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Sample records for direct numerical evaluation

  1. An evaluation of directional analysis techniques for multidirectional, partially reflected waves .1. numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilic, C; Chadwick, A; Helm-Petersen, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    , non-phased locked methods are more appropriate. In this paper, the accuracy of two non-phased locked methods of directional analysis, the maximum likelihood method (MLM) and the Bayesian directional method (BDM) have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical simulations for the case...... of multidirectional waves with partial reflections. It is shown that the results are influenced by the ratio of distance from the reflector (L) to the length of the time series (S) used in the spectral analysis. Both methods are found to be capable of determining the incident and reflective wave fields when US > 0......Recent studies of advanced directional analysis techniques have mainly centred on incident wave fields. In the study of coastal structures, however, partially reflective wave fields are commonly present. In the near structure field, phase locked methods can be successfully applied. In the far field...

  2. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of Direct Tension Test for Cylindrical Concrete Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung J. Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete cracking strength can be defined as the tensile strength of concrete subjected to pure tension stress. However, as it is difficult to apply direct tension load to concrete specimens, concrete cracking is usually quantified by the modulus of rupture for flexural members. In this study, a new direct tension test setup for cylindrical specimens (101.6 mm in diameter and 203.2 mm in height similar to those used in compression test is developed. Double steel plates are used to obtain uniform stress distributions. Finite element analysis for the proposed test setup is conducted. The uniformity of the stress distribution along the cylindrical specimen is examined and compared with rectangular cross section. Fuzzy image pattern recognition method is used to assess stress uniformity along the specimen. Moreover, the probability of cracking at different locations along the specimen is evaluated using probabilistic finite element analysis. The experimental and numerical results of the cracking location showed that gravity effect on fresh concrete during setting time might affect the distribution of concrete cracking strength along the height of the structural elements.

  3. Soot and smoke emissions numerical evaluation for a direct injection (DI diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of Diesel internal combustion engines emissions is one of the major concerns of the engines manufacturers. Despite the fact that the efficiency of the gas post-treatment systems has been significantly improved, decreasing the smoke and the soot from the cylinder inside remains a main research goal. This work is proposing a theoretical study on these pollutants formation for different kinds of direct injection methods. By dividing the in-cylinder injection the heat release characteristic could be modified, leading to different temperature and pressure levels. Using exhaust gas recirculation (EGR the reduction of the gas temperatures might also be decreased, limiting NOx formation. To evaluate the level of the cylinder gas emissions formation a two-step procedure could be followed. First, by using a numerical calculation system the heat release characteristic can be highlighted concerning a Diesel engine with stratified injection; then, using an experimental relationship applying a large data base, the amount of the gas emissions can be subsequently provided. The authors propose some combinations between injection characteristics and EGR used fractions which could generate successfully results speaking in terms of NOx, soot and smoke formation.

  4. Investigation on convective mixing of triple-jet. Evaluation of turbulent quantities using particle image velocimetry and direct numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Igarashi, Minoru; Kamide, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    We performed a water experiment on parallel triple-jet and a calculation using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) for a quantification of thermal striping. The local temperatures and velocities were measured by using thermocouples and the particle image velocimetry (PIV), respectively. The calculation was carried out using the quasi-DNS code, DINUS-3, which was based on the finite difference method. The oscillation of the jets obtained from the flow visualization was related to the movements of the twin vortices between the jets by using the PIV. The experimental temperatures/velocities results were close to the numerical results. The heat transportation among the jets was evaluated by using the turbulent heat fluxes obtained from the quasi-DNS. (author)

  5. Numerical reactor evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, A.M.

    1973-08-01

    A short discussion is given of the physics of a nuclear reactor and the parameters which are used in the study of neutron transport. The mathematical formulation and detailed derivation is given of the neutron diffusion and transport equations. A description is given of the computer programmes, FIRE-5 and PELSN, developed at Pelindaba for the evaluation of both thermal and fast reactor systems. It is indicated how these computer programmes have been applied in the study of the PELINDUNA-O and other known critical facilities. The application of Lie-series to the solution of the neutron diffusion equation is discussed in detail. The time dependence of the variables is removed by means of a Laplacetransformation and the semi-analytical solution is written in terms of a transfer matrix. A complete set of recursion formulae, applicable to both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactor systems, is derived. The method used in the evaluation of the effective multiplication factor, k-eff, and the alpha-eigen-value is described. A computer programme was written to solve the neutron diffusion equation in terms of the Lie-series. The results are compared with the TIMOC and PELSN computer programmes. A method is suggested in which the Lie-series are used to solve the neutron transport equation. The transfer matrix for this case, is derived. A complete discussion is given of the solution to the space and time dependent diffusion equation in the presence of a delta source [af

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of Driven Cavity Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.; Wissink, J.G.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D driven cavity flows have been performed. The simulations exhibit that the flow converges to a periodically oscillating state at Re=11,000, and reveal that the dynamics is chaotic at Re=22,000. The dimension of the attractor and the Kolmogorov entropy have been

  7. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean's critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of annular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchvarov, Assen; Kahouadji, Lyes; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon; Craster, Richard V.; Matar, Omar K.

    2017-11-01

    Vertical counter-current two-phase flows are investigated using direct numerical simulations. The computations are carried out using Blue, a front-tracking-based CFD solver. Preliminary results show good qualitative agreement with experimental observations in terms of interfacial phenomena; these include three-dimensional, large-amplitude wave formation, the development of long ligaments, and droplet entrainment. The flooding phenomena in these counter current systems are closely investigated. The onset of flooding in our simulations is compared to existing empirical correlations such as Kutateladze-type and Wallis-type. The effect of varying tube diameter and fluid properties on the flooding phenomena is also investigated in this work. EPSRC, UK, MEMPHIS program Grant (EP/K003976/1), RAEng Research Chair (OKM).

  9. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of human phonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodony, Daniel; Saurabh, Shakti

    2017-11-01

    The generation and propagation of the human voice in three-dimensions is studied using direct numerical simulation. A full body domain is employed for the purpose of directly computing the sound in the region past the speaker's mouth. The air in the vocal tract is modeled as a compressible and viscous fluid interacting with the elastic vocal folds. The vocal fold tissue material properties are multi-layered, with varying stiffness, and a linear elastic transversely isotropic model is utilized and implemented in a quadratic finite element code. The fluid-solid domains are coupled through a boundary-fitted interface and utilize a Poisson equation-based mesh deformation method. A kinematic constraint based on a specified minimum gap between the vocal folds is applied to prevent collision during glottal closure. Both near VF flow dynamics and far-field acoustics have been studied. A comparison is drawn to current two-dimensional simulations as well as to data from the literature. Near field vocal fold dynamics and glottal flow results are studied and in good agreement with previous three-dimensional phonation studies. Far-field acoustic characteristics, when compared to their two-dimensional counterpart, are shown to be sensitive to the dimensionality. Supported by the National Science Foundation (CAREER Award Number 1150439).

  11. Evaluation of turbulent transport and flame surface dissipation using direct numerical simulation of turbulent combustion; Evaluation des termes de transport et de dissipation de surface de flamme par simulation numerique directe de la combustion turbulente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughanem, H.

    1998-03-24

    The assumption of gradient transport for the mean reaction progress variable has a limited domain of validity in premixed turbulent combustion. The existence of two turbulent transport regimes, gradient and counter-gradient, is demonstrated in the present work using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of plane flame configurations. The DNS data base describes the influence of the heat release factor, of the turbulence-to-flame velocity ratio, and of an external pressure gradient. The simulations reveal a strong correlation between the regime of turbulent transport and the turbulent flame speed and turbulent flame thickness. These effects re not well described by current turbulent combustion models. A conditional approach `fresh gases / burnt gases` is proposed to overcome these difficulties. Furthermore, he development of flame instabilities in turbulent configurations is also observed in the simulations. A criterion is derived that determines the domain of occurrence of these instabilities (Darrieus- Landau instabilities, Rayleigh- Taylor instabilities, thermo-diffusive instabilities). This criterion suggests that the domain of occurrence of flame instabilities is not limited to small Reynolds numbers. (author) 98 refs.

  12. Direct numerical simulations of nucleate boiling flows of binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier Jamet; Celia Fouillet

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Better understand the origin and characteristics of boiling crisis is still a scientific challenge despite many years of valuable studies. One of the reasons why boiling crisis is so difficult to understand is that local and coupled physical phenomena are believed to play a key role in the trigger of instabilities which lead to the dry out of large portions of the heated solid phase. Nucleate boiling of a single bubble is fairly well understood compared to boiling crisis. Therefore, the numerical simulation of a single bubble growth during nucleate boiling is a good candidate to evaluate the capabilities of a numerical method to deal with complex liquid-vapor phenomena with phase-change and eventually to tackle the boiling crisis problem. In this paper, we present results of direct numerical simulations of nucleate boiling. The numerical method used is the second gradient method, which is a diffuse interface method dedicated to liquid vapor flows with phase-change. This study is not intended to provide quantitative results, partly because all the simulations are two-dimensional. However, particular attention is paid to the influence of some parameters on the main features of nucleate boiling, i.e. the radius of departure and the frequency of detachment of bubbles. In particular, we show that, as the contact angle increases, the radius of departure increases whereas the frequency of detachment decreases. Moreover, the influence of the existence of quasi non-condensable gas is studied. Numerical results show an important decrease of the heat exchange coefficient when a small amount of a quasi non-condensable gas is added to the pure liquid-vapor water system. This result is in agreement with experimental observations. Beyond these qualitative results, this numerical study allows to get insight into some important physical phenomena and to confirm that during nucleate boiling, large scale quantities are influenced by small scale

  13. Direct numerical simulations of premixed turbulent flames with flamelet-generated manifolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, van J.A.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is a very powerful tool to evaluate the validity of new models and theories for turbulent combustion. In this paper, direct numerical simulations of spherically expanding premixed turbulent flames in the thin reaction zone regime and in the broken reaction zone regime are

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of turbulent flow in a driven cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.; Wissink, J.G.; Cazemier, W.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of 2 and 3D turbulent flows in a lid-driven cavity have been performed. DNS are numerical solutions of the unsteady (here: incompressible) Navier-Stokes equations that compute the evolution of all dynamically significant scales of motion. In view of the large

  15. Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.; Arias, Paul G.; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms

  16. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  17. Vortex locking in direct numerical simulations of quantum turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Karla; Koplik, Joel; Rouson, Damian W I

    2008-07-04

    Direct numerical simulations are used to examine the locking of quantized superfluid vortices and normal fluid vorticity in evolving turbulent flows. The superfluid is driven by the normal fluid, which undergoes either a decaying Taylor-Green flow or a linearly forced homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, although the back reaction of the superfluid on the normal fluid flow is omitted. Using correlation functions and wavelet transforms, we present numerical and visual evidence for vortex locking on length scales above the intervortex spacing.

  18. Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    Type-directed partial evaluation uses a normalization function to achieve partial evaluation. These lecture notes review its background, foundations, practice, and applications. Of specific interest is the modular technique of offline and online type-directed partial evaluation in Standard ML...

  19. Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    Type-directed partial evaluation uses a normalization function to achieve partial evaluation. These lecture notes review its background, foundations, practice, and applications. Of specific interest is the modular technique of offline and online type-directed partial evaluation in Standard ML of ...

  20. Application of HPCN to direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, RWCP; Veldman, AEP; van Waveren, GM; Hertzberger, B; Sloot, P

    1997-01-01

    This poster shows how HPCN can be used as a path-finding tool for turbulence research. The parallelization of direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow using the data-parallel model and Fortran 95 constructs is treated, both on a shared memory and a distributed memory computer.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of particulate flow with heat transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavassoli Estahbanati, H; Kriebitzsch, S.H.L.; Hoef, van der M.A.; Peters, E.A.J.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The Immersed Boundary (IB) method proposed by Uhlmann for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of fluid flow through dense fluid-particle systems is extended to systems with interphase heat transport. A fixed Eulerian grid is employed to solve the momentum and energy equations by traditional

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flow Over Complex Bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, L.; Hsu, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is regarded as a powerful tool in the investigation of turbulent flow featured with a wide range of time and spatial scales. With the application of coordinate transformation in a pseudo-spectral scheme, a parallelized numerical modeling system was created aiming at simulating flow over complex bathymetry with high numerical accuracy and efficiency. The transformed governing equations were integrated in time using a third-order low-storage Runge-Kutta method. For spatial discretization, the discrete Fourier expansion was adopted in the streamwise and spanwise direction, enforcing the periodic boundary condition in both directions. The Chebyshev expansion on Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto points was used in the wall-normal direction, assuming there is no-slip on top and bottom walls. The diffusion terms were discretized with a Crank-Nicolson scheme, while the advection terms dealiased with the 2/3 rule were discretized with an Adams-Bashforth scheme. In the prediction step, the velocity was calculated in physical domain by solving the resulting linear equation directly. However, the extra terms introduced by coordinate transformation impose a strict limitation to time step and an iteration method was applied to overcome this restriction in the correction step for pressure by solving the Helmholtz equation. The numerical solver is written in object-oriented C++ programing language utilizing Armadillo linear algebra library for matrix computation. Several benchmarking cases in laminar and turbulent flow were carried out to verify/validate the numerical model and very good agreements are achieved. Ongoing work focuses on implementing sediment transport capability for multiple sediment classes and parameterizations for flocculation processes.

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of Flow Over Passive Geometric Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizard, Alexander

    It is well understood that delaying flow separation on a bluff body allows significant drag reduction, which is attractive in many applications. With this in mind, many separation control mechanisms, both active and passive, have been developed and tested to optimize the effects of this phenomenon. Although this idea is generally accepted, the physical occurrences in the near-wall region during transition that lead to separation delay are not well understood. The current study evaluates the impact of both spherical dimples, and sandgrain style roughness on downstream flow by performing direct numerical simulations over such geometries on a zero pressure gradient flat plate. It is shown that although dimples and random roughness of similar characteristic length scales exhibit similar boundary layer characteristics, dimples are more successful in developing high momentum in the vicinity of the wall. Additionally it is shown that increasing the relative size of the rough elements does not increase the near-wall momentum, and is undesirable in controlling separation. Finally, it is shown that the impact of roughness elements on the flow is more immediate, and that, for the case of one row of dimples and an equivalent area of roughness, the roughness patch is more successful in transitioning the near-wall region to a non-laminar state. It can be concluded from variation in the span of the flowfield for a single row of dimples that the size and orientation of the disturbance region is significant to the results.

  4. Induction and direct resistance heating theory and numerical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Lupi, Sergio; Aliferov, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    This book offers broad, detailed coverage of theoretical developments in induction and direct resistance heating and presents new material on the solution of problems in the application of such heating. The physical basis of induction and conduction heating processes is explained, and electromagnetic phenomena in direct resistance and induction heating of flat workpieces and cylindrical bodies are examined in depth. The calculation of electrical and energetic characteristics of induction and conduction heating systems is then thoroughly reviewed. The final two chapters consider analytical solutions and numerical modeling of problems in the application of induction and direct resistance heating, providing industrial engineers with the knowledge needed in order to use numerical tools in the modern design of installations. Other engineers, scientists, and technologists will find the book to be an invaluable reference that will assist in the efficient utilization of electrical energy.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation and Visualization of Subcooled Pool Boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Kunugi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct numerical simulation of the boiling phenomena is one of the promising approaches in order to clarify their heat transfer characteristics and discuss the mechanism. During these decades, many DNS procedures have been developed according to the recent high performance computers and computational technologies. In this paper, the state of the art of direct numerical simulation of the pool boiling phenomena during mostly two decades is briefly summarized at first, and then the nonempirical boiling and condensation model proposed by the authors is introduced into the MARS (MultiInterface Advection and Reconstruction Solver developed by the authors. On the other hand, in order to clarify the boiling bubble behaviors under the subcooled conditions, the subcooled pool boiling experiments are also performed by using a high speed and high spatial resolution camera with a highly magnified telescope. Resulting from the numerical simulations of the subcooled pool boiling phenomena, the numerical results obtained by the MARS are validated by being compared to the experimental ones and the existing analytical solutions. The numerical results regarding the time evolution of the boiling bubble departure process under the subcooled conditions show a very good agreement with the experimental results. In conclusion, it can be said that the proposed nonempirical boiling and condensation model combined with the MARS has been validated.

  6. Numerical Investigation on the Directionality of Nonlinear Indicial Responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Kwan Jung; Hong, Sang Won; Lee, Dong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An unsteady Euler solver is modified to investigate the directionality of nonlinear indicial response to a step change in the angle of attack. An impulsive change in the angle of attack is incorporated by using the field velocity approach, which is known to decouple the step change in the angle of attack from a pitch rate. Numerical results are thoroughly compared against analytical results for two-dimensional indicial responses. The same method is applied to investigate the directionality of nonlinear indicial responses. It is found that directionality is mainly due to the asymmetry of initial shock locations. Since the directionality of the pitching moment responses is significant in the critical Mach number region, it is also shown that consideration of the directionality is crucial for accurate modeling of the nonlinear indicial functions

  7. Direct numerical methods of mathematical modeling in mechanical structural design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahili, Jihad; Verchery, Georges; Ghaddar, Ahmad; Zoaeter, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    Full text.Structural design and numerical methods are generally interactive; requiring optimization procedures as the structure is analyzed. This analysis leads to define some mathematical terms, as the stiffness matrix, which are resulting from the modeling and then used in numerical techniques during the dimensioning procedure. These techniques and many others involve the calculation of the generalized inverse of the stiffness matrix, called also the 'compliance matrix'. The aim of this paper is to introduce first, some different existing mathematical procedures, used to calculate the compliance matrix from the stiffness matrix, then apply direct numerical methods to solve the obtained system with the lowest computational time, and to compare the obtained results. The results show a big difference of the computational time between the different procedures

  8. Direct numerical simulation of noninvasive channel healing in electrical field

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yi

    2017-11-25

    Noninvasive channel healing is a new idea to repair the broken pipe wall, using external electric fields to drive iron particles to the destination. The repair can be done in the normal operation of the pipe flow without any shutdown of the pipeline so that this method can be a potentially efficient and safe technology of pipe healing. However, the real application needs full knowledge of healing details. Numerical simulation is an effective method. Thus, in this research, we first established a numerical model for noninvasive channel healing technology to represent fluid–particle interaction. The iron particles can be attached to a cracking area by external electrostatic forces or can also be detached by mechanical forces from the fluid. When enough particles are permanently attached on the cracking area, the pipe wall can be healed. The numerical criterion of the permanent attachment is discussed. A fully three-dimensional finite difference framework of direct numerical simulation is established and applied to different cases to simulate the full process of channel healing. The impact of Reynolds number and particle concentration on the healing process is discussed. This numerical investigation provides valuable reference and tools for further simulation of real pipe healing in engineering.

  9. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent lean premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R; Chen, Jacqueline H; Lu Tianfeng; Law, Chung K

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, due to the advent of high-performance computers and advanced numerical algorithms, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of combustion has emerged as a valuable computational research tool, in concert with experimentation. The role of DNS in delivering new Scientific insight into turbulent combustion is illustrated using results from a recent 3D turbulent premixed flame simulation. To understand the influence of turbulence on the flame structure, a 3D fully-resolved DNS of a spatially-developing lean methane-air turbulent Bunsen flame was performed in the thin reaction zones regime. A reduced chemical model for methane-air chemistry consisting of 13 resolved species, 4 quasi-steady state species and 73 elementary reactions was developed specifically for the current simulation. The data is analyzed to study possible influences of turbulence on the flame thickness. The results show that the average flame thickness increases, in qualitative agreement with several experimental results

  10. Direct numerical simulations of gas-liquid multiphase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Tryggvason, Grétar; Zaleski, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Accurately predicting the behaviour of multiphase flows is a problem of immense industrial and scientific interest. Modern computers can now study the dynamics in great detail and these simulations yield unprecedented insight. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to direct numerical simulations of multiphase flows for researchers and graduate students. After a brief overview of the context and history the authors review the governing equations. A particular emphasis is placed on the 'one-fluid' formulation where a single set of equations is used to describe the entire flow field and

  11. Efficient Parallel Algorithm For Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Stuti; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1997-01-01

    A distributed algorithm for a high-order-accurate finite-difference approach to the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of transition and turbulence in compressible flows is described. This work has two major objectives. The first objective is to demonstrate that parallel and distributed-memory machines can be successfully and efficiently used to solve computationally intensive and input/output intensive algorithms of the DNS class. The second objective is to show that the computational complexity involved in solving the tridiagonal systems inherent in the DNS algorithm can be reduced by algorithm innovations that obviate the need to use a parallelized tridiagonal solver.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulations for Combustion Science: Past, Present, and Future

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. This chapter attempts to provide a brief historical review of the progress in DNS of turbulent combustion during the past decades. Major scientific accomplishments and contributions towards fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion will be summarized and future challenges and research needs will be proposed.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulations for Combustion Science: Past, Present, and Future

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2017-12-12

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. This chapter attempts to provide a brief historical review of the progress in DNS of turbulent combustion during the past decades. Major scientific accomplishments and contributions towards fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion will be summarized and future challenges and research needs will be proposed.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2016-07-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties of hydrocarbon fuels, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. The article attempts to provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art DNS of turbulent premixed flames at high Re/Ka conditions, with an emphasis on homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow configurations. Some important qualitative findings from numerical studies are summarized, new analytical approaches to investigate intensely turbulent premixed flame dynamics are discussed, and topics for future research are suggested. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of bubbles with parallelized adaptive mesh refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talpaert, A.

    2015-01-01

    The study of two-phase Thermal-Hydraulics is a major topic for Nuclear Engineering for both security and efficiency of nuclear facilities. In addition to experiments, numerical modeling helps to knowing precisely where bubbles appear and how they behave, in the core as well as in the steam generators. This work presents the finest scale of representation of two-phase flows, Direct Numerical Simulation of bubbles. We use the 'Di-phasic Low Mach Number' equation model. It is particularly adapted to low-Mach number flows, that is to say flows which velocity is much slower than the speed of sound; this is very typical of nuclear thermal-hydraulics conditions. Because we study bubbles, we capture the front between vapor and liquid phases thanks to a downward flux limiting numerical scheme. The specific discrete analysis technique this work introduces is well-balanced parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). With AMR, we refined the coarse grid on a batch of patches in order to locally increase precision in areas which matter more, and capture fine changes in the front location and its topology. We show that patch-based AMR is very adapted for parallel computing. We use a variety of physical examples: forced advection, heat transfer, phase changes represented by a Stefan model, as well as the combination of all those models. We will present the results of those numerical simulations, as well as the speed up compared to equivalent non-AMR simulation and to serial computation of the same problems. This document is made up of an abstract and the slides of the presentation. (author)

  16. CSR Fields: Direct Numerical Solution of the Maxwell's Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novokhatski, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the properties of the coherent electromagnetic fields of a very short, ultra-relativistic bunch in a rectangular vacuum chamber inside a bending magnet. The analysis is based on the results of a direct numerical solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations. We use a new dispersion-free time-domain algorithm which employs a more efficient use of finite element mesh techniques and hence produces self-consistent and stable solutions for very short bunches. We investigate the fine structure of the CSR fields including coherent edge radiation. This approach should be useful in the study of existing and future concepts of particle accelerators and ultrafast coherent light sources. The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) fields have a strong action on the beam dynamics of very short bunches, which are moving in the bends of all kinds of magnetic elements. They are responsible for additional energy loss and energy spread; micro bunching and beam emittance growth. These fields may bound the efficiency of damping rings, electron-positron colliders and ultrafast coherent light sources, where high peak currents and very short bunches are envisioned. This is relevant to most high-brightness beam applications. On the other hand these fields together with transition radiation fields can be used for beam diagnostics or even as a powerful resource of THz radiation. A history of the study of CSR and a good collection of references can be found in (1). Electromagnetic theory suggests several methods on how to calculate CSR fields. The most popular method is to use Lienard-Wiechert potentials. Other approach is to solve numerically the approximate equations, which are a Schrodinger type equation. These numerical methods are described in (2). We suggest that a direct solution of Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations can describe the detailed structure of the CSR fields (3).

  17. Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying Directional and Non-directional Spatial-Numerical Associations across the Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ninaus

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence suggesting an association of numbers with physical space. However, the origin of such spatial-numerical associations (SNAs is still debated. In the present study we investigated the development of two SNAs in a cross-sectional study involving children, young and middle-aged adults as well as the elderly: (1 the SNARC (spatial-numerical association of response codes effect, reflecting a directional SNA; and (2 the numerical bisection bias in a line bisection task with numerical flankers. Results revealed a consistent SNARC effect in all age groups that continuously increased with age. In contrast, a numerical bisection bias was only observed for children and elderly participants, implying an U-shaped distribution of this bias across age groups. Additionally, individual SNARC effects and numerical bisection biases did not correlate significantly. We argue that the SNARC effect seems to be influenced by longer-lasting experiences of cultural constraints such as reading and writing direction and may thus reflect embodied representations. Contrarily, the numerical bisection bias may originate from insufficient inhibition of the semantic influence of irrelevant numerical flankers, which should be more pronounced in children and elderly people due to development and decline of cognitive control, respectively. As there is an ongoing debate on the origins of SNAs in general and the SNARC effect in particular, the present results are discussed in light of these differing accounts in an integrative approach. However, taken together, the present pattern of results suggests that different cognitive mechanisms underlie the SNARC effect and the numerical bisection bias.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of fractal-generated turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H; Hasegawa, Y; Ushijima, T; Nagata, K; Sakai, Y; Hayase, T

    2013-01-01

    We simulate fractal-generated turbulence (Hurst and Vassilicos 2007 Phys. Fluids 19 035103)) by means of a direct numerical simulation and address its fundamental characteristics. We examine whether the fractal-generated turbulence in the upstream region has a nature similar to that of a wake. We propose an equation for predicting peak values of the velocity fluctuation intensity and devise a method for formulating the functional form of the quantity of interest by focusing on the time scale of decaying turbulence, and we examine those forms for the turbulent kinetic energy and rms of pressure fluctuation through this method. By using the method, both of these functional forms are found to be power-law functions in the downstream region, even though these profiles follow exponential functions around these peaks. In addition, decay exponents of these quantities are estimated. The integral length scales of velocity fluctuations for transverse as well as streamwise directions are essentially constant in the downstream direction. Decaying turbulence having both these characteristics conflicts with decaying turbulence described by the theory predicting exponential decay. We discuss a factor causing the difference by focusing on the functional form of the transfer function of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. (paper)

  19. Direct Numerical Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livescu, D; Wei, T; Petersen, M R

    2011-01-01

    The development of the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer is studied using data from an extensive new set of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), performed on the 0.5 Petaflops, 150k compute cores BG/L Dawn supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This includes a suite of simulations with grid size of 1024 2 × 4608 and Atwood number ranging from 0.04 to 0.9, in order to examine small departures from the Boussinesq approximation as well as large Atwood number effects, and a high resolution simulation of grid size 4096 2 × 4032 and Atwood number of 0.75. After the layer width had developed substantially, additional branched simulations have been run under reversed and zero gravity conditions. While the bulk of the results will be published elsewhere, here we present preliminary results on: 1) the long-standing open question regarding the discrepancy between the numerically and experimentally measured mixing layer growth rates and 2) mixing characteristics.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of bluff-body-stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Arias, Paul G.

    2014-01-10

    To enable high fidelity simulation of combustion phenomena in realistic devices, an embedded boundary method is implemented into direct numerical simulations (DNS) of reacting flows. One of the additional numerical issues associated with reacting flows is the stable treatment of the embedded boundaries in the presence of multicomponent species and reactions. The implemented method is validated in two test con gurations: a pre-mixed hydrogen/air flame stabilized in a backward-facing step configuration, and reactive flows around a square prism. The former is of interest in practical gas turbine combustor applications in which the thermo-acoustic instabilities are a strong concern, and the latter serves as a good model problem to capture the vortex shedding behind a bluff body. In addition, a reacting flow behind the square prism serves as a model for the study of flame stabilization in a micro-channel combustor. The present study utilizes fluid-cell reconstruction methods in order to capture important flame-to-solid wall interactions that are important in confined multicomponent reacting flows. Results show that the DNS with embedded boundaries can be extended to more complex geometries without loss of accuracy and the high fidelity simulation data can be used to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for the design of practical combustion devices.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of axisymmetric laminar low-density jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Lendinez, Daniel; Coenen, Wilfried; Sevilla, Alejandro

    2017-11-01

    The stability of submerged laminar axisymmetric low-density jets has been investigated experimentally (Kyle & Sreenivasan 1993, Hallberg & Strykowski 2006) and with linear analysis (Jendoubi & Strykowski 1994, Coenen & Sevilla 2012, Coenen et al. 2017). These jets become globally unstable when the Reynolds number is larger than a certain critical value which depends on the density ratio and on the velocity profile at the injector outlet. In this work, Direct Numerical Simulations using FreeFEM + + (Hecht 2012) with P1 elements for pressure and P2 for velocity and density are performed to complement the above mentioned studies. Density and velocity fields are analyzed at long time showing the unforced space-time evolution of nonlinear disturbances propagating along the jet. Using the Stuart-Landau model to fit the numerical results for the self-excited oscillations we have computed a neutral stability curve that shows good agreement with experiments and stability theory. Thanks to Spanish MINECO under projects DPI2014-59292-C3-1-P and DPI2015-71901-REDT for financial support.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with deformed bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the direct numerical simulation of a fully-developed turbulent channel flow with deformed bubbles were conducted by means of the refined MARS method, turbulent Reynolds number 150, and Bubble Reynolds number 120. As the results, large-scale wake motions were observed round the bubbles. At the bubble located region, mean velocity was degreased and turbulent intensities and Reynolds shear stress were increased by the effects of the large-scale wake motions round bubbles. On the other hands, near wall region, bubbles might effect on the flow laminarlize and drag reduction. Two types of drag coefficient of bubble were estimated from the accelerated velocity of bubble and correlation equation as a function of Particle Reynolds number. Empirical correlation equation might be overestimated the drag effects in this Particle Reynolds number range. (author)

  3. Direct numerical simulation of homogeneous stratified rotating turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, O.; Tsujimura, S.; Nagano, Y. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Department of Mech. Eng., Nagoya (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    The effects of the Prandtl number on stratified rotating turbulence have been studied in homogeneous turbulence by using direct numerical simulations and a rapid distortion theory. Fluctuations under strong stable-density stratification can be theoretically divided into the WAVE and the potential vorticity (PV) modes. In low-Prandtl-number fluids, the WAVE mode deteriorates, while the PV mode remains. Imposing rotation on a low-Prandtl-number fluid makes turbulence two-dimensional as well as geostrophic; it is found from the instantaneous turbulent structure that the vortices merge to form a few vertically-elongated vortex columns. During the period toward two-dimensionalization, the vertical vortices become asymmetric in the sense of rotation. (orig.)

