next to the maximum winds of the right quadrants. Evidence of waves generated by concentric eyewalls associated with secondary maximum winds was also found. The frequency spectra display some of the characteristics of the JONSWAP spectrum adjusted by Young (J Geophys Res 111:8020, 2006); however, at the spectral peak, the similarity with the Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum is clear. These results establish the basis for the use in assessing the ability of numerical models to simulate the wave field in hurricanes.

  7. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    Gaussian smoothed SAR image spectra have been evaluated from 512 x 512 pixel sub- scenes of image mode ERS-1 SAR scenes off Goa, Visakhapatnam, Paradeep and Portugal. The two recently acquired scenes off Portugal showed the signature of swell...

  8. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    Gaussian smoothed SAR image spectra have been evaluated from 512 x 512 pixel subscenes of image mode ERS-1 SAR scenes off Goa, Visakhapatnam, Paradeep and Portugal. The two recently acquired scenes off Portugal showed the signature of swell...

  9. Commensurate and incommensurate states of a spin density wave in a quasi-two-dimensional system with an anisotropic energy spectrum in an external magnetic field of arbitrary direction relative to magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palistrant, M. E., E-mail: mepalistrant@yandex.com; Ursu, V. A. [Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Institute of Applied Physics (Moldova, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    A theory of thermodynamic properties of a spin density wave (SDW) in a quasi-two-dimensional system (with a preset impurity concentration x) is constructed. We choose an anisotropic dispersion relation for the electron energy and assume that external magnetic field H has an arbitrary direction relative to magnetic moment M{sub Q}. The system of equations defining order parameters M{sub Q}{sup z}, M{sub Q}{sup {sigma}}, M{sub z}, and M{sup {sigma}} is constructed and transformed with allowance for the Umklapp processes. Special cases when H Double-Vertical-Line M{sub Q} and H Up-Tack M{sub Q} (H{sub Z}H{sup {sigma}} = 0) are considered in detail as well as cases of weak fields H of arbitrary direction. The condition for the transition of the system to the commensurate and incommensurate states of the SDW is analyzed. The concentration dependence of magnetic transition temperature T{sub M} is calculated, and the components of the order parameter for the incommensurate phase are determined. The phase diagram (T,{approx}x) is constructed. The effect of the magnetic field on magnetic transition temperature T{sub M} is analyzed for H{sub Z}H{sup {sigma}} = 0, and longitudinal magnetic susceptibility {chi} Double-Vertical-Line is calculated; this quantity demonstrates the temperature dependence corresponding to a system with a gap for x < x{sub c} and to a gapless state for x > x{sub c}. In the immediate vicinity of the critical impurity concentration (x {approx} x{sub c}), the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility acquires a local maximum. The effect of anisotropy of the electron energy spectrum on the investigated physical quantities is also analyzed.

  10. Modal Wave Number Spectrum for Mesoscale Eddies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Ying; PENG Linhui

    2003-01-01

    The variations of ocean environmental parameters invariably result in variations of local modal wave numbers of a sound pressure field. The asymptotic Hankel transform with a short sliding window is applied to the complex sound pressure field in the water containing a mesoscale eddy to examine the variation of local modal wave numbers in such a range-dependent environment. The numerical simulation results show that modal wave number spectra obtained by this method can reflect the location and strength of a mesoscale eddy, therefore it can be used to monitor the strength and spatial scale of ocean mesoscale eddies.

  11. Numeric Spectrum of Relic Gravitational Waves in Accelerating Universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yang; ZHAO Wen; YUAN Ye-Fei; XIA Tian-Yang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The accelerating expansion of the Universe in the present stage is a process that will change the spectrum of relic gravitational waves. Here we present a numerical calculation for the power spectrum of relic gravitational waves in the accelerating Universe. The results show that although the overall features of the power spectrum are similar to those in the non-accelerating models, the amplitude is smaller in order of 10-1. We also find that the spectrum is very sensitive to the index β of the inflationary expansion with the scale factor a(τ) ∝ |τ|1+β. With increase of β, the resulting spectrum tends to be flatter with more power on high frequencies, and the sensitivity of the second science run of the LIGO detectors puts a restriction on the parameterβ< -1.8. The influence of reheating followed by the inflation has been examined.

  12. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lamb, Bradford [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Prudell, Joseph [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hammagren, Erik [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-08-22

    This Project aims to satisfy objectives of the DOE’s Water Power Program by completing a system detailed design (SDD) and other important activities in the first phase of a utility-scale grid-connected ocean wave energy demonstration. In early 2012, Columbia Power (CPwr) had determined that further cost and performance optimization was necessary in order to commercialize its StingRAY wave energy converter (WEC). CPwr’s progress toward commercialization, and the requisite technology development path, were focused on transitioning toward a commercial-scale demonstration. This path required significant investment to be successful, and the justification for this investment required improved annual energy production (AEP) and lower capital costs. Engineering solutions were developed to address these technical and cost challenges, incorporated into a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE), and then adapted to form the technical content and statement of project objectives of the resulting Project (DE-EE0005930). Through Project cost-sharing and technical collaboration between DOE and CPwr, and technical collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and other Project partners, we have demonstrated experimentally that these conceptual improvements have merit and made significant progress towards a certified WEC system design at a selected and contracted deployment site at the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) at the Marine Corps Base in Oahu, HI (MCBH).

  13. Gravitational Wave Spectrums from Pole-like Inflations based on Generalized Gravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, J

    1998-01-01

    We present a general and unified formulation which can handle the classical evolution and quantum generation processes of the cosmological gravitational wave in a broad class of generalized gravity theories. Applications are made in several inflation models based on the scalar-tensor theory, the induced gravity, and the low energy effective action of string theory. The gravitational wave power spectrums based on the vacuum expectation value of the quantized fluctuating metric during the pole-like inflation stages are derived in analytic forms. Assuming that the gravity theory transits to Einstein one while the relevant scales remain in the superhorizon scale, we derive the consequent power spectrums and the directional fluctuations of the relic radiation produced by the gravitational wave. The spectrums seeded by the vacuum fluctuations in the pole-like inflation models based on the generalized gravity show a distinguished common feature which differs from the scale invariant spectrum generated in an exponent...

  14. Trend analysis of the wave storminess: the wave direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Prat, M.; Sierra, J. P.; Mösso, C.; Sánchez-Arcilla, A.

    2009-09-01

    Climate change has an important role in the current scientific research because of its possible future negative consequences. Concerning the climate change in the coastal engineering field, the apparent sea level rise is one of the key parameters as well as the wave height and the wave direction temporal variations. According to the IPCC (2007), during the last century the sea level has been increasing with a mean rate of 1.7 ± 0.5 mm/yr. However, at local/regional scale the tendency significantly differs from the global trend since the local pressure and wind field variations become more relevant. This appears to be particularly significant in semi-enclosed areas in the Mediterranean Sea (Cushman-Roisin et al., 2001). Even though the existing unsolved questions related to the sea level rise, the uncertainty concerning the wave height is even larger, in which stormy conditions are especially important because they are closely related to processes such as coastal erosion, flooding, etc. Therefore, it is necessary to identify possible existing tendencies of storm related parameters. In many studies, only the maximum wave height and storm duration are analysed, remaining the wave direction in a second term. Note that a possible rotation of the mean wave direction may involve severe consequences since most beach and harbour defence structures have been designed assuming a constant predominant wave incidence. Liste et al. (2004) illustrated this fact with an example in which a rotation of only 2 degrees of the mean energy flux vector could produce a beach retreat of 20 m. Another possible consequence would be a decrease of the harbour operability: increased frequency of storms in the same direction as the harbour entrance orientation would influence the navigability. The present study, which focuses in the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean Sea), aims to improve the present knowledge of the wave storminess variations at regional scale, specially focusing on the wave

  15. Toward an Internal Gravity Wave Spectrum in Global Ocean Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302 Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be...14 MAY 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Toward an Internal Gravity Wave Spectrum in Global...resolution global ocean models forced by atmospheric fields and tides are beginning to display realistic internal gravity wave spectra, especially as

  16. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  17. Is the Spectrum of Gravitational Waves the "Holy Grail" of Inflation?

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenberger, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    It is often said that detecting a spectrum of primordial gravitational waves via observing B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background is the "Holy Grail" of inflation. The purpose of this short note is to point out that it is indeed of immense scientific interest to search for a signal of gravitational waves in B-mode polarization. However, rather than proving that inflation is the right paradigm of early universe cosmology, a positive signal of direct primordial B-mode polarization might well be due to other sources than inflation. In fact, a careful characterization of the spectrum of B-mode polarization might even falsify the inflationary paradigm.

  18. Wave directional spreading at shallow and intermediate depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.

    . The spectrum computed from measured data shows that Scott spectrum approximates the observations in a fairly satisfactory way. A comparative study was carried out based on the directional spectrum estimated from Fourier coefficients and the model directional...

  19. Millimetre Wave Rotational Spectrum of Glycolic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczolkowski, Lech; Bialkowska-Jaworska, Ewa; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of glycolic acid, CH2OHCOOH, was studied in the region 115-318 GHz. For the most stable SSC conformer, transitions in all vibrational states up to 400 cm(exp -1) have been measured and their analysis is reported. The data sets for the ground state, v21 = 1, and v21 = 2 have been considerably extended. Immediately higher in vibrational energy are two triads of interacting vibrational states and their rotational transitions have been assigned and successfully fitted with coupled Hamiltonians accounting for Fermi and Coriolis resonances. The derived energy level spacings establish that the vibrational frequency of the v21 mode is close to 100 cm(exp -1). The existence of the less stable AAT conformer in the near 50 C sample used in our experiment was also confirmed and additional transitions have been measured.

  20. Ocean wave parameters and spectrum estimated from single and dual high-frequency radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaki, Yukiharu

    2016-09-01

    The high-frequency (HF) radar inversion algorithm for spectrum estimation (HIAS) can estimate ocean wave directional spectra from both dual and single radar. Wave data from a dual radar and two single radars are compared with in situ observations. The agreement of the wave parameters estimated from the dual radar with those from in situ observations is the best of the three. In contrast, the agreement of the wave parameters estimated from the single radar in which no Doppler spectra are observed in the cell closest to the in situ observation point is the worst among the three. Wave data from the dual radar and the two single radars are compared. The comparison of the wave heights estimated from the single and dual radars shows that the area sampled by the Doppler spectra for the single radar is more critical than the number of Doppler spectra in terms of agreement with the dual-radar-estimated wave heights. In contrast, the comparison of the wave periods demonstrates that the number of Doppler spectra observed by the single radar is more critical for agreement of the wave periods than the area of the Doppler spectra. There is a bias directed to the radar position in the single radar estimated wave direction.

  1. Generation of magnetosonic waves over a continuous spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lunjin; Sun, Jicheng; Lu, Quanming; Gao, Xinliang; Xia, Zhiyang; Zhima, Zeren

    2016-02-01

    Magnetosonic waves, also known as equatorial noise emission, were found to have discrete frequency structures, which is consistent with instability caused by proton ring distribution. Nonetheless, nondiscrete structure, i.e., a broadband spectrum over a continuous frequency range, has been reported. We investigate the question whether proton ring distribution can generate nondiscrete spectra for perpendicularly propagating magnetosonic waves. We propose discrete and nondiscrete characteristics of the local instability for explaining the observation of discrete, continuous, and mixed spectra. The criterion for transition from discrete and continuous instability is given, γ >˜ Ωh/2, where γ is wave growth rate and Ωh is proton cyclotron frequency. The condition is verified by particle-in-cell simulation using more realistic electron-to-proton mass ratio and speed of light than in previous studies. Such criterion of generating a continuous spectrum can be tested against simultaneous in situ measurement of wave and particle. We also find that the modes at low Ωh harmonics, including the fundamental Ωh, can be still excited through nonlinear wave-wave coupling, even when they are neutral modes (γ = 0) according to the linear kinetic theory. Comparison with magnetosonic waves in cold plasma limit and electromagnetic ion Bernstein mode is also discussed.

  2. Wave turbulence theory for gravitational waves in general relativity: The Space-Time Kolmogorov spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Rica, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The recent observation of gravitational waves, stimulates the question of the longtime evolution of the space-time fluctuations. Gravitational waves interact themselves through the nonlinear character of Einstein's equations of general relativity. This nonlinear wave interaction allows the spectral energy transfer from mode to mode. According to the wave turbulence theory, the weakly nonlinear interaction of gravitational waves leads to the existence of an irreversible kinetic regime that dominates the longtime evolution. The resulting kinetic equation suggests the existence of an equilibrium wave spectrum and the existence of a non-equilibrium Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum for spatio-temporal fluctuations. Evidence of these solutions extracted in the fluctuating signal of the recent observations will be discussed in the paper. Probably, the present results would be pertinent in the new age of development of gravitational astronomy, as well as, in new tests of General Relativity.

  3. Two-atom energy spectrum in a harmonic trap near a Feshbach resonance at higher partial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Liang, Yi; Bhaduri, Rajat K.

    2009-09-01

    Two atoms in an optical lattice may be made to interact strongly at higher partial waves near a Feshbach resonance. These atoms, under appropriate constraints, could be bosonic or fermionic. The universal l=2 energy spectrum for such a system, with a caveat, is presented in this paper and checked with the spectrum obtained by direct numerical integration of the Schrödinger equation. The results reported here extend those of Yip for p -wave resonance [S.-K. Yip, Phys. Rev. A 78, 013612 (2008)], while exploring the limitations of a universal expression for the spectrum for the higher partial waves.

  4. Directional wave measurements using an autonomous vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Lars R.; Fer, Ilker; Peddie, David

    2016-09-01

    An autonomous vessel, the Offshore Sensing Sailbuoy, was used for wave measurements near the Ekofisk oil platform complex in the North Sea (56.5º N, 3.2º E, operated by ConocoPhillips) from 6 to 20 November 2015. Being 100 % wind propelled, the Sailbuoy has two-way communication via the Iridium network and has the capability for missions of 6 months or more. It has previously been deployed in the Arctic, Norwegian Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, but the present study was the first test for wave measurements. During the campaign the Sailbuoy held position about 20 km northeast of Ekofisk (on the lee side) during rough conditions. Mean wind speed measured at Ekofisk during the campaign was 9.8 m/s, with a maximum of 20.4 m/s, with wind mostly from south and southwest. A Datawell MOSE G1000 GPS-based 2 Hz wave sensor was mounted on the Sailbuoy. Mean significant wave height ( H s 1 min) measured was 3 m, whereas maximum H s was 6 m. Mean wave period was 7.7 s, while maximum wave height, H max, was 12.6 m. These measurements have been compared with non-directional Waverider observations at the Ekofisk complex. The agreement between the two data sets was very good, with a mean percent absolute error of 7 % and a linear correlation coefficient of 0.97. The wave frequency spectra measured by the two instruments compared very well, except for low H s (˜1 m), where the motion of the vessel seemed to influence the measurements. Nevertheless, the Sailbuoy performed well during this campaign, and results suggest that it is a suitable platform for wave measurements in a broad range of sea conditions.

  5. A method of determining dominant wave direction from multipara-meter hydrological gauge measurements and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng'an; LONG Xiaomin; ZHANG Keben; CHEN Junchang; ZHANG Wenjing; CAI Shuqun

    2007-01-01

    Multi-parameter hydrological gauge is an instrument developed by the South China Sea Institute of Oceanology,the Chinese Academy of Sciences to make simultaneous observation of current, wave, tide, water temperature and conductivity.By using the well-known "PUV method", the directional wave spectrum can be calculated and the dominant wave direction is then obtained.The comparison of the dominant wave directions derived from the measurements using both the multi-parameter hydrological gauge and the MARK Ⅱ "Wave-Rider" directional buoy shows that the dominant wave directions derived from the two kinds of measurements are in good agreement.

  6. Direct numerical experiment on measuring of dispersion relation for gravity waves in the presence of condensate

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    During previous numerical experiments on isotropic turbulence of surface gravity waves we observed formation of the long wave background (condensate). It was shown (Korotkevich, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 101 (7), 074504 (2008)), that presence of the condensate changes a spectrum of direct cascade, corresponding to the flux of energy to the small scales from pumping region (large scales). Recent experiments show that the inverse cascade spectrum is also affected by the condensate. In this case mechanism proposed as a cause for the change of direct cascade spectrum cannot work. But inverse cascade is directly influenced by the linear dispersion relation for waves, as a result direct measurement of the dispersion relation in the presence of condensate is necessary. We performed the measurement of this dispersion relation from the direct numerical experiment. The results demonstrate that in the region of inverse cascade influence of the condensate cannot be neglected.

  7. The Gravitational Wave Spectrum from Cosmological B-L Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmuller, Wilfried; Kamada, Kohei; Schmitz, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Cosmological B-L breaking is a natural and testable mechanism to generate the initial conditions of the hot early universe. If B-L is broken at the grand unification scale, the false vacuum phase drives hybrid inflation, ending in tachyonic preheating. The decays of heavy B-L Higgs bosons and heavy neutrinos generate entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter and also control the reheating temperature. The different phases in the transition from inflation to the radiation dominated phase produce a characteristic spectrum of gravitational waves. We calculate the complete gravitational wave spectrum due to inflation, preheating and cosmic strings, which turns out to have several features. The production of gravitational waves from cosmic strings has large uncertainties, with lower and upper bounds provided by Abelian Higgs strings and Nambu-Goto strings, implying \\Omega_GW h^2 ~ 10^{-13} - 10^{-8}, much larger than the spectral amplitude predicted by inflation. Forthcoming gravitational wave detectors such as eL...

  8. The gravitational wave spectrum from cosmological B-L breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmüller, W.; Domcke, V.; Kamada, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Schmitz, K., E-mail: buchmuwi@mail.desy.de, E-mail: valerie.domcke@desy.de, E-mail: kohei.kamada@desy.de, E-mail: kai.schmitz@ipmu.jp [Kavli IPMU (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Cosmological B-L breaking is a natural and testable mechanism to generate the initial conditions of the hot early universe. If B-L is broken at the grand unification scale, the false vacuum phase drives hybrid inflation, ending in tachyonic preheating. The decays of heavy B-L Higgs bosons and heavy neutrinos generate entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter and also control the reheating temperature. The different phases in the transition from inflation to the radiation dominated phase produce a characteristic spectrum of gravitational waves. We calculate the complete gravitational wave spectrum due to inflation, preheating and cosmic strings, which turns out to have several features. The production of gravitational waves from cosmic strings has large uncertainties, with lower and upper bounds provided by Abelian Higgs strings and Nambu-Goto strings, implying Ω{sub GW}h{sup 2} ∼ 10{sup −13}–10{sup −8}, much larger than the spectral amplitude predicted by inflation. Forthcoming gravitational wave detectors such as eLISA, advanced LIGO, ET, BBO and DECIGO will reach the sensitivity needed to test the predictions from cosmological B-L breaking.

  9. The gravitational wave spectrum from cosmological B-L breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W.; Domcke, V.; Kamada, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Schmitz, K. [Tokyo Univ., Kashiwa (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI)

    2013-05-15

    Cosmological B-L breaking is a natural and testable mechanism to generate the initial conditions of the hot early universe. If B-L is broken at the grand unification scale, the false vacuum phase drives hybrid inflation, ending in tachyonic preheating. The decays of heavy B-L Higgs bosons and heavy neutrinos generate entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter and also control the reheating temperature. The different phases in the transition from inflation to the radiation dominated phase produce a characteristic spectrum of gravitational waves. We calculate the complete gravitational wave spectrum due to inflation, preheating and cosmic strings, which turns out to have several features. The production of gravitational waves from cosmic strings has large uncertainties, with lower and upper bounds provided by Abelian Higgs strings and Nambu-Goto strings, implying {Omega}{sub GW}h{sup 2}{proportional_to}10{sup -13}-10{sup -8}, much larger than the spectral amplitude predicted by inflation. Forthcoming gravitational wave detectors such as eLISA, advanced LIGO and BBO/DECIGO will reach the sensitivity needed to test the predictions from cosmological B-L breaking.

  10. AKNS eigenvalue spectrum for densely spaced envelope solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Starobor, Alexey

    2010-05-01

    The problem of the influence of one envelope soliton to the discrete eigenvalues of the associated scattering problem for the other envelope soliton, which is situated close to the first one, is discussed. Envelope solitons are exact solutions of the integrable nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS). Their generalizations (taking into account the background nonlinear waves [1-4] or strongly nonlinear effects [5, 6]) are possible candidates to rogue waves in the ocean. The envelope solitary waves could be in principle detected in the stochastic wave field by approaches based on the Inverse Scattering Technique in terms of ‘unstable modes' (see [1-3]), or envelope solitons [7-8]. However, densely spaced intense groups influence the spectrum of the associated scattering problem, so that the solitary trains cannot be considered alone. Here we solve the initial-value problem exactly for some simplified configurations of the wave field, representing two closely placed intense wave groups, within the frameworks of the NLS equation by virtue of the solution of the AKNS system [9]. We show that the analogues of the level splitting and the tunneling effects, known in quantum physics, exist in the context of the NLS equation, and thus may be observed in application to sea waves [10]. These effects make the detecting of single solitary wave groups surrounded by other nonlinear wave groups difficult. [1]. A.L. Islas, C.M. Schober (2005) Predicting rogue waves in random oceanic sea states. Phys. Fluids 17, 031701-1-4. [2]. A.R. Osborne, M. Onorato, M. Serio (2005) Nonlinear Fourier analysis of deep-water random surface waves: Theoretical formulation and and experimental observations of rogue waves. 14th Aha Huliko's Winter Workshop, Honolulu, Hawaii. [3]. C.M. Schober, A. Calini (2008) Rogue waves in higher order nonlinear Schrödinger models. In: Extreme Waves (Eds.: E. Pelinovsky & C. Kharif), Springer. [4]. N. Akhmediev, A. Ankiewicz, M. Taki (2009) Waves that appear from

  11. Future directions in standing-wave photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alexander X., E-mail: axgray@temple.edu

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Probing magnetic properties at the buried interface with SW-MCD. • Probing electronic structure at the buried interface with resonant SW-XPS and SW-HAXPES. • Probing momentum-resolved electronic structure at a buried interface with SWARPES. • Adding depth resolution to photoemission microscopy with standing-wave excitation. • Standing-wave localization, total reflection and waveguide effects. - Abstract: Over the past decade, standing-wave photoemission (SW-XPS) has evolved into a powerful and versatile non-destructive technique for probing element-specific electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of buried layers and interfaces with sub-nanometer depth resolution. In this article, I will discuss several promising future directions in this emergent field stemming from experimental and theoretical studies wherein SW-XPS is combined with other X-ray techniques, such as magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES), angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), and photoemission microscopy (PEEM), adding extra dimensions to the measurement and thus widening the scope of scientific and technological questions accessible via the use of standing waves. I will further discuss examples of recently developed methods for X-ray standing-wave data analysis, which yield layer-resolved matrix-element-weighted densities of states at interfaces as well as Ångstrom-level changes in periodicity of synthetic superlattices. Finally, I will explore the possibility of localizing the standing waves near the surface and within a buried layer by the use of aperiodic superlattices, total reflection, and X-ray waveguide effects.

  12. Spectrum of an electromagnetic light wave on scattering from an anisotropic semisoft boundary medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Zhenfei; Ji, Xiaoling; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-04-01

    Spectral shifts and spectral switches of a polychromatic electromagnetic light wave on scattering from an anisotropic semisoft boundary medium are discussed. It is shown that both the property of the incident field and the character of the scattering medium play roles in the change of the spectrum of the far-zone scattered field. It is also shown that the distribution of the far-zone scattered spectrum, including the magnitude of the spectral shift and the direction at which the spectral switch occurs, is rotationally nonsymmetric.

  13. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  14. Modeling the Complete Gravitational Wave Spectrum of Neutron Star Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim; Nagar, Alessandro

    2015-08-28

    In the context of neutron star mergers, we study the gravitational wave spectrum of the merger remnant using numerical relativity simulations. Postmerger spectra are characterized by a main peak frequency f2 related to the particular structure and dynamics of the remnant hot hypermassive neutron star. We show that f(2) is correlated with the tidal coupling constant κ(2)^T that characterizes the binary tidal interactions during the late-inspiral merger. The relation f(2)(κ(2)^T) depends very weakly on the binary total mass, mass ratio, equation of state, and thermal effects. This observation opens up the possibility of developing a model of the gravitational spectrum of every merger unifying the late-inspiral and postmerger descriptions.

  15. The spin-wave spectrum of layered magnetic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stapele, R. P.; Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; Smits, J. W.

    1985-02-01

    The ferromagnetic resonance spectrum of a layered magnetic thin film is expected to show a number of standing spin-wave resonances with a wavelength that matches the thickness of the film. For the case of perpendicular resonance such spectra were calculated for some typical films in which magnetic layers are alternated with weaker magnetic layers. Some useful approximations are discussed. The results of the calculations are compared with experimental perpendicular spectra measured on films in which fifty Permalloy layers alternate with Ni layers.

  16. A STUDY ON THE INTERPRETATION OF WAVE COMPONENTS IN MICROTREMOR H/V SPECTRUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Takashi; Yamada, Masayuki; Nozu, Atsushi

    The peak information in microtremor H/V spectrum is often used in the evaluation of amplification characteristics of earthquake ground motion. Although characteristics of microtremor H/V spectrum can be generally explained by those of surface waves, the assumption that microtremor only consists of surface wave is hardly valid considering the fact that peak amplification is finite and often correlates with amplification characteristics of earthquake ground motion. This study presents a new in terpretation of wave components of microtremor H/V spectrum using medium response analysis. Mixture rates of surface wave and body wave that well explain microtremor H/V spectrum was studied.

  17. On the direct detection of gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovoit, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Different types of gravitational wave (GW) detectors are considered. It is noted that interferometric techniques offer the greatest prospects for GW registration due to their high sensitivity and extremely wide frequency band. Using laser interferometers, proposed as far back as 1962 in the work by M E Gertsenshtein and V I Pustovoit published in Russian (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz., vol. 43, p. 605, 1962) and in English translation (Sov. Phys. JETP, vol. 16, p. 433, 1963), it proved possible for the first time to directly detect GW emission from a merger of two black holes. It is noted that the assertion that Gertsen-shtein-Pustovoit's work was unknown to some of those experts involved in direct GW detection is inconsistent with reality. The problems of high-power laser radiation affecting the electrostatic polarization of free-mass mirrors are discussed. It is shown that mirror polarization can lead to additional links with electrically conducting elements of the design resulting in the interferometer's reduced sensitivity. Some new prospects for developing high reflection structures are discussed and heat extraction problems are considered. This article is the revised and extended version of the report “On the first direct detection of gravitational waves” delivered by V I Pustovoit at the Scientific Session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (March 2, 2016). All other reports presented at the session were published in the preceding issue of Physics-Uspekhi (September 2016) (see Refs [108, 111-113]). (Editorial note)

  18. Optimal directed searches for continuous gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ming, Jing; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Aulbert, Carsten; Fehrmann, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Wide parameter space searches for long lived continuous gravitational wave signals are computationally limited. It is therefore critically important that available computational resources are used rationally. In this paper we consider directed searches, i.e. targets for which the sky position is known accurately but the frequency and spindown parameters are completely unknown. Given a list of such potential astrophysical targets, we therefore need to prioritize. On which target(s) should we spend scarce computing resources? What parameter space region in frequency and spindown should we search? Finally, what is the optimal search set-up that we should use? In this paper we present a general framework that allows to solve all three of these problems. This framework is based on maximizing the probability of making a detection subject to a constraint on the maximum available computational cost. We illustrate the method for a simplified problem.

  19. Comparative study on spreading function for directional wave spectra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.S.; Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.

    -dimensional wave energy S(f) and the directional spreading function D(f, theta). This paper reviews various spreading functions proposed in the past for estimating the directional wave energy and presents their application to the Indian wave condition. It is found...

  20. Retrieval of the ocean wave spectrum in open and thin ice covered ocean waters from ERS Synthetic Aperture Radar images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Carolis, G. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Tecnologia Informatica Spaziale, Centro di Geodesia Spaziale G. Colombo, Terlecchia, MT (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    This paper concerns with the task of retrieving ocean wave spectra form imagery provided by space-borne SAR systems such as that on board ERS satellite. SAR imagery of surface wave fields travelling into open ocean and into thin sea ice covers composed of frazil and pancake icefields is considered. The major purpose is to gain insight on how the spectral changes can be related to sea ice properties of geophysical interest such as the thickness. Starting from SAR image cross spectra computed from Single Look Complex (SLC) SAR images, the ocean wave spectrum is retrieved using an inversion procedure based on the gradient descent algorithm. The capability of this method when applied to satellite SAR sensors is investigated. Interest in the SAR image cross spectrum exploitation is twofold: first, the directional properties of the ocean wave spectra are retained; second, external wave information needed to initialize the inversion procedure may be greatly reduced using only information included in the SAR image cross spectrum itself. The main drawback is that the wind waves spectrum could be partly lost and its spectral peak wave number underestimated. An ERS-SAR SLC image acquired on April 10, 1993 over the Greenland Sea was selected as test image. A pair of windows that include open-sea only and sea ice cover, respectively, were selected. The inversions were carried out using different guess wave spectra taken from SAR image cross spectra. Moreover, care was taken to properly handle negative values eventually occurring during the inversion runs. This results in a modification of the gradient descending the technique that is required if a non-negative solution of the wave spectrum is searched for. Results are discussed in view of the possibility of SAR data to detect ocean wave dispersion as a means for the retrieval of ice thickness.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Wave Heights in A Directional Wave Field Through Image Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chung-Ren CHOU; Teng-Wei LIN; Ruey-Syan SHIH; John Z. YIM

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of wave heights with image sequences from a Charged Coupled Device(CCD) camera were made. Sinusoidal, as well as unidirectional and directional, waves were used for the experiments. A transfer function was obtained by calibration of the magnitudes of the gray values of the images against the results of wave gauge measurements for directional waves. With this transfer function, wave heights for regular waves were deduced. It is shown that the average relative errors are smaller than 16% for both unidirectional and directional waves.

  2. Variation of wave directional spread parameters along the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.

    Directional spreading of wave energy is popularly modeled with the help of the Cosine Power model and it mainly depends on the spreading parameter. This paper describes the variation of the spreading parameter estimated based on the wave data...

  3. A suppressor to prevent direct wave-induced cavitation in shock wave therapy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Hilmo, Paul R.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-07-01

    Cavitation plays a varied but important role in lithotripsy. Cavitation facilitates stone comminution, but can also form an acoustic barrier that may shield stones from subsequent shock waves. In addition, cavitation damages tissue. Spark-gap lithotripters generate cavitation with both a direct and a focused wave. The direct wave propagates as a spherically diverging wave, arriving at the focus ahead of the focused shock wave. It can be modeled with the same waveform (but lower amplitude) as the focused wave. We show with both simulations and experiments that bubbles are forced to grow in response to the direct wave, and that these bubbles can still be large when the focused shock wave arrives. A baffle or ``suppressor'' that blocks the propagation of the direct wave is shown to significantly reduce the direct wave pressure amplitude, as well as direct wave-induced bubble growth. These results are applicable to spark-gap lithotripters and extracorporeal shock wave therapy devices, where cavitation from the direct wave may interfere with treatment. A simple direct-wave suppressor might therefore be used to improve the therapeutic efficacy of these devices.

  4. Using LMS Adaptive Filter in Direct Wave Cancellation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐元军; 陶然; 王越; 单涛

    2003-01-01

    The way to use the least-mean-square (LMS) arithmetic to cancel the direct wave for a passive radar system is introduced. The model of the direct wave is deduced. By using the LMS adaptive FIR filter, the software solution for FM passive radar system is developed instead of the hardware consumption of the existent experiment system of passive radar. Further more some simulative results are given. The simulative results indicate that using LMS arithmetic to cancel the direct wave is effective.

  5. Solitary Wave Generation from Constant Continuous Wave in Asymmetric Oppositely Directed Waveguide Coupler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazantseva E.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a model which describes asymmetric oppositely directed nonlinear coupler it was observed in numerical simulations a phenomenon of solitary wave generation from the input constant continuous wave set at the entrance of a waveguide with negative refraction. The period of solitary wave formation decreases with increase of the continuum wave amplitude.

  6. Multi-directional wave spectra from marine X-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Björn; Collins, Clarence O.; Tamura, Hitoshi; Graber, Hans C.

    2016-08-01

    The signal measured by heave-pitch-roll directional wave buoys yields the first four coefficients of a Fourier series. Data adaptive methods must be employed to estimate a directional wave spectrum. Marine X-band radars (MRs) have the advantage over buoys that they can measure "model-free" two-dimensional (2D) wave spectra. This study presents the first comprehensive validation of MR-derived multi-directional wave characteristics. It is based on wave data from the 2010 Impact of Typhoons on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP) experiment in the Philippine Sea, namely MR measurements from R/V Roger Revelle, Extreme Air-Sea Interaction (EASI) buoy measurements, as well as WAVEWATCH-III (WW3) modeling results. Buoy measurements of mean direction and spreading as function of frequency, which do not require data adaptive methods, are used to validate the WW3 wave spectra. An advanced MR wave retrieval technique is introduced that addresses various shortcomings of existing methods. Spectral partitioning techniques, applied to MR and WW3 results, reveal that multimodal seas are frequently present. Both data sets are in excellent agreement, tracking the evolution of up to 4 simultaneous wave systems over extended time periods. This study demonstrates MR's and WW3's strength at measuring and predicting 2D wave spectra in swell-dominated seas.

  7. On the stability of the moments of the maximum entropy wind wave spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, H.G.

    1983-03-01

    The stability of some current wind wave parameters as a function of high-frequency cut-off and degrees of freedom of the spectrum has been numerically investigated when computed in terms of the moments of the wave energy spectrum. From the Pierson-Moskovitz wave spectrum type, a sea surface profile is simulated and its wave energy spectrum is estimated by the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM). As the degrees of freedom of the MEM spectral estimation are varied, the results show a much better stability of the wave parameters as compared to the classical periodogram and correlogram spectral approaches. The stability of wave parameters as a function of high-frequency cut-off has the same result as obtained by the classical techniques.

  8. Preconditioned prestack plane-wave least squares reverse time migration with singular spectrum constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuang; Huang, Jian-Ping; Li, Zhen-Chun; Wang, Rong-Rong

    2017-03-01

    Least squares migration can eliminate the artifacts introduced by the direct imaging of irregular seismic data but is computationally costly and of slow convergence. In order to suppress the migration noise, we propose the preconditioned prestack plane-wave least squares reverse time migration (PLSRTM) method with singular spectrum constraint. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is used in the preconditioning of the take-offangle-domain common-image gathers (TADCIGs). In addition, we adopt randomized singular value decomposition (RSVD) to calculate the singular values. RSVD reduces the computational cost of SSA by replacing the singular value decomposition (SVD) of one large matrix with the SVD of two small matrices. We incorporate a regularization term into the preconditioned PLSRTM method that penalizes misfits between the migration images from the plane waves with adjacent angles to reduce the migration noise because the stacking of the migration results cannot effectively suppress the migration noise when the migration velocity contains errors. The regularization imposes smoothness constraints on the TADCIGs that favor differential semblance optimization constraints. Numerical analysis of synthetic data using the Marmousi model suggests that the proposed method can efficiently suppress the artifacts introduced by plane-wave gathers or irregular seismic data and improve the imaging quality of PLSRTM. Furthermore, it produces better images with less noise and more continuous structures even for inaccurate migration velocities.

  9. Millimeter Wave Spectrum and Astronomical Search for Vinyl Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, E. R.; Kolesniková, L.; Tercero, B.; Cabezas, C.; Alonso, J. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-11-01

    Previous detections of methyl and ethyl formate make other small substituted formates potential candidates for observation in the interstellar medium. Among them, vinyl formate is one of the simplest unsaturated carboxylic ester. The aim of this work is to provide direct experimental frequencies of the ground vibrational state of vinyl formate in a large spectral range for astrophysical use. The room-temperature rotational spectrum of vinyl formate has been measured from 80 to 360 GHz and analyzed in terms of Watson’s semirigid rotor Hamiltonian. Two thousand six hundred transitions within J = 3-88 and K a = 0-28 were assigned to the most stable conformer of vinyl formate and a new set of spectroscopic constants was accurately determined. Spectral features of vinyl formate were then searched for in Orion KL, Sgr B2(N), B1-b, and TMC-1 molecular clouds. Upper limits to the column density of vinyl formate are provided.

  10. Design wave estimation considering directional distribution of waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C

    the directional distribution of H sub(s). The conventionally obtained omni-directional 100-year design H s value was found to be marginally lower with a reduction factor of 4.6%at 23 m water depth and 0.5% at 15 m water depth when recalculated using directional H...

  11. Several Modulation in Direct-Sequence Spectrum-Spread Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Performances of BPSK, balanced-quaternary modulation, dual-quaternary modulation and complex-quaternary modulation in direct-sequence spectrum-spread (DS-SS) system are discussed in this paper. Based on the criterion the power of original signal is the same, it is shown that complex-quaternary modulation has the best performance, and dual-quaternary modulation degrades 2dB. Moreover, the frequency efficient of the two modulations is 2bit/Hz. Balanced-quaternary has the same performance as BPSK with frequency efficient 1bit/Hz.

  12. A Numerical Implementation of a Nonlinear Mild Slope Model for Shoaling Directional Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Davis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the numerical implementation of a phase-resolving, nonlinear spectral model for shoaling directional waves over a mild sloping beach with straight parallel isobaths. The model accounts for non-linear, quadratic (triad wave interactions as well as shoaling and refraction. The model integrates the coupled, nonlinear hyperbolic evolution equations that describe the transformation of the complex Fourier amplitudes of the deep-water directional wave field. Because typical directional wave spectra (observed or produced by deep-water forecasting models such as WAVEWATCH III™ do not contain phase information, individual realizations are generated by associating a random phase to each Fourier mode. The approach provides a natural extension to the deep-water spectral wave models, and has the advantage of fully describing the shoaling wave stochastic process, i.e., the evolution of both the variance and higher order statistics (phase correlations, the latter related to the evolution of the wave shape. The numerical implementation (a Fortran 95/2003 code includes unidirectional (shore-perpendicular propagation as a special case. Interoperability, both with post-processing programs (e.g., MATLAB/Tecplot 360 and future model coupling (e.g., offshore wave conditions from WAVEWATCH III™, is promoted by using NetCDF-4/HD5 formatted output files. The capabilities of the model are demonstrated using a JONSWAP spectrum with a cos2s directional distribution, for shore-perpendicular and oblique propagation. The simulated wave transformation under combined shoaling, refraction and nonlinear interactions shows the expected generation of directional harmonics of the spectral peak and of infragravity (frequency <0.05 Hz waves. Current development efforts focus on analytic testing, development of additional physics modules essential for applications and validation with laboratory and field observations.

  13. On the nonlinear shaping mechanism for gravity wave spectrum in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Chunchuzov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mechanism of shaping of a high vertical wave number spectral tail in the field of a few discrete internal gravity waves in the atmosphere is studied in this paper. The effects of advection of fluid parcels by interacting gravity waves are taken strictly into account by calculating wave field in Lagrangian variables, and performing a variable transformation from Lagrangian to Eulerian frame. The vertical profiles and vertical wave number spectra of the Eulerian displacement field are obtained for both the case of resonant and non-resonant wave-wave interactions. The evolution of these spectra with growing parameter of nonlinearity of the internal wave field is studied and compared to that of a broad band spectrum of gravity waves with randomly independent amplitudes and phases. The calculated vertical wave number spectra of the vertical displacements or relative temperature fluctuations are found to be consistent with the observed spectra in the middle atmosphere.

  14. Direct exit-wave reconstruction from a single defocused image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A J; Martin, A V; D'Alfonso, A J; Putkunz, C T; Allen, L J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a direct, non-iterative method for the exact recovery of the complex wave in the exit-surface plane of a coherently illuminated object from a single defocused image. The method is applicable for a wide range of illumination conditions. The defocus range is subject to certain conditions, which if satisfied allow the complex exit-surface wave to be directly recovered by solving a set of linear equations. These linear equations, whose coefficients depend on the incident illumination, are obtained by analyzing the autocorrelation function of an auxiliary wave which is related to the exit-surface wave in a simple way. This autocorrelation is constructed by taking the inverse Fourier transform of the defocused image. We present an experimental proof of concept by recovering the exit-surface wave of a microfiber illuminated by a plane wave formed using a HeNe laser.

  15. Estimation of wave directional spreading in shallow water

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; Chandramohan, P.

    ) G(2s +1) (5) and G is the gamma function, s is the spreading parameter and u m is the mean wave direction. Here the value of the parameter s controls directional spreading around the mean wave direction. Cartwright (1963) showed that s can be related... = a 2 2 + b 2 2 a 0 (7) For fairly steady wind condition and mild sea states parameter s can be expressed as a function of relative frequency (f/f m ) and wave age (c m /U) (Mitsuyasu et al., 1975), as under: s 3 = 11.5(c m /U) 2.5 (f/f m ) b (8) where...

  16. Error analysis of the wave directional spectrum measurement by Disc Buoys%碟形浮标观测方向波谱误差分析及修正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高家俊; 钱桦; 邱铭达; 庄士贤

    2003-01-01

    改进了方向波谱的分析方法及噪声谱经验公式,使本法随测波环境及仪器特性自动修正经验参数值,更易于实际应用.基于Maximum heave/pitch quad-spectrum method,由时域及频率域上的浮标动力反应数值计算,推求反应增益因子及相位延迟项,并进一步将其导入方向波谱计算,使其能修正资料浮标对波浪之轴不对称动态反应所造成的相位延迟不一致及主波向误差.经数值仿真验证,该方法的确能消减因资料浮标对波浪之轴不对称动态反应所造成的相位延迟及对主波向估算所造成之影响.应用花莲现场观测资料验证改良之主波向估算方法,得出是否考虑波浪运动与浮标运动间之振幅响应因子及相位延迟因子,所得之主波向的差异介于0~12℃之间.

  17. Numerical modeling and validation of wave heights and directionality in the ice using WAVEWATCH III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Dumont, Dany; Accensi, Mickael; Sevigny, Caroline; Boutin, Guillaume; Rogers, Erick

    2016-04-01

    The poorly understood attenuation of waves, the key dynamic effect that defines the width of the Marginal Ice Zone, has been attributed to the combined effect of wave scattering and wave dissipation. Because scattering and dissipation have very different effects on the directional distribution of wave energy, it is possible to better understand the balance between scattering and dissipation by an analysis of the width of the directional wave spectrum. We have thus introduced dissipation and scattering terms in the spectral wave model WAVEWATCH III, and an estimation of the maximum ice floe size. Academic and realistic simulations show that the energy level and directional spreading far into the Arctic pack ice (Wadhams and Doble 2009) can be well explained by dissipative processes without the need for scattering. The same is true of observed swells in the Southern Ocean (Ardhuin et al. 2015). However, the dissipation level required to explain the observed wave height goes from 2 in the southern ocean to 12 times the viscous dissipation under a smooth ice plate. This and other data suggest that broken ice causes less dissipation than a continuous ice cover, possibly due to the dissipation by creep inside the ice when it is not broken and bends. Work is under way to parameterize that effect using the estimated maximum ice floe size.

  18. Determination of wave direction using an orbital following buoy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Almeida, A; Vaithiyanathan, R.; Vethamony, P.

    Software has been developed in FORTRAN language using a personal computer for the determination of wave direction from time series measurements of heave, pitch and roll of an orbital following buoy. The method of digital band pass filtering describ...

  19. Retrieving capillary-gravity wave spectrum from polarimetric microwave radiation of ocean surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new simple two-scale model on the polarimetric microwave emission of ocean surface is derived at first, which can be ex-pressed as an integral of weighting functions (M0 and M2) and ocean surface curvature spectrum coefficients (C0 and C2). This provides a simple way to investigate the effect of curvature spectrum on ocean emission. It is found that ocean waves with wavelengths both comparable to and much greater than the electromagnetic wavelength can contribute to the harmonics of ocean surface microwave emission, depending on the magnitude of the ocean surface spectrum in these length scales. Bright-ness temperature predictions differ significantly due to present diverse spectrum models, and thus a study on wave spectrum obtained inversely from brightness temperature measurements is necessary. From the ocean surface radiation data measured by polarimetric microwave radiometer, we derived an ocean wave spectrum with a wider wave number range, using the proposed two-scale model and constrained linear least-squares method. The derived ocean wave spectrum is useful for comparing with present diverse models.

  20. VLT Captures First Direct Spectrum of an Exoplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    By studying a triple planetary system that resembles a scaled-up version of our own Sun's family of planets, astronomers have been able to obtain the first direct spectrum - the "chemical fingerprint" [1] - of a planet orbiting a distant star [2], thus bringing new insights into the planet's formation and composition. The result represents a milestone in the search for life elsewhere in the Universe. "The spectrum of a planet is like a fingerprint. It provides key information about the chemical elements in the planet's atmosphere," says Markus Janson, lead author of a paper reporting the new findings. "With this information, we can better understand how the planet formed and, in the future, we might even be able to find tell-tale signs of the presence of life." The researchers obtained the spectrum of a giant exoplanet that orbits the bright, very young star HR 8799. The system is at about 130 light-years from Earth. The star has 1.5 times the mass of the Sun, and hosts a planetary system that resembles a scaled-up model of our own Solar System. Three giant companion planets were detected in 2008 by another team of researchers, with masses between 7 and 10 times that of Jupiter. They are between 20 and 70 times as far from their host star as the Earth is from the Sun; the system also features two belts of smaller objects, similar to our Solar System's asteroid and Kuiper belts. "Our target was the middle planet of the three, which is roughly ten times more massive than Jupiter and has a temperature of about 800 degrees Celsius," says team member Carolina Bergfors. "After more than five hours of exposure time, we were able to tease out the planet's spectrum from the host star's much brighter light." This is the first time the spectrum of an exoplanet orbiting a normal, almost Sun-like star has been obtained directly. Previously, the only spectra to be obtained required a space telescope to watch an exoplanet pass directly behind its host star in an "exoplanetary

  1. Influence of hurricane wind field in the structure of directional wave spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Osuna, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Extensive field measurements of wind waves in deep waters in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, have been analyzed to describe the spatial structure of directional wave spectra during hurricane conditions. Following Esquivel-Trava et al. (2015) this analysis was made for minor hurricanes (categories 1 and 2) and major hurricanes (categories 3, 4 and 5). In both cases the directionality of the energy wave spectrum is similar in all quadrants. Some differences are observed however, and they are associated with the presence and the shape of swell energy in each quadrant. Three numerical experiments using the spectral wave prediction model SWAN were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. The aim of the experiments is to evaluate the effect of the translation speed of the hurricane and the presence of concentric eye walls, on both the wave growth process and the shape of the directional wave spectrum. The HRD wind field of Hurricane Dean on August 20 at 7:30 was propagated at two different velocities (5 and 10 m/s). An idealized concentric eye wall (a Gaussian function that evolve in time along a path in the form of an Archimedean spiral) was imposed to the wind field. The white-capping formulation of Westhuysen et al. (2007) was selected. The wave model represents fairly well the directionality of the energy and the shape of the directional spectra in the hurricane domain. The model results indicate that the forward movement of the storm influences the development of the waves, consistent with field observations. This work has been supported by CONACYT scholarship 164510 and projects RugDisMar (155793), CB-2011-01-168173 and the Department of Physical Oceanography of CICESE. References Esquivel-Trava, B., Ocampo-Torres, F. J., & Osuna, P. (2015). Spatial structure of directional wave spectra in hurricanes. Ocean Dynam., 65(1), 65-76. doi:10.1007/s10236-014-0791-9 Van der

  2. Directional Wave Spectra Using Normal Spreading Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    energy spectral density function U. g. Army Engineer Waternays Experiment Station. Coastal Engineering Research Center P. 0. lox 631, Vicksburg...Z39-18 D(f,e) = spreading function E (f,(3) = directional spectral density function f = frequency in cycles per second 8 = direction in radians...of this assumption depends on the narrow bandedness of the energy spectral density function . For fairly narrow spectra (e.g., a swell train), the

  3. Spectrum of spin waves in cold polarized gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, T. L., E-mail: phdocandreeva@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The spin dynamics of cold polarized gases are investigated using the Boltzmann equation. The dispersion relation for spin waves (transverse component of the magnetic moment) and the spin diffusion coefficient of the longitudinal component of the magnetic moment are calculated without using fitting parameters. The spin wave frequency and the diffusion coefficient for rubidium atoms are estimated numerically.