  4. Numerical and experimental analysis of the directional stability on crack propagation under biaxial stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RodrIguez-MartInez, R; Urriolagoitia-Calderon, G; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G; Hernandez-Gomez, L H; Merchan-Cruz, E A; RodrIguez-Canizo, R G; Sandoval-Pineda, J M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the case of Single Edge Notch (SEN) specimens subject to opening/compressive loading was analyzed; The loads are applied in several ratios to evaluate the influence of the specimen geometry, and the Stress Intensity Factor (SIF) K 1 values on the directional stability of crack propagation. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the behaviour of the fracture propagation, when modifying the geometry of the SEN specimen and different relationships of load tension/compression are applied. Additionally, the precision of the numerical and experimental analysis is evaluated to determine its reliability when solving this type of problems. The specimens are subjected to biaxial opening/compression loading; both results (numerical and experimental) are compared in order to evaluate the condition of directional stability on crack propagation. Finally, an apparent transition point related to the length of specimens was identified, in which the behaviour of values of SIF changes for different loading ratios.

  5. Numerical and experimental analysis of the directional stability on crack propagation under biaxial stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RodrIguez-MartInez, R; Urriolagoitia-Calderon, G; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G; Hernandez-Gomez, L H [Instituto Politecnico Nacional Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion (SEPI), Escuela Superior de IngenierIa Mecanica y Electrica (ESIME), Edificio 5. 2do Piso, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos ' Zacatenco' Col. Lindavista, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Merchan-Cruz, E A; RodrIguez-Canizo, R G; Sandoval-Pineda, J M, E-mail: rrodriguezm@ipn.m, E-mail: urrio332@hotmail.co, E-mail: guiurri@hotmail.co, E-mail: luishector56@hotmail.co, E-mail: eamerchan@gmail.co, E-mail: ricname@hotmail.co, E-mail: jsandovalp@ipn.m [Instituto Politecnico Nacional Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion (SEPI), Escuela Superior de IngenierIa Mecanica y Electrica (ESIME). Unidad profesional, AZCAPOTZALCO, Av. de las Granjas No. 682, Col. Sta. Catarina Azcapotzalco, C.P. 02550, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the case of Single Edge Notch (SEN) specimens subject to opening/compressive loading was analyzed; The loads are applied in several ratios to evaluate the influence of the specimen geometry, and the Stress Intensity Factor (SIF) K{sub 1} values on the directional stability of crack propagation. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the behaviour of the fracture propagation, when modifying the geometry of the SEN specimen and different relationships of load tension/compression are applied. Additionally, the precision of the numerical and experimental analysis is evaluated to determine its reliability when solving this type of problems. The specimens are subjected to biaxial opening/compression loading; both results (numerical and experimental) are compared in order to evaluate the condition of directional stability on crack propagation. Finally, an apparent transition point related to the length of specimens was identified, in which the behaviour of values of SIF changes for different loading ratios.

  6. Development of sodium droplet combustion analysis methodology using direct numerical simulation in 3-dimensional coordinate (COMET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Yasushi; Ohira, Hiroaki

    1998-08-01

    In the early stage of sodium leak event of liquid metal fast breeder reactor, LMFBR, liquid sodium flows out from a piping, and ignition and combustion of liquid sodium droplet might occur under certain environmental condition. Compressible forced air flow, diffusion of chemical species, liquid sodium droplet behavior, chemical reactions and thermodynamic properties should be evaluated with considering physical dependence and numerical connection among them for analyzing combustion of sodium liquid droplet. A direct numerical simulation code was developed for numerical analysis of sodium liquid droplet in forced convection air flow. The numerical code named COMET, 'Sodium Droplet COmbustion Analysis METhodology using Direct Numerical Simulation in 3-Dimensional Coordinate'. The extended MAC method was used to calculate compressible forced air flow. Counter diffusion among chemical species is also calculated. Transport models of mass and energy between droplet and surrounding atmospheric air were developed. Equation-solving methods were used for computing multiphase equilibrium between sodium and air. Thermodynamic properties of chemical species were evaluated using dynamic theory of gases. Combustion of single sphere liquid sodium droplet in forced convection, constant velocity, uniform air flow was numerically simulated using COMET. Change of droplet diameter with time was closely agree with d 2 -law of droplet combustion theory. Spatial distributions of combustion rate and heat generation and formation, decomposition and movement of chemical species were analyzed. Quantitative calculations of heat generation and chemical species formation in spray combustion are enabled for various kinds of environmental condition by simulating liquid sodium droplet combustion using COMET. (author)

  7. Direct Numerical Simulations of Particle-Laden Turbulent Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebakumar, Anand Samuel; Premnath, Kannan; Abraham, John

    2017-11-01

    In a recent experimental study, Lau and Nathan (2014) reported that the distribution of particles in a turbulent pipe flow is strongly influenced by the Stokes number (St). At St lower than 1, particles migrate toward the wall and at St greater than 10 they tend to migrate toward the axis. It was suggested that this preferential migration of particles is due to two forces, the Saffman lift force and the turbophoretic force. Saffman lift force represents a force acting on the particle as a result of a velocity gradient across the particle when it leads or lags the fluid flow. Turbophoretic force is induced by turbulence which tends to move the particle in the direction of decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. In this study, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is employed to simulate a particle-laden turbulent channel flow through Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). We find that the preferential migration is a function of particle size in addition to the St. We explain the effect of the particle size and St on the Saffman lift force and turbophoresis and present how this affects particle concentration at different conditions.

  8. Direct Numerical Simulation of Fingering Instabilities in Coating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eres, Murat H.; Schwartz, Leonard W.

    1998-11-01

    We consider stability and finger formation in free surface flows. Gravity driven downhill drainage and temperature gradient driven climbing flows are two examples of such problems. The former situation occurs when a mound of viscous liquid on a vertical wall is allowed to flow. Constant surface shear stress due to temperature gradients (Marangoni stress) can initiate the latter problem. The evolution equations are derived using the lubrication approximation. We also include the effects of finite-contact angles in the evolution equations using a disjoining pressure model. Evolution equations for both problems are solved using an efficient alternating-direction-implicit method. For both problems a one-dimensional base state is established, that is steady in a moving reference frame. This base state is unstable to transverse perturbations. The transverse wavenumbers for the most rapidly growing modes are found through direct numerical solution of the nonlinear evolution equations, and are compared with published experimental results. For a range of finite equilibrium contact angles, the fingers can grow without limit leading to semi-finite steady fingers in a moving coordinate system. A computer generated movie of the nonlinear simulation results, for several sets of input parameters, will be shown.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Low Capillary Number Pore Scale Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, S.; Soulaine, C.; Tchelepi, H.

    2017-12-01

    The arrangement of void spaces and the granular structure of a porous medium determines multiple macroscopic properties of the rock such as porosity, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. Therefore, it is important to study the microscopic structure of the reservoir pores and understand the dynamics of fluid displacements through them. One approach for doing this, is direct numerical simulation of pore-scale flow that requires a robust numerical tool for prediction of fluid dynamics and a detailed understanding of the physical processes occurring at the pore-scale. In pore scale flows with a low capillary number, Eulerian multiphase methods are well-known to produce additional vorticity close to the interface. This is mainly due to discretization errors which lead to an imbalance of capillary pressure and surface tension forces that causes unphysical spurious currents. At the pore scale, these spurious currents can become significantly stronger than the average velocity in the phases, and lead to unphysical displacement of the interface. In this work, we first investigate the capability of the algebraic Volume of Fluid (VOF) method in OpenFOAM for low capillary number pore scale flow simulations. Afterward, we compare VOF results with a Coupled Level-Set Volume of Fluid (CLSVOF) method and Iso-Advector method. It has been shown that the former one reduces the VOF's unphysical spurious currents in some cases, and both are known to capture interfaces sharper than VOF. As the conclusion, we will investigate that whether the use of CLSVOF or Iso-Advector will lead to less spurious velocities and more accurate results for capillary driven pore-scale multiphase flows or not. Keywords: Pore-scale multiphase flow, Capillary driven flows, Spurious currents, OpenFOAM

  10. Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Autoigniting Hydrogen Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaithambi, Rajapandiyan

    Autoignition is an important phenomenon and a tool in the design of combustion engines. To study autoignition in a canonical form a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent autoigniting hydrogen jet in vitiated coflow conditions at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 is performed. A detailed chemical mechanism for hydrogen-air combustion and non-unity Lewis numbers for species transport is used. Realistic inlet conditions are prescribed by obtaining the velocity eld from a fully developed turbulent pipe flow simulation. To perform this simulation a scalable modular density based method for direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible reacting flows is developed. The algorithm performs explicit time advancement of transport variables on structured grids. An iterative semi-implicit time advancement is developed for the chemical source terms to alleviate the chemical stiffness of detailed mechanisms. The algorithm is also extended from a Cartesian grid to a cylindrical coordinate system which introduces a singularity at the pole r = 0 where terms with a factor 1/r can be ill-defined. There are several approaches to eliminate this pole singularity and finite volume methods can bypass this issue by not storing or computing data at the pole. All methods however face a very restrictive time step when using a explicit time advancement scheme in the azimuthal direction (theta) where the cell sizes are of the order DelrDeltheta. We use a conservative finite volume based approach to remove the severe time step restriction imposed by the CFL condition by merging cells in the azimuthal direction. In addition, fluxes in the radial direction are computed with an implicit scheme to allow cells to be clustered along the jet's shear layer. This method is validated and used to perform the large scale turbulent reacting simulation. The resulting flame structure is found to be similar to a turbulent diusion flame but stabilized by autoignition at the

  11. Direct numerical simulation of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S.

    Interaction of liquid droplets with turbulence is important in numerous applications ranging from rain formation to oil spills to spray combustion. The physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction are largely unknown, especially when compared to that of solid particles. Compared to solid particles, droplets can deform, break up, coalesce and have internal fluid circulation. The main goal of this work is to investigate using direct numerical simulation (DNS) the physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction, both for non-evaporating and evaporating droplets. To achieve this objective, we develop and couple a new pressure-correction method with the volume-of-fluid (VoF) method for simulating incompressible two-fluid flows. The method's main advantage is that the variable coefficient Poisson equation that arises in solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for two-fluid flows is reduced to a constant coefficient equation. This equation can then be solved directly using, e.g., the FFT-based parallel Poisson solver. For a 10243 mesh, our new pressure-correction method using a fast Poisson solver is ten to forty times faster than the standard pressure-correction method using multigrid. Using the coupled pressure-correction and VoF method, we perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of 3130 finite-size, non-evaporating droplets of diameter approximately equal to the Taylor lengthscale and with 5% droplet volume fraction in decaying isotropic turbulence at initial Taylor-scale Reynolds number Relambda = 83. In the droplet-laden cases, we vary one of the following three parameters: the droplet Weber number based on the r.m.s. velocity of turbulence (0.1 ≤ Werms ≤ 5), the droplet- to carrier-fluid density ratio (1 ≤ rhod/rho c ≤ 100) or the droplet- to carrier-fluid viscosity ratio (1 ≤ mud/muc ≤ 100). We derive the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) equations for the two-fluid, carrier-fluid and droplet-fluid flow. These equations allow

  12. Single-phase multi-dimensional thermohydraulics direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3. Input data description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-08-01

    This report explains the numerical methods and the set-up method of input data for a single-phase multi-dimensional thermohydraulics direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3 (Direct Numerical Simulation using a 3rd-order upwind scheme). The code was developed to simulate non-stationary temperature fluctuation phenomena related to thermal striping phenomena, developed at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). The DINUS-3 code was characterized by the use of a third-order upwind scheme for convection terms in instantaneous Navier-Stokes and energy equations, and an adaptive control system based on the Fuzzy theory to control time step sizes. Author expect this report is very useful to utilize the DINUS-3 code for the evaluation of various non-stationary thermohydraulic phenomena in reactor applications. (author)

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of heat transfer in a turbulent flume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergant, R.; Tiselj, I.

    2001-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) can be used for the description of turbulent heat transfer in the fluid at low Reynolds numbers. DNS means precise solving of Navier-Stoke's equations without any extra turbulent models. DNS should be able to describe all relevant length scales and time scales in observed turbulent flow. The largest length scale is actually dimension of system and the smallest length and time scale is equal to Kolmogorov scale. In the present work simulations of fully developed turbulent velocity and temperature fields were performed in a turbulent flume (open channel) with pseudo-spectral approach at Reynolds number 2670 (friction Reynolds number 171) and constant Prandtl number 5.4, considering the fluid temperature as a passive scalar. Two ideal thermal boundary conditions were taken into account on the heated wall. The first one was an ideal isothermal boundary condition and the second one an ideal isoflux boundary condition. We observed different parameters like mean temperature and velocity, fluctuations of temperature and velocity, and auto-correlation functions.(author)

  14. Direct numerical simulation of vector-controlled free jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, K; Ao, K; Shakouchi, T; Ando, T

    2011-01-01

    We conduct DNS (direct numerical simulation) of vector controlled free jets. The inflow velocity of jet is periodically oscillated perpendicular to the jet axis. In order to realize the high accurate computation, a discretization in space is performed with hybrid scheme in which Fourier spectral and 6th order compact scheme are adopted. From visualized instantaneous vortex structures, it is found that the flow pattern considerably changes according to the oscillating frequency, i.e., according to the increasing the frequency, wave, bifurcating and flapping modes appear in turn. In order to quantify mixing efficiency under the vector control, as the mixing measure, statistical entropy is investigated. Compared to the uncontrolled jet, the mixing efficiency is improved in order of wavy, flapping and bifurcating modes. Thus the vector control can be expected for the improvement of mixing efficiency. Further to make clear the reason for the mixing enhancement, Snapshot POD and DMD method are applied. The primary flow structures under the vector control are demonstrated.

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Transition Due to Traveling Crossflow Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Duan, Lian

    2016-01-01

    Previous simulations of laminar breakdown mechanisms associated with stationary crossflow instability over a realistic swept-wing configuration are extended to investigate the alternate scenario of transition due to secondary instability of traveling crossflow modes. Earlier analyses based on secondary instability theory and parabolized stability equations have shown that this alternate scenario is viable when the initial amplitude of the most amplified mode of the traveling crossflow instability is greater than approximately 0.03 times the initial amplitude of the most amplified stationary mode. The linear growth predictions based on the secondary instability theory and parabolized stability equations agree well with the direct numerical simulation. Nonlinear effects are initially stabilizing but subsequently lead to a rapid growth followed by the onset of transition when the amplitude of the secondary disturbance exceeds a threshold value. Similar to the breakdown of stationary vortices, the transition zone is rather short and the boundary layer becomes completely turbulent across a distance of less than 15 times the boundary layer thickness at the completion of transition.

  16. DIPOLE COLLAPSE AND DYNAMO WAVES IN GLOBAL DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel [MAG (ENS/IPGP), LRA, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Petitdemange, Ludovic, E-mail: martin@schrinner.eu [Previously at Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. (Germany)

    2012-06-20

    Magnetic fields of low-mass stars and planets are thought to originate from self-excited dynamo action in their convective interiors. Observations reveal a variety of field topologies ranging from large-scale, axial dipoles to more structured magnetic fields. In this article, we investigate more than 70 three-dimensional, self-consistent dynamo models in the Boussinesq approximation obtained by direct numerical simulations. The control parameters, the aspect ratio, and the mechanical boundary conditions have been varied to build up this sample of models. Both strongly dipolar and multipolar models have been obtained. We show that these dynamo regimes in general can be distinguished by the ratio of a typical convective length scale to the Rossby radius. Models with a predominantly dipolar magnetic field were obtained, if the convective length scale is at least an order of magnitude larger than the Rossby radius. Moreover, we highlight the role of the strong shear associated with the geostrophic zonal flow for models with stress-free boundary conditions. In this case the above transition disappears and is replaced by a region of bistability for which dipolar and multipolar dynamos coexist. We interpret our results in terms of dynamo eigenmodes using the so-called test-field method. We can thus show that models in the dipolar regime are characterized by an isolated 'single mode'. Competing overtones become significant as the boundary to multipolar dynamos is approached. We discuss how these findings relate to previous models and to observations.

  17. Direct numerical simulations of evaporating droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    This work demonstrates direct numerical simulations of evaporating two phase flows, with applications to studying combustion in aircraft engines. Inside the engine, liquid fuel is injected into the combustion chamber where it atomizes into droplets and evaporates. Combustion occurs as the fuel vapor mixes with the surrounding flow of turbulent gas. Understanding combustion, therefore, requires studying evaporation in a turbulent flow and the resulting vapor distribution. We study the problem using a finite volume framework to solve the Navier-Stokes and scalar transport equations under a low-Mach assumption [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008]. The liquid-gas interface is tracked using a conservative level-set method [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008] which allows for a sharp reconstruction of the discontinuity across the interface. Special care is taken in the discretization of cells near the liquid-gas interface to ensure the stability and accuracy of the solution. Results are discussed for non-reacting simulations of liquid droplets evaporating into a turbulent field of inert gas.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of stratified gas-liquid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, P.; De Angelis, V.; Banerjee, S.

    1996-01-01

    Interactions through an interface between two turbulent flows play an important role in many environmental and industrial problems, e.g. in determining the coupling fluxes of heat mass and momentum, between the ocean and atmosphere, and in the design of gas-liquid contractors for the chemical industry, as well as in determining interactions between phases in nuclear transients that are accompanied by system voiding e.g. LOCAs. Here, the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the interaction of two turbulent fluids through a flat interface has been simulated. The flow and the temperature fields are computed using a pseudospectral method. This study shows that shear stress at the interface correlates well with the heat flux. Extensive analysis of the near interface turbulence structure has been performed using quadrant analysis. From this it is clear that gas-side sweeps dominate over the high shear stress regions. This suggests that simple parameterizations based on sweep frequency may be adequate for predictions of scalar transport rates

  19. Direct numerical simulation of free and forced square jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohil, Trushar B.; Saha, Arun K.; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Free square jet at Re = 500–2000 is studied using DNS. • Forced square jet at Re = 1000 subjected to varicose perturbation is also investigated at various forcing frequencies. • Vortex interactions within the jet and jet spreading are affected both for free and forced jets. • Perturbation at higher frequency shows axis-switching. - Abstract: Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of incompressible, spatially developing square jets in the Reynolds number range of 500–2000 is reported. The three-dimensional unsteady Navier–Stokes equations are solved using high order spatial and temporal discretization. The objective of the present work is to understand the evolution of free and forced square jets by examining the formation of large-scale structures. Coherent structures and related interactions of free jets suggest control strategies that can be used to achieve enhanced spreading and mixing of the jet with the surrounding fluid. The critical Reynolds number for the onset on unsteadiness in an unperturbed free square jet is found to be 875–900 while it reduces to the range 500–525 in the presence of small-scale perturbations. Disturbances applied at the flow inlet cause saturation of KH-instability and early transition to turbulence. Forced jet calculations have been carried out using varicose perturbation with amplitude of 15%, while frequency is independently varied. Simulations show that the initial development of the square jet is influenced by the four corners leading to the appearance hairpin structures along with the formation of vortex rings. Farther downstream, adjacent vortices strongly interact leading to their rapid breakup. Excitation frequencies in the range 0.4–0.6 cause axis-switching of the jet cross-section. Results show that square jets achieve greater spreading but are less controllable in comparison to the circular ones

  20. Direct numerical simulation of a NACA0012 in full stall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, I.; Lehmkuhl, O.; Borrell, R.; Oliva, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Coherent structures at transitional and supercritical wake modes are presented. • Vortex shedding is detected in both wake modes. • KH instabilities and vortex shedding frequencies are identified. • Low-frequency flapping of the shear-layer is also detected after stall. • Local pressure distribution at both AOA is coherent with experimental observations. -- Abstract: This work aims at investigating the mechanisms of separation and the transition to turbulence in the separated shear-layer of aerodynamic profiles, while at the same time to gain insight into coherent structures formed in the separated zone at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers. To do this, direct numerical simulations of the flow past a NACA0012 airfoil at Reynolds numbers Re = 50,000 (based on the free-stream velocity and the airfoil chord) and angles of attack AOA = 9.25° and AOA = 12° have been carried out. At low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, NACA0012 exhibits a combination of leading-edge/trailing-edge stall which causes the massive separation of the flow on the suction side of the airfoil. The initially laminar shear layer undergoes transition to turbulence and vortices formed are shed forming a von Kármán like vortex street in the airfoil wake. The main characteristics of this flow together with its main features, including power spectra of a set of selected monitoring probes at different positions on the suction side and in the wake of the airfoil are provided and discussed in detail

  1. An Evaluation of Java for Numerical Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Blount

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and implementation of high performance numerical software in Java. Our primary goals are to characterize the performance of object‐oriented numerical software written in Java and to investigate whether Java is a suitable language for such endeavors. We have implemented JLAPACK, a subset of the LAPACK library in Java. LAPACK is a high‐performance Fortran 77 library used to solve common linear algebra problems. JLAPACK is an object‐oriented library, using encapsulation, inheritance, and exception handling. It performs within a factor of four of the optimized Fortran version for certain platforms and test cases. When used with the native BLAS library, JLAPACK performs comparably with the Fortran version using the native BLAS library. We conclude that high‐performance numerical software could be written in Java if a handful of concerns about language features and compilation strategies are adequately addressed.

  2. Numerical characterization of nanopillar photonic crystal waveguides and directional couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chigrin, Dmitry N.; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.

    2005-01-01

    We numerically characterize a novel type of a photonic crystal waveguide, which consists of several rows of periodically arranged dielectric cylinders. In such a nanopillar photonic crystal waveguide, light confinement is due to the total internal reflection. A nanopillar waveguide is a multimode...

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation Sediment Transport in Horizontal Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    We numerically simulate turbulent flow in a horizontal plane channel over a bed of mobile particles. All scales of fluid motion are resolved without modeling and the phase interface is accurately represented. Our results indicate a possible scenario for the onset of erosion through collective motion induced by buffer-layer streaks. (Author) 27 refs

  4. Numerical Study on Fan Spray for Gasoline Direct Injection Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Shirabe, Naotaka; Sato, Takaaki; Murase, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    In gasoline direct injection engines, it is important to optimize fuel spray characteristics, which strongly affect stratified combustion process. Spray simulation is expected as a tool for optimizing the nozzle design. Conventional simulation method, how

  5. Numerical simulation of multi-directional random wave transformation in a yacht port

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qiaoling; Dong, Sheng; Zhao, Xizeng; Zhang, Guowei

    2012-09-01

    This paper extends a prediction model for multi-directional random wave transformation based on an energy balance equation by Mase with the consideration of wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection and breaking. This numerical model is improved by 1) introducing Wen's frequency spectrum and Mitsuyasu's directional function, which are more suitable to the coastal area of China; 2) considering energy dissipation caused by bottom friction, which ensures more accurate results for large-scale and shallow water areas; 3) taking into account a non-linear dispersion relation. Predictions using the extended wave model are carried out to study the feasibility of constructing the Ai Hua yacht port in Qingdao, China, with a comparison between two port layouts in design. Wave fields inside the port for different incident wave directions, water levels and return periods are simulated, and then two kinds of parameters are calculated to evaluate the wave conditions for the two layouts. Analyses show that Layout I is better than Layout II. Calculation results also show that the harbor will be calm for different wave directions under the design water level. On the contrary, the wave conditions do not wholly meet the requirements of a yacht port for ship berthing under the extreme water level. For safety consideration, the elevation of the breakwater might need to be properly increased to prevent wave overtopping under such water level. The extended numerical simulation model may provide an effective approach to computing wave heights in a harbor.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of solidification microstructures affected by fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juric, D.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of fluid flow on the solidification morphology of pure materials and solute microsegregation patterns of binary alloys are studied using a computational methodology based on a front tracking/finite difference method. A general single field formulation is presented for the full coupling of phase change, fluid flow, heat and solute transport. This formulation accounts for interfacial rejection/absorption of latent heat and solute, interfacial anisotropies, discontinuities in material properties between the liquid and solid phases, shrinkage/expansion upon solidification and motion and deformation of the solid. Numerical results are presented for the two dimensional dendritic solidification of pure succinonitrile and the solidification of globulitic grains of a plutonium-gallium alloy. For both problems, comparisons are made between solidification without fluid flow and solidification within a shear flow

  7. REPFLO model evaluation, physical and numerical consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.N.; Holland, D.H.

    1978-11-01

    This report contains a description of some suggested changes and an evaluation of the REPFLO computer code, which models ground-water flow and nuclear-waste migration in and about a nuclear-waste repository. The discussion contained in the main body of the report is supplemented by a flow chart, presented in the Appendix of this report. The suggested changes are of four kinds: (1) technical changes to make the code compatible with a wider variety of digital computer systems; (2) changes to fill gaps in the computer code, due to missing proprietary subroutines; (3) changes to (a) correct programming errors, (b) correct logical flaws, and (c) remove unnecessary complexity; and (4) changes in the computer code logical structure to make REPFLO a more viable model from the physical point of view

  8. Numerical implementation of a model with directional distortional hardening

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, René; Plešek, Jiří; Hrubý, Zbyněk; Parma, Slavomír; Feigenbaum, H. P.; Dafalias, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 12 (2015), 04015048-04015048 ISSN 0733-9399 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH14018; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20666S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : plasticity * directional distortional hardening * finite-element procedures Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.346, year: 2015 http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29EM.1943-7889.0000954

  9. Direct numerical simulation of incompressible multiphase flow with phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon Soo; Riaz, Amir; Aute, Vikrant

    2017-09-01

    Simulation of multiphase flow with phase change is challenging because of the potential for unphysical pressure oscillations, spurious velocity fields and mass flux errors across the interface. The resulting numerical errors may become critical when large density contrasts are present. To address these issues, we present a new approach for multiphase flow with phase change that features, (i) a smooth distribution of sharp velocity jumps and mass flux within a narrow region surrounding the interface, (ii) improved mass flux projection from the implicit interface onto the uniform Cartesian grid and (iii) post-advection velocity correction step to ensure accurate velocity divergence in interfacial cells. These new features are implemented in combination with a sharp treatment of the jumps in pressure and temperature gradient. A series of 1-D, 2-D, axisymmetric and 3-D problems are solved to verify the improvements afforded by the new approach. Axisymmetric film boiling results are also presented, which show good qualitative agreement with heat transfer correlations as well as experimental observations of bubble shapes.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of MHD flow with electrically conducting wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, S.; Kunugi, T.; Naito, N.; Sagara, A.

    2006-01-01

    The 2D vortex problem and 3D turbulent channel flow are treated numerically to assess the effect of electrically conducting walls on turbulent MHD flow. As a first approximation, the twin vortex pair is considered as a model of a turbulent eddy near the wall. As the eddy approaches and collides with the wall, a high value electrical potential is induced inside the wall. The Lorentz force, associated with the potential distribution, reduces the velocity gradient in the near-wall region. When considering a fully developed turbulent channel flow, a high electrical conductivity wall was chosen to emphasize the effect of electromagnetic coupling between the wall and the flow. The analysis was performed using DNS. The results are compared with a non-MHD flow and MHD flow in the insulated channel. The mean velocity within the logarithmic region in the case of the electrically conducting wall is slightly higher than that in the non-conducting wall case. Thus, the drag is smaller compared to that in the non-conducting wall case due to a reduction of the Reynolds stress in the near wall region through the Lorentz force. This mechanism is explained via reduction of the production term in the Reynolds shear stress budget

  11. Direct numerical simulation of water droplet coalescence in the oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Mehdi; Shahhosseini, Shahrokh; Bayat, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► VOF computational technique has been used to simulate coalescence of two water droplets in oil. ► The model was validated with the experimental data for binary droplet coalescence. ► Based on the CFD simulation results a correlation has been proposed to predict the coalescence time. - Abstract: Coalescence of two water droplets in the oil was simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The finite volume numerical method was applied to solve the Navier–Stokes equations in conjunction with the Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach for interface tracking. The effects of some parameters consisting of the collision velocity, off-center collision parameter, oil viscosity and water–oil interfacial tension on the coalescence time were investigated. The simulation results were validated against the experimental data available in the literature. The results revealed that quicker coalescence could be achieved if the head-on collisions occur or the droplets approach each other with a high velocity. In addition, low oil viscosities or large water–oil interfacial tensions cause less coalescence time. Moreover, a correlation was developed to predict coalescence efficiency as a function of the mentioned parameters.