  4. Laboratory millimeter wave spectrum and astronomical search for vinyl acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesniková, L.; Peña, I.; Alonso, J. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B.; Kleiner, I.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The recent discovery of methyl acetate in Orion KL makes vinyl acetate, CH3C=OOCH=CH2, a potential molecule in the interstellar medium. We obtained very accurate spectroscopic constants in a comprehensive laboratory analysis of its rotational spectra which can be used to predict those transition frequencies towards interstellar sources. Aims: We present the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the ground torsional state of vinyl acetate in a large spectral range for astrophysical use. Methods: The room-temperature rotational spectrum of vinyl acetate has been measured from 125 to 305 GHz to provide direct frequencies to the astronomical community. Additional measurements have also been made using a broadband CP-FTMW spectrometer in the region of 6-18 GHz. Transition lines, corresponding to the most stable conformer, have been observed and assigned. All the rotational transitions revealed the A-E splitting due to the methyl internal rotation and had to be treated with a specific internal rotation code (BELGI-Cs). Results: We analyzed 2508 transitions up to J'' = 75 for vt = 0 for the most stable conformer of vinyl acetate. The new lines were globally fitted with previously published data and 24 parameters of the Hamiltonian were accurately determined. The spectral features of vinyl acetate were then searched for in Orion KL. Using the whole line survey of Orion KL (80-280 GHz) obtained with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope we can provide only an upper limit to the column density of vinyl acetate. However, using the ALMA science verification data we obtain a tentative detection of this species that will require further search at other frequencies to confirm its presence in this high mass star forming region. Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A91

  5. Analysis of Wave Directional Spreading by Bayesian Parameter Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱桦; 莊士贤; 高家俊

    2002-01-01

    A spatial array of wave gauges installed on an observatoion platform has been designed and arranged to measure the lo-cal features of winter monsoon directional waves off Taishi coast of Taiwan. A new method, named the Bayesian ParameterEstimation Method( BPEM), is developed and adopted to determine the main direction and the directional spreading parame-ter of directional spectra. The BPEM could be considered as a regression analysis to find the maximum joint probability ofparameters, which best approximates the observed data from the Bayesian viewpoint. The result of the analysis of field wavedata demonstrates the highly dependency of the characteristics of normalized directional spreading on the wave age. The Mit-suyasu type empirical formula of directional spectnun is therefore modified to be representative of monsoon wave field. More-over, it is suggested that Smax could be expressed as a function of wave steepness. The values of Smax decrease with increas-ing steepness. Finally, a local directional spreading model, which is simple to be utilized in engineering practice, is prop-osed.

  6. The energy spectrum of gravitational waves in a loop quantum cosmological model

    CERN Document Server

    Morais, Joao; Henriques, Alfredo B

    2014-01-01

    We explore the consequences of loop quantum cosmology (inverse-volume corrections) in the spectrum of the gravitational waves using the method of the Bogoliubov coefficients. These corrections are taken into account at the background level of the theory as well as at the first order in the perturbations theory framework. We show that these corrections lead to an intense graviton production during the loop super-inflationary phase prior to the standard slow-roll era, which leave their imprints through new features on the energy spectrum of the gravitational waves as would be measured today, including a new maximum on the low frequency end of the spectrum.

  7. Fast calculation of spherical computer generated hologram using spherical wave spectrum method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2013-01-14

    A fast calculation method for computer generation of spherical holograms in proposed. This method is based on wave propagation defined in spectral domain and in spherical coordinates. The spherical wave spectrum and transfer function were derived from boundary value solutions to the scalar wave equation. It is a spectral propagation formula analogous to angular spectrum formula in cartesian coordinates. A numerical method to evaluate the derived formula is suggested, which uses only N(logN)2 operations for calculations on N sampling points. Simulation results are presented to verify the correctness of the proposed method. A spherical hologram for a spherical object was generated and reconstructed successfully using the proposed method.

  8. Wind Profiles and Wave Spectra for Potential Wind Farms in South China Sea. Part II: Wave Spectrum Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the commercialization of offshore wind energy in China, the South China Sea has been identified as ideal for constructing offshore wind farms, especially for farms consisting of floating wind turbines over deep waters. Since the wind profiles and wave spectra are somewhat primitive for the design of an offshore wind turbine, engineering models describing the wind and wave characteristics in the South China Sea area are necessary for the offshore wind energy exploitation given the meteorological, hydrological, and geographical differences between the South China Sea and the North/Norwegian Sea, where the commonly used wind profile and wave spectrum models were designated. In the present study; a series of numerical simulations were conducted to reveal the wave characteristics in the South China Sea under both typhoon and non-typhoon conditions. By analyzing the simulation results; the applicability of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP spectrum model; in terms of characterizing the wind-induced wave fields in the South China Sea; was discussed. In detail; the key parameters of the JONSWAP spectrum model; such as the Phillips constant; spectral width parameter; peak-enhancement factor, and high frequency tail decay; were investigated in the context of finding suitable values.

  9. Fourier spectrum and shape evolution of an internal Riemann wave of moderate amplitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kartashova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear deformation of long internal waves in the ocean is studied using the dispersionless Gardner equation. The process of nonlinear wave deformation is determined by the signs of the coefficients of the quadratic and cubic nonlinear terms; the breaking time depends only on their absolute values. The explicit formula for the Fourier spectrum of the deformed Riemann wave is derived and used to investigate the evolution of the spectrum of the initially pure sine wave. It is shown that the spectrum has exponential form for small times and a power asymptotic before breaking. The power asymptotic is universal for arbitrarily chosen coefficients of the nonlinear terms and has a slope close to –8/3.

  10. Energy spectrum analysis of blast waves based on an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Wang, F.; Shang, F.; Jia, Y.; Zhao, C.; Kong, D.

    2016-07-01

    Using the improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), this paper investigates the problems of analysis and interpretation of the energy spectrum of a blast wave. It has been previously established that the energy spectrum is an effective feature by which to characterize a blast wave. In fact, the higher the energy spectra in a frequency band of a blast wave, the greater the damage to a target in the same frequency band. However, most current research focuses on analyzing wave signals in the time domain or frequency domain rather than considering the energy spectrum. We propose here an improved HHT method combined with a wavelet packet to extract the energy spectrum feature of a blast wave. When applying the HHT, the signal is first roughly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition. The wavelet packet method is then performed on each IMF to eliminate noise on the energy spectrum. Second, a coefficient is introduced to remove unrelated IMFs. The energy of each instantaneous frequency can be derived through the Hilbert transform. The energy spectrum can then be obtained by adding up all the components after the wavelet packet filters and screens them through a coefficient to obtain the effective IMFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by 12 groups of experimental data, and an energy attenuation model is established based on the experimental data. The improved HHT is a precise method for blast wave signal analysis. For other shock wave signals from blasting experiments, an energy frequency time distribution and energy spectrum can also be obtained through this method, allowing for more practical applications.

  11. Spectrum analysis of seismic surface waves and its applications in seismic landmine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mubashir; McClellan, James H; Scott, Waymond R

    2007-03-01

    In geophysics, spectrum analysis of surface waves (SASW) refers to a noninvasive method for soil characterization. However, the term spectrum analysis can be used in a wider sense to mean a method for determining and identifying various modes of seismic surface waves and their properties such as velocity, polarization, etc. Surface waves travel along the free boundary of a medium and can be easily detected with a transducer placed on the free surface of the boundary. A new method based on vector processing of space-time data obtained from an array of triaxial sensors is proposed to produce high-resolution, multimodal spectra from surface waves. Then individual modes can be identified in the spectrum and reconstructed in the space-time domain; also, reflected waves can be separated easily from forward waves in the spectrum domain. This new SASW method can be used for detecting and locating landmines by analyzing the reflected waves for resonance. Processing examples are presented for numerically generated data, experimental data collected in a laboratory setting, and field data.

  12. Direct radiative capture of p-wave neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Mengoni, A; Ishihara, M

    1995-01-01

    The neutron direct radiative capture (DRC) process is investigated, highlighting the role of incident p-wave neutrons. A set of calculations is shown for the 12-C(n,gamma) process at incoming neutron energies up to 500 keV, a crucial region for astrophysics. The cross section for neutron capture leading to loosely bound s, p and d orbits of 13-C is well reproduced by the DRC model demonstrating the feasibility of using this reaction channel to study the properties of nuclear wave functions on and outside the nuclear surface. A sensitivity analysis of the results on the neutron-nucleus interaction is performed for incident s- as well as p-waves. It turned out that the DRC cross section for p-wave neutrons is insensitive to this interaction, contrary to the case of incident s-wave neutrons. PACS number(s): 25.40Lw,21.10Gv,23.40.Hc

  13. Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semicoherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first-order spindown values down to -7.86×10-8Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. The 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic center are ˜3.35×10-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  14. Uni-directional waves over slowly varying bottom, part II: Deformation of travelling waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudjaprasetya, S.R.; Pudjaprasetya, S.R.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    1996-01-01

    A new Korteweg-de Vries type of equation for uni-directional waves over slowly varying bottom has been derived in Part I. The equation retains the Hamiltonian structure of the underlying complete set of equations for surface waves. For flat bottom it reduces to the standard Korteweg-de Vries

  15. A simple approximation for wave refraction - Application to the assessment of the nearshore wave directionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruiz, Alejandro; Solari, Sebastián; Ortega-Sánchez, Miguel; Losada, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a simple and relatively quick methodology to obtain the nearshore wave angle. The method is especially valuable for curvilinear coasts where Snell's law may provide excessively inaccurate results. We defined a correction factor, K, that depends on the geometry of the coast and on the wave climate. The values of this coefficient were obtained minimizing the differences with a sophisticated numerical model. The limitations and performance of the methodology are further discussed. The procedure was applied to a beach in Southern Spain to analyze the influence of shoreline geometry on nearshore wave directionality. Offshore and nearshore distributions of wave period and directions were analyzed, and the results showed that the geometry of the coast played a crucial role in the directionality of the nearshore waves, which also plays an important role in hydrodynamics. The methodology presented here is able to analyze and quantify the importance of this directionality without a noticeable computational cost, even when a long time series of wave data are considered. Hence, this methodology constitutes a useful and efficient tool for practical applications in Coastal and Ocean Engineering, such as sedimentary, wave energy, and wave climate studies.

  16. Influence of hurricane wind field in the structure of directional wave spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; García-Nava, Hector; Osuna, Pedro; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Three numerical experiments using the spectral wave prediction model SWAN were carried out to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the directional and frequency distributions of hurricane wave energy. One particular objective is to evaluate the effect of the translation speed of the hurricane and the presence of concentric eye walls, on both the wave growth process and the shape of the directional wave spectrum. The HRD wind field of Hurricane Dean on August 20 at 7:30 was propagated at two different velocities (5 and 10 m/s). An idealized concentric eye wall (a Gaussian function that evolve in time along a path in the form of an Archimedean spiral) was imposed to the wind field. The white-capping formulation of Westhuysen et al. (2007) was selected. The wave model represents fairly well the directionality of the energy and the shape of the directional spectra in the hurricane domain. The model results indicate that the forward movement of the storm influences the development of the waves, consistent with field observations. Additionally the same experiments were carried out using the Wave Watch III model with the source terms formulation proposed by Ardhuin et al., 2010, with the aim of making comparisons between the physical processes that represent each formulation, and the latest results will be addressed. References Ardhuin, F., Rogers, E., Babanin, A. V., Filipot, J.-F., Magne, R., Roland, A., van der Westhuysen, A., et al. (2010). Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 40(9), 1917-1941. doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1 Van der Westhuysen, A. J., Zijlema, M., & Battjes, J. A. (2007). Nonlinear saturation-based whitecapping dissipation in SWAN for deep and shallow water. Coast. Eng., 54(2), 151-170. doi:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2006.08.006

  17. Spin-electron acoustic waves: The Landau damping and ion contribution in the spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2014-01-01

    Separated spin-up and spin-down quantum kinetics is derived for more detailed research of the spin-electron acoustic waves. Kinetic theory allows to obtain spectrum of the spin-electron acoustic waves including effects of occupation of quantum states more accurately than quantum hydrodynamics. We apply quantum kinetic to calculate the Landau damping of the spin-electron acoustic waves. We have considered contribution of ions dynamics in the spin-electron acoustic wave spectrum. We obtain contribution of ions in the Landau damping in temperature regime of classic ions. Kinetic analysis for ion-acoustic, zero sound, and Langmuir waves at separated spin-up and spin-down electron dynamics is presented as well.

  18. Effect of the initial spectrum on the spatial evolution of statistics of unidirectional nonlinear random waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer, Lev; Sergeeva, Anna; Liberzon, Dan

    2010-12-01

    Results of extensive experiments on propagation of unidirectional nonlinear random waves in a large wave tank are presented. The nonlinearity of the wavefield determined by the characteristic wave amplitude and the dominant wave length was retained constant in various series of experimental runs. In each experimental series, initial spectra of different shape and/or width were considered. Every series contained sufficient number of independent realizations to ensure reliable statistics. Evolution of various statistical parameters along the tank was investigated. It is demonstrated that the spectrum width plays an important role in the evolution of the random wavefield and strongly affects the variation of the wave spectrum as well as of parameters that characterize the deviation of the wavefield statistics from that corresponding to the Gaussian distribution. In particular, in a random wavefield that initially contains independent free harmonics within a narrow spectrum, extremely steep waves appear more often in the process of evolutions than predicted by a Rayleigh distribution, while for wider initial wave spectra the probability of those waves decreases sharply and is well below the Rayleigh values.

  19. Polarization controlled directional propagation of Bloch surface wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Suarez, Miguel; Salut, Roland; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Grosjean, Thierry

    2017-03-06

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are recently developing alternative to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Due to dramatically enhanced propagation distance and strong field confinement these surface states can be successfully used in on-chip all-optical integrated devices of increased complexity. In this work we propose a highly miniaturized grating based BSW coupler which is gathering launching and directional switching functionalities in a single element. This device allows to control with polarization the propagation direction of Bloch surface waves at subwavelength scale, thus impacting a large panel of domains such as optical circuitry, function design, quantum optics, etc.

  20. Energy spectrum in high-resolution direct numerical simulations of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Uno, Atsuya; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-12-01

    A study is made about the energy spectrum E (k ) of turbulence on the basis of high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box using a Fourier spectral method with the number of grid points and the Taylor scale Reynolds number Rλ up to 12 2883 and approximately 2300, respectively. The DNS data show that there is a wave-number range (approximately 5 ×10-3 2 /3k-5 /3] =c (kL ) m , where is the mean energy dissipation rate per unit mass; L is the integral length scale; and m ≈-0.12 . The coefficient c is independent of k , but has a Rλ dependence, such as c =C Rλζ , where C ≈0.9 and ζ ≈0.14 .

  1. A frequency selective acoustic transducer for directional Lamb wave sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesi, Matteo; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    A frequency selective acoustic transducer (FSAT) is proposed for directional sensing of guided waves. The considered FSAT design is characterized by a spiral configuration in wavenumber domain, which leads to a spatial arrangement of the sensing material producing output signals whose dominant frequency component is uniquely associated with the direction of incoming waves. The resulting spiral FSAT can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves, without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the spiral FSAT is obtained through the theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. Testing is performed by forming a discrete array through the points of the measurement grid of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. The discrete array approximates the continuous spiral FSAT geometry, and provides the flexibility to test several configurations. The experimental results demonstrate the strong frequency dependent directionality of the spiral FSAT and suggest its application for frequency selective acoustic sensors, to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the directional generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health.

  2. Congratulations on the direct detection of gravitational waves

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    This week saw the announcement of an extraordinary physics result: the first direct detection of gravitational waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, which includes the GEO team, and the Virgo Collaboration, using the twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington, USA.   Albert Einstein predicted gravitational waves in a paper published 100 years ago in 1916. They are a natural consequence of the theory of general relativity, which describes the workings of gravity and was published a few months earlier. Until now, they have remained elusive. Gravitational waves are tiny ripples in space-time produced by violent gravitational phenomena. Because the fractional change in the space-time geometry can be at the level of 10-21 or smaller, extremely sophisticated, high-sensitivity instruments are needed to detect them. Recently, the Advanced LIGO detector increased its sensitivity by alm...

  3. Binocular rivalry waves in a directionally selective neural field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Samuel R.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2014-10-01

    We extend a neural field model of binocular rivalry waves in the visual cortex to incorporate direction selectivity of moving stimuli. For each eye, we consider a one-dimensional network of neurons that respond maximally to a fixed orientation and speed of a grating stimulus. Recurrent connections within each one-dimensional network are taken to be excitatory and asymmetric, where the asymmetry captures the direction and speed of the moving stimuli. Connections between the two networks are taken to be inhibitory (cross-inhibition). As per previous studies, we incorporate slow adaption as a symmetry breaking mechanism that allows waves to propagate. We derive an analytical expression for traveling wave solutions of the neural field equations, as well as an implicit equation for the wave speed as a function of neurophysiological parameters, and analyze their stability. Most importantly, we show that propagation of traveling waves is faster in the direction of stimulus motion than against it, which is in agreement with previous experimental and computational studies.

  4. Wave Directional Characteristics on a Partially Sheltered Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    refraction as a possible first order mechanism for the spreading of wave energy into the lee of islands. His conclusion, based primarily on the study of...Collins (1972), for the theoretical description of the refraction process. The method is based on the conservation of E(L), the wavenumber spectrum...A) I f Ed dtp da (11.9) =T"A do(fado) dado do F’l(atp-A) 15 and is approximated by F-(tp+b) a’do Edo(fcdo) da do (11.10) F-(atp- A) where Etp(fatp

  5. Spectral evolution of weakly nonlinear random waves: kinetic description vs direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, Sergei; Shrira, Victor

    2016-04-01

    We study numerically the long-term evolution of water wave spectra without wind forcing, using three different models, aiming at understanding the role of different sets of assumptions. The first model is the classical Hasselmann kinetic equation (KE). We employ the WRT code kindly provided by G. van Vledder. Two other models are new. As the second model, we use the generalised kinetic equation (gKE), derived without the assumption of quasi-stationarity. Thus, unlike the KE, the gKE is valid in the cases when a wave spectrum is changing rapidly (e.g. at the initial stage of evolution of a narrow spectrum). However, the gKE employs the same statistical closure as the KE. The third model is based on the Zakharov integrodifferential equation for water waves and does not depend on any statistical assumptions. Since the Zakharov equation plays the role of the primitive equation of the theory of wave turbulence, we refer to this model as direct numerical simulation of spectral evolution (DNS-ZE). For initial conditions, we choose two narrow-banded spectra with the same frequency distribution (a JONSWAP spectrum with high peakedness γ = 6) and different degrees of directionality. These spectra are from the set of observations collected in a directional wave tank by Onorato et al (2009). Spectrum A is very narrow in angle (corresponding to N = 840 in the cosN directional model). Spectrum B is initially wider in angle (corresponds to N = 24). Short-term evolution of both spectra (O(102) wave periods) has been studied numerically by Xiao et al (2013) using two other approaches (broad-band modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation and direct numerical simulation based on the high-order spectral method). We use these results to verify the initial stage of our DNS-ZE simulations. However, the advantage of the DNS-ZE method is that it allows to study long-term spectral evolution (up to O(104) periods), which was previously possible only with the KE. In the short-term evolution

  6. Determination of wave direction from linear and polygonal arrays

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Gouveia, A.D.; Nagarajan, R.

    documentation of Borgman (1974) in case of linear arrays; and the second issue being the failure of Esteva (1976, 1977) to correctly determine wave directions over the design range 25 to 7 sec of his polygonal array. This paper presents requisite documentation...

  7. 基于ADCP测量的海浪方向谱研究%ADCP based direction spectrum estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈茜; 彭东立; 朱安珏

    2013-01-01

    海洋方向谱的研究对于海洋预报、海上建设等人类海洋活动有重要的意义。介绍了一种利用声学多普勒流速剖面仪(Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, ADCP)测量海浪方向谱的方法。通过计算ADCP测量的流速之间的交叉谱,利用最大似然算法可以得到海浪的方向谱。给出了利用 ADCP 估计方向谱的算法流程,进行了仿真,结果表明所提出的方法可以较准确地估计海浪方向谱。%Measurements of ocean directional spectrum have significant impact on marine forecasting, marine con-struction and other human maritime activities. A method of measuring the directional spectrum by using the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) is presented in this paper. Calculating the cross spectrum between the wave hight and the current velocity measured by ADCP and using the maximum likelihood algorithm (MLM) can derive the ocean directianl spectrum. The flowchat of the algorithm and the simulation result with this method are given, which shows that the algorithm can rather correctly estimate the ocean directional spectrum.

  8. Wave spectral response to sudden changes in wind direction in finite-depth waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijaz, Saima; Rogers, W. Erick; Babanin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The response of a wind-sea spectrum to sudden changes in wind directions of 180° and 90° is investigated. Numerical simulations using the third-generation wave spectral model SWAN have been undertaken at micro timescales of 30 s and fine spatial resolution of less than 10 m. The results have been validated against the wave data collected during the field campaign at Lake George, Australia. The newly implemented 'ST6' physics in the SWAN model has been evaluated using a selection of bottom-friction terms and the two available functions for the nonlinear energy transfer: (1) exact solution of the nonlinear term (XNL), and (2) discrete interactions approximation (DIA) that parameterizes the nonlinear term. Good agreement of the modelled data is demonstrated directly with the field data and through the known experimental growth curves obtained from the extensive Lake George data set. The modelling results show that of the various combinations of models tested, the ST6/XNL model provides the most reliable computations of integral and spectral wave parameters. When the winds and waves are opposing (180° wind turn), the XNL is nearly twice as fast in the aligning the young wind-sea with the new wind direction than the DIA. In this case, the young wind-sea gradually decouples from the old waves and forms a new secondary peak. Unlike the 180° wind turn, there is no decoupling in the 90° wind turn and the entire spectrum rotates smoothly in the new direction. In both cases, the young wind-sea starts developing in the new wind direction within 10 min of the wind turn for the ST6 while the directional response of the default physics lags behind with a response time that is nearly double of ST6. The modelling results highlight the differences in source term balance among the different models in SWAN. During high wind speeds, the default settings provide a larger contribution from the bottom-friction dissipation than the whitecapping. In contrast, the whitecapping

  9. Analysis of (K^-,K^+) inclusive spectrum with semiclassical distorted wave model

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, S; Kohno, M; Ogata, K

    2006-01-01

    The inclusive K^+ momentum spectrum in the 12C(K^-,K^+) reaction is calculated by the semiclassical distorted wave (SCDW) model, including the transition to the \\Xi^- bound state. The calculated spectra with the strength of the \\Xi^--nucleus potential -50, -20, and +10 MeV are compared with the experimental data measured at KEK with p_{K^-}=1.65 GeV/c. The shape of the spectrum is reproduced by the calculation. Though the inclusive spectrum changes systematically depending on the potential strength, it is not possible to obtain a constraint on the potential from the present data. The calculated spectrum is found to have strong emission-angle dependence. We also investigate the incident K^- momentum dependence of the spectrum to see the effect of the Fermi motion of the target nucleons which is explicitly treated in the SCDW method.

  10. Gravitational wave spectrum of anisotropic neutron stars in Cowling approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Doneva, Daniela D

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common assumption in the studies of neutron star models and their oscillations is that the pressure is isotopic but there are arguments that this may not be correct. Thus in the present paper we make a first step towards studying the nonradial oscillations of neutron stars with anisotropic pressure. We adopt the so-called Cowling approximation where the spacetime metric is kept fixed and the oscillation spectrum for the first few fluid modes is obtained. The effect of the anisotropy on the frequencies is apparent, although with the present results it might be hard to distinguish it from the changes in the frequencies caused by different equations of state.

  11. Zeeman effects on d-wave superconductor and tunneling spectrum in normal-metal/d-wave superconductor tunnel junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Zhengchao

    2006-01-01

    We study the Zeeman effect on the d-wave superconductor and tunneling spectrum in normal-metal(N)/d-wave superconductor(S) junction by applying a Zeeman magnetic field to the S. It is shown that: (1) the Zeeman magnetic field can lead to the S gap decreasing, and with the increase in Zeeman energy, the superconducting state is changed to the normal state, exhibiting a first-order phase transition; (2) the Zeeman energy difference between the two splitting peaks in the conductance spectrum is equal to2h0 (h0 is the Zeeman energy); (3) both the barrier strength of interface scattering and the temperature can lower the magnitudes of splitting peaks, of which the barrier strength can lead to the splitting peaks becoming sharp and the temperature can smear out the peaks,however, neither of them can influence the Zeeman effect.

  12. Tilt of primordial gravitational wave spectrum in a universe with sterile neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we constrain the spectral index $n_t$ of the primordial gravitational wave power spectrum in a universe with sterile neutrinos by using the Planck temperature data, the WMAP 9-year polarization data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, and the BICEP2 data. We call this model the $\\Lambda$CDM+$r$+$\

  13. Waves on fluid-loaded shells and their resonance frequency spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, X.L.; Uberall, H.; Raju, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Technical requirements for elastic (metal) cylindrical shells include the knowledge of their natural frequency spectrum. These shells may be empty and fluid-immersed, or fluid-filled in an ambient medium of air, or doubly fluid-loaded inside and out. They may support circumferential waves, or axi...

  14. Discrete-Spectrum Waves in the Vicinity of Cyclotron Resonance in Silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    Cyclotron-resonance studies of silver have revealed two additional series of oscillations, one between the fundamental and the second harmonic, the other above the fundamental resonance. These series are caused by the excitation of weakly damped discrete-spectrum waves propagating perpendicular...

  15. Reheating signature in the gravitational wave spectrum from self-ordering scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the imprint of reheating on the gravitational wave spectrum produced by self-ordering of multi-component scalar fields after a global phase transition. The equation of state of the Universe during reheating, which usually has different behaviour from that of a radiation-dominated Universe, affects the evolution of gravitational waves through the Hubble expansion term in the equations of motion. This gives rise to a different power-law behavior of frequency in the gravitational wave spectrum. The reheating history is therefore imprinted in the shape of the spectrum. We perform $512^3$ lattice simulations to investigate how the ordering scalar field reacts to the change of the Hubble expansion and how the reheating effect arises in the spectrum. We also compare the result with inflation-produced gravitational waves, which has a similar spectral shape, and discuss whether it is possible to distinguish the origin between inflation and global phase transition by detecting the shape with future direc...

  16. Improved calculation of the gravitational wave spectrum from kinks on infinite cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Matsui, Yuka; Nitta, Daisuke; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational wave observations provide unique opportunities to search for cosmic strings. One of the strongest sources of gravitational waves is discontinuities of cosmic strings, called kinks, which are generated at points of intersection. Kinks on infinite strings are known to generate a gravitational wave background over a wide range of frequencies. In this paper, we calculate the spectrum of the gravitational wave background by numerically solving the evolution equation for the distribution function of the kink sharpness. We find that the number of kinks for small sharpness is larger than the analytical estimate used in a previous work, which makes a difference in the spectral shape. Our numerical approach also helps to avoid the use of analytic approximations, and enables us to make a more precise prediction on the spectral amplitude for future gravitational wave experiments.

  17. - Wave Spectrum of Carbonyl Diazide in Pursuit of Diazirinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberger, Brent K.; Esselman, Brian J.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-06-01

    Pyrolysis of carbonyl diazide (CO(N_3)_2) has been shown to give diazirinone (CON_2). While diazirione decomposes over the course of a few hours under terrestrial conditions, there is the possibility for it to exist in space. In the pursuit of obtaining a rotational spectrum for diazirinone, we have started with the rotational spectroscopy of its immediate precursor, carbonyl diazide. Carbonyl diazide is highly explosive, and requires careful synthesis. Spectra in the range of 260-360 GHz were collected at room temperature and at -60°C. Ab initio calculations at the CCSD/cc-pVDZ level predict that the conformation where both azide groups are syn to the carbonyl is preferred. A second conformation, where one azide is syn and one is anti, is calculated to lie about 2 kcal/ mol higher in energy. Pure rotational transitions for the ground state and multiple low-lying excited vibrational states of the syn- syn conformation are readily observed and assigned. X. Zeng, H. Beckers, H. Willner and J. F. Stanton, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50 (2011), 1720-1723 A. M. Nolan, B. K. Amberger, B. J. Esselman, V. S. Thimmakondu, J. F. Stanton, R. C. Woods, and R. J. McMahon, Inorg. Chem. 51 (2012), 9846-9851

  18. Direct Calculations of Current Drive with a Full Wave Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.

    1997-11-01

    We have developed a current drive package that evaluates the current driven by fast magnetosonic waves in arbitrary flux geometry. An expression for the quasilinear flux has been derived which accounts for coupling between modes in the spectrum of waves launched from the antenna. The field amplitudes are calculated in the full wave code, FISIC, and the current response function, \\chi, also known as the Spitzer function, is determined with Charles Karney's Fokker-Planck code, adj.f. Both codes have been modified to incorporate the same numerical equilibria. To model the effects of a trapped particle population, the bounce averaged equations for current and power are used, and the bounce averaged flux is calculated. The computer model is benchmarked against the homogenous equations for a high aspect ratio case in which the expected agreement is confirmed. Results from cases for TFTR, NSTX and CDX-U are contrasted with the predictions of the Ehst-Karney parameterization of current drive for circular equilibria. For theoretical background, please see the authors' archive of papers. (http://w3.pppl.gov/ ~jwright/Publications)

  19. The millimeter wave tunneling-rotational spectrum of phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesniková, L.; Daly, A. M.; Alonso, J. L.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-07-01

    The millimeter wave spectra of phenol in the vibrational ground state and the first excited states of the bending and torsion vibrational modes have been studied in the frequency regions of 140-170 GHz and 280-360 GHz. The internal rotation of the hydroxyl group is responsible for the observed tunneling splitting into two substates (vt, vb)+ and (vt, vb)- and more than 3500 distinct tunneling-rotational bR- and bQ-type transitions between them were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, accidental near degeneracies of the (±) and (-) energy levels were observed in case of the ground state and the vb = 1 excited state and the analysis using a two-state effective Hamiltonian including tunneling-rotational Coriolis-like terms was performed. The analysis of the microwave data provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants necessary for the astrophysical search of phenol. We report a tentative detection for this molecule in the IRAM 30m line survey of Orion KL.

  20. Millimeter Wave Tunneling-Rotational Spectrum of Phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, L.; Daly, A. M.; Alonso, J. L.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2013-06-01

    The millimeter wave spectra of phenol in the vibrational ground state and the first excited states of the bending and torsion vibrational modes have been studied in the frequency regions of 140 - 170 GHz and 280 - 360 GHz. The internal rotation of the hydroxyl group is responsible for the observed tunneling splitting into two substates (v_{t}, v_{b})^{+} and (v_{t}, v_{b})^{-} and more than 3500 distinct tunneling-rotational ^{b}R- and ^{b}Q-type transitions between them were measured and analyzed. Furthermore, accidental near degeneracies of the (+) and (-) energy levels were observed in case of the ground state and the v_{b} = 1 excited state and the analysis using a two-state effective Hamiltonian including tunneling-rotational Coriolis terms was performed. The spectroscopic constants for the first excited states of the bending and the torsion vibrational modes have been determined for the first time. The analysis of the microwave data provided very precise values of the spectroscopic constants necessary for the astrophysical search of phenol. We report a tentative detection for this molecule in the IRAM 30m line survey of Orion KL.

  1. High-Directional Wave Propagation in Periodic Gain/Loss Modulated Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, N; Herrero, R; Loiko, Yu; Staliunas, K

    2012-01-01

    Amplification/attenuation of light waves in artificial materials with a gain/loss modulation on the wavelength scale can be sensitive to the propagation direction. We give a numerical proof of the high anisotropy of the gain/loss in two dimensional periodic structures with square and rhombic lattice symmetry by solving the full set of Maxwell's equations using the finite difference time domain method. Anisotropy of amplification/attenuation leads to the narrowing of the angular spectrum of propagating radiation with wavevectors close to the edges of the first Brillouin Zone. The effect provides a novel and useful method to filter out high spatial harmonics from noisy beams.

  2. Multi-directional random wave interaction with an array of cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Xinran; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.;

    2015-01-01

    . The biggest transverse force is found to occur on the rear cylinder rather than the front one. This is quite different from the results in unidirectional waves and should be paid much more attention in the design of offshore structures. At last, the possibility of the near-trapping under the multi......Based on the linear theory of wave interaction with an array of circular bottom-mounted vertical cylinders, systematic calculations are made to investigate the effects of the wave directionality on wave loads in short-crested seas. The multi-directional waves are specified using a discrete form...... of the Mitsuyasu-type spreading function. The time series of multi-directional wave loads, including both the wave run-up and wave force, can be simulated. The effect of wave directionality on the wave run-up and wave loading on the cylinders is investigated. For multi-directional waves, as the distribution...

  3. A directional analysis of environmental signals in gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriela

    2001-04-01

    In gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO, there are many environmental signals and some interferometer signals that have directional information. We develop a method ("beam analysis") to discover such information, and apply it to seismic noise at the LIGO Hanford site. Using this method, we can find out the direction of approach, as well as the transverse or longitudinal characteristics of the seismic waves. We show the application of these results to the analysis of gravitational gradients influencing the interferometer. We also propose the use of this method in some of the interferometric signals. This work was supported by The Pennsylvania State University and by the National Science Foundation awards PHY-9973783 and PHY-9870032.

  4. Single-wave-number representation of nonlinear energy spectrum in elastic-wave turbulence of the Föppl-von Kármán equation: energy decomposition analysis and energy budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Naoto; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    A single-wave-number representation of a nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., a stretching-energy spectrum, is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the Föppl-von Kármán (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wave-number space and analytical expressions of detailed energy budgets in the nonlinear interactions. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic energy and bending energy are comparable with each other at large wave numbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wave numbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode a(k) and its companion mode a(-k) is observed at the small wave numbers. The energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wave numbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wave numbers. Total-energy flux consistent with energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

  5. Thalamic Atrophy Contributes to Low Slow Wave Sleep in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lei; Han, Yujuan; Xue, Rong; Wood, Kristofer; Shi, Fu-Dong; Liu, Yaou; Fu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Slow wave sleep abnormality has been reported in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), but mechanism for such abnormality is unknown. To determine the structural defects in the brain that account for the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Thirty-three NMOSD patients and 18 matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. Polysomnography was used to monitor slow wave sleep and three-dimensional T1-weighted MRIs were obtained to assess the alterations of grey matter volume. The percentage of deep slow wave sleep decreased in 93% NMOSD patients. Compared to HC, a reduction of grey matter volume was found in the bilateral thalamus of patients with a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (FWE corrected at cluster-level, p 400 voxels). Furthermore, the right thalamic fraction was positively correlated with the decrease in the percentage of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients (p 200 voxels). Our study identified that thalamic atrophy is associated with the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Further studies should evaluate whether neurotransmitters or hormones which stem from thalamus are involved in the decrease of slow wave sleep. PMID:28053819

  6. Thalamic Atrophy Contributes to Low Slow Wave Sleep in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lei; Han, Yujuan; Xue, Rong; Wood, Kristofer; Shi, Fu-Dong; Liu, Yaou; Fu, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Slow wave sleep abnormality has been reported in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), but mechanism for such abnormality is unknown. To determine the structural defects in the brain that account for the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Thirty-three NMOSD patients and 18 matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. Polysomnography was used to monitor slow wave sleep and three-dimensional T1-weighted MRIs were obtained to assess the alterations of grey matter volume. The percentage of deep slow wave sleep decreased in 93% NMOSD patients. Compared to HC, a reduction of grey matter volume was found in the bilateral thalamus of patients with a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (FWE corrected at cluster-level, p 400 voxels). Furthermore, the right thalamic fraction was positively correlated with the decrease in the percentage of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients (p 200 voxels). Our study identified that thalamic atrophy is associated with the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Further studies should evaluate whether neurotransmitters or hormones which stem from thalamus are involved in the decrease of slow wave sleep.

  7. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  8. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  9. Amplified spontaneous emission spectrum at the output of a diode amplifier saturated by an input monochromatic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatov, A. P.; Drakin, A. E.; D'yachkov, N. V.; Gushchik, T. I.

    2016-08-01

    Expressions for the amplitudes of amplified spontaneous emission waves in a diode amplifier near the frequency ω0 of a 'strong' input monochromatic wave have been derived in terms of a random function of a stationary Gaussian process. We have found expressions for the spectral density of the amplitudes and shown that, on the red side of the spectrum with respect to frequency ω0, spontaneous emission waves obtain additional nonlinear gain, induced by the strong wave, whereas on the blue side of the spectrum an additional loss is induced. Such behaviour of the amplitudes of amplified waves agrees with previous results.

  10. Response spectrum method for extreme wave loading with higher order components of drag force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Tabeshpour Mohammad; Mani, Fatemi Dezfouli; Mohammad Ali, Dastan Diznab; Saied, Mohajernasab; Saied, Seif Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Response spectra of fixed offshore structures impacted by extreme waves are investigated based on the higher order components of the nonlinear drag force. In this way, steel jacket platforms are simplified as a mass attached to a light cantilever cylinder and their corresponding deformation response spectra are estimated by utilizing a generalized single degree of freedom system. Based on the wave data recorded in the Persian Gulf region, extreme wave loading conditions corresponding to different return periods are exerted on the offshore structures. Accordingly, the effect of the higher order components of the drag force is considered and compared to the linearized state for different sea surface levels. When the fundamental period of the offshore structure is about one third of the main period of wave loading, the results indicate the linearized drag term is not capable of achieving a reliable deformation response spectrum.

  11. Condition for invariant spectrum of an electromagnetic wave scattered from an anisotropic random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping

    2015-08-24

    Within the accuracy of the first-order Born approximation, sufficient conditions are derived for the invariance of spectrum of an electromagnetic wave, which is generated by the scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave from an anisotropic random media. We show that the following restrictions on properties of incident fields and the anisotropic media must be simultaneously satisfied: 1) the elements of the dielectric susceptibility matrix of the media must obey the scaling law; 2) the spectral components of the incident field are proportional to each other; 3) the second moments of the elements of the dielectric susceptibility matrix of the media are inversely proportional to the frequency.

  12. Goal-directed action control in children with autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, H.M.; de Wit, S.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive behavior is a key characteristic of autism spectrum disorders. Our aim was to investigate the hypothesis that this abnormal behavioral repetition results from a tendency to over-rely on habits at the expense of flexible, goal-directed action. Twenty-four children with autism spectrum diso

  13. The Weibull functional form for the energetic particle spectrum at interplanetary shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenza, M.; Consolini, G.; Storini, M.; Pallocchia, G.; Damiani, A.

    2016-11-01

    Transient interplanetary shock waves are often associated with high energy particle enhancements, which are called energetic storm particle (ESP) events. Here we present a case study of an ESP event, recorded by the SEPT, LET and HET instruments onboard the STEREO B spacecraft, on 3 October 2011, in a wide energy range from 0.1 MeV to ∼ 30 MeV. The obtained particle spectrum is found to be reproduced by a Weibull like shape. Moreover, we show that the Weibull spectrum can be theoretically derived as the asymptotic steady state solution of the diffusion loss equation by assuming anomalous diffusion for particle velocity. The evaluation of Weibull's parameters obtained from particle observations and the power spectral density of the turbulent fluctations in the shock region, support this scenario and suggest that stochastic acceleration can contribute significantly to the acceleration of high energetic particles at collisioness shock waves.

  14. Complete mapping of the spin-wave spectrum in a vortex-state nanodisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurel, B.; Valet, T.; Naletov, V. V.; Vukadinovic, N.; de Loubens, G.; Klein, O.

    2016-05-01

    We report a study on the complete spin-wave spectrum inside a vortex-state nanodisk. Transformation of this spectrum is continuously monitored as the nanodisk becomes gradually magnetized by a perpendicular magnetic field and encounters a second-order phase transition to the uniformly magnetized state. This reveals the bijective relationship that exists between the eigenmodes in the vortex state and the ones in the saturated state. It is found that the gyrotropic mode can be continuously viewed as a uniform phase precession, which uniquely softens (its frequency vanishes) at the saturation field to transform above into the Kittel mode. By contrast, the other spin-wave modes remain finite as a function of the applied field, while their character is altered by level anticrossing.

  15. The Direct Digital Modulation of Traveling Wave Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhamohan, Ranjan S.

    2004-01-01

    Traveling wave tube (TWT) technology, first described by Rudolf Kompfner in the early 1940s, has been a key component of space missions from the earliest communication satellites in the 1960s to the Cassini probe today. TWTs are essentially signal amplifiers that have the special capability of operating at microwave frequencies. The microwave frequency range, which spans from approximately 500 MHz to 300 GHz, is shared by many technologies including cellular phones, satellite television, space communication, and radar. TWT devices are superior in reliability, weight, and efficiency to solid-state amplifiers at the high power and frequency levels required for most space missions. TWTs have three main components -an electron gun, slow wave structure, and collector. The electron gun generates an electron beam that moves along the length of the tube axis, inside of the slow wave circuit. At the same time, the inputted signal is slowed by its travel through the coils of the helical slow wave circuit. The interaction of the electron beam and this slowed signal produces a transfer of kinetic energy to the signal, and in turn, amplification. At the end of its travel, the spent electron beam moves into the collector where its remaining energy is dissipated as heat or harnessed for reuse. TWTs can easily produce gains in the tens of decibels, numbers that are suitable for space missions. To date, however, TWTs have typically operated at fixed levels of gain. This gain is determined by various, unchanging, physical factors of the tube. Traditionally, to achieve varying gain, an input signal s amplitude has had to first be modulated by a separate device before being fed into the TWT. This is not always desirable, as significant distortion can occur in certain situations. My mentor, Mr. Dale Force, has proposed an innovative solution to this problem called direct digital modulation . The testing and implementation of this solution is the focus of my summer internship. The

  16. Terahertz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors: spectrum, generation, nonlinear and quantum phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savel' ev, Sergey; Yampol' skii, V A; Rakhmanov, A L; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    The recent growing interest in terahertz (THz) and sub-THz science and technology is due to its many important applications in physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology and medicine, including THz imaging, spectroscopy, tomography, medical diagnosis, health monitoring, environmental control, as well as chemical and biological identification. We review the problem of linear and nonlinear THz and sub-THz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors and their excitations produced by moving Josephson vortices. We start by discussing the coupled sine-Gordon equations for the gauge-invariant phase difference of the order parameter in the junctions, taking into account the effect of breaking the charge neutrality, and deriving the spectrum of Josephson plasma waves. We also review surface and waveguide Josephson plasma waves. The spectrum of these waves is presented, and their excitation is discussed. We review the propagation of weakly nonlinear Josephson plasma waves below the plasma frequency, {omega}{sub J}, which is very unusual for plasma-like excitations. In close analogy to nonlinear optics, these waves exhibit numerous remarkable features, including a self-focusing effect and the pumping of weaker waves by a stronger one. In addition, an unusual stop-light phenomenon, when {partial_derivative}{omega}/{partial_derivative}k {approx} 0, caused by both nonlinearity and dissipation, can be observed in the Josephson plasma waves. At frequencies above {omega}{sub J}, the current-phase nonlinearity can be used for transforming continuous sub-THz radiation into short, strongly amplified, pulses. We also present quantum effects in layered superconductors, specifically, the problem of quantum tunneling of fluxons through stacks of Josephson junctions. Moreover, the nonlocal sine-Gordon equation for Josephson vortices is reviewed. We discuss the Cherenkov and transition radiations of the Josephson plasma waves produced by moving Josephson vortices, either in a single

  17. Analysis of vertical wave number spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves in the stratosphere using COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available GPS radio occultation (RO is characterized by high accuracy and excellent height resolution, which has great advantages in analyzing atmospheric structures including small-scale vertical fluctuations. The vertical resolution of the geometrical optics (GO method in the stratosphere is about 1.5 km due to Fresnel radius limitations, but full spectrum inversion (FSI can provide superior resolutions. We applied FSI to COSMIC GPS-RO profiles from ground level up to 30 km altitude, although basic retrieval at UCAR/CDAAC sets the sewing height from GO to FSI below the tropopause. We validated FSI temperature profiles with routine high-resolution radiosonde data in Malaysia and North America collected within 400 km and about 30 min of the GPS RO events. The average discrepancy at 10–30 km altitude was less than 0.5 K, and the bias was equivalent with the GO results.

    Using the FSI results, we analyzed the vertical wave number spectrum of normalized temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere at 20–30 km altitude, which exhibits good consistency with the model spectra of saturated gravity waves. We investigated the white noise floor that tends to appear at high wave numbers, and the substantial vertical resolution of the FSI method was estimated as about 100–200 m in the lower stratosphere. We also examined a criterion for the upper limit of the FSI profiles, beyond which bending angle perturbations due to system noises, etc, could exceed atmospheric excess phase fluctuations. We found that the FSI profiles can be used up to about 28 km in studies of temperature fluctuations with vertical wave lengths as short as 0.5 km.

  18. Analysis of vertical wave number spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves in the stratosphere using COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available GPS radio occultation (RO is characterized by high accuracy and excellent height resolution, which has great advantages in analyzing atmospheric structures including small-scale vertical fluctuations. The vertical resolution of the geometrical optics (GO method in the stratosphere is about 1.5 km due to Fresnel radius limitations, but full spectrum inversion (FSI can provide superior resolutions. We applied FSI to COSMIC GPS-RO profiles from ground level up to 30 km altitude, although basic retrieval at UCAR/CDAAC sets the sewing height from GO to FSI below the tropopause. We validated FSI temperature profiles with routine high-resolution radiosonde data in Malaysia and North America collected within 400 km and about 30 min of the GPS RO events. The average discrepancy at 10–30 km altitude was less than 0.5 K, and the bias was equivalent with the GO results.

    Using the FSI results, we analyzed the vertical wave number spectrum of normalized temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere at 20–30 km altitude, which exhibits good consistency with the model spectra of saturated gravity waves. We investigated the white noise floor that tends to appear at high wave numbers, and the substantial vertical resolution of the FSI method was estimated as about 100–200 m in the lower stratosphere. We also examined a criterion for the upper limit of the FSI profiles, beyond which bending angle perturbations due to system noises, etc., could exceed atmospheric excess phase fluctuations. We found that the FSI profiles can be used up to about 28 km in studies of temperature fluctuations with vertical wave lengths as short as 0.5 km.

  19. Variations in wave direction estimated using first and second order Fourier coefficients

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anand, N.M.

    In most design applications such as alignment of the berthing structure and breakwater alignment, it becomes necessary to determine the direction of design wave. There are two different approaches to determine wave direction. One involves the use...

  20. Computation of the spectrum of spatial Lyapunov exponents for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems and electron-wave devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hramov, Alexander E; Maximenko, Vladimir A; Moskalenko, Olga I; 10.1063/1.4740063

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of Lyapunov exponents is powerful tool for the analysis of the complex system dynamics. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamical systems a number of the numerical technics have been developed to obtain the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents for the complex temporal behavior of the systems with a few degree of freedom. Unfortunately, these methods can not apply directly to analysis of complex spatio-temporal dynamics in plasma devices which are characterized by the infinite phase space, since they are the spatially extended active media. In the present paper we propose the method for the calculation of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents (SLEs) for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems. The calculation technique is applied to the analysis of chaotic spatio-temporal oscillations in three different beam-plasma model: (1) simple plasma Pierce diode, (2) coupled Pierce diodes, and (3) electron-wave system with backward electromagnetic wave. We find an excellent agreement between the...

  1. Wave and Wind Direction Effects on SFMR Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbach, Heather; Uhlhorn, Eric; Bourassa, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Surface winds in a tropical cyclone are essential for determining its strength. Currently the Stepped-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) dropwindsondes are the main instruments used for obtaining in situ surface wind measurements. The platforms for these instruments are the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) P-3 and Air Force C-130J hurricane hunter aircraft. The SFMR measures sea surface microwave brightness temperatures at six frequencies ranging from 4.7 to 7.2 GHz. Surface wind speed estimates are obtained from these brightness temperatures by using a retrieval algorithm that employs a geophysical model function relating surface emissivity and wind speed. The SFMR is designed to obtain a single nadir track of surface wind speeds directly beneath the aircraft during level flight and not when turning because of the complexity of the wave field and foam distribution when the SFMR views the surface off-nadir or during aircraft rolls. However, the effects of the wave field on the measurements can be investigated using measurements obtained during the 2008 and 2014 Atlantic hurricane seasons. An SFMR module was flown in precipitation-free regions of the tropical cyclones to collect data at specified roll angles of 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° in some cases. Excess brightness temperatures are then calculated with respect to zero wind speed values and independent of wind direction. An asymmetry is found in the resulting excess brightness temperatures. It is hypothesized that this asymmetry is caused by the direction of wave propagation and the angle at which the wave field is viewed by the SFMR. Wind direction may also play a role in the asymmetry. To analyze the asymmetry further measurement from WindSat will be used. Once the relationship is determined between surface wind speed, brightness temperature, and incidence angle a technique will be developed to obtain a surface wind speed when the aircraft is

  2. Capillary-wave description of rapid directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhenevskii, Alexander L; Bausch, Richard; Schmitz, Rudi

    2012-02-01

    A recently introduced capillary-wave description of binary-alloy solidification is generalized to include the procedure of directional solidification. For a class of model systems a universal dispersion relation of the unstable eigenmodes of a planar steady-state solidification front is derived, which readjusts previously known stability considerations. We moreover establish a differential equation for oscillatory motions of a planar interface that offers a limit-cycle scenario for the formation of solute bands and, taking into account the Mullins-Sekerka instability, of banded structures.

  3. Palm-shaped spectrum generation for dual-band millimeter wave and baseband signals over fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R.; Feng, Z.; Tang, M.; Wang, R.; Fu, S.; Shum, P.; Liu, D.; Chen, J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to offer abundant available bandwidth for radio access networks satisfying future 5G requirements on capacity, this paper proposes a simple and cost-effective palm-shaped spectrum generation scheme that can be used for high capacity radio over fiber (RoF) system. The proposed scheme can simultaneously generate an optical carrier used for upstream and two bands of millimeter wave (MMW) that are capable of carrying different downstream data. The experiment results show that the proposed palm-shaped spectrum generation scheme outperforms optical frequency comb (OFC) based multi-band MMW generation in terms of upstream transmission performance. Furthermore, simulation is carried out with different dual-band MMW configurations to verify the feasibility of using the proposed spectrum generation scheme in the RoF system.

  4. Polarization controlled directional excitation of Bloch surface waves (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevich, Tatiana; Boyer, Philippe; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Kim, Myun-Sik; Herzig, Hans Peter; Grosjean, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Bloch surface waves (BSWs) are electromagnetic surface waves which can be excited at the interface between periodic dielectric multilayer and a surrounding medium. In comparison with surface plasmon polaritons these surface states perform high quality factor due to low loss characteristics of dielectric materials and can be exited both by TE and TM polarized light. A platform consisting of periodic stacks of alternative SiO2 and Si3N4 layers is designed and fabricated to work at the wavelength of 1.55 µm. The platform has an application in sensing and in integrated optics domain. A standard way of BSW excitation is coupling via Kretschmann configuration, but in this work we investigate a grating coupling of BSWs. Grating parameters are analytically and numerically optimized by RCWA and FDTD methods in order to obtain the best coupling conditions. The light is launched orthogonally to the surface of the photonic crystal and the grating. Due to a special grating configuration we demonstrate directionality of the BSW propagation depending on polarization of the incident light. The structure was experimentally realized on the surface of the photonic crystal by FIB milling. Experimental results are in a good agreement with a theory. The investigated configuration can be successfully used as a BSW launcher in on-chip all-optical integrated systems and work as a surface wave switch or modulator.

  5. [Study on phase-matching of four-wave mixing spectrum in photonic crystal fiber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-xu; Wang, Shu-tao; Zhao, Xing-tao; Chen, Shuang; Zhou, Gui-yao; Wu, Xi-jun; Li, Shu-guang; Hou, Lan-Tian

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, the four-wave mixing principle of fiber was analyzed, and the high-gain phase-matching conditions were shown. The nonlinear coefficient and dispersion characteristics of photonic crystal fibers were calculated by multipole method. The phase mismatch characteristics of fibers with multiple zero-dispersion wavelengths were analyzed for the first time. The changing rules of phase matching wavelength with the pump wavelength and the pump power were obtained, and the phase matching curves were shown. The characteristics of phase matching wavelengths for different dispersion curves were analyzed. There are four new excitation wavelengths of four-wave mixing spectrum in two zero-dispersion wavelength photonic crystal fiers. Four-wave mixing spectroscopy of photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths was obtained in the experi-ent, which is consistent with the theoretical analysis, and verified the reliability of the phase matching theory. The fiber with multiple zero-dispersion wavelengths can create a ricbhphase-matching topology, excite more four-wave mixing wavelengths, ena-ling enhanced control over the spectral locations of the four-wave mixing and resonant-radiation bands emitted by solitons and short pulses. These provide theoretical guidance for photonic crystal fiber wavelength conversion and supercontinoum generation based on four-wave mixing.

  6. Partial-Wave Series Expansion and Angular Spectrum Decomposition Formalisms for Acoustical Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Mitri, F G

    2014-01-01

    Complex weights factors (CWFs) that fully define the incident beam independent of the presence of a scatterer, may be represented mathematically by either a partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) of multipoles, or the method of angular spectrum decomposition (ASD) of plane waves. Once the mathematical expression for the CWFs of the incident waves is known, evaluation of the arbitrary scattering, radiation force, and torque components on an object in 3D, using the Generalized Theories of Resonance Scattering (GTRS), Radiation Force (GTRF) and Radiation Torque (GTRT), becomes feasible. The aim of this Letter is to establish the connection between these two approaches in the framework of the GTRS, GTRF and GTRT in spherical coordinates for various acoustical applications. The advantage of using the ASD approach is also discussed for specific beams with particular properties.

  7. Generation of a highly directional supercontinuum in the visible spectrum range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, N. G.; Losev, V. F.; Prokop'ev, V. E.; Sitnik, K. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies on the formation conditions of a highly directional supercontinuum (SC) produced via filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse in air. The laser beam had an energy of 8-15 mJ, radiation wavelength of 940 nm and pulse duration of 70 fs. A spherical mirror, with or without aberrations, was used to focus the laser beam. It is shown that a SC forms behind a visible filament through a step-by-step conversion of the spectral composition from long wavelength to short wavelength (to 350 nm). The radiation is most stable when it is generated in the presence of aberrations in the wave front of the laser beam. On the track section 35-135 cm from the filament, radiation propagates in the form of a spatially stable structure similar to a soliton with a transverse dimension ≤300 μm. In this case, the SC significantly differs from the conical off-axis emission that occurs in the aberration-free filament, in that it displays a divergence close to the diffraction limit, linear polarisation and a shorter-range wing of the spectrum. The infrared component of the SC has a duration 2.8-times shorter than the pulse duration of the initial laser beam.

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SEA SURFACE DIRECTIONAL WAVE SPECTRA UNDER TYPHOON WIND FORCING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Numercial simulation of sea surface directional wave spectra under typhoon wind forcing in the South China Sea (SCS) was carreid out using the WAVEWATCH-III wave model. The simulation was run for 210 h until the Typhoon Damrey (2005) approached Vietnam. The simulated data were compared with buoy observations, which were obtained in the northwest sea area of Hainan Island. The results show that the significant wave height, wave direction, wave length and frequency spetra agree well with buoy observations. The spatial characteristics of the signifciant wave height, mean wave period, mean wave length, wave age and directional spectra depend on the relative position from the typhoon center. Also, the misalignment between local wind and wave directions were investigated.

  9. A Mechanism of the Effect of Non-uniform Current on the Spectrum of Short Wind Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Guizhen; SHENG Lifang; CONG Peixiu

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism is suggested in this paper concerning the effect of non-uniform current on the spectrum of short wind waves. According to this mechanism, a non-uniform current brings changes to the breaking criteria of short wind waves through modulating the surface drift, and hence enhances or weakens wave breaking. Some modification is proposed to the source term, which represents the spectral rate of wave energy dissipation due to wave breaking so that the source term can incorporate this mechanism. In order to illustrate whether this mechanism is significant, a real case is studied, in which the wind waves propagate on a tidal current flowing over the sea bottom covered with sand waves. Finally, the effect of the new mechanism on the equilibrium spectrum of small scale gravity waves is discussed. Numerical estimates suggest that, for water depths less than 50 m and wavelengths less than 1 m, this current field may result in distinct spatial variations of the wave breaking criteria, the spectral rate of wave energy dissipation and the equilibrium spectrum of short gravity waves.

  10. Identifying Contributing Harmonics in the Gravitational Wave Spectrum of Highly Eccentric EMRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andrew; Stone, Jordan; Ahrens, Sloan; Kennefick, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    In the study of gravitational waves emitted from extreme mass ratio inspirals highly eccentric orbits are problematic because of the large number of harmonics, and thus the lengthy computation times that were thought to be inherent to it. The issue however, is made simpler because the spectrum is not that broad and is fairly localized. The true complexity lies in finding the peaks of the largest contributors to accurately describe the complete spectrum, since for any given multipole of the spectrum the position of the peak in the emission is difficult to predict. This project uses two methods of finding the peak harmonic of a given spectrum. The first method uses a skipping algorithm to systematically jump over harmonics with insignificant contributions to the total waveform. Because this method is still not completely efficient, a second method uses a Newtonian order approximation given by Peters and Matthews to give an estimate of the frequency of the actual waveform peak, and then fills in around this harmonics to give the spectrum. The two methods are complementary since the skipping algorithm can be used when the Newtonian estimation fails to find the peak immediately.

  11. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Foroughi Abari, Farzad; Mann, Jakob;

    2014-01-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both...... leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift...... has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2....

  12. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeier Pedersen, A.; Abari, C. F.; Mann, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2014-06-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2.

  13. The spectrum for overlarge sets of directed triple systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-hong; TIAN; Li-jun; Ji

    2007-01-01

    A directed triple system of order v, denoted by DTS(v, λ), is a pair (X,B) where X is a v-set and B is a collection of transitive triples on X such that every ordered pair of X belongs to λ triples of B. An overlarge set of disjoint DTS(v, λ), denoted by OLDTS(v, λ), is a collection {(Y\\{y}, Ai)}i,such that Y is a (v + 1)-set, each (Y\\{y}, Ai) is a DTS(v, λ) and all Ai's form a partition of all transitive triples of Y. In this paper, we shall discuss the existence problem of OLDTS(v, λ) and give the following conclusion: there exists an OLDTS(v, λ) if and only if either λ = 1 and v = 0, 1 (mod 3), or λ = 3 and v≠2.

  14. Localization of Dispersive Alfvén Wave in Solar wind plasmas and Turbulent Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    Solar wind turbulence at large inertial scales is well known for decades and believed to consist of Alfvén cascade. The inertial range of Solar wind turbulence can be described by a magnetohydrodynamic model. But at small scales the MHD description is not valid. At scales of the order of proton inertial length, Alfvén cascade excites kinetic Alfvén wave or fast wave or whistler wave that carries wave energy to smaller scales. On the other hand, parallel propagating right(R) and left(L) circularly polarized Alfvén/ ion cyclotron wave in the framework of Hall MHD are also thought to be essential ingredients of the solar wind turbulence. Recently, He et.al[1] have used the magnetic field data from the STEREO spacecraft to calculate the magnetic helicities in the solar wind turbulence and reported the possible existence of Alfvén -cyclotron waves and their coexistence with the right handed polarized fluctuations. In the present article we intend to study the right circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) and their role in the solar wind turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term causes the dispersion of the AW which, in the present study, is considered on account of the finite frequency (frequency comparable to ion gyro frequency) of the pump wave. Filamentation instability has been reported to occur for the case of circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) propagating parallel to ambient magnetic field. In the present study, the instability arises on account of the transverse density perturbations of the acoustic wave that may couple nonlinearly with the Alfvén wave and the driven ponderomotive force sequentially leads to growth of density perturbations. Numerical simulation involves finite difference method for the time domain and pseudo spectral method for the spatial domain. The power spectrum is investigated which shows a steepening for scales larger than the proton inertial length. These findings have been reported by Alexandrova et al

  15. Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgfeldt Hansen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum.......The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum....

  16. Autism spectrum disorders and the amplitude of auditory brainstem response wave I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mariline; Marques, Cristina; Nóbrega Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Raquel; Coutinho, Miguel Bebiano; Almeida E Sousa, Cecília

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have an increased number of wave I abnormal amplitudes in auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) than age- and sex-matched typically developing children. This analytical case-control study compared patients with ASDs between the ages of 2 and 6 years and children who had a language delay not associated with any other pathology. Amplitudes of ABR waves I and V; absolute latencies (ALs) of waves I, III, and V; and interpeak latencies (IPLs) I-III, III-IV, and I-V at 90 dB were compared between ASD patients and normally developing children. The study enrolled 40 children with documented ASDs and 40 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Analyses of the ABR showed that children with ASDs exhibited higher amplitudes of wave 1 than wave V (35%) more frequently than the control group (10%), and this difference between groups reached statistical significance by Chi-squared analysis. There were no significant differences in ALs and IPLs between ASD children and matched controls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case-control study testing the amplitudes of ABR wave I in ASD children. The reported results suggest a potential for the use of ABR recordings in children, not only for the clinical assessment of hearing status, but also for the possibility of using amplitude of ABR wave I as an early marker of ASDs allowing earlier diagnosis and intervention. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Signal Construction-Based Dispersion Compensation of Lamb Waves Considering Signal Waveform and Amplitude Spectrum Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of Lamb wave identification for the aerospace structures could be easily affected by the nonlinear-dispersion characteristics. In this paper, dispersion compensation of Lamb waves is of particular concern. Compared with the similar research works on the traditional signal domain transform methods, this study is based on signal construction from the viewpoint of nonlinear wavenumber linearization. Two compensation methods of linearly-dispersive signal construction (LDSC and non-dispersive signal construction (NDSC are proposed. Furthermore, to improve the compensation effect, the influence of the signal construction process on the other crucial signal properties, including the signal waveform and amplitude spectrum, is considered during the investigation. The linear-dispersion and non-dispersion effects are firstly analyzed. Then, after the basic signal construction principle is explored, the numerical realization of LDSC and NDSC is discussed, in which the signal waveform and amplitude spectrum preservation is especially regarded. Subsequently, associated with the delay-and-sum algorithm, LDSC or NDSC is employed for high spatial resolution damage imaging, so that the adjacent multi-damage or quantitative imaging capacity of Lamb waves can be strengthened. To verify the proposed signal construction and damage imaging methods, the experimental and numerical validation is finally arranged on the aluminum plates.

  18. Estimation of frequency wave spectrum from high frequency radar data using a parametric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, V. G.; Ocampo, F. J.; Flores-Vidal, X.; Durazo, R.; Flament, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Models that obtain wave information from high frequency radars (HF) use information of the measured second order Doppler spectrum. The estimation is completed through an integral equation as in the case of the Barrick model, or linearly as in the Hasselmann model. For the latter, the linear form uses a parameter (α) obtained using an exclusive set of data (EuroROSE) which suggests a universal expression of such parameter. In this work we developed a methodology and better approach to extract second order information from the Doppler spectra, and a new parameterization for α was obtained by comparing with in situ measured information in the Gulf of Tehuantepec (GT), Mexico. We present frequency spectra and significant wave height obtained for a four-month data set in the GT, during the season of strong (> 10 ms-1) northerly gap winds. We found that signal strength of Doppler spectra showed a clear diurnal cycle. The time average of these spectra allowed us to select the spectra with high SNR value. The second-order information obtained was used in the mathematical model of Hasselmann, and found that α, which is a function of frequency, depends on wind speed (U10). The results suggest a good agreement between the data measured by the ASIS buoy and those obtained by the Hasselmann model. The results showed improvement in the estimation of wave frequency spectrum and pointed at the need to have a theoretical model for α to be used in any data set.

  19. Signal Construction-Based Dispersion Compensation of Lamb Waves Considering Signal Waveform and Amplitude Spectrum Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jian; Yuan, Shenfang; Wang, Tongguang

    2016-12-23

    The results of Lamb wave identification for the aerospace structures could be easily affected by the nonlinear-dispersion characteristics. In this paper, dispersion compensation of Lamb waves is of particular concern. Compared with the similar research works on the traditional signal domain transform methods, this study is based on signal construction from the viewpoint of nonlinear wavenumber linearization. Two compensation methods of linearly-dispersive signal construction (LDSC) and non-dispersive signal construction (NDSC) are proposed. Furthermore, to improve the compensation effect, the influence of the signal construction process on the other crucial signal properties, including the signal waveform and amplitude spectrum, is considered during the investigation. The linear-dispersion and non-dispersion effects are firstly analyzed. Then, after the basic signal construction principle is explored, the numerical realization of LDSC and NDSC is discussed, in which the signal waveform and amplitude spectrum preservation is especially regarded. Subsequently, associated with the delay-and-sum algorithm, LDSC or NDSC is employed for high spatial resolution damage imaging, so that the adjacent multi-damage or quantitative imaging capacity of Lamb waves can be strengthened. To verify the proposed signal construction and damage imaging methods, the experimental and numerical validation is finally arranged on the aluminum plates.

  20. [A quick algorithm of dynamic spectrum photoelectric pulse wave detection based on LabVIEW].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ling; Li, Na; Li, Gang

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic spectrum (DS) detection is attractive among the numerous noninvasive blood component detection methods because of the elimination of the main interference of the individual discrepancy and measure conditions. DS is a kind of spectrum extracted from the photoelectric pulse wave and closely relative to the artery blood. It can be used in a noninvasive blood component concentration examination. The key issues in DS detection are high detection precision and high operation speed. The precision of measure can be advanced by making use of over-sampling and lock-in amplifying on the pick-up of photoelectric pulse wave in DS detection. In the present paper, the theory expression formula of the over-sampling and lock-in amplifying method was deduced firstly. Then in order to overcome the problems of great data and excessive operation brought on by this technology, a quick algorithm based on LabVIEW and a method of using external C code applied in the pick-up of photoelectric pulse wave were presented. Experimental verification was conducted in the environment of LabVIEW. The results show that by the method pres ented, the speed of operation was promoted rapidly and the data memory was reduced largely.

  1. The Simulation of Direct Spread Spectrum System based on Transmitted Reference Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Code synchronization is indispensable in the direct spread spectrum system because it can influence the incepting capacity directly. Transmitted reference is proposed in this paper to predigest the code synchronization circuit of the incepting machine in order to reduce the cost of time, energy and money for the development of the code synchronization technology. The software named Systemview is employed to simulate the transmitted reference direct spread spectrum system. The simulation results were presented with the condition of gauss noise and temperature. It demonstrates that the proposed simulation has significant effect and benefit in engineering.

  2. Does Gaze Direction Modulate Facial Expression Processing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Hironori; Senju, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Tojo, Yoshikuni; Osanai, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) integrate relevant communicative signals, such as gaze direction, when decoding a facial expression. In Experiment 1, typically developing children (9-14 years old; n = 14) were faster at detecting a facial expression accompanying a gaze direction with a congruent…

  3. Compressive sensing for direct millimeter-wave holographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lingbo; Wang, Yingxin; Shen, Zongjun; Zhao, Ziran; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2015-04-10

    Direct millimeter-wave (MMW) holographic imaging, which provides both the amplitude and phase information by using the heterodyne mixing technique, is considered a powerful tool for personnel security surveillance. However, MWW imaging systems usually suffer from the problem of high cost or relatively long data acquisition periods for array or single-pixel systems. In this paper, compressive sensing (CS), which aims at sparse sampling, is extended to direct MMW holographic imaging for reducing the number of antenna units or the data acquisition time. First, following the scalar diffraction theory, an exact derivation of the direct MMW holographic reconstruction is presented. Then, CS reconstruction strategies for complex-valued MMW images are introduced based on the derived reconstruction formula. To pursue the applicability for near-field MMW imaging and more complicated imaging targets, three sparsity bases, including total variance, wavelet, and curvelet, are evaluated for the CS reconstruction of MMW images. We also discuss different sampling patterns for single-pixel, linear array and two-dimensional array MMW imaging systems. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate the feasibility of recovering MMW images from measurements at 1/2 or even 1/4 of the Nyquist rate.

  4. Directional change of particles in dissipative drift-wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoch, Benjamin; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the statistical properties of Lagrangian particle transport in dissipative drift-wave turbulence modeled by the Hasegawa-Wakatani system. The angle between subsequent particle displacement increments is evaluated as a function of the timelag and thus multi-scale geometric statistics can be performed. The evolution of the mean angle with the time lag is studied and the probability density function of the directional change are analyzed for the different flow regimes. By varying the adiabaticity parameter the flow regime can be modified from the hydrodynamic limit to a geostrophic limit, including the quasi adiabatic regime which has some relevance for edge turbulence of fusion plasmas in tokamaks. Support by the French Research Federation for Fusion Studies within the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) is thankfully acknowledged.

  5. Demodulating Subsampled Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Signals using Compressive Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten; Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    We show that to lower the sampling rate in a spread spectrum communication system using Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS), compressive signal processing can be applied to demodulate the received signal. This may lead to a decrease in the power consumption or the manufacturing price of wireless...... theoretical work is exemplified with a numerical experiment using the IEEE 802.15.4 standard’s 2.4GHz band specification. The numerical results support our theoretical indings and indicate that compressive sensing may be used successfully in spread spectrum communication systems. The results obtained here may...

  6. Retrieving wind statistics from average spectrum of continuous-wave lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Branlard

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to experimentally demonstrate that the time-average Doppler spectrum of a continuous-wave (cw lidar is proportional to the probability density function of the line-of-sight velocities. This would open the possibility of using cw lidars for the determination of the second-order atmospheric turbulence statistics. An atmospheric field campaign and a wind tunnel experiment are carried out to show that the use of an average Doppler spectrum instead of a time series of velocities determined from individual Doppler spectra significantly reduces the differences with the standard deviation measured using ordinary anemometers, such as ultra-sonic anemometers or hotwires. The proposed method essentially removes the spatial averaging effect intrinsic to the cw lidar systems.

  7. Towards a description of the complete gravitational wave spectrum of neutron star mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Nagar, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In the context of neutron star mergers, we study the gravitational wave spectrum of the merger remnant using numerical relativity simulations. Postmerger spectra are characterized by a main peak frequency $f_2$ related to the particular structure and dynamics of the remnant hot massive or hypermassive neutron star. We show that $f_2$ is correlated with the tidal coupling constant $\\kappa^T_2$ that characterizes the binary tidal interactions during the late-inspiral--merger. The relation $f_2(\\kappa^T_2)$ depends very weakly on the binary total mass, mass-ratio, equation-of-state, and on thermal effects. This observation opens up the possibility of developing a model of the gravitational spectrum of \\textit{every} neutron star binary merger which unifies the late-inspiral and postmerger descriptions.

  8. Real-Time Leaky Lamb Wave Spectrum Measurement and Its Application to NDE of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1999-01-01

    Numerous analytical and theoretical studies of the behavior of leaky Lamb waves (LLW) in composite materials were documented in the literature. One of the key issues that are constraining the application of this method as a practical tool is the amount of data that needs to be acquired and the slow process that is involved with such experiments. Recently, a methodology that allows quasi real-time acquisition of LLW dispersion data was developed. At each angle of incidence the reflection spectrum is available in real time from the experimental setup and it can be used for rapid detection of the defects. This technique can be used to rapidly acquire the various plate wave modes along various angles of incidence for the characterization of the material elastic properties. The experimental method and data acquisition technique will be described in this paper. Experimental data was used to examine a series of flaws including porosity and delaminations and demonstrated the efficiency of the developed technique.

  9. Sound power spectrum and wave drag of a propeller in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    Theory is presented for the sound power and sound power spectrum of a single rotation propeller in forward flight. Calculations are based on the linear wave equation with sources distributed over helicoidal surfaces to represent effects of blade thickness and steady loading. Sound power is distributed continuously over frequecy, as would be expected from Doppler effects, rather than in discrete harmonics. The theory is applied to study effects of sweep and Mach number in propfans. An acoustic efficiency is defined as the ratio of radiated sound power to shaft input power. This value is the linear estimate of the effect of wave drag due to the supersonic blade section speeds. It is shown that the acoustic efficiency is somewhat less than 1 percent for a well designed propfan.

  10. Modified High Frequency Radial Spin Wave Mode Spectrum in a Chirality-Controlled Nanopillar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolthammer, J. E.; Rudge, J.; Choi, B. C.; Hong, Y. K.

    2016-09-01

    Circular magnetic spin valve nanopillars in a dual vortex configuration have dynamic characteristics strongly dependent on the interlayer dipole coupling. We report here on frequency domain properties of such nanopillars obtained by micromagnetic simulations. After the free layer is chirality switched with spin transfer torque, a radial spin wave eigenmode spectrum forms in the free layer with unusually large edge amplitude. The structure of these modes indicate a departure from the magnetostatic processes typically observed experimentally and treated analytically in low aspect ratio isolated disks. Our findings give new details of dynamic chirality control and relxation in nanopillars and raise potential signatures for experiments.

  11. Chip scale mechanical spectrum analyzers based on high quality factor overmoded bulk acouslic wave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, R. H., III

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this project was to develop high frequency quality factor (fQ) product acoustic resonators matched to a standard RF impedance of 50 {Omega} using overmoded bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators. These resonators are intended to serve as filters in a chip scale mechanical RF spectrum analyzer. Under this program different BAW resonator designs and materials were studied theoretically and experimentally. The effort resulted in a 3 GHz, 50 {Omega}, sapphire overmoded BAW with a fQ product of 8 x 10{sup 13}, among the highest values ever reported for an acoustic resonator.

  12. Similar Data Retrieval from Enormous Datasets on ELF/VLF Wave Spectrum Observed by Akebono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Kasahara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As the total amount of data measured by scientific spacecraft is drastically increasing, it is necessary for researchers to develop new computation methods for efficient analysis of these enormous datasets. In the present study, we propose a new algorithm for similar data retrieval. We first discuss key descriptors that represent characteristics of the VLF/ELF waves observed by the Akebono spacecraft. Second, an algorithm for similar data retrieval is introduced. Finally, we demonstrate that the developed algorithm works well for the retrieval of the VLF spectrum with a small amount of CPU load.

  13. Direct observation of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water and relevance of approximate resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The theoretical framework of Weak Turbulence describes the statistical properties of a large collection of nonlinear waves. For a weakly nonlinear wave field, energy is assumed to be transferred only trough resonant interaction. This enables the computation of analytical solutions of the stationary statistical states (Zakhaorv spectrum). Some similarities with hydrodynamical turbulence appear : an energy cascade is present from the injection scale to the dissipation at small scales. The theory has been applied to numerous systems many of them being of geophysical or astrophysical nature (water surface waves, internal waves, inertial waves, solar winds) as well as superfluid turbulence, lasers, nonlinear optics in fibers or vibrated elastic plates. For water surface waves, experimental laboratory measurements often fail to reproduce quantitatively theoretical predictions. Gravity waves and capillary waves are often treated separately because of their different nature. For capillary waves, energy is supposed to be transferred trough 3-waves interactions, whereas for gravity waves the coupling involves 4 waves (because of the curvature of the dispersion relation which does not allow triadic solutions). In the laboratory, the range of exited wavelength are usually not strongly separated from the crossover between capillary and gravity waves (which occur near 13 Hz) due to size or measurement limitations. Near this crossover, the dispersion relation is significantly affected and this impacts most likely the theoretical predictions. To investigate how this special point may act on the phenomenology, we report laboratory experiments on gravity-capillary waves focused on the crossover (Aubourg,Mordant-PRL,2015). The setup consists in a 70 ∗ 40 cm2 vessel where waves are generated by horizontal vibration. A Fourier Transform Profilometry technique is used that is fully resolved in time and space and thus permits to compute the full space-time spectrum. The presence of an

  14. Versatile directional searches for gravitational waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Zhu, X.-J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Wang, J. B.; Tiburzi, C.; Manchester, R. N.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wen, L.; You, X.

    2016-02-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straightforward technique by which a PTA can be `phased-up' to form time series of the two polarization modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodelled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power from any direction. For the lines of sight to several nearby massive galaxy clusters, we carry out a more detailed search for GW bursts with memory, which are distinct signatures of SMBHB mergers. In all cases, we find that the data are consistent with noise.

  15. Oblique and Multi-Directional Random Wave Loads on Vertical Breakwaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞聿修; 李本霞; 张宁川

    2003-01-01

    Extensive 3-D model tests have been performed to study the effects of wave obliquity and multi-directionality on the wave loads acting on vertical breakwaters. The variation of horizontal and uplift forces acting on an unit length of a breakwater with wave direction, the longitudinal distribution of wave forces, as well as the longitudinal load reduction are analyzed. Some empirical formulae of the longitudinal distribution coefficient and the longitudinal load reduction factor are presented for practical use.

  16. Boring and Sealing Rock with Directed Energy Millimeter-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H. H.; Oglesby, K.

    2015-12-01

    Millimeter-wave directed energy is being investigated to penetrate into deep crystalline basement rock formations to lower well costs and to melt rocks, metals, and other additives to seal wells for applications that include nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy. Laboratory tests have established that intense millimeter-wave (MMW) beams > 1 kW/cm2 can melt and/ or vaporize hard crystalline rocks. In principle this will make it possible to create open boreholes and a method to seal them with a glass/ceramic liner and plug formed from the original rock or with other materials. A 10 kW, 28 GHz commercial (CPI) gyrotron system with a launched beam diameter of about 32 mm was used to heat basalt, granite, limestone, and sandstone specimens to temperatures over 2500 °C to create melts and holes. A calibrated 137 GHz radiometer view, collinear with the heating beam, monitored real time peak rock temperature. A water load surrounding the rock test specimen primarily monitored unabsorbed power at 28 GHz. Power balance analysis of the laboratory observations shows that the temperature rise is limited by radiative heat loss, which would be expected to be trapped in a borehole. The analysis also indicates that the emissivity (absorption efficiency) in the radiated infrared range is lower than the emissivity at 28 GHz, giving the MMW frequency range an important advantage for rock melting. Strength tests on one granite type indicated that heating the rock initially weakens it, but with exposure to higher temperatures the resolidified black glassy product regains strength. Basalt was the easiest to melt and penetrate, if a melt leak path was provided, because of its low viscosity. Full beam holes up to about 50 mm diameter (diffraction increased beam size) were achieved through 30 mm thick basalt and granite specimens. Laboratory experiments to form a seal in an existing hole have also been carried out by melting rock and a simulated steel casing.

  17. Springing Response Due to Directional Wave Field Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the wave-induced high-frequency bending moment response of ships, denoted springing. The aim is to predict measured severe springing responses in a large bulk carrier. It is shown that the most important springing contribution is due to the resultant second order excitation...... in multidirectional sea. The incident pressure field from the second order bidirectional wave field is derived, including the non-linear cross-coupling terms between the two wave systems (e.g. wind driven waves and swell). The resulting effect of the super-harmonic cross-coupling interaction terms on the springing...... response is discussed. An example with opposing waves is given, representing probably the 'worst' case for energy exchange between the wave systems. Theoretical predictions of standard deviation of wave- and springing-induced stress amidships are compared with full-scale measurements for a bulk carrier....

  18. Kinetic analysis of spin current contribution to spectrum of electromagnetic waves in spin-1/2 plasma, Part II: Dispersion dependencies

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    The dielectric permeability tensor for spin polarized plasmas derived in terms of the spin-1/2 quantum kinetic model in six-dimensional phase space in Part I of this work is applied for study of spectra of high-frequency transverse and transverse-longitudinal waves propagating perpendicular to the external magnetic field. Cyclotron waves are studied at consideration of waves with electric field directed parallel to the external magnetic field. It is found that the separate spin evolution modifies the spectrum of cyclotron waves. These modifications increase with the increase of the spin polarization and the number of the cyclotron resonance. Spin dynamics with no account of the anomalous magnetic moment gives a considerable modification of spectra either. The account of anomalous magnetic moment leads to a fine structure of each cyclotron resonance. So, each cyclotron resonance splits on three waves. Details of this spectrum and its changes with the change of spin polarization are studied for the first and se...

  19. Lommel pulses: an analytic form for localized waves of the focus wave mode type with bandlimited spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Saari, Peeter

    2008-01-07

    A criticism of the focus wave mode (FWM) solution for localized pulses is that it contains backward propagating components that are difficult to generate in many practical situations. We describe a form of FWM where the strength of the backward propagating components is identically zero and derive special cases where the field can be written in an analytic form. In particular, a free-space version of "backward light" pulse is considered, which moves in the opposite direction with respect to all its spectral constituents.

  20. Vacuum and Gravitons of Relic Gravitational Waves, and Regularization of Spectrum and Energy-Momentum Tensor

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dong-Gang; Chen, Jie-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of relic gravitational wave (RGW) contains high-frequency divergences, which should be removed. We present a systematic study of the issue, based on the exact RGW solution that covers the five stages, from inflation to the acceleration, each being a power law expansion. We show that the present RGW consists of vacuum dominating at $f>10^{11}$Hz and graviton dominating at $f<10^{11}$Hz, respectively. The gravitons are produced by the four cosmic transitions, mostly by the inflation-reheating one. We perform adiabatic regularization to remove vacuum divergences in three schemes: at present, at the end of inflation, and at horizon-exit, to the 2-nd adiabatic order for the spectrum, and the 4-th order for energy density and pressure. In the first scheme a cutoff is needed to remove graviton divergences. We find that all three schemes yield the spectra of a similar profile, and the primordial spectrum defined far outside horizon during inflation is practically unaffected. We also regularize the gau...

  1. Quantum analysis of the direct measurement of light waves

    CERN Document Server

    Saldanha, Pablo L

    2014-01-01

    In a beautiful experiment performed about a decade ago, Goulielmakis et al. made a direct measurement of the electric field of light waves [E. Goulielmakis et al., Science 305, 1267-1269 (2004)]. However, they used a laser source to produce the light field, whose quantum state has a null expectation value for the electric field operator, so how was it possible to measure this electric field? Here we present a quantum treatment for the f:2f interferometer used to calibrate the carrier-envelope phase of the light pulses in the experiment. We show how the special nonlinear features of the f:2f interferometer can change the quantum state of the electromagnetic field inside the laser cavity to a state with a definite oscillating electric field, explaining how the "classical" electromagnetic field emerges in the experiment. We discuss that this experiment was, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of an absolute coherent superposition of different photon number states in the optical regime.

  2. Versatile Directional Searches for Gravitational Waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Madison, D R; Hobbs, G; Coles, W; Shannon, R M; Wang, J; Tiburzi, C; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Dempsey, J; Keith, M; Kerr, M; Lasky, P; Levin, Y; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reardon, D; Rosado, P; Spiewak, R; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wen, L; You, X

    2015-01-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straight-forward technique by which a PTA can be "phased-up" to form time series of the two polarisation modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodeled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power fr...

  3. Gravitational Waves from Direct Collapse Black Holes Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Pacucci, Fabio; Marassi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The possible formation of Direct Collapse Black Holes (DCBHs) in the first metal-free atomic cooling halos at high redshifts ($z > 10$) is nowadays object of intense study and several methods to prove their existence are currently under development. The abrupt collapse of a massive ($\\sim 10^4 - 10^5 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$) and rotating object is a powerful source of gravitational waves emission. In this work, we employ modern waveforms and the improved knowledge on the DCBHs formation rate to estimate the gravitational signal emitted by these sources at cosmological distances. Their formation rate is very high ($\\sim 10^4 \\, \\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ up to $z\\sim20$), but due to a short duration of the collapse event ($\\sim 2-30\\, \\mathrm{s}$, depending on the DCBH mass) the integrated signal from these sources is characterized by a very low duty-cycle (${\\cal D}\\sim 10^{-3}$), i.e. a shot-noise signal. Our results show that the estimated signal lies above the foreseen sensitivity of the Ultimate-DECIGO observatory ...

  4. SPECTRUM OF DIRECTED KIRKMAN PACKING DESIGNS%有向Kirkman填充设计的谱

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦; 杜北梁

    2003-01-01

    The problem studied in this article is the directed Kirkman packing,the resolvable directed packing which requires all blocks to be of size three except that,each resolution class should contain either one block of size two(when v≡2(mod 3)) or one block of size four (when v≡1 (mod 3)). A directed Kirkman packing design DKPD(v) is a resolvable directed packing of a v-set by the maximum possible number of resolution classes of this type. This article investigates the spectrum of DKPD(v) and it is found that it contains all positive integers v≥3 and v≠ 5,6.

  5. Affective-Motivational Brain Responses to Direct Gaze in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylliainen, Anneli; Wallace, Simon; Coutanche, Marc N.; Leppanen, Jukka M.; Cusack, James; Bailey, Anthony J.; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is unclear why children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) tend to be inattentive to, or even avoid eye contact. The goal of this study was to investigate affective-motivational brain responses to direct gaze in children with ASD. To this end, we combined two measurements: skin conductance responses (SCR), a robust arousal…

  6. DIRECT SPECTRUM ANALYSIS OF ANELASTIC DEFORMATION RESPONSE DURING STRUCTURAL RELAXATION OF AMORPHOUS METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CSACH, K; Ocelik, Vaclav; MISKUF, J; BENGUS, VZ; DUHAJ, P

    1994-01-01

    Direct relaxation time spectrum analysis method has been successfully used to observe and. to study changes in the kinetics of isothermal anelastic deformation response of soft magnetic metallic glass Fe40Ni40B20 during structural relaxation. Computed relaxation time spectra contain three or four qu

  7. Transverse wave propagation in [ab0] direction of silicon single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Sang Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Se Ho; Kim, Young H. [Applied Acoustics Lab, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The speed and oscillation directions of elastic waves propagating in the [ab0] direction of a silicon single crystal were obtained by solving Christoffel's equation. It was found that the quasi waves propagate in the off-principal axis, and hence, the directions of the phase and group velocities are not the same. The maximum deviation of the two directions was 7.2 degree angle. Two modes of the pure transverse waves propagate in the [110] direction with different speeds, and hence, two peaks were observed in the pulse echo signal. The amplitude ratio of the two peaks was dependent on the initial oscillating direction of the incident wave. The pure and quasi-transverse waves propagate in the [210] direction, and the oscillation directions of these waves are perpendicular to each other. The skewing angle of the quasi wave was calculated as 7.14 degree angle, and it was measured as 9.76 degree angle. The amplitude decomposition in the [210] direction was similar to that in the [110] direction, since the oscillation directions of these waves are perpendicular to each other. These results offer useful information in measuring the crystal orientation of the silicon single crystal.

  8. Direct Comparison of a Solar Moreton Wave, EUV Wave and CME (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    Veronig et al. 2010) show that other traveling EIT disturbances definitely are freely propagating MHD waves.” The latest studies from STEREO and SDO...one was reported). From an analytic model of the Moreton wave on 2005 January 17, Temmer et al. (2009) concluded that the wave was driven either...propagating EUV disturbances were identified as fast–mode magnetohydrodynamic ( MHD ) waves. They also identified a slow bright wave behind the fast

  9. Off-axis holographic lens spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system for direct and diffuse solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorndran, Shelby D; Chrysler, Benjamin; Wheelwright, Brian; Angel, Roger; Holman, Zachary; Kostuk, Raymond

    2016-09-20

    This paper describes a high-efficiency, spectrum-splitting photovoltaic module that uses an off-axis volume holographic lens to focus and disperse incident solar illumination to a rectangular shaped high-bandgap indium gallium phosphide cell surrounded by strips of silicon cells. The holographic lens design allows efficient collection of both direct and diffuse illumination to maximize energy yield. We modeled the volume diffraction characteristics using rigorous coupled-wave analysis, and simulated system performance using nonsequential ray tracing and PV cell data from the literature. Under AM 1.5 illumination conditions the simulated module obtained a 30.6% conversion efficiency. This efficiency is a 19.7% relative improvement compared to the more efficient cell in the system (silicon). The module was also simulated under a typical meteorological year of direct and diffuse irradiance in Tucson, Arizona, and Seattle, Washington. Compared to a flat panel silicon module, the holographic spectrum splitting module obtained a relative improvement in energy yield of 17.1% in Tucson and 14.0% in Seattle. An experimental proof-of-concept volume holographic lens was also fabricated in dichromated gelatin to verify the main characteristics of the system. The lens obtained an average first-order diffraction efficiency of 85.4% across the aperture at 532 nm.

  10. A Rational Procedure for Determination of Directional Individual Design Wave Heights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sterndorff, M.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2001-01-01

    crest elevation are available. In Sørensen & Sterndorff (2000) stochastic models for the annual maximum values of the omnidirectional and directional significant wave heights, individual wave heights, and individual crest heights were presented. The models include dependencies between the maximum wave......For code-based LRFD and for reliability-based assessment of offshore structures such as steel platforms it is essential that consistent directional and omnidirectional probability distributions for the maximum significant wave height, the maximum individual wave height, and the maximum individual...

  11. Analysis of Directional Spectra and Reflection Coefficients in Incident and Reflected Wave Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳淑学; 俞聿修

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the modified Bayesian method for the analysis of directional wave spectra and reflection coefficients is verified by numerical and physical simulation of waves. The results show that the method can basically separate the incident and reflected directional spectra. In addition, the effect of the type of wave gage arrays, the number of measured wave properties, and the distance between the wave gage array and the reflection line on the resolution of the method are investigated. Some suggestions are proposed for practical application.

  12. Solitary wave generation from continuum in asymmetric oppositely directed nonlinear waveguide coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantseva, E. V.; Maimistov, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    In a model which describes asymmetric oppositely directed nonlinear waveguide coupler it was observed in the numerical simulation a phenomenon of solitary wave formation from the input constant continuous wave set at the entrance of a waveguide with negative index of refraction. Threshold value of the amplitude of the constant continuous wave, which defines the condition of appearance of the first solitary wave, decreases with increasing of the parameter of nonlinearity. The period of solitary wave formation decreases with increasing of the continuum wave amplitude.

  13. Design of folded holographic spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system for direct and diffuse illumination conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuechen; Vorndran, Shelby D.; Russo, Juan M.; Ayala, Silvana; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2014-10-01

    Spectrum-splitting is a beneficial technique to increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of photovoltaic (PV) systems. This method divides the incident solar spectrum into spectral components that are spatially separated and directed to PV cells with matching spectral responsivity characteristics. This approach eliminates problems associated with current and lattice matching that must be maintained in tandem multi-junction systems. In this paper, a two-junction holographic spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system is demonstrated with a folded PV geometry. The system is designed to use both direct and diffuse solar irradiation. It consists of holographic elements, a wedge-shaped optical guide, and PV substrates with back reflectors. The holographic elements and back reflectors spatially separate the incident solar spectrum and project spectral components onto matching PV cell types. In addition, the wedge-shaped optical guide traps diffuse illumination inside the system to increase absorption. In this paper, the wedge spectrum splitting system is analyzed using tabulated data for InGaP2/GaAs cells with direct illumination combined with experimental data for reflection volume holograms. A system efficiency of 31.42% is obtained with experimental reflection hologram data. This efficiency is a 21.42% improvement over a similar system that uses one PV cell with the highest efficiency (GaAs). Simulation results show large acceptance angle for both in-plane and out-of plane directions. Simulation of the output power of the system with different configurations at different times of the year are also presented.

  14. Experimental research on spectrum and imaging of continuous-wave terahertz radiation based on interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tie-Lin; Yuan, Hui; Kong, Ling-Qin; Zhao, Yue-Jin; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2016-08-01

    A system for measuring terahertz spectrum is proposed based on optical interferometer theory, and is experimentally demonstrated by using a backward-wave oscillator as the terahertz source. A high-resolution, high-precision interferometer is constructed by using a pyroelectric detector and a chopper. The results show that the spectral resolution is better than 1 GHz and the relative error of frequency is less than 3%. The terahertz energy density distribution is calculated by an inverse Fourier transform and tested to verify the feasibility of the interferometric approach. Two kinds of carbon-fiber composites are imaged. The results confirm that the interferometer is useful for transmission imaging of materials with different thickness values. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61377109 and 11374007).

  15. A survey of the millimeter-wave spectrum of Sagittarius B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, S. E.; Thaddeus, P.; Linke, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    More than 60 percent of the millimeter wave spectrum between 70 and 150 GHz of the giant Sgr B2 molecular cloud was surveyed with the Bell Laboratories 7 m telescope at a spectral resolution of 1 MHz. The observations and instrumentation are described, including beam efficiency and beamwidth as functions of frequency, frequency coverage, and rms noise. The catalog used to identify the 457 lines found is summarized, and the analysis of the data to determine column densities and rotational temperatures is discussed. The range of rotational temperatures obtained and their relation to the kinetic temperature, and their implications for the hydrogen density, are considered. More than 300 lines are transitions of 21 molecules, and the results for these are analyzed, giving excitation diagrams for most of them. A partly successful attempt is made to use ratios of the calculated abundances to predict abundances of as yet undetected species. Finally, the spectra for the entire survey are presented.

  16. Directionality and spread of shallow water waves along the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anoop, T.R.

    height, (b) peak wave period, (c) mean wave direction, (d) wave age, (e) skewness of the surface elevation, and (f) mean spreading angle. The hourly average value of directional width during differ- ent months indicates that the variation is large (≈ 16... between θ and ϕ (Fig. 6c and d). The difference between θ and ϕ at spectral peak is large for Hm0 less than 1 m (Fig. 6e and f) and is neg- ligible (< 5◦) for Hm0 more than 1 m. The directional width is large (∼ 60◦) for the waves from θp < 240◦ with Hm0...

  17. Spectrum Trading in India and 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripathi, Purnendu; Prasad, Ramjee

    2013-01-01

    Currently radio spectrum is largely managed through Command and Control method. Public mobile services require spectrum below 3 GHz for providing cost effective services. The existing method has created artificial shortage of spectrum especially below 3 GHz. Spectrum trading is a new concept in w...... for spectrum trading and it could provide a boost to the Indian telecom sector. Further, it will also discuss spectrum issue related with 5G in the direction of millimeter waves....

  18. Influence of the condensate and inverse cascade on the direct cascade in wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, A O

    2009-01-01

    During direct numerical simulation of the isotropic turbulence of surface gravity waves in the framework of Hamiltonian equations formation of the long wave background or condensate was observed. Exponents of the direct cascade spectra at the different levels of an artificial condensate suppression show a tendency to become closer to the prediction of the wave turbulence theory at lower levels of condensate. A simple qualitative explanation of the mechanism of this phenomenon is proposed.

  19. 3D attitude measurement by means of spread spectrum modulated ultrasonic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinji Ohyama; Hiroshi Iwasawa; Sang Il Ko; Junya Takayama

    2007-01-01

    Local position and attitude measurement methods are necessary for the navigation of autonomous robots and the other applications. In this paper, a 3D attitude measurement method is proposed. This method uses the spread spectrum modulated ultrasonic wave for the measurement of the pseudo-distance of each pathway between transmitter and receiver elements that are arranged in an array. The relative attitude between transmitter and receiver unit could be calculated from the relationship between these pseudo-distances. The use of spread spectrum modulation enables the high accuracy, noise tolerance, and coexistence of multiple transmitter devices by code division multiple access (CDMA) between transmitter and receiver elements. A pair of transmitter and receiver prototype for proposed method was manufactured, and the fundamental performance was examined in experiments. As a result, accuracy of σ = 0.78 mm in the pseudo-distance measurement of each pathway between transmitter and receiver elements was confirmed, and about 0.01 rad resolution in the attitude measurement was also confirmed.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of the Responses of Classic Spar Platform Subjected to Bi-directional Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.J. Kurian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the bi-directional short-crested waves on the dynamic motion responses of the moored classic spar is demonstrated from the results of the models test in this study. Practically in the design of offshore structures, long-crested or 2-dimensional wave properties that propagated to one direction are considered. Even though such long-crested wave is widely used for the design purposes, it is hardly determined in the real sea. The wind generated sea state in the real sea conditions are indeed well represented by the short-crested waves. Short-crested waves are defined as linear summation of long-crested wave series that propagated to different directions. Hence, the motions of the model were investigated experimentally by conducting the wave tank tests in the wave tank of Offshore Laboratory of Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS. Five groups of bi-directional wave series were defined and exerted on the classic spar model, which fabricated by using steel with scaling factor of 1:100. From the results measured, it was found that similar trends of the responses in term of Response Amplitude Operator (RAO for surge, heave and pitch motions were obtained. Maximum responses of surge, heave and pitch were found due to wave crossing angle 90°, while minimum response was found due to wave crossing angle 135°, respectively. It could be concluded that the wave crossing angle 90° (BD3 gives the widest spreading for short crested waves, while the wave crossing angle 135° (BD4 gives the narrowest spreading for short crested waves.

  1. Computer Analysis of Spectrum Anomaly in 32-GHz Traveling-Wave Tube for Cassini Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, James A., Jr.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kory, Carol L.

    1999-01-01

    Computer modeling of the 32-GHz traveling-wave tube (TWT) for the Cassini Mission was conducted to explain the anomaly observed in the spectrum analysis of one of the flight-model tubes. The analysis indicated that the effect, manifested as a weak signal in the neighborhood of 35 GHz, was an intermodulation product of the 32-GHz drive signal with a 66.9-GHz oscillation induced by coupling to the second harmonic'signal. The oscillation occurred only at low- radiofrequency (RF) drive power levels that are not expected during the Cassini Mission. The conclusion was that the anomaly was caused by a generic defect inadvertently incorporated in the geometric design of the slow-wave circuit and that it would not change as the TWT aged. The most probable effect of aging on tube performance would be a reduction in the electron beam current. The computer modeling indicated that although not likely to occur within the mission lifetime, a reduction in beam current would reduce or eliminate the anomaly but would do so at the cost of reduced RF output power.