  12. Numerical estimation of aircrafts' unsteady lateral-directional stability derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maričić N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique for predicting steady and oscillatory aerodynamic loads on general configuration has been developed. The prediction is based on the Doublet-Lattice Method, Slender Body Theory and Method of Images. The chord and span wise loading on lifting surfaces and longitudinal bodies (in horizontal and vertical plane load distributions are determined. The configuration may be composed of an assemblage of lifting surfaces (with control surfaces and bodies (with circular cross sections and a longitudinal variation of radius. Loadings predicted by this method are used to calculate (estimate steady and unsteady (dynamic lateral-directional stability derivatives. The short outline of the used methods is given in [1], [2], [3], [4] and [5]. Applying the described methodology software DERIV is developed. The obtained results from DERIV are compared to NASTRAN examples HA21B and HA21D from [4]. In the first example (HA21B, the jet transport wing (BAH wing is steady rolling and lateral stability derivatives are determined. In the second example (HA21D, lateral-directional stability derivatives are calculated for forward- swept-wing (FSW airplane in antisymmetric quasi-steady maneuvers. Acceptable agreement is achieved comparing the results from [4] and DERIV.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doom, Jeffrey Joseph

    This dissertation: (i) develops a novel numerical method for DNS/LES of compressible, turbulent reacting flows, (ii) performs several validation simulations, (iii) studies auto-ignition of a hydrogen vortex ring in air and (iv) studies a hydrogen/air turbulent diffusion flame. The numerical method is spatially non-dissipative, implicit and applicable over a range of Mach numbers. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are rescaled so that the zero Mach number equations are discretely recovered in the limit of zero Mach number. The dependent variables are co--located in space, and thermodynamic variables are staggered from velocity in time. The algorithm discretely conserves kinetic energy in the incompressible, inviscid, non--reacting limit. The chemical source terms are implicit in time to allow for stiff chemical mechanisms. The algorithm is readily applicable to complex chemical mechanisms. Good results are obtained for validation simulations. The algorithm is used to study auto-ignition in laminar vortex rings. A nine species, nineteen reaction mechanism for H2/air combustion proposed by Mueller et al. [37] is used. Diluted H 2 at ambient temperature (300 K) is injected into hot air. The simulations study the effect of fuel/air ratio, oxidizer temperature, Lewis number and stroke ratio (ratio of piston stroke length to diameter). Results show that auto--ignition occurs in fuel lean, high temperature regions with low scalar dissipation at a 'most reactive' mixture fraction, zeta MR (Mastorakos et al. [32]). Subsequent evolution of the flame is not predicted by zetaMR; a most reactive temperature TMR is defined and shown to predict both the initial auto-ignition as well as subsequent evolution. For stroke ratios less than the formation number, ignition in general occurs behind the vortex ring and propagates into the core. At higher oxidizer temperatures, ignition is almost instantaneous and occurs along the entire interface between fuel and oxidizer. For stroke

  14. Numerical investigations on unstable direct contact condensation of cryogenic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, K. N.; Arnab, Roy; Parthasarathi, Ghosh

    2017-02-01

    A typical problem of Direct Contact Condensation (DCC) occurs at the liquid oxygen (LOX) booster turbopump exit of oxidiser rich staged combustion cycle based semi-cryogenic rocket engines, where the hot gas mixture (predominantly oxygen and small amounts of combustion products) that runs the turbine mixes with LOX from the pump exit. This complex multiphase phenomena leads to the formation of solid CO2 & H2O, which is undesirable for the functioning of the main LOX turbopump. As a starting point for solving this complex problem, in this study, the hot gas mixture is taken as pure oxygen and hence, DCC of pure oxygen vapour jets in subcooled liquid oxygen is simulated using the commercial CFD package ANSYS CFX®. A two fluid model along with the thermal phase change model is employed for capturing the heat and mass transfer effects. The study mainly focuses on the subsonic DCC bubbling regime, which is reported as unstable with bubble formation, elongation, necking and collapsing effects. The heat transfer coefficients over a period of time have been computed and the various stages of bubbling have been analysed with the help of vapour volume fraction and pressure profiles. The results obtained for DCC of oxygen vapour-liquid mixtures is in qualitative agreement with the experimental results on DCC of steam-water mixtures.

  15. Numerical simulation of controlled directional solidification under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, S.; Roos, D.; Wein, J.

    The computer-assisted simulation of solidification processes influenced by gravity has gained increased importance during the previous years regarding ground-based as well as microgravity research. Depending on the specific needs of the investigator, the simulation model ideally covers a broad spectrum of applications. These primarily include the optimization of furnace design in interaction with selected process parameters to meet the desired crystallization conditions. Different approaches concerning the complexity of the simulation models as well as their dedicated applications will be discussed in this paper. Special emphasis will be put on the potential of software tools to increase the scientific quality and cost-efficiency of microgravity experimentation. The results gained so far in the context of TEXUS, FSLP, D-1 and D-2 (preparatory program) experiments, highlighting their simulation-supported preparation and evaluation will be discussed. An outlook will then be given on the possibilities to enhance the efficiency of pre-industrial research in the Columbus era through the incorporation of suitable simulation methods and tools.

  16. Memoization in Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balat, Vincent; Danvy, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    the functions and type-directed partial evaluation provides a convenient setting to obtain the normal form of their composition. However, off-the-shelf type-directed partial evaluation turns out to yield gigantic normal forms. We identify that this gigantism is due to redundancies, and that these redundancies...

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation of Oscillatory Flow Over a Wavy, Rough, and Permeable Bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuoli, Marco; Blondeaux, Paolo; Simeonov, Julian; Calantoni, Joseph

    2018-03-01

    The results of a direct numerical simulation of oscillatory flow over a wavy bottom composed of different layers of spherical particles are described. The amplitude of wavy bottom is much smaller in scale than typical bed forms such as sand ripples. The spherical particles are packed in such a way to reproduce a bottom profile observed during an experiment conducted in a laboratory flow tunnel with well-sorted coarse sand. The amplitude and period of the external forcing flow as well as the size of the particles are set equal to the experimental values and the computed velocity field is compared with the measured velocity profiles. The direct numerical simulation allows for the evaluation of quantities, which are difficult to measure in a laboratory experiment (e.g., vorticity, seepage flow velocity, and hydrodynamic force acting on sediment particles). In particular, attention is focused on the coherent vortex structures generated by the vorticity shed by both the spherical particles and the bottom waviness. Results show that the wavy bottom triggers transition to turbulence. Moreover, the forces acting on the spherical particles are computed to investigate the mechanisms through which they are possibly mobilized by the oscillatory flow. It was found that forces capable of mobilizing surface particles are strongly correlated with the particle position above the mean bed elevation and the passage of coherent vortices above them.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of non-premixed ethylene-air flames: Local flame extinction criterion

    KAUST Repository

    Lecoustre, Vivien R.; Arias, Paul G.; Roy, Somesh P.; Luo, Zhaoyu; Haworth, Daniel C.; Im, Hong G.; Lu, Tianfeng; Trouvé , Arnaud C.

    2014-01-01

    difference and explicit time integration schemes. The ethylene/air chemistry is simulated with a reduced mechanism that is generated based on the directed relation graph (DRG) based methods along with stiffness removal. The numerical configuration

  19. Numerical Study on the Tensile Behavior of 3D Four Directional Cylindrical Braided Composite Shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoqi; Wang, Jiayi; Hao, Wenfeng; Liu, Yinghua; Luo, Ying

    2017-10-01

    The tensile behavior of 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts was analyzed with the numerical method. The unit cell models for the 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts with various braiding angles were constructed with ABAQUS. Hashin's failure criterion was used to analyze the tensile strength and the damage evolution of the unit cells. The influence of the braiding angle on the tensile behavior of the 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts was analyzed. The numerical results showed that the tensile strength along the braiding direction increased as the braiding angle decreased. These results should play an integral role in the design of braiding composites shafts.

  20. Evaluation of wave runup predictions from numerical and parametric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Thompson, David M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    Wave runup during storms is a primary driver of coastal evolution, including shoreline and dune erosion and barrier island overwash. Runup and its components, setup and swash, can be predicted from a parameterized model that was developed by comparing runup observations to offshore wave height, wave period, and local beach slope. Because observations during extreme storms are often unavailable, a numerical model is used to simulate the storm-driven runup to compare to the parameterized model and then develop an approach to improve the accuracy of the parameterization. Numerically simulated and parameterized runup were compared to observations to evaluate model accuracies. The analysis demonstrated that setup was accurately predicted by both the parameterized model and numerical simulations. Infragravity swash heights were most accurately predicted by the parameterized model. The numerical model suffered from bias and gain errors that depended on whether a one-dimensional or two-dimensional spatial domain was used. Nonetheless, all of the predictions were significantly correlated to the observations, implying that the systematic errors can be corrected. The numerical simulations did not resolve the incident-band swash motions, as expected, and the parameterized model performed best at predicting incident-band swash heights. An assimilated prediction using a weighted average of the parameterized model and the numerical simulations resulted in a reduction in prediction error variance. Finally, the numerical simulations were extended to include storm conditions that have not been previously observed. These results indicated that the parameterized predictions of setup may need modification for extreme conditions; numerical simulations can be used to extend the validity of the parameterized predictions of infragravity swash; and numerical simulations systematically underpredict incident swash, which is relatively unimportant under extreme conditions.

  1. Numerical evaluation of high energy particle effects in magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.; Wu, Y.

    1994-03-01

    The interaction of high energy ions with magnetohydrodynamic modes is analyzed. A numerical code is developed which evaluates the contribution of the high energy particles to mode stability using orbit averaging of motion in either analytic or numerically generated equilibria through Hamiltonian guiding center equations. A dispersion relation is then used to evaluate the effect of the particles on the linear mode. Generic behavior of the solutions of the dispersion relation is discussed and dominant contributions of different components of the particle distribution function are identified. Numerical convergence of Monte-Carlo simulations is analyzed. The resulting code ORBIT provides an accurate means of comparing experimental results with the predictions of kinetic magnetohydrodynamics. The method can be extended to include self consistent modification of the particle orbits by the mode, and hence the full nonlinear dynamics of the coupled system

  2. Numerical evaluation of one-loop QCD amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Simon David; Biedermann, Benedikt; Uwer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present the publicly available program NGluon allowing the numerical evaluation of primitive amplitudes at one-loop order in massless QCD. The program allows the computation of one-loop amplitudes for an arbitrary number of gluons. The focus of the present article is the extension to one-loop ...

  3. Numerical evaluation of the tensor bispectrum in two field inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raveendran, Rathul Nath [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, HBNI, CIT Campus, Chennai, 600113 India (India); Sriramkumar, L., E-mail: rathulnr@imsc.res.in, E-mail: sriram@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, 600036 India (India)

    2017-07-01

    We evaluate the dimensionless non-Gaussianity parameter h {sub NL}, that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bispectrum, numerically for a class of two field inflationary models such as double inflation, hybrid inflation and aligned natural inflation. We compare the numerical results with the slow roll results which can be obtained analytically. In the context of double inflation, we also investigate the effects on h {sub NL} due to curved trajectories in the field space. We explicitly examine the validity of the consistency relation governing the tensor bispectrum in the squeezed limit. Lastly, we discuss the contribution to h {sub NL} due to the epoch of preheating in two field models.

  4. Numerical evaluation of the tensor bispectrum in two field inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveendran, Rathul Nath; Sriramkumar, L.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate the dimensionless non-Gaussianity parameter h NL , that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bispectrum, numerically for a class of two field inflationary models such as double inflation, hybrid inflation and aligned natural inflation. We compare the numerical results with the slow roll results which can be obtained analytically. In the context of double inflation, we also investigate the effects on h NL due to curved trajectories in the field space. We explicitly examine the validity of the consistency relation governing the tensor bispectrum in the squeezed limit. Lastly, we discuss the contribution to h NL due to the epoch of preheating in two field models.

  5. Calculation of radiation effects in solids by direct numerical solution of the adjoint transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, W.K.

    1998-01-01

    The 'adjoint transport equation in its integro-differential form' is derived for the radiation damage produced by atoms injected into solids. We reduce it to the one-dimensional form and prepare it for a numerical solution by: --discretizing the continuous variables energy, space and direction, --replacing the partial differential quotients by finite differences and --evaluating the collision integral by a double sum. By a proper manipulation of this double sum the adjoint transport equation turns into a (very large) set of linear equations with tridiagonal matrix which can be solved by a special (simple and fast) algorithm. The solution of this set of linear equations contains complete information on a specified damage type (e.g. the energy deposited in a volume V) in terms of the function D(i,E,c,x) which gives the damage produced by all particles generated in a cascade initiated by a particle of type i starting at x with energy E in direction c. It is essential to remark that one calculation gives the damage function D for the complete ranges of the variables {i,E,c and x} (for numerical reasons of course on grid-points in the {E,c,x}-space). This is most useful to applications where a general source-distribution S(i,E,c,x) of particles is given by the experimental setup (e.g. beam-window and and target in proton accelerator work. The beam-protons along their path through the window--or target material generate recoil atoms by elastic collisions or nuclear reactions. These recoil atoms form the particle source S). The total damage produced then is eventually given by: D = (Σ)i ∫ ∫ ∫ S(i, E, c, x)*D(i, E, c, x)*dE*dc*dx A Fortran-77 program running on a PC-486 was written for the overall procedure and applied to some problems

  6. Numerical evaluation of tensor Feynman integrals in Euclidean kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluza, J.; Kajda [Silesia Univ., Katowice (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Riemann, T.; Yundin, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    For the investigation of higher order Feynman integrals, potentially with tensor structure, it is highly desirable to have numerical methods and automated tools for dedicated, but sufficiently 'simple' numerical approaches. We elaborate two algorithms for this purpose which may be applied in the Euclidean kinematical region and in d=4-2{epsilon} dimensions. One method uses Mellin-Barnes representations for the Feynman parameter representation of multi-loop Feynman integrals with arbitrary tensor rank. Our Mathematica package AMBRE has been extended for that purpose, and together with the packages MB (M. Czakon) or MBresolve (A. V. Smirnov and V. A. Smirnov) one may perform automatically a numerical evaluation of planar tensor Feynman integrals. Alternatively, one may apply sector decomposition to planar and non-planar multi-loop {epsilon}-expanded Feynman integrals with arbitrary tensor rank. We automatized the preparations of Feynman integrals for an immediate application of the package sectordecomposition (C. Bogner and S. Weinzierl) so that one has to give only a proper definition of propagators and numerators. The efficiency of the two implementations, based on Mellin-Barnes representations and sector decompositions, is compared. The computational packages are publicly available. (orig.)

  7. Direct Calculation of Permeability by High-Accurate Finite Difference and Numerical Integration Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yi

    2016-07-21

    Velocity of fluid flow in underground porous media is 6~12 orders of magnitudes lower than that in pipelines. If numerical errors are not carefully controlled in this kind of simulations, high distortion of the final results may occur [1-4]. To fit the high accuracy demands of fluid flow simulations in porous media, traditional finite difference methods and numerical integration methods are discussed and corresponding high-accurate methods are developed. When applied to the direct calculation of full-tensor permeability for underground flow, the high-accurate finite difference method is confirmed to have numerical error as low as 10-5% while the high-accurate numerical integration method has numerical error around 0%. Thus, the approach combining the high-accurate finite difference and numerical integration methods is a reliable way to efficiently determine the characteristics of general full-tensor permeability such as maximum and minimum permeability components, principal direction and anisotropic ratio. Copyright © Global-Science Press 2016.

  8. Numerical investigation of natural gas direct injection properties and mixture formation in a spark ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollahi Bijan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a numerical model has been developed in AVL FIRE software to perform investigation of Direct Natural Gas Injection into the cylinder of Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines. In this regard two main parts have been taken into consideration, aiming to convert an MPFI gasoline engine to direct injection NG engine. In the first part of study multi-dimensional numerical simulation of transient injection process, mixing and flow field have been performed via three different validation cases in order to assure the numerical model validity of results. Adaption of such a modeling was found to be a challenging task because of required computational effort and numerical instabilities. In all cases present results were found to have excellent agreement with experimental and numerical results from literature. In the second part, using the moving mesh capability the validated model has been applied to methane Injection into the cylinder of a Direct Injection engine. Five different piston head shapes along with two injector types have been taken into consideration in investigations. A centrally mounted injector location has been adapted to all cases. The effects of injection parameters, combustion chamber geometry, injector type and engine RPM have been studied on mixing of air-fuel inside cylinder. Based on the results, suitable geometrical configuration for a NG DI Engine has been discussed.

  9. Pragmatics of type-directed partial evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    1996-01-01

    Type-directed partial evaluation stems from the residualization of static values in dynamic contexts, given their type and the type of their free variables. Its algorithm coincides with the algorithm for coercing a subtype value into a supertype value, which itself coincides with Berger and Schwi...

  10. Parameter estimation method that directly compares gravitational wave observations to numerical relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Boyle, M.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, T.; Clark, J. A.; Demos, N.; Fong, H.; Healy, J.; Hemberger, D. A.; Hinder, I.; Jani, K.; Khamesra, B.; Kidder, L. E.; Kumar, P.; Laguna, P.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Ossokine, S.; Pfeiffer, H.; Scheel, M. A.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.

    2017-11-01

    We present and assess a Bayesian method to interpret gravitational wave signals from binary black holes. Our method directly compares gravitational wave data to numerical relativity (NR) simulations. In this study, we present a detailed investigation of the systematic and statistical parameter estimation errors of this method. This procedure bypasses approximations used in semianalytical models for compact binary coalescence. In this work, we use the full posterior parameter distribution for only generic nonprecessing binaries, drawing inferences away from the set of NR simulations used, via interpolation of a single scalar quantity (the marginalized log likelihood, ln L ) evaluated by comparing data to nonprecessing binary black hole simulations. We also compare the data to generic simulations, and discuss the effectiveness of this procedure for generic sources. We specifically assess the impact of higher order modes, repeating our interpretation with both l ≤2 as well as l ≤3 harmonic modes. Using the l ≤3 higher modes, we gain more information from the signal and can better constrain the parameters of the gravitational wave signal. We assess and quantify several sources of systematic error that our procedure could introduce, including simulation resolution and duration; most are negligible. We show through examples that our method can recover the parameters for equal mass, zero spin, GW150914-like, and unequal mass, precessing spin sources. Our study of this new parameter estimation method demonstrates that we can quantify and understand the systematic and statistical error. This method allows us to use higher order modes from numerical relativity simulations to better constrain the black hole binary parameters.

  11. Direct numerical solution of Poisson's equation in cylindrical (r, z) coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, E.H.; Paul, S.F.; Davidson, R.C.; Fine, K.S.

    1997-01-01

    A direct solver method is developed for solving Poisson's equation numerically for the electrostatic potential φ(r,z) in a cylindrical region (r wall , 0 wall , z) are specified, and ∂φ/∂z = 0 at the axial boundaries (z = 0, L)

  12. Comparison of direct numerical simulation databases of turbulent channel flow at $Re_{\\tau}$ = 180

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreman, A.W.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases are compared to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of standard and non-standard turbulence statistics of incompressible plane channel flow at $Re_{\\tau}$ = 180. Two fundamentally different DNS codes are shown to produce maximum relative deviations

  13. Comparison of direct numerical simulation databases of turbulent channel flow at Re = 180

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreman, A.W.; Kuerten, J.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases are compared to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of standard and non-standard turbulence statistics of incompressible plane channel flow at Re t = 180. Two fundamentally different DNS codes are shown to produce maximum relative deviations below 0.2%

  14. A three–step discretization scheme for direct numerical solution of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a three-step discretization (numerical) formula is developed for direct integration of second-order initial value problems in ordinary differential equations. The development of the method and analysis of its basic properties adopt Taylor series expansion and Dahlquist stability test methods. The results show that ...

  15. Direct numerical simulation of non-isothermal flow through dense bidisperse random arrays of spheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavassoli Estahbanati, H.; Peters, E.A.J.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive direct numerical simulations were performed to obtain the heat transfer coefficients (HTC) of bidisperse random arrays of spheres. We have calculated the HTC for a range of compositions and solids volume fractions for mixtures of spheres with a size ratio of 1:2. The Reynolds numbers are

  16. Direct design of LPV feedback controllers: technical details and numerical examples

    OpenAIRE

    Novara, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The paper contains technical details of recent results developed by the author, regarding the design of LPV controllers directly from experimental data. Two numerical examples are also presented, about control of the Duffing oscillator and control of a two-degree-of-freedom manipulator.

  17. Direct numerical simulations of flow and heat transfer over a circular cylinder at Re = 2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidya, Mahening Citra; Beishuizen, N.A.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady direct numerical simulations of the flow around a circular cylinder have been performed at Re = 2000. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations were validated with laminar cold flow simulations and experiments. Heat transfer simulations were carried out and the time-averaged

  18. Analysis of macroscopic and microscopic rotating motions in rotating jets: A direct numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A direct numerical simulation study of the characteristics of macroscopic and microscopic rotating motions in swirling jets confined in a rectangular flow domain is carried out. The different structures of vortex cores for different swirl levels are illustrated. It is found that the vortex cores of low swirl flows are of regular cylindrical-helix patterns, whereas those of the high swirl flows are characterized by the formation of the bubble-type vortex breakdown followed by the radiant processing vortex cores. The results of mean velocity fields show the general procedures of vortex origination. Moreover, the effects of macroscopic and microscopic rotating motions with respect to the mean and fluctuation fields of the swirling flows are evaluated. The microscopic rotating effects, especially the effects with respect to the turbulent fluctuation motion, are increasingly intermittent with the increase in the swirl levels. In contrast, the maximum value of the probability density functions with respect to the macroscopic rotating effects of the fluctuation motion occurs at moderate swirl levels since the macroscopic rotating effects are attenuated by the formation of the bubble vortex breakdown with a region of stagnant fluids at supercritical swirl levels.

  19. Electrokinetic Particle Transport in Micro-Nanofluidics Direct Numerical Simulation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Shizhi

    2012-01-01

    Numerous applications of micro-/nanofluidics are related to particle transport in micro-/nanoscale channels, and electrokinetics has proved to be one of the most promising tools to manipulate particles in micro/nanofluidics. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of electrokinetic particle transport in micro-/nanoscale channels is crucial to the development of micro/nano-fluidic devices. Electrokinetic Particle Transport in Micro-/Nanofluidics: Direct Numerical Simulation Analysis provides a fundamental understanding of electrokinetic particle transport in micro-/nanofluidics involving elect

  20. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of electromagnetically driven multiscale shallow layer flows: Numerical modeling and physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeau, Sylvain; Ferrari, Simone; Rossi, Lionel

    2008-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulations of a flow driven by multiscale electromagnetic forcing are performed in order to reproduce with maximum accuracy the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) flow generated by the same multiscale forcing in the laboratory. The method presented is based on a 3D description of the flow and the electromagnetic forcing. Very good agreements between our simulations and the experiments are found both on velocity and acceleration field, this last comparison being, to our knowledge, done for the first time. Such agreement requires that both experiments and simulations are carefully performed and, more importantly, that the underlying simplification to model the experiments and the multiscale electromagnetic forcing do not introduce significant errors. The results presented in this paper differ significantly from previous 2D direct numerical simulation in which a classical linear Rayleigh friction modeling term was used to mimic the effect of the wall-normal friction. Indeed, purely 2D simulations are found to underestimate the Reynolds number and, due to the dominance of nonhomogeneous bottom friction, lead to the wrong physical mechanism. For the range of conditions presented in this paper, the Reynolds number, defined by the ratio between acceleration and viscous terms, remains the order of unity, and the Hartmann number, defined by the ratio between electromagnetic force terms and viscous terms, is about 2. The main conclusion is that 3D simulations are required to model the (3D) electromagnetic forces and the wall-normal shear. Indeed, even if the flow is quasi-2D in terms of energy, a full 3D approach is required to simulate these shallow layer flows driven by multiscale electromagnetic forcing. In the range of forcing intensity investigated in this paper, these multiscale flows remain quasi-2D, with negligible energy in the wall-normal velocity component. It is also shown that the driving terms are the electromagnetic forcing and

  1. Direct numerical simulation of granular flows with fluid; Simulation numerique directe d'ecoulements granulaires en presence de fluide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiwes, V.

    1999-09-01

    Numerical models applied to simulation of granular flow with fluid are developed. The physical model selected to describe particles flow is a discrete approach. Particle trajectories are calculated by the Newton law and collision is describe by a soft-sphere approach. The fluid flow is modelled by Navier-Stokes equations. The modelling of the momentum transfer depends on the resolution scale: for a scale of the order of the particle diameter, it is modelled by a drag-law and for a scale smaller than the particle diameter, it is directly calculated by stress tensor computation around particles. The direct model is used to find representative elementary volume and prove the local character of the Ergun's law. This application shows the numerical (mesh size), physical (Reynolds number) and computational (CPU time and memory consumptions) limitations. The drag law model and the direct model are validated with analytical and empirical solutions and compared. For the two models, the CPU time and the memory consumptions are discussed. The drag law model is applied to the simulation of gas-solid dense fluidized-beds. In the case of uniform gas distribution, the fluidized-bed simulation heights are compared to experimental data for particle of group A and B of the Geldart classification. (author)

  2. Numerical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boumaza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transient convection heat transfer is of fundamental interest in many industrial and environmental situations, as well as in electronic devices and security of energy systems. Transient fluid flow problems are among the more difficult to analyze and yet are very often encountered in modern day technology. The main objective of this research project is to carry out a theoretical and numerical analysis of transient convective heat transfer in vertical flows, when the thermal field is due to different kinds of variation, in time and space of some boundary conditions, such as wall temperature or wall heat flux. This is achieved by the development of a mathematical model and its resolution by suitable numerical methods, as well as performing various sensitivity analyses. These objectives are achieved through a theoretical investigation of the effects of wall and fluid axial conduction, physical properties and heat capacity of the pipe wall on the transient downward mixed convection in a circular duct experiencing a sudden change in the applied heat flux on the outside surface of a central zone.

  3. Direct numerical simulation and modeling of turbulent natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjemadi, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are the direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot and the improvements of second-order turbulence modelling. A three-dimensional direct numerical simulation code has been developed in order to gain a better understanding of turbulence properties in natural convection flows. This code has been validated in several physical configurations: non-stratified natural convection flows (conduction solution), stratified natural convection flows (double boundary layer solution), transitional and turbulent Poiseuille flows. For the conduction solution, the turbulent regime was reached at a Rayleigh number of 1*10 5 and 5.4*10 5 . A detailed analysis of these results has revealed the principal qualities of the available models but has also pointed our their shortcomings. This data base has been used in order to improve the triple correlations transport models and to select the turbulent time scales suitable for such flows. (author). 122 refs., figs., tabs., 4 appends

  4. Parallel spatial direct numerical simulations on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1993-01-01

    The implementation and performance of a parallel spatial direct numerical simulation (PSDNS) approach on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube is documented. The direct numerical simulation approach is used to compute spatially evolving disturbances associated with the laminar-to-turbulent transition in boundary-layer flows. The feasibility of using the PSDNS on the hypercube to perform transition studies is examined. The results indicate that the direct numerical simulation approach can effectively be parallelized on a distributed-memory parallel machine. By increasing the number of processors nearly ideal linear speedups are achieved with nonoptimized routines; slower than linear speedups are achieved with optimized (machine dependent library) routines. This slower than linear speedup results because the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) routine dominates the computational cost and because the routine indicates less than ideal speedups. However with the machine-dependent routines the total computational cost decreases by a factor of 4 to 5 compared with standard FORTRAN routines. The computational cost increases linearly with spanwise wall-normal and streamwise grid refinements. The hypercube with 32 processors was estimated to require approximately twice the amount of Cray supercomputer single processor time to complete a comparable simulation; however it is estimated that a subgrid-scale model which reduces the required number of grid points and becomes a large-eddy simulation (PSLES) would reduce the computational cost and memory requirements by a factor of 10 over the PSDNS. This PSLES implementation would enable transition simulations on the hypercube at a reasonable computational cost.

  5. Computational Enhancements for Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Mukhadiyev, Nurzhan

    2017-05-01

    Combustion at extreme conditions, such as a turbulent flame at high Karlovitz and Reynolds numbers, is still a vast and an uncertain field for researchers. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent flame is a superior tool to unravel detailed information that is not accessible to most sophisticated state-of-the-art experiments. However, the computational cost of such simulations remains a challenge even for modern supercomputers, as the physical size, the level of turbulence intensity, and chemical complexities of the problems continue to increase. As a result, there is a strong demand for computational cost reduction methods as well as in acceleration of existing methods. The main scope of this work was the development of computational and numerical tools for high-fidelity direct numerical simulations of premixed planar flames interacting with turbulence. The first part of this work was KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flow Solver (KARFS) development. KARFS is a high order compressible reacting flow solver using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism; it is capable to run on various types of heterogeneous computational architectures. In this work, it was shown that KARFS is capable of running efficiently on both CPU and GPU. The second part of this work was numerical tools for direct numerical simulations of planar premixed flames: such as linear turbulence forcing and dynamic inlet control. DNS of premixed turbulent flames conducted previously injected velocity fluctuations at an inlet. Turbulence injected at the inlet decayed significantly while reaching the flame, which created a necessity to inject higher than needed fluctuations. A solution for this issue was to maintain turbulence strength on the way to the flame using turbulence forcing. Therefore, a linear turbulence forcing was implemented into KARFS to enhance turbulence intensity. Linear turbulence forcing developed previously by other groups was corrected with net added momentum removal mechanism to prevent mean

  6. Factors influencing undergraduates' self-evaluation of numerical competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Vicki N.; Durrani, Naureen

    2012-04-01

    This empirical study explores factors influencing undergraduates' self-evaluation of their numerical competence, using data from an online survey completed by 566 undergraduates from a diversity of academic disciplines, across all four faculties at a post-1992 UK university. Analysis of the data, which included correlation and multiple regression analyses, revealed that undergraduates exhibiting greater confidence in their mathematical and numeracy skills, as evidenced by their higher self-evaluation scores and their higher scores on the confidence sub-scale contributing to the measurement of attitude, possess more cohesive, rather than fragmented, conceptions of mathematics, and display more positive attitudes towards mathematics/numeracy. They also exhibit lower levels of mathematics anxiety. Students exhibiting greater confidence also tended to be those who were relatively young (i.e. 18-29 years), whose degree programmes provided them with opportunities to practise and further develop their numeracy skills, and who possessed higher pre-university mathematics qualifications. The multiple regression analysis revealed two positive predictors (overall attitude towards mathematics/numeracy and possession of a higher pre-university mathematics qualification) and five negative predictors (mathematics anxiety, lack of opportunity to practise/develop numeracy skills, being a more mature student, being enrolled in Health and Social Care compared with Science and Technology, and possessing no formal mathematics/numeracy qualification compared with a General Certificate of Secondary Education or equivalent qualification) accounted for approximately 64% of the variation in students' perceptions of their numerical competence. Although the results initially suggested that male students were significantly more confident than females, one compounding variable was almost certainly the students' highest pre-university mathematics or numeracy qualification, since a higher

  7. Memoization in Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balat, Vincent; Danvy, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    We use a code generator—type-directed partial evaluation— to verify conversions between isomorphic types, or more precisely to verify that a composite function is the identity function at some complicated type. A typed functional language such as ML provides a natural support to express the funct......We use a code generator—type-directed partial evaluation— to verify conversions between isomorphic types, or more precisely to verify that a composite function is the identity function at some complicated type. A typed functional language such as ML provides a natural support to express...... originate in the handling of sums, which uses delimited continuations. We successfully eliminate these redundancies by extending type-directed partial evaluation with memoization capabilities. The result only works for pure functional programs, but it provides an unexpected use of code generation...... and it yields orders-of-magnitude improvements both in time and in space for type isomorphisms. Basic Research in Computer Science (www. brics. dk), funded by the Danish National Research Foundation....

  8. Numerical Prediction of a Bi-Directional Micro Thermal Flow Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Amayrah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal flow sensors such as hot-wire anemometer (HWA can be used to measure the flow velocity with certain accuracy. However, HWA can measure the flow velocity without determining the flow direction. Pulsed-Wire Anemometer (PWA with 3 wires can be used to measure flow velocity and flow directions. The present study aims to develop a numerical analysis of unsteady flow around a pulsed hot-wire anemometer using three parallel wires. The pulsed wire which is called the heated wire is located in the middle and the two sensor wires are installed upstream and downstream of the pulsed wire. 2-D numerical models were built and simulated using different wires arrangements. The ratio of the separation distance between the heated wire and sensor wire (x to the diameter of the heated wire (D ratios (x/D was varied between 3.33 and 183.33. The output results are plotted as a function of Peclet number (convection time / diffusion time. It was found that as the ratio of x/D increases, the sensitivity of PWA device to the time of flight decreases. But at the same the reading of the time of flight becomes more accurate, because the effects of the diffusion and wake after the heated wire decrease. Also, a very good agreement has been obtained between the present numerical simulation and the previous experimental data.

  9. Enhancing performance in numerical magnitude processing and mental arithmetic using transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias U. Hauser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to accurately process numerical magnitudes and solve mental arithmetic is of highest importance for schooling and professional career. Although impairments in these domains in disorders such as developmental dyscalculia (DD are highly detrimental, remediation is still sparse. In recent years, transcranial brain stimulation methods such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS have been suggested as a treatment for various neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC is known to be crucially involved in numerical magnitude processing and mental arithmetic. In this study, we evaluated whether tDCS has a beneficial effect on numerical magnitude processing and mental arithmetic. Due to the unclear lateralization, we stimulated the left, right as well as both hemispheres simultaneously in two experiments. We found that left anodal tDCS significantly enhanced performance in a number comparison and a subtraction task, while bilateral and right anodal tDCS did not induce any improvements compared to sham. Our findings demonstrate that the left PPC is causally involved in numerical magnitude processing and mental arithmetic. Furthermore, we show that these cognitive functions can be enhanced by means of tDCS. These findings encourage to further investigate the beneficial effect of tDCS in the domain of mathematics in healthy and impaired humans.

  10. Three-dimensional transition in the wake of a circular cylinder by direct numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S. J.; Mo, J. O.; Lee, Y. H.; Tanahashi, M.; Miyauchi, T.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional time-dependent flow past a circular cylinder is numerically investigated using direct numerical simulation for Reynolds number 280 and 300. The higher-order finite difference scheme is employed for the spatial distributions along with the second order Adams-Bashforth and the first order backward-Euler time integration. In x-y plane, the convection term is applied by the 5th order upwind scheme and the pressure and viscosity terms are applied by the 4th order central difference. And in spanwise, Navier-Stokes equation is distributed using of spectral method. At Reynolds number 259 the two-dimensional wake becomes linearly unstable to a second branch of modes with wavelength about 1.0 diameters at onset (B-mode). Present results of three-dimensional effects of in wake of a circular cylinder is represented with spanwise and streamwise vorticity contours as Reynolds numbers

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Noise Generation from the Nozzle Wall of a Hypersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junji; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan; Missouri Univ of Sci; Tech Team; NASA Langley Research Center Team

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the acoustic noise generation from the turbulent boundary layer on the nozzle wall of a Mach 6 Ludwieg Tube. The emphasis is on characterizing the freestream acoustic pressure disturbances radiated from the nozzle-wall turbulent boundary layer and comparing it with acoustic noise generated from a single, flat wall in an unconfined setting at a similar freestream Mach number to assess the effects of noise reverberation. In particular, the numerical database is used to provide insights into the pressure disturbance spectrum and amplitude scaling with respect to the boundary-layer parameters as well as to understand the acoustic source mechanisms. Such information is important for characterizing the freestream disturbance environment in conventional (i.e., noisy) hypersonic wind tunnels. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0170.

  12. Numerical Evaluation of a Light-Gas Gun Facility for Impact Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rahner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tests which match the application conditions might be used to properly evaluate materials for specific applications. High velocity impacts can be simulated using light-gas gun facilities, which come in different types and complexities. In this work different setups for a one-stage light-gas gun facility have been numerically analyzed in order to evaluate their suitability for testing materials and composites used as armor protection. A maximal barrel length of 6 m and a maximal reservoir pressure of a standard industrial gas bottle (20 MPa were chosen as limitations. The numerical predictions show that it is not possible to accelerate the projectile directly to the desired velocity with nitrogen, helium, or hydrogen as propellant gas. When using a sabot corresponding to a higher bore diameter, the necessary velocity is achievable with helium and hydrogen gases.

  13. A theoretical and numerical study of polarimetric scattering and emission from random rough surfaces with anisotropic directional spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, theoretical and numerical results of the polarimetric scattering and emission from random rough surfaces with anisotropic directional spectrum are presented for the remote sensing of ocean and soil surfaces. The polarimetric scattered field for rough dielectric surfaces is derived to the second order by the small perturbation method (SPM). It is found that the second-order scattered field is coherent in nature, and its coefficients for different polarizations present the lowest-order corrections to the Fresnel reflection coefficients of the surfaces. In addition, the cross-polarized (HV and VH) components of the coherent fields are reciprocal and not zero for surfaces with anisotropic directional spectrum when the azimuth angle of the incident direction is not aligned with the symmetry directions of surfaces. In order to verify the energy conservation condition of the theoretical results, which is important if the theory is to be applied to the passive polarimetry of rough surfaces, a Monte Carlo simulation is performed to numerically calculate the polarimetric reflectivities of one-dimensional random rough surfaces which are generated with a prescribed power-law spectrum in the spectral domain and transformed to the spatial domain by the FFT. The surfaces simulated by this approach are periodic with the period corresponding to the low-wavenumber cutoff. To calculate the scattering from periodic dielectric surfaces, the authors present a new numerical technique which applies the Floquet theorem to reduce the problem to one period and does not require the evaluation of one-dimensional periodic Green's function used in the conventional method of moment formulation. Once the scattering coefficients are obtained, the polarimetric Stokes vectors for the emission from the random surfaces are then calculated according to the Kirchhoff's law and are illustrated as functions of relative azimuth observation and row directions. The second-order SPM is also

  14. A Numerical Implementation of a Nonlinear Mild Slope Model for Shoaling Directional Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Davis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the numerical implementation of a phase-resolving, nonlinear spectral model for shoaling directional waves over a mild sloping beach with straight parallel isobaths. The model accounts for non-linear, quadratic (triad wave interactions as well as shoaling and refraction. The model integrates the coupled, nonlinear hyperbolic evolution equations that describe the transformation of the complex Fourier amplitudes of the deep-water directional wave field. Because typical directional wave spectra (observed or produced by deep-water forecasting models such as WAVEWATCH III™ do not contain phase information, individual realizations are generated by associating a random phase to each Fourier mode. The approach provides a natural extension to the deep-water spectral wave models, and has the advantage of fully describing the shoaling wave stochastic process, i.e., the evolution of both the variance and higher order statistics (phase correlations, the latter related to the evolution of the wave shape. The numerical implementation (a Fortran 95/2003 code includes unidirectional (shore-perpendicular propagation as a special case. Interoperability, both with post-processing programs (e.g., MATLAB/Tecplot 360 and future model coupling (e.g., offshore wave conditions from WAVEWATCH III™, is promoted by using NetCDF-4/HD5 formatted output files. The capabilities of the model are demonstrated using a JONSWAP spectrum with a cos2s directional distribution, for shore-perpendicular and oblique propagation. The simulated wave transformation under combined shoaling, refraction and nonlinear interactions shows the expected generation of directional harmonics of the spectral peak and of infragravity (frequency <0.05 Hz waves. Current development efforts focus on analytic testing, development of additional physics modules essential for applications and validation with laboratory and field observations.

  15. Quasi-direct numerical simulation of a pebble bed configuration, Part-II: Temperature field analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shams, A.; Roelofs, F.; Komen, E.M.J.; Baglietto, E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNSs) of a pebble bed configuration have been performed. ► This q-DNS database may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. ► A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data throughout the computational domain has been generated. ► Results for mean, RMS of temperature and respective turbulent heat fluxes are extensively reported in this paper. -- Abstract: Good prediction of the flow and heat transfer phenomena in the pebble bed core of a high temperature reactor (HTR) is a challenge for available turbulence models, which still require to be validated. While experimental data are generally desirable in this validation process, due to the complex geometric configuration and measurement difficulties, a very limited amount of data is currently available. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is considered an accurate simulation technique, which may serve as an alternative for validating turbulence models. In the framework of the present study, quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a single face cubic centered pebble bed is performed, which will serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches in order to perform calculations for a randomly arranged pebble bed. These simulations were performed at a Reynolds number of 3088, based on pebble diameter, with a porosity level of 0.42. Results related to flow field (mean, RMS and covariance of velocity) have been presented in Part-I, whereas, in the present article, we focus our attention to the analysis of the temperature field. A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data for the thermal field (mean, RMS and turbulent heat flux) has been generated

  16. Direct numerical simulations of fluid flow, heat transfer and phase changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juric, D.; Tryggvason, G.; Han, J.

    1997-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of fluid flow, heat transfer, and phase changes are presented. The simulations are made possible by a recently developed finite difference/front tracking method based on the one-field formulation of the governing equations where a single set of conservation equations is written for all the phases involved. The conservation equations are solved on a fixed rectangular grid, but the phase boundaries are kept sharp by tracking them explicitly by a moving grid of lower dimension. The method is discussed and applications to boiling heat transfer and the solidification of drops colliding with a wall are shown.

  17. From neutron Compton profiles to momentum distribution: Assessment of direct numerical determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senesi, R.; Flammini, D.; Romanelli, G.; Andreani, C.

    2013-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering at high momentum transfers, in the neutron Compton scattering regime, provides an access to the neutron Compton profiles, the analogous of Compton profiles in X-ray scattering. The line shape analysis of the neutron Compton profiles is usually carried out making use of multiparametric nonlinear fitting, garnering detailed information about the momentum distribution of the target atoms. This paper presents the proposal to directly determine numerically the momentum distribution from the profiles, thus eliminating the possible instabilities present in multiparametric fitting. A comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and with previous measurements on polycrystalline ice provides quantitative assessments of the proposed method

  18. Direct numerical simulation of 3D particle motion in an evaporating liquid film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ho Chan; Son, Gi Hun

    2016-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation method is developed for 3D particle motion in liquid film evaporation. The liquid-gas and fluid-solid interfaces are tracked by a sharp-interface Level-set (LS) method, which includes the effects of evaporation, contact line and solid particles. The LS method is validated through simulation of the interaction between two particles falling in a single-phase fluid. The LS based DNS method is applied to computation of the particle motion in liquid film evaporation to investigate the particle-interface and particle-particle interactions

  19. Numerical evaluation of cracked pipes under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, M.; Jamet, P.

    1989-01-01

    In order to apply the leak-before-break concept to piping systems, the behavior of cracked pipes under dynamic, and especially seismic, loadings must be studied. A simple finite element model of a cracked pipe has been developed and implemented in the general purpose computer code CASTEM 2000. The model is a generalization of the approach proposed by Paris and Tada (1). Considered loads are bending moment and axial force (representing thermal expansion and internal pressure.) The elastic characteristics of the model are determined using the Zahoor formulae for the geometry-dependent factors. Owing to the material behabior plasticity must be taken into account. To represent the crack growth, the material is defined by two characteristic values: J 1c which is the level of energy corresponding to crack initiation and the tearing modulus, T, which governs the length of propagation of the crack. For dynamic loads, unilateral conditions are imposed to represent crack closure. The model has been used for the design of dynamic tests to be conducted on shaking tables. Test principle is briefly described and numerical results are presented. Finally evaluation of margin, due to plasticity, in comparison with the standard design procedure is made

  20. The development of an erosive burning model for solid rocket motors using direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Brian A.

    A method for developing an erosive burning model for use in solid propellant design-and-analysis interior ballistics codes is described and evaluated. Using Direct Numerical Simulation, the primary mechanisms controlling erosive burning (turbulent heat transfer, and finite rate reactions) have been studied independently through the development of models using finite rate chemistry, and infinite rate chemistry. Both approaches are calibrated to strand burn rate data by modeling the propellant burning in an environment with no cross-flow, and adjusting thermophysical properties until the predicted regression rate matches test data. Subsequent runs are conducted where the cross-flow is increased from M = 0.0 up to M = 0.8. The resulting relationship of burn rate increase versus Mach Number is used in an interior ballistics analysis to compute the chamber pressure of an existing solid rocket motor. The resulting predictions are compared to static test data. Both the infinite rate model and the finite rate model show good agreement when compared to test data. The propellant considered is an AP/HTPB with an average AP particle size of 37 microns. The finite rate model shows that as the cross-flow increases, near wall vorticity increases due to the lifting of the boundary caused by the side injection of gases from the burning propellant surface. The point of maximum vorticity corresponds to the outer edge of the APd-binder flame. As the cross-flow increases, the APd-binder flame thickness becomes thinner; however, the point of highest reaction rate moves only slightly closer to the propellant surface. As such, the net increase of heat transfer to the propellant surface due to finite rate chemistry affects is small. This leads to the conclusion that augmentation of thermal transport properties and the resulting heat transfer increase due to turbulence dominates over combustion chemistry in the erosive burning problem. This conclusion is advantageous in the development of

  1. Numerical simulation of the effect of dissipation and phase fluctuation in a direct communication scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fu; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zhang, Jun-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the direct counterfactual communication protocol, proposed by Salih et al (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 170502) using a single photon source under ideal conditions (no dissipation, no phase fluctuation and an infinite number of beam splitters), has attracted much interest from a broad range of scientists. In order to put the direct communication protocol into a realistic framework, we numerically simulate the effect of the dissipation and the phase fluctuation with a finite number of beam splitters. Our calculation shows that the dissipation and phase fluctuation will dramatically decrease the reliability and the efficiency of communication, and even corrupt the communication. To counteract the negative effect of dissipation, we propose the balanced dissipation method, which substantially improves the reliability of the protocol at the expense of decreasing communication efficiency. Meanwhile, our theoretical derivation shows that the reliability and efficiency of communication are independent of the input state: a single photon state or a coherent state. (paper)

  2. Numerical simulation of the effect of dissipation and phase fluctuation in a direct communication scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu; Zhang, Jun-Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the direct counterfactual communication protocol, proposed by Salih et al (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 170502) using a single photon source under ideal conditions (no dissipation, no phase fluctuation and an infinite number of beam splitters), has attracted much interest from a broad range of scientists. In order to put the direct communication protocol into a realistic framework, we numerically simulate the effect of the dissipation and the phase fluctuation with a finite number of beam splitters. Our calculation shows that the dissipation and phase fluctuation will dramatically decrease the reliability and the efficiency of communication, and even corrupt the communication. To counteract the negative effect of dissipation, we propose the balanced dissipation method, which substantially improves the reliability of the protocol at the expense of decreasing communication efficiency. Meanwhile, our theoretical derivation shows that the reliability and efficiency of communication are independent of the input state: a single photon state or a coherent state.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of the passive scalar field in a two-dimensional turbulent channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasagi, N.; Tomita, Y.; Kuroda, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the fully developed thermal field in a two-dimensional turbulent channel flow of air that was carried out. The iso-flux condition is imposed on the walls so that the local mean temperature linearly increases in the streamwise direction. The computation was executed on 1,589,248 grid points by using a spectral method. The statistics obtained include rms velocity and temperature fluctuations, Reynolds stresses, turbulent heat fluxes and other higher order correlations. They are compared mainly with the DNS data obtained by Kim and Moin (1987) and Kim (1987) in a higher Reynolds number flow with isothermal walls. Agreement between these two results is generally good. Each term in the budget equations of temperature variance, its dissipation rate and turbulent heat fluxes is also calculated in order to establish a data base of convective heat transfer for thermal turbulence modeling

  4. A method for the direct generation of comprehensive numerical solar building transfer functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.Y. [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (China). Dept. of Building Services Engineering

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a method for the direct generation of comprehensive numerical room transfer functions with any derived parameters as output, such as operative temperature or thermal load. Complex conductive, convective and radiant heat transfer processes, or any derived thermal parameters in buildings can be explicitly and precisely described by a generalized thermal network. This allows the s-transfer and z-transfer functions to be directly generated, using semi-symbolic analysis techniques, Cayley's expansion of determinant and Heaviside's expansion theorem. A simple algorithm is developed for finding the roots of the denominator in the inverse transform of the s-transfer functions, which ensures that no single root is missing. The techniques have been applied to generating the transfer functions of a passive solar room with floor heating. The example calculation demonstrates the high efficiency of the computational method. (author)

  5. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a vertical thin disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Yin; He, Xiao-Zhou; Yik, Hiu-Fai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Schumacher, Jorg; Tong, Penger

    2017-11-01

    We report a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a thin vertical disk with a high-order spectral element method code NEK5000. An unstructured mesh is used to adapt the turbulent flow in the thin disk and to ensure that the mesh sizes satisfy the refined Groetzbach criterion and a new criterion for thin boundary layers proposed by Shishkina et al. The DNS results for the mean and variance temperature profiles in the thermal boundary layer region are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of the new boundary layer models proposed by Shishkina et al. and Wang et al.. Furthermore, we numerically calculate the five budget terms in the boundary layer equation, which are difficult to measure in experiment. The DNS results agree well with the theoretical predictions by Wang et al. Our numerical work thus provides a strong support for the development of a common framework for understanding the effect of boundary layer fluctuations. This work was supported in part by Hong Kong Research Grants Council.

  6. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulation of bubble cloud cavitation by front-tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, G; Shimizu, S; Tryggvason, G

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady bubble cloud cavitation phenomenon caused by negative pressure pulse has been treated numerically by applying a front tracking method. The behaviour of bubble cloud expanding and contracting is evaluated by tracking the motion of all bubble interfaces. Numerical investigation demonstrates that: (1) In the collapsing of bubble cloud micro liquid jets toward the inner bubbles are formed while the outer layer bubbles contract extremely, and then a high impact pressure is released when the inner central bubble contacts to its minimum. (2) The oscillation of bubble cloud depends upon the void fraction greatly. In the case of high void fraction, the frequency of cloud oscillation is lower than that of individual bubble and the decay of the oscillation becomes much slowly also

  7. Experimental and numerical study of waste heat recovery characteristics of direct contact thermoelectric generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Young; Negash, Assmelash; Cho, Gyubaek

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy harvesting performance of direct contact thermoelectric generator was studied. • Power-current and voltage-current curves were given for various operating conditions. • Output power prediction using numerical results and empirical correlation was verified. • A 1.0–2.0% conversion efficiency and 5.7–11.1% heat recovery efficiency were obtained. • A 0.25% increase in efficiency was found with a 10 K decrease in coolant temperature. - Abstract: In this study, waste heat recovery performance of a direct contact thermoelectric generator (DCTEG) is experimentally investigated on a diesel engine. In order to conduct an insightful analysis of the DCTEG characteristics, three experimental parameters—engine load, rotation speed, and coolant temperature—are chosen to vary over ranges during the experiments. Experimental results show that higher temperature differences across thermoelectric modules (TEM), larger engine loads, and rotation speeds lead to an improved energy conversion efficiency of the DCTEG, which lies in the range of approximately 1.0–2.0%, while the output power ranges approximately 12–45 W. The increase in the conversion efficiency for an increased engine load becomes more noticeable with a higher engine rotation speed. A 10 K decrease in the coolant temperature yields an approximately 0.25% increase in the conversion efficiency for the engine operating conditions tested. In addition, 3D numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the heat transfer and pressure characteristics of the DCTEG. Numerically obtained exhaust gas temperatures exiting the DCTEG were in good agreement with experimental results. It is also revealed that incorporation of the temperature fields from the numerical simulation and an empirical correlation for a temperature-power relationship provides a good predictor for output power from the DCTEG, especially at low engine load conditions, which deviates from experimental results as the

  8. Evaluation of kinetic uncertainty in numerical models of petroleum generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K.E.; Walters, C.C.; Mankiewicz, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Oil-prone marine petroleum source rocks contain type I or type II kerogen having Rock-Eval pyrolysis hydrogen indices greater than 600 or 300-600 mg hydrocarbon/g total organic carbon (HI, mg HC/g TOC), respectively. Samples from 29 marine source rocks worldwide that contain mainly type II kerogen (HI = 230-786 mg HC/g TOC) were subjected to open-system programmed pyrolysis to determine the activation energy distributions for petroleum generation. Assuming a burial heating rate of 1??C/m.y. for each measured activation energy distribution, the calculated average temperature for 50% fractional conversion of the kerogen in the samples to petroleum is approximately 136 ?? 7??C, but the range spans about 30??C (???121-151??C). Fifty-two outcrop samples of thermally immature Jurassic Oxford Clay Formation were collected from five locations in the United Kingdom to determine the variations of kinetic response for one source rock unit. The samples contain mainly type I or type II kerogens (HI = 230-774 mg HC/g TOC). At a heating rate of 1??C/m.y., the calculated temperatures for 50% fractional conversion of the Oxford Clay kerogens to petroleum differ by as much as 23??C (127-150??C). The data indicate that kerogen type, as defined by hydrogen index, is not systematically linked to kinetic response, and that default kinetics for the thermal decomposition of type I or type II kerogen can introduce unacceptable errors into numerical simulations. Furthermore, custom kinetics based on one or a few samples may be inadequate to account for variations in organofacies within a source rock. We propose three methods to evaluate the uncertainty contributed by kerogen kinetics to numerical simulations: (1) use the average kinetic distribution for multiple samples of source rock and the standard deviation for each activation energy in that distribution; (2) use source rock kinetics determined at several locations to describe different parts of the study area; and (3) use a weighted

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of an Airfoil with Sand Grain Roughness on the Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Andre F. P.; Casalino, Damiano; Fares, Ehab; Choudhari, Meelan

    2016-01-01

    As part of a computational study of acoustic radiation due to the passage of turbulent boundary layer eddies over the trailing edge of an airfoil, the Lattice-Boltzmann method is used to perform direct numerical simulations of compressible, low Mach number flow past an NACA 0012 airfoil at zero degrees angle of attack. The chord Reynolds number of approximately 0.657 million models one of the test conditions from a previous experiment by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini at NASA Langley Research Center. A unique feature of these simulations involves direct modeling of the sand grain roughness on the leading edge, which was used in the abovementioned experiment to trip the boundary layer to fully turbulent flow. This report documents the findings of preliminary, proof-of-concept simulations based on a narrow spanwise domain and a limited time interval. The inclusion of fully-resolved leading edge roughness in this simulation leads to significantly earlier transition than that in the absence of any roughness. The simulation data is used in conjunction with both the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustic analogy and a semi-analytical model by Roger and Moreau to predict the farfield noise. The encouraging agreement between the computed noise spectrum and that measured in the experiment indicates the potential payoff from a full-fledged numerical investigation based on the current approach. Analysis of the computed data is used to identify the required improvements to the preliminary simulations described herein.

  10. An analytical–numerical model of laser direct metal deposition track and microstructure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahsan, M Naveed; Pinkerton, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Multiple analytical and numerical models of the laser metal deposition process have been presented, but most rely on sequential solution of the energy and mass balance equations or discretization of the problem domain. Laser direct metal deposition is a complex process involving multiple interdependent processes which can be best simulated using a fully coupled mass-energy balance solution. In this work a coupled analytical–numerical solution is presented. Sub-models of the powder stream, quasi-stationary conduction in the substrate and powder assimilation into the area of the substrate above the liquidus temperature are combined. An iterative feedback loop is used to ensure mass and energy balances are maintained at the melt pool. The model is verified using Ti–6Al–4V single track deposition, produced with a coaxial nozzle and a diode laser. The model predictions of local temperature history, the track profile and microstructure scale show good agreement with the experimental results. The model is a useful industrial aid and alternative to finite element methods for selecting the parameters to use for laser direct metal deposition when separate geometric and microstructural outcomes are required

  11. Numerical investigation of CAI Combustion in the Opposed- Piston Engine with Direct and Indirect Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyszczek, R.; Mazuro, P.; Teodorczyk, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is focused on the CAI combustion control in a turbocharged 2-stroke Opposed-Piston (OP) engine. The barrel type OP engine arrangement is of particular interest for the authors because of its robust design, high mechanical efficiency and relatively easy incorporation of a Variable Compression Ratio (VCR). The other advantage of such design is that combustion chamber is formed between two moving pistons - there is no additional cylinder head to be cooled which directly results in an increased thermal efficiency. Furthermore, engine operation in a Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) mode at high compression ratios (CR) raises a possibility of reaching even higher efficiencies and very low emissions. In order to control CAI combustion such measures as VCR and water injection were considered for indirect ignition timing control. Numerical simulations of the scavenging and combustion processes were performed with the 3D CFD multipurpose AVL Fire solver. Numerous cases were calculated with different engine compression ratios and different amounts of directly and indirectly injected water. The influence of the VCR and water injection on the ignition timing and engine performance was determined and their application in the real engine was discussed.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent pipe flow using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Geneva, Nicholas; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present a first direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent pipe flow using the mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) on both a D3Q19 lattice grid and a D3Q27 lattice grid. DNS of turbulent pipe flows using LBM has never been reported previously, perhaps due to inaccuracy and numerical stability associated with the previous implementations of LBM in the presence of a curved solid surface. In fact, it was even speculated that the D3Q19 lattice might be inappropriate as a DNS tool for turbulent pipe flows. In this paper, we show, through careful implementation, accurate turbulent statistics can be obtained using both D3Q19 and D3Q27 lattice grids. In the simulation with D3Q19 lattice, a few problems related to the numerical stability of the simulation are exposed. Discussions and solutions for those problems are provided. The simulation with D3Q27 lattice, on the other hand, is found to be more stable than its D3Q19 counterpart. The resulting turbulent flow statistics at a friction Reynolds number of Reτ = 180 are compared systematically with both published experimental and other DNS results based on solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The comparisons cover the mean-flow profile, the r.m.s. velocity and vorticity profiles, the mean and r.m.s. pressure profiles, the velocity skewness and flatness, and spatial correlations and energy spectra of velocity and vorticity. Overall, we conclude that both D3Q19 and D3Q27 simulations yield accurate turbulent flow statistics. The use of the D3Q27 lattice is shown to suppress the weak secondary flow pattern in the mean flow due to numerical artifacts.

  13. Direct imaging of turbid media using long-time back-scattered photons, a numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, Joan; Liu, Fengshan; El Akel, Azad; Charette, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Direct imaging is a convenient way to obtain information on the interior of a semi-transparent turbid material by non-invasive probing using laser beams. The major difficulty is linked to scattering which scrambles the directional information coming from the laser beam. It is found in this paper that the long-term multiple-scattered reflected photons may provide structural information on the inside of a material, which offers an interesting alternative to using information only from un-scattered or least-scattered photons as obtained from current direct imaging set-ups for thin media. Based on some observations on a non-homogeneous three layered 1-D slab irradiated by a laser pulse, a direct probing methodology making use of the long-term back-scattered photons is illustrated to recover inclusions positions in a turbid 2-D medium. First, the numerical model is presented. Second, an extended parametrical study is conducted on 1-D homogeneous and non-homogeneous slabs with different laser pulse durations. It is found that the reflected asymptotic logarithmic slope carries information about the presence of the inclusion and that short laser pulses are not necessary since only the decaying parts of the remanent optical signature is important. Longer laser pulses allow a higher level of energy injection and signal to noise ratio. Third, those observations are used for the probing of a 2-D non-homogeneous phantom. (author)

  14. Numerical simulation of a Linear Fresnel Reflector Concentrator used as direct generator in a Solar-GAX cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, N.; Sauceda, D.; Beltran, R. [Instituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Blvd. Benito Juarez y Calle de la Normal s/n, Mexicali, Baja California 21280 (Mexico); Garcia-Valladares, O. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    In this work a methodological analysis to design and evaluate the technical feasibility of use a Linear Fresnel Reflector Concentrator (LFRC) as generator in an advanced absorption refrigeration system (Solar-GAX cycle) has been carried out. For this purpose, a detailed one-dimensional numerical simulation of the thermal and fluid-dynamic behavior of a LFRC that solves, in a segregated manner, four subroutines: (a) fluid flow inside the receptor tube, (b) heat transfer in the receptor tube wall, (c) heat transfer in cover tube wall, and (d) solar thermal analysis in the solar concentrator has been developed. The LFRC numerical model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the technical literature; after that, a parametric study for different configurations of design has been carried out in order to obtain the highest solar concentration with the lowest thermal losses, keeping in mind both specific weather conditions and construction restrictions. The numerical result obtained demonstrates that using a LFRC as a direct generator in a Solar-GAX cycle satisfy not only the quantity and quality of the energy demanded by the advanced cooling system, it also allows to obtain higher global efficiencies of the system due to it can be operated in conditions where the maximum performance of the Solar-GAX cycle is obtained without affecting in any significant way the solar collector efficiency. (author)

  15. Numerical simulation of a Linear Fresnel Reflector Concentrator used as direct generator in a Solar-GAX cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez, N.; Garcia-Valladares, O.; Sauceda, D.; Beltran, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work a methodological analysis to design and evaluate the technical feasibility of use a Linear Fresnel Reflector Concentrator (LFRC) as generator in an advanced absorption refrigeration system (Solar-GAX cycle) has been carried out. For this purpose, a detailed one-dimensional numerical simulation of the thermal and fluid-dynamic behavior of a LFRC that solves, in a segregated manner, four subroutines: (a) fluid flow inside the receptor tube, (b) heat transfer in the receptor tube wall, (c) heat transfer in cover tube wall, and (d) solar thermal analysis in the solar concentrator has been developed. The LFRC numerical model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the technical literature; after that, a parametric study for different configurations of design has been carried out in order to obtain the highest solar concentration with the lowest thermal losses, keeping in mind both specific weather conditions and construction restrictions. The numerical result obtained demonstrates that using a LFRC as a direct generator in a Solar-GAX cycle satisfy not only the quantity and quality of the energy demanded by the advanced cooling system, it also allows to obtain higher global efficiencies of the system due to it can be operated in conditions where the maximum performance of the Solar-GAX cycle is obtained without affecting in any significant way the solar collector efficiency.

  16. Direct numerical solution of the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation and spatial distribution of water around hydrophobic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Doi, Junta

    1995-09-01

    The Ornstein-Zernike integral equation (OZ equation) has been used to evaluate the distribution function of solvents around solutes, but its numerical solution is difficult for molecules with a complicated shape. This paper proposes a numerical method to directly solve the OZ equation by introducing the 3D lattice. The method employs no approximation the reference interaction site model (RISM) equation employed. The method enables one to obtain the spatial distribution of spherical solvents around solutes with an arbitrary shape. Numerical accuracy is sufficient when the grid-spacing is less than 0.5 Å for solvent water. The spatial water distribution around a propane molecule is demonstrated as an example of a nonspherical hydrophobic molecule using iso-value surfaces. The water model proposed by Pratt and Chandler is used. The distribution agrees with the molecular dynamics simulation. The distribution increases offshore molecular concavities. The spatial distribution of water around 5α-cholest-2-ene (C27H46) is visualized using computer graphics techniques and a similar trend is observed.