  2. Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices by Marc Litz...MD 20783-1138 ARL-TR-7082 September 2014 Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN... Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  3. 60-GHz Millimeter-wave Over Fiber with Directly Modulated Dual-mode Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2016-06-01

    A directly modulated dual-mode laser diode (DMLD) with third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD3) suppression is proposed for a 60-GHz millimeter-wave over fiber (MMWoF) architecture, enabling new fiber-wireless communication access to cover 4-km single-mode-fiber (SMF) and 3-m wireless 16-QAM OFDM transmissions. By dual-mode injection-locking, the throughput degradation of the DMLD is mitigated with saturation effect to reduce its threshold, IMD3 power and relative intensity noise to 7.7 mA, ‑85 dBm and ‑110.4 dBc/Hz, respectively, providing huge spurious-free dynamic range of 85.8 dB/Hz2/3. This operation suppresses the noise floor of the DMLD carried QPSK-OFDM spectrum by 5 dB. The optical receiving power is optimized to restrict the power fading effect for improving the bit error rate to 1.9 × 10‑3 and the receiving power penalty to 1.1 dB. Such DMLD based hybrid architecture for 60-GHz MMW fiber-wireless access can directly cover the current optical and wireless networks for next-generation indoor and short-reach mobile communications.

  4. The June 2016 Australian East Coast Low: Importance of Wave Direction for Coastal Erosion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Mortlock

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In June 2016, an unusual East Coast Low storm affected some 2000 km of the eastern seaboard of Australia bringing heavy rain, strong winds and powerful wave conditions. While wave heights offshore of Sydney were not exceptional, nearshore wave conditions were such that beaches experienced some of the worst erosion in 40 years. Hydrodynamic modelling of wave and current behaviour as well as contemporaneous sand transport shows the east to north-east storm wave direction to be the major determinant of erosion magnitude. This arises because of reduced energy attenuation across the continental shelf and the focussing of wave energy on coastal sections not equilibrated with such wave exposure under the prevailing south-easterly wave climate. Narrabeen–Collaroy, a well-known erosion hot spot on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, is shown to be particularly vulnerable to storms from this direction because the destructive erosion potential is amplified by the influence of the local embayment geometry. We demonstrate the magnified erosion response that occurs when there is bi-directionality between an extreme wave event and preceding modal conditions and the importance of considering wave direction in extreme value analyses.

  5. The research on direct-drive wave energy conversion system and performance optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhongxian; YU Haitao; HU Minqiang

    2014-01-01

    A direct-drive wave energy conversion system based on a three-phase permanent magnet tubular linear generator (PMTLG) and a heaving buoy is proposed to convert wave energy into electrical energy. Sufficient experimental methods are adopted to compare the computer simulations, the validity of which is verified by the experiment results from a wave tank laboratory. In the experiment, the motion curves of heaving buoy are with small fluctuations, mainly caused by the PMTLG’s detent force. For the reduction of these small fluctuations and a maximum operational efficiency of the direct-drive wave energy conversion system, the PMTLG’s detent force minimization technique and the heaving buoy optimization will be discussed. It is discovered that the operational efficiency of the direct-drive wave energy conversion system increases dra-matically after optimization. The experiment and optimization results will provide useful reference for the future research on ocean wave energy conversion system.

  6. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  7. A highly efficient directional molecular white-light emitter driven by a continuous-wave laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemann, Nils W.; Eußner, Jens P.; Beyer, Andreas; Koch, Stephan W.; Volz, Kerstin; Dehnen, Stefanie; Chatterjee, Sangam

    2016-06-01

    Tailored light sources have greatly advanced technological and scientific progress by optimizing the emission spectrum or color and the emission characteristics. We demonstrate an efficient spectrally broadband and highly directional warm-white-light emitter based on a nonlinear process driven by a cheap, low-power continuous-wave infrared laser diode. The nonlinear medium is a specially designed amorphous material composed of symmetry-free, diamondoid-like cluster molecules that are readily obtained from ubiquitous resources. The visible part of the spectrum resembles the color of a tungsten-halogen lamp at 2900 kelvin while retaining the superior beam divergence of the driving laser. This approach of functionalizing energy-efficient state-of-the-art semiconductor lasers enables a technology complementary to light-emitting diodes for replacing incandescent white-light emitters in high-brilliance applications.

  8. Third-order theory for multi-directional irregular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2012-01-01

    at the free surface are also provided, and the formulation incorporates the effect of an ambient current with the option of specifying zero net volume flux. Harmonic resonance may occur at third order for certain combinations of frequencies and wavenumber vectors, and in this situation the perturbation theory...... breaks down due to singularities in the transfer functions. We analyse harmonic resonance for the case of a monochromatic short-crested wave interacting with a plane wave having a different frequency, and make long-term simulations with a high-order Boussinesq formulation in order to study the evolution...

  9. Experimental verification of directional liquid surface wave emission at band edge frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenyu, E-mail: wzyu@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Yongqiang; Nie, Xiaofei

    2013-12-15

    Directional liquid surface wave emission at band edge frequencies is an interesting physical phenomenon and has already been studied in theoretical research. There has been no experimental validation of it to date, however. This paper has as its subject the experimental investigation of the emission effect when a point source is placed inside a finite square array of rigid cylinders standing vertically in liquid. Both the wave patterns and spatial intensities are obtained by experiment and compared with simulated results calculated by using the finite element method. We can see from this comparison that the two results correspond closely both at lower and upper band edge frequency. Obvious directional wave emission along a desired direction is observed in the source structures, confirming previous theoretical predictions. In the future, this method could serve as a directional liquid wave source in applications used in hydraulic and ocean engineering for the concentration of wave energy.

  10. The effect of turbulent density fluctuations on wave-particle interactions and solar flare X-ray spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hannah, I G; Reid, H A S

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the effect of turbulent background density fluctuations on flare accelerated electron transport in the solar corona. Using the quasi-linear approximation, we numerically simulate the propagation of a beam of accelerated electrons from the solar corona to chromosphere, including the self-consistent response of the inhomogeneous background plasma in the form of Langmuir waves. We calculate the X-ray spectrum from these simulations using the bremsstrahlung cross-section and fit the footpoint spectrum using the collisional "thick-target" model, a standard approach adopted in observational studies. We find that the interaction of the Langmuir waves with the background electron density gradient shifts the waves to higher phase velocity where they then resonate with higher velocity electrons. The consequence is that some of the electrons are shifted to higher energies, producing more high energy X-rays than expected in the cases where the density inhomogeneity is not considered. We find that the level...

  11. Transformation of a wave energy spectrum from encounter to absolute domain when observing from an advancing ship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a practical approach to transform a wave energy spectrum from encounter domain to absolute domain. This problem has its specific relevance, when shipboard sea state estimation is conducted by the buoy analogy; notably for some particular implementation solving for the sea state......” the waves (beam to head sea) but in following sea conditions there exists no unique solution to the problem. Instead, a reasonable approach valid for practical engineering must be applied, and the article outlines one viable solution that can be used to transform a wave spectrum from encounter to absolute...... domain. Specifically, two pseudo algorithms are presented, and good performance is achieved with both algorithms when they are tested at different operational scenarios....

  12. Universal breaking point asymptotic for energy spectrum of Riemann waves in weakly nonlinear non-dispersive media

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter we study the form of the energy spectrum of Riemann waves in weakly nonlinear non-dispersive media. For quadratic and cubic nonlinearity we demonstrate that the deformation of an Riemann wave over time yields an exponential energy spectrum which turns into power law asymptotic with the slope being approximately -8/3 at the last stage of evolution before breaking. We argue, that this is the universal asymptotic behaviour of Riemann waves in any nonlinear non-dispersive medium at the point of breaking. The results reported in this Letter can be used in various non-dispersive media, e.g. magneto-hydro dynamics, physical oceanography, nonlinear acoustics.

  13. Directional wave measurements off Navinal, Gulf of Kachchh, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; KrishnaKumar, V.; Suryanarayana, A.; Antony, M.K.; Swamy, G.N.

    traced. An exercise was carried out to see if any relationship exists between these long period waves and various stages of tides, but no pattern could be noticed. As this study is meant for coastal development activities, occurrence of cyclone is also...

  14. Direct excitation of resonant torsional Alfven waves by footpoint motions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruderman, M. S.; Berghmans, D.; Goossens, M.; Poedts, S.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper studies the heating of coronal loops by linear resonant Alfven waves that are excited by the motions of the photospheric footpoints of the magnetic field lines. The analysis is restricted to torsionally polarised footpoint motions in an axially symmetric system so that only

  15. Directional bending wave propagation in periodically perforated plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Manktelow, Kevin; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We report on the investigation of wave propagation in a periodically perforated plate. A unit cell with double-C perforations is selected as a test article suitable to investigate two-dimensional dispersion characteristics, group velocities, and internal resonances. A numerical model, formulated ...

  16. Spectrum for heavy quarkonia and mixture of the relevant wave functions within the framework of Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG; ChaoHsi

    2010-01-01

    Considering the fact that some excited states of the heavy quarkonia (charmonium and bottomonium) are still missing in experimental observations and potential applications of the relevant wave functions of the bound states,we re-analyze the spectrum and the relevant wave functions of the heavy quarkonia within the framework of Bethe-Salpeter (B.S.) equation with a proper QCDinspired kernel.Such a kernel for the heavy quarkonia,relating to potential of the non-relativistic quark model,is instantaneous,so we call the corresponding B.S.equation as BS-In equation throughout the paper.Particularly,a new way to solve the B.S.equation,which is different from the traditional ones,is proposed here,and with it not only the known spectrum for the heavy quarkonia is re-generated,but also an important issue is brought in,i.e.,the obtained solutions of the equation ‘automatically’ include the ‘fine’,‘hyperfine’ splittings and the wave function mixture,such as S-D wave mixing in J PC = 1-states,P-F wave mixing in J PC = 2 ++ states for charmonium,bottomonium etc.It is pointed out that the best place to test the wave mixture probably is at Z-factory (e + e-collider running at Z-boson pole with extremely high luminosity).

  17. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts. III - Polarization, directivity, and spectrum of the reflected and total bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, S. H.; Petrosian, V.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the spectrum, directivity, and state of polarization of the bremsstrahlung radiation expected from a beam of high-energy electrons spiraling along radial magnetic field lines toward the photosphere. A Monte Carlo method is then described for evaluation of the spectrum, directivity, and polarization of X-rays diffusely reflected from stellar photospheres. The accuracy of the technique is evaluated through comparison with analytic results. The calculated characteristics of the incident X-rays are used to evaluate the spectrum, directivity, and polarization of the reflected and total X-ray fluxes. The results are compared with observations.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of an inertial wave attractor in linear and nonlinear regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Jouve, Laurène

    2014-01-01

    In a uniformly rotating fluid, inertial waves propagate along rays that are inclined to the rotation axis by an angle that depends on the wave frequency. In closed domains, multiple reflections from the boundaries may cause inertial waves to focus on to particular structures known as wave attractors. Such structures have previously been studied from a theoretical point of view, in laboratory experiments, in linear numerical calculations and in some recent numerical simulations. In the present paper, two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of an inertial wave attractor are presented. In the linear regime, we first recover the results of the linear calculations and asymptotic theory of Ogilvie (2005) who considered a prototypical problem involving the focusing of linear internal waves into a narrow beam centred on a wave attractor in a steady state. The velocity profile of the beam and its scalings with the Ekman number, as well as the asymptotic value of the dissipation rate, are found to be in agreement ...

  19. Direct Synthesis and Spectrum Analysis of CeO2 Nanoparticles Deposited on Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zuwei; HU Chenguo; XIONG Yufeng; XIA Chuanhui; LI Feiyun; WANG Xue

    2009-01-01

    A novel method of direct synthesis of CeO2 nanoparticles onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was developed with advantages of simplicity, ease of scale-up, and low costs.The size of CeO2 particles deposited on the MWNTs was less than 6 nm. SEM and TEM were em-ployed to analysis the CeO2 coated MWNTs, and the properties of FTIR spectrum and UV-vis ab-sorption spectrum were investigated. The functional groups on the MWNTs obtained by nitric acid treatment play an important role on the deposition of the CeO2 particles. The carbon nanotubes possess broadened UV absorption function after being coated with CeO2 nanopartilces.

  20. Does gaze direction modulate facial expression processing in children with autism spectrum disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Hironori; Senju, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Tojo, Yoshikuni; Osanai, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) integrate relevant communicative signals, such as gaze direction, when decoding a facial expression. In Experiment 1, typically developing children (9-14 years old; n = 14) were faster at detecting a facial expression accompanying a gaze direction with a congruent motivational tendency (i.e., an avoidant facial expression with averted eye gaze) than those with an incongruent motivational tendency. Children with ASD (9-14 years old; n = 14) were not affected by the gaze direction of facial stimuli. This finding was replicated in Experiment 2, which presented only the eye region of the face to typically developing children (n = 10) and children with ASD (n = 10). These results demonstrated that children with ASD do not encode and/or integrate multiple communicative signals based on their affective or motivational tendency.

  1. EXACT SOLITARY WAVE SOLUTIONS TO A CLASS OF NONLINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS USING DIRECT ALGEBRAIC METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Using direct algebraic method,exact solitary wave solutions are performed for a class of third order nonlinear dispersive disipative partial differential equations. These solutions are obtained under certain conditions for the relationship between the coefficients of the equation. The exact solitary waves of this class are rational functions of real exponentials of kink-type solutions.

  2. Fifth ASTROD Symposium and Outlook of Direct Gravitational-Wave Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G; Ni, Wei-Tou

    2012-01-01

    From July 11 to July 13, 2012, Raman Research Institute (Bangalore, India) hosted the Fifth International ASTROD Symposium on Laser Astrodynamics, Space Test of Relativity and Gravitational-Wave Astronomy. This is a report on the symposium with an exposition of the outlook of direct gravitational-wave detection.

  3. An evaluation of directional analysis techniques for multidirectional, partially reflected waves .1. numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilic, C; Chadwick, A; Helm-Petersen, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies of advanced directional analysis techniques have mainly centred on incident wave fields. In the study of coastal structures, however, partially reflective wave fields are commonly present. In the near structure field, phase locked methods can be successfully applied. In the far fie...

  4. Directional cloaking of flexural waves in a plate with a locally resonant metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Rupin, Matthieu

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the numerical design of a directional invisibility cloak for backward scattered elastic waves propagating in a thin plate (A0 Lamb waves). The directional cloak is based on a set of resonating beams that are attached perpendicular to the plate and are arranged at a sub-wavelength scale in ten concentric rings. The exotic effective properties of this locally resonant metamaterial ensure coexistence of bandgaps and directional cloaking for certain beam configurations over a large frequency band. The best directional cloaking was obtained when the resonators' length decreases from the central to the outermost ring. In this case, flexural waves experience a vanishing index of refraction when they cross the outer layers, leading to a frequency bandgap that protects the central part of the cloak. Numerical simulation shows that there is no back-scattering in these configurations. These results might have applications in the design of seismic-wave protection devices.

  5. The synchrotron-self-Compton spectrum of relativistic blast waves at large Y

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, M

    2015-01-01

    Recent analyses of multiwavelength light curves of gamma-ray bursts afterglows point to values of the magnetic turbulence well below the canonical $\\sim1\\,$\\% of equipartition, in agreement with theoretical expectations of a micro-turbulence generated in the shock precursor, which then decays downstream of the shock front through collisionless damping. As a direct consequence, the Compton parameter $Y$ can take large values in the blast. In the presence of decaying micro-turbulence and/or as a result of the Klein-Nishina suppression of inverse Compton cooling, the $Y$ parameter carries a non-trivial dependence on the electron Lorentz factor, which modifies the spectral shape of the synchrotron and inverse Compton components. This paper provides detailed calculations of this synchrotron-self-Compton spectrum in this large $Y$ regime, accounting for the possibility of decaying micro-turbulence. It calculates the expected temporal and spectral indices $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ customarily defined by $F_\

  6. Time-dependent wave packet approach to the pulse delay effect upon RbI photoelectron spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chunhua; MENG Qingtian; ZHANG Qinggang

    2006-01-01

    The time-resolved photoelectron spectrum (TRPES) of Rbl molecule is simulated using the time-dependent wave-packet method. Both the normal three-photon ionization process and auto-ionization process are involved in the simulation. The calculated results show that the change of delay time will influence the shape of the photoelectron spectrum (PES), and the influence is substantially due to the existence of the crossing between excited states and the strong laser field which will change the position of relevant curves.

  7. FULLSPECTRUM. A new PV wave making more efficient use of the solar spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luque, A.; Marti, A.; Algora, C.; Wahnon, P.; Sala, G.; Beniteze, P. [Instituto de Energia Solar-Universidad Politecnica de Madrid IES-UPM, Madrid (Spain); Bett, A.; Gombert, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany); Andreev, V.M. [Ioffe Physico-Ttechnical Institute, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Jaussaud, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Department. pour les Technologies des Energies Nouvelles CEA-DTEN, Grenoble (France); Van Roosmalen, J.A.M. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Alonso, J. [Isofoton S.A., Malaga (Spain); Rauber, A. [PSE Projektgesellschaft Solare Energiesysteme, Freiburg (Germany); Strobl, G. [RWE Space Solar Power, Heilbronn (Germany); Stolz, W. [Philipps University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Bitnarj, B. [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Stanleyk, C. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Conesa, J.C. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [Department of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijerink, A. [Department of Chemistry of Condensed Matter, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Klink, G.P.M. [Department of Homogeneous Catalysis and Metal-Mediated Synthesis, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Barnham, K. [Imperial College of Science, Medicine and Technology, London (United Kingdom); Danz, R. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP, Potsdam (Germany); Meyer, T. [Solaronix SA, Aubonne (Switzerland); Luque-Heredia, I. [Inspira S.L., Madrid (Spain); Kenny, R. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (Italy); Christofides, C. [Department of Physics, University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2005-04-01

    The project FULLSPECTRUM, an Integrated Project (IP) in the terminology of the European Commission, pursues a better exploitation of the FULL solar SPECTRUM by (1) further developing concepts already scientifically proven but not yet developed and (2) by trying to prove new ones in the search for a breakthrough in photovoltaic (PV) technology. More specific objectives are the development of: (a) III-V multijunction cells (MJC), (b) solar thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) converters, (c) intermediate band (IB) materials and cells (IBC), (d) molecular-based concepts (MBC) for full PV utilisation of the solar spectrum and (e) manufacturing technologies (MFG) for novel concepts including assembling. MJC technology towards 40% efficiency will be developed using lower cost substrates and high light concentration (up or above 1000 suns). TPV is a concept with a theoretically high efficiency limit because the entire energy of all the photons is used in the heating process and because the non-used photons can be fed back to the emitter, therefore helping in keeping it hot. In the IBC approach, sub-bandgap photons are exploited by means of an IB. Specific IB materials will be sought by direct synthesis suggested by material-band calculations and using nanotechnology in quantum dot (QD) IBCs. In the development of the MBC, topics such as the development of two-photon dye cells and the development of a static global (direct and diffuse) light concentrator by means of luminescent multicolour dyes and QDs, with the radiation confined by photonic crystals, will be particularly addressed. MFG include optoelectronic assembling techniques and coupling of light to cells with new-optic miniconcentrators.

  8. Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Steganographic Scheme for IEEE 802.15.4

    CERN Document Server

    Zielinska, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the issues related to network steganography in IEEE 802.15.4 Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPAN). The proposed communication scheme employs illicit Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum code sequences for the transmission of steganographic data. The presented approach is a compromise between minimising the probability of covert channel disclosure and providing robustness against random errors and a high steganographic data rate. The conducted analyses show that it is possible to create a covert channel with a data rate comparable to the raw data rate of IEEE 802.15.4 without much impact on the perceived receiver sensitivity, the Chip Error Rate and the Bit Error Rate.

  9. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts. 4: Polarization, directivity and spectrum of the reflected and total bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, S. H.; Petrosian, V.

    1976-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method is described for evaluation of the spectrum, directivity and polarization of X-rays diffusely reflected from stellar photospheres. the accuracy of the technique is evaluated through comparison with analytic results. Using the characteristics of the incident X-rays of the model for solar X-ray flares, the spectrum, directivity and polarization of the reflected and the total X-ray fluxes are evaluated. The results are compared with observations.

  10. Analysis of wave directional spreading using neural networks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deo, M.C.; Gondane, D; SanilKumar, V.

    be arrived at from easily average zero-cross wave period, using the technique of neural networks. model the spreading function, D( f ,u), at a given location ~Borg- cable for buoy measurements used herein are stated in Appendix man 1969!. Out of these..., the Cosine Power 2-s model is common and popular. This model is as follows: D~ f ,u!5G~s! cos 2s @~u2u m !/2# (2) where G~s!5@G~s11!#/@2ApG~s10.5!# (3) I. Use of a 1 ( f ), b 1 ( f ) and a 2 ( f ), b 2 ( f ) separately yields two alternative values...

  11. Double-Directional Information Azimuth Spectrum and Relay Network Tomography for a Decentralized Wireless Relay Network

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yifan

    2010-01-01

    A novel channel representation for a two-hop decentralized wireless relay network (DWRN) is proposed, where the relays operate in a completely distributive fashion. The modeling paradigm applies an analogous approach to the description method for a double-directional multipath propagation channel, and takes into account the finite system spatial resolution and the extended relay listening/transmitting time. Specifically, the double-directional information azimuth spectrum (IAS) is formulated to provide a compact representation of information flows in a DWRN. The proposed channel representation is then analyzed from a geometrically-based statistical modeling perspective. Finally, we look into the problem of relay network tomography (RNT), which solves an inverse problem to infer the internal structure of a DWRN by using the instantaneous doubledirectional IAS recorded at multiple measuring nodes exterior to the relay region.

  12. Reflection of plane electromagnetic waves from the surface of a perfect conductor moving in an arbitrary direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The reflection of plane electromagnetic waves (TE wave and TM wave) from a perfect conductor which moves in an arbitrary direction is investigated. Based on Maxwell's equations and the boundary conditions for moving boundary, the relation between the field vectors of reflected and incident waves, and the reflection coefficient are derived. The energy balance between incident and reflected waves, the force exerted by electromagnetic waves to the moving conductor are also discussed and some new conclusions are suggested for notice.

  13. A Chaos-Based Secure Direct-Sequence/Spread-Spectrum Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Xuan Quyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a chaos-based secure direct-sequence/spread-spectrum (DS/SS communication system which is based on a novel combination of the conventional DS/SS and chaos techniques. In the proposed system, bit duration is varied according to a chaotic behavior but is always equal to a multiple of the fixed chip duration in the communication process. Data bits with variable duration are spectrum-spread by multiplying directly with a pseudonoise (PN sequence and then modulated onto a sinusoidal carrier by means of binary phase-shift keying (BPSK. To recover exactly the data bits, the receiver needs an identical regeneration of not only the PN sequence but also the chaotic behavior, and hence data security is improved significantly. Structure and operation of the proposed system are analyzed in detail. Theoretical evaluation of bit-error rate (BER performance in presence of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN is provided. Parameter choice for different cases of simulation is also considered. Simulation and theoretical results are shown to verify the reliability and feasibility of the proposed system. Security of the proposed system is also discussed.

  14. Oscillation in power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave as a signature of higher-order stringy corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yong; Piao, Yun-Song

    2015-01-01

    In low-energy effective string theory, $\\alpha'$ corrections involve the coupling of the dilaton field to higher-order curvature terms. By numerical method, we find that such corrections may bring unusual oscillations to the inflationary gravitational wave spectrum, which can be measurably imprinted in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization. We analytically show that the intensity of the oscillations is determined by the string scale $M_s$ and the string coupling $g_s$.

  15. Efficient computation of the gravitational wave spectrum emitted by eccentric massive black hole binaries in stellar environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyuan; Sesana, Alberto; Del Pozzo, Walter

    2017-09-01

    We present a fast and versatile method to calculate the characteristic spectrum hc of the gravitational wave background (GWB) emitted by a population of eccentric massive black hole binaries (MBHBs). We fit the spectrum of a reference MBHB with a simple analytic function and show that the spectrum of any other MBHB can be derived from this reference spectrum via simple scalings of mass, redshift and frequency. We then apply our calculation to a realistic population of MBHBs evolving via three-body scattering of stars in galactic nuclei. We demonstrate that our analytic prescription satisfactorily describes the signal in the frequency band relevant to pulsar timing array (PTA) observations. Finally, we model the high-frequency steepening of the GWB to provide a complete description of the features characterizing the spectrum. For typical stellar distributions observed in massive galaxies, our calculation shows that three-body scattering alone is unlikely to affect the GWB in the PTA band and a low-frequency turnover in the spectrum is caused primarily by high eccentricities.

  16. Development of an omni-directional shear-horizontal wave magnetostrictive patch transducer for plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Hong Min; Kim, Hoe Woong; Kim, Yoon Young

    2013-09-01

    As an effective tool to inspect large plates, omni-directional guided wave transducers have become more widely used to form phased-array inspection systems. While omni-directional Lamb wave transducers have been successfully utilized in the systems, omni-directional Shear-Horizontal (SH) wave transducers have not been investigated. In this paper, we propose an omni-directional SH magnetostrictive patch transducer that consists of an annular magnetostrictive patch, a toroidal coil and a permanent magnet. After presenting the unique configuration of the proposed transducer and its working principle, the omni-directivity of the developed transducer is verified through simulations and experiments conducted in an aluminum plate. The frequency characteristics of the proposed transducer depending on the patch size are also investigated as the underlying reference data for future construction of an SH phased-array system.

  17. Cavity-based linear polarizer immune to the polarization direction of an incident plane wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Shen, Zhongxiang; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Wen

    2016-01-15

    We herein report a linear polarizer based on a 2D array of substrate integrated waveguide cavities, which can convert an arbitrary linearly polarized (LP) incident wave into an outgoing LP wave in a specified polarization direction with constant transmittance. Two orthogonal slots etched on the front surface of the cavity are utilized to couple a wave of arbitrary polarization into the cavity, while another slot on the back side helps to couple the field out along a desired polarization direction. Microwave experiments are performed as a proof of concept. The proposed polarizer exhibits very good performance with stable transmittance as 50% and a polarization extinction ratio over 45 dB. The new polarizer is potentially useful in novel polarization-selective devices that are immune to the polarization direction of an incident plane wave.

  18. One-Directional Fluidic Flow Induced by Chemical Wave Propagation in a Microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Miyu; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Hattori, Mika; Hasegawa, Takahiko; Sato, Mami; Unoura, Kei; Nabika, Hideki

    2016-05-26

    A one-directional flow induced by chemical wave propagation was investigated to understand the origin of its dynamic flow. A cylindrical injection port was connected with a straight propagation channel; the chemical wave was initiated at the injection port. Chemical waves propagated with a constant velocity irrespective of the channel width, indicating that the dynamics of the chemical waves were governed by a geometry-independent interplay between the chemical reaction and diffusion. In contrast, the velocity of the one-directional flow was dependent on the channel width. Furthermore, enlargement of the injection port volume increased the flow velocity and volume flux. These results imply that the one-directional flow in the microchannel is due to a hydrodynamic effect induced in the injection port. Spectroscopic analysis of a pH indicator revealed the simultaneous behavior between the pH increase near the injection port and the one-directional flow. Hence, we can conclude that the one-directional flow in the microchannel with chemical wave propagation was caused by a proton consumption reaction in the injection port, probably through liquid volume expansion by the reaction products and the reaction heat. It is a characteristic feature of the present system that the hydrodynamic flow started from the chemical wave initiation point and not the propagation wavefront, as observed for previous systems.

  19. Direct bed stress measurements under solitary tsunami-type waves and breaking tsunami wave fronts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    in the stability of submarine sediments. Laboratory experiments were performed to obtain total shear stresses under tsunami-type breaking and non-breaking solitary waves. The total stress comprises arises from a pressure gradient force and a skin friction shear...

  20. The effect of nonuniform motion on the Doppler spectrum of scattered continuous-wave waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Addison, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a widely treated phenomena in both radar and sonar for objects undergoing uniform motion. There are many different models (Censor has written a history of the subject) one can use to derive the Doppler effect. The treatment of non-uniform motion is not widely discussed in the literature of radar and sonar. Some authors argue it is negligible, while others refer to work dating back to Kelly in the early sixties. The treatment by Kelly, based on waveform analysis in acoustics, is difficult to justify in electromagnetism. Using the language of waveform analysis it is difficult to determine when approximations are justified by the physics of the waveform interaction and when they aren't. By returning to electromagnetic considerations in the derivation and subsequent analysis, issues associated with the correct physics and proper approximations become transparent. We present a straight forward analysis of the non-uniform Doppler effect based on the relativistic mirror (moving boundary) that is undergoing arbitrary motion. The resultant structure of the scattered waveform provides a simple representation of the effect of non-uniform motion on the scattered waveform that can be more easily analyzed. This work is a continuation of earlier work done by Censor, De Smedt, and Cooper. This analysis is independent of narrow-band assumptions so it is completely general. Non-uniform motion can produce two types of effects associated with the Doppler spectrum, a baseband line that isn't straight and micro-Doppler off of the baseband that produces complicated sideband behavior. Complicated baseband and micro-Doppler are illustrated by using the example of a particular waveform, the continuous wave (CW) which is analyzed for a number of examples of interest to the radar community. Application of this information is then discussed.

  1. Directly observing continuum emission from self-gravitating spiral waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Cassandra; Rice, Ken; Harries, Tim J; Klaassen, Pamela D; Biller, Beth

    2016-01-01

    We use a simple, self-consistent, self-gravitating semi-analytic disc model to conduct an examination of the parameter space in which self-gravitating discs may exist. We then use Monte-Carlo radiative transfer to generate synthetic ALMA images of these self-gravitating discs to determine the subset of this parameter space in which they generate non-axisymmetric structure that is potentially detectable by ALMA. Recently, several transition discs have been observed to have non-axisymmetric structure that extends out to large radii. It has been suggested that one possible origin of these asymmetries could be spiral density waves induced by disc self-gravity. We use our simple model to see if these discs exist in the region of parameter space where self-gravity could feasibly explain these spiral features. We find that for self-gravity to play a role in these systems typically requires a disc mass around an order of magnitude higher than the observed disc masses for the systems. The spiral amplitudes produced by...

  2. Detection of cerebral ischemia using the power spectrum of the pulse wave measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Akira; Tanaka, Yuichi; Konno, Takehiko; Kawasaki, Shingo; Fujiwara, Michiyuki; Watanabe, Eiju

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and medical treatment of cerebral ischemia are becoming more important due to the increase in the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease. However, conventional methods of evaluating cerebral perfusion have several drawbacks: they are invasive, require physical restraint, and the equipment is not portable, which makes repeated measurements at the bedside difficult. An alternative method is developed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS signals are measured at 44 positions (22 on each side) on the fronto-temporal areas in 20 patients with cerebral ischemia. In order to extract the pulse-wave component, the raw total hemoglobin data recorded from each position are band-pass filtered (0.8 to 2.0 Hz) and subjected to a fast Fourier transform to obtain the power spectrum of the pulse wave. The ischemic region is determined by single-photon emission computed tomography. The pulse-wave power in the ischemic region is compared with that in the symmetrical region on the contralateral side. In 17 cases (85%), the pulse-wave power on the ischemic side is significantly lower than that on the contralateral side, which indicates that the transmission of the pulse wave is attenuated in the region with reduced blood flow. Pulse-wave power might be useful as a noninvasive marker of cerebral ischemia.

  3. DETECTION OF FAST-MOVING WAVES PROPAGATING OUTWARD ALONG SUNSPOTS’ RADIAL DIRECTION IN THE PHOTOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Junwei; Chen, Ruizhu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Hartlep, Thomas [BAER Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94043 (United States); Kosovichev, Alexander G. [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2015-08-10

    Helioseismic and magnetohydrodynamic waves are abundant in and above sunspots. Through cross-correlating oscillation signals in the photosphere observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, we reconstruct how waves propagate away from virtual wave sources located inside a sunspot. In addition to the usual helioseismic wave, a fast-moving wave is detected traveling along the sunspot’s radial direction from the umbra to about 15 Mm beyond the sunspot boundary. The wave has a frequency range of 2.5–4.0 mHz with a phase velocity of 45.3 km s{sup −1}, substantially faster than the typical speeds of Alfvén and magnetoacoustic waves in the photosphere. The observed phenomenon is consistent with a scenario of that a magnetoacoustic wave is excited at approximately 5 Mm beneath the sunspot. Its wavefront travels to and sweeps across the photosphere with a speed higher than the local magnetoacoustic speed. The fast-moving wave, if truly excited beneath the sunspot’s surface, will help open a new window for studying the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  4. Detection of Fast-Moving Waves Propagating Outward along Sunspots' Radial Direction in the Photosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Junwei; Hartlep, Thomas; Kosovichev, Alexander G

    2015-01-01

    Helioseismic and magnetohydrodynamic waves are abundant in and above sunspots. Through cross-correlating oscillation signals in the photosphere observed by the SDO/HMI, we reconstruct how waves propagate away from virtual wave sources located inside a sunspot. In addition to the usual helioseismic wave, a fast-moving wave is detected traveling along the sunspot's radial direction from the umbra to about 15 Mm beyond the sunspot boundary. The wave has a frequency range of 2.5 - 4.0 mHz with a phase velocity of 45.3 km/s, substantially faster than the typical speeds of Alfven and magnetoacoustic waves in the photosphere. The observed phenomenon is consistent with a scenario of that a magnetoacoustic wave is excited at approximately 5 Mm beneath the sunspot, and its wavefront travels to and sweeps across the photosphere with a speed higher than the local magnetoacoustic speed. The fast-moving wave, if truly excited beneath the sunspot's surface, will help open a new window to study the internal structure and dyn...

  5. Existence of a directional Stokes drift in asymmetrical three-dimensional travelling gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iooss, Gérard; Plotnikov, Pavel

    2009-09-01

    We consider periodic travelling gravity waves at the surface of an infinitely deep perfect fluid. The pattern is non-symmetric with respect to the propagation direction of the waves and we consider a general non-resonant situation. Defining a couple of amplitudes ɛ,ɛ along the basis of wave vectors which satisfy the dispersion relation, following Iooss and Plotnikov (2009), travelling waves exist with an asymptotic expansion in powers of ɛ,ɛ, for nearly all pair of angles made by the basic wave vectors with the critical propagation direction, and for values of the couple (ɛ12,ɛ22) in a subset of the plane, with asymptotic full measure at the origin. We prove the remarkable property that on the free surface, observed in the moving frame, the propagation direction of the waves differs from the asymptotic direction taken by fluid particles, by a small angle which is computed. To cite this article: G. Iooss, P. Plotnikov, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  6. Direct Simulations of Wind-Driven Breaking Ocean Waves with Data Assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Dommermuth, Douglas G; Tran, Vu H; Valenciano, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    A formulation is developed to assimilate ocean-wave data into the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. NFA is a Cartesian-based implicit Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) code with Volume of Fluid (VOF) interface capturing. The sequential assimilation of data into NFA permits detailed analysis of ocean-wave physics with higher bandwidths than is possible using either other formulations, such as High-Order Spectral (HOS) methods, or field measurements. A framework is provided for assimilating the wavy and vortical portions of the flow. Nudging is used to assimilate wave data at low wavenumbers, and the wave data at high wavenumbers form naturally through nonlinear interactions, wave breaking, and wind forcing. Similarly, the vertical profiles of the mean vortical flow in the wind and the wind drift are nudged, and the turbulent fluctuations are allowed to form naturally. As a demonstration, the results of a HOS of a JONSWAP wave spectrum are assimilated to study short-crested seas in equilibrium with the wind. Log pr...

  7. Direct detection of resonant electron pitch angle scattering by whistler waves in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Compernolle, B; Bortnik, J; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W; Nakamoto, M; Tao, X; Thorne, R M

    2014-04-11

    Resonant interactions between energetic electrons and whistler mode waves are an essential ingredient in the space environment, and in particular in controlling the dynamic variability of Earth's natural radiation belts, which is a topic of extreme interest at the moment. Although the theory describing resonant wave-particle interaction has been present for several decades, it has not been hitherto tested in a controlled laboratory setting. In the present Letter we report on the first laboratory experiment to directly detect resonant pitch angle scattering of energetic (∼keV) electrons due to whistler mode waves. We show that the whistler mode wave deflects energetic electrons at precisely the predicted resonant energy, and that varying both the maximum beam energy, and the wave frequency, alters the energetic electron beam very close to the resonant energy.

  8. Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, V P

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet at sea surface is studied both analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet, in connection with the problem of oceanic rogue waves. In the framework of Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2D) hyperbolic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived, which determines the evolution of coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description for the process of nonlinear spatio-temporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system is integrated in quadratures, which fact allows us to understand qualitative differences between the linear and nonlinear regimes of the focusing of wave packet. Comparison of the Gaussian model predictions with results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-cres...

  9. A directed search for continuous Gravitational Waves from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagliá, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Deléglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kucharczyk, C; Kudla, S; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Roux, A Le; Leaci, P; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levine, B; Lewis, J B; Lhuillier, V; Li, T G F; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lloyd, D; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Luan, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Mokler, F; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Kumar, D Nanda; Nardecchia, I; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R; Necula, V; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishida, E; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oppermann, P; O'Reilly, B; Larcher, W Ortega; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Ou, J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Peiris, P; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pindor, B; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poole, V; Poux, C; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Roever, C; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Soden, K; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Sperandio, L; Staley, A; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stevens, D; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vlcek, B; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vrinceanu, D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, J; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wibowo, S; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yum, H; Yvert, M; Zadrony, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic Center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO's fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semi-coherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first order spindown values down to -7.86 x 10^-8 Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. We place 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic Center. Reaching ~3.35 x 10^-25 at ~150 Hz, those upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  10. Controlling the onset of turbulence by streamwise traveling waves. Part 2. Direct numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lieu, Binh K; Jovanović, Mihailo R

    2010-01-01

    This work builds on and confirms the theoretical findings of Part 1 of this paper, Moarref & Jovanovi\\'c (2010). We use direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations to assess the efficacy of blowing and suction in the form of streamwise traveling waves for controlling the onset of turbulence in a channel flow. We highlight the effects of the modified base flow on the dynamics of velocity fluctuations and net power balance. Our simulations verify the theoretical predictions of Part 1 that the upstream traveling waves promote turbulence even when the uncontrolled flow stays laminar. On the other hand, the downstream traveling waves with parameters selected in Part 1 are capable of reducing the fluctuations' kinetic energy, thereby maintaining the laminar flow. In flows driven by a fixed pressure gradient, a positive net efficiency as large as 25 % relative to the uncontrolled turbulent flow can be achieved with downstream waves. Furthermore, we show that these waves can also relaminarize full...

  11. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenzhi Wang

    Full Text Available Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI. To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts.

  12. Direct and inverse cascades of energy, momentum and wave action in spectra of wind-driven waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badulin, S. I.; Pushkarev, A. N.; Resio, D.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2003-04-01

    The time-dependent, spatially uniform Hasselmann's kinetic equation for surface gravity waves in presence of wind forcing and white-capping dissipation is studied numerically. We use conventional parameterizations of wind wave input (Snyder et al. 1981; Plant 1982; Hsiao &Shemdin 1983; Donelan, Pierson 1987) that are consistent with weakly nonlinear scaling. We assume that strong dissipation due to white-capping is essential for short waves only (with frequencies above 1Hz) belonging to the spectral tail and can be neglected near the spectral peak. We compare our numerical results with the predictions of the theory of weak turbulence and found a very good coincidence. It is shown that asymptotic behavior of wave spectra is in perfect agreement with stationary solutions of the Hasselmann equation -- Kolmogorov's solutions for direct (Zakharov & Filonenko 1966) and inverse (Zakharov &Zaslavskii 1982) cascades. This asymptotic behavior appears at rather early stages of wind wave evolution (physical time of order of few hours in our experiments); A strong tendency of solutions to self-similar behavior of duration limited solutions is found for rather wide range of initial conditions and external forcing; Good quantitative coincidence with recapitulative experimental data for duration limited wind wave growth (Young 1999, p.111) and for fetch-limited (JONSWAP) spectra parameterized by wave age C_p/Uwind is found. The findings here are quite robust and hopefully will be applied to the practical problems. Present wave prediction models are based on fairly crude parameterizations of the nonlinear energy transfers. In large part due to inaccuracies in these parameterizations, these models have had to rely on empirical fitting of general growth equation as a basis for constraining additional source-sink terms in the detailed balance equations. Results from this study could be used to reformulate a complete energy balance equation for wave generation, propagation and decay

  13. A Remote Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Communications Lab Utilising the Emona DATEx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmas Mwikirize

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Remote labs have become popular learning aids due to their versatility and considerable ease of utilisation as compared to their physical counterparts. At Makerere University, the remote labs are based on the standard Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT iLabs Shared Architecture (ISA - a scalable and generic platform. Presented in this paper is such a lab, addressing the key practical aspects of Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS communication. The lab is built on the National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Suite (NI ELVIS with the Emona Digital and Analog Telecommunications Experimenter (DATEx add-on board. It also incorporates switching hardware. The lab facilitates real-time control of the equipment, with users able to set, manipulate and observe signal parameters in both the frequency and the time domains. Simulation and data Acquisition modes of the experiment are supported to provide a richer learning experience.

  14. Child-Directed Interaction Training for Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Parent and Child Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Nicole C; Clionsky, Leah N; Eyberg, Sheila M; Warner-Metzger, Christina; Abner, John-Paul

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of the Child-Directed Interaction Training (CDIT) phase of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Thirty mother-child dyads with children ages 3-7 years with a diagnosis of ASD participated in this randomized controlled study. Following manualized CDIT, statistically significant and meaningful improvements in child disruptive behavior and social awareness as well as maternal distress associated with child disruptive behavior occurred. Across 8 sessions, mothers learned to provide positive attention to their children's appropriate social and play behaviors. Both child and parent changes were maintained at 6-week follow-up. A relatively brief, time-limited, and accessible intervention may be efficacious for improving child and parent behaviors in families of young children with ASD. By decreasing child disruptive behaviors, CDIT may also help to prepare children to benefit further from future interventions.

  15. Implementasi dan Evaluasi Kinerja Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum menggunakan Wireless Open-Access Research Platform (WARP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Sukmana Putra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dalam sistem komunikasi nirkabel, khususnya pada dunia komunikasi taktis atau militer, salah satu yang harus dihadapi adalah gangguan jamming.Salah satu sistem yang dapat mengatasi masalah tersebut adalah Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS dimana informasi akan dikalikan secara langsung dengan pseudo-noise sequence yang mempunyai laju chip jauh lebih besar.Sistem ini dapat diimplementasikan pada Wireless Open-Access Research Platform (WARP yang merupakan salah satu dari jenis Software Define Radio (SDR.Modul WARP mampu diprogram secara langsung dengan software MATLAB.Kinerja sistem terbaik didapatkan ketika daya sinyal jamming lebih kecil atau sama dengan daya sinyal carrier sistem DSSS. Pada Single Tone Jamming (STJ sistem akan mencapai nilai BER 10E-3  saat daya sinyal jamming 125 % dari daya sinyal sistem DSSS, sedangkan pada Multi Tone Jamming (MTJ sistem akan mencapai BER 10E-3  saat daya sinyal jamming 100 % dari daya sistem DSSS.

  16. Low-Power Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum Modem Architecture for Distributed Wireless Sensor Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, C; Elgorriaga, I; McConaghy, C

    2001-07-03

    Emerging CMOS and MEMS technologies enable the implementation of a large number of wireless distributed microsensors that can be easily and rapidly deployed to form highly redundant, self-configuring, and ad hoc sensor networks. To facilitate ease of deployment, these sensors should operate on battery for extended periods of time. A particular challenge in maintaining extended battery lifetime lies in achieving communications with low power. This paper presents a direct-sequence spread-spectrum modem architecture that provides robust communications for wireless sensor networks while dissipating very low power. The modem architecture has been verified in an FPGA implementation that dissipates only 33 mW for both transmission and reception. The implementation can be easily mapped to an ASIC technology, with an estimated power performance of less than 1 mW.

  17. Investigation of mantle kinematics beneath the Hellenic-subduction zone with teleseismic direct shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confal, Judith M.; Eken, Tuna; Tilmann, Frederik; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Çubuk-Sabuncu, Yeşim; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2016-12-01

    The subduction and roll-back of the African plate beneath the Eurasian plate along the arcuate Hellenic trench is the dominant geodynamic process in the Aegean and western Anatolia. Mantle flow and lithospheric kinematics in this region can potentially be understood better by mapping seismic anisotropy. This study uses direct shear-wave splitting measurements based on the Reference Station Technique in the southern Aegean Sea to reveal seismic anisotropy in the mantle. The technique overcomes possible contamination from source-side anisotropy on direct S-wave signals recorded at a station pair by maximizing the correlation between the seismic traces at reference and target stations after correcting the reference stations for known receiver-side anisotropy and the target stations for arbitrary splitting parameters probed via a grid search. We obtained splitting parameters at 35 stations with good-quality S-wave signals extracted from 81 teleseismic events. Employing direct S-waves enabled more stable and reliable splitting measurements than previously possible, based on sparse SKS data at temporary stations, with one to five events for local SKS studies, compared with an average of 12 events for each station in this study. The fast polarization directions mostly show NNE-SSW orientation with splitting time delays between 1.15 s and 1.62 s. Two stations in the west close to the Hellenic Trench and one in the east show N-S oriented fast polarizations. In the back-arc region three stations exhibit NE-SW orientation. The overall fast polarization variations tend to be similar to those obtained from previous SKS splitting studies in the region but indicate a more consistent pattern, most likely due to the usage of a larger number of individual observations in direct S-wave derived splitting measurements. Splitting analysis on direct shear waves typically resulted in larger split time delays compared to previous studies, possibly because S-waves travel along a longer path

  18. Heat waves and morbidity: current knowledge and further direction-a comprehensive literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Gu, Shaohua; Bi, Peng; Yang, Jun; Liu, Qiyong

    2015-05-18

    In the past few decades, several devastating heat wave events have significantly challenged public health. As these events are projected to increase in both severity and frequency in the future, it is important to assess the relationship between heat waves and the health indicators that can be used in the early warning systems to guide the public health response. Yet there is a knowledge gap in the impact of heat waves on morbidity. In this study, a comprehensive review was conducted to assess the relationship between heat waves and different morbidity indicators, and to identify the vulnerable populations. The PubMed and ScienceDirect database were used to retrieve published literature in English from 1985 to 2014 on the relationship between heat waves and morbidity, and the following MeSH terms and keywords were used: heat wave, heat wave, morbidity, hospital admission, hospitalization, emergency call, emergency medical services, and outpatient visit. Thirty-three studies were included in the final analysis. Most studies found a short-term negative health impact of heat waves on morbidity. The elderly, children, and males were more vulnerable during heat waves, and the medical care demand increased for those with existing chronic diseases. Some social factors, such as lower socioeconomic status, can contribute to heat-susceptibility. In terms of study methods and heat wave definitions, there remain inconsistencies and uncertainties. Relevant policies and guidelines need to be developed to protect vulnerable populations. Morbidity indicators should be adopted in heat wave early warning systems in order to guide the effective implementation of public health actions.

  19. Slope wavenumber spectrum models of capillary and capillary-gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾永君; 张杰; 王岩峰

    2010-01-01

    Capillary and capillary-gravity waves possess a random character, and the slope wavenumber spectra of them can be used to represent mean distributions of wave energy with respect to spatial scale of variability. But simple and practical models of the slope wavenumber spectra have not been put forward so far. In this article, we address the accurate definition of the slope wavenumber spectra of water surface capillary and capillary-gravity waves. By combining the existing slope wavenumber models and using th...

  20. Spin-wave propagation spectrum in magnetization-modulated cylindrical nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-xiong; Wang, Meng-ning; Nie, Yao-zhuang; Wang, Dao-wei; Xia, Qing-lin; Tang, Wei; Zeng, Zhong-ming; Guo, Guang-hua

    2016-09-01

    Spin-wave propagation in periodic magnetization-modulated cylindrical nanowires is studied by micromagnetic simulation. Spin wave scattering at the interface of two magnetization segments causes a spin-wave band structure, which can be effectively tuned by changing either the magnetization modulation level or the period of the cylindrical nanowire magnonic crystal. The bandgap width is oscillating with either the period or magnetization modulation due to the oscillating variation of the spin wave transmission coefficient through the interface of the two magnetization segments. Analytical calculation based on band theory is used to account for the micromagnetic simulation results.

  1. Directional infrared emission resulting from cascade population inversion and four-wave mixing in Rb vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulshin, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry; McLean, Russell

    2014-02-15

    Directional infrared emission at 1.37 and 5.23 μm is generated in Rb vapors that are stepwise excited by low-power cw resonant light. The radiation at 5.23 μm originating from amplified spontaneous emission on the 5D(5/2)→6P(3/2) transition and wave mixing consists of forward- and backward-directed components with distinctive spectral and spatial properties. Diffraction-limited light at 1.37 μm generated in the copropagating direction only is a product of parametric wave mixing around the 5P(3/2)→5D(5/2)→6P(3/2)→6S(1/2)→5P(3/2) transition loop. This highly nondegenerate mixing process involves one externally applied and two internally generated optical fields. Similarities between wave mixing generated blue and 1.37 μm light are demonstrated.