  17. Empirical Evaluation of Directional-Dependence Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoemmes, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Testing of directional dependence is a method to infer causal direction that recently has attracted some attention. Previous examples by e.g. von Eye and DeShon (2012a) and extensive simulation studies by Pornprasertmanit and Little (2012) have demonstrated that under specific assumptions, directional-dependence tests can recover the true causal…

  18. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with spanwise alternatively distributed strips control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Weidan; Lu, Lipeng; Fang, Jian; Moulinec, Charles; Yao, Yufeng

    2018-05-01

    The effect of spanwise alternatively distributed strips (SADS) control on turbulent flow in a plane channel has been studied by direct numerical simulations to investigate the characteristics of large-scale streamwise vortices (LSSVs) induced by small-scale active wall actuation, and their potential in suppressing flow separation. SADS control is realized by alternatively arranging out-of-phase control (OPC) and in-phase control (IPC) wall actuations on the lower channel wall surface, in the spanwise direction. It is found that the coherent structures are suppressed or enhanced alternatively by OPC or IPC, respectively, leading to the formation of a vertical shear layer, which is responsible for the LSSVs’ presence. Large-scale low-speed region can also be observed above the OPC strips, which resemble large-scale low-speed streaks. LSSVs are found to be in a statistically-converged steady state and their cores are located between two neighboring OPC and IPC strips. Their motions contribute significantly to the momentum transport in the wall-normal and spanwise directions, demonstrating their potential ability to suppress flow separation.

  19. Investigation of the Dynamic Contact Angle Using a Direct Numerical Simulation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangpu; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hai; Li, Aifen; Shams, Bilal

    2016-11-15

    A large amount of residual oil, which exists as isolated oil slugs, remains trapped in reservoirs after water flooding. Numerous numerical studies are performed to investigate the fundamental flow mechanism of oil slugs to improve flooding efficiency. Dynamic contact angle models are usually introduced to simulate an accurate contact angle and meniscus displacement of oil slugs under a high capillary number. Nevertheless, in the oil slug flow simulation process, it is unnecessary to introduce the dynamic contact angle model because of a negligible change in the meniscus displacement after using the dynamic contact angle model when the capillary number is small. Therefore, a critical capillary number should be introduced to judge whether the dynamic contact model should be incorporated into simulations. In this study, a direct numerical simulation method is employed to simulate the oil slug flow in a capillary tube at the pore scale. The position of the interface between water and the oil slug is determined using the phase-field method. The capacity and accuracy of the model are validated using a classical benchmark: a dynamic capillary filling process. Then, different dynamic contact angle models and the factors that affect the dynamic contact angle are analyzed. The meniscus displacements of oil slugs with a dynamic contact angle and a static contact angle (SCA) are obtained during simulations, and the relative error between them is calculated automatically. The relative error limit has been defined to be 5%, beyond which the dynamic contact angle model needs to be incorporated into the simulation to approach the realistic displacement. Thus, the desired critical capillary number can be determined. A three-dimensional universal chart of critical capillary number, which functions as static contact angle and viscosity ratio, is given to provide a guideline for oil slug simulation. Also, a fitting formula is presented for ease of use.

  20. Effects of non-adiabatic walls on shock/boundary-layer interaction using direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpiani, Pedro S.; Bernardini, Matteo; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    The influence of wall thermal conditions on the properties of an impinging shock wave interacting with a turbulent supersonic boundary layer is a research topic that still remains underexplored. In the present study, direct numerical simulations (DNS) are employed to investigate the flow properties of a shock wave interacting with a turbulent boundary layer at free-stream Mach number M∞ = 2.28 with distinct wall thermal conditions and shock strengths. Instantaneous and mean flow fields, wall quantities and the low-frequency unsteadiness are analyzed. While heating contributes to increase the extent of the interaction zone, wall cooling turns out to be a good candidate for flow control. The distribution of the Stanton number shows a good agreement with prior experimental studies and confirms the strong heat transfer and complex pattern within the interaction region. Numerical results indicate that the changes in the interaction length are mainly linked to the incoming boundary layer as suggested in previous studies (Souverein et al., 2013 and Jaunet et al., 2014). This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant FA95501610385.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of Passive Scalar Mixing in Shock Turbulence Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiangyu; Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Larsson, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Passive scalar mixing in the canonical shock-turbulence interaction configuration is investigated through shock-capturing Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Scalar fields with different Schmidt numbers are transported by an initially isotropic turbulent flow field passing across a nominally planar shock wave. A solution-adaptive hybrid numerical scheme on Cartesian structured grids is used, that combines a fifth-order WENO scheme near shocks and a sixth-order central-difference scheme away from shocks. The simulations target variations in the shock Mach number, M (from 1.5 to 3), turbulent Mach number, Mt (from 0.1 to 0.4, including wrinkled- and broken-shock regimes), and scalar Schmidt numbers, Sc (from 0.5 to 2), while keeping the Taylor microscale Reynolds number constant (Reλ 40). The effects on passive scalar statistics are investigated, including the streamwise evolution of scalar variance budgets, pdfs and spectra, in comparison with their temporal evolution in decaying isotropic turbulence.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing in grid-generated turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Kouji; Suzuki, Hiroki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Takashi; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent mixing of passive scalar (heat) in grid-generated turbulence (GGT) is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). A turbulence-generating grid, on which the velocity components are set to zero, is located downstream of the channel entrance, and it is numerically constructed on the staggered mesh arrangement using the immersed boundary method. The grid types constructed are: (a) square-mesh biplane grid, (b) square-mesh single-plane grid, (c) composite grid consisting of parallel square-bars and (d) fractal grid. Two fluids with different temperatures are provided separately in the upper and lower streams upstream of the turbulence-generating grids, generating the thermal mixing layer behind the grids. For the grid (a), simulations for two different Prandtl numbers of 0.71 and 7.1, corresponding to air and water flows, are conducted to investigate the effect of the Prandtl number. The results show that the typical grid turbulence and shearless mixing layer are generated downstream of the grids. The results of the scalar field show that a typical thermal mixing layer is generated as well, and the effects of the Prandtl numbers on turbulent heat transfer are observed.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing in grid-generated turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Kouji; Suzuki, Hiroki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Takashi [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Hayase, Toshiyuki [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: nagata@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: hsuzuki@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: ysakai@mech.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: t-kubo@nagoya-u.jp, E-mail: hayase@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp

    2008-12-15

    Turbulent mixing of passive scalar (heat) in grid-generated turbulence (GGT) is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). A turbulence-generating grid, on which the velocity components are set to zero, is located downstream of the channel entrance, and it is numerically constructed on the staggered mesh arrangement using the immersed boundary method. The grid types constructed are: (a) square-mesh biplane grid, (b) square-mesh single-plane grid, (c) composite grid consisting of parallel square-bars and (d) fractal grid. Two fluids with different temperatures are provided separately in the upper and lower streams upstream of the turbulence-generating grids, generating the thermal mixing layer behind the grids. For the grid (a), simulations for two different Prandtl numbers of 0.71 and 7.1, corresponding to air and water flows, are conducted to investigate the effect of the Prandtl number. The results show that the typical grid turbulence and shearless mixing layer are generated downstream of the grids. The results of the scalar field show that a typical thermal mixing layer is generated as well, and the effects of the Prandtl numbers on turbulent heat transfer are observed.

  4. Influence of lubrication forces in direct numerical simulations of particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitri, Rohit; Peters, Frank; Padding, Johan; Kuipers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Accurate numerical representation of particle-laden flows is important for fundamental understanding and optimizing the complex processes such as proppant transport in fracking. Liquid-solid flows are fundamentally different from gas-solid flows because of lower density ratios (solid to fluid) and non-negligible lubrication forces. In this interface resolved model, fluid-solid coupling is achieved by incorporating the no-slip boundary condition implicitly at particle's surfaces by means of an efficient second order ghost-cell immersed boundary method. A fixed Eulerian grid is used for solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the particle-particle interactions are implemented using the soft sphere collision and sub-grid scale lubrication model. Due to the range of influence of lubrication force on a smaller scale than the grid size, it is important to implement the lubrication model accurately. In this work, different implementations of the lubrication model on particle dynamics are studied for various flow conditions. The effect of a particle surface roughness on lubrication force and the particle transport is also investigated. This study is aimed at developing a validated methodology to incorporate lubrication models in direct numerical simulation of particle laden flows. This research is supported from Grant 13CSER014 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  5. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent concentric annular pipe flow Part 2: Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2003-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation is performed for turbulent heat transfer in a concentric annulus at Re D h =8900 and Pr=0.71 for two radius ratios (R 1 /R 2 =0.1 and 0.5) and wall heat flux ratio q * =1.0. Main emphasis is placed on the transverse curvature effect on near-wall turbulent thermal structures. Near-wall turbulent thermal structures close to the inner and outer walls are scrutinized by computing the lower-order statistics. The fluctuating temperature variance and turbulent heat flux budgets are illustrated to confirm the results of the lower-order statistics. Probability density functions of the splat/anti-splat process are investigated to analyze the transverse curvature effect on the strong relationship between sweep and splat events. The present numerical results show that the turbulent thermal structures near the outer wall are more activated than those near the inner wall, which may be attributed to the different vortex regeneration processes between the inner and outer walls

  6. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent pipe flow with nonuniform surface heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    1998-01-01

    Turbulent transport computations of a scalar quantity for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow were carried out by means of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) procedure. In this paper, three wall-heating boundary conditions were considered as follows: Case-1) a uniform heat-flux condition along the wall, Case-2) a nonuniform wall-heating condition, that is, a cosine heat-flux distribution along the wall and Case-3) a nonuniform wall-heating condition with a constant temperature over a half of the pipe wall. The number of computational grids used in this paper is 256 x 128 x 128. Prandtl number of the working fluid is 0.71. The Nusselt number in case of Case-1 is in good agreement with the empirical correlation. In case of Case-3, the distributions of the turbulent quantity and the Nusselt number seem to be reasonable. However, as for Case-2, the distributions of the turbulent quantity and the Nusselt number seem to be unrealistic. Two numerical treatments of thermal boundary condition on the wall were applied and their results were discussed from the viewpoint of the turbulent transport feature. (author)

  7. Direct numerical simulation of vacillation in convection induced by centrifugal buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitz, Diogo B.; Marxen, Olaf; Chew, John W.

    2017-11-01

    Flows induced by centrifugal buoyancy occur in industrial systems, such as in the compressor cavities of gas turbines, as well as in flows of geophysical interest. In this numerical study we use direct numerical simulation (DNS) to investigate the transition between the steady waves regime, which is characterized by great regularity, to the vacillation regime, which is critical to understand transition to the fully turbulent regime. From previous work it is known that the onset of convection occurs in the form of pairs of nearly-circular rolls which span the entire axial length of the cavity, with small deviations near the parallel, no-slip end walls. When non-linearity sets in triadic interactions occur and, depending on the value of the centrifugal Rayleigh number, the flow is dominated by either a single mode and its harmonics or by broadband effects if turbulence develops. In this study we increase the centrifugal Rayleigh number progressively and investigate mode interactions during the vacillation regime which eventually lead to chaotic motion. Diogo B. Pitz acknowledges the financial support from the Capes foundation through the Science without Borders program.

  8. Computational Flame Diagnostics for Direct Numerical Simulations with Detailed Chemistry of Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Tianfeng [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2017-02-16

    The goal of the proposed research is to create computational flame diagnostics (CFLD) that are rigorous numerical algorithms for systematic detection of critical flame features, such as ignition, extinction, and premixed and non-premixed flamelets, and to understand the underlying physicochemical processes controlling limit flame phenomena, flame stabilization, turbulence-chemistry interactions and pollutant emissions etc. The goal has been accomplished through an integrated effort on mechanism reduction, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flames at engine conditions and a variety of turbulent flames with transport fuels, computational diagnostics, turbulence modeling, and DNS data mining and data reduction. The computational diagnostics are primarily based on the chemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) and a recently developed bifurcation analysis using datasets from first-principle simulations of 0-D reactors, 1-D laminar flames, and 2-D and 3-D DNS (collaboration with J.H. Chen and S. Som at Argonne, and C.S. Yoo at UNIST). Non-stiff reduced mechanisms for transportation fuels amenable for 3-D DNS are developed through graph-based methods and timescale analysis. The flame structures, stabilization mechanisms, local ignition and extinction etc., and the rate controlling chemical processes are unambiguously identified through CFLD. CEMA is further employed to segment complex turbulent flames based on the critical flame features, such as premixed reaction fronts, and to enable zone-adaptive turbulent combustion modeling.

  9. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Wacks, Daniel H.

    2016-12-02

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H-2-air flames with an equivalence ratio phi = 0.7. It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P, Q, and R) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  10. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Noise Generation from the Nozzle Wall of a Hypersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junji; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic radiation from the turbulent boundary layer on the nozzle wall of a Mach 6 Ludwieg Tube is simulated using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), with the flow conditions falling within the operational range of the Mach 6 Hypersonic Ludwieg Tube, Braunschweig (HLB). The mean and turbulence statistics of the nozzle-wall boundary layer show good agreement with those predicted by Pate's correlation and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations. The rms pressure fluctuation P'(rms)/T(w) plateaus in the freestream core of the nozzle. The intensity of the freestream noise within the nozzle is approximately 20% higher than that radiated from a single at pate with a similar freestream Mach number, potentially because of the contributions to the acoustic radiation from multiple azimuthal segments of the nozzle wall.

  11. Wavelet Analysis on Turbulent Structure in Drag-Reducing Channel Flow Based on Direct Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulation has been performed to study a polymer drag-reducing channel flow by using a discrete-element model. And then, wavelet analyses are employed to investigate the multiresolution characteristics of velocity components based on DNS data. Wavelet decomposition is applied to decompose velocity fluctuation time series into ten different frequency components including approximate component and detailed components, which show more regular intermittency and burst events in drag-reducing flow. The energy contribution, intermittent factor, and intermittent energy are calculated to investigate characteristics of different frequency components. The results indicate that energy contributions of different frequency components are redistributed by polymer additives. The energy contribution of streamwise approximate component in drag-reducing flow is up to 82%, much more than 25% in the Newtonian flow. Feature of turbulent multiscale structures is shown intuitively by continuous wavelet transform, verifying that turbulent structures become much more regular in drag-reducing flow.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  13. Numerical simulation of direct-drive ICF ignition in spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiaojin

    2006-01-01

    The basic condition required for achieving central ignition is producing a hot spot with 10 keV temperature and 0.3 g/cm 2 surface density. Growth of hydrodynamic instability during deceleration phase will destroy the symmetric-drive, reduce the volume of central hot spot and make a harmful effect on ignition. Based on the LARED-S code, considering the thermonuclear reaction and α-particle heating, a numerical study of direct-drive ICF in spherical geometry is made. One-dimensional results agree well with the NIF ignition target designs, and show that the α-particle heating plays an important role in marginal ignition. Two-dimensional results show that the growth of hydrodynamic instability during deceleration phase makes a harmful effect on ignition. (authors)

  14. Direct numerical simulations of reacting flows with detailed chemistry using many-core/GPU acceleration

    KAUST Repository

    Herná ndez Pé rez, Francisco E.; Mukhadiyev, Nurzhan; Xu, Xiao; Sow, Aliou; Lee, Bok Jik; Sankaran, Ramanan; Im, Hong G.

    2018-01-01

    A new direct numerical simulation (DNS) code for multi-component gaseous reacting flows has been developed at KAUST, with the state-of-the-art programming model for next generation high performance computing platforms. The code, named KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flows Solver (KARFS), employs the MPI+X programming, and relies on Kokkos for “X” for performance portability to multi-core, many-core and GPUs, providing innovative software development while maintaining backward compatibility with established parallel models and legacy code. The capability and potential of KARFS to perform DNS of reacting flows with large, detailed reaction mechanisms is demonstrated with various model problems involving ignition and turbulent flame propagations with varying degrees of chemical complexities.

  15. Anisotropic Characteristics of Turbulence Dissipation in Swirling Flow: A Direct Numerical Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the anisotropic characteristics of turbulent energy dissipation rate in a rotating jet flow via direct numerical simulation. The turbulent energy dissipation tensor, including its eigenvalues in the swirling flows with different rotating velocities, is analyzed to investigate the anisotropic characteristics of turbulence and dissipation. In addition, the probability density function of the eigenvalues of turbulence dissipation tensor is presented. The isotropic subrange of PDF always exists in swirling flows relevant to small-scale vortex structure. Thus, with remarkable large-scale vortex breakdown, the isotropic subrange of PDF is reduced in strongly swirling flows, and anisotropic energy dissipation is proven to exist in the core region of the vortex breakdown. More specifically, strong anisotropic turbulence dissipation occurs concentratively in the vortex breakdown region, whereas nearly isotropic turbulence dissipation occurs dispersively in the peripheral region of the strong swirling flows.

  16. Direct numerical simulations of mack-mode damping on porous coated cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdeke, H.; Wartemann, V.

    2013-06-01

    The flow field over a 3 degree blunt cone is investigated with respect to a hypersonic stability analysis of the boundary-layer flow at Mach 6 with porous as well as smooth walls by comparing local direct numerical simulations (DNS) and linear stability theory (LST) data. The original boundary-layer profile is generated by a finite volume solver, using shock capturing techniques to generate an axisymmetric flow field. Local boundary-layer profiles are extracted from this flow field and hypersonic Mack-modes are superimposed for cone-walls with and without a porous surface used as a passive transition-reduction device. Special care is taken of curvature effects of the wall on the mode development over smooth and porous walls.

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation and Theories of Wall Turbulence with a Range of Pressure Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, G. N.; Garbaruk, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Couette-Poiseuille flow at a higher Reynolds number is presented and compared with DNS of other wall-bounded flows. It is analyzed in terms of testing semi-theoretical proposals for universal behavior of the velocity, mixing length, or eddy viscosity in pressure gradients, and in terms of assessing the accuracy of two turbulence models. These models are used in two modes, the traditional one with only a dependence on the wall-normal coordinate y, and a newer one in which a lateral dependence on z is added. For pure Couette flow and the Couette-Poiseuille case considered here, this z-dependence allows some models to generate steady streamwise vortices, which generally improves the agreement with DNS and experiment. On the other hand, it complicates the comparison between DNS and models.

  18. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Wacks, Daniel H.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Arias, Paul G.; Im, Hong G.

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H-2-air flames with an equivalence ratio phi = 0.7. It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P, Q, and R) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  19. Direct numerical simulations of reacting flows with detailed chemistry using many-core/GPU acceleration

    KAUST Repository

    Hernández Pérez, Francisco E.

    2018-03-29

    A new direct numerical simulation (DNS) code for multi-component gaseous reacting flows has been developed at KAUST, with the state-of-the-art programming model for next generation high performance computing platforms. The code, named KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flows Solver (KARFS), employs the MPI+X programming, and relies on Kokkos for “X” for performance portability to multi-core, many-core and GPUs, providing innovative software development while maintaining backward compatibility with established parallel models and legacy code. The capability and potential of KARFS to perform DNS of reacting flows with large, detailed reaction mechanisms is demonstrated with various model problems involving ignition and turbulent flame propagations with varying degrees of chemical complexities.

  20. Direct numerical simulations of a thin liquid film coating an axially oscillating cylindrical surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binz, Matthias; Rohlfs, Wilko; Kneer, Reinhold, E-mail: rohlfs@wsa.rwth-aachen.de [Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer, RWTH Aachen University, Augustinerbach 6, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Liquid films on cylindrical bodies like wires or fibers disintegrate into droplets if their length exceeds a critical measure (Plateau–Rayleigh instability). Stabilization of such films can be achieved by an axial oscillation of the solid core provided that a suitable combination of forcing amplitude and frequency is given. To investigate the stabilizing effect, direct numerical simulations of the axisymmetric problem are conducted in this study. Thus, a modified volume-of-fluid solver is employed based on the open source library OpenFOAM{sup ®}. The effect of film stabilization is demonstrated and the required conditions for a stable film configuration are found to be in accordance with other studies. Finally, parameter variations are conducted to investigate the influence on the long-term shape of the stabilized film surface. (paper)

  1. Direct numerical simulation of heat transfer to CO2 at supercritical pressure in a vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Joong-Hun; Yoo, Jung-Yul; Choi, Hae-Cheon

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, the turbulent heat transfer to CO 2 at supercritical pressure in a vertical tube is investigated using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), where no turbulence model is adopted. Heat transfer to the supercritical pressure fluids is characterized by rapid variation of thermodynamic/ thermo-physical properties in the fluids. This change in properties occurs within a very narrow range of temperature across the so-called pseudo-critical temperature, causing a peculiar behavior of heat transfer characteristics. The buoyancy effects associated with very large changes in density proved to play a major role in turbulent heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids. Depending on the degree of buoyancy effects, turbulent heat transfer may increase or significantly decrease, resulting in a local hot spot along the wall. Based on the results of the present DNS study combined with theoretical considerations for turbulent mixed convection heat transfer, the basic mechanism of this local heat transfer deterioration is explained

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Multi-Stage Autoignition Relevant to Engine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jacqueline

    2017-11-01

    Due to the unrivaled energy density of liquid hydrocarbon fuels combustion will continue to provide over 80% of the world's energy for at least the next fifty years. Hence, combustion needs to be understood and controlled to optimize combustion systems for efficiency to prevent further climate change, to reduce emissions and to ensure U.S. energy security. In this talk I will discuss recent progress in direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion focused on providing fundamental insights into key `turbulence-chemistry' interactions that underpin the development of next generation fuel efficient, fuel flexible engines for transportation and power generation. Petascale direct numerical simulation (DNS) of multi-stage mixed-mode turbulent combustion in canonical configurations have elucidated key physics that govern autoignition and flame stabilization in engines and provide benchmark data for combustion model development under the conditions of advanced engines which operate near combustion limits to maximize efficiency and minimize emissions. Mixed-mode combustion refers to premixed or partially-premixed flames propagating into stratified autoignitive mixtures. Multi-stage ignition refers to hydrocarbon fuels with negative temperature coefficient behavior that undergo sequential low- and high-temperature autoignition. Key issues that will be discussed include: 1) the role of mixing in shear driven turbulence on the dynamics of multi-stage autoignition and cool flame propagation in diesel environments, 2) the role of thermal and composition stratification on the evolution of the balance of mixed combustion modes - flame propagation versus spontaneous ignition - which determines the overall combustion rate in autoignition processes, and 3) the role of cool flames on lifted flame stabilization. Finally prospects for DNS of turbulent combustion at the exascale will be discussed in the context of anticipated heterogeneous machine architectures. sponsored by DOE

  3. Quasi-direct numerical simulation of a pebble bed configuration. Part I: Flow (velocity) field analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shams, A.; Roelofs, F.; Komen, E.M.J.; Baglietto, E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNS) of a pebble bed configuration has been performed. ► This q-DNS database may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. ► A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data throughout the computational domain has been generated. ► Results for mean, RMS and covariance of velocity field are extensively reported in this paper. -- Abstract: High temperature reactors (HTR) are being considered for deployment around the world because of their excellent safety features. The fuel is embedded in a graphite moderator and can sustain very high temperatures. However, the appearance of hot spots in the pebble bed cores of HTR's may affect the integrity of the pebbles. A good prediction of the flow and heat transport in such a pebble bed core is a challenge for available turbulence models and such models need to be validated. In the present article, quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNS) of a pebble bed configuration are reported, which may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. Such approaches can be used in order to perform calculations for a randomly arranged pebble bed. Simulations are performed at a Reynolds number of 3088, based on pebble diameter, with a porosity level of 0.42. Detailed flow analyses have shown complex physics flow behavior and make this case challenging for turbulence model validation. Hence, a wide range of qualitative and quantitative data for velocity and temperature field have been extracted for this benchmark. In the present article (part I), results related to the flow field (mean, RMS and covariance of velocity) are documented and discussed in detail. Moreover, the discussion regarding the temperature field will be published in a separate article

  4. Direct numerical simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations with an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method are used to investigate the effects of particle rotation on flows past random arrays of mono-disperse spheres at moderate particle Reynolds numbers. This study is an extension of a previous study of the authors [Q. Zhou and L.-S. Fan, "Direct numerical simulation of low-Reynolds-number flow past arrays of rotating spheres," J. Fluid Mech. 765, 396-423 (2015)] that explored the effects of particle rotation at low particle Reynolds numbers. The results of this study indicate that as the particle Reynolds number increases, the normalized Magnus lift force decreases rapidly when the particle Reynolds number is in the range lower than 50. For the particle Reynolds number greater than 50, the normalized Magnus lift force approaches a constant value that is invariant with solid volume fractions. The proportional dependence of the Magnus lift force on the rotational Reynolds number (based on the angular velocity and the diameter of the spheres) observed at low particle Reynolds numbers does not change in the present study, making the Magnus lift force another possible factor that can significantly affect the overall dynamics of fluid-particle flows other than the drag force. Moreover, it is found that both the normalized drag force and the normalized torque increase with the increase of the particle Reynolds number and the solid volume fraction. Finally, correlations for the drag force, the Magnus lift force, and the torque in random arrays of rotating spheres at arbitrary solids volume fractions, rotational Reynolds numbers, and particle Reynolds numbers are formulated.

  5. Direct numerical simulations of non-premixed ethylene-air flames: Local flame extinction criterion

    KAUST Repository

    Lecoustre, Vivien R.

    2014-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of ethylene/air diffusion flame extinctions in decaying two-dimensional turbulence were performed. A Damköhler-number-based flame extinction criterion as provided by classical large activation energy asymptotic (AEA) theory is assessed for its validity in predicting flame extinction and compared to one based on Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis (CEMA) of the detailed chemistry. The DNS code solves compressible flow conservation equations using high order finite difference and explicit time integration schemes. The ethylene/air chemistry is simulated with a reduced mechanism that is generated based on the directed relation graph (DRG) based methods along with stiffness removal. The numerical configuration is an ethylene fuel strip embedded in ambient air and exposed to a prescribed decaying turbulent flow field. The emphasis of this study is on the several flame extinction events observed in contrived parametric simulations. A modified viscosity and changing pressure (MVCP) scheme was adopted in order to artificially manipulate the probability of flame extinction. Using MVCP, pressure was changed from the baseline case of 1 atm to 0.1 and 10 atm. In the high pressure MVCP case, the simulated flame is extinction-free, whereas in the low pressure MVCP case, the simulated flame features frequent extinction events and is close to global extinction. Results show that, despite its relative simplicity and provided that the global flame activation temperature is correctly calibrated, the AEA-based flame extinction criterion can accurately predict the simulated flame extinction events. It is also found that the AEA-based criterion provides predictions of flame extinction that are consistent with those provided by a CEMA-based criterion. This study supports the validity of a simple Damköhler-number-based criterion to predict flame extinction in engineering-level CFD models. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  6. The numerical benchmark CB2-S, final evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrapciak, V.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper are final results of numerical benchmark CB2-S compared (activity, gamma and neutron sources, concentration of important nuclides and decay heat). The participants are: Vladimir Chrapciak (SCALE), Ludmila Markova (SCALE), Svetlana Zabrodskaja (SCALA), Pavel Mikolas (WIMS). Eva Tinkova (HELIOS) and Maria Manolova (SCALE) (Authors)

  7. Numerical evaluation of a robust self-triggered MPC algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, F.D.; Heemels, W.P.M.H.; Allgöwer, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical examples demonstrating the efficacy of a recently proposed self-triggered model predictive control scheme for disturbed linear discrete-time systems with hard constraints on the input and state. In order to reduce the amount of communication between the controller and the

  8. High Performance Computation of a Jet in Crossflow by Lattice Boltzmann Based Parallel Direct Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulation (DNS of a round jet in crossflow based on lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is carried out on multi-GPU cluster. Data parallel SIMT (single instruction multiple thread characteristic of GPU matches the parallelism of LBM well, which leads to the high efficiency of GPU on the LBM solver. With present GPU settings (6 Nvidia Tesla K20M, the present DNS simulation can be completed in several hours. A grid system of 1.5 × 108 is adopted and largest jet Reynolds number reaches 3000. The jet-to-free-stream velocity ratio is set as 3.3. The jet is orthogonal to the mainstream flow direction. The validated code shows good agreement with experiments. Vortical structures of CRVP, shear-layer vortices and horseshoe vortices, are presented and analyzed based on velocity fields and vorticity distributions. Turbulent statistical quantities of Reynolds stress are also displayed. Coherent structures are revealed in a very fine resolution based on the second invariant of the velocity gradients.