  2. Source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Antani, Lakulish; Kim, Sujeong; Manocha, Dinesh

    2014-04-01

    We present an approach to model dynamic, data-driven source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation in virtual environments and computer games. Our directional source representation is expressed as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic (SH) sources. In the preprocessing stage, we precompute and encode the propagated sound fields due to each SH source. At runtime, we perform the SH decomposition of the varying source directivity interactively and compute the total sound field at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave decomposition approach based on higher-order derivatives of the sound field that enables dynamic HRTF-based listener directivity at runtime. We provide a generic framework to incorporate our source and listener directivity in any offline or online frequency-domain wave-based sound propagation algorithm. We have integrated our sound propagation system in Valve's Source game engine and use it to demonstrate realistic acoustic effects such as sound amplification, diffraction low-passing, scattering, localization, externalization, and spatial sound, generated by wave-based propagation of directional sources and listener in complex scenarios. We also present results from our preliminary user study.

  3. A NEW MEASURE FOR DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE BED SHEAR STRESS OF WAVE BOUNDARY LAYER IN WAVE FLUME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a shear plate was mounted on the bottom in a wave flume and direct measurements of the smooth and rough bed shear stress under regular and irregular waves were conducted with the horizontal force exerted on the shear plates by the bottom shear stress in the wave boundary layer. Under immobile bed condition, grains of sand were glued uniformly and tightly onto the shear plate, being prevented from motion with the fluid flow and generation of sand ripples. The distribution of the bottom mean shear stress varying with time was measured by examining the interaction between the shear plate and shear transducers. The relation between the force measured by the shear transducers and its voltage is a linear one. Simultaneous measurements of the bottom velocity were carried out by an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), while the whole process was completely controlled by computers, bottom shear stress and velocity were synchronously measured. Based on the experimental results, it can be concluded that (1) the friction coefficient groews considerably with the increase of the Reynolds number, (2) the shear stress is a function varying with time and linearly proportional to the velocity. Compared with theoretical results and previous experimental data, it is shown that the experimental method is feasible and effective, A further study on the bed shear stress under regular or irregular waves can be carried out. And applicability to the laboratory studies on the initiation of sediments and the measurement of the shear stress after sediment imigration.

  4. Discrepancies between direct and indirect measures of interpersonal and neurocognitive skills in autism spectrum disorder children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, M Mar; Calero, M Dolores; Mata, Sara; Molinero, Clara

    2016-10-01

    Subjects with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) show persistent deficits in social interaction. In order to explore the scope of their deficits, it is of great interest to compare the different interpersonal skills and executive functions of ASD subjects to those of children with typical development. Assessing these skills usually involves a large variety of informants (parents, teachers, other family members) and of measures, with frequent discrepancies between direct performance measures and indirect measures (third-party report). Different explanations of this mismatch between measures have been addressed in previous studies. We wish to analyze whether there are differences between children with ASD and children with typical development on several direct performance measures of interpersonal and neurocognitive skills and one third-party report on real-life performance of interpersonal skills; we also want to look at whether discrepancies appear between the two types of measurements in the two groups of participants. A total of 68 Spanish children between the ages of 7 and 12 years participated; 34 were children with ASD, and 34 showed typical development. All participants were tested for recognition of emotions, solving interpersonal conflicts, and executive function. Significant differences between the two groups were not found on most of the direct performance measures, but they did appear in the report by third parties, in favor of the group with typical development. There was also a significant association between neurocognitive and social variables in the latter group. There were intergroup differences and discrepancies between the direct performance and indirect measures in children with ASD, and these must be explained. For this reason, future studies could seek to explain the cause of these discrepancies with a greater number of measures for each of the skills.

  5. An optimal control method for maximizing the efficiency of direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongxian; Yu, Haitao; Wen, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The goal of direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system is to convert ocean wave energy into electricity. The problem explored in this paper is the design and optimal control for the direct drive ocean wave energy extraction system. An optimal control method based on internal model proportion integration differentiation (IM-PID) is proposed in this paper though most of ocean wave energy extraction systems are optimized by the structure, weight, and material. With this control method, the heavy speed of outer heavy buoy of the energy extraction system is in resonance with incident wave, and the system efficiency is largely improved. Validity of the proposed optimal control method is verified in both regular and irregular ocean waves, and it is shown that IM-PID control method is optimal in that it maximizes the energy conversion efficiency. In addition, the anti-interference ability of IM-PID control method has been assessed, and the results show that the IM-PID control method has good robustness, high precision, and strong anti-interference ability.

  6. Direction dependent Love and Rayleigh wave noise characteristics using multiple arrays across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juretzek, Carina; Perleth, Magdalena; Hadziioannou, Celine

    2016-04-01

    Seismic noise has become an important signal source for tomography and monitoring purposes. Better understanding of the noise field characteristics is crucial to further improve noise applications. Our knowledge about common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves in the microseism band is still limited. This applies in particular for constraints on source locations and source mechanisms of Love waves. Here, 3-component beamforming is used to distinguish between the different polarized wave types in the primary and secondary microseism noise field recorded at several arrays across Europe. We compare characteristics of Love and Rayleigh wave noise, such as source directions and frequency content. Further, Love to Rayleigh wave ratios are measured and a dependence on direction is found, especially in the primary microseism band. Estimates of the kinetic energy density ratios propose a dominance of coherent Love waves in the primary, but not in the secondary microseism band. The seasonality of the noise field characteristics is examined by using a full year of data in 2013 and is found to be stable.

  7. New directions for gravity-wave physics via "Millikan oil drops"

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2006-01-01

    Pairs of Planck-mass--scale drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e., "Millikan oil drops"), when levitated in a superconducting magnetic trap in the presence of strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. A Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves back into EM waves, should be practical to perform. As a step in this direction, an experiment to measure the quadrupolar electromagnetic scattering cross-section of a pair of "Millikan oil drops" will be performed first.

  8. Directional spectra of ocean waves from microwave backscatter: A physical optics solution with application to the short-pulse and two-frequency measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two simple microwave radar techniques that are potentially capable of providing routine satellite measurements of the directional spectrum of ocean waves were developed. One technique, the short pulse technique, makes use of very short pulses to resolve ocean surface wave contrast features in the range direction; the other technique, the two frequency correlation technique makes use of coherency in the transmitted waveform to detect the large ocean wave contrast modulation as a beat or mixing frequency in the power backscattered at two closely separated microwave frequencies. A frequency domain analysis of the short pulse and two frequency systems shows that the two measurement systems are essentially duals; they each operate on the generalized (three frequency) fourth-order statistical moment of the surface transfer function in different, but symmetrical ways, and they both measure the same directional contrast modulation spectrum. A three dimensional physical optics solution for the fourth-order moment was obtained for backscatter in the near vertical, specular regime, assuming Gaussian surface statistics.

  9. Lossless directional guiding of light in dielectric nanosheets using Dyakonov surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Osamu; Artigas, David; Torner, Lluis

    2014-06-01

    Guiding light at the nanoscale is usually accomplished using surface plasmons. However, plasmons propagating at the surface of a metal sustain propagation losses. A different type of surface excitation is the Dyakonov surface wave. These waves, which exist in lossless media, were predicted more than two decades ago but observed only recently. Dyakonov surface waves exist when at least one of the two media forming the surface exhibits a suitable anisotropy of refractive indexes. Although propagating only within a narrow range of directions, these waves can be used to create modes supported by ultrathin films that confine light efficiently within film thicknesses well below the cutoff thickness required in standard waveguides. Here, we show that 10 nm and 20 nm dielectric nanosheets of aluminium oxide clad between an anisotropic crystal (lithium triborate) and different liquids support Dyakonov-like modes. The direction of light propagation can be controlled by modulating the refractive index of the cladding. The possibility of guiding light in nanometre-thick films with no losses and high directionality makes Dyakonov wave modes attractive for planar photonic devices in schemes similar to those currently employing long-range plasmons.

  10. Progress Towards the Development of a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter for Aneutronic Fusion Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, A. G.; Chap, A.; Wolinsky, J.; Scott, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    A coordinated experimental and theory/simulation effort has been carried out to investigate the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC), a scheme that has been proposed in the past for the direct conversion into electricity of the kinetic energy of an ion beam generated from fusion reactions. This effort has been focused in particular on the TWDEC process in the high density beam regime, thus accounting for the ion beam expansion due to its space charge.

  11. Transcranial direct current stimulation in refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep: a controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Edina T; Terney, Daniella; Atkins, Mary D

    2011-01-01

    Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) decreases cortical excitability. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether cathodal tDCS could interrupt the continuous epileptiform activity. Five patients with focal, refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep were ...

  12. Asymmetric Directional Multicast for Capillary Machine-to-Machine Using mmWave Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2016-01-01

    The huge demand for high data rate machine-to-machine (M2M) services has led to the use of millimeter Wave (mmWave) band communications with support for a multi-Gbps data rate through the use of directional antennas. However, unnecessary sector switching in multicast transmissions with directional antennas results in a long delay, and consequently a low throughput. We propose asymmetric directional multicast (ADM) for capillary M2M to address this problem in mmWave communications. ADM provides asymmetric sectorization that is optimized for the irregular deployment pattern of mulicast group members. In ADM, an M2M gateway builds up asymmetric sectors with a beamwidth of a different size to cover all multicast group members with the minimum number of directional transmissions. The performance of ADM under various simulation environments is evaluated through a comparison with legacy mmWave multicast. The results of the simulation indicate that ADM achieves a better performance in terms of the transmission sectors, the transmission time, and the aggregate throughput when compared with the legacy multicast method.

  13. DIRECT SPECTRUM OF THE BENCHMARK T DWARF HD 19467 B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crepp, Justin R.; Matthews, Christopher T. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Rice, Emily L.; Giorla, Paige [College of Staten Island, CUNY, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Veicht, AAron; Nilsson, Ricky; Luszcz-Cook, Statia H.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Brenner, Douglas [American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Aguilar, Jonathan; Pueyo, Laurent; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Remi [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Vasisht, Gautam; Cady, Eric; Lockhart, Thomas; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Beichman, Charles A., E-mail: jcrepp@nd.edu [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2015-01-10

    HD 19467 B is presently the only directly imaged T dwarf companion known to induce a measurable Doppler acceleration around a solar-type star. We present spectroscopy measurements of this important benchmark object taken with the Project 1640 integral field unit at Palomar Observatory. Our high-contrast R ≈ 30 observations obtained simultaneously across the JH bands confirm the cold nature of the companion as reported from the discovery article and determine its spectral type for the first time. Fitting the measured spectral energy distribution to SpeX/IRTF T dwarf standards and synthetic spectra from BT-Settl atmospheric models, we find that HD 19467 B is a T5.5 ± 1 dwarf with effective temperature T{sub eff}=978{sub −43}{sup +20} K. Our observations reveal significant methane absorption affirming its substellar nature. HD 19467 B shows promise to become the first T dwarf that simultaneously reveals its mass, age, and metallicity independent from the spectrum of light that it emits.

  14. Laboratory investigation and direct numerical simulation of wind effect on steep surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Druzhinin, Oleg; Ermakova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    particles 20 μm in diameter were injected into the airflow. The images of the illuminated particles were photographed with a digital CCD video camera at a rate of 1000 frames per second. For the each given parameters of wind and waves, a statistical ensemble of 30 movies with duration from 200 to 600 ms was obtained. Individual flow realizations manifested the typical features of flow separation, while the average vector velocity fields obtained by the phase averaging of the individual vector fields were smooth and slightly asymmetrical, with the minimum of the horizontal velocity near the water surface shifted to the leeward side of the wave profile, but do not demonstrate the features of flow separation. The wave-induced pressure perturbations, averaged over the turbulent fluctuations, were retrieved from the measured velocity fields, using the Reynolds equations. It ensures sufficient accuracy for study of the dependence of the wave increment on the wave amplitude. The dependences of the wave growth rate on the wave steepness are weakly decreasing, serving as indirect proof of the non-separated character of flow over waves. Also direct numerical simulation of the airflow over finite amplitude periodic surface wave was performed. In the experiments the primitive 3-dimensional fluid mechanics equations were solved in the airflow over curved water boundary for the following parameters: the Reynolds number Re=15000, the wave steepness ka=0-0.2, the parameter c/u*=0-10 (where u* is the friction velocity and c is the wave celerity). Similar to the physical experiment the instant realizations of the velocity field demonstrate flow separation at the crests of the waves, but the ensemble averaged velocity fields had typical structures similar to those excising in shear flows near critical levels, where the phase velocity of the disturbance coincides with the flow velocity. The wind growth rate determined by the ensemble averaged wave-induced pressure component in phase of the

  15. Directed electromagnetic wave propagation in 1D metamaterial: Projecting operators method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampilogov, Dmitrii, E-mail: DVAmpilogov@kantiana.ru; Leble, Sergey, E-mail: sleble@kantiana.ru

    2016-07-01

    We consider a boundary problem for 1D electrodynamics modeling of a pulse propagation in a metamaterial medium. We build and apply projecting operators to a Maxwell system in time domain that allows to split the linear propagation problem to directed waves for a material relations with general dispersion. Matrix elements of the projectors act as convolution integral operators. For a weak nonlinearity we generalize the linear results still for arbitrary dispersion and derive the system of interacting right/left waves with combined (hybrid) amplitudes. The result is specified for the popular metamaterial model with Drude formula for both permittivity and permeability coefficients. We also discuss and investigate stationary solutions of the system related to some boundary regimes. - Highlights: • The problem of boundary regime propagation is solved by a systematic dynamic projecting method. • By this method a hybrid amplitude is introduced and used for derivation of nonlinear equation of opposite directed waves. • The equations are specified for Drude metamaterial dispersion and Kerr nonlinearity. • It is shown that one of unidirection waves in the metamaterial is specified as Shafer–Wayn integrable equation. • A stationary wave solution is approximately expressed in terms of elliptic functions.

  16. Direct numerical simulation study of statistically stationary propagation of a reaction wave in homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rixin; Lipatnikov, Andrei N.

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulation (DNS) study of the propagation of a reaction wave in forced, constant-density, statistically stationary, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is performed by solving Navier-Stokes and reaction-diffusion equations at various (from 0.5 to 10) ratios of the rms turbulent velocity U' to the laminar wave speed, various (from 2.1 to 12.5) ratios of an integral length scale of the turbulence to the laminar wave thickness, and two Zeldovich numbers Ze=6.0 and 17.1. Accordingly, the Damköhler and Karlovitz numbers are varied from 0.2 to 25.1 and from 0.4 to 36.2, respectively. Contrary to an earlier DNS study of self-propagation of an infinitely thin front in statistically the same turbulence, the bending of dependencies of the mean wave speed on U' is simulated in the case of a nonzero thickness of the local reaction wave. The bending effect is argued to be controlled by inefficiency of the smallest scale turbulent eddies in wrinkling the reaction-zone surface, because such small-scale wrinkles are rapidly smoothed out by molecular transport within the local reaction wave.

  17. Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruban, V. P., E-mail: ruban@itp.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet on a sea surface is analyzed analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet in relation to the problem of the so-called rogue waves. Within the Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2)-dimensional hyperbolic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE), a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived that describes the evolution of the coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description of the process of nonlinear spatiotemporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system of equations is integrated in quadratures, which allows one to better understand the qualitative differences between linear and nonlinear focusing regimes of a wave packet. Predictions of the Gaussian model are compared with the results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-crested waves.

  18. High resolution evidence for the Garrett-Munk spectrum of stratospheric gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, E. M.; Grossbard, N.; Quesada, A. F.; Good, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Vertical profiles of scalar horizontal winds have been measured at high resolution (10 m) in the 13 to 37 km region of the stratosphere. This resolution (at that range of altitude) represents the state-of-the-art, and is unique. The technique used smoke trails laid by rockets in the stratosphere, and were taken by AFGL at Wallops Island, VA, White Sands Missile Range, NM, and Ft. Churchill, Canada, in the 1977-78 time period. Two or three cameras were used to give the time-lapse photographs. The goal was to ascertain whether or not the internal waves of the stratosphere behave consistently with the Garrett-Munk model which was originally created for oceanic internal waves. Five profiles of horizontal wind are presented. It is concluded: (1) stratospheric internal waves obey the Garrett-Munk model for vertical wave numbers; (2) there is not statistically significant evidence for a break in the curve at high wave numbers when due allowance is made for aliasing effects; and (3) the power density level of the spectra are almost equal on a log-log scale in spite of the difference in time, season, and geographical location.

  19. Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves from Advanced LIGO's First Observing Run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Ananyeva, A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Appert, S; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Avila-Alvarez, A; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Beer, C; Bejger, M; Belahcene, I; Belgin, M; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Billman, C R; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Biscoveanu, A S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackman, J; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bohe, A; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T A; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campbell, W; Canepa, M; Cannon, K C; Cao, H; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, H-P; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Chmiel, T; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, A J K; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Cocchieri, C; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conti, L; Cooper, S J; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, E; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Covas, P B; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cullen, T J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dasgupta, A; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Davis, D; Daw, E J; Day, B; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devenson, J; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Doctor, Z; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorrington, I; Douglas, R; Dovale Álvarez, M; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R C; Etienne, Z; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Fauchon-Jones, E J; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Fernández Galiana, A; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Forsyth, S S; Fournier, J-D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fries, E M; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H; Gadre, B U; Gaebel, S M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gayathri, V; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghonge, S; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P

    2017-03-24

    We employ gravitational-wave radiometry to map the stochastic gravitational wave background expected from a variety of contributing mechanisms and test the assumption of isotropy using data from the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory's (aLIGO) first observing run. We also search for persistent gravitational waves from point sources with only minimal assumptions over the 20-1726 Hz frequency band. Finding no evidence of gravitational waves from either point sources or a stochastic background, we set limits at 90% confidence. For broadband point sources, we report upper limits on the gravitational wave energy flux per unit frequency in the range F_{α,Θ}(f)<(0.1-56)×10^{-8}    erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} Hz^{-1}(f/25  Hz)^{α-1} depending on the sky location Θ and the spectral power index α. For extended sources, we report upper limits on the fractional gravitational wave energy density required to close the Universe of Ω(f,Θ)<(0.39-7.6)×10^{-8}  sr^{-1}(f/25  Hz)^{α} depending on Θ and α. Directed searches for narrowband gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting objects (Scorpius X-1, Supernova 1987 A, and the Galactic Center) yield median frequency-dependent limits on strain amplitude of h_{0}<(6.7,5.5,  and  7.0)×10^{-25}, respectively, at the most sensitive detector frequencies between 130-175 Hz. This represents a mean improvement of a factor of 2 across the band compared to previous searches of this kind for these sky locations, considering the different quantities of strain constrained in each case.

  20. Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves from Advanced LIGO's First Observing Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, A. S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campbell, W.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, E.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernández Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schlassa, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tao, D.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We employ gravitational-wave radiometry to map the stochastic gravitational wave background expected from a variety of contributing mechanisms and test the assumption of isotropy using data from the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory's (aLIGO) first observing run. We also search for persistent gravitational waves from point sources with only minimal assumptions over the 20-1726 Hz frequency band. Finding no evidence of gravitational waves from either point sources or a stochastic background, we set limits at 90% confidence. For broadband point sources, we report upper limits on the gravitational wave energy flux per unit frequency in the range Fα ,Θ(f )<(0.1 - 56 )×10-8 erg cm-2 s-1 Hz-1(f /25 Hz )α -1 depending on the sky location Θ and the spectral power index α . For extended sources, we report upper limits on the fractional gravitational wave energy density required to close the Universe of Ω (f ,Θ )<(0.39 - 7.6 )×10-8 sr-1(f /25 Hz )α depending on Θ and α . Directed searches for narrowband gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting objects (Scorpius X-1, Supernova 1987 A, and the Galactic Center) yield median frequency-dependent limits on strain amplitude of h0<(6.7 ,5.5 , and 7.0 )×10-25 , respectively, at the most sensitive detector frequencies between 130-175 Hz. This represents a mean improvement of a factor of 2 across the band compared to previous searches of this kind for these sky locations, considering the different quantities of strain constrained in each case.

  1. Constraints on the High-l Power Spectrum of Millimeter-wave Anisotropies from APEX-SZ

    CERN Document Server

    Reichardt, C L; Ade, P A R; Basu, K; Bender, A N; Bertoldi, F; Cho, H -M; Chon, G; Dobbs, M; Ferrusca, D; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Horellou, C; Johansson, D; Johnson, B R; Kennedy, J; Kneissl, R; Lanting, T; Lee, A T; Lueker, M; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Nord, M; Pacaud, F; Richards, P L; Schaaf, R; Schwan, D; Spieler, H; Weiss, A; Westbrook, B

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular power spectrum of millimeter wave anisotropies with the APEX-SZ instrument. APEX-SZ has mapped 0.8 square degrees of sky at a frequency of 150 GHz with an angular resolution of 1'. These new measurements significantly improve the power constraints at 150 GHz over the range of angular multipoles 3000 < l < 10,000, limiting the total astronomical anisotropy in a flat band power to be less than 105 microK^2 at 95% CL. We expect both submillimeter-bright, dusty galaxies and secondary CMB anisotropies from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) to significantly contribute to the observed power. Subtracting the SZE power spectrum expected for sigma_8=0.8 and masking bright sources, the best fit value for the remaining power is C_l = 1.1^{+0.9}_{-0.8} x 10^{-5} micro K^2 (1.7^{+1.4}_{-1.3} Jy^2 sr^{-1}). This agrees well with model predictions for power due to submillimeter-bright, dusty galaxies. Simultaneously fitting for the amplitude of the SZE power spectrum and a Poiss...

  2. A qubit strongly coupled to a resonant cavity: asymmetry of the spontaneous emission spectrum beyond the rotating wave approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, X [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 (China); You, J Q; Nori, F [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Zheng, H, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the spontaneous emission (SE) spectrum of a qubit in a lossy resonant cavity. We use neither the rotating-wave approximation nor the Markov approximation. For the weak-coupling case, the SE spectrum of the qubit is a single peak, with its location depending on the spectral density of the qubit environment. Then, the asymmetry (of the location and heights of the two peaks) of the two SE peaks (which are related to the vacuum Rabi splitting) changes as the qubit-cavity coupling increases. Explicitly, for a qubit in a low-frequency intrinsic bath, the height asymmetry of the splitting peaks is enhanced as the qubit-cavity coupling strength increases. However, for a qubit in an Ohmic bath, the height asymmetry of the spectral peaks is inverted compared to the low-frequency bath case. With further increasing the qubit-cavity coupling to the ultra-strong regime, the height asymmetry of the left and right peaks is slightly inverted, which is consistent with the corresponding case of a low-frequency bath. This inversion of the asymmetry arises from the competition between the Ohmic bath and the cavity bath. Therefore, after considering the anti-rotating terms, our results explicitly show how the height asymmetry in the SE spectrum peaks depends on the qubit-cavity coupling and the type of intrinsic noise experienced by the qubit.

  3. Reconstruction of the first derivative EPR spectrum from multiple harmonics of the field-modulated continuous wave signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    Selection of the amplitude of magnetic field modulation for continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) often is a trade-off between sensitivity and resolution. Increasing the modulation amplitude improves the signal-to-noise ratio, S/N, at the expense of broadening the signal. Combining information from multiple harmonics of the field-modulated signal is proposed as a method to obtain the first derivative spectrum with minimal broadening and improved signal-to-noise. The harmonics are obtained by digital phase-sensitive detection of the signal at the modulation frequency and its integer multiples. Reconstruction of the first derivative EPR line is done in the Fourier conjugate domain where each harmonic can be represented as the product of the Fourier transform of the 1st derivative signal with an analytical function. The analytical function for each harmonic can be viewed as a filter. The Fourier transform of the 1st derivative spectrum can be calculated from all available harmonics by solving an optimization problem with the goal of maximizing the S/N. Inverse Fourier transformation of the result produces the 1st derivative EPR line in the magnetic field domain. The use of modulation amplitude greater than linewidth improves the S/N, but does not broaden the reconstructed spectrum. The method works for an arbitrary EPR line shape, but is limited to the case when magnetization instantaneously follows the modulation field, which is known as the adiabatic approximation. PMID:21349750

  4. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were

  5. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine

  6. A method for direct in vivo measurement of drug concentrations from a single 2H NMR spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelhoch, J L; McCoy, C L; Giri, B P

    1989-03-01

    The use of 2H-labeled drugs provides a measure of drug concentration in situ directly from a single 2H NMR spectrum obtained with any antenna by correcting only for differential saturation effects. The limit of detection for a drug labeled with three equivalent deuterons is roughly 0.5 mM.

  7. Synthesis of Directional Sources Using Wave Field Synthesis, Possibilities, and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corteel E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of directional sources using wave field synthesis is described. The proposed formulation relies on an ensemble of elementary directivity functions based on a subset of spherical harmonics. These can be combined to create and manipulate directivity characteristics of the synthesized virtual sources. The WFS formulation introduces artifacts in the synthesized sound field for both ideal and real loudspeakers. These artifacts can be partly compensated for using dedicated equalization techniques. A multichannel equalization technique is shown to provide accurate results thus enabling for the manipulation of directional sources with limited reconstruction artifacts. Applications of directional sources to the control of the direct sound field and the interaction with the listening room are discussed.

  8. On the reliability of direct Rayleigh-wave estimation from multicomponent cross-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongbo; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2017-09-01

    Seismic interferometry is routinely used to image and characterize underground geology. The vertical component cross-correlations (CZZ) are often analysed in this process; although one can also use radial component and multicomponent cross-correlations (CRR and CZR, respectively), which have been shown to provide a more accurate Rayleigh-wave Green's function than CZZ when sources are unevenly distributed. In this letter, we identify the relationship between the multicomponent cross-correlations (CZR and CRR) and the Rayleigh-wave Green's functions to show why CZR and CRR are less sensitive than CZZ to non-stationary phase source energy. We demonstrate the robustness of CRR with a synthetic seismic noise data example. These results provide a compelling reason as to why CRR should be used to estimate the dispersive characteristics of the direct Rayleigh wave with seismic interferometry when the signal-to-noise ratio is high.

  9. Direct detection of lower hybrid wave using a reflectometer on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S.; Dominguez, A.; Marmar, E.; Parker, R.; Kramer, G. J.

    2010-10-01

    The possibility of directly detecting a density perturbation produced by lower hybrid (LH) waves using a reflectometer is presented. We investigate the microwave scattering of reflectometer probe beams by a model density fluctuation produced by short wavelength LH waves in an Alcator C-Mod experimental condition. In the O-mode case, the maximum response of phase measurement is found to occur when the density perturbation is approximately centimeters in front of the antenna, where Bragg scattering condition is satisfied. In the X-mode case, the phase measurement is predicted to be more sensitive to the density fluctuation close to the cut-off layer. A feasibility test was carried out using a 50 GHz O-mode reflectometer on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, and positive results including the detection of 4.6 GHz pump wave and parametric decay instabilities were obtained.

  10. 2D continuous spectrum of shear Alfven waves in the presence of a magnetic island

    CERN Document Server

    Biancalani, Alessandro; Pegoraro, Francesco; Zonca, Fulvio

    2010-01-01

    The radial structure of the continuous spectrum of shear Alfven modes is calculated in the presence of a magnetic island in tokamak plasmas. Modes with the same helicity of the magnetic island are considered in a slab model approximation. In this framework, with an appropriate rotation of the coordinates the problem reduces to 2 dimensions. Geometrical effects due to the shape of the flux surface’s cross section are retained to all orders. On the other hand, we keep only curvature effects responsible of the beta induced gap in the low-frequency part of the continuous spectrum. New continuum accumulation points are found at the O-point of the magnetic island. The beta-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (BAE) continuum accumulation point is found to be positioned at the separatrix flux surface. The most remarkable result is the nonlinear modification of the BAE continuum accumulation point frequency.

  11. Directional Filtering Due to Mesospheric Wind Shear on the Propagation of Acoustic-gravity Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yonghui; CHEN Wei; WANG Yachong

    2013-01-01

    Gravity waves with periods close to the Brunt-V(a)is(a)l(a) period of the upper troposphere are often observed at mesopause altitudes as short period,quasi-monochromatic waves.The assumption that these short period waves originate in the troposphere may be problematic because their upward propagation to the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region could be significantly impeded due to an extended region of strong evanescence above the stratopause.To reconcile this apparent paradox,an alternative explanation is proposed in this paper.The inclusion of mean winds and their vertical shears is sufficient to allow certain short period waves to remain internal above the stratopause and to propagate efficiently to higher altitudes.A time-dependent numerical model is used to demonstrate the feasibility of this and to determine the circumstances under which the mesospheric wind shears play a role in the removal and directional filtering of short period gravity waves.Finally this paper concludes that the combination of the height-dependent mean winds and the mean temperature structure probably explains the existence of short period,quasi-monochromatic structures observed in airglow images of mesopause region.

  12. Retrieving wind statistics from average spectrum of continuous-wave lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Mann, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    -order atmospheric turbulence statistics. An atmospheric field campaign and a wind tunnel experiment are carried out to show that the use of an average Doppler spectrum instead of a time series of velocities determined from individual Doppler spectra significantly reduces the differences with the standard deviation...... measured using ordinary anemometers, such as ultra-sonic anemometers or hotwires. The proposed method essentially removes the spatial averaging effect intrinsic to the cw lidar systems....

  13. High-resolution wave number spectrum using multi-point measurements in space – the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new analysis method is presented that provides a high-resolution power spectrum in a broad wave number domain based on multi-point measurements. The analysis technique is referred to as the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR and it benefits from Capon's minimum variance method for obtaining the proper power spectral density of the signal as well as the MUSIC algorithm (Multiple Signal Classification for considerably reducing the noise part in the spectrum. The mathematical foundation of the analysis method is presented and it is applied to synthetic data as well as Cluster observations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Using the MSR technique for Cluster data we find a wave in the solar wind propagating parallel to the mean magnetic field with relatively small amplitude, which is not identified by the Capon spectrum. The Cluster data analysis shows the potential of the MSR technique for studying waves and turbulence using multi-point measurements.

  14. Semiclassical Distorted Wave Model Analysis of the $(\\pi^-,K^+)$ $\\Sigma$ Formation Inclusive Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, M; Kawai, M; Ogata, K; Watanabe, Y

    2006-01-01

    $(\\pi^-,K^+)$ hyperon production inclusive spectra with $p_\\pi =1.2$ GeV/c measured at KEK on $^{12}$C and $^{28}$Si are analyzed by the semiclassical distorted wave model. Single-particle wave functions of the target nucleus are treated using Wigner transformation. This method is able to account for the energy and angular dependences of the elementary process in nuclear medium without introducing the factorization approximation frequently employed. Calculations of the $(\\pi^+,K^+)$ $\\Lambda$ formation process, for which there is no free parameter since the $\\Lambda$ s.p. potential is known, demonstrate that the present model is useful to describe inclusive spectra. It is shown that in order to account for the experimental data of the $\\Sigma^-$ formation spectra a repulsive $\\Sigma$-nucleus potential is necessary whose magnitude is not so strong as around 100 MeV previously suggested.

  15. Feasibility of Traveling Wave Direct Energy Conversion of Fission Reaction Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarditi, A. G.; George, J. A.; Miley, G. H.; Scott, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Fission fragment direct energy conversion has been considered in the past for the purpose of increasing nuclear power plant efficiency and for advanced space propulsion. Since the fragments carry electric charge (typically in the order of 20 e) and have 100 MeV-range kinetic energy, techniques utilizing very high-voltage DC electrodes have been considered. This study is focused on a different approach: the kinetic energy of the charged fission fragments is converted into alternating current by means of a traveling wave coupling scheme (Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter, TWDEC), thereby not requiring the utilization of high voltage technology. A preliminary feasibility analysis of the concept is introduced based on a conceptual level study and on a particle simulation model of the beam dynamics.

  16. Directional dependence of nonlinear surface acoustic waves in the (001) plane of cubic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumon, R E; Hamilton, M F

    2002-05-01

    Spectral evolution equations are used to perform analytical and numerical studies of nonlinear surface acoustic waves in the (001) plane of a variety of nonpiezoelectric cubic crystals. The basic theory underlying the model equations is outlined, and quasilinear solutions of the equations are presented. Expressions are also developed for a characteristic length scale for nonlinear distortion and a nonlinearity coefficient. A time-domain equation corresponding to the spectral equations is derived. Numerical calculations based on measured second- and third-order elastic constants taken from the literature are performed to predict the evolution of initially monofrequency surface waves. Nonlinearity matrix elements that indicate the coupling strength of harmonic interactions are shown to provide a useful tool for characterizing waveform distortion. The formation of compression or rarefaction shocks can be strongly dependent on the direction of propagation, and harmonic generation is suppressed or increased in certain directions.

  17. Direct observation of Rogue Waves in optical turbulence using Time Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Suret, Pierre; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clement; Randoux, Stephane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The formation of coherent structures in noise driven phenomena and in Turbulence is a complex and fundamental question. A particulary important structure is the so-called Rogue Wave (RW) that arises as the sudden appearance of a localized and giant peak. First studied in Oceanography, RWs have been extensively investigated in Optics since 2007, in particular in optical fibers experiments on supercontinua and optical turbulence. However the typical time scales underlying the random dynamics in those experiments prevented --up to now-- the direct observation of isolated RWs. Here we report on the direct observation of RWs, using an ultrafast acquisition system equivalent to microscope in the time domain. The RWs are generated by nonlinear propagation of random waves inside an optical fiber, and recorded with $\\sim 250$~fs resolution. Our experiments demonstrate the central role played by "breathers-like" solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (1D-NLSE) in the formation of RWs

  18. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-02

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km.

  19. Transcranial direct current stimulation in refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep: a controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Edina T; Terney, Daniella; Atkins, Mary D;

    2011-01-01

    Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) decreases cortical excitability. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether cathodal tDCS could interrupt the continuous epileptiform activity. Five patients with focal, refractory continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep were...... recruited. Cathodal tDCS and sham stimulation were applied to the epileptic focus, before sleep (1 mA; 20 min). Cathodal tDCS did not reduce the spike-index in any of the patients....

  20. Observation of Directional Ocean Wave Spectra in China Seas and Northwest Pacific Ocean Using SAR Retrieval Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Kan; He, Mingxia

    2014-11-01

    A software to retrieve directional ocean wave spectra from SAR images has been developed for China seas and northwest Pacific. The software, written with C programming language, is based on the MPI method proposed by Hasselmann. It is designed to support the wave mode SAR data of ERS, Envisat, Sentinel and so on. The directional ocean wave spectra produced by this software are validated with buoy data in global ocean area, northwest Pacific and China seas and the retrieved significant wave height (SWH) errors are 5.2%, 4.9% and 9.3% respectively. About 15,000 directional ocean wave spectra are obtained with the software from the wave mode data of Envisat/ASAR over the China seas and northwest Pacific during the period between Jan 2003 and Jan 2012. The preliminary analysis is presented.

  1. Influence of pump power and modulation instability gain spectrum on seeded supercontinuum and rogue wave generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper; Møller, Uffe;

    2012-01-01

    The noise properties of a supercontiuum can be significantly improved both in terms of coherence and intensity stability by modulating the input pulse with a seed. In this paper, we numerically investigate the influence of the seed wavelength, the pump power, and the modulation instability gain...... spectrum. Finally, we show that the coherent pulse breakup afforded by seeding is washed out by turbulent solitonic dynamics when the pump power is increased to the kilowatt level. Thus our results show that seeding cannot improve the noise performance of a high power supercontinuum source....

  2. The study of the effect of the surface wave on turbulent stably-stratified boundary layer air-flow by direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzhinin, Oleg; Troitskaya, Yliya; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    our DNS a "wave-pumping" regime. We develop a theoretical model and explain the occurrence of the wave-pumping regime observed in DNS as a result of the generation of two-dimensional (2D) disturbances in the air flow under the influence of the surface wave and secondary, parametric instability of these disturbances along the surface-wave front direction. The model predicts that the wave-pumping regime occurs only for sufficiently steep waves which is in agreement with DNS results. The model prediction for the amplitudes of the wave-induced 2D disturbances in the air flow is also in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with DNS results. The results also show that increasing the bulk Reynolds number of the air-flow leads to the development of a wide spectrum of the disturbances. At a sufficiently high super-criticality we expect a transition to occur from the wave-pumping regime to a fully-developed, turbulent BL-flow regime, even at high Richardson number when the air flow over a smooth surface relaminarizes. This work was supported by RFBR (project No. 14-05-00367) and by RSF (project No. 14-17 -0086).

  3. Evolution of double white dwarf binaries undergoing direct-impact accretion: Implications for gravitational wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kyle; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2017-01-01

    For close double white dwarf binaries, the mass-transfer phenomenon known as direct-impact accretion (when the mass transfer stream impacts the accretor directly rather than forming a disc) may play a pivotal role in the long-term evolution of the systems. In this analysis, we explore the long-term evolution of white dwarf binaries accreting through direct-impact and explore implications of such systems to gravitational wave astronomy. We cover a broad range of parameter space which includes initial component masses and the strength of tidal coupling, and show that these systems, which lie firmly within the LISA frequency range, show strong negative chirps which can last as long as several million years. Detections of double white dwarf systems in the direct-impact phase by detectors such as LISA would provide astronomers with unique ways of probing the physics governing close compact object binaries.

  4. The millimeter wave spectrum of methyl cyanate: a laboratory study and astronomical search in space ⋆,⋆⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, J. L.; Bermúdez, C.; Alonso, E. R.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The recent discovery of methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO) in Sgr B2(N) and Orion KL makes methyl cyanate (CH3OCN) a potential molecule in the interstellar medium. The aim of this work is to fulfill the first requirement for its unequivocal identification in space, i.e. the availability of transition frequencies with high accuracy. Methods The room-temperature rotational spectrum of methyl cyanate was recorded in the millimeter wave domain from 130 to 350 GHz. All rotational transitions revealed A-E splitting owing to methyl internal rotation and were globally analyzed using the ERHAM program. Results The data set for the ground torsional state of methyl cyanate exceeds 700 transitions within J″ = 10 – 35 and Ka″=0−13 and newly derived spectroscopic constants reproduce the spectrum close to the experimental uncertainty. Spectral features of methyl cyanate were then searched for in Orion KL, Sgr B2(N), B1-b, and TMC-1 molecular clouds. Upper limits to the column density of methyl cyanate are provided. PMID:27721514

  5. Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars in binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadors, Grant David

    2014-09-01

    Gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) seek to observe ripples in space predicted by General Relativity. Black holes, neutron stars, supernovae, the Big Bang and other sources can radiate gravitational waves. Original contributions to the LIGO effort are presented in this thesis: feedforward filtering, directed binary neutron star searches for continuous waves, and scientific outreach and education, as well as advances in quantum optical squeezing. Feedforward filtering removes extraneous noise from servo-controlled instruments. Filtering of the last science run, S6, improves LIGO's astrophysical range (+4.14% H1, +3.60% L1: +12% volume) after subtracting noise from auxiliary length control channels. This thesis shows how filtering enhances the scientific sensitivity of LIGO's data set during and after S6. Techniques for non-stationarity and verifying calibration and integrity may apply to Advanced LIGO. Squeezing is planned for future interferometers to exceed the standard quantum limit on noise from electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations; this thesis discusses the integration of a prototype squeezer at LIGO Hanford Observatory and impact on astrophysical sensitivity. Continuous gravitational waves may be emitted by neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binary systems such as Scorpius X-1. The TwoSpect directed binary search is designed to detect these waves. TwoSpect is the most sensitive of 4 methods in simulated data, projecting an upper limit of 4.23e-25 in strain, given a year-long data set at an Advanced LIGO design sensitivity of 4e-24 Hz. (-1/2). TwoSpect is also used on real S6 data to set 95% confidence upper limits (40 Hz to 2040 Hz) on strain from Scorpius X-1. A millisecond pulsar, X-ray transient J1751-305, is similarly considered. Search enhancements for Advanced LIGO are proposed. Advanced LIGO and fellow interferometers should detect gravitational waves in the coming decade. Methods in these

  6. When black holes collide: Probing the interior composition by the spectrum of ringdown modes and emitted gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.; Yagi, K.

    2017-09-01

    The merger of colliding black holes (BHs) should lead to the production of ringdown or quasinormal modes (QNMs), which may very well be sensitive to the state of the interior. We put this idea to the test with a recent proposal that the interior of a BH consists of a bound state of highly excited, long, closed, interacting strings; figuratively, a collapsed polymer. We show, using scalar perturbations for simplicity, that such BHs do indeed have a distinct signature in their QNM spectrum: A new class of modes whose frequencies are parametrically lower than the lowest-frequency mode of a classical BH and whose damping times are parametrically longer. The reason for the appearance of the new modes is that our model contains another scale, the string length, which is parametrically larger than the Planck length. This distinction between the collapsed-polymer model and general-relativistic BHs could be made with gravitational-wave observations and offers a means for potentially measuring the strength of the coupling in string theory. For example, GW150914 already allows us to probe the strength of the string coupling near the regime which is predicted by the unification of the gravitational and gauge-theory couplings. We also derive bounds on the amplitude of the collapsed-polymer QNMs that can be placed by current and future gravitational-wave observations.

  7. Interlace properties for the real and imaginary parts of the wave functions of complex-valued potentials with real spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes-Nájera, Alfonso; Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Some general properties of the wave functions of complex-valued potentials with real spectrum are studied. The main results are presented in a series of lemmas, corollaries and theorems that are satisfied by the zeros of the real and imaginary parts of the wave functions on the real line. In particular, it is shown that such zeros interlace so that the corresponding probability densities ρ(x) are never null. We find that the profile of the imaginary part VI(x) of a given complex-valued potential determines the number and distribution of the maxima and minima of the related probability densities. Our conjecture is that VI(x) must be continuous in R, and that its integral over all the real line must be equal to zero in order to get control on the distribution of the maxima and minima of ρ(x) . The applicability of these results is shown by solving the eigenvalue equation of different complex potentials, these last being either PT-symmetric or not invariant under the PT-transformation.

  8. The physical basis for estimating wave-energy spectra with the radar ocean-wave spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Frederick C.

    1987-01-01

    The derivation of the reflectivity modulation spectrum of the sea surface for near-nadir-viewing microwave radars using geometrical optics is described. The equations required for the derivation are presented. The derived reflectivity modulation spectrum provides data on the physical basis of the radar ocean-wave spectrometer measurements of ocean-wave directional spectra.

  9. Theoretical research relating to excitation spectrum of furan. Application of integral direct coupled cluster linear response (direct CCLR) method; Furan no reiki supekutoru ni kansuru ronriteki kenkyu. Integral-direct Coupled Cluster Linear Response (direct CCLR) ho no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigemitsu, Yasuhiro. [Nagasaki Industrial Technology Center, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    heoretical researches relating to excitation spectrum of furan have been carried out for many years, and they reveal the problems that should be solved in order to predict highly reliable excitation energy. In general, it is difficult to uniformly obtain highly reliable calculation results for all excitation states since different excitation states show different electronic correlative effects. Means for obtaining the electron states in ground state and excited state and calculating the energy difference thereof is the mainstream of the theoretical calculation of the excitation energy. CASSCF/CASPT 2 developed by Roos et al. is a typical method excellent in quantitative description. Recently, the comparison between direct CCLR and CASSCF/CASPT 2 as examples for calculating the excitation spectrum of furan was carried out by using the same ground function. For Rydberg excitation, CC3, CAS, CASPT 2 show good agreement with each other. (NEDO)

  10. Ultra-directional source of longitudinal acoustic waves based on a two-dimensional solid/solid phononic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morvan, B.; Tinel, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P. [Laboratoire Ondes et Milieux Complexes, UMR CNRS 6294, Université du Havre, 75 rue Bellot, 76058 Le Havre (France); Vasseur, J. O.; Hladky-Hennion, A.-C. [Institut d' Electronique, de Micro-électronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, Cité Scientifique, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Swinteck, N.; Deymier, P. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2014-12-07

    Phononic crystals (PC) can be used to control the dispersion properties of acoustic waves, which are essential to direct their propagation. We use a PC-based two-dimensional solid/solid composite to demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the spatial filtering of a monochromatic non-directional wave source and its emission in a surrounding water medium as an ultra-directional beam with narrow angular distribution. The phenomenon relies on square-shaped equifrequency contours (EFC) enabling self-collimation of acoustic waves within the phononic crystal. Additionally, the angular width of collimated beams is controlled via the EFC size-shrinking when increasing frequency.

  11. Wave- and Current-Supported Gravity Flows: Insights from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Discoveries over the last three decades have shown that current- and wave-enhanced gravity flows (CWEGFs) are among the significant agents that carry substantial amounts of sediments across low-gradient shelves and thereby they are important elements of sediment source-to-sink. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) complement the existing field and laboratory experiments in that it offers unprecedented details of participating physical processes. Also, since the state-of-the-art optical and acoustic sensors are limited to measure 50 kg/m3 of suspended sediment concentration, CFD becomes the only means to evaluate the physical processes when the turbid layer is highly concentrated. In this presentation, the roles of wave- and alongshore current-induced turbulent boundary layers are investigated separately on across-shelf fine sediment transport. Turbulence-resolving simulations (Direct Numerical Simulations) that utilize a simplified Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow model are conducted. The results show that the sediment carrying capacity of wave boundary layers far exceeds the ones carried by along-shelf currents. The results also show that across-shelf velocity in wall units obeys a logarithmic profile, u+=α ln(z+)+β . However, this logarithmic velocity profile is far apart from the log-law and parameters α and β are dependent on sediment loading and the representative settling velocity of sediments. The key parameters that characterize CWEGFs, such as drag coefficient, Cd, and their variation are also calculated and are found to be close to the ones that are observed in the field experiments. It is also found that for wave boundary layers, drag coefficient increases as the wave orbital velocity increases. Further discussion on the details of the sediment-turbulence interaction is also warranted.

  12. Flow Characteristics in an Augmentation Channel of a Direct Drive Turbine for Wave Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Deepak; Zullah, Mohammed Asid; Choi, Young-Do; Lee, Young-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Cross flow turbine also known as Banki turbine, is a hydraulic turbine that may be classified as an impulse turbine. At present it has gained interest in small and low head establishments because of its simple structure, cost effectiveness and low maintenance. Therefore, the present paper expands on this idea and aims at implementing the Direct Drive Turbine (DDT) for wave power generation. Wave power has enormous amount of energy which is environmentally friendly, renewable and can be exploited to satisfy the energy needs. A Numerical Wave Tank (NWT) was used to simulate the sea conditions and after obtaining desired wave properties; the augmentation channel plus the front guide nozzle and rear chamber were integrated to the NWT. The augmentation channel consisted of a front nozzle, rear nozzle and an internal fluid region which represented the turbine housing. The front and rear nozzle were geometrically identical. Two different nozzle configurations were studied; spiral rear wall type and a straight rear wall type. In addition to this, the effect of front guide nozzle divergent angle was also studied. The general idea is to investigate how different augmentation channel geometry and front guide nozzle divergent angle affects the flow, the water horse power and the first stage (primary stage) energy conversion. The analysis was performed using a commercial CFD code of the ANSYS-CFX. The results of the flow in an augmentation channel of the Direct Drive Turbine in oscillating flow for all the cases are presented by means of pressure and velocity vectors. The water horse power (WHP) and first stage energy conversion for the models are also presented.

  13. Numerical simulation and power spectrum estimation of storm surge based on wave spectrum%基于海浪谱的风暴潮海浪数值仿真与功率谱估计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小健; 吴庆; 张道明

    2014-01-01

    Based on the mathematic model of random wave, the corresponding significant wave height and average period are chosen as characteristic parameters of the modified JONSWAP spectrum when the tidal level of storm surge reached highest. Numerical simulation of storm surge wave is realized by using spectrum analysis method and MATLAB programming. The simulated extreme tidal level of storm surge is consistent with the experimental data of reference. Finally, according to the basic principle of Welch algorithm, pwelch function in MATLAB is used to estimate the power spectrum of the wave simulation results.It is proved that the effect of simulation experiment is good.%基于随机海浪的数学模型,采用改进的JONSWAP谱,以最高风暴潮位对应的有效波高和平均周期作为海浪谱的特征参数;利用谱分析法,通过MATLAB编程实现了风暴潮浪的数值仿真,模拟得到的风暴潮极值潮位与文献所给的试验数据较为吻合。最后,根据welch算法基本原理,利用MATLAB中的pwelch函数对海浪的仿真结果进行了功率谱估计,证明其仿真效果良好。

  14. Spectrum Trading in India and 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripathi, Purnendu; Prasad, Ramjee

    2013-01-01

    Currently radio spectrum is largely managed through Command and Control method. Public mobile services require spectrum below 3 GHz for providing cost effective services. The existing method has created artificial shortage of spectrum especially below 3 GHz. Spectrum trading is a new concept...... in which service providers are permitted to purchase spectrum from the market to fulfil their requirements. Spectrum trading has not yet been permitted in India. This paper provides an overview of possibilities of spectrum trading in India and concludes that necessary ingredients are present in India...... for spectrum trading and it could provide a boost to the Indian telecom sector. Further, it will also discuss spectrum issue related with 5G in the direction of millimeter waves....