  9. A numerical study of scalar dispersion downstream of a wall-mounted cube using direct simulations and algebraic flux models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R., E-mail: riccardo.rossi12@unibo.i [Laboratorio di Termofluidodinamica Computazionale Seconda Facolta di Ingegneria di Forli, Universita di Bologna Via Fontanelle 40, 47100 Forli (Italy); Center for Turbulence Research Department of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University, CA 94305 (United States); Philips, D.A.; Iaccarino, G. [Center for Turbulence Research Department of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University, CA 94305 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The computed DNS statistics indicate that a gradient-transport scheme can be applied to the vertical and spanwise scalar flux components. {yields} The streamwise scalar flux is characterized by a counter-gradient transport mechanism in the wake region close to the obstacle. {yields} The wake profiles of scalar fluctuations and the shape of probability density functions do not suggest a significant flapping movement of the scalar plume. {yields} The evaluation of scalar dispersion models must include a careful assessment of the computed mean velocity field and Reynolds stress tensor. {yields} Algebraic models provide an improved prediction of the mean concentration field as compared to the standard eddy-diffusivity model. -- Abstract: The dispersion of a passive scalar downstream of a wall-mounted cube is examined using direct numerical simulations and turbulence models applied to the Reynolds equations. The scalar is released from a circular source located on top of the obstacle, which is immersed in a developing boundary-layer flow. Direct simulations are performed to give insight into the mixing process and to provide a reference database for turbulence closures. Algebraic flux models are evaluated against the standard eddy-diffusivity representation. Coherent structures periodically released from the cube top are responsible for a counter-diffusion mechanism appearing in the streamwise scalar flux. Alternating vortex pairs form from the lateral edges of the cube, but the intensity profiles and probability density functions of scalar fluctuations suggest that they do not cause a significant flapping movement of the scalar plume. The gradient-transport scheme is consistent with the vertical and spanwise scalar flux components. From the comparative study with our direct simulations, we further stress that Reynolds stress predictions must be carefully evaluated along with scalar flux closures in order to establish the reliability of

  10. A numerical study of scalar dispersion downstream of a wall-mounted cube using direct simulations and algebraic flux models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, R.; Philips, D.A.; Iaccarino, G.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The computed DNS statistics indicate that a gradient-transport scheme can be applied to the vertical and spanwise scalar flux components. → The streamwise scalar flux is characterized by a counter-gradient transport mechanism in the wake region close to the obstacle. → The wake profiles of scalar fluctuations and the shape of probability density functions do not suggest a significant flapping movement of the scalar plume. → The evaluation of scalar dispersion models must include a careful assessment of the computed mean velocity field and Reynolds stress tensor. → Algebraic models provide an improved prediction of the mean concentration field as compared to the standard eddy-diffusivity model. -- Abstract: The dispersion of a passive scalar downstream of a wall-mounted cube is examined using direct numerical simulations and turbulence models applied to the Reynolds equations. The scalar is released from a circular source located on top of the obstacle, which is immersed in a developing boundary-layer flow. Direct simulations are performed to give insight into the mixing process and to provide a reference database for turbulence closures. Algebraic flux models are evaluated against the standard eddy-diffusivity representation. Coherent structures periodically released from the cube top are responsible for a counter-diffusion mechanism appearing in the streamwise scalar flux. Alternating vortex pairs form from the lateral edges of the cube, but the intensity profiles and probability density functions of scalar fluctuations suggest that they do not cause a significant flapping movement of the scalar plume. The gradient-transport scheme is consistent with the vertical and spanwise scalar flux components. From the comparative study with our direct simulations, we further stress that Reynolds stress predictions must be carefully evaluated along with scalar flux closures in order to establish the reliability of Reynolds

  11. Direct numerical simulation of particle laden flow in a human airway bifurcation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stylianou, Fotos S.; Sznitman, Josué; Kassinos, Stavros C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An anatomically realistic model of a human airway bifurcation is constructed. • Direct numerical simulations are used to study laminar and turbulent airflow. • Aerosol deposition in the bifurcation is studied with lagrangian particle tracking. • Carinal vortices forming during steady expiration are reported for the first time. • Stokes number determines deposition differences between inspiration and expiration. - Abstract: During the delivery of inhaled medicines, and depending on the size distribution of the particles in the formulation, airway bifurcations are areas of preferential deposition. Previous studies of laminar flow through airway bifurcations point to an interplay of inertial and centrifugal forces that leads to rich flow phenomena and controls particle deposition patterns. However, recent computational studies have shown that the airflow in the upper human airways is turbulent during much of the respiratory cycle. The question of how the presence of turbulence modifies these effects remains open. In this study, we perform for the first time Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulent flow through a single human airway bifurcation model, emulating steady prolonged inspiration and expiration. We use the rich information obtained from the DNS in order to identify key structures in the flow field and scrutinize their role in determining deposition patterns in the bifurcation. We find that the vortical structures present in the bifurcation during expiration differ from those identified during inspiration. While Dean vortices are present in both cases, a set of three dimensional “carinal vortices” are identified only during expiration. A set of laminar simulations in the same geometries, but at lower Reynolds numbers, allow us to identify key differences in aerosol deposition patterns between laminar and turbulent respiration. We also report deposition fractions for representative Stokes numbers for both

  12. Formulation and Evaluation of Ascorbic acid Tablets by Direct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formulation and Evaluation of Ascorbic acid Tablets by Direct Compression using Microcrystalline Starch as a Direct Compression Excipient. ... Abstract. PURPOSE: To evaluate the tableting properties of microcrystalline starch (MCS) used as a direct ... RESULTS: Mechanical properties of tablets formulated with MCS were

  13. Memorization in Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balat, Vincent; Danvy, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    We use a code generator—type-directed partial evaluation— to verify conversions between isomorphic types, or more precisely to verify that a composite function is the identity function at some complicated type. A typed functional language such as ML provides a natural support to express the funct...

  14. Evaluating Foreign Direct Investment and Africa's Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The question of Africa's development has continued to occupy the front burner from the social and economic discussions by scholars of various divides. But Africa's development through foreign direct investment has become a recent challenge to the African continent. African social critics and commentators as well as ...

  15. Direct numerical simulation of thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layer subjected to adverse pressure gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hirofumi; Kono, Amane; Houra, Tomoya

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We study various thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layers having adverse pressure gradient (APG) by means of DNS. • The detailed turbulent statistics and structures in various thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layers having APG are discussed. • It is found that the friction coefficient and Stanton number decrease along the streamwise direction due to the effects of stable thermal stratification and APG, but those again increase due to the APG effect in the case of weak stable thermal stratification. • In the case of strong stable stratification with or without APG, the flow separation is observed in the downstream region. - Abstract: The objective of this study is to investigate and observe turbulent heat transfer structures and statistics in thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layers subjected to a non-equilibrium adverse pressure gradient (APG) by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). DNSs are carried out under conditions of neutral, stable and unstable thermal stratifications with a non-equilibrium APG, in which DNS results reveal heat transfer characteristics of thermally-stratified non-equilibrium APG turbulent boundary layers. In cases of thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layers affected by APG, heat transfer performances increase in comparison with a turbulent boundary layer with neutral thermal stratification and zero pressure gradient (ZPG). Especially, it is found that the friction coefficient and Stanton number decrease along the streamwise direction due to the effects of stable thermal stratification and APG, but those again increase due to the APG effect in the case of weak stable thermal stratification (WSBL). Thus, the analysis for both the friction coefficient and Stanton number in the case of WSBL with/without APG is conducted using the FIK identity in order to investigate contributions from the transport equations, in which it is found that both Reynolds-shear-stress and the mean convection terms

  16. Numerical Aerodynamic Evaluation and Noise Investigation of a Bladeless Fan

    OpenAIRE

    mohammad jafari; Hossein Afshin; Bijan Farhanieh; Hamidreza bozorgasareh

    2015-01-01

    Bladeless fan is a novel fan type that has no observable impeller, usually used for domestic applications. Numerical investigation of a Bladeless fan via Finite Volume Method was carried out in this study. The fan was placed in center of a 4×2×2m room and 473 Eppler airfoil profile was used as cross section of the fan. Performance and noise level of the fan by solving continuity and momentum equations as well as noise equations of Broadband Noise Source (BNS) and Ffowcs Williams a...

  17. Osborne Reynolds pipe flow: direct numerical simulation from laminar to fully-developed turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, R. J.; Wu, X.; Moin, P.; Baltzer, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    Osborne Reynolds' pipe experiment marked the onset of modern viscous flow research, yet the detailed mechanism carrying the laminar state to fully-developed turbulence has been quite elusive, despite notable progress related to dynamic edge-state theory. Here, we continue our direct numerical simulation study on this problem using a 250R long, spatially-developing pipe configuration with various Reynolds numbers, inflow disturbances, and inlet base flow states. For the inlet base flow, both fully-developed laminar profile and the uniform plug profile are considered. Inlet disturbances consist of rings of turbulence of different width and radial location. In all the six cases examined so far, energy norms show exponential growth with axial distance until transition after an initial decay near the inlet. Skin-friction overshoots the Moody's correlation in most, but not all, the cases. Another common theme is that lambda vortices amplified out of susceptible elements in the inlet disturbances trigger rapidly growing hairpin packets at random locations and times, after which infant turbulent spots appear. Mature turbulent spots in the pipe transition are actually tight concentrations of hairpin packets looking like a hairpin forest. The plug flow inlet profile requires much stronger disturbances to transition than the parabolic profile.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of an arc-powered heater for used in a hypersonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilbum; Panesi, Marco; Freund, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    We study a model arc-heater using direct numerical simulations, in a configuration motivated by its used to generated inflow of a high-speed wind tunnel for hypersonics research. The flow is assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and is modeled with with 11 species (N2, O2, NO, N, O, N2+,O2+,NO+, N+, O+, e-). The flow equations are solved in conjunction with an electrostatic field solver and the gas electric conductivity in LTE. The flow rate and the mean arc power are set to be 50.42 g/s and 84.7 kW with 214.0 V of the mean arc voltage , respectively. We study the flow details, the heading and thrust mechanisms, and make general comparisons with a corresponding, though geometrically more complex, experimental configuration. We particularly interested in the radical species it produces and will potentially be present in the wind-tunnel test section. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number DE-NA0002374.

  19. Direct numerical simulations of premixed autoignition in compressible uniformly-sheared turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, Colin; Darragh, Ryan; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2017-11-01

    High-speed combustion systems, such as scramjet engines, operate at high temperatures and pressures, extremely short combustor residence times, very high rates of shear stress, and intense turbulent mixing. As a result, the reacting flow can be premixed and have highly-compressible turbulence fluctuations. We investigate the effects of compressible turbulence on the ignition delay time, heat-release-rate (HRR) intermittency, and mode of autoignition of premixed Hydrogen-air fuel in uniformly-sheared turbulence using new three-dimensional direct numerical simulations with a multi-step chemistry mechanism. We analyze autoignition in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian reference frames at eight different turbulence Mach numbers, Mat , spanning the quasi-isentropic, linear thermodynamic, and nonlinear compressibility regimes, with eddy shocklets appearing in the nonlinear regime. Results are compared to our previous study of premixed autoignition in isotropic turbulence at the same Mat and with a single-step reaction mechanism. This previous study found large decreases in delay times and large increases in HRR intermittency between the linear and nonlinear compressibility regimes and that detonation waves could form in both regimes.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer flow on a flared cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruett, C.D. [James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Math. and Comput. Sci.; Chang Chau-Lyan [High Technology Corporation, Hampton, VA 23666 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The forced transition of the boundary layer on an axisymmetric flared cone in Mach 6 flow is simulated by the method of spatial direct numerical simulation (DNS). The full effects of the flared afterbody are incorporated into the governing equations and boundary conditions; these effects include nonzero streamwise surface curvature, adverse streamwise pressure gradient, and decreasing boundary-layer edge Mach number. Transition is precipitated by periodic forcing at the computational inflow boundary with perturbations derived from parabolized stability equation (PSE) methodology and based, in part, on frequency spectra available from physical experiments. Significant qualitative differences are shown to exist between the present results and those obtained previously for a cone without afterbody flare. In both cases, the primary instability is of second-mode type; however, frequencies are much higher for the flared cone because of the decrease in boundary-layer thickness in the flared region. Moreover, Goertler modes, which are linearly stable for the straight cone, are unstable in regions of concave body flare. Reynolds stresses, which peak near the critical layer for the straight cone, exhibit peaks close to the wall for the flared cone. The cumulative effect appears to be that transition onset is shifted upstream for the flared cone. However, the length of the transition zone may possibly be greater because of the seemingly more gradual nature of the transition process on the flared cone. (orig.) With 20 figs., 28 refs.

  1. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer inside an Axisymmetric Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junji; Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step toward a study of acoustic disturbance field within a conventional, hypersonic wind tunnel, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a Mach 6 turbulent boundary layer on the inner wall of a straight axisymmetric nozzle are conducted and the results are compared with those for a flat plate. The DNS results for a nozzle radius to boundary-layer thickness ratio of 5:5 show that the turbulence statistics of the nozzle-wall boundary layer are nearly unaffected by the transverse curvature of the nozzle wall. Before the acoustic waves emanating from different parts of the nozzle surface can interfere with each other and undergo reflections from adjacent portions of the nozzle surface, the rms pressure fluctuation beyond the boundary layer edge increases toward the nozzle axis, apparently due to a focusing effect inside the axisymmetric configuration. Spectral analysis of pressure fluctuations at both the wall and the freestream indicates a similar distribution of energy content for both the nozzle and the flat plate, with the peak of the premultiplied frequency spectrum at a frequency of [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 6.0 inside the free stream and at [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 2.0 along the wall. The present results provide the basis for follow-on simulations involving reverberation effects inside the nozzle.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of steady state, three dimensional, laminar flow around a wall mounted cube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Anastasios; Malamataris, Nikolaos

    2014-11-01

    The topology and evolution of flow around a surface mounted cubical object in three dimensional channel flow is examined for low to moderate Reynolds numbers. Direct numerical simulations were performed via a home made parallel finite element code. The computational domain has been designed according to actual laboratory experimental conditions. Analysis of the results is performed using the three dimensional theory of separation. Our findings indicate that a tornado-like vortex by the side of the cube is present for all Reynolds numbers for which flow was simulated. A horse-shoe vortex upstream from the cube was formed at Reynolds number approximately 1266. Pressure distributions are shown along with three dimensional images of the tornado-like vortex and the horseshoe vortex at selected Reynolds numbers. Finally, and in accordance to previous work, our results indicate that the upper limit for the Reynolds number for which steady state results are physically realizable is roughly 2000. Financial support of author NM from the Office of Naval Research Global (ONRG-VSP, N62909-13-1-V016) is acknowledged.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulation of Flows over an NACA-0012 Airfoil at Low and Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow over an NACA-0012 airfoil are performed at a low and a moderate Reynolds numbers of Re(sub c)=50 times10(exp 3) and 1times 10(exp 6). The angles of attack are 5 and 15 degrees at the low and the moderate Reynolds number cases respectively. The three-dimensional unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using higher order compact schemes. The flow field in the low Reynolds number case consists of a long separation bubble near the leading-edge region and an attached boundary layer on the aft part of the airfoil. The shear layer that formed in the separated region persisted up to the end of the airfoil. The roles of the turbulent diffusion, advection, and dissipation terms in the turbulent kinetic-energy balance equation change as the boundary layer evolves over the airfoil. In the higher Reynolds number case, the leading-edge separation bubble is very small in length and in height. A fully developed turbulent boundary layer is observed in a short distance downstream of the reattachment point. The boundary layer velocity near the wall gradually decreases along the airfoil. Eventually, the boundary layer separates near the trailing edge. The Reynolds stresses peak in the outer part of the boundary layer and the maximum amplitude also gradually increases along the chord.

  5. Multiphase turbulence mechanisms identification from consistent analysis of direct numerical simulation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Magolan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS serves as an irreplaceable tool to probe the complexities of multiphase flow and identify turbulent mechanisms that elude conventional experimental measurement techniques. The insights unlocked via its careful analysis can be used to guide the formulation and development of turbulence models used in multiphase computational fluid dynamics simulations of nuclear reactor applications. Here, we perform statistical analyses of DNS bubbly flow data generated by Bolotnov (Reτ = 400 and Lu–Tryggvason (Reτ = 150, examining single-point statistics of mean and turbulent liquid properties, turbulent kinetic energy budgets, and two-point correlations in space and time. Deformability of the bubble interface is shown to have a dramatic impact on the liquid turbulent stresses and energy budgets. A reduction in temporal and spatial correlations for the streamwise turbulent stress (uu is also observed at wall-normal distances of y+ = 15, y/δ = 0.5, and y/δ = 1.0. These observations motivate the need for adaptation of length and time scales for bubble-induced turbulence models and serve as guidelines for future analyses of DNS bubbly flow data.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of a low momentum round jet in channel crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhao, E-mail: zhao.wu@manchester.ac.uk; Laurence, Dominique; Afgan, Imran

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Detailed flow physics of jet in crossflow with low velocity ratio, R, is analysed. • The horseshoe vortex comes from the reversed jet fluid, different from high R JICF. • CVP comes from the stretching and reorientation of the injection-flow vorticity. • Recirculation is seen at the downstream low-pressure region. • The shear layer vortices are from shed crossflow boundary layer vortices. - Abstract: Results of a direct numerical simulation of a jet in crossflow with passive scalar mixing are presented. The laminar jet issues from a circular exit into the channel crossflow with a low jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 1/6. The governing equations are solved by Incompact3d, an open-source code combining the high-order compact scheme and Poisson spectral solver. An internal recycling approach is used to generate the fully turbulent channel flow profile. Four main flow structures are identified: 1) a large recirculation seen immediately downstream of the jet-exit; 2) a contour-rotating vortex pair formed from the stretching and reorientation of the injection-flow vorticity; 3) a horseshoe vortex generated as a result of the stretching of the vorticity at the jet-exit windward side; 4) shear layer vortices coming from the lifted and shed crossflow boundary layer vorticity. Passive scalar profiles show the mixing are strong in the shear layer where the crossflow fluid encounters the jet fluid. The database is made available online for public access.

  7. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-07-14

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society.

  8. GPU accelerated flow solver for direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvadore, Francesco [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy); Bernardini, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bernardini@uniroma1.it [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ – via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Botti, Michela [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical processing units (GPUs), characterized by significant computing performance, are nowadays very appealing for the solution of computationally demanding tasks in a wide variety of scientific applications. However, to run on GPUs, existing codes need to be ported and optimized, a procedure which is not yet standardized and may require non trivial efforts, even to high-performance computing specialists. In the present paper we accurately describe the porting to CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) of a finite-difference compressible Navier–Stokes solver, suitable for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent flows. Porting and validation processes are illustrated in detail, with emphasis on computational strategies and techniques that can be applied to overcome typical bottlenecks arising from the porting of common computational fluid dynamics solvers. We demonstrate that a careful optimization work is crucial to get the highest performance from GPU accelerators. The results show that the overall speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla S2070 GPU is approximately 22 compared with one AMD Opteron 2352 Barcelona chip and 11 compared with one Intel Xeon X5650 Westmere core. The potential of GPU devices in the simulation of unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows is proved by performing a DNS of a spatially evolving compressible mixing layer.

  9. Reduced-Order Direct Numerical Simulation of Solute Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2017-11-01

    Pore-scale models are an important tool for analyzing fluid dynamics in porous materials (e.g., rocks, soils, fuel cells). Current direct numerical simulation (DNS) techniques, while very accurate, are computationally prohibitive for sample sizes that are statistically representative of the porous structure. Reduced-order approaches such as pore-network models (PNM) aim to approximate the pore-space geometry and physics to remedy this problem. Predictions from current techniques, however, have not always been successful. This work focuses on single-phase transport of a passive solute under advection-dominated regimes and delineates the minimum set of approximations that consistently produce accurate PNM predictions. Novel network extraction (discretization) and particle simulation techniques are developed and compared to high-fidelity DNS simulations for a wide range of micromodel heterogeneities and a single sphere pack. Moreover, common modeling assumptions in the literature are analyzed and shown that they can lead to first-order errors under advection-dominated regimes. This work has implications for optimizing material design and operations in manufactured (electrodes) and natural (rocks) porous media pertaining to energy systems. This work was supported by the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute for Reservoir Simulation (SUPRI-B).

  10. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent combustion: fundamental insights towards predictive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, Evatt R; Sankaran, Ramanan; Sutherland, James C; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2005-01-01

    The advancement of our basic understanding of turbulent combustion processes and the development of physics-based predictive tools for design and optimization of the next generation of combustion devices are strategic areas of research for the development of a secure, environmentally sound energy infrastructure. In direct numerical simulation (DNS) approaches, all scales of the reacting flow problem are resolved. However, because of the magnitude of this task, DNS of practical high Reynolds number turbulent hydrocarbon flames is out of reach of even terascale computing. For the foreseeable future, the approach to this complex multi-scale problem is to employ distinct but synergistic approaches to tackle smaller sub-ranges of the complete problem, which then require models for the small scale interactions. With full access to the spatially and temporally resolved fields, DNS can play a major role in the development of these models and in the development of fundamental understanding of the micro-physics of turbulence-chemistry interactions. Two examples, from simulations performed at terascale Office of Science computing facilities, are presented to illustrate the role of DNS in delivering new insights to advance the predictive capability of models. Results are presented from new three-dimensional DNS with detailed chemistry of turbulent non-premixed jet flames, revealing the differences between mixing of passive and reacting scalars, and determining an optimal lower dimensional representation of the full thermochemical state space

  11. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow over a liquid-infused micro-grooved surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jaehee; Jung, Taeyong; Choi, Haecheon; Kim, John

    2016-11-01

    Recently a superhydrophobic surface has drawn much attention as a passive device to achieve high drag reduction. Despite the high performance promised at ideal conditions, maintaining the interface in real flow conditions is an intractable problem. A non-wetting surface, known as the slippery liquid-infused porous surface (SLIPS) or the lubricant-impregnated surface (LIS), has shown a potential for drag reduction, as the working fluid slips at the interface but cannot penetrate into the lubricant layer. In the present study, we perform direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow over a liquid-infused micro-grooved surface to investigate the effects of this surface on the interfacial slip and drag reduction. The flow rate of water is maintained constant corresponding to Reτ 180 in a fully developed turbulent channel flow, and the lubricant layer is shear-driven by the turbulent water flow. The lubricant layer is also simulated with the assumption that the interface is flat (i.e. the surface tension effect is neglected). The solid substrate in which the lubricant is infused is modelled as straight ridges using an immersed boundary method. DNS results show that drag reduction by the liquid-infused surface is highly dependent on the viscosity of the lubricant.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of stable and unstable turbulent thermal boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hirofumi; Houra, Tomoya; Nagano, Yasutaka

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents direct numerical simulations (DNS) of stable and unstable turbulent thermal boundary layers. Since a buoyancy-affected boundary layer is often encountered in an urban environmental space where stable and unstable stratifications exist, exploring a buoyancy-affected boundary layer is very important to know the transport phenomena of the flow in an urban space. Although actual observation may qualitatively provide the characteristics of these flows, the relevant quantitative turbulent quantities are very difficult to measure. Thus, in order to quantitatively investigate a buoyancy-affected boundary layer in detail, we have here carried out for the first time time- and space-developing DNS of slightly stable and unstable turbulent thermal boundary layers. The DNS results show the quantitative turbulent statistics and structures of stable and unstable thermal boundary layers, in which the characteristic transport phenomena of thermally stratified boundary layers are demonstrated by indicating the budgets of turbulent shear stress and turbulent heat flux. Even though the input of buoyant force is not large, the influence of buoyancy is clearly revealed in both stable and unstable turbulent boundary layers. In particular, it is found that both stable and unstable thermal stratifications caused by the weak buoyant force remarkably alter the structure of near-wall turbulence

  13. Direct numerical simulation of cellular-scale blood flow in microvascular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation method is developed to study cellular-scale blood flow in physiologically realistic microvascular networks that are constructed in silico following published in vivo images and data, and are comprised of bifurcating, merging, and winding vessels. The model resolves large deformation of individual red blood cells (RBC) flowing in such complex networks. The vascular walls and deformable interfaces of the RBCs are modeled using the immersed-boundary methods. Time-averaged hemodynamic quantities obtained from the simulations agree quite well with published in vivo data. Our simulations reveal that in several vessels the flow rates and pressure drops could be negatively correlated. The flow resistance and hematocrit are also found to be negatively correlated in some vessels. These observations suggest a deviation from the classical Poiseuille's law in such vessels. The cells are observed to frequently jam at vascular bifurcations resulting in reductions in hematocrit and flow rate in the daughter and mother vessels. We find that RBC jamming results in several orders of magnitude increase in hemodynamic resistance, and thus provides an additional mechanism of increased in vivo blood viscosity as compared to that determined in vitro. Funded by NSF CBET 1604308.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of a Full Stationary Wind-Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Adnan; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of flow past a full stationary wind-turbine blade is carried out at Reynolds number, Re = 10,000 placed at 0 and 5 (degree) angle of attack. The study is targeted to create a DNS database for verification of solvers and turbulent models that are utilized in wind-turbine modeling applications. The full blade comprises of a circular cylinder base that is attached to a spanwise varying airfoil cross-section profile (without twist). An overlapping composite grid technique is utilized to perform these DNS computations, which permits block structure in the mapped computational space. Different flow shedding regimes are observed along the blade length. Von-Karman shedding is observed in the cylinder shaft region of the turbine blade. Along the airfoil cross-section of the blade, near body shear layer breakdown is observed. A long tip vortex originates from the blade tip region, which exits the computational plane without being perturbed. Laminar to turbulent flow transition is observed along the blade length. The turbulent fluctuations amplitude decreases along the blade length and the flow remains laminar regime in the vicinity of the blade tip. The Strouhal number is found to decrease monotonously along the blade length. Average lift and drag coefficients are also reported for the cases investigated. Supported by funding under a KAUST OCRF-CRG grant.

  15. Direct numerical simulation and statistical analysis of turbulent convection in lead-bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otic, I.; Grotzbach, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institut fuer Kern-und Energietechnik (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Improved turbulent heat flux models are required to develop and analyze the reactor concept of an lead-bismuth cooled Accelerator-Driven-System. Because of specific properties of many liquid metals we have still no sensors for accurate measurements of the high frequency velocity fluctuations. So, the development of the turbulent heat transfer models which are required in our CFD (computational fluid dynamics) tools needs also data from direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows. We use new simulation results for the model problem of Rayleigh-Benard convection to show some peculiarities of the turbulent natural convection in lead-bismuth (Pr = 0.025). Simulations for this flow at sufficiently large turbulence levels became only recently feasible because this flow requires the resolution of very small velocity scales with the need for recording long-wave structures for the slow changes in the convective temperature field. The results are analyzed regarding the principle convection and heat transfer features. They are also used to perform statistical analysis to show that the currently available modeling is indeed not adequate for these fluids. Basing on the knowledge of the details of the statistical features of turbulence in this convection type and using the two-point correlation technique, a proposal for an improved statistical turbulence model is developed which is expected to account better for the peculiarities of the heat transfer in the turbulent convection in low Prandtl number fluids. (authors)

  16. Direct Numerical Simulations of High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers over Riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan, M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially developing turbulent boundary layers over riblets with a broad range of riblet spacings are conducted to investigate the effects of riblets on skin friction at high speeds. Zero-pressure gradient boundary layers under two flow conditions (Mach 2:5 with T(sub w)/T(sub r) = 1 and Mach 7:2 with T(sub w)/T(sub r) = 0:5) are considered. The DNS results show that the drag-reduction curve (delta C(sub f)/C(sub f) vs l(sup +)(sub g )) at both supersonic speeds follows the trend of low-speed data and consists of a `viscous' regime for small riblet size, a `breakdown' regime with optimal drag reduction, and a `drag-increasing' regime for larger riblet sizes. At l l(sup +)(sub g) approx. 10 (corresponding to s+ approx 20 for the current triangular riblets), drag reduction of approximately 7% is achieved at both Mach numbers, and con rms the observations of the few existing experiments under supersonic conditions. The Mach- number dependence of the drag-reduction curve occurs for riblet sizes that are larger than the optimal size, with smaller slopes of (delta C(sub f)/C(sub f) for larger freestream Mach numbers. The Reynolds analogy holds with 2(C(sub h)=C(sub f) approximately equal to that of at plates for both drag-reducing and drag-increasing configurations.

  17. Direct Numerical Simulations of NOx formation in spatially developing turbulent premixed Bunsen flames with mixture inhomogeneity

    KAUST Repository

    Luca, Stefano

    2017-01-05

    Direct Numerical Simulation of three-dimensional spatially developing turbulent methane/air flames are performed. Four flames are simulated; they differ for the level of premixing of the fuel inlet: one has a fully premixed inlet, the other three have a partially premixed inlet that mimic a common injection strategy in stationary gas turbines. The jet consist of a methane/air mixture with global equivalence ratio ɸ = 0.7 and temperature of 800 K. The simulations are performed at 4 atm. The inlet velocity field and the fuel/air fields were extracted from a fully developed turbulent channel simulation. Chemistry is treated with a new skeletal chemical mechanism consisting of 33 species developed specifically for the DNS. The data are analyzed to study possible influences of partial premixing on the flame structure and the combustion efficiency. The results show that increasing the level of partial premixing, the fluctuations of heat release rate increase, due to the richer and leaner pockets of mixture in the flame, while the conditional mean decreases. Increasing the level of partial premixing, the peak of NO and the range of NO values for a given temperature increase. An analysis of NO production is performed categorizing the different initiation steps in the Ndecomposition through four pathways: thermal, prompt, NNH and NO. Different behaviour with respect to laminar flames is found for the NNH pathway suggesting that turbulence influences this pathway of formation of NO.

  18. Numerical simulation of internal and near-nozzle flow of a gasoline direct injection fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kaushik; Som, Sibendu; Battistoni, Michele; Li, Yanheng; Quan, Shaoping; Senecal, Peter Kelly

    2015-12-01

    A numerical study of two-phase flow inside the nozzle holes and the issuing spray jets for a multi-hole direct injection gasoline injector has been presented in this work. The injector geometry is representative of the Spray G nozzle, an eight-hole counterbore injector, from, the Engine Combustion Network (ECN). Simulations have been carried out for the fixed needle lift. Effects of turbulence, compressibility and, non-condensable gases have been considered in this work. Standard k—ɛ turbulence model has been used to model the turbulence. Homogeneous Relaxation Model (HRM) coupled with Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach has been utilized to capture the phase change phenomena inside and outside the injector nozzle. Three different boundary conditions for the outlet domain have been imposed to examine non-flashing and evaporative, non-flashing and non-evaporative, and flashing conditions. Inside the nozzle holes mild cavitation-like and in the near-nozzle region flash boiling phenomena have been predicted in this study when liquid fuel is subjected to superheated ambiance. Noticeable hole to hole variation has been also observed in terms of mass flow rates for all the holes under both flashing and non-flashing conditions.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  20. Slow transition of the Osborne Reynolds pipe flow: A direct numerical simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Adrian, Ronald J.; Baltzer, Jon R.

    2015-11-01

    Osborne Reynolds' pipe transition experiment marked the onset of fundamental turbulence research, yet the precise dynamics carrying the laminar state to fully-developed turbulence has been quite elusive. Our spatially-developing direct numerical simulation of this problem reveals interesting connections with theory and experiments. In particular, during transition the energy norms of localized, weakly finite inlet perturbations grow exponentially, rather than algebraically, with axial distance, in agreement with the edge-state based temporal results of Schneider et al. (PRL, 034502, 2007). When inlet disturbance is the core region, helical vortex filaments evolve into large-scale reverse hairpin vortices. The interaction of these reverse hairpins among themselves or with the near-wall flow produces small-scale hairpin packets. When inlet disturbance is near the wall, optimally positioned quasi-spanwise structure is stretched into a Lambda vortex, which grows into a turbulent spot of concentrated small-scale hairpin vortices. Waves of hairpin-like structures were observed by Mullin (Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech., Vol.43, 2011) in their experiment with very weak blowing and suction. This vortex dynamics is broadly analogous to that in the boundary layer bypass transition and in the secondary instability and breakdown stage of natural transition. Further details of our simulation are reported in Wu et al. (PNAS, 1509451112, 2015).