  15. The high resolution spectrum of methyltrioxorhenium reinvestigated with new infrared and millimeter-wave measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Asselin, Pierre; Huet, Thérèse; Margulès, Laurent; Motiyenko, Roman; Hendricks, Richard; Tarbutt, Michael; Tokunaga, Sean; Darquié, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Following our first paper about high resolution spectroscopy of methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) [Stoeffler et al. PCCP, 13, 854, (2011)], the present study reports a deeper investigation of the ground state, and Re=O antisymmetric (nu\\_as) and symmetric (nu\\_s) stretching excited states of both CH3(187Re)O3 and CH3(185Re)O3 isotopologues, thanks to new devices implemented within our consortium. We carry out high resolution millimeter-wave (MMW) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy in room temperature absorption cells, in a pulsed supersonic jet and in a cryogenic buffer gas cell. This collection of sensitive spectrometers enables us to probe both levels of a vibrational transition in low and room temperature gaseous environments. We thus report a new series of measurements providing particularly accurate rotational and rovibrational data for such a large and heavy organometallic molecule that is solid at room temperature.The combination of the new MMW and IR data leads to an improvement of the rovibrational model of MTO:...

  16. General Analysis of Directional Ocean Wave Data from Heave Pitch Roll Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen F. Barstow

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional ocean wave data is usually analysed using the so-called linear model of the sea surface, but experience has shown that the results may deviate substantially from the predictions of the theory, in particular in the high frequency range. A general theory is presented here which includes the linear model as a special case. Properties of commonly used parameters under the influence of currents and non-linearities are easily explained within the general theory. Some results from the NORWAVE heave/pitch/roll data buoy operated offshore Norway are also presented.

  17. Highly directive Fabry-Perot leaky-wave nanoantennas based on optical partially reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorente-Crespo, M.; Mateo-Segura, C., E-mail: C.Mateo-Segura@hw.ac.uk [Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    Nanoantennas enhance the conversion between highly localized electromagnetic fields and far-field radiation. Here, we investigate the response of a nano-patch partially reflective surface backed with a silver mirror to an optical source embedded at the centre of the structure. Using full wave simulations, we demonstrate a two orders of magnitude increased directivity compared to the isotropic radiator, 50% power confinement to a 13.8° width beam and a ±16 nm bandwidth. Our antenna does not rely on plasmonic phenomena thus reducing non-radiative losses and conserving source coherence.

  18. The Millimeter-Wave Spectrum of Methacrolein. Torsion-Rotation Effects in the Excited States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, Olena; Motiyenko, R. A.; Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.

    2015-06-01

    Last year we reported the analysis of the rotational spectrum of s-trans conformer of methacrolein CH2=C(CH3)CHO in the ground vibrational state. In this talk we report the study of its low lying excited vibrational states. The study is based on room-temperature absorption spectra of methacrolein recorded in the frequency range 150 - 465 GHz using the spectrometer in Lille. The new results include assignment of the first excited torsional state (131 cm-1), and the joint analysis of the vt = 0 and vt = 1 states, that allowed us to improve the model in the frame of Rho-Axis-Method (RAM) Hamiltonian and to remove some strong correlations between parameters. Also we assigned the first excited vibrational state of the skeletal torsion mode (170 cm-1). The inverse sequence of A and E tunneling substates as well as anomalous A-E splittings observed for the rotational lines of vsk = 1 state clearly indicate a coupling between methyl torsion and skeletal torsion. However we were able to fit within experimental accuracy the rotational lines of vsk = 1 state using the RAM Hamiltonian. Because of the inversion of the A and E tunneling substates the rotational lines of the vsk = 1 states were assumed to belong to a virtual first excited torsional state. Finally, we assigned several low-Ka rotational transitions of the excited vibrational states above 200 cm-1 but their analysis is complicated by different rotation-vibration interactions. In particular there is an evidence of the Fermi-type resonance between the second excited torsional state and the first excited state of the in-plane skeletal bending mode (265 cm-1). Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged. Zakharenko O. et al., 69th ISMS, 2014, TI01

  19. Random noise de-noising and direct wave eliminating based on SVD method for ground penetrating radar signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cai; Song, Chao; Lu, Qi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method using singular value decomposition (SVD) which aims at eliminating the random noise and direct wave from ground penetrating radar (GPR) signals. To demonstrate the validity and high efficiency of the SVD method in eliminating random noise, we compare the SVD de-noising method with wavelet threshold de-noising method and bandpass filtering method on both noisy synthetic data and field data. After that, we compare the SVD method with the mean trace deleting in eliminating direct wave on synthetic data and field data. We set general and quantitative criteria on choosing singular values to carry out the random noise de-noising and direct wave eliminating process. We find that by choosing appropriate singular values, SVD method can eliminate the random noise and direct wave in the GPR data validly and efficiently to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the GPR profiles and make effective reflection signals clearer.

  20. An improved hypothesis-feedback equalization algorithm for multicode direct-sequence spread-spectrum underwater communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jing; HUANG Jianguo; SHEN Xiaohong; WANG Yu

    2007-01-01

    In underwater acoustic communication,because the available bandwidth of the channel is severely limited,the direct-sequence spread-spectrum scheme can only be realized at low bit rates.To improve the transmission speed,a multicode spread-spectrum scheme is considered.However,in this case,due to the rapid time-variability of the underwater channel,and the influence of inter-symbol interference(ISI)and inter-channel interference(ICI),the conventional rake receiver may fail to function.The hypothesis-feedback equalization algorithm has been proposed for the direct-sequence spread-spectrum system[1].By updating coefficients at chip rate and feeding back hypothesized chips,it can track time-variability and combat ISI effectively.However,for a multicode system,its performance will be degraded bv ICI.An improved algorithm is proposed in this paper,which combines parallel interference cancellation(PIC)with hypothesis-feedback equalization(HFE),with the capabilities of tracking the time-varying channel and suppressing the ISI and ICI at the same time.Simulation results prove that the proposed algorithm can significantly improve the performance of a multicode system.

  1. Banks of templates for directed searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pisarski, Andrzej; Pietka, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for directed searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning nuetron stars in our Galaxy in data being collected by currently operating interferometric detectors. We thus assume that the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky is known, but we do not assume that the wave's frequency and its derivatives are a priori known. In the construction we employ simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a polynomial function of time. All our template banks enable usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood F-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank. We study and employ the dependence of the grid's construction on the choice of the position of the observational interval with respect to the origin of time axis. We also study the usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithms with non-standard frequency resolutions achieved by zero padding or...

  2. Wave steering effects in anisotropic composite structures: Direct calculation of the energy skew angle through a finite element scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulos, D

    2017-01-01

    A systematic expression quantifying the wave energy skewing phenomenon as a function of the mechanical characteristics of a non-isotropic structure is derived in this study. A structure of arbitrary anisotropy, layering and geometric complexity is modelled through Finite Elements (FEs) coupled to a periodic structure wave scheme. A generic approach for efficiently computing the angular sensitivity of the wave slowness for each wave type, direction and frequency is presented. The approach does not involve any finite differentiation scheme and is therefore computationally efficient and not prone to the associated numerical errors.

  3. Improving efficiency of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal|fibers by direct degenerate four-wave-mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Nikola Ivanov; Bang, Ole; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers is significantly improved by designing the dispersion to allow widely separated spectral lines generated by degenerate four-wave-mixing directly from the pump to broaden and merge.......The efficiency of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers is significantly improved by designing the dispersion to allow widely separated spectral lines generated by degenerate four-wave-mixing directly from the pump to broaden and merge....

  4. Performance improvement of hybrid subcarrier multiplexing optical spectrum code division multiplexing system using spectral direct decoding detection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbudin, R. K. Z.; Abdullah, M. K.; Mokhtar, M.

    2009-06-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid subcarrier multiplexing/optical spectrum code division multiplexing (SCM/OSCDM) system for the purpose of combining the advantages of both techniques. Optical spectrum code division multiple-access (OSCDMA) is one of the multiplexing techniques that is becoming popular because of the flexibility in the allocation of channels, ability to operate asynchronously, enhanced privacy and increased capacity in bursty nature networks. On the other hand, subcarrier multiplexing (SCM) technique is able to enhance the channel data rate of OSCDMA systems. In this paper, a newly developed detection technique for the OSCDM called spectral direct decoding (SDD) detection technique is compared mathematically with the AND subtraction detection technique. The system utilizes a new unified code construction named KS (Khazani-Syed) code. The results characterizing the bit-error-rate (BER) show that SDD offers a significant improved performance at BER of 10 -9.

  5. Nexus between directionality of THz waves and structural parameters in groove-patterned InAs

    CERN Document Server

    Yim, Jong-Hyuk; Jeong, Hoonil; Song, Jin-Dong; Jho, Young-Dahl

    2012-01-01

    We have performed terahertz (THz)-time domain spectroscopy in various geometries, for characterizing the directivity of THz waves emitted from groove-patterned InAs structures. First, we have distinguished the THz emission mechanisms as a function of epilayer thickness. The carrier drift was predominant in thin sample group (10-70 nm) which the electronic diffusion motion was overriding the oppositely aligned drifting dipoles in thick sample group (370-900 nm) as revealed via amplitude and phase variations. By combined use of the electron-beam lithography and the inductively coupled plasma etching in 1 {\\mu}m-thick InAs epilayers, we have further fabricated either asymmetric V-groove patterns or symmetric parabolic patterns. The THz amplitude was enhanced, particularly along line-of-sight transmissive direction when the groove patterns act as microscale reflective mirrors periodically separated by a scale of diffusion length.

  6. Astrophysical motivation for directed searches for a stochastic gravitational wave background

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumder, Nairwita; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    The nearby universe is expected to create an anisotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB). Different algorithms have been developed and implemented to search for isotropic and anisotropic SGWB. The aim of this paper is to quantify the advantage of an optimal anisotropic search, specifically comparing a point source with an isotropic background. Clusters of galaxies appear as point sources to a network of ground based laser interferometric detectors. The optimal search strategy for these sources is a ``directed radiometer search''. We show that the flux of SGWB created by the millisecond pulsars in the Virgo cluster produces a significantly stronger signal than the nearly isotropic background of unresolved sources of the same kind. We compute their strain power spectra for different cosmologies and distribution of population over redshifts. We conclude that a localised source, like the Virgo cluster, can be resolved from the isotropic background with very high significance using the directed sea...

  7. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral

  8. A direct current rectification scheme for microwave space power conversion using traveling wave electron acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of the Vision-21 conference held three years ago allowed the present author to reflect and speculate on the problem of converting electromagnetic energy to a direct current by essentially reversing the process used in traveling wave tubes that converts energy in the form of a direct current to electromagnetic energy. The idea was to use the electric field of the electromagnetic wave to produce electrons through the field emission process and accelerate these electrons by the same field to produce an electric current across a large potential difference. The acceleration process was that of cyclotron auto-resonance. Since that time, this rather speculative ideas has been developed into a method that shows great promise and for which a patent is pending and a prototype design will be demonstrated in a potential laser power beaming application. From the point of view of the author, a forum such as Vision-21 is becoming an essential component in the rather conservative climate in which our initiatives for space exploration are presently formed. Exchanges such as Vision-21 not only allows us to deviate from the 'by-the-book' approach and rediscover the ability and power in imagination, but provides for the discussion of ideas hitherto considered 'crazy' so that they may be given the change to transcend from the level of eccentricity to applicability.

  9. The Water Abundance of the Directly Imaged Substellar Companion κ And b Retrieved from a Near Infrared Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Line, Michael R.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Meyer, Michael R.; Quanz, Sascha P.; Hinkley, Sasha; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-05-01

    Spectral retrieval has proven to be a powerful tool for constraining the physical properties and atmospheric compositions of extrasolar planet atmospheres based on observed spectra, primarily for transiting objects but also for directly imaged planets and brown dwarfs. Despite its strengths, this approach has been applied to only about a dozen targets. Determining the abundances of the main carbon- and oxygen-bearing compounds in a planetary atmosphere can lead to the C/O ratio of the object, which is crucial for understanding its formation and migration history. We present a retrieval analysis of the published near-infrared spectrum of κ \\quad {Andromedae} b, a directly imaged substellar companion to a young B9 star. We fit the emission spectrum model utilizing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We estimate the abundance of water vapor, and its uncertainty, in the atmosphere of the object. In addition, we place an upper limit on the abundance of CH4. We qualitatively compare our results with studies that have applied model retrieval on multiband photometry and emission spectroscopy of hot Jupiters (extrasolar giant planets with orbital periods of several days) and the directly imaged giant planet HR 8799b.

  10. Evidence for the Direct Detection of the Thermal Spectrum of the Non-Transiting Hot Gas Giant HD 88133 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorz, Danielle; Crockett, Nathan R.; Lockwood, Alexandra; Benneke, Björn; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Barman, Travis S.; Bender, Chad F.; Bryan, Marta; Carr, John S.; Fischer, Debra; Howard, Andrew; Isaacson, Howard T.; Johnson, John A.

    2016-10-01

    We target the thermal emission spectrum of the non-transiting gas giant HD 88133 b with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, by treating the planet and its host star as a spectroscopic binary. For sufficiently deep summed flux observations of the star and planet across multiple epochs, it is possible to resolve the signal of the hot gas giant's atmosphere compared to the brighter stellar spectrum, at a level consistent with the aggregate shot noise of the full data set. To do this, we first perform a principal component analysis to remove the contribution of the Earth's atmosphere to the observed spectra. Then, we use a cross-correlation analysis to tease out the spectra of the host star and HD 88133 b to determine its orbit and identify key sources of atmospheric opacity. In total, six epochs of Keck NIRSPEC L band observations and three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC K band observations of the HD 88133 system were obtained. Based on an analysis of the maximum likelihood curves calculated from the multi-epoch cross correlation of the full data set with two atmospheric models, we report the direct detection of the emission spectrum of the non-transiting exoplanet HD 88133 b and measure a radial projection of its Keplerian orbital velocity, its true mass, its orbital inclination, and dominant atmospheric species. This, combined with eleven years of radial velocity measurements of the system, provides the most up-to-date ephemeris for HD 88133.

  11. The Energy Spectrum of Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and the Direct Comparison to the High Resolution Fly's Eye Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array's Middle Drum fluorescence detector was instrumented with telescopes refurbished from the High Resolution Fly's Eye's HiRes-1 site. The data observed by Middle Drum in monocular mode was analyzed via the HiRes-1 profile-constrained geometry reconstruction technique and utilized the same calibration techniques enabling a direct comparison of the energy spectra and energy scales between the two experiments. The spectrum measured using the Middle Drum telescopes is based on a three-year exposure collected between December 16, 2007 and December 16, 2010. The calculated difference between the spectrum of the Middle Drum observations and the published spectrum obtained by the data collected by the HiRes-1 site allows the HiRes-1 energy scale to be transferred to Middle Drum. The HiRes energy scale is applied to the entire Telescope Array by making a comparison between Middle Drum monocular events and hybrid events that triggered both Middle Drum and the Telescope Array's scintillator Ground Arra...

  12. CFOSAT: a new Chinese-French satellite for joint observations of ocean wind vector and directional spectra of ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, D.; Tison, C.; Amiot, T.; Delaye, L.; Mouche, A.; Guitton, G.; Aouf, L.; Castillan, P.

    2016-05-01

    CFOSAT (the China France Oceanography Satellite) is a joint mission from the Chinese and French Space Agencies, devoted to the observation ocean surface wind and waves so as to improve wind and wave forecast for marine meteorology, ocean dynamics modeling and prediction, climate variability knowledge, fundamental knowledge of surface processes. Currently under Phase D (manufacturing phase), the launch is now planned for mid-2018 the later. The CFOSAT will carry two payloads, both Ku-Band radar: the wave scatterometer (SWIM) and the wind scatterometer (SCAT). Both instruments are based on new concepts with respect to existing satellite-borne wind and wave sensors. Indeed, one of the originalities of CFOSAT is that it will provide simultaneously and in the same zone, the directional spectra of ocean waves and the wind vector. The concept used to measure the directional spectra of ocean waves has never been used from space until now: it is based on a near-nadir incidence pointing, rotating fan-beam radar, used in a real-aperture mode. In this paper we present the CFOSAT mission, its objectives and main characteristics. We then focus on the SWIM instrument, the expected geophysical products and performances. Finally, we present ongoing studies based on existing satellite data of directional spectra of ocean waves (Sentinel-1, ..) and carried out in preparation to CAL/VAL activities and to future data exploitation.

  13. Intramode wave packet in a thin left-handed film with the spectrum near the frequency of the zero group velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkin, D. A.; Litvinov, R. V.; Parfenova, E. S.; Rakhim, R. A. A.; Stukach, O. V.

    2016-11-01

    We consider the frequency dependence of propagation constants (phase dispersion) and of the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic field (shape dispersion) of guided optical TE modes in a thin left-handed film. It is shown that the spatiotemporal transformation of narrow-band intramode wave packets with the spectrum adjacent to the frequency of the zero group velocity is caused by the dispersion of both types. The propagation velocity of the power carried by such wave packets is significantly lower than the group velocity of light in a bulk left-handed metamaterial.

  14. The Water Abundance of the Directly Imaged Substellar Companion {\\kappa} And b Retrieved from a Near Infrared Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Kamen O; Pineda, Jaime E; Meyer, Michael R; Quanz, Sascha P; Hinkley, Sasha; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, spectral retrieval has proven to be a powerful tool for constraining the physical properties and atmospheric compositions of extrasolar planet atmospheres from observed spectra, primarily for transiting objects but also increasingly for directly imaged planets and brown dwarfs. Despite its strengths, this approach has been applied to only about a dozen targets. Determining the abundances of the main carbon and oxygen-bearing compounds in a planetary atmosphere can lead to the C/O ratio of the object, which is crucial in understanding its formation and migration history. We present a retrieval analysis on the published near-infrared spectrum of {\\kappa} And b, a directly imaged substellar companion to a young B9 star. We fit the emission spectrum model utilizing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We estimate the abundance of water vapor, and its uncertainty, in the atmosphere of the object. We also place upper limits on the abundances of carbon dioxide and methane and constrain the pressure-temper...

  15. Direct visualization of surface acoustic waves along substrates using smoke particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ming K.; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie Y.

    2007-11-01

    Smoke particles (SPs) are used to directly visualize surface acoustic waves (SAWs) propagating on a 128°-rotated Y-cut X-propagating lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. By electrically exciting a SAW device in a compartment filled with SP, the SP were found to collect along the regions where the SAW propagates on the substrate. The results of the experiments show that SPs are deposited adjacent to regions of large vibration amplitude and form a clear pattern corresponding to the surface wave profile on the substrate. Through an analysis of the SAW-induced acoustic streaming in the air adjacent to the substrate and the surface acceleration measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer, we postulate that the large transverse surface accelerations due to the SAW ejects SP from the surface and carries them aloft to relatively quiescent regions nearby via acoustic streaming. Offering finer detail than fine powders common in Chladni figures [E. Chladni, Entdeckungen über die Theorie des Klanges (Weidmanns, Erben und Reich, Leipzig, Germany, 1787)] the approach is an inexpensive and a quick counterpart to laser interferometric techniques, presenting a means to explore the controversial phenomena of particle agglomeration on surfaces.

  16. Direct Observation of Spin- and Charge-Density Waves in a Luttinger Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chenglin; Marcum, Andrew; Mawardi Ismail, Arif; Fonta, Francisco; O'Hara, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    At low energy, interacting fermions in one dimension (e.g. electrons in quantum wires or fermionic atoms in 1D waveguides) should behave as Luttinger liquids. In stark contrast to Fermi liquids, the low-energy elementary excitations in Luttinger liquids are collective sound-like modes that propagate independently as spin-density and/or charge-density (i.e. particle-density) waves with generally unequal, and interaction-dependent, velocities. Here we aim to unambiguously confirm this hallmark feature of the Luttinger liquid - the phenomenon of spin-charge separation - by directly observing in real space the dynamics of spin-density and ``charge''-density waves excited in an ultracold gas of spin-1/2 fermions confined in an array of 1D optical waveguides. Starting from a two-component mixture of 6 Li atoms harmonically confined along each of the 1D waveguides, we excite low lying normal modes of the trapped system - namely the spin dipole and density dipole and quadrupole modes - and measure their frequency as a function of interaction strength. Luttinger liquid theory predicts that the spin dipole frequency is strongly dependent on interaction strength whereas the density dipole and quadrupole mode frequencies are relatively insensitive. We will also discuss extending our approach to exciting localized spin density and particle density wavepackets which should propagate at different velocities. Supported by AFOSR and NSF.

  17. Direct single-shot observation of millimeter wave superradiance in Rydberg-Rydberg transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Grimes, David D; Barnum, Timothy J; Zhou, Yan; Yelin, Susanne F; Field, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    We have directly detected millimeter wave (mm-wave) free space superradiant emission from Rydberg states ($n \\sim 30$) of barium atoms in a single shot. We trigger the cooperative effects with a weak initial pulse and detect with single-shot sensitivity and 20 ps time resolution, which allows measurement and shot-by-shot analysis of the distribution of decay rates, time delays, and time-dependent frequency shifts. Cooperative line shifts and decay rates are observed that exceed values that would correspond to the Doppler width of 250 kHz by a factor of 20 and the spontaneous emission rate of 50 Hz by a factor of $10^5$. The initial superradiant output pulse is followed by evolution of the radiation-coupled many-body system toward complex long-lasting emission modes. A comparison to a mean-field theory is presented which reproduces the quantitative time-domain results, but fails to account for either the frequency-domain observations or the long-lived features.

  18. Goal-Directed and Goal-Less Imitation in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Kelly S.; Poliakoff, Ellen; Jerrison, Andrew; Gowen, Emma

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how people with Autism are affected by the presence of goals during imitation, we conducted a study to measure movement kinematics and eye movements during the imitation of goal-directed and goal-less hand movements. Our results showed that a control group imitated changes in movement kinematics and increased the level that they…

  19. Direct measurement of the absolute absorption spectrum of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Paillet, Matthieu; Tran, Huy Nam; Than, Xuan Tinh; Guebrou, Samuel Aberra; Ayari, Anthony; Miguel, Alfonso San; Phan, Ngoc-Minh; Zahab, Ahmed-Azmi; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Fatti, Natalia Del; Vallée, Fabrice

    2013-09-01

    The optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes are very promising for developing novel opto-electronic components and sensors with applications in many fields. Despite numerous studies performed using photoluminescence or Raman and Rayleigh scattering, knowledge of their optical response is still partial. Here we determine using spatial modulation spectroscopy, over a broad optical spectral range, the spectrum and amplitude of the absorption cross-section of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. These quantitative measurements permit determination of the oscillator strength of the different excitonic resonances and their dependencies on the excitonic transition and type of semiconducting nanotube. A non-resonant background is also identified and its cross-section comparable to the ideal graphene optical absorbance. Furthermore, investigation of the same single-wall nanotube either free standing or lying on a substrate shows large broadening of the excitonic resonances with increase of oscillator strength, as well as stark weakening of polarization-dependent antenna effects, due to nanotube-substrate interaction.

  20. Assessment of pretend play in Prader-Willi syndrome: a direct comparison to autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyga, Olena; Russ, Sandra; Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E; Dimitropoulos, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    Children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including pervasive social deficits. While play impairments in ASD are well documented, play abilities in PWS have not been evaluated. Fourteen children with PWS and ten children with ASD were administered the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) (Lord et al. in Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule manual. Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, 2006) as part of a larger project. A modified Affect in Play Scale (APS; Russ in Play in child development and psychotherapy: toward empirically supported practice. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers, Mahwah, 2004; Pretend play in childhood: foundation of adult creativity. APA Books, Washington, 2014) was used to score ADOS play activities. Results indicate both groups scored below normative data on measures of imagination, organization, and affective expression during individual play. In addition, the inclusion of a play partner in both groups increased all scaled scores on the APS. These findings suggest children with PWS show impaired pretend play abilities similar to ASD. Further research is warranted and should focus on constructing and validating programs aimed at improving symbolic and functional play abilities within these populations.

  1. An analysis of JET fast-wave heating and current drive experiments directly related to ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Eriksson, L.; Gormezano, C.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A.; Start, D.F.H. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The ITER fast-wave system is required to serve a variety of purposes, in particular, plasma heating to ignition, current profile and burn control and eventually, in conjunction with other schemes, a central non-inductive current drive (CD) for the steady-state operation of ITER. The ICRF heating and current drive data that has been obtained in JET are analyzed in terms of dimensionless parameters, with a view to ascertaining its direct relevance to key ITER requirements. The analysis is then used to identify areas both in physics and technological aspects of ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and CD that require further experimentation in ITER-relevant devices such as JET to establish the required data base. (authors). 12 refs., 8 figs.

  2. On the sensitivity of directions which support Voigt wave propagation in infiltrated biaxial dielectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2013-01-01

    Voigt wave propagation (VWP) was considered in a porous biaxial dielectric material which was infiltrated with a material of refractive index $n_a$. The infiltrated material was regarded as a homogenized composite material in the long-wavelength regime and its constitutive parameters were estimated using the extended Bruggeman homogenization formalism. In our numerical studies, the directions which support VWP were found to vary by as much as $300^\\circ$ per RIU as the refractive index $n_a$ was varied. The sensitivities achieved were acutely dependent upon the refractive index $n_a$ and the degrees of anisotropy and dissipation of the porous biaxial material. The orientations, shapes and sizes of the particles which constitute the infiltrating material and the porous biaxial material exerted only a secondary influence on the maximum sensitivities achieved. Also, for the parameter ranges considered, the degree of porosity of the biaxial material had little effect on the maximum sensitivities achieved. These n...

  3. Direct path from microscopic mechanics to Debye shielding, Landau damping, and wave-particle interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Escande, Dominique F; Doveil, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    The derivation of Debye shielding and Landau damping from the $N$-body description of plasmas is performed directly by using Newton's second law for the $N$-body system. This is done in a few steps with elementary calculations using standard tools of calculus, and no probabilistic setting. Unexpectedly, Debye shielding is encountered together with Landau damping. This approach is shown to be justified in the one-dimensional case when the number of particles in a Debye sphere becomes large. The theory is extended to accommodate a correct description of trapping and chaos due to Langmuir waves. Shielding and collisional transport are found to be two related aspects of the repulsive deflections of electrons, in such a way that each particle is shielded by all other ones while keeping in uninterrupted motion.

  4. Direct path from microscopic mechanics to Debye shielding, Landau damping and wave-particle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, D. F.; Elskens, Yves; Doveil, F.

    2015-02-01

    The derivation of Debye shielding and Landau damping from the N-body description of plasmas is performed directly by using Newton’s second law for the N-body system. This is done in a few steps with elementary calculations using standard tools of calculus and no probabilistic setting. Unexpectedly, Debye shielding is encountered together with Landau damping. This approach is shown to be justified in the one-dimensional case when the number of particles in a Debye sphere becomes large. The theory is extended to accommodate a correct description of trapping and chaos due to Langmuir waves. On top of their well-known production of collisional transport, the repulsive deflections of electrons are shown to produce shielding, in such a way that each particle is shielded by all other ones, while keeping in uninterrupted motion.

  5. Direct observation of Feshbach enhanced $\\it{s}$-wave scattering of fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Genkina, Dina; Stuhl, Benjamin K; Lu, Hsin-I; Spielman, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We directly measured the normalized $\\it{s}$-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold $^{40}\\rm{K}$ atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be $B_0 = 20.206(15)$ mT with width $\\Delta = 1.0(5)$ mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing signal-to-noise ratio on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution.

  6. Structural Crack Detection Method Based on Propagation Energy Spectrum of Lamb Waves%Lamb波传播能量谱结构裂纹检测方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晶; 王强

    2013-01-01

    针对裂纹损伤易引发严重后果且难以观测这一问题,对Lamb波传播能量谱结构裂纹检测技术进行了研究.利用Lamb波传播距离远,对微小损伤敏感的特点,对传播路径上不同点观测得到的期望模式Lamb波进行分析,得出其传播距离与能量关系谱,根据能量谱的突变检测出结构损伤的位置.在真实结构试件上进行了实验验证,实验观测得到的期望模式Lamb波传播能量谱反映出结构裂纹的具体位置,证明了该方法的有效性和实用性.%Crack damage may cause serious accidents and is hard to be detected intuitively. A new crack damage detection technique based on propagation energy spectrum of Lamb wave was researched. By using its long propagation distance and sensitivity to small damages, the analysis of the expected Lamb waves mode was performed to obtain their propagation energy spectrum. These Lamb waves were collected from different monitoring point along the propagation path. The damage location would be indicated by a sudden change of the energy spectrum. Experimental validation was conducted on an actual structural specimen. The propagation energy spectrum of expected Lamb wave mode observed in the experiments showed the happening and location of the crack damage, which improved the effect and practicability of the method.

  7. High accuracy solution of bi-directional wave propagation in continuum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulloth, Akhil; Sawant, Nilesh; Haider, Ijlal; Sharma, Nidhi; Sengupta, Tapan K.

    2015-10-01

    Solution of partial differential equations by numerical method is strongly affected due to numerical errors, which are caused mainly by deviation of numerical dispersion relation from the physical dispersion relation. To quantify and control such errors and obtain high accuracy solutions, we consider a class of problems which involve second derivative of unknowns with respect to time. Here, we analyse numerical metrics such as the numerical group velocity, numerical phase speed and the numerical amplification factor for different methods in solving the model bi-directional wave equation (BDWE). Such equations can be solved directly, for example, by Runge-Kutta-Nyström (RKN) method. Alternatively, the governing equation can be converted to a set of first order in time equations and then using four-stage fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK4) method for time integration. Spatial discretisation considered are the classical second and fourth order central difference schemes, along with Lele's central compact scheme for evaluating second derivatives. In another version, we have used Lele's scheme for evaluating first derivatives twice to obtain the second derivative. As BDWE represents non-dissipative, non-dispersive dynamics, we also consider the canonical problem of linearised rotating shallow water equation (LRSWE) in a new formulation involving second order derivative in time, which represents dispersive waves along with a stationary mode. The computations of LRSWE with RK4 and RKN methods for temporal discretisation and Lele's compact schemes for spatial discretisation are compared with computations performed with RK4 method for time discretisation and staggered compact scheme (SCS) for spatial discretisation by treating it as a set of three equations as reported in Rajpoot et al. (2012) [1].

  8. The relationship between parent report of adaptive behavior and direct assessment of reading ability in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciuli, Joanne; Stevens, Kirsten; Trembath, David; Simpson, Ian Craig

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to shed light on the profile of reading ability in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A key aim was to examine the relationship between parent report of adaptive behavior and direct assessment of reading ability in these children. The authors investigated children's reading ability using the Wide Range Achievement Test—Fourth Edition (Wilkinson & Robertson, 2006) and the Neale Analysis of Reading Ability—Third Edition (Neale, 2007). Parent report data was collected using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales—Second Edition (Sparrow, Cicchetti, & Balla, 2005). Participants were 21 children with ASD (6-11 years) and their primary caregivers. Direct assessment of children's reading ability showed that some children with ASD have difficulty learning to read and exhibit particular weaknesses in comprehension. The results revealed positive relationships between Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales scores in the Adaptive Communication domain and direct assessment of children's reading ability across 3 measures of reading (word-level accuracy, passage-level accuracy, and passage-level comprehension). Although literacy levels vary among children with ASD, some clearly struggle with reading. There is a significant relationship between parent self-report of adaptive behavior and direct assessment of children's reading ability.

  9. Estimation of femoral bone density from trabecular direct wave and cortical guided wave ultrasound velocities measured at the proximal femur in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkmann, Reinhard; Dencks, Stefanie; Bremer, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur is a predictor of hip fracture risk. We developed a Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) scanner for measurements at this site with similar performance (FemUS). In this study we tested if ultrasound velocities of direct waves through trabecular bone...... echoes reflected from the skin of the leg to yield speed-of-sound (SOS) of different wave components. Data were cross-calibrated and pooled (62 women). Bivariate correlations and a multivariate model were calculated for the estimation of femur BMD. BMD correlated both with trabecular and cortical SOS...

  10. EVIDENCE FOR THE DIRECT DETECTION OF THE THERMAL SPECTRUM OF THE NON-TRANSITING HOT GAS GIANT HD 88133 b

    KAUST Repository

    Piskorz, Danielle

    2016-11-23

    We target the thermal emission spectrum of the non-transiting gas giant HD 88133 b with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, by treating the planet and its host star as a spectroscopic binary. For sufficiently deep summed flux observations of the star and planet across multiple epochs, it is possible to resolve the signal of the hot gas giant\\'s atmosphere compared to the brighter stellar spectrum, at a level consistent with the aggregate shot noise of the full data set. To do this, we first perform a principal component analysis to remove the contribution of the Earth\\'s atmosphere to the observed spectra. Then, we use a cross-correlation analysis to tease out the spectra of the host star and HD 88133 b to determine its orbit and identify key sources of atmospheric opacity. In total, six epochs of Keck NIRSPEC L-band observations and three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC K-band observations of the HD 88133 system were obtained. Based on an analysis of the maximum likelihood curves calculated from the multi-epoch cross-correlation of the full data set with two atmospheric models, we report the direct detection of the emission spectrum of the non-transiting exoplanet HD 88133 b and measure a radial projection of the Keplerian orbital velocity of 40 +/- 15 km s(-1), a true mass of 1.02(-0.28)(+0.61) M-J, a nearly face-on orbital inclination of 15(-5)(+60), and an atmosphere opacity structure at high dispersion dominated by water vapor. This, combined with 11 years of radial velocity measurements of the system, provides the most up-to-date ephemeris for HD 88133.

  11. Improved performance of traveling wave directional coupler modulator based on electro-optic polymer

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xingyu; Lin, Che-yun; Wang, Alan X; Hosseini, Amir; Lin, Xiaohui; Chen, Ray T

    2014-01-01

    Polymer based electro-optic modulators have shown great potentials in high frequency analog optical links. Existing commercial LiNibO3 Mach-Zehnder modulators have intrinsic drawbacks in linearity to provide high fidelity communication. In this paper, we present the design, fabrication and characterization of a traveling wave directional coupler modulator based on electro-optic polymer, which is able to provide high linearity, high speed, and low optical insertion loss. A silver ground electrode is used to reduce waveguide sidewall roughness due to the scattering of UV light in photolithography process in addition to suppressing the RF loss. A 1-to-2 multi-mode interference 3dB-splitter, a photobleached refractive index taper and a quasi-vertical taper are used to reduce the optical insertion loss of the device. The symmetric waveguide structure of the MMI-fed directional coupler is intrinsically bias-free, and the modulation is obtained at the 3-dB point regardless of the ambient temperature. By achieving lo...

  12. Direct analysis of dispersive wave fields from near-field pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horchens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Flexural waves play a significant role for the radiation of sound from plates. The analysis of flexural wave fields enables the detection of sources and transmission paths in plate-like structures. The measurement of these wave fields can be carried out indirectly by means of near-field acoustic hol

  13. A Wave Modulation Model of Ripples over Long Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Peixiu; ZHENG Guizhen

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented on the modulation of ripples induced by a long surface wave (LW) and a new theoretical modulation model is proposed. In this model, the wind surface stress modulation is related to the modulation of tipple spectrum. The model results show that in the case of LW propagating in the wind direction with the wave age parameter of LW increasing, the area with enhanced shear stress shifts from the region near the LW crest on the upwind slope to the LW trough. With a smaller wave age parameter of LW, the tipple modulation has the maximum on the upwind slope in the vicinity of LW crest, while with a larger parameter the enhancement of ripple spectrum does not occur in that region. At low winds the amplitude of ripple modulation transfer function (MTF) is larger in the gravity wave range, while at moderate or high winds it changes little in the range from short gravity waves to capillary waves.

  14. Direct Evaluation of Transition Amplitude Using Determinant of Wave Operator in One-Dimensional Potential Scattering System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Itsuki Banno; Kazumi Fujima

    2007-01-01

    A determinantal formula is developed for direct evaluation of transition amplitude without solving the wave equation in a one-dimensional potential scattering system. Our formulation is based on the principle that a desired quantity can be extracted from the wave operator, which is the master operator maintaining all the information of the system. This principle is tested in a simplified system, I.e., in a one-dimensional potential scattering system. We are now developing a formula for direct evaluation of near-field amplitude to design a system, in which local Geld enhancement is desired.

  15. Automatic assignment of protein backbone resonances by direct spectrum inspection in targeted acquisition of NMR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Leo E; Masse, James E; Jaravine, Victor; Orekhov, Vladislav; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2008-10-01

    The necessity to acquire large multidimensional datasets, a basis for assignment of NMR resonances, results in long data acquisition times during which substantial degradation of a protein sample might occur. Here we propose a method applicable for such a protein for automatic assignment of backbone resonances by direct inspection of multidimensional NMR spectra. In order to establish an optimal balance between completeness of resonance assignment and losses of cross-peaks due to dynamic processes/degradation of protein, assignment of backbone resonances is set as a stirring criterion for dynamically controlled targeted nonlinear NMR data acquisition. The result is demonstrated with the 12 kDa (13)C,(15) N-labeled apo-form of heme chaperone protein CcmE, where hydrolytic cleavage of 29 C-terminal amino acids is detected. For this protein, 90 and 98% of manually assignable resonances are automatically assigned within 10 and 40 h of nonlinear sampling of five 3D NMR spectra, respectively, instead of 600 h needed to complete the full time domain grid. In addition, resonances stemming from degradation products are identified. This study indicates that automatic resonance assignment might serve as a guiding criterion for optimal run-time allocation of NMR resources in applications to proteins prone to degradation.

  16. Automatic assignment of protein backbone resonances by direct spectrum inspection in targeted acquisition of NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Leo E. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Biological Sciences (Singapore); Masse, James E. [National Institutes of Health (United States); Jaravine, Victor [J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Orekhov, Vladislav [Gothenburg University, Swedish NMR Centre (Sweden); Pervushin, Konstantin [Nanyang Technological University, School of Biological Sciences (Singapore)], E-mail: kpervushin@ntu.edu.sg

    2008-10-15

    The necessity to acquire large multidimensional datasets, a basis for assignment of NMR resonances, results in long data acquisition times during which substantial degradation of a protein sample might occur. Here we propose a method applicable for such a protein for automatic assignment of backbone resonances by direct inspection of multidimensional NMR spectra. In order to establish an optimal balance between completeness of resonance assignment and losses of cross-peaks due to dynamic processes/degradation of protein, assignment of backbone resonances is set as a stirring criterion for dynamically controlled targeted nonlinear NMR data acquisition. The result is demonstrated with the 12 kDa {sup 13}C,{sup 15} N-labeled apo-form of heme chaperone protein CcmE, where hydrolytic cleavage of 29 C-terminal amino acids is detected. For this protein, 90 and 98% of manually assignable resonances are automatically assigned within 10 and 40 h of nonlinear sampling of five 3D NMR spectra, respectively, instead of 600 h needed to complete the full time domain grid. In addition, resonances stemming from degradation products are identified. This study indicates that automatic resonance assignment might serve as a guiding criterion for optimal run-time allocation of NMR resources in applications to proteins prone to degradation.

  17. Low-energy spectrum of iron-sulfur clusters directly from many-particle quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Sandeep; Neese, Frank; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-01

    FeS clusters are a universal biological motif. They carry out electron transfer, redox chemistry, and even oxygen sensing, in diverse processes including nitrogen fixation, respiration, and photosynthesis. The low-lying electronic states are key to their remarkable reactivity, but cannot be directly observed. Here we present the first ever quantum calculation of the electronic levels of [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters free from any model assumptions. Our results highlight limitations of long-standing models of their electronic structure. In particular, we demonstrate that the widely used Heisenberg-Double-Exchange model underestimates the number of states by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which can conclusively be traced to the absence of Fe d$\\rightarrow$d excitations, thought to be important in these clusters. Further, the electronic energy levels of even the same spin are dense on the scale of vibrational fluctuations, and this provides a natural explanation for the ubiquity of these clusters in nature for cataly...

  18. The existence spectrum for overlarge sets of pure directed triple systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A directed triple system of order v,denoted by DTS(v),is a pair (X,B) where X is a v-set and B is a collection of transitive triples on X such that every ordered pair of X belongs to exactly one triple of B.A DTS(v) (X,A) is called pure and denoted by PDTS(v) if (a,b,c) ∈ A implies (c,b,a) ∈/ A.An overlarge set of PDTS(v),denoted by OLPDTS(v),is a collection {(Y \\{yi},Aij) : yi ∈ Y,j ∈ Z3},where Y is a (v+1)-set,each (Y \\{yi},Aij) is a PDTS(v) and these Ais form a partition of all transitive triples on Y .In this paper,we shall discuss the existence problem of OLPDTS(v) and give the following conclusion: there exists an OLPDTS(v) if and only if v ≡ 0,1 (mod 3) and v > 3.

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Goal-Directed Reaching in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. G. Salowitz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An unanswered question concerning the neural basis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD is how sensorimotor deficits in individuals with ASD are related to abnormalities of brain function. We previously described a robotic joystick and video game system that allows us to record functional magnetic resonance images (FMRI while adult humans make goal-directed wrist motions. We anticipated several challenges in extending this approach to studying goal-directed behaviors in children with ASD and in typically developing (TYP children. In particular we were concerned that children with autism may express increased levels of anxiety as compared to typically developing children due to the loud sounds and small enclosed space of the MRI scanner. We also were concerned that both groups of children might become restless during testing, leading to an unacceptable amount of head movement. Here we performed a pilot study evaluating the extent to which autistic and typically developing children exhibit anxiety during our experimental protocol as well as their ability to comply with task instructions. Our experimental controls were successful in minimizing group differences in drop-out due to anxiety. Kinematic performance and head motion also were similar across groups. Both groups of children engaged cortical regions (frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital while making goal-directed movements. In addition, the ASD group exhibited task-related correlations in subcortical regions (cerebellum, thalamus, whereas correlations in the TYP group did not reach statistical significance in subcortical regions. Four distinct regions in frontal cortex showed a significant group difference such that TYP children exhibited positive correlations between the hemodynamic response and movement, whereas children with ASD exhibited negative correlations. These findings demonstrate feasibility of simultaneous application of robotic manipulation and functional imaging to study goal-directed

  20. Inferring Weighted Directed Association Networks from Multivariate Time Series with the Small-Shuffle Symbolic Transfer Entropy Spectrum Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhu Hu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Complex network methodology is very useful for complex system exploration. However, the relationships among variables in complex systems are usually not clear. Therefore, inferring association networks among variables from their observed data has been a popular research topic. We propose a method, named small-shuffle symbolic transfer entropy spectrum (SSSTES, for inferring association networks from multivariate time series. The method can solve four problems for inferring association networks, i.e., strong correlation identification, correlation quantification, direction identification and temporal relation identification. The method can be divided into four layers. The first layer is the so-called data layer. Data input and processing are the things to do in this layer. In the second layer, we symbolize the model data, original data and shuffled data, from the previous layer and calculate circularly transfer entropy with different time lags for each pair of time series variables. Thirdly, we compose transfer entropy spectrums for pairwise time series with the previous layer’s output, a list of transfer entropy matrix. We also identify the correlation level between variables in this layer. In the last layer, we build a weighted adjacency matrix, the value of each entry representing the correlation level between pairwise variables, and then get the weighted directed association network. Three sets of numerical simulated data from a linear system, a nonlinear system and a coupled Rossler system are used to show how the proposed approach works. Finally, we apply SSSTES to a real industrial system and get a better result than with two other methods.

  1. Directional asymmetry of the nonlinear wave phenomena in a three-dimensional granular phononic crystal under gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Gusev, V

    2014-08-01

    We report the experimental observation of the gravity-induced asymmetry for the nonlinear transformation of acoustic waves in a noncohesive granular phononic crystal. Because of the gravity, the contact precompression increases with depth inducing space variations of not only the linear and nonlinear elastic moduli but also of the acoustic wave dissipation. We show experimentally and explain theoretically that, in contrast to symmetric propagation of linear waves, the amplitude of the nonlinearly self-demodulated wave depends on whether the propagation of the waves is in the direction of the gravity or in the opposite direction. Among the observed nonlinear processes, we report frequency mixing of the two transverse-rotational modes belonging to the optical band of vibrations and propagating with negative phase velocities, which results in the excitation of a longitudinal wave belonging to the acoustic band of vibrations and propagating with positive phase velocity. We show that the measurements of the gravity-induced asymmetry in the nonlinear acoustic phenomena can be used to compare the in-depth distributions of the contact nonlinearity and of acoustic absorption.

  2. Forward- and Reverse-Traveling Waves in DP Phenomenology: Does Inverted Direction of Wave Propagation Occur in Classical Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, Renata; Shera, Christopher A.; Moleti, Arturo; Botti, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Recent basilar-membrane (BM) vibration experiments show that the phase slope of the distortion product (DP) in the cochlear region in which a backward-traveling wave is expected is negative, which is typical of a forward-traveling wave, according to the predictions of quasi-linear approximate solutions of classical 1-D transmission-line cochlear models. This phase behavior has been interpreted as suggesting a strong deviation from the “classical” models of the otoacoustic emission (OAE) generation and transmission. In this paper, the DP phase inversion phenomenon is approached from a conservative point of view. The DP phase is calculated in a classical cochlear model. The main conclusion is that deviations from the classical model are not necessary to account for the observed phase behavior. PMID:24376285

  3. Forward- and Reverse-Traveling Waves in DP Phenomenology: Does Inverted Direction of Wave Propagation Occur in Classical Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, Renata; Shera, Christopher A.; Moleti, Arturo; Botti, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Recent basilar-membrane (BM) vibration experiments show that the phase slope of the distortion product (DP) in the cochlear region in which a backward-traveling wave is expected is negative, which is typical of a forward-traveling wave, according to the predictions of quasi-linear approximate solutions of classical 1-D transmission-line cochlear models. This phase behavior has been interpreted as suggesting a strong deviation from the "classical" models of the otoacoustic emission (OAE) generation and transmission. In this paper, the DP phase inversion phenomenon is approached from a conservative point of view. The DP phase is calculated in a classical cochlear model. The main conclusion is that deviations from the classical model are not necessary to account for the observed phase behavior.

  4. Investigation on empowering one direction emission of guided waves to avoid undesired reflections from other pipe attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Peter W.; Zhou, Fang

    2016-02-01

    An in-service pipe always contains elbows and joints at the ends of the pipe. Since the emitted guided waves from a transducer array is bi-directional, any attachments located at both ends of the pipe will cause reflections. For building pipes that are partially covered by wall, the transducer array must be installed near one end of the pipe. If there is elbow or joint connected to that end of the pipe, high reflections generated from the elbow or joint are inevitable. Such reflections may interfere the detection of reflections caused by true defect exists along the pipe body. Hence, to minimize such undesired interference, one must employs some smart devices or algorithms so that it can reduce the emission of guided wave from one direction but enhance the emission from the other direction. To achieve such purpose, two identical transducer arrays must be installed on the same pipe but with a smartly and specially calculated distance apart from the mounting locations of these two arrays. The distance is to ensure there is a proper time delay for emitting the second array after the emission of the first array. The designed processes are listed as follow. Firstly, two identical transducer arrays that could emit L(0,1) guided waves were mounted on a pipe with a specific distance apart from their mounting locations. The distance was determined after calculating the necessary time delay. Secondly, the guided waves generated from the two arrays are combined together to create the desired superimposing effect. With the help of simulation and finite element analysis, such single direction guided wave was successfully generated and tested. By accurately adjusted the time delay, results showed that it is possible to minimize the emitted guided waves in one direction and then empower the guided waves in another direction. Hence, the reflections generated from elbows and joints at one end of the pipe has been minimized, whilst, the emission of guided wave in the other direction

  5. Improvement of Epicentral Direction Estimation by P-wave Polarization Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Mitsutaka

    2016-04-01

    Polarization analysis has been used to analyze the polarization characteristics of waves and developed in various spheres, for example, electromagnetics, optics, and seismology. As for seismology, polarization analysis is used to discriminate seismic phases or to enhance specific phase (e.g., Flinn, 1965)[1], by taking advantage of the difference in polarization characteristics of seismic phases. In earthquake early warning, polarization analysis is used to estimate the epicentral direction using single station, based on the polarization direction of P-wave portion in seismic records (e.g., Smart and Sproules(1981) [2], Noda et al.,(2012) [3]). Therefore, improvement of the Estimation of Epicentral Direction by Polarization Analysis (EEDPA) directly leads to enhance the accuracy and promptness of earthquake early warning. In this study, the author tried to improve EEDPA by using seismic records of events occurred around Japan from 2003 to 2013. The author selected the events that satisfy following conditions. MJMA larger than 6.5 (JMA: Japan Meteorological Agency). Seismic records are available at least 3 stations within 300km in epicentral distance. Seismic records obtained at stations with no information on seismometer orientation were excluded, so that precise and quantitative evaluation of accuracy of EEDPA becomes possible. In the analysis, polarization has calculated by Vidale(1986) [4] that extended the method proposed by Montalbetti and Kanasewich(1970)[5] to use analytical signal. As a result of the analysis, the author found that accuracy of EEDPA improves by about 15% if velocity records, not displacement records, are used contrary to the author's expectation. Use of velocity records enables reduction of CPU time in integration of seismic records and improvement in promptness of EEDPA, although this analysis is still rough and further scrutiny is essential. At this moment, the author used seismic records that obtained by simply integrating acceleration

  6. Spectrum, radial wave functions, and hyperfine splittings of the Rydberg states in heavy alkali-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanayei, Ali; Schopohl, Nils

    2016-07-01

    We present numerically accurate calculations of the bound-state spectrum of the highly excited valence electron in the heavy alkali-metal atoms solving the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with a modern spectral collocation method that applies also for a large principal quantum number n ≫1 . As an effective single-particle potential we favor the reputable potential of Marinescu et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49, 982 (1994)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.49.982. Recent quasiclassical calculations of the quantum defect of the valence electron agree for orbital angular momentum l =0 ,1 ,2 ,... overall remarkably well with the results of the numerical calculations, but for the Rydberg states of rubidium and also cesium with l =3 this agreement is less fair. The reason for this anomaly is that in rubidium and cesium the potential acquires for l =3 deep inside the ionic core a second classical region, thus invalidating a standard Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) calculation with two widely spaced turning points. Comparing then our numerical solutions of the radial Schrödinger eigenvalue problem with the uniform analytic WKB approximation of Langer constructed around the remote turning point rn,j ,l (" close=")n -δ0)">+ we observe everywhere a remarkable agreement, apart from a tiny region around the inner turning point rn,j ,l (-). For s states the centrifugal barrier is absent and no inner turning point exists: rn,j ,0 (-)=0 . With the help of an ansatz proposed by Fock we obtain for the s states a second uniform analytic approximation to the radial wave function complementary to the WKB approximation of Langer, which is exact for r →0+ . From the patching condition, that is, for l =0 the Langer and Fock solutions should agree in the intermediate region 0 application we consider recent spectroscopic data for the hyperfine splittings of the isotopes 85Rb and 87Rb and find a remarkable agreement with the predicted scaling relation An,j ,0 (HFS )=const .

  7. A New Omni-Directional EMAT for Ultrasonic Lamb Wave Tomography Imaging of Metallic Plate Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songling Huang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new omni-directional electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT for the ultrasonic Lamb wave (ULW tomography imaging (TI of defects in metallic plates. The proposed EMAT is composed of a permanent magnet and a coil with a contra-flexure structure. This new EMAT coil structure is used for omni-directional ULW transmission and reception and ULW TI for the first time. The theoretical background and the working principles of this EMAT are presented and analyzed. The experimental results of its use on a 3 mm thick aluminum plate indicate that the EMAT with a contra-flexure coil (CFC can transmit and receive a pure single A0 mode ULW with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Thus, the extraction of the projection data used for ULW TI may be performed accurately. The circumferential consistency of the projection data is only slightly influenced by the distortion of the eddy current field that is induced by the new CFC with an irregular shape. When the new EMAT array is used for ULW TI using the cross-hole method and SIRT arithmetic, a desirable imaging quality can be achieved, and the estimated size of an artificial corrosion defect agreed well with its actual value. The relation between the reconstruction resolution and the number of the new EMATs used is analyzed. More TI experiments are carried out when the aluminum plate defect is in two different locations relative to the EMAT array, for the further investigation of the performances of the new EMATs.

  8. A new omni-directional EMAT for ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography imaging of metallic plate defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Songling; Wei, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Shen

    2014-02-20

    This paper proposes a new omni-directional electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) for the ultrasonic Lamb wave (ULW) tomography imaging (TI) of defects in metallic plates. The proposed EMAT is composed of a permanent magnet and a coil with a contra-flexure structure. This new EMAT coil structure is used for omni-directional ULW transmission and reception and ULW TI for the first time. The theoretical background and the working principles of this EMAT are presented and analyzed. The experimental results of its use on a 3 mm thick aluminum plate indicate that the EMAT with a contra-flexure coil (CFC) can transmit and receive a pure single A0 mode ULW with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Thus, the extraction of the projection data used for ULW TI may be performed accurately. The circumferential consistency of the projection data is only slightly influenced by the distortion of the eddy current field that is induced by the new CFC with an irregular shape. When the new EMAT array is used for ULW TI using the cross-hole method and SIRT arithmetic, a desirable imaging quality can be achieved, and the estimated size of an artificial corrosion defect agreed well with its actual value. The relation between the reconstruction resolution and the number of the new EMATs used is analyzed. More TI experiments are carried out when the aluminum plate defect is in two different locations relative to the EMAT array, for the further investigation of the performances of the new EMATs.

  9. Ramp-wave compression experiment with direct laser illumination on Shen Guang III prototype Laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Xu, Tao; Optical Team Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Ramp-wave compression (RWC) experiment to balance the high compression pressure generation in aluminum and x-ray blanking effect in transparent window was demonstrated on Shen Guang-III prototype laser facility. A new target concept was proposed to develop a laser-driven shocks-RWC technique for studying material behavior under dynamic, high pressure conditions. As the ``little shocks'' in our experiment cannot be avoided, the effort to diminish the shock under a special level has been demonstrated with Al/Au/Al/LiF target. The highest pressure is about 500GPa after using the multilayer target design Al/Au/Al/LiF and about 1013W/cm2 laser pulse incident on the planer Al target, instantaneously affecting ablation layer located 500 μm away. As the x-ray generated by Al layer had been prevented by the Au layer, the width abrupt onset of strong absorption of an optical probe beam (λ = 532 nm) in LiF window may be the limitation for this kind if RWC experiment during the experiment time scale for 30 μm thick step. With the design laser shape and target structure of Al/Au/Al/LiF, 500GPa may be the highest pressure after balance the preheat effect and ablation efficiency for laser direct-drive experiment.

  10. Omni-directional Slotted Waveguide Antenna with Low Omni Ripple at MM Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramendra Kumar Verma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the design, simulation, and realisation of a slotted waveguide based horizontally polarized omni-directional antenna at millimeter wave frequency. This design has been optimised for minimum ripple in omni pattern and wide elevation coverage. It is based on radiating slots on both sides of waveguide for generating omni pattern and reduced height waveguide along with metallic wings on both sides used to obtain minimum omni pattern variation. The designed antenna has been simulated on finite element method-based ANSYS’s HFSS EM Simulator software using proper boundary conditions. A metallic strip on both side of slot on upper face of antenna has been used to provide flatness as well as strength to antenna. The antenna has the advantages of being robust, low cost, and easy to fabricate being in waveguide configuration. Measured VSWR of antenna is less than 2.0 over the frequency band of 37-40 GHz and minimum omni gain of the antenna is 0 dBi over the frequency band.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 2, March 2015, pp.159-162, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.8025

  11. Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves Using LIGO S5 Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as astrophysical and cosmological stochastic backgrounds. Since the relative strength and angular distribution of the many possible sources of GWs are not well constrained, searches for GW signals must be performed in a model-independent way. To that end we perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for pointlike sources and one for arbitrary extended sources. The latter result is the first of its kind. Finding no evidence to support the detection of GWs, we present 90% confidence level (CL) upper-limit maps of GW strain power with typical values between 2 - 20 X 10 (exp -50) strain2Hz(exp -1) and 5 - 35 X 10 (exp -49) strain2Hz(exp -1)/sr for pointlike and extended sources respectively. The limits on pointlike sources constitute a factor of 30 improvement over the previous best limits. We also set 90% CL limits on the narrow-band root-mean-square GW strain from interesting targets including Sco X-1, SN1987A and the Galactic Center as low as approximately equal 7 X 10(exp -25) in the most sensitive frequency range near 160Hz. These limits are the most constraining to date and constitute a factor of 5 improvement over the previous best limits.

  12. A directed search for gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 with initial LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ashton, G; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barclay, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio,, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dartez, L; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fuentes-Tapia, S; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Hee, S; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Key, J S

    2014-01-01

    We present results of a search for continuously-emitted gravitational radiation, directed at the brightest low-mass X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1. Our semi-coherent analysis covers 10 days of LIGO S5 data ranging from 50-550 Hz, and performs an incoherent sum of coherent $\\mathcal{F}$-statistic power distributed amongst frequency-modulated orbital sidebands. All candidates not removed at the veto stage were found to be consistent with noise at a 1% false alarm rate. We present Bayesian 95% confidence upper limits on gravitational-wave strain amplitude using two different prior distributions: a standard one, with no a priori assumptions about the orientation of Scorpius X-1; and an angle-restricted one, using a prior derived from electromagnetic observations. Median strain upper limits of 1.3e-24 and 8e-25 are reported at 150 Hz for the standard and angle-restricted searches respectively. This proof of principle analysis was limited to a short observation time by unknown effects of accretion on the intrinsic spin...

  13. Rupture of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake inferred from direct P-wave imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ning; CHEN QiFu; NIU FengLin; CHEN Yong

    2007-01-01

    The Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on December 26, 2004 is the first well recorded gigantic earthquake (moment magnitude MW 9.3) by modern broadband seismic and Global Positioning System networks. The rich seismic and geodetic recordings have documented unprecedented details about the earthquake rupture, coseismic and postseismic deformations. This is a report of detailed images of the rupture process using the first-arriving compressional waves recorded by the China National Digital Seismic Network (CNDSN). An improved imaging condition was employed to account for the sparse distribution of the CNDSN stations. The resulting images are consistent with the major rupture features reported by previous seismic and geodetic studies. It is found that the earthquake rupture initiated at offshore of northwestern Sumatra and propagated in the north northwest direction at a speed of 2.7 ± 0.2 km/s. The rupture continued for at least 420 s and extended about 1200-1300 km along the Andaman trough with two bursts of seismic energy.

  14. A unified explanation for dark matter and electroweak baryogenesis with direct detection and gravitational wave signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chala, Mikael [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Nardini, Germano [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Sobolev, Ivan [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Particle Physics and Cosmology

    2016-05-15

    A minimal extension of the Standard Model that provides both a dark matter candidate and a strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) consists of two additional Lorentz and gauge singlets. In this paper we work out a composite Higgs version of this scenario, based on the coset SO(7)/SO(6). We show that by embedding the elementary fermions in appropriate representations of SO(7), all dominant interactions are described by only three free effective parameters. Within the model dependencies of the embedding, the theory predicts one of the singlets to be stable and responsible for the observed dark matter abundance. At the same time, the second singlet introduces new CP-violation phases and triggers a strong first-order EWPT, making electroweak baryogenesis feasible. It turns out that this scenario does not conflict with current observations and it is promising for solving the dark matter and baryon asymmetry puzzles. The tight predictions of the model will be accessible at the forthcoming dark matter direct detection and gravitational wave experiments.

  15. Experimentation and direct numerical simulation of self-similar convergent detonation wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozier O.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of self similar convergent detonation wave in TATB-based explosive composition was studied both experimentally and numerically. The device constists in a 50 mm cylinder of TATB surrounded by an HMX tube. The detonation in HMX overdrives the detonation in TATB which adapts to the propagation velocity with a convergent front at centerline. We measured a curvature of κ = −21.2 m−1 for propagation velocity of 8750 m/s, which extends the knowledge of the (Dn,κ law. A wide ranged EOS/reaction rate model inspired from previous work of Wescott et al. was calibrated to reproduce both the run-to-detonation distance and the newly extended (Dn,κ law for the 1D sligthly curved detonation theory. 2D Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS were made on fine resolved mesh grid for the experimental configuration and for various driver velocities. The simulation reproduces the experimental data both qualitatively (overall detonation structure and quantitatively (κ = −25.4 m−1.

  16. Unified explanation for dark matter and electroweak baryogenesis with direct detection and gravitational wave signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chala, Mikael; Nardini, Germano; Sobolev, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    A minimal extension of the Standard Model that provides both a dark matter candidate and a strong first-order electroweak phase transition (EWPT) consists of two additional Lorentz and gauge singlets. In this paper we work out a composite Higgs version of this scenario, based on the coset S O (7 )/S O (6 ). We show that by embedding the elementary fermions in appropriate representations of S O (7 ), all dominant interactions are described by only three free effective parameters. Within the model dependencies of the embedding, the theory predicts one of the singlets to be stable and responsible for the observed dark matter abundance. At the same time, the second singlet introduces new C P -violation phases and triggers a strong first-order EWPT, making electroweak baryogenesis feasible. It turns out that this scenario does not conflict with current observations and it is promising for solving the dark matter and baryon asymmetry puzzles. The tight predictions of the model will be accessible at the forthcoming dark matter direct detection and gravitational wave experiments.

  17. Directional limits on gravitational waves using LIGO S5 science data

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as astrophysical and cosmological stochastic backgrounds. Since the relative strength and angular distribution of the many possible sources of GWs are not well constrained, searches for GW signals must be performed in a model-independent way. To that end we perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for pointlike sources and one for arbitrary extended sources. The latter result is the first of its kind. Finding no evidence to support the detection of GWs, we present 90% confidence level (CL) upper-limit maps of GW strain power with typical values between 2-20x10^-50 strain^2 Hz^-1 and 5-35x10^-49 strain^2 Hz^-1 sr^-1 for pointlike and extended sources respectively. The limits on pointlike sources constitute a factor of 30 improvement over the previous best limits. We also set 90% CL limits on the narrow-band root-mean-square GW strain from interesting targets including S...

  18. Directional limits on persistent gravitational waves using LIGO S5 science data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aronsson, M; Arun, K G; Aso, Y; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Belletoile, A; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bigotta, S; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Boccara, C; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Budzyński, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coulon, J-P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Davier, M; Davies, G; Davis, A; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Devanka, P; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Paolo Emilio, M; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dueck, J; Dumas, J-C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J-D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gholami, I; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hall, P; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J-F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hoyland, D; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, H; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Krause, T; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kullman, J; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Lundgren, A D; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Mak, C; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A

    2011-12-30

    The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as stochastic backgrounds. We perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for pointlike sources and one for arbitrary extended sources. Finding no evidence to support the detection of GWs, we present 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper-limit maps of GW strain power with typical values between 2-20×10(-50)  strain(2) Hz(-1) and 5-35×10(-49)  strain(2) Hz(-1) sr(-1) for pointlike and extended sources, respectively. The latter result is the first of its kind. We also set 90% C.L. limits on the narrow-band root-mean-square GW strain from interesting targets including Sco X-1, SN 1987A and the Galactic center as low as ≈7×10(-25) in the most sensitive frequency range near 160 Hz.

  19. Directed search for gravitational waves from Scorpius X-1 with initial LIGO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.

    2015-03-01

    We present results of a search for continuously emitted gravitational radiation, directed at the brightest low-mass x-ray binary, Scorpius X-1. Our semicoherent analysis covers 10 days of LIGO S5 data ranging from 50-550 Hz, and performs an incoherent sum of coherent F -statistic power distributed amongst frequency-modulated orbital sidebands. All candidates not removed at the veto stage were found to be consistent with noise at a 1% false alarm rate. We present Bayesian 95% confidence upper limits on gravitational-wave strain amplitude using two different prior distributions: a standard one, with no a priori assumptions about the orientation of Scorpius X-1; and an angle-restricted one, using a prior derived from electromagnetic observations. Median strain upper limits of 1.3 ×10-24 and 8 ×10-25 are reported at 150 Hz for the standard and angle-restricted searches respectively. This proof-of-principle analysis was limited to a short observation time by unknown effects of accretion on the intrinsic spin frequency of the neutron star, but improves upon previous upper limits by factors of ˜1.4 for the standard, and 2.3 for the angle-restricted search at the sensitive region of the detector.

  20. Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves Using LIGO S5 Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belletoile, A.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; de Rosa, R.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; Derosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Fiore, L.; di Lieto, A.; di Palma, I.; di Paolo Emilio, M.; di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J.-C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh–Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.

    2011-12-01

    The gravitational-wave (GW) sky may include nearby pointlike sources as well as stochastic backgrounds. We perform two directional searches for persistent GWs using data from the LIGO S5 science run: one optimized for pointlike sources and one for arbitrary extended sources. Finding no evidence to support the detection of GWs, we present 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper-limit maps of GW strain power with typical values between 2-20×10-50strain2Hz-1 and 5-35×10-49strain2Hz-1sr-1 for pointlike and extended sources, respectively. The latter result is the first of its kind. We also set 90% C.L. limits on the narrow-band root-mean-square GW strain from interesting targets including Sco X-1, SN 1987A and the Galactic center as low as ≈7×10-25 in the most sensitive frequency range near 160 Hz.

  1. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.

  2. Probing pre-inflationary anisotropy with directional variations in the gravitational wave background

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Yu; Sendouda, Yuuiti

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis on a primordial gravitational-wave background amplified during a Kasner-like pre-inflationary phase allowing for general triaxial anisotropies. It is found that the predicted angular distribution map of gravitational-wave intensity on large scales exhibits topologically distinctive patterns according to the degree of the pre-inflationary anisotropy, thereby serving as a potential probe for the pre-inflationary early universe with future all-sky observations of gravitational waves. We also derive an observational limit on the amplitude of such anisotropic gravitational waves from the B-mode polarisation of the cosmic microwave background.

  3. Direct voltage measurements using bulk acoustic wave sensing in LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant Bhupendra

    Accurate (impedance effects that can distort the pulse shape, and pickup of extraneous signals resulting from electromagnetic interference effects. A piezoelectric crystal-based bulk acoustic wave sensor using lithium niobate (LiNbO3) that has applications to metrology, research, and power metering was developed to overcome these measurement issues with the factors of scalability, ease of use, and compactness in mind. A Y+36° cut LiNbO3crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current (DC) voltages ranging from 128--1100 V were applied transversely to the crystal. An acoustic wave was used to interrogate the crystal before, during, and after voltage application. Both single and multiple pass measurements were performed and compared to linear piezoelectric theory. A comparison study between Y+36° and 0° X-cut LiNbO3 was performed to evaluate the influence of crystal cut on acoustic propagation. The study was extended to applying alternating current (AC), and pulsed voltages. The measured DC data was compared to a 1-D impedance matrix model that was based on a three port circuit with voltage-induced strain effects inputted as a model parameter. An uncertainty budget was carried out for both crystal cuts and compared. Environmental effects such as pressure and temperature were also measured to determine their influence on the sensor under ambient conditions. Published literature regarding material constants, such as elastic constants and piezoelectric constants, for LiNbO3 do not account for the influence of an electric field. In light of this, measurements of the acoustic velocities and material constants under the presence of a DC electric field were performed up to 896 V. This information was used to develop an uncertainty analysis for the determination of stress-charge form piezoelectric constants e15 and e22. All measured and calculated values were input into a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the error of the strain-charge form

  4. Particle acceleration at shock waves: particle spectrum as a function of the equation of state of the shocked plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Vietri, M

    2007-01-01

    We determine the spectrum of particles accelerated at shocks with arbitrary speed and arbitrary scattering properties for different choices of the equation of state of the downstream plasma. More specifically we consider the effect of energy exchange between the electron and proton thermal components downstream, and the effect of generation of a turbulent magnetic field in the downstream plasma. The slope of the spectrum turns out to be appreciably affected by all these phenomena, especially in the Newtonian and trans-relativistic regime, while in the ultra-relativistic limit the universal spectrum $s\\approx 4.3$ seems to be a very solid prediction.

  5. Impact Of Coral Structures On Wave Directional Spreading Across A Shallow Reef Flat - Lizard Island, Northern Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, J. X.; Baldock, T.; Callaghan, D. P.; Hoegh-guldberg, O.; Mumby, P.; Phinn, S. R.; Roelfsema, C. M.; Saunders, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Coral reef hydrodynamics operate at several and overlapping spatial-temporal scales. Waves have the most important forcing function on shallow (stress, directly mixing water (temperature and nutrients) and transporting sediments, nutrients and plankton. Reef flats are very effective at dissipating wave energy and providing an important ecosystem service by protecting highly valued shorelines. The effectiveness of reef flats to dissipate wave energy is related to the extreme hydraulic roughness of the benthos and substrate composition. Hydraulic roughness is usually obtained empirically from frictional-dissipation calculations, as detailed field measurements of bottom roughness (e.g. chain-method or profile gauges) is a very labour and time-consuming task. In this study we measured the impact of coral structures on wave directional spreading. Field data was collected during October 2012 across a reef flat on Lizard Island, northern Great Barrier Reef. Wave surface levels were measured using an array of self-logging pressure sensors. A rapid in situ close-range photogrammetric method was used to create a high-resolution (0.5 cm) image mosaic and digital elevation model. Individual coral heads were extracted from these datasets using geo-morphometric and object-based image analysis techniques. Wave propagation was modelled using a modified version of the SWAN model which includes the measured coral structures in 2m by 1m cells across the reef. The approach followed a cylinder drag approach, neglecting skin friction and inertial components. Testing against field data included bed skin friction. Our results show, for the first time, how the variability of the reef benthos structures affects wave dissipation across a shallow reef flat. This has important implications globally for coral reefs, due to the large extent of their area occupied by reef flats, particularly, as global-scale degradation in coral reef health is causing a lowering of reef carbonate production that

  6. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  7. Modeling the spectrum of infrasonic hydroacoustic radiation generated by the sea surface under storm conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapevalov, A. S.; Pokazeev, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    Generation of infrasonic radiation into a water medium by sea surface waves is analyzed. The analysis is carried out for the situation in which the infrasound is generated by surface waves with frequencies close to those of dominant waves. The presence of two wave systems on the sea surface is assumed: swell and wind waves. It is shown that if the frequencies of spectral peaks of wind waves and swell diverge by 20%, the maximum value of the radiation spectrum decreases by approximately 40% (if the general directions of the two wave systems are oriented strictly towards each other). A deviation of the general directions of the two wave systems from the opposite direction by 45° leads to a decrease in the maximum value of the radiation spectrum by more than two times.

  8. Characteristics of waves off Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; AshokKumar, K.; Anand, N.M.

    significant wave heights show that the contribution from the swells were predominant than from the seas and the swell direction was from 230 degrees to 270 degrees . The unidirectional spectrum showed that it can be satisfactorily represented by Scott...

  9. Performance estimation of bi-directional turbines in wave energy plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Anand; V. Jayashankar; S. Nagata; K. Toyota; M.Takao; T. Setoguchi

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating water column (OWC) based wave energy plants have been designed with several types of bidirectional turbines for converting pneumatic power to shaft power. Impulse turbines with linked guide vanes and fixed guide vanes have been tested at the Indian Wave Energy plant. This was after initial experimentation with Well's turbines. In contrast to the Well's turbine which has a linear damping characteristic, impulse turbines have non-linear damping. This has an important effect in the overall energy conversion from wave to wire. Optimizing the wave energy plant requires a turbine with linear damping and good efficiency over a broad range of flow coefficient. This work describes how such a design can be made using fixed guide vane impulse turbines. The Indian Wave Energy plant is used as a case study.

  10. Generation and Limiters of Rogue Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    chapter ( X ) Confetei’ICe P~tildlngs (not refereed) f l Multimedia report Journal article not rtfereed) Oral Presen ~n. not pub118hed It is...directional spectrum: , (4) i.e. higher values of A correspond to narrower directional distributions. Babanin et al. (2010) suggested a directional...Sell, W. and Walden, H. (1973). Measurements of wind-wave growth and swell decay during the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP). Dtsch

  11. Uni-directional wavelength conversion in silicon using four-wave mixing driven by cross-polarized pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Bryn A; Xiong, Chunle; Marpaung, David; McKinstrie, Colin J; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate optical frequency conversion between telecom wavelengths using four-wave mixing Bragg scattering powered by two pump pulses polarized on orthogonal axes of a silicon waveguide. This allows conversion in a single frequency direction while, with co-polarized pumps, the signal is redshifted or blueshifted with similar efficiency. Our approach exploits the birefringence of the waveguide and its effect on the phase matching of the four-wave mixing process. The blue or red direction can be selected by the input polarization of the signal, and 20 dB extinction ratios are observed with the unintended direction. This technique will allow efficient and controlled conversion between specified wavelength channels in integrated photonic devices.

  12. Statistics for long irregular wave run-up on a plane beach from direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Senichev, Dmitry; Dutykh, Denys

    2017-04-01

    Very often for global and transoceanic events, due to the initial wave transformation, refraction, diffraction and multiple reflections from coastal topography and underwater bathymetry, the tsunami approaches the beach as a very long wave train, which can be considered as an irregular wave field. The prediction of possible flooding and properties of the water flow on the coast in this case should be done statistically taking into account the formation of extreme (rogue) tsunami wave on a beach. When it comes to tsunami run-up on a beach, the most used mathematical model is the nonlinear shallow water model. For a beach of constant slope, the nonlinear shallow water equations have rigorous analytical solution, which substantially simplifies the mathematical formulation. In (Didenkulova et al. 2011) we used this solution to study statistical characteristics of the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline and its horizontal velocity. The influence of the wave nonlinearity was approached by considering modifications of probability distribution of the moving shoreline and its horizontal velocity for waves of different amplitudes. It was shown that wave nonlinearity did not affect the probability distribution of the velocity of the moving shoreline, while the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline was affected substantially demonstrating the longer duration of coastal floods with an increase in the wave nonlinearity. However, this analysis did not take into account the actual transformation of irregular wave field offshore to oscillations of the moving shoreline on a slopping beach. In this study we would like to cover this gap by means of extensive numerical simulations. The modeling is performed in the framework of nonlinear shallow water equations, which are solved using a modern shock-capturing finite volume method. Although the shallow water model does not pursue the wave breaking and bore formation in a general sense (including the water surface

  13. Numerical Analysis on the Effects of Submerged Depth of the Grid and Direction of Incident Wave on Gravity Cage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-ping; LI Yu-cheng; ZHAO Yun-peng; DONG Guo-hai; GUI Fu-kun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the numerical model of the net cage with the grid mooring system in waves is set up by the lumped mass method and rigid kinematics theory,and then the motion equations of floating system,net system,mooring system,and floaters are solved by the Runge-Kutta fifth-order method.For the verification of the numerical model,a series of physical model tests have been carried out.According to the comparisons between the simulated and experimental results,it can be found that the simulated and experimental results agree well in each condition.Then,the effects of submerged depth of grid and direction of incident wave propagation on hydrodynamic behaviors of the net cage are analyzed.According to the simulated results,it can be found that with the increase of submerged depth of grid,the forces acting on mooring lines and bridle lines increase,while the forces on grid lines decrease;the horizontal motion amplitudes of floating collar decrease obviously,while the vertical motion amplitudes of floating collar change little.When the direction of incident wave propagation changes,forces on mooting lines and motion of net cage also change accordingly.When the propagation direction of incident wave changes from 0° to 45°,forces on the main ropes and bridle ropes increase,while the forces on the grid ropes decrease.With the increasing propagation direction of incident wave,the horizontal amplitude of the forces collar decreases,while the vertical amplitude of the floating collar has little variation.

  14. RegPT: Direct and fast calculation of regularized cosmological power spectrum at two-loop order

    CERN Document Server

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Codis, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    We present a specific prescription for the calculation of cosmological power spectra, exploited here at two-loop order in perturbation theory (PT), based on the multi-point propagator expansion. In this approach power spectra are constructed from the regularized expressions of the propagators that reproduce both the resummed behavior in the high-k limit and the standard PT results at low-k. With the help of N-body simulations, we show that such a construction gives robust and accurate predictions for both the density power spectrum and the correlation function at percent-level in the weakly non-linear regime. We then present an algorithm that allows accelerated evaluations of all the required diagrams by reducing the computational tasks to one-dimensional integrals. This is achieved by means of pre-computed kernel sets defined for appropriately chosen fiducial models. The computational time for two-loop results is then reduced from a few minutes, with the direct method, to a few seconds with the fast one. The...

  15. Nonstationary Interference Excision in Time-Frequency Domain Using Adaptive Hierarchical Lapped Orthogonal Transform for Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yi-Sheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive hierarchical lapped orthogonal transform (HLOT exciser is proposed for tracking, localizing, and rejecting the nonstationary interference in direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS communications. The method is based on HLOT. It utilizes a fast dynamic programming algorithm to search for the best basis, which matches the interference structure best, in a library of lapped orthogonal bases. The adaptive HLOT differs from conventional block transform and the more advanced modulated lapped transform (MLT in that the former produces arbitrary time-frequency tiling, which can be adapted to the signal structure, while the latter yields fixed tilings. The time-frequency tiling of the adaptive HLOT can be time varying, so it is also able to track the variations of the signal time-frequency structure. Simulation results show that the proposed exciser brings significant performance improvement in the presence of nonstationary time-localized interference with or without instantaneous frequency (IF information compared with the existing block transform domain excisers. Also, the proposed exciser is effective in suppressing narrowband interference and combined narrowband and time-localized impulsive interference.

  16. Breaking a chaotic direct sequence spread spectrum communication system using interacting multiple model-unscented Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gan; Bo, Xiong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new method to break chaotic direct sequence spread spectrum (CD3S) communication systems is proposed. Here, the CD3S communication system transmitting different information symbols is considered as a combination of two subsystems which are driven by two different chaotic dynamic models, respectively. At every single time moment, the CD3S signal can be regarded as generated by the subsystem corresponding to the information symbol transmitted. Then, based on the multiple model form of CD3S signals, an interacting multiple model unscented Kalman filter with model switching detection mechanism is exploited to track the CD3S signals. The l(2)-norm of tracking errors is used to choose the model which best matches the intercepted signals. Thus, the information symbols are recovered indirectly. Compared with the existing methods, the proposed algorithm can: (1) reduce the influence of a low spreading factor; (2) calculate the spreading factor using the length of time intervals between model switching; and (3) be more effective under scenarios of low signal-to-noise ratio or multipath fading. Simulation results verify the superiority of the proposed method.

  17. Direct Measurement of the Phase Space Ion Fluctuation Spectrum of a Laboratory Plasma Using Two Independently Tunable Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    A novel technique for probing velocity space correlations has been developed using laser-induced fluorescence. The experiment consists of a 3 m cylindrical plasma column of singly-charged Argon ions (Ar II) with density ~ 109 cm-3 , Te ~ 5 eV , Ti ~ . 06 eV , and a 1 kG axial magnetic field. Separate metastable lines of the Ar II ions are excited using two separate narrow bandwidth lasers. The LIF response from each laser is measured through an independently moveable periscope. These periscopes may be focused on the same localized region (~ 0 . 1 cm3) or separated to view different parts of the plasma simultaneously. By adjusting these lasers independently, one may measure a correlation function as a function of the difference in measured velocities. This measurement may be repeated for different periscope positions in the plasma to obtain a two-dimensional correlation function in space and velocity difference. This correlation is directly related to the fluctuation spectrum through a Fourier transform. Measurements of these correlations are reported and discussed. NSF DOE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  18. Intensive wave power and steel quenching 3-D model for cylindrical sample. Time direct and reverse formulations and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buikis Andris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop mathematical models for three dimensional hyperbolic heat equations (wave equation or telegraph equation with inner source power and construct their analytical solutions for the determination of the initial heat flux for cylindrical sample. As additional conditions the temperature and heat flux at the end time are given. In some cases we give expression of wave energy. In some cases we give expression of wave energy. Some solutions of time inverse problems are obtained in the form of first kind Fredholm integral equation, but others has been obtained in closed analytical form as series. We viewed both direct and inverse problems at the time. For the time inverse problem we use inversion in the time argument.

  19. Longshore transport based on directional waves along north Tamilnadu Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jena, B.K.; Chandramohan, P.; SanilKumar, V.

    the coastline tends to be a nodal drift regime. The temporary rise in wave activities during the cyclonic days often increases the southerly drift, which partly gets deposited in the Palk Bay and causes deficit for the northerly drift...

  20. Directional characteristics of shallow water waves along southwestern Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Johnson, G.; SanilKumar, V.; Anoop, T.R.; Joseph, J.

    the coast during southwest monsoon season (June–September) and intrusion of moderate easterly winds propagating from Gulf of Thailand over the narrow land mass of Thailand and Myanmar. The reflected wave energy is maximum (14%) during the southwest monsoon...

  1. WAVE DIRECTION and Other Data from GILLISS from 19740903 to 19740918 (NODC Accession 7601715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean wave property data collected from the SAIL Pitch-roll Buoy as part of the 1974 Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) project that was part of the Global...

  2. Propagation and Directional Scattering of Ocean Waves in the Marginal Ice Zone and Neighboring Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    example of the massive floe simulation test of Squire et al. In our test simulations, the MIZ can be subdivided into N adjacent infinite strips of...floe packing. Thus, establish a way to incorporate what has been done by Squire and co-workers into the wave model paradigm (in which the phase of the...packing test cases, in order to incorporate related work by Squire and co-workers into the wave model. iv. Floe breaking: We have developed

  3. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  5. Distribution characteristic of scattering field for an ellipsoidal target irradiated by an electromagnetic wave from an arbitrary direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying-Le; Huang Ji-Ying; Wang Ming-Jun; Zhang Jia-Tian

    2008-01-01

    It is of great importance for enginsering applications to obtain the expression of scattering field for an ellipsoidal target irradiated by an electromagnetic wave from an arbitrary direction.Literature relevant to this problem is seldom found.In this paper,the scattering field for an ellipsoidal target is presented by utilizing the scale transformation of electromagnetic field and the rotation of coordinate system,with an electromagnetic wave projecting on the target from an arbitrary direction.The obtained result is in good agreement with the solution available from the literature if we consider the scale factors to be unity.Taking a conducting ellipsoidal target for sample,we perform the partial simulations of the ellipsoidat model and a plant leaf model by choosing different scale factors.The obtained results show that the distribution characteristic of scattering field is sensitively affected by the polarization of the incident wave and varies not much with the incident wave angle but changes with the observation point.At some points the scattering energy arrives at its maximum.

  6. Experimental demonstration of directive Si3N4 optical leaky wave antenna with semiconductor perturbations at near infrared frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Huang, Yuewang; Campione, Salvatore; Capolino, Filippo; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2015-01-01

    Directive optical leaky wave antennas (OLWAs) with tunable radiation pattern are promising integrated optical modulation and scanning devices. OLWAs fabricated using CMOS-compatible semiconductor planar waveguide technology have the potential of providing high directivity with electrical tunability for modulation and switching capabilities. We experimentally demonstrate directive radiation from a silicon nitride ($Si_3N_4$) waveguide-based OLWA. The OLWA design comprises 50 crystalline Si perturbations buried inside the waveguide, with a period of 1 {\\mu}m, each with a length of 260 nm and a height of 150 nm, leading to a directive radiation pattern at telecom wavelengths. The measured far-field radiation pattern at the wavelength of 1540 nm is very directive, with the maximum intensity at the angle of 84.4{\\deg} relative to the waveguide axis and a half-power beam width around 6.2{\\deg}, which is consistent with our theoretical predictions. The use of semiconductor perturbations facilitates electronic radiat...

  7. Direct detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (CTX-M) from blood cultures by LC-MS/MS bottom-up proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Fleurbaaij; W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); H.C. van Leeuwen (Hans); M. Kraakman (Margriet); S.T. Bernards; P. Hensbergen (Paul); E. Kuijper

    2017-01-01

    textabstractRapid bacterial species identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing in positive blood cultures have an important impact on the antibiotic treatment for patients. To identify extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) directly in positive blood culture bottles, we developed a

  8. Automatic identification of fault zone head waves and direct P waves and its application in the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    Fault zone head waves (FZHWs) are observed along major strike-slip faults and can provide high-resolution imaging of fault interface properties at seismogenic depth. In this paper, we present a new method to automatically detect FZHWs and pick direct P waves secondary arrivals (DWSAs). The algorithm identifies FZHWs by computing the amplitude ratios between the potential FZHWs and DSWAs. The polarities, polarizations and characteristic periods of FZHWs and DSWAs are then used to refine the picks or evaluate the pick quality. We apply the method to the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault where FZHWs have been identified before by manual picks. We compare results from automatically and manually picked arrivals and find general agreement between them. The obtained velocity contrast at Parkfield is generally 5-10 per cent near Middle Mountain while it decreases below 5 per cent near Gold Hill. We also find many FZHWs recorded by the stations within 1 km of the background seismicity (i.e. the Southwest Fracture Zone) that have not been reported before. These FZHWs could be generated within a relatively wide low velocity zone sandwiched between the fast Salinian block on the southwest side and the slow Franciscan Mélange on the northeast side. Station FROB on the southwest (fast) side also recorded a small portion of weak precursory signals before sharp P waves. However, the polarities of weak signals are consistent with the right-lateral strike-slip mechanisms, suggesting that they are unlikely genuine FZHW signals.

  9. An Application of the Direct Coulomb Electron Pair Production Process to the Energy Measurement of the "VH-Group" in the "Knee" Region of the "All-Particle" Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrickson, J. H.; Wu, J.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    The "all-particle" cosmic ray energy spectrum appears to be exhibiting a significant change in the spectral index just above approximately 3000 TeV. This could indicate (1) a change in the propagation of the cosmic rays in the galactic medium, and/or (2) the upper limit of the supernova shock wave acceleration mechanism, and/or (3) a new source of high-energy cosmic rays. Air shower and JACEE data indicate the spectral change is associated with a composition change to a heavier element mixture whereas DICE does not indicate this. A detector concept will be presented that utilizes the energy dependence of the production of direct Coulomb electron-positron pairs by energetic heavy ions. Monte Carlo simulations of a direct electron pair detector consisting of Pb target foils interleaved with planes of 1-mm square scintillating optical fibers will be discussed. The goal is to design a large area, non-saturating instrument to measure the energy spectrum of the individual cosmic ray elements in the "VH-group" for energies greater than 10 TeV/nucleon.

  10. The scattering fields for a spherical target irradiated by a plane electromagnetic wave in an arbitrary direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying-Le; Huang Ji-Ying

    2006-01-01

    The relation between corresponding trigonometric functions in two rotating coordinate systems is presented. The transformation formula for a vector in the two rotating spherical coordinate systems is obtained. The scattering fields for a spherical target irradiated by a plane electromagnetic wave in an arbitrary direction are derived. These fields in a particular case retrogress to those available in the literature. The obtained results have great potential in practical applications.

  11. Stimulated Raman signals at conical intersections: Ab initio surface hopping simulation protocol with direct propagation of the nuclear wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalewski, Markus, E-mail: mkowalew@uci.edu; Mukamel, Shaul, E-mail: smukamel@uci.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) signals that monitor the excited state conical intersections dynamics of acrolein are simulated. An effective time dependent Hamiltonian for two C—H vibrational marker bands is constructed on the fly using a local mode expansion combined with a semi-classical surface hopping simulation protocol. The signals are obtained by a direct forward and backward propagation of the vibrational wave function on a numerical grid. Earlier work is extended to fully incorporate the anharmonicities and intermode couplings.

  12. Wideband spectrum analysis of ultra-high frequency radio-wave signals due to advanced one-phonon non-collinear anomalous light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S; Arellanes, Adan Omar

    2017-04-20

    We present a principally new acousto-optical cell providing an advanced wideband spectrum analysis of ultra-high frequency radio-wave signals. For the first time, we apply a recently developed approach with the tilt angle to a one-phonon non-collinear anomalous light scattering. In contrast to earlier cases, now one can exploit a regime with the fixed optical wavelength for processing a great number of acoustic frequencies simultaneously in the linear regime. The chosen rutile-crystal combines a moderate acoustic velocity with low acoustic attenuation and allows us wide-band data processing within GHz-frequency acoustic waves. We have created and experimentally tested a 6-cm aperture rutile-made acousto-optical cell providing the central frequency 2.0 GHz, frequency bandwidth ∼0.52  GHz with the frequency resolution about 68.3 kHz, and ∼7620 resolvable spots. A similar cell permits designing an advanced ultra-high-frequency arm within a recently developed multi-band radio-wave acousto-optical spectrometer for astrophysical studies. This spectrometer is intended to operate with a few parallel optical arms for processing the multi-frequency data flows within astrophysical observations. Keeping all the instrument's advantages of the previous schematic arrangement, now one can create the highest-frequency arm using the developed rutile-based acousto-optical cell. It permits optimizing the performances inherent in that arm via regulation of both the central frequency and the frequency bandwidth for spectrum analysis.

  13. Omni-directional guided wave transducer arrays for the rapid inspection of large areas of plate structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Paul D

    2003-06-01

    Omni-directional guided wave array transducers contain a circular pattern of elements that individually behave as omni-directional point transmitters or receivers. The data set acquired from such an array contains time-domain signals from each permutation of transmitter and receiver. A phased addition algorithm is developed that allows an omni-directional, B-scan image of the surrounding plate to be synthesized from any geometry of array. Numerically simulated data from a single reflector is used to test the performance of the algorithm. The results from an array containing a fully populated circular area of elements (Type I array) are found to be good, but those from an array containing a single ring of elements (Type II array) contain many large side-lobes. An enhancement to the basic-phased addition algorithm is presented that uses deconvolution to suppress these side-lobes. The deconvolution algorithm enables a Type II array to equal the performance of a Type I array of the same overall diameter. The effect of diameter on angular resolution is investigated. Experimental data obtained from a guided wave array containing electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) elements for exciting and detecting the So Lamb wave mode in a 5-mm thick aluminium plate are processed with both algorithms and the results are discussed.

  14. Nonlinear waves in lattice materials: Adaptively augmented directivity and functionality enhancement by modal mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, R.; Gonella, S.

    2017-02-01

    The motive of this work is to understand the complex spatial characteristics of finite-amplitude elastic wave propagation in periodic structures and leverage the unique opportunities offered by nonlinearity to activate complementary functionalities and design adaptive spatial wave manipulators. The underlying assumption is that the magnitude of wave propagation is small with respect to the length scale of the structure under consideration, albeit large enough to elicit the effects of finite deformation. We demonstrate that the interplay of dispersion, nonlinearity and modal complexity involved in the generation and propagation of higher harmonics gives rise to secondary wave packets that feature multiple characteristics, one of which conforms to the dispersion relation of the corresponding linear structure. This provides an opportunity to engineer desired wave characteristics through a geometric and topological design of the unit cell, and results in the ability to activate complementary functionalities, typical of high frequency regimes, while operating at low frequencies of excitation - an effect seldom observed in linear periodic structures. The ability to design adaptive switches is demonstrated here using lattice configurations whose response is characterized by geometric and/or material nonlinearities.

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation with a half-sine wave pulse elicits direction-specific effects in human motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Delvendahl, Igor; Pechmann, Astrid;

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) commonly uses so-called monophasic pulses where the initial rapidly changing current flow is followed by a critically dampened return current. It has been shown that a monophasic TMS pulse preferentially excites different cortical circuits in the human motor...... hand area (M1-HAND), if the induced tissue current has a posterior-to-anterior (PA) or anterior-to-posterior (AP) direction. Here we tested whether similar direction-specific effects could be elicited in M1-HAND using TMS pulses with a half-sine wave configuration....

  16. Simulations of direct and reflected wave trajectories for ground-based GNSS-R experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, N.; Frappart, F.; Ramillien, G.; Darrozes, J.; Desjardins, C.; Gegout, P.; Pérosanz, F.; Biancale, R.

    2014-10-01

    The detection of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals that are reflected off the surface, along with the reception of direct GNSS signals, offers a unique opportunity to monitor water level variations over land and ocean. The time delay between the reception of the direct and reflected signals gives access to the altitude of the receiver over the reflecting surface. The field of view of the receiver is highly dependent on both the orbits of the GNSS satellites and the configuration of the study site geometries. A simulator has been developed to determine the location of the reflection points on the surface accurately by modeling the trajectories of GNSS electromagnetic waves that are reflected by the surface of the Earth. Only the geometric problem was considered using a specular reflection assumption. The orbit of the GNSS constellation satellites (mainly GPS, GLONASS and Galileo), and the position of a fixed receiver, are used as inputs. Four different simulation modes are proposed, depending on the choice of the Earth surface model (local plane, osculating sphere or ellipsoid) and the consideration of topography likely to cause masking effects. Angular refraction effects derived from adaptive mapping functions are also taken into account. This simulator was developed to determine where the GNSS-R receivers should be located to monitor a given study area efficiently. In this study, two test sites were considered: the first one at the top of the 65 m Cordouan lighthouse in the Gironde estuary, France, and the second one on the shore of Lake Geneva (50 m above the reflecting surface), at the border between France and Switzerland. This site is hidden by mountains in the south (orthometric altitude up to 2000 m), and overlooking the lake in the north (orthometric altitude of 370 m). For this second test site configuration, reflections occur until 560 m from the receiver. The planimetric (arc length) differences (or altimetric difference as WGS84

  17. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Inflation: CMB and Direct Detection With Space-Based Laser Interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, A R

    2005-01-01

    The curl-modes of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization probe horizon-scale primordial gravitational waves related to inflation. A significant source of confusion is expected from a lensing conversion of polarization related to density perturbations to the curl mode, during the propagation of photons through the large scale structure. Either high resolution CMB anisotropy observations or 21 cm fluctuations at redshifts 30 and higher can be used to delens polarization data and to separate gravitational-wave polarization signature from that of cosmic-shear related signal. Separations based on proposed lensing reconstruction techniques for reasonable future experiments allow the possibility to probe inflationary energy scales down to 10^15 GeV. Beyond CMB polarization, at frequencies between 0.01 Hz to 1 Hz, space-based laser interferometers can also be used to probe the inflationary gravitational wave background. The confusion here is related to the removal of merging neutron star binaries at cosmologi...

  18. Forming of space charge wave with broad frequency spectrum in helical relativistic two-stream electron beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Alexander V.; Volk, Iurii I.; Serozhko, A.

    2017-01-01

    We elaborate a quadratic nonlinear theory of plural interactions of growing space charge wave (SCW) harmonics during the development of the two-stream instability in helical relativistic electron beams. It is found that in helical two-stream electron beams the growth rate of the two-stream instab...

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Interaction Between Wave and Porous Breakwater Based on N-S Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Deng-ting

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,a numerical model is established.A modified N-S equation is used as a control equation for the wave field and porous flow area.The control equations are discreted and solved by the finite difference method.The free surface is tracked by the VOF method.The pressure field and velocity field of the whole flow area are solved by the reiterative iteration method.Finally,compared with the physical model test results of wave flume,the numerical model established in the present study is validated.

  20. Performance evaluation of compounding and directional beamforming techniques for carotid strain imaging using plane wave transmissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hendrik H.G.; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    2014-01-01

    using linear array ultrasound data of a pulsating concentric homogeneous artery simulated using Field II . The transducer ( f c = 9 MHz, pitch = 197.9 μ m, 192 elements, f s = 180 MHz) transmitted plane waves at 3 sequentially alternating angles (0°, + θ , - θ ) at a PRF of 2 kHz. Simulations were...

  1. Polarisation independent bi-directional four wave mixing for mid span spectral inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Buxens, Alvaro A.; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov

    1999-01-01

    Polarisation independent Four Wave Mixing in a Semiconductor Optical Amplifier used for Mid Span Spectral Inversion (MSSI) is implemented and introduce only 0.9 dB penalty compared to polarisation dependent MSSI. The polarisation dependence in receiver sensitivity is 1 dB....

  2. Comparison of Polarimetric SAR Techniques for the Measurement of Directional Ocean Wave Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-25

    II . ORIENTATION ANGLE INTENSITY MODULATION The first polarimetric SAR technique has been investigated for improving the visibility of...Buoy, Bodega Bay). Modulations in the polarization orientation angle induced by azimuth traveling ocean waves in the study area were visible in the

  3. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  4. Direct Time Domain Numerical Analysis of Transient Behavior of a VLFS during Unsteady External Loads in Wave Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient response of the VLFS subjected to arbitrary external load is systematically investigated by a direct time domain modal expansion method, in which the BEM solutions based on time domain Kelvin sources are used for hydrodynamic forces. In the analysis, the time domain free-surface Green functions with sufficient accuracy are rapidly evaluated in finite water depth by the interpolation-tabulation method, and the boundary integral equation with a quarter VLFS model is established taking advantage of symmetry of flow field and structure. The validity of the present method is verified by comparing with the time histories of vertical displacements of the VLFS during a mass drop and airplane landing and takeoff in still water conditions, respectively. Then the developed numerical scheme is used in wave conditions to study the combined action taking into account the mass drop/airplane landing/takeoff loads as well as incident wave action. It is found that the elevation of structural waves due to mass drop load can be significantly changed near the impact region, while the vertical motion of runway in wave conditions is dominant as compared with that only generated by airplane.

  5. Precision measurement of the B → Xs γ photon energy spectrum, branching fraction, and direct CP asymmetry A(CP)((B → X(s+d)γ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Lu, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-11-01

    The photon spectrum in the inclusive electromagnetic radiative decays of the B meson, B → X(s)γ plus B → X(d)γ, is studied using a data sample of (382.8 ± 4.2) × 10(6)Υ(4S) → BB decays collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. The spectrum is used to extract the branching fraction B(B → X(s)γ) = (3.21 ± 0.33) × 10(-4) for E(γ) >1.8 GeV and the direct CP asymmetry A(CP) (B → X(s+d)γ) = 0.057 ± 0.063. The effects of detector resolution and Doppler smearing are unfolded to measure the photon energy spectrum in the B meson rest frame.