  1. Scalability of Parallel Spatial Direct Numerical Simulations on Intel Hypercube and IBM SP1 and SP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Hanebutte, Ulf R.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1995-01-01

    The implementation and performance of a parallel spatial direct numerical simulation (PSDNS) approach on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube and IBM SP1 and SP2 parallel computers is documented. Spatially evolving disturbances associated with the laminar-to-turbulent transition in boundary-layer flows are computed with the PSDNS code. The feasibility of using the PSDNS to perform transition studies on these computers is examined. The results indicate that PSDNS approach can effectively be parallelized on a distributed-memory parallel machine by remapping the distributed data structure during the course of the calculation. Scalability information is provided to estimate computational costs to match the actual costs relative to changes in the number of grid points. By increasing the number of processors, slower than linear speedups are achieved with optimized (machine-dependent library) routines. This slower than linear speedup results because the computational cost is dominated by FFT routine, which yields less than ideal speedups. By using appropriate compile options and optimized library routines on the SP1, the serial code achieves 52-56 M ops on a single node of the SP1 (45 percent of theoretical peak performance). The actual performance of the PSDNS code on the SP1 is evaluated with a "real world" simulation that consists of 1.7 million grid points. One time step of this simulation is calculated on eight nodes of the SP1 in the same time as required by a Cray Y/MP supercomputer. For the same simulation, 32-nodes of the SP1 and SP2 are required to reach the performance of a Cray C-90. A 32 node SP1 (SP2) configuration is 2.9 (4.6) times faster than a Cray Y/MP for this simulation, while the hypercube is roughly 2 times slower than the Y/MP for this application. KEY WORDS: Spatial direct numerical simulations; incompressible viscous flows; spectral methods; finite differences; parallel computing.

  2. Evaluating Cloud and Precipitation Processes in Numerical Models using Current and Potential Future Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Tao, W. K.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Tanelli, S.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Petersen, W. A.; Kummerow, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud, aerosol and precipitation processes play a fundamental role in the water and energy cycle. It is critical to accurately represent these microphysical processes in numerical models if we are to better predict cloud and precipitation properties on weather through climate timescales. Much has been learned about cloud properties and precipitation characteristics from NASA satellite missions such as TRMM, CloudSat, and more recently GPM. Furthermore, data from these missions have been successfully utilized in evaluating the microphysical schemes in cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and global models. However, there are still many uncertainties associated with these microphysics schemes. These uncertainties can be attributed, at least in part, to the fact that microphysical processes cannot be directly observed or measured, but instead have to be inferred from those cloud properties that can be measured. Evaluation of microphysical parameterizations are becoming increasingly important as enhanced computational capabilities are facilitating the use of more sophisticated schemes in CRMs, and as future global models are being run on what has traditionally been regarded as cloud-resolving scales using CRM microphysical schemes. In this talk we will demonstrate how TRMM, CloudSat and GPM data have been used to evaluate different aspects of current CRM microphysical schemes, providing examples of where these approaches have been successful. We will also highlight CRM microphysical processes that have not been well evaluated and suggest approaches for addressing such issues. Finally, we will introduce a potential NASA satellite mission, the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CAPPM), which would facilitate the development and evaluation of different microphysical-dynamical feedbacks in numerical models.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of MHD heat transfer in high Reynolds number turbulent channel flows for Prandtl number of 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, the MHD heat transfer DNS database corresponding to the typical nondimensional parameters of the fusion blanket design using molten salt, were established. • MHD heat transfer correlation was proposed and about 20% of the heat transfer degradation was evaluated under the design conditions. • The contribution of the turbulent diffusion to heat transfer is increased drastically with increasing Hartmann number. - Abstract: The high-Prandtl number passive scalar transport of the turbulent channel flow imposed a wall-normal magnetic field is investigated through the large-scale direct numerical simulation (DNS). All essential turbulence scales of velocities and temperature are resolved by using 2048 × 870 × 1024 computational grid points in stream, vertical, and spanwise directions. The heat transfer phenomena for a Prandtl number of 25 were observed under the following flow conditions: the bulk Reynolds number of 14,000 and Hartman number of up to 28. These values were equivalent to the typical nondimensional parameters of the fusion blanket design proposed by Wong et al. As a result, a high-accuracy DNS database for the verification of magnetohydrodynamic turbulent heat transfer models was established for the first time, and it was confirmed that the heat transfer correlation for a Prandtl number of 5.25 proposed by Yamamoto and Kunugi was applicable to the Prandtl number of 25 used in this study

  4. Direct numerical simulation of MHD heat transfer in high Reynolds number turbulent channel flows for Prandtl number of 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu, E-mail: yamamotoy@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Kunugi, Tomoaki [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Yoshida, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, the MHD heat transfer DNS database corresponding to the typical nondimensional parameters of the fusion blanket design using molten salt, were established. • MHD heat transfer correlation was proposed and about 20% of the heat transfer degradation was evaluated under the design conditions. • The contribution of the turbulent diffusion to heat transfer is increased drastically with increasing Hartmann number. - Abstract: The high-Prandtl number passive scalar transport of the turbulent channel flow imposed a wall-normal magnetic field is investigated through the large-scale direct numerical simulation (DNS). All essential turbulence scales of velocities and temperature are resolved by using 2048 × 870 × 1024 computational grid points in stream, vertical, and spanwise directions. The heat transfer phenomena for a Prandtl number of 25 were observed under the following flow conditions: the bulk Reynolds number of 14,000 and Hartman number of up to 28. These values were equivalent to the typical nondimensional parameters of the fusion blanket design proposed by Wong et al. As a result, a high-accuracy DNS database for the verification of magnetohydrodynamic turbulent heat transfer models was established for the first time, and it was confirmed that the heat transfer correlation for a Prandtl number of 5.25 proposed by Yamamoto and Kunugi was applicable to the Prandtl number of 25 used in this study.

  5. Cloud-edge mixing: Direct numerical simulation and observations in Indian Monsoon clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bipin; Bera, Sudarsan; Prabha, Thara V.; Grabowski, Wojceich W.

    2017-03-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) with the decaying turbulence setup has been carried out to study cloud-edge mixing and its impact on the droplet size distribution (DSD) applying thermodynamic conditions observed in monsoon convective clouds over Indian subcontinent during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement EXperiment (CAIPEEX). Evaporation at the cloud-edges initiates mixing at small scale and gradually introduces larger-scale fluctuations of the temperature, moisture, and vertical velocity due to droplet evaporation. Our focus is on early evolution of simulated fields that show intriguing similarities to the CAIPEEX cloud observations. A strong dilution at the cloud edge, accompanied by significant spatial variations of the droplet concentration, mean radius, and spectral width, are found in both the DNS and in observations. In DNS, fluctuations of the mean radius and spectral width come from the impact of small-scale turbulence on the motion and evaporation of inertial droplets. These fluctuations decrease with the increase of the volume over which DNS data are averaged, as one might expect. In cloud observations, these fluctuations also come from other processes, such as entrainment/mixing below the observation level, secondary CCN activation, or variations of CCN activation at the cloud base. Despite large differences in the spatial and temporal scales, the mixing diagram often used in entrainment/mixing studies with aircraft data is remarkably similar for both DNS and cloud observations. We argue that the similarity questions applicability of heuristic ideas based on mixing between two air parcels (that the mixing diagram is designed to properly represent) to the evolution of microphysical properties during turbulent mixing between a cloud and its environment.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of numerical weather prediction radiative schemes to forecast direct solar radiation over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkavilli, S. K.; Kay, M. J.; Taylor, R.; Prasad, A. A.; Troccoli, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Australian Solar Energy Forecasting System (ASEFS) project requires forecasting timeframes which range from nowcasting to long-term forecasts (minutes to two years). As concentrating solar power (CSP) plant operators are one of the key stakeholders in the national energy market, research and development enhancements for direct normal irradiance (DNI) forecasts is a major subtask. This project involves comparing different radiative scheme codes to improve day ahead DNI forecasts on the national supercomputing infrastructure running mesoscale simulations on NOAA's Weather Research & Forecast (WRF) model. ASEFS also requires aerosol data fusion for improving accurate representation of spatio-temporally variable atmospheric aerosols to reduce DNI bias error in clear sky conditions over southern Queensland & New South Wales where solar power is vulnerable to uncertainities from frequent aerosol radiative events such as bush fires and desert dust. Initial results from thirteen years of Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) deseasonalised DNI and MODIS NASA-Terra aerosol optical depth (AOD) anomalies demonstrated strong negative correlations in north and southeast Australia along with strong variability in AOD (~0.03-0.05). Radiative transfer schemes, DNI and AOD anomaly correlations will be discussed for the population and transmission grid centric regions where current and planned CSP plants dispatch electricity to capture peak prices in the market. Aerosol and solar irradiance datasets include satellite and ground based assimilations from the national BOM, regional aerosol researchers and agencies. The presentation will provide an overview of this ASEFS project task on WRF and results to date. The overall goal of this ASEFS subtask is to develop a hybrid numerical weather prediction (NWP) and statistical/machine learning multi-model ensemble strategy that meets future operational requirements of CSP plant operators.

  7. A direct numerical simulation of cool-flame affected autoignition in diesel engine-relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisman, Alexander; Hawkes, Evatt Robert.; Talei, Mohsen; Bhagatwala, Ankit; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-11-11

    In diesel engines, combustion is initiated by a two-staged autoignition that includes both low- and high-temperature chemistry. The location and timing of both stages of autoignition are important parameters that influence the development and stabilisation of the flame. In this study, a two-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) is conducted to provide a fully resolved description of ignition at diesel engine-relevant conditions. The DNS is performed at a pressure of 40 atmospheres and at an ambient temperature of 900 K using dimethyl ether (DME) as the fuel, with a 30 species reduced chemical mechanism. At these conditions, similar to diesel fuel, DME exhibits two-stage ignition. The focus of this study is on the behaviour of the low-temperature chemistry (LTC) and the way in which it influences the high-temperature ignition. The results show that the LTC develops as a “spotty” first-stage autoignition in lean regions which transitions to a diffusively supported cool-flame and then propagates up the local mixture fraction gradient towards richer regions. The cool-flame speed is much faster than can be attributed to spatial gradients in first-stage ignition delay time in homogeneous reactors. The cool-flame causes a shortening of the second-stage ignition delay times compared to a homogeneous reactor and the shortening becomes more pronounced at richer mixtures. Multiple high-temperature ignition kernels are observed over a range of rich mixtures that are much richer than the homogeneous most reactive mixture and most kernels form much earlier than suggested by the homogeneous ignition delay time of the corresponding local mixture. Altogether, the results suggest that LTC can strongly influence both the timing and location in composition space of the high-temperature ignition.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing at very low Schmidt number with a uniform mean gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, P. K.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent direct numerical simulation (DNS) study [P. K. Yeung and K. R. Sreenivasan, "Spectrum of passive scalars of high molecular diffusivity in turbulent mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 716, R14 (2013)] with Schmidt number as low as 1/2048, we verified the essential physical content of the theory of Batchelor, Howells, and Townsend ["Small-scale variation of convected quantities like temperature in turbulent fluid. 2. The case of large conductivity," J. Fluid Mech. 5, 134 (1959)] for turbulent passive scalar fields with very strong diffusivity, decaying in the absence of any production mechanism. In particular, we confirmed the existence of the -17/3 power of the scalar spectral density in the so-called inertial-diffusive range. In the present paper, we consider the DNS of the same problem, but in the presence of a uniform mean gradient, which leads to the production of scalar fluctuations at (primarily) the large scales. For the parameters of the simulations, the presence of the mean gradient alters the physics of mixing fundamentally at low Peclet numbers. While the spectrum still follows a -17/3 power law in the inertial-diffusive range, the pre-factor is non-universal and depends on the magnitude of the mean scalar gradient. Spectral transfer is greatly reduced in comparison with those for moderately and weakly diffusive scalars, leading to several distinctive features such as the absence of dissipative anomaly and a new balance of terms in the spectral transfer equation for the scalar variance, differing from the case of zero gradient. We use the DNS results to present an alternative explanation for the observed scaling behavior, and discuss a few spectral characteristics in detail.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of an isothermal reacting turbulent wall-jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouransari, Zeinab; Brethouwer, Geert; Johansson, Arne V.

    2011-08-01

    In the present investigation, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to study a binary irreversible and isothermal reaction in a plane turbulent wall-jet. The flow is compressible and a single-step global reaction between an oxidizer and a fuel species is solved. The inlet based Reynolds, Schmidt, and Mach numbers of the wall-jet are Re = 2000, Sc = 0.72, and M = 0.5, respectively, and a constant coflow velocity is applied above the jet. At the inlet, fuel and oxidizer enter the domain separately in a non-premixed manner. The turbulent structures of the velocity field show the common streaky patterns near the wall, while a somewhat patchy or spotty pattern is observed for the scalars and the reaction rate fluctuations in the near-wall region. The reaction mainly occurs in the upper shear layer in thin highly convoluted reaction zones, but it also takes place close to the wall. Analysis of turbulence and reaction statistics confirms the observations in the instantaneous snapshots, regarding the intermittent character of the reaction rate near the wall. A detailed study of the probability density functions of the reacting scalars and comparison to that of the passive scalar throughout the domain reveals the significance of the reaction influence as well as the wall effects on the scalar distributions. The higher order moments of both the velocities and the scalar concentrations are analyzed and show a satisfactory agreement with experiments. The simulations show that the reaction can both enhance and reduce the dissipation of fuel scalar, since there are two competing effects; on the one hand, the reaction causes sharper scalar gradients and thus a higher dissipation rate, on the other hand, the reaction consumes the fuel scalar thereby reducing the scalar dissipation.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of bubble dynamics in subcooled and near-saturated convective nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Sreeyuth; Sato, Yohei; Niceno, Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We simulate convective nucleate pool boiling with a novel phase-change model. • We simulate four cases at different sub-cooling and wall superheat levels. • We investigate the flow structures around the growing bubble and analyze the accompanying physics. • We accurately simulate bubble shape elongation and enhanced wall cooling due to the sliding and slanting motions of bubbles. • Bubble cycle durations show good agreement with experimental observations. - Abstract: With the long-term objective of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) prediction, bubble dynamics in convective nucleate boiling flows has been studied using a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). A sharp-interface phase change model which was originally developed for pool boiling flows is extended to convective boiling flows. For physical scales smaller than the smallest flow scales (smaller than the grid size), a micro-scale model was used. After a grid dependency study and a parametric study for the contact angle, four cases of simulation were carried out with different wall superheat and degree of subcooling. The flow structures around the growing bubble were investigated together with the accompanying physics. The relation between the heat flux evolution and the bubble growth was studied, along with investigations of bubble diameter and bubble base diameter evolutions across the four cases. As a validation, the evolutions of bubble diameter and bubble base diameter were compared to experimental observations. The bubble departure period and the bubble shapes show good agreement between the experiment and the simulation, although the Reynolds number of the simulation cases is relatively low

  11. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Parkinson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier–Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of reactor two-phase flows enabled by high-performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jun; Cambareri, Joseph J.; Brown, Cameron S.; Feng, Jinyong; Gouws, Andre; Li, Mengnan; Bolotnov, Igor A.

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear reactor two-phase flows remain a great engineering challenge, where the high-resolution two-phase flow database which can inform practical model development is still sparse due to the extreme reactor operation conditions and measurement difficulties. Owing to the rapid growth of computing power, the direct numerical simulation (DNS) is enjoying a renewed interest in investigating the related flow problems. A combination between DNS and an interface tracking method can provide a unique opportunity to study two-phase flows based on first principles calculations. More importantly, state-of-the-art high-performance computing (HPC) facilities are helping unlock this great potential. This paper reviews the recent research progress of two-phase flow DNS related to reactor applications. The progress in large-scale bubbly flow DNS has been focused not only on the sheer size of those simulations in terms of resolved Reynolds number, but also on the associated advanced modeling and analysis techniques. Specifically, the current areas of active research include modeling of sub-cooled boiling, bubble coalescence, as well as the advanced post-processing toolkit for bubbly flow simulations in reactor geometries. A novel bubble tracking method has been developed to track the evolution of bubbles in two-phase bubbly flow. Also, spectral analysis of DNS database in different geometries has been performed to investigate the modulation of the energy spectrum slope due to bubble-induced turbulence. In addition, the single-and two-phase analysis results are presented for turbulent flows within the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core geometries. The related simulations are possible to carry out only with the world leading HPC platforms. These simulations are allowing more complex turbulence model development and validation for use in 3D multiphase computational fluid dynamics (M-CFD) codes.

  13. Large eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Frankel, S. H.; Madnia, C. K.; Givi, P.

    The objective of this research is to make use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first phase of this research conducted within the past three years have been directed in several issues pertaining to intricate physics of turbulent reacting flows. In our previous 5 semi-annual reports submitted to NASA LaRC, as well as several technical papers in archival journals, the results of our investigations have been fully described. In this progress report which is different in format as compared to our previous documents, we focus only on the issue of LES. The reason for doing so is that LES is the primary issue of interest to our Technical Monitor and that our other findings were needed to support the activities conducted under this prime issue. The outcomes of our related investigations, nevertheless, are included in the appendices accompanying this report. The relevance of the materials in these appendices are, therefore, discussed only briefly within the body of the report. Here, results are presented of a priori and a posterior analyses for validity assessments of assumed Probability Density Function (PDF) methods as potential subgrid scale (SGS) closures for LES of turbulent reacting flows. Simple non-premixed reacting systems involving an isothermal reaction of the type A + B yields Products under both chemical equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions are considered. A priori analyses are conducted of a homogeneous box flow, and a spatially developing planar mixing layer to investigate the performance of the Pearson Family of PDF's as SGS models. A posteriori analyses are conducted of the mixing layer using a hybrid one-equation Smagorinsky/PDF SGS closure. The Smagorinsky closure augmented by the solution of the subgrid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is employed to account for hydrodynamic fluctuations, and the PDF is employed for modeling the

  14. Evaluation of deconvolution modelling applied to numerical combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Cédric; Idier, Jérôme; Fiorina, Benoît

    2018-01-01

    A possible modelling approach in the large eddy simulation (LES) of reactive flows is to deconvolve resolved scalars. Indeed, by inverting the LES filter, scalars such as mass fractions are reconstructed. This information can be used to close budget terms of filtered species balance equations, such as the filtered reaction rate. Being ill-posed in the mathematical sense, the problem is very sensitive to any numerical perturbation. The objective of the present study is to assess the ability of this kind of methodology to capture the chemical structure of premixed flames. For that purpose, three deconvolution methods are tested on a one-dimensional filtered laminar premixed flame configuration: the approximate deconvolution method based on Van Cittert iterative deconvolution, a Taylor decomposition-based method, and the regularised deconvolution method based on the minimisation of a quadratic criterion. These methods are then extended to the reconstruction of subgrid scale profiles. Two methodologies are proposed: the first one relies on subgrid scale interpolation of deconvolved profiles and the second uses parametric functions to describe small scales. Conducted tests analyse the ability of the method to capture the chemical filtered flame structure and front propagation speed. Results show that the deconvolution model should include information about small scales in order to regularise the filter inversion. a priori and a posteriori tests showed that the filtered flame propagation speed and structure cannot be captured if the filter size is too large.

  15. Numerical evaluation of methods for computing tomographic projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, W.; Gopal, S.S.; Hebert, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods for computing forward/back projections of 2-D images can be viewed as numerical integration techniques. The accuracy of any ray-driven projection method can be improved by increasing the number of ray-paths that are traced per projection bin. The accuracy of pixel-driven projection methods can be increased by dividing each pixel into a number of smaller sub-pixels and projecting each sub-pixel. The authors compared four competing methods of computing forward/back projections: bilinear interpolation, ray-tracing, pixel-driven projection based upon sub-pixels, and pixel-driven projection based upon circular, rather than square, pixels. This latter method is equivalent to a fast, bi-nonlinear interpolation. These methods and the choice of the number of ray-paths per projection bin or the number of sub-pixels per pixel present a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy. To solve the problem of assessing backprojection accuracy, the analytical inverse Fourier transform of the ramp filtered forward projection of the Shepp and Logan head phantom is derived

  16. Evaluation and purchase of confocal microscopes: Numerous factors to consider

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purchase of a confocal microscope can be a complex and difficult decision for an individual scientist, group or evaluation committee. This is true even for scientists that have used confocal technology for many years. The task of reaching the optimal decision becomes almost i...

  17. Computer numeric control subaperture aspheric surface polishing—microroughness evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procháska, František; Polák, Jaroslav; Matoušek, O.; Tomka, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 9 (2014), 092011-092011 ISSN 0091-3286 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0079 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : aspheric polishing * optic surface microroughness evaluation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.954, year: 2014 http://opticalengineering.spiedigitallibrary.org/article.aspx?articleid=1901511

  18. Numerical modeling on air quality in an urban environment with changes of the aspect ratio and wind direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Mohamed F

    2013-06-01

    Due to heavy traffic emissions within an urban environment, air quality during the last decade becomes worse year by year and hazard to public health. In the present work, numerical modeling of flow and dispersion of gaseous emissions from vehicle exhaust in a street canyon were investigated under changes of the aspect ratio and wind direction. The three-dimensional flow and dispersion of gaseous pollutants were modeled using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model which was numerically solved using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The diffusion flow field in the atmospheric boundary layer within the street canyon was studied for different aspect ratios (W/H=1/2, 3/4, and 1) and wind directions (θ=90°, 112.5°, 135°, and 157.5°). The numerical models were validated against wind tunnel results to optimize the turbulence model. The numerical results agreed well with the wind tunnel results. The simulation demonstrated that the minimum concentration at the human respiration height within the street canyon was on the windward side for aspect ratios W/H=1/2 and 1 and wind directions θ=112.5°, 135°, and 157.5°. The pollutant concentration level decreases as the wind direction and aspect ratio increase. The wind velocity and turbulence intensity increase as the aspect ratio and wind direction increase.

  19. Evaluation of Offshore Wind Turbine Tower Dynamics with Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begum Yurdanur Dagli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic behaviour of a cylindirical wind tower with variable cross section is investigated under environmental and earthquake forces. The ground acceleration term is represented by a simple cosine function to investigate both normal and parallel components of the earthquake motions located near ground surface. The function of earthquake force is simplified to apply Rayleigh’s energy method. Wind forces acting on above the water level and wave forces acting on below this level are utilized in computations considering earthquake effect for entire structure. The wind force is divided into two groups: the force acting on the tower and the forces acting on the rotor nacelle assembly (RNA. The drag and the inertial wave forces are calculated with water particle velocities and accelerations due to linear wave theory. The resulting hydrodynamic wave force on the tower in an unsteady viscous flow is determined using the Morison equation. The displacement function of the physical system in which dynamic analysis is performed by Rayleigh’s energy method is obtained by the single degree of freedom (SDOF model. The equation of motion is solved by the fourth-order Runge–Kutta method. The two-way FSI (fluid-structure interaction technique was used to determine the accuracy of the numerical analysis. The results of computational fluid dynamics and structural mechanics are coupled in FSI analysis by using ANSYS software. Time-varying lateral displacements and the first natural frequency values which are obtained from Rayleigh’s energy method and FSI technique are compared. The results are presented by graphs. It is observed from these graphs that the Rayleigh model can be an alternative way at the prelimanary stage of the structural analysis with acceptable accuracy.

  20. Evaluation of cladding residual stresses in clad blocks by measurements and numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupas, P.; Moinereau, D.

    1996-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessels are internally clad with austenitic stainless steel. This welding operation generates residual stresses which can have an important role in integrity assessments. In order to evaluate these stresses, an experimental and numerical programme has been conducted. The experiments includes cladding operations, macrographic analyses, temperature and residual stresses measurements with different methods. According to these measurements, transversal stresses (perpendicular to the welding direction) and longitudinal stresses (parallel to the welding direction) are highly tensile in stainless steel and they are compressive in the HAZ. Finite element calculations were used to simulate both welding operations and post weld heat treatment. These calculations coupled the thermal, metallurgical and mechanical aspects in a 2D representation. Different models were studied including effect of generalised plane strain, transformation plasticity, creep and tempering. The transversal stresses calculated are similar to the measured ones, but the longitudinal stresses showed to be very sensitive to the model used. As expected because of the two-dimension model, the longitudinal stresses can't be well estimated. More work is needed to improve measurements of stresses in depth (important differences appeared between the different methods). A predictive model would be also very useful to determine the thermal loading which is at present dependant on measurements. A 3D calculation appears to be necessary to evaluate longitudinal stresses. (orig.)

  1. Numerical Evaluation of Storm Surge Indices for Public Advisory Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, B.; Bedient, P. B.; Dawson, C.; Proft, J.

    2016-12-01

    After the devastating hurricane season of 2005, shortcomings with the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale's (SSHS) ability to characterize a tropical cyclones potential to generate storm surge became widely apparent. As a result, several alternative surge indices were proposed to replace the SSHS, including Powell and Reinhold's Integrated Kinetic Energy (IKE) factor, Kantha's Hurricane Surge Index (HSI), and Irish and Resio's Surge Scale (SS). Of the previous, the IKE factor is the only surge index to-date that truly captures a tropical cyclones integrated intensity, size, and wind field distribution. However, since the IKE factor was proposed in 2007, an accurate assessment of this surge index has not been performed. This study provides the first quantitative evaluation of the IKEs ability to serve as a predictor of a tropical cyclones potential surge impacts as compared to other alternative surge indices. Using the tightly coupled ADvanced CIRCulation and Simulating WAves Nearshore models, the surge and wave responses of Hurricane Ike (2008) and 78 synthetic tropical cyclones were evaluated against the SSHS, IKE, HSI and SS. Results along the upper TX coast of the Gulf of Mexico demonstrate that the HSI performs best in capturing the peak surge response of a tropical cyclone, while the IKE accounting for winds greater than tropical storm intensity (IKETS) provides the most accurate estimate of a tropical cyclones regional surge impacts. These results demonstrate that the appropriate selection of a surge index ultimately depends on what information is of interest to be conveyed to the public and/or scientific community.

  2. Scalar Dissipation Modeling for Passive and Active Scalars: a priori Study Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, L. C.; Bellan, Josette

    2006-01-01

    Transitional databases from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of three-dimensional mixing layers for single-phase flows and two-phase flows with evaporation are analyzed and used to examine the typical hypothesis that the scalar dissipation Probability Distribution Function (PDF) may be modeled as a Gaussian. The databases encompass a single-component fuel and four multicomponent fuels, two initial Reynolds numbers (Re), two mass loadings for two-phase flows and two free-stream gas temperatures. Using the DNS calculated moments of the scalar-dissipation PDF, it is shown, consistent with existing experimental information on single-phase flows, that the Gaussian is a modest approximation of the DNS-extracted PDF, particularly poor in the range of the high scalar-dissipation values, which are significant for turbulent reaction rate modeling in non-premixed flows using flamelet models. With the same DNS calculated moments of the scalar-dissipation PDF and making a change of variables, a model of this PDF is proposed in the form of the (beta)-PDF which is shown to approximate much better the DNS-extracted PDF, particularly in the regime of the high scalar-dissipation values. Several types of statistical measures are calculated over the ensemble of the fourteen databases. For each statistical measure, the proposed (beta)-PDF model is shown to be much superior to the Gaussian in approximating the DNS-extracted PDF. Additionally, the agreement between the DNS-extracted PDF and the (beta)-PDF even improves when the comparison is performed for higher initial Re layers, whereas the comparison with the Gaussian is independent of the initial Re values. For two-phase flows, the comparison between the DNS-extracted PDF and the (beta)-PDF also improves with increasing free-stream gas temperature and mass loading. The higher fidelity approximation of the DNS-extracted PDF by the (beta)-PDF with increasing Re, gas temperature and mass loading bodes well for turbulent reaction rate

  3. Numerical evaluation of one-loop diagrams near exceptional momentum configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giele, Walter T.; Zanderighi, Giulia; Glover, E.W.N.

    2004-01-01

    One problem which plagues the numerical evaluation of one-loop Feynman diagrams using recursive integration by part relations is a numerical instability near exceptional momentum configurations. In this contribution we will discuss a generic solution to this problem. As an example we consider the case of forward light-by-light scattering

  4. Direct numerical simulation of complex multi-fluid flows using a combined front tracking and immersed boundary method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, N.G.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a simulation model is presented for the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of complex multi-fluid flows in which simultaneously (moving) deformable (drops or bubbles) and non-deformable (moving) elements (particles) are present, possibly with the additional presence of free surfaces.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of fluid-particle heat transfer in fixed random arrays of non-spherical particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavassoli Estahbanati, H.; Peters, E.A.J.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are conducted to characterize the fluid-particle heat transfer coefficient in fixed random arrays of non-spherical particles. The objective of this study is to examine the applicability of well-known heat transfer correlations, that are proposed for spherical particles,

  6. SMILE: numerical evaluation of the WPS validation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Studer, V.; Dahl, A.; Wadier, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is an essential component liable to limit the lifetime duration of nuclear PWR power plants. The structural integrity assessment of RPV subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTA) transients made at an European level does not take always into account the potential beneficial effect of the load history (warm pre-stress WPS). A three-year European Research and Development program (SMILE) started in January 2002 as part of the Fifth Framework Program of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) to evaluate this effect. The SMILE project is one of a ''cluster'' of Fifth Framework Projects in the area of Plant Life Management. It aims to give sufficient elements to model and to validate the beneficial WPS effect in a RPV structural integrity assessment. Finally, this project aims to harmonize the different approaches to lay the basis for European codes and standards regarding the inclusion of the warm pre-stress (WPS) effect in the RPV assessments. Within the framework of this project, an important experimental work has been conducted including WPS type tests on CT specimens and also a PTS type transient experiment on a large cracked cylinder. The present paper describes shortly the PTS type experiment and presents the corresponding analyses based on engineering methods, finite element elastic and elastic-plastic computations, and local approach to fracture. The results are in good agreement with the experimental result. Significant margins are underlined, with an effective significant increase of the material resistance regarding the risk of brittle failure. (orig.)