  6. Is J enough? Comparison of gravitational waves emitted along the total angular momentum direction with other preferred orientations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shaughnessy, R; London, L; Meeks, Z; Shoemaker, D

    2012-01-01

    The gravitational wave signature emitted from a merging binary depends on the orientation of an observer relative to the binary. Previous studies suggest that emission along the total initial or total final angular momenta leads to both the strongest and simplest signal from a precessing compact binary. In this paper we describe a concrete counterexample: a binary with $m_1/m_2=4$, $a_1=0.6 \\hat{x} = -a_2$, placed in orbit in the x,y plane. We extract the gravitational wave emission along several proposed emission directions, including the initial (Newtonian) orbital angular momentum; the final (~ initial) total angular momentum; and the dominant principal axis of $_M$. Using several diagnostics, we show that the suggested preferred directions are not representative. For example, only for a handful of other directions (0.95). We conclude that the information available in just one direction (or mode) does not adequately encode the complexity of orientation-dependent emission for even short signals from merging...

  7. Impacts of tropical cyclone inflow angle on ocean surface waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; HONG Xin

    2011-01-01

    The inflow angle of tropical cyclones (TC) is generally neglected in numerical studies of ocean surface waves induced by TC. In this study, the impacts of TC inflow angle on ocean surface waves were investigated using a high-resolution wave model. Six numerical experiments were conducted to examine, in detail, the effects of inflow angle on mean wave parameters and the spectrum of wave directions. A comparison of the waves simulated in these experiments shows that inflow angle significantly modifies TC-induced ocean surface waves. As the inflow angle increases, the asymmetric axis of the significant wave height (SWH) field shifts 30° clockwise, and the maximum SWH moves from the front-right to the rear-right quadrant. Inflow angle also affects other mean wave parameters, especially in the rear-left quadrant, such as the mean wave direction, the mean wavelength, and the peak direction. Inflow angle is a key factor in wave models for the reproduction of double-peak or multi-peak patterns in the spectrum of wave directions. Sensitivity experiments also show that the simulation with a 40° inflow angle is the closest to that of the NOAA statistical SLOSH inflow angle. This suggests that 40° can be used as the inflow angle in future TC-induced ocean surface wave simulations when SLOSH or observed inflow angles are not available.

  8. Exploring spectral wave climate variability using a weather type approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, F.; Espejo, A.; Camus, P.; Losada, I.

    2012-12-01

    Traditional approaches for determining wave climate variability in scales from month to decades have been broadly focused on aggregated or statistical parameters such as significant wave height, wave energy flux or mean wave direction. These studies, although revealing the major general modes of wave climate variability and trends, do not take in consideration the complexity of the gravity wave fields. Because ocean waves are the response of both local and remote winds, analyzing directional full spectrum variability can throw light on atmosphere circulation not only over the immediate ocean region, but also over a more broadly basin-scale. In this work we use the weather type approach (data mining) to explore wave climate variability in the frequency-direction domain. This approach identifies daily to 15 daily synoptic modes (depending on the basin) of the sea level pressure (from NCEP/NCAR) over the effective fetch of one selected ocean point, finding bi-univocal relations between each synoptic pattern (weather type) and each spectral wave energy distribution. Thus, it allows exploring wave spectrum (from GOW reanalisys, WaveWatchIII) covering all temporal scales of variability: daily, monthly, seasonal, inter-annual, decadal, long term trends and future climate change projections. The proposed scheme provides valuable information improving our ocean waves understanding. Moreover this new approach can support offshore wind-wave energy farms optimization or a more rigorous determination of wave induced sediment transport between others applications.

  9. Reduced-order prediction of rogue waves in two-dimensional deep-water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazmand, Mohammad; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the problem of large wave prediction in two-dimensional water waves. Such waves form due to the synergistic effect of dispersive mixing of smaller wave groups and the action of localized nonlinear wave interactions that leads to focusing. Instead of a direct simulation approach, we rely on the decomposition of the wave field into a discrete set of localized wave groups with optimal length scales and amplitudes. Due to the short-term character of the prediction, these wave groups do not interact and therefore their dynamics can be characterized individually. Using direct numerical simulations of the governing envelope equations we precompute the expected maximum elevation for each of those wave groups. The combination of the wave field decomposition algorithm, which provides information about the statistics of the system, and the precomputed map for the expected wave group elevation, which encodes dynamical information, allows (i) for understanding of how the probability of occurrence of rogue waves changes as the spectrum parameters vary, (ii) the computation of a critical length scale characterizing wave groups with high probability of evolving to rogue waves, and (iii) the formulation of a robust and parsimonious reduced-order prediction scheme for large waves. We assess the validity of this scheme in several cases of ocean wave spectra.

  10. The Coriolis Interaction between the v2 = 1 and v3 = 2 States of Nitrosyl Bromide: Anomalous Quadrupole Patterns and Interstate Transitions in the Millimeter-Wave Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposti; Fuganti; Kisiel; Tamassia

    1998-10-01

    The millimeter-wave rotational spectra of 79BrNO and 81BrNO in the v2 = 1 and v3 = 2 vibrational states have been reinvestigated. Measurements of the rotational spectrum in the region of maximum c-type Coriolis interaction between the two states allowed the previous analysis to be extended to account for some uncommon effects. For the most perturbed transitions the nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure arises from coupling of not only the bromine nucleus, but also the nitrogen nucleus with the rotational angular momentum. These effects were satisfactorily fitted with a Hamiltonian describing Coriolis coupling in a molecule with two quadrupolar nuclei. The successful analysis of pure rotational transitions then allowed accurate prediction of rovibrational transitions, six of which were measured for 79BrNO and four for 81BrNO. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  11. Advanced Direct-Drive Generator for Improved Availability of Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Power Generation Systems Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englebretson, Steven [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Ouyang, Wen [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Tschida, Colin [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Carr, Joseph [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Ramanan, V.R. [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Johnson, Matthew [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Gardner, Matthew [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Toliyat, Hamid [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Staby, Bill [Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Chertok, Allan [Resolute Marine Energy, Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Hazra, Samir [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States); Bhattacharya, Subhashish [ABB Inc., Cary, NC (United States)

    2017-05-13

    This report summarizes the activities conducted under the DOE-EERE funded project DE-EE0006400, where ABB Inc. (ABB), in collaboration with Texas A&M’s Advanced Electric Machines & Power Electronics (EMPE) Lab and Resolute Marine Energy (RME) designed, derisked, developed, and demonstrated a novel magnetically geared electrical generator for direct-drive, low-speed, high torque MHK applications The project objective was to investigate a novel and compact direct-drive electric generator and its system aspects that would enable elimination of hydraulic components in the Power Take-Off (PTO) of a Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) system with an oscillating wave surge converter (OWSC), thereby improving the availability of the MHK system. The scope of this project was limited to the development and dry lab demonstration of a low speed generator to enable future direct drive MHK systems.

  12. Geometric phase coded metasurface: from polarization dependent directive electromagnetic wave scattering to diffusion-like scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Feng, Yijun; Yang, Zhongjie; Cui, Li; Zhao, Junming; Zhu, Bo; Jiang, Tian

    2016-10-24

    Ultrathin metasurface compromising various sub-wavelength meta-particles offers promising advantages in controlling electromagnetic wave by spatially manipulating the wavefront characteristics across the interface. The recently proposed digital coding metasurface could even simplify the design and optimization procedures due to the digitalization of the meta-particle geometry. However, current attempts to implement the digital metasurface still utilize several structural meta-particles to obtain certain electromagnetic responses, and requiring time-consuming optimization especially in multi-bits coding designs. In this regard, we present herein utilizing geometric phase based single structured meta-particle with various orientations to achieve either 1-bit or multi-bits digital metasurface. Particular electromagnetic wave scattering patterns dependent on the incident polarizations can be tailored by the encoded metasurfaces with regular sequences. On the contrast, polarization insensitive diffusion-like scattering can also been successfully achieved by digital metasurface encoded with randomly distributed coding sequences leading to substantial suppression of backward scattering in a broadband microwave frequency. The proposed digital metasurfaces provide simple designs and reveal new opportunities for controlling electromagnetic wave scattering with or without polarization dependence.

  13. 基于Gold序列的直接扩频通信系统仿真%Simulation of Direct Spread Spectrum Communication System Based on Gold Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚文

    2012-01-01

    The working principle of direct spread spectrum communication systemia analysed which is spreaded spectrum by Gold code sequence,and simulating this communicaton with Matlab/Simulink.By the experiment,it follows the complete process of spread spectrum communication.The result of simulation indicates that the Direct spread spectrum communication system base on Gold sequence has advantages of good performance of anti-interference and simple circuit,it can implementate users need of communication transmission and have the better reliability.%分析了直接序列扩频通信系统的工作原理,选用Gold序列作为扩频序列码,利用MATLAB/Simulink对直接扩频通信系统进行仿真,通过仿真实验,实时跟踪了扩频通信的完整过程。分析实验结果可知,基于Gold序列的直接扩频通信系统抗干扰性较好,电路实现简单,能实现用户通信传输的需要,并且可靠性较好。

  14. Introducing two hyperparameters in Bayesian estimation of wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2008-01-01

    ranges. From numerical simulations of stochastic response measurements, it is shown that the optimal hyperparameters, determined by use of ABIC (a Bayesian Information Criterion), correspond to the best estimate of the wave spectrum, which is not always the case when only one hyperparameter is included......An estimate of the on-site wave spectrum can be obtained from measured ship responses by use of Bayesian modelling, which means that the wave spectrum is found as the optimum solution from a probabilistic viewpoint. The paper describes the introduction of two hyperparameters into Bayesian modelling...... so that the prior information included in the modelling is based on two constraints: the wave spectrum must be smooth directional-wise as well as frequency-wise. Traditionally, only one hyperparameter has been used to control the amount of smoothing applied in both the frequency and directional...

  15. THE CM-, MM-, AND SUB-MM-WAVE SPECTRUM OF ALLYL ISOCYANIDE AND RADIOASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS IN ORION KL AND THE SgrB2 LINE SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykal, I.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Motyienko, R. A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes, et Molécules, UMR CNRS 8523, Université de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France); Écija, P.; Cocinero, E. J.; Basterretxea, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Castaño, F. [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, E-48940 Leioa (Spain); Lesarri, A. [Departamento de Química Física y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Guillemin, J. C. [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, Allèe de Beaulieu, CS 50837, F-35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J., E-mail: laurent.margules@univ-lille1.fr [Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Laboratory of Molecular Astrophysics, Department of Astrophysics, Ctra. De Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-10

    Organic isocyanides have an interesting astrochemistry and some of these molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, rotational spectral data for this class of compounds are still scarce. We provide laboratory spectra of the four-carbon allyl isocyanide covering the full microwave region, thus allowing a potential astrophysical identification in the ISM. We assigned the rotational spectrum of the two cis (synperiplanar) and gauche (anticlinal) conformations of allyl isocyanide in the centimeter-wave region (4-18 GHz), resolved its {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) hyperfine structure, and extended the measurements into the millimeter and submillimeter-wave (150-900 GHz) ranges for the title compound. Rotational constants for all the monosubstituted {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopologues are additionally provided. Laboratory observations are supplemented with initial radioastronomical observations. Following analysis of an extensive dataset (>11000 rotational transitions), accurate ground-state molecular parameters are reported for the cis and gauche conformations of the molecule, including rotational constants, NQC parameters, and centrifugal distortion terms up to octic contributions. Molecular parameters have also been obtained for the two first excited states of the cis conformation, with a dataset of more than 3300 lines. The isotopic data allowed determining substitution and effective structures for the title compound. We did not detect allyl isocyanide either in the IRAM 30 m line survey of Orion KL or in the PRIMOS survey toward SgrB2. Nevertheless, we provided an upper limit to its column density in Orion KL.

  16. Accumulating microparticles and direct-writing micropatterns using a continuous-wave laser-induced vapor bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yajian; Liu, Hui; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Cong; Wang, Shuming; Cao, Jingxiao; Zhu, Shining

    2011-11-21

    Through the enhanced photothermal effect, which was achieved using a silver film, a low power weakly focused continuous-wave laser (532 nm) was applied to create a vapor bubble. A convective flow was formed around the bubble. Microparticles dispersed in water were carried by the convective flow to the vapor bubble and accumulated on the silver film. By moving the laser spot, we easily manipulated the location of the bubble, allowing us to direct-write micropatterns on the silver film with accumulated particles. The reported simple controllable accumulation method can be applied to bimolecular detection, medical diagnosis, and other related biochip techniques.

  17. Directional Wave Spectra Using Cosine-Squared And Cosine 2S Spreading Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    the product of two functions: E(f, 0) = E(f)*D(f, 0) where R(f, 0) = directional spectral density function R(f) = one-dimensional energy spectral ... density function D(f, 0) = angular spreading function f = frequency in hertz 8 = direction in radians The formulation of D(f, 0) requires that 2

  18. WAVE DIRECTION and Other Data from FIXED PLATFORMS and Other Platforms From North Atlantic Ocean from 19690701 to 19730930 (NODC Accession 8100447)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The entry contains Wave direction and other data collected from fixed platforms and other platforms from North Atlantic Ocean between July 1, 1969 and September 30,...

  19. The Power Card Strategy: Strength-Based Intervention to Increase Direction Following of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Abbi; Tincani, Matt

    2011-01-01

    The Power Card strategy is a strength-based intervention to promote social skills of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) by capitalizing on their special interests. Although preliminary studies have shown that the Power Card strategy is a promising approach to teach social skills, additional research is needed. The purpose of this study…

  20. Significant Wave Heights, Periods, and Directions, and Air and Sea Temperature Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Diamond Head, Oahu during March-April 2000 (NODC Accession 0000475)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A directional waverider buoy located about one nautical mile south of Diamond Head, Oahu, provided an approximately 10-day time series of wave characteristics and...

  1. A study of wave forces on an offshore platform by direct CFD and Morison equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang D.

    2015-01-01

    The next step is the presentation of 3D multiphase RANS simulation of the wind-turbine platform in single-harmonic regular waves. Simulation results from full 3D simulation will be compared to the results from Morison’s equation. We are motivated by the challenges of a floating platform which has complex underwater geometry (e.g. tethered semi-submersible. In cases like this, our hypothesis is that Morison’s equation will result in inaccurate prediction of forces, due to the limitations of 2D coefficients of simple geometries, and that 3D multiphase RANS CFD will be required to generate reliable predictions of platform loads and motions.

  2. Theory of a Directive Optical Leaky Wave Antenna Integrated into a Resonator and Enhancement of Radiation Control

    CERN Document Server

    Guclu, Caner; Boyraz, Ozdal; Capolino, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    We provide for the first time the detailed study of the radiation performance of an optical leaky wave antenna (OLWA) integrated into a Fabry-P\\'erot resonator. We show that the radiation pattern can be expressed as the one generated by the interference of two leaky waves counter-propagating in the resonator leading to a design procedure for achieving optimized broadside radiation, i.e., normal to the waveguide axis. We thus report a realizable implementation of the OLWA made of semiconductor and dielectric regions. The theoretical modeling is supported by full-wave simulation results, which are found to be in good agreement. We aim to control the radiation intensity in the broadside direction via excess carrier generation in the semiconductor regions. We show that the presence of the resonator can provide an effective way of enhancing the radiation level modulation, which reaches values as high as 13.5 dB, paving the way for novel promising control capabilities that might allow the generation of very fast op...

  3. Diffusion of Sound Waves in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    1960-01-01

    The directional and frequency diffusion of a plane monochromatic 2 sound wave in statistically homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulence is analyzed theoretically. The treatment is based on the diffusion equation for the energy density of sound waves, using the scattering cross section derived by Kraichnan for the type of turbulence assumed here. A form for the frequency-wave number spectrum of the turbulence is adopted which contains the pertinent parameters of the flow and is adapted to ease of calculation. A new approach to the evaluation of the characteristic period of the flow is suggested. This spectrum is then related to the scattering cross section. Finally, a diffusion equation is derived as a small-angle scattering approximation to the rigorous transport equation. The rate of spread of the incident wave in frequency and direction is calculated, as well as the power spectrum and autocorrelation for the wave.

  4. Influence factors of harmonic waves and directional waveforms of tidal geoelectrical field%潮汐地电场谐波和各向波形的影响要素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭大诚; 王兰炜; 赵家骝; 席继楼; 刘大鹏; 于华; 陈军营

    2011-01-01

    潮汐地电场表现出近正弦形态,形态持续全天属TGF-A型,只在午前午后出现属TGF-B型,两类潮汐地电场前5阶谐波周期分别是23~24、12、7.9、6、4.8h.不同场地的潮汐地电场振幅谱可能有差异,周期变化的径向、切向月球潮汐力的振幅谱也存在差异.岩石裂隙面分布不同,则各向潮汐力对裂隙的作用效果不同,这可能是导致潮汐地电场振幅谱差异的因素.同场地,岩石裂隙优势走向可能会导致潮汐地电场各向波幅、稳定性特征出现较大差异,沿裂隙优势走向的潮汐地电场波幅大、稳定,垂直裂隙优势走向的波幅小、稳定性差,网络状裂隙易使潮汐地电场各向波形特征接近.利用潮汐地电场波形特征及振幅谱,可能判断出岩石裂隙水渗流方位、裂隙面方向,在数个场地裂隙优势走向的分析结果与应用区域应力场或局部应力场的分析结果一致.%The waveform of tidal geoelectrical field is an approximate sine wave. The TGF-A waveform appears in all-day and the TGF-B only appears in the prenoon-postnoon. The first 5 order harmonic period of the waves is 23~24, 12, 7. 9, 6 and 4. 8 h. On different sites, the amplitude spectrum of tidal geoelectrical field could be different. The vertical tidal force and the horizontal tidal force, being produced by moon, change periodically, whose amplitude spectrums are also different. To the different directions of crack plane, the tidal forces gives different effect. This could be the reason for the different amplitude spectrum of tidal geoelectrical field. On the same site, the obvious difference of the directional waveform characteristics in wave amplitude and stability could be caused by the preferential orientation of cracks. The wave amplitude of tidal geoelectrical field is much larger and stable along the preferential orientation, and on the contrary, the wave amplitude is smaller and could be unstable in the direction vertical to

  5. Wave Reflection on a Two-Slope Steep Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    surveys taken during cross-shore transport study experiment. .....................................12  Figure 7.  Sea kayak with echo sounder and...Suhayda, 1974) Natural beaches are composed of complicated slopes and encounter a wide spectrum of wave frequencies, amplitudes, and directions. Suhayda...1974) conducted a field experiment investigating standing waves on a natural beach. He expanded on the theoretical results of Lamb (1932

  6. Genome-wide identification of transcriptional targets of RORA reveals direct regulation of multiple genes associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachana, Tewarit; Hu, Valerie W

    2013-05-22

    We have recently identified the nuclear hormone receptor RORA (retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-alpha) as a novel candidate gene for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our independent cohort studies have consistently demonstrated the reduction of RORA transcript and/or protein levels in blood-derived lymphoblasts as well as in the postmortem prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of individuals with ASD. Moreover, we have also shown that RORA has the potential to be under negative and positive regulation by androgen and estrogen, respectively, suggesting the possibility that RORA may contribute to the male bias of ASD. However, little is known about transcriptional targets of this nuclear receptor, particularly in humans. Here we identify transcriptional targets of RORA in human neuronal cells on a genome-wide level using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with an anti-RORA antibody followed by whole-genome promoter array (chip) analysis. Selected potential targets of RORA were then validated by an independent ChIP followed by quantitative PCR analysis. To further demonstrate that reduced RORA expression results in reduced transcription of RORA targets, we determined the expression levels of the selected transcriptional targets in RORA-deficient human neuronal cells, as well as in postmortem brain tissues from individuals with ASD who exhibit reduced RORA expression. The ChIP-on-chip analysis reveals that RORA1, a major isoform of RORA protein in human brain, can be recruited to as many as 2,764 genomic locations corresponding to promoter regions of 2,544 genes across the human genome. Gene ontology analysis of this dataset of genes that are potentially directly regulated by RORA1 reveals statistically significant enrichment in biological functions negatively impacted in individuals with ASD, including neuronal differentiation, adhesion and survival, synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission and plasticity, and axonogenesis, as well as higher level functions such as

  7. Gravitational waves from inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, M. C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-09-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index nT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  8. Tuning directional dependent metal-insulator transitions in quasi-1D quantum wires with spin-orbit density wave instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanmoy

    2016-07-01

    We study directional dependent band gap evolutions and metal-insulator transitions (MITs) in model quantum wire systems within the spin-orbit density wave (SODW) model. The evolution of MIT is studied as a function of varying anisotropy between the intra-wire hopping ({{t}\\parallel} ) and inter-wire hopping ({{t}\\bot} ) with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We find that as long as the anisotropy ratio (β ={{t}\\bot}/{{t}\\parallel} ) remains below 0.5, and the Fermi surface nesting is tuned to {{\\mathbf{Q}}1}=≤ft(π,0\\right) , an exotic SODW induced MIT easily develops, with its critical interaction strength increasing with increasing anisotropy. As β \\to 1 (2D system), the nesting vector switches to {{\\mathbf{Q}}2}=≤ft(π,π \\right) , making this state again suitable for an isotropic MIT. Finally, we discuss various physical consequences and possible applications of the directional dependent MIT.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of Direct Path State Characterization by Strongly Measuring Weak Values in a Matter-Wave Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkmayr, Tobias; Geppert, Hermann; Lemmel, Hartmut; Waegell, Mordecai; Dressel, Justin; Hasegawa, Yuji; Sponar, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A method was recently proposed and experimentally realized for characterizing a quantum state by directly measuring its complex probability amplitudes in a particular basis using so-called weak values. Recently, Vallone and Dequal [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 040502 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.040502] showed theoretically that weak measurements are not a necessary condition to determine the weak value. Here, we report a measurement scheme used in a matter-wave interferometric experiment in which the neutron path system's quantum state was characterized via direct measurements, using both strong and weak interactions. Experimental evidence is given that strong interactions outperform weak ones for tomographic accuracy. Our results are not limited to neutron interferometry, but can be used in a wide range of quantum systems.

  10. Estimation of Wave Disturbance in Harbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helm-Petersen, Jacob

    been presented for the analysis of reflected wave fields in 2D and 3D. The Bayesian Directional Wave Spectrum Estimation Method has been applied throughout the study. Reflection characteristics have been investigated by use of physical models for three types of coastal structures with vertical fronts....... Information on how the sponge layers perform with respect to reflection of short-crested waves are presented mainly in terms of overall reflection coefficients and main directions as functions of incident main direction relative to the structure. The influence of a irregular structure front has also been......The motivation for the present study has been to improve the reliability in using numerical wave propagation models as a tool for estimating wave disturbance in harbours. Attention has been directed towards the importance of the modelling of reflection in the applied mild-slope model. Methods have...

  11. Improving performance of direct coal liquefaction through swelling with solvent under the radiation of ultrasonic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xian-zhi; LI Ke-jian; WANG Li

    2004-01-01

    Three kinds of lower rank bituminous coals from Yanzhou mine and Tengxian mine from Shandong Province were treated and hydrogenated in the study. The test results show that the performance of hydrogenation liquefaction of the pretreated coals is improved markedly. Under the test condition of H2 initial pressure 8.2 MPa, addition of the oil yield of pretreated YZ1 coal is 69.76% compared with 62.53% of oil yield of untreated YZ1. Seminally the oil yield of pretreated YZ2 coal is 55.43% compared with20.88% of untreated YZ2 coal. The results of tests also prove that the improving degree of hydrogenation liquefaction of the pretreated coals is related with radiation duration when the radiation frequency and radiation power of ultrasonic wave are fixed.

  12. Direct determination of molybdenum in seawater by adsorption cathodic stripping square-wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Mierzwa, J; Lan, C R

    2000-06-30

    A reliable and very sensitive procedure for the determination of trace levels of molybdenum in seawater is proposed. The complex of molybdenum with 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) is analyzed by cathodic stripping square-wave voltammetry based on the adsorption collection onto a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). This procedure of molybdenum determination was found to be more favorable than differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry because of inherently faster scan rate and much better linearity obtained through the one-peak (instead of one-of-two peaks) calibration. The variation of polarographic peak and peak current with a pH, adsorption time, adsorption potential, and some instrumental parameters such as scan rate and pulse height were optimized. The alteration of polarographic wave and its likely mechanism are also discussed. The relationship between peak current and molybdenum concentration is linear up to 150 mug l(-1). Under the optimal analytical conditions, the determination limit of 0.5 mug l(-1) Mo was reached after 60 s of the stirred collection. The estimated detection limit is better than 0.1 mug l(-1) of Mo. The applicability of this method to analysis of seawater was assessed by the determination of molybdenum in two certified reference seawater samples (CASS-2 and NASS-2) and the comparison of the analytical results for real seawater samples (study on a vertical distribution of Mo in the seawater column) with the results obtained by Zeeman-corrected electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (Zeeman ETAAS). A good agreement between two used methods of molybdenum determination was obtained.

  13. The - - and Submm-Wave Spectrum of Allyl Isocyanide and Radioastronomical Observations in Orion KL and the Primos Line Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margules, L.; Huet, T. R.; Ecija, P.; Cocinero, E. J.; Basterretxea, F.; Fernandez, J. A.; Castano, F.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Lesarri, A.; Guillemin, J. C.

    2013-06-01

    Last year we presented the first rotational analysis of the ground state of the two conformers of allyl isocyanide from 4 GHz to 905 GHz. The analysis of the rotational spectrum of the cis conformer of allyl isocyanide was extended. We resolved Coriolis interactions of a and b types between the excited vibrational states ν_1=1 and ν_2=1, calculated to be at 156 cm^{-1} (A^{'}) and 167 cm^{-1} (A^{''}) respectively (MP2/aug-cc-pvtz), from 150 GHz to 600 GHz. Strong perturbations were observed in the 150-310 GHz range for low values of the quantum number K_a starting from K_a = 0, 1. The anharmonicities appeared as well at higher frequencies for larger quantum numbers. The two modes were fitted together with the SPFIT/SPCAT suite of programs and a set of Coriolis parameters was accurately determined. The fit contains more than 3000 lines up to J = 99 and K_a = 12 for both modes. We did not detect these species neither in the IRAM 30-m line survey of Orion KL nor in the PRIMOS survey towards SgrB2. Nevertheless, we provided upper limits to their column density in Orion KL. This work was supported by the CNES and the Action sur Projets de l'INSU, PCMI. I. Haykal et al. manuscript in preparation H. Pickett J. Mol. Spec.{148}, 371-377, 1991.

  14. 船舶动力定位海浪环境的实时仿真与海浪谱分析%Real-time Simulation and Spectrum-Analisis of a Dynamic Positioning System Ship in Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立军; 陈锋; 丁福光; 施小成

    2001-01-01

    提出一种根据随机海浪频谱来实时模拟随机海浪的方法,它可以用于研究动力定位船舶及其 控制系统在不同海况时的性能。该方法可以采用多种海浪谱来进行随机海浪的仿真。仿真结果利用了 快速傅立叶变换FFT(Fast Fourier Transform)进行频谱分析。仿真程序可用于实际的动力定位船舶系 统。%Provides a way to simulate waves in real-time according to random-wave-spectrum. It can be used to study the performances of dynamic positioning ship and control system under different waves. This method adapts several kinds of wave-spectrum to simulate waves. The results of simulation apply FFT(Fast Fourier Transform) to analyse the spectrum. The program has been applied to DPS (Dynamic Positioning System) ships.

  15. Research on and Implement of Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Communication Based on FPGA%直序扩频的研究与FPGA实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王道平; 郭峰; 韩溟

    2011-01-01

    The direct sequence spread spectrum communication(DSSS) is widely developed in military and personal mobile communication for its advantages of high noise resistance,low interception probability,multiple-access communication ability.How to implement a direct sequence spread spectrum communication system used FPGA is researched.A DSSS included transmit and receive module is established based on QUARTUS II.The transmit module is combined with PN generator,spread spectrum modulator,the receive module is combined with match filter and de-spread demodulator.The circuit design and its results are given.%直接序列扩频通信系统以强抗噪声、低截获性和多址通信等特点,在军事及民用移动通信网络中得到广泛应用。文中对直序扩频的FPGA实现技术进行了研究。以Quartus Ⅱ为开发工具,建立了一个初步的直接序列扩频通信系统。设计了发射模块和接收模块,发射模块包括PN码产生器、扩频调制器、接收模块包括匹配滤波器和解扩器;给出了上述模块的实现电路及仿真结果。

  16. High-Power Continuous-Wave Directly-Diode-Pumped Fiber Raman Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfu Yao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe novel fiber Raman lasers pumped directly by spectrally combined high power multimode laser diodes at 975 nm and emitting at 1019 nm. With a commercial multimode graded-index fiber, we reached 20 W of laser output power with a record slope efficiency of 80%. With an in-house double-clad fiber, the beam quality improved to M2 = 1.9, albeit with lower output power and slope efficiency due to higher fiber loss. We believe this is the first publication of a fiber Raman laser cladding-pumped directly by diodes.

  17. Assessment of arterial stiffness among schizophrenia-spectrum disorders using aortic pulse wave velocity and arterial compliance: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Aaron A; Warburton, Darren E R; Flynn, Sean W; Fredrikson, Diane; Lang, Donna J

    2014-01-30

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness provides a non-invasive indication of cardiovascular disease risk. To date, arterial stiffness, which has been shown to have independent predictive value for CVD morbidity and mortality, has not been evaluated in this population. We aimed to examine aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as large and small artery compliance (Comp1 and Comp2) in patients being treated for schizophrenia, compared to healthy volunteers. Ten patients and 10 age and gendermatched volunteers underwent a comprehensive evaluation of arterial stiffness including: aPWV, Comp1, Comp2, stroke volume, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance. Patient aPWV was significantly elevated compared to healthy volunteers (9.1 ± 4.11 vs. 5.7 ± 1.4, P=0.03). Increased age, blood pressure, heart rate, and cigarettes/day were associated with reduced arterial health in patients. This is the first time aPWV has been described in those treated for schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness is increased in this population. Measuring arterial stiffness is a non-invasive, sensitive and effective tool for evaluating CVD risk in this population. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    A new era in astronomy will begin when the gravitational wave window onto the universe opens in approx. 5 years, as ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources - such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters - through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This talk will explore gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources and opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy across the gravitational wave spectrum.

  19. In Vivo High Frame Rate Vector Flow Imaging Using Plane Waves and Directional Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    Directional beamforming (DB) estimates blood flowvelocities accurately when the flow angle is known. However, forautomatically finding the flow angle a computationally expensive approach is used. This work presents a method for estimating the flow angle using a combination of inexpensive transverse...

  20. On the direct detection of gravitational waves, and some of the problems of improving laser interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovoyt, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we describe an observational method for determining black holes masses. The study shows that the knowledge of the recorded low-frequency gravitational waves and the period from the beginning of registration till the moment of black holes collapse is sufficient and even preferable in determining the possible values of collapsing black holes masses. The reason for this is that the proportion of the period in the measured interval containing relativistic corrections (i.e. those ones in which the black hole speed is comparable to the speed of light), is smaller if the observed and measured time interval is longer. The values of black holes masses and the measured time interval, obtained as a result of the first observations, according to this model are in a very good agreement.We examine the problem of mirror heating in Fabry-Perot cavity of Michelson interferometer, by incident laser radiation, and we conclude that the problem of heat removal can be solved by a different approach, without use of multilayer reflective openings. As an alternative approach to the creation of highly reflective structures, we suggest using a spatially extended structure with a sinusoidal variation of the refractive index. We consider some of the possible technological methods for producing such structures based on heterogeneous media.The article describes the effects of the incident laser radiation exposure on the periodic structure, and it shows that the volume ponderomotive force may lead to a mirror polarization due to the radiation, and consequently, to appearance of an additional mechanical connection of the mirror with the surrounding mirror suspension design. The article examines the impact of the surface ponderomotive forces on the media boundary with different dielectric permeability and it shows that pressure spatial variables arising at the same time lead to deformation of the media layers, and the deformation and pressure values depend on the difference in the

  1. The electromagnetic spectrum: current and future applications in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Ron R

    2013-05-01

    The electromagnetic spectrum is composed of waves of various energies that interact with matter. When focused upon and directed at tumors, these energy sources can be employed as a means of lesion ablation. While the use of x-rays is widely known in this regard, a growing body of evidence shows that other members of this family can also achieve oncologic success. This article will review therapeutic application of the electromagnetic spectrum in current interventions and potential future applications.

  2. Directed Searches for Broadband Extended Gravitational Wave Emission in Nearby Energetic Core-collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are factories of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. SNe Ib/c stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and they have a branching ratio of about 1% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein the accretion of fall-back matter down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) offers a window into broadband extended gravitational wave emission (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time-frequency space by time-sliced matched filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse-grained searches followed by high-resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse-grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br (z = 0.002339) using a bank of up to 64,000 templates of one-second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events with signal-to-noise ratios > 6 from the LIGO L1 and H1 detectors reduces the total to a few events of interest. Lacking any further properties reflecting a common excitation by broadband gravitational radiation, we disregarded these as spurious. This new pipeline may be used to systematically search for long-duration chirps in nearby CC-SNe from robotic optical transient surveys using embarrassingly parallel computing.

  3. DIRECTED SEARCHES FOR BROADBAND EXTENDED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE EMISSION IN NEARBY ENERGETIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M., E-mail: mvp@sejong.ac.kr [Room 614, Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong Gwangin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-10

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are factories of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. SNe Ib/c stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and they have a branching ratio of about 1% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein the accretion of fall-back matter down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) offers a window into broadband extended gravitational wave emission (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time–frequency space by time-sliced matched filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse-grained searches followed by high-resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse-grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br (z = 0.002339) using a bank of up to 64,000 templates of one-second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events with signal-to-noise ratios > 6 from the LIGO L1 and H1 detectors reduces the total to a few events of interest. Lacking any further properties reflecting a common excitation by broadband gravitational radiation, we disregarded these as spurious. This new pipeline may be used to systematically search for long-duration chirps in nearby CC-SNe from robotic optical transient surveys using embarrassingly parallel computing.

  4. Inbound waves in the solar corona: a direct indicator of Alfv\\'en Surface location

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

    2014-01-01

    The tenuous supersonic solar wind that streams from the top of the corona passes through a natural boundary -- the Alfv\\'en surface -- that marks the causal disconnection of individual packets of plasma and magnetic flux from the Sun itself. The Alfv\\'en surface is the locus where the radial motion of the accelerating solar wind passes the radial Alfv\\'en speed, and therefore any displacement of material cannot carry information back down into the corona. It is thus the natural outer boundary of the solar corona, and the inner boundary of interplanetary space. Using a new and unique motion analysis to separate inbound and outbound motions in synoptic visible-light image sequences from the COR2 coronagraph on board the STEREO-A spacecraft, we have identified inbound wave motion in the outer corona beyond 6 solar radii for the first time, and used it to determine that the Alfv\\'en surface is at least 12.5 solar radii from the Sun over the polar coronal holes and 17 solar radii in the streamer belt, well beyond ...

  5. Directed searches for broadband extended gravitational-wave emission in nearby energetic core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Van Putten, Maurice H P M

    2016-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are factories of neutron stars and stellar mass black holes. Type Ib/c supernovae stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and their branching ratio of about 1\\% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein accretion of fall-back matter down to the Inner Most Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) offers a window to {\\em broadband extended gravitational-wave emission} (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time-frequency space by Time Sliced Matched Filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse grained searches followed by high resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br $(z=0.002339)$ using a bank of up to 64 thousand templates of one second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events w...

  6. An Improved Solution for Chaotic Direct Spread Spectrum System%一种改进的混沌直扩方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰楷; 王亚涛

    2013-01-01

      直接序列扩频是低截获概率通信常用的通信技术。传统的扩频技术受到自身扩频码性能的限制,抗截获性能不高。近年来被广泛研究的混沌扩频技术能改善传统扩频通信的一些缺陷,但新的截获技术迫使我们寻找具有更高抗截获性能的通信技术。基于混沌扩频,提出了一种改进的直扩通信方案——变速混沌扩频,包括两种变速方法。通过仿真和分析,证明了变速混沌扩频适合于直扩通信系统。同时,理论分析表明,与传统混沌直扩系统相比,该方案具有更好的抗截获性能。%DSSS (Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum) is usually used as the communication technology for low-interception-probability communication. The traditional SS (Spread Spectrum) technology is limited by the PN code performance, and this would result in its poor anti-interception performance. Chaotic spread spectrum technology is extensively studied in recent years and and this technology could remedy some defects of the traditional spread spectrum. However the newly-occurred interception technology forces the people to look for a communication technology with better anti-intercept performance. A variable speed chaotic spread spectrum method based on chaotic spread spectrum and with two speed-varing ways is proposed. Simulation and analysis show that the variable speed chaotic spread spectrum sequences is applicable to DSSS system. The theoretical analysis indicates that this solution is of better LPI performance as compared with traditional chaotic DSSS system.

  7. Conditional short-crested waves in shallow water and with superimposed current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2002-01-01

    For bottom-supported offshore structures like oil drilling rigs and oil production platforms, a deterministic design wave approach is often applied using a regular non-linear Stokes´ wave. Thereby, the procedure accounts for non-linear effects in the wave loading but the randomness of the ocean...... wave, given the value of the wave crest at a specific point in time or space. In the present paper a derivation of the expected linear short-crested wave riding on a uniform current is given. The analysis is based on the conventional shallow water Airy wave theory and the direction of the main wind...... direction can make any direction with the current. A consistent derivation of the wave spectrum taking into account current and finite water depth is used. The numerical results show a significant effect of the water depth, the directional spreading and the current on the conditional mean wave profile...

  8. Fast Plane Wave 2-D Vector Flow Imaging Using Transverse Oscillation and Directional Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2017-01-01

    Several techniques can estimate the 2-D velocity vector in ultrasound. Directional beamforming (DB) estimates blood flow velocities with a higher precision and accuracy than transverse oscillation (TO), but at the cost of a high beamforming load when estimating the flow angle. In this paper......, it is proposed to use TO to estimate an initial flow angle, which is then refined in a DB step. Velocity magnitude is estimated along the flow direction using cross-correlation. It is shown that the suggested TO-DB method can improve the performance of velocity estimates compared to TO, and with a beamforming...... but within 4% for TO-DB. The same trends are observed in measurements although with a slightly larger bias. Simulations of realistic flow in a carotid bifurcation model provide visualization of complex flow, and the spread of velocity magnitude estimates is 7.1 cm/s for TO-DB, while it is 11.8 cm/s using...

  9. 5G Spectrum Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Nekovee, Maziar; Rudd, Richard

    2017-01-01

    In this paper an overview is given of the current status of 5G industry standards, spectrum allocation and use cases, followed by initial investigations of new opportunities for spectrum sharing in 5G using cognitive radio techniques, considering both licensed and unlicensed scenarios. A particular attention is given to sharing millimeter-wave frequencies, which are of prominent importance for 5G.

  10. Evidence for the Direct Detection of the Thermal Spectrum of the Non-Transiting Hot Gas Giant HD 88133 b

    CERN Document Server

    Piskorz, Danielle; Crockett, Nathan R; Lockwood, Alexandra C; Blake, Geoffrey A; Barman, Travis S; Bender, Chad F; Bryan, Marta L; Carr, John S; Fischer, Debra A; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A

    2016-01-01

    We target the thermal emission spectrum of the non-transiting gas giant HD 88133 b with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, by treating the planet and its host star as a spectroscopic binary. For sufficiently deep summed flux observations of the star and planet across multiple epochs, it is possible to resolve the signal of the hot gas giant's atmosphere compared to the brighter stellar spectrum, at a level consistent with the aggregate shot noise of the full data set. To do this, we first perform a principal component analysis to remove the contribution of the Earth's atmosphere to the observed spectra. Then, we use a cross-correlation analysis to tease out the spectra of the host star and HD 88133 b to determine its orbit and identify key sources of atmospheric opacity. In total, six epochs of Keck NIRSPEC L band observations and three epochs of Keck NIRSPEC K band observations of the HD 88133 system were obtained. Based on an analysis of the maximum likelihood curves calculated from the multi-epoch...

  11. Dynamic analysis of propulsion mechanism directly driven by wave energy for marine mobile buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenjiang; Zheng, Zhongqiang; Yang, Xiaoguang; Chang, Zongyu

    2016-07-01

    Marine mobile buoy(MMB) have many potential applications in the maritime industry and ocean science. Great progress has been made, however the technology in this area is far from maturity in theory and faced with many difficulties in application. A dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism is very necessary for optimizing the parameters of the MMB, especially with consideration of hydrodynamic force. The principle of wave-driven propulsion mechanism is briefly introduced. To set a theory foundation for study on the MMB, a dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism of the MMB is obtained. The responses of the motion of the platform and the hydrofoil are obtained by using a numerical integration method to solve the ordinary differential equations. A simplified form of the motion equations is reached by omitting terms with high order small values. The relationship among the heave motion of the buoy, stiffness of the elastic components, and the forward speed can be obtained by using these simplified equations. The dynamic analysis show the following: The angle of displacement of foil is fairly small with the biggest value around 0.3 rad; The speed of mobile buoy and the angle of hydrofoil increased gradually with the increase of heave motion of buoy; The relationship among heaven motion, stiffness and attack angle is that heave motion leads to the angle change of foil whereas the item of speed or push function is determined by vertical velocity and angle, therefore, the heave motion and stiffness can affect the motion of buoy significantly if the size of hydrofoil is kept constant. The proposed model is provided to optimize the parameters of the MMB and a foundation is laid for improving the performance of the MMB.

  12. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave-current coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave-current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave-current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave-current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  13. Direct numerical solution of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in coordinate space without partial-wave decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruoǧlu, Zeki C.

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical solution of the coordinate-space integral-equation version of the two-particle Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation is considered without invoking the traditional partial-wave decomposition. The singular kernel of the three-dimensional LS equation in coordinate space is regularized by a subtraction technique. The resulting nonsingular integral equation is then solved via the Nystrom method employing a direct-product quadrature rule for three variables. To reduce the computational burden of discretizing three variables, advantage is taken of the fact that, for central potentials, the azimuthal angle can be integrated out, leaving a two-variable reduced integral equation. A regularization method for the kernel of the two-variable integral equation is derived from the treatment of the singularity in the three-dimensional equation. A quadrature rule constructed as the direct product of single-variable quadrature rules for radial distance and polar angle is used to discretize the two-variable integral equation. These two- and three-variable methods are tested on the Hartree potential. The results show that the Nystrom method for the coordinate-space LS equation compares favorably in terms of its ease of implementation and effectiveness with the Nystrom method for the momentum-space version of the LS equation.

  14. Direct bandgap GeSn light emitting diodes for short-wave infrared applications grown on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    von den Driesch, Nils; Stange, Daniela; Wirths, Stephan; Rainko, Denis; Mussler, Gregor; Stoica, Toma; Ikonic, Zoran; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Grützmacher, Detlev; Mantl, Siegfried; Buca, Dan

    2016-03-01

    The experimental demonstration of fundamental direct bandgap, group IV GeSn alloys has constituted an important step towards realization of the last missing ingredient for electronic-photonic integrated circuits, i.e. the efficient group IV laser source. In this contribution, we present electroluminescence studies of reduced-pressure CVD grown, direct bandgap GeSn light emitting diodes (LEDs) with Sn contents up to 11 at.%. Besides homojunction GeSn LEDs, complex heterojunction structures, such as GeSn/Ge multi quantum wells (MQWs) have been studied. Structural and compositional investigations confirm high crystalline quality, abrupt interfaces and tailored strain of the grown structures. While also being suitable for light absorption applications, all devices show light emission in a narrow short-wave infrared (SWIR) range. Temperature dependent electroluminescence (EL) clearly indicates a fundamentally direct bandgap in the 11 at.% Sn sample, with room temperature emission at around 0.55 eV (2.25 µm). We have, however, identified some limitations of the GeSn/Ge MQW approach regarding emission efficiency, which can be overcome by introducing SiGeSn ternary alloys as quantum confinement barriers.

  15. Room-temperature continuous-wave electrically injected InGaN-based laser directly grown on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Zhou, Kun; Sun, Qian; Liu, Jianping; Feng, Meixin; Li, Zengcheng; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Liqun; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Shuming; Ikeda, Masao; Liu, Sheng; Yang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Silicon photonics would greatly benefit from efficient, visible on-chip light sources that are electrically driven at room temperature. To fully utilize the benefits of large-scale, low-cost manufacturing foundries, it is highly desirable to grow direct bandgap III-V semiconductor lasers directly on Si. Here, we report the demonstration of a blue-violet (413 nm) InGaN-based laser diode grown directly on Si that operates under continuous-wave current injection at room temperature, with a threshold current density of 4.7 kA cm-2. The heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on Si is confronted with a large mismatch in both the lattice constant and the coefficient of thermal expansion, often resulting in a high density of defects and even microcrack networks. By inserting an Al-composition step-graded AlN/AlGaN multilayer buffer between the Si and GaN, we have not only successfully eliminated crack formation, but also effectively reduced the dislocation density. The result is the realization of a blue-violet InGaN-based laser on Si.

  16. Can the Earth’s harmonic spectrum be derived directly from the stochastic inversion of global travel-time data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Della Mora

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A set of seismic observations which all sample the same structure in the same way should have zero variance. This is naturally the case if all sources are in the same place, and the data are recorded by the same station. If sources and/or receivers are not in the same place, but close to one another, variance will generally be nonzero, but small. Variance might become large if the sampled region of the Earth contains heterogeneities whose spatial wavelength is comparable to the distances between sources and between receivers (and thus between the corresponding ray paths. The travel-time variance of a “bundle” of seismic rays thus reflects the degree of complexity of the sampled region of the medium. We apply this simple principle to real seismic databases, attempting to constrain the spherical harmonic spectrum of Earth’s structure without having to derive a tomographic model. This results in a reduction of the dimensionality of the solution space, and hence of computational costs. This approach allows to constrain the statistical properties, rather than exact geographic locations of structural features; knowing the statistics of Earth’s structure is most valuable for many fundamental geodynamic questions. We follow an earlier study by Gudmundsson et al. [1990] to find an approximate analytical relationship between averaged variance and harmonic spectrum; this allows us to determine the latter from a measurement of the former via a linear least squares inversion. Our analysis shows that the variance of ray bundles associated with large geographic extent of source/receiver bins is sensitive to low-degree spectral power, and vice-versa for small bins/high harmonic degrees. The method is accordingly ineffective at very low harmonic degrees, associated with an inherently limited number of source-receiver bins. We conduct a suite of inversions of both real and synthetic seismic data sets to evaluate the resolving power of our algorithm, and

  17. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  18. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Lewis J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  19. Uniformity of spherical shock wave dynamically stabilized by two successive laser profiles in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temporal, M., E-mail: mauro.temporal@hotmail.com [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan and CNRS, 61 Av. du President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Canaud, B. [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Garbett, W. J. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ramis, R. [ETSI Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The implosion uniformity of a directly driven spherical inertial confinement fusion capsule is considered within the context of the Laser Mégajoule configuration. Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations have been performed assuming irradiation with two laser beam cones located at 49° and 131° with respect to the axis of symmetry. The laser energy deposition causes an inward shock wave whose surface is tracked in time, providing the time evolution of its non-uniformity. The illumination model has been used to optimize the laser intensity profiles used as input in the 2D hydro-calculations. It is found that a single stationary laser profile does not maintain a uniform shock front over time. To overcome this drawback, it is proposed to use two laser profiles acting successively in time, in order to dynamically stabilize the non-uniformity of the shock front.

  20. The 1998 November 14 Occultation of GSC 0622-00345 by Saturn. II. Stratospheric Thermal Profile, Power Spectrum, and Gravity Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Harrington, Joseph; Matcheva, Katia; 10.1088/0004-637X/716/1/404

    2010-01-01

    On 1998 November 14, Saturn and its rings occulted the star GSC 0622-00345. The occultation latitude was 55.5 degrees S. This paper analyzes the 2.3 {\\mu}m light curve derived by Harrington & French. A fixed-baseline isothermal fit to the light curve has a temperature of 140 +/- 3 K, assuming a mean molecular mass of 2.35 AMU. The thermal profile obtained by numerical inversion is valid between 1 and 60 {\\mu}bar. The vertical temperature gradient is >0.2 K/km more stable than the adiabatic lapse rate, but it still shows the alternating-rounded-spiked features seen in many temperature gradient profiles from other atmospheric occultations and usually attributed to breaking gravity (buoyancy) waves. We conduct a wavelet analysis of the thermal profile, and show that, even with our low level of noise, scintillation due to turbulence in Earth's atmosphere can produce large temperature swings in light-curve inversions. Spurious periodic features in the "reliable" region of a wavelet amplitude spectrum can excee...