  7. NASA Numerical and Experimental Evaluation of UTRC Low Emissions Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Anderson, Robert C.; Iannetti, Anthony C.; Smith, Lance L.; Dai, Zhongtao

    2014-01-01

    Computational and experimental analyses of a PICS-Pilot-In-Can-Swirler technology injector, developed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) are presented. NASA has defined technology targets for near term (called "N+1", circa 2015), midterm ("N+2", circa 2020) and far term ("N+3", circa 2030) that specify realistic emissions and fuel efficiency goals for commercial aircraft. This injector has potential for application in an engine to meet the Pratt & Whitney N+3 supersonic cycle goals, or the subsonic N+2 engine cycle goals. Experimental methods were employed to investigate supersonic cruise points as well as select points of the subsonic cycle engine; cruise, approach, and idle with a slightly elevated inlet pressure. Experiments at NASA employed gas analysis and a suite of laser-based measurement techniques to characterize the combustor flow downstream from the PICS dump plane. Optical diagnostics employed for this work included Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence of fuel for injector spray pattern and Spontaneous Raman Spectroscopy for relative species concentration of fuel and CO2. The work reported here used unheated (liquid) Jet-A fuel for all fuel circuits and cycle conditions. The initial tests performed by UTRC used vaporized Jet-A to simulate the expected supersonic cruise condition, which anticipated using fuel as a heat sink. Using the National Combustion Code a PICS-based combustor was modeled with liquid fuel at the supersonic cruise condition. All CFD models used a cubic non-linear k-epsilon turbulence wall functions model, and a semi-detailed Jet-A kinetic mechanism based on a surrogate fuel mixture. Two initial spray droplet size distribution and spray cone conditions were used: (1) an initial condition (Lefebvre) with an assumed Rosin-Rammler distribution, and 7 degree Solid Spray Cone; and (2) the Boundary Layer Stripping (BLS) primary atomization model giving the spray size distribution and directional properties. Contour and line plots

  8. Wave Transformation Over Reefs: Evaluation of One-Dimensional Numerical Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Demirbilek, Zeki; Nwogu, Okey G; Ward, Donald L; Sanchez, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Three one-dimensional (1D) numerical wave models are evaluated for wave transformation over reefs and estimates of wave setup, runup, and ponding levels in an island setting where the beach is fronted by fringing reef and lagoons...

  9. Direct Time Domain Numerical Analysis of Transient Behavior of a VLFS during Unsteady External Loads in Wave Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient response of the VLFS subjected to arbitrary external load is systematically investigated by a direct time domain modal expansion method, in which the BEM solutions based on time domain Kelvin sources are used for hydrodynamic forces. In the analysis, the time domain free-surface Green functions with sufficient accuracy are rapidly evaluated in finite water depth by the interpolation-tabulation method, and the boundary integral equation with a quarter VLFS model is established taking advantage of symmetry of flow field and structure. The validity of the present method is verified by comparing with the time histories of vertical displacements of the VLFS during a mass drop and airplane landing and takeoff in still water conditions, respectively. Then the developed numerical scheme is used in wave conditions to study the combined action taking into account the mass drop/airplane landing/takeoff loads as well as incident wave action. It is found that the elevation of structural waves due to mass drop load can be significantly changed near the impact region, while the vertical motion of runway in wave conditions is dominant as compared with that only generated by airplane.

  10. Evaluate the accuracy of the numerical solution of hydrogeological problems of mass transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevhrashkina G.P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the hydrogeological task on quantifying pollution of aquifers the error are starting add up with moment organization of regime observation network as a source of information on the pollution of groundwater in order to evaluate migration options for future prognosis calculations. Optimum element regime observation network should consist of three drill holes on the groundwater flow at equal distances from one another and transversely to the flow of the three drill holes, and at equal distances. If the target of observation drill holes coincides with the stream line on which will then be decided by direct migration task, the error will be minimal. The theoretical basis and results of numerical experiments to assess the accuracy of direct predictive tasks planned migration of groundwater in the area of full water saturation. For the vadose zone, we consider problems of vertical salt transport moisture. All studies were performed by comparing the results of fundamental and approximate solutions in a wide range of characteristics of the processes, which are discussed in relation to ecological and hydrogeological conditions of mining regions on the example of the Western Donbass.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of the thermal dehydration reaction in a TGA experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lan, S.; Gaeini, M.; Zondag, H.A.; van Steenhoven, A.A.; Rindt, C.C.M.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents a detailed mathematical model of the coupled mass and heat transfer processes in salt hydrate grains in a TGA experiment. The purpose of developing this numerical model is to get a more fundamental understanding of the influence of parameters like particle size, nucleation rate

  12. A Direct Numerical Reconstruction Algorithm for the 3D Calderón Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Hansen, Per Christian; Knudsen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    In three dimensions Calderón's problem was addressed and solved in theory in the 1980s in a series of papers, but only recently the numerical implementation of the algorithm was initiated. The main ingredients in the solution of the problem are complex geometrical optics solutions to the conducti...

  13. Direct numerical simulation of rotating fluid flow in a closed cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Christensen, Erik Adler

    1995-01-01

    , is validated against experimental visualizations of both transient and stable periodic flows. The complexity of the flow problem is illuminated numerically by injecting flow tracers into the flow domain and following their evolution in time. The vortex dynamics appears as stretching, folding and squeezing...

  14. Evaluation of a new type of direct digital radiography machine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of a new type of direct digital radiography machine. ... Ease of use, anatomical coverage and tolerance to patient motion were advantages. ... to that of conventional radiographs, with limited fine detail visibility and penetration.

  15. Correction to the crack extension direction in numerical modelling of mixed mode crack paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucht, Tore; Aliabadi, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    In order to avoid introduction of an error when a local crack-growth criterion is used in an incremental crack growth formulation, each straight crack extension would have to be infinitesimal or have its direction corrected. In this paper a new procedure to correct the crack extension direction...

  16. Generalisation to binary mixtures of the second gradient method and application to direct numerical simulation of nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouillet, C.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we simulate a nucleate boiling problem using direct numerical simulation. The numerical method used is the second gradient method based on a diffuse interface model which represents interfaces as volumetric regions of finite thickness across which the physical properties of the fluid vary continuously. First, this method is successfully applied to nucleate boiling of a pure fluid. Then, the model is extended to dilute binary mixtures. After studying its validity and its limits in simple configurations, it is then applied to nucleate boiling of a dilute mixture. These simulations show a strong decrease of the heat transfer coefficient as the concentration increases, in agreement with the numerous experimental studies published in this domain. (author) [fr

  17. Direct numerical simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with the spectral element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xu; Tan Duowang

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities using a specially-developed unsteady three-dimensional high-order spectral element method code. The numerical model used consists of Navier-Stokes equations and a transport-diffusive equation. The code is first validated with the results of linear stability perturbation theory. Then several characteristics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are studied using this three-dimensional unsteady code, including instantaneous turbulent structures and statistical turbulent mixing heights under different initial wave numbers. These results indicate that turbulent structures of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are strongly dependent on the initial conditions. The results also suggest that a high-order numerical method should provide the capability of simulating small scale fluctuations of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of turbulent flows. (authors)

  18. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Rayleigh−Taylor Instability with the Spectral Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhang; Duo-Wang, Tan

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to simulate Rayleigh−Taylor instabilities using a specially-developed unsteady three-dimensional high-order spectral element method code. The numerical model used consists of Navier–Stokes equations and a transport-diffusive equation. The code is first validated with the results of linear stability perturbation theory. Then several characteristics of the Rayleigh−Taylor instabilities are studied using this three-dimensional unsteady code, including instantaneous turbulent structures and statistical turbulent mixing heights under different initial wave numbers. These results indicate that turbulent structures of Rayleigh–Taylor instabilities are strongly dependent on the initial conditions. The results also suggest that a high-order numerical method should provide the capability of simulating small scale fluctuations of Rayleigh−Taylor instabilities of turbulent flows. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  19. Numerical investigations of subglacial hydrology as a direct and indirect driver of glacial erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Beaud, Flavien

    2017-01-01

    Glaciers shape high altitude and latitude landscapes in numerous ways. Erosion associated with glacial processes can limit the average height of mountain ranges, while creating the greatest relief on Earth and shaping the highest mountain peaks, but glaciers can also shield pre-existing topography. Glacial erosion processes, though still enigmatic, are central to the evolution of landscapes, particularly since the onset of the Pleistocene. Glacial erosion comprises three fundamental processes...

  20. Direct numerical simulation of electrokinetic instability and transition to chaotic motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demekhin, E. A.; Nikitin, N. V.; Shelistov, V. S.

    2013-12-01

    A new type of instability—electrokinetic instability—and an unusual transition to chaotic motion near a charge-selective surface (semiselective electric membrane, electrode, or system of micro-/nanochannels) was studied by the numerical integration of the Nernst-Planck-Poisson-Stokes system and a weakly nonlinear analysis near the threshold of instability. A special finite-difference method was used for the space discretization along with a semi-implicit 31/3-step Runge-Kutta scheme for the integration in time. Two kinds of initial conditions were considered: (a) white-noise initial conditions to mimic "room disturbances" and subsequent natural evolution of the solution, and (b) an artificial monochromatic ion distribution with a fixed wave number to simulate regular wave patterns. The results were studied from the viewpoint of hydrodynamic stability and bifurcation theory. The threshold of electroconvective movement was found by the linear spectral stability theory, the results of which were confirmed by numerical simulation of the entire system. Our weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical integration of the entire system predict possibility of both kinds of bifurcations at the critical point, supercritical and subcritical, depending on the system parameters. The following regimes, which replace each other as the potential drop between the selective surfaces increases, were obtained: one-dimensional steady solution, two-dimensional steady electroconvective vortices (stationary point in a proper phase space), unsteady vortices aperiodically changing their parameters (homoclinic contour), periodic motion (limit cycle), and chaotic motion. The transition to chaotic motion does not include Hopf bifurcation. The numerical resolution of the thin concentration polarization layer showed spike-like charge profiles along the surface, which could be, depending on the regime, either steady or aperiodically coalescent. The numerical investigation confirmed the

  1. Direct numerical simulation of electrokinetic instability and transition to chaotic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demekhin, E. A.; Nikitin, N. V.; Shelistov, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of instability—electrokinetic instability—and an unusual transition to chaotic motion near a charge-selective surface (semiselective electric membrane, electrode, or system of micro-/nanochannels) was studied by the numerical integration of the Nernst-Planck-Poisson-Stokes system and a weakly nonlinear analysis near the threshold of instability. A special finite-difference method was used for the space discretization along with a semi-implicit 31/3 -step Runge-Kutta scheme for the integration in time. Two kinds of initial conditions were considered: (a) white-noise initial conditions to mimic “room disturbances” and subsequent natural evolution of the solution, and (b) an artificial monochromatic ion distribution with a fixed wave number to simulate regular wave patterns. The results were studied from the viewpoint of hydrodynamic stability and bifurcation theory. The threshold of electroconvective movement was found by the linear spectral stability theory, the results of which were confirmed by numerical simulation of the entire system. Our weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical integration of the entire system predict possibility of both kinds of bifurcations at the critical point, supercritical and subcritical, depending on the system parameters. The following regimes, which replace each other as the potential drop between the selective surfaces increases, were obtained: one-dimensional steady solution, two-dimensional steady electroconvective vortices (stationary point in a proper phase space), unsteady vortices aperiodically changing their parameters (homoclinic contour), periodic motion (limit cycle), and chaotic motion. The transition to chaotic motion does not include Hopf bifurcation. The numerical resolution of the thin concentration polarization layer showed spike-like charge profiles along the surface, which could be, depending on the regime, either steady or aperiodically coalescent. The numerical investigation confirmed the

  2. Direct numerical simulation of electrokinetic instability and transition to chaotic motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demekhin, E. A., E-mail: edemekhi@gmail.com [Laboratory of Micro- and Nanofluidics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation); Department of Computation Mathematics and Computer Science, Kuban State University, Krasnodar 350040 (Russian Federation); Institute of Mechanics, Moscow State University, Moscow 117192 (Russian Federation); Nikitin, N. V. [Institute of Mechanics, Moscow State University, Moscow 117192 (Russian Federation); Shelistov, V. S. [Institute of Mechanics, Moscow State University, Moscow 117192 (Russian Federation); Scientific Research Department, Kuban State University, Krasnodar 350040 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    A new type of instability—electrokinetic instability—and an unusual transition to chaotic motion near a charge-selective surface (semiselective electric membrane, electrode, or system of micro-/nanochannels) was studied by the numerical integration of the Nernst-Planck-Poisson-Stokes system and a weakly nonlinear analysis near the threshold of instability. A special finite-difference method was used for the space discretization along with a semi-implicit 31/3 -step Runge-Kutta scheme for the integration in time. Two kinds of initial conditions were considered: (a) white-noise initial conditions to mimic “room disturbances” and subsequent natural evolution of the solution, and (b) an artificial monochromatic ion distribution with a fixed wave number to simulate regular wave patterns. The results were studied from the viewpoint of hydrodynamic stability and bifurcation theory. The threshold of electroconvective movement was found by the linear spectral stability theory, the results of which were confirmed by numerical simulation of the entire system. Our weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical integration of the entire system predict possibility of both kinds of bifurcations at the critical point, supercritical and subcritical, depending on the system parameters. The following regimes, which replace each other as the potential drop between the selective surfaces increases, were obtained: one-dimensional steady solution, two-dimensional steady electroconvective vortices (stationary point in a proper phase space), unsteady vortices aperiodically changing their parameters (homoclinic contour), periodic motion (limit cycle), and chaotic motion. The transition to chaotic motion does not include Hopf bifurcation. The numerical resolution of the thin concentration polarization layer showed spike-like charge profiles along the surface, which could be, depending on the regime, either steady or aperiodically coalescent. The numerical investigation confirmed the

  3. Numerical and experimental evaluation of masonry prisms by finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F.R. SANTOS

    Full Text Available Abstract This work developed experimental tests and numerical models able to represent the mechanical behavior of prisms made of ordinary and high strength concrete blocks. Experimental tests of prisms were performed and a detailed micro-modeling strategy was adopted for numerical analysis. In this modeling technique, each material (block and mortar was represented by its own mechanical properties. The validation of numerical models was based on experimental results. It was found that the obtained numerical values of compressive strength and modulus of elasticity differ by 5% from the experimentally observed values. Moreover, mechanisms responsible for the rupture of the prisms were evaluated and compared to the behaviors observed in the tests and those described in the literature. Through experimental results it is possible to conclude that the numerical models have been able to represent both the mechanical properties and the mechanisms responsible for failure.

  4. Direct evaluation of transient surface temperatures and heat fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, R.A.

    1975-08-01

    Evaluations of transient surface temperatures resulting from the absorption of radiation are required in laser fusion reactor systems studies. A general method for the direct evaluation of transient surface temperatures and heat fluxes on the boundaries of bounded media is developed by constructing fundamental solutions of the scalar Helmholtz equation and performing certain elementary integrations

  5. Direct numerical reconstruction of conductivities in three dimensions using scattering transforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikowski, Jutta; Knudsen, Kim; Mueller, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    A direct three-dimensional EIT reconstruction algorithm based on complex geometrical optics solutions and a nonlinear scattering transform is presented and implemented for spherically symmetric conductivity distributions. The scattering transform is computed both with a Born approximation and from...

  6. Numerically Stable Evaluation of Moments of Random Gram Matrices With Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Elkhalil, Khalil; Kammoun, Abla; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the computation of the positive moments of one-side correlated random Gram matrices. Closed-form expressions for the moments can be obtained easily, but numerical evaluation thereof is prone to numerical stability, especially in high-dimensional settings. This letter provides a numerically stable method that efficiently computes the positive moments in closed-form. The developed expressions are more accurate and can lead to higher accuracy levels when fed to moment based-approaches. As an application, we show how the obtained moments can be used to approximate the marginal distribution of the eigenvalues of random Gram matrices.

  7. Numerically Stable Evaluation of Moments of Random Gram Matrices With Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Elkhalil, Khalil

    2017-07-31

    This paper focuses on the computation of the positive moments of one-side correlated random Gram matrices. Closed-form expressions for the moments can be obtained easily, but numerical evaluation thereof is prone to numerical stability, especially in high-dimensional settings. This letter provides a numerically stable method that efficiently computes the positive moments in closed-form. The developed expressions are more accurate and can lead to higher accuracy levels when fed to moment based-approaches. As an application, we show how the obtained moments can be used to approximate the marginal distribution of the eigenvalues of random Gram matrices.

  8. Direct numerical control of machine tools in a nuclear research center by the CAMAC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwoll, K.; Mueller, K.D.; Becks, B.; Erven, W.; Sauer, M.

    1977-01-01

    The production of mechanical parts in research centers can be improved by connecting several numerically controlled machine tools to a central process computer via a data link. The CAMAC Serial Highway with its expandable structure yields an economic and flexible system for this purpose. The CAMAC System also facilitates the development of modular components controlling the machine tools itself. A CAMAC installation controlling three different machine tools connected to a central computer (PDP11) via the CAMAC Serial Highway is described. Besides this application, part of the CAMAC hardware and software can also be used for a great variety of scientific experiments

  9. Performance evaluation of 2D image registration algorithms with the numeric image registration and comparison platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerganov, G.; Kuvandjiev, V.; Dimitrova, I.; Mitev, K.; Kawrakow, I.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the capabilities of the NUMERICS web platform for evaluation of the performance of image registration algorithms. The NUMERICS platform is a web accessible tool which provides access to dedicated numerical algorithms for registration and comparison of medical images (http://numerics.phys.uni-sofia.bg). The platform allows comparison of noisy medical images by means of different types of image comparison algorithms, which are based on statistical tests for outliers. The platform also allows 2D image registration with different techniques like Elastic Thin-Plate Spline registration, registration based on rigid transformations, affine transformations, as well as non-rigid image registration based on Mobius transformations. In this work we demonstrate how the platform can be used as a tool for evaluation of the quality of the image registration process. We demonstrate performance evaluation of a deformable image registration technique based on Mobius transformations. The transformations are applied with appropriate cost functions like: Mutual information, Correlation coefficient, Sum of Squared Differences. The accent is on the results provided by the platform to the user and their interpretation in the context of the performance evaluation of 2D image registration. The NUMERICS image registration and image comparison platform provides detailed statistical information about submitted image registration jobs and can be used to perform quantitative evaluation of the performance of different image registration techniques. (authors)

  10. Heat release effects on mixing scales of non-premixed turbulent wall-jets: A direct numerical simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouransari, Zeinab; Vervisch, Luc; Johansson, Arne V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A non-premixed turbulent flame close to a solid surface is studied using DNS. ► Heat release effects delay transition and enlarge fluctuation of density and pressure. ► The fine-scale structures damped and surface wrinkling diminished due to heat-release. ► Using semilocal scaling improves the collapse of turbulence statistic in inner region. ► There are regions of the flame where considerable (up to 10%) premixed burning occurs. -- Abstract: The present study concerns the role of heat release effects on characteristics mixing scales of turbulence in reacting wall-jet flows. Direct numerical simulations of exothermic reacting turbulent wall-jets are performed and compared to the isothermal reacting case. An evaluation of the heat-release effects on the structure of turbulence is given by examining the mixture fraction surface characteristics, diagnosing vortices and exploring the dissipation rate of the fuel and passive scalar concentrations, and moreover by illustration of probability density functions of reacting species and scatter plots of the local temperature against the mixture fraction. Primarily, heat release effects delay the transition, enlarge the fluctuation intensities of density and pressure and also enhance the fluctuation level of the species concentrations. However, it has a damping effect on all velocity fluctuation intensities and the Reynolds shear stress. A key result is that the fine-scale structures of turbulence are damped, the surface wrinkling is diminished and the vortices become larger due to heat-release effects. Taking into account the varying density by using semi-local scaling improves the collapse of the turbulence statistics in the inner region, but does not eliminate heat release induced differences in the outer region. Examining the two-dimensional premultiplied spanwise spectra of the streamwise velocity fluctuations indicates a shifting in the positions of the outer peaks, associated with large

  11. Multigrid direct numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Zhining

    1993-01-01

    A new technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition at relatively low CPU cost. Most other spatial numerical simulations require high CPU cost and blow up at the stage of flow breakdown. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all used for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The cost for a typical case with 162 x 34 x 34 grid is around 2 CRAY-YMP CPU hours for 10 T-S periods.

  12. Directly comparing GW150914 with numerical solutions of Einstein's equations for binary black hole coalescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, I.W.T.; Clark, M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Fong, H.; Healy, J.; Hemberger, D.; Hinder, I.; Husa, S.; Kalaghati, C.; Khan., S.; Kidder, L. E.; Kinsey, M.; Laguna, P.; London, L. T.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Ossokine, S.; Pannarale, F.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Scheel, M.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Vinuales, A. Vano; Zlochower, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We compare GW150914 directly to simulations of coalescing binary black holes in full general relativity, including several performed specifically to reproduce this event. Our calculations go beyond existing semianalytic models, because for all simulations—including sources with two independent,

  13. ESTIMATION OF TURBULENT DIFFUSIVITY WITH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF STELLAR CONVECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, H.; Iida, Y.; Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta.h@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-05-20

    We investigate the value of horizontal turbulent diffusivity {eta} by numerical calculation of thermal convection. In this study, we introduce a new method whereby the turbulent diffusivity is estimated by monitoring the time development of the passive scalar, which is initially distributed in a given Gaussian function with a spatial scale d{sub 0}. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) assuming the relation {eta} = L{sub c} v{sub rms}/3, where v{sub rms} is the root-mean-square (rms) velocity, the characteristic length L{sub c} is restricted by the shortest one among the pressure (density) scale height and the region depth. (2) The value of turbulent diffusivity becomes greater with the larger initial distribution scale d{sub 0}. (3) The approximation of turbulent diffusion holds better when the ratio of the initial distribution scale d{sub 0} to the characteristic length L{sub c} is larger.

  14. pySecDec: A toolbox for the numerical evaluation of multi-scale integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowka, S.; Heinrich, G.; Jahn, S.; Jones, S. P.; Kerner, M.; Schlenk, J.; Zirke, T.

    2018-01-01

    We present pySECDEC, a new version of the program SECDEC, which performs the factorization of dimensionally regulated poles in parametric integrals, and the subsequent numerical evaluation of the finite coefficients. The algebraic part of the program is now written in the form of python modules, which allow a very flexible usage. The optimization of the C++ code, generated using FORM, is improved, leading to a faster numerical convergence. The new version also creates a library of the integrand functions, such that it can be linked to user-specific codes for the evaluation of matrix elements in a way similar to analytic integral libraries.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations on the direct contact condensation phenomenon in horizontal flow channels and its implications in nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceuca, Sabin Cristian [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany); Laurinavicius, Darius [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2016-11-15

    The complex direct contact condensation phenomenon is investigated in horizontal flow channels both experimentally and numerically with special emphasis on its implications on safety assessment studies. Under certain conditions direct contact condensation can act as the driving force for the water hammer phenomenon with potentially local devastating results, thus posing a threat to the integrity of the affected NPP components. New experimental results of in-depth analysis of the direct contact condensation phenomena obtained in Kaunas at the Lithuanian Energy Institute will be presented. The German system code ATHLET employing for the calculation of the heat transfer coefficient a mechanistic model accounting for two different eddy length scales, combined with the interfacial area transport equation will be assessed against condensation induced water hammer experimental data from the integral thermal-hydraulic experimental facility PMK-2, located at the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute in Budapest Hungary.

  16. Nonlinear mechanics of thin-walled structures asymptotics, direct approach and numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vetyukov, Yury

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a hybrid approach to the mechanics of thin bodies. Classical theories of rods, plates and shells with constrained shear are based on asymptotic splitting of the equations and boundary conditions of three-dimensional elasticity. The asymptotic solutions become accurate as the thickness decreases, and the three-dimensional fields of stresses and displacements can be determined. The analysis includes practically important effects of electromechanical coupling and material inhomogeneity. The extension to the geometrically nonlinear range uses the direct approach based on the principle of virtual work. Vibrations and buckling of pre-stressed structures are studied with the help of linearized incremental formulations, and direct tensor calculus rounds out the list of analytical techniques used throughout the book. A novel theory of thin-walled rods of open profile is subsequently developed from the models of rods and shells, and traditionally applied equations are proven to be asymptotically exa...

  17. Numerical study of unsteady flows past oscillating airfoils using direct zonal coupling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, F.; Khalid, M.

    2005-01-01

    A direct zonal coupling method was proposed for solving the flows past oscillating airfoils in this study. The entire computational domain was divided into inner and outer zones. The grid in the inner zone is moving with the oscillation of the airfoil, whereas the grid in the outer zone is artificially adjusted to the position consistent with the inner zone grid. The governing equations in the moving frame (the rotation potential energy is included) and those under the stationary frame were applied to inner and outer zones, respectively. By using this kind of treatment, the grid on the zonal interface is 1-to-1 matched. The coupling between the two zones is direct. Both the geometric and flow conservations are entirely satisfied. The NACA0012 and NLR7301 airfoils with oscillations were used as the test cases. The accuracy of the proposed method was demonstrated by the computational results compared with the experimental data.(author)

  18. Numerical convergence in simulations of multiaxial ratcheting with directional distortional hardening

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Welling, CH.A.; Marek, René; Feigenbaum, H. P.; Dafalias, Y.F.; Plešek, Jiří; Hrubý, Zbyněk; Parma, Slavomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 126, November (2017), s. 105-121 ISSN 0020-7683 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EF15_003/0000493; GA MŠk LH14018 Keywords : plastic ity * yield * ratcheting * yield surface distortion * directional distortional hardening Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.760, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020768317303499

  19. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial instabilities: A consistent, conservative, all-speed, sharp-interface method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Deng, Xiaolong; Theofanous, Theo G.

    2013-06-01

    We present a conservative and consistent numerical method for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in flow domains that may be separated by any number of material interfaces, at arbitrarily-high density/viscosity ratios and acoustic-impedance mismatches, subjected to strong shock waves and flow speeds that can range from highly supersonic to near-zero Mach numbers. A principal aim is prediction of interfacial instabilities under superposition of multiple potentially-active modes (Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov) as found for example with shock-driven, immersed fluid bodies (locally oblique shocks)—accordingly we emphasize fidelity supported by physics-based validation, including experiments. Consistency is achieved by satisfying the jump discontinuities at the interface within a conservative 2nd-order scheme that is coupled, in a conservative manner, to the bulk-fluid motions. The jump conditions are embedded into a Riemann problem, solved exactly to provide the pressures and velocities along the interface, which is tracked by a level set function to accuracy of O(Δx5, Δt4). Subgrid representation of the interface is achieved by allowing curvature of its constituent interfacial elements to obtain O(Δx3) accuracy in cut-cell volume, with attendant benefits in calculating cell- geometric features and interface curvature (O(Δx3)). Overall the computation converges at near-theoretical O(Δx2). Spurious-currents are down to machine error and there is no time-step restriction due to surface tension. Our method is built upon a quadtree-like adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure. When necessary, this is supplemented by body-fitted grids to enhance resolution of the gas dynamics, including flow separation, shear layers, slip lines, and critical layers. Comprehensive comparisons with exact solutions for the linearized Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz problems demonstrate excellent performance. Sample simulations of liquid drops subjected to

  20. Study on applicability of numerical simulation to evaluation of gas entrainment due to free surface vortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kei; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    An onset condition of gas entrainment (GE) due to free surface vortex has been studied to establish a design of sodium-cooled fast reactor with a higher coolant velocity than conventional designs. Numerous investigations have been conducted experimentally and theoretically; however, the universal onset condition of the GE has not been determined yet due to the nonlinear characteristics of the GE. Recently, we have been studying numerical simulation methods as a promising method to evaluate GE, instead of the reliable but costly real-scale tests. In this paper, the applicability of the numerical simulation methods to the evaluation of the GE is discussed. For the purpose, a quasi-steady vortex in a cylindrical tank and a wake vortex (unsteady vortex) in a rectangular channel were numerically simulated using the volume-of-fluid type two-phase flow calculation method. The simulated velocity distributions and free surface shapes of the quasi-steady vortex showed good (not perfect, however) agreements with experimental results when a fine mesh subdivision and a high-order discretization scheme were employed. The unsteady behavior of the wake vortex was also simulated with high accuracy. Although the onset condition of the GE was slightly underestimated in the simulation results, the applicability of the numerical simulation methods to the GE evaluation was confirmed. (author)

  1. Direct numerical simulation of combustion at high Reynolds numbers; Direkte Numerische Simulation der Verbrennung bei hoeheren Reynoldszahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frouzakis, C. E.; Boulouchos, K.

    2005-12-15

    This comprehensive illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on the work done at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich on the numerical simulation of combustion processes at high Reynolds numbers. The authors note that with appropriate extensive calculation effort, results can be obtained that demonstrate a high degree of accuracy. It is noted that a large part of the project work was devoted to the development of algorithms for the simulation of the combustion processes. Application work is also discussed with research on combustion stability being carried on. The direct numerical simulation (DNS) methods used are described and co-operation with other institutes is noted. The results of experimental work are compared with those provided by simulation and are discussed in detail. Conclusions and an outlook round off the report.

  2. Numerical study of the direct pressure effect of acoustic waves in planar premixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H. [BTU Cottbus, Siemens-Halske-Ring 14, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); Jimenez, C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Recently the unsteady response of 1-D premixed flames to acoustic pressure waves for the range of frequencies below and above the inverse of the flame transit time was investigated experimentally using OH chemiluminescence Wangher (2008). They compared the frequency dependence of the measured response to the prediction of an analytical model proposed by Clavin et al. (1990), derived from the standard flame model (one-step Arrhenius kinetics) and to a similar model proposed by McIntosh (1991). Discrepancies between the experimental results and the model led to the conclusion that the standard model does not provide an adequate description of the unsteady response of real flames and that it is necessary to investigate more realistic chemical models. Here we follow exactly this suggestion and perform numerical studies of the response of lean methane flames using different reaction mechanisms. We find that the global flame response obtained with both detailed chemistry (GRI3.0) and a reduced multi-step model by Peters (1996) lies slightly above the predictions of the analytical model, but is close to experimental results. We additionally used an irreversible one-step Arrhenius reaction model and show the effect of the pressure dependence of the global reaction rate in the flame response. Our results suggest first that the current models have to be extended to capture the amplitude and phase results of the detailed mechanisms, and second that the correlation between the heat release and the measured OH* chemiluminescence should be studied deeper. (author)

  3. Cellular Spacing Selection During the Directional Solidification of Binary Alloys. A Numerical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Sen, S.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of cellular solid/liquid interfaces from an initially unstable planar front was studied by means of a two-dimensional computer simulation. The developed numerical model makes use of an interface tracking procedure and has the capability to describe the dynamics of the interface morphology based on local changes of the thermodynamic conditions. The fundamental physics of this formulation was validated against experimental microgravity results and the predictions of the analytical linear stability theory. The performed simulations revealed that in certain conditions, based on a competitive growth mechanism, an interface could become unstable to random perturbations of infinitesimal amplitude even at wavelengths smaller than the neutral wavelength, lambda(sub c), predicted by the linear stability theory. Furthermore, two main stages of spacing selection have been identified. In the first stage, at low perturbations amplitude, the selection mechanism is driven by the maximum growth rate of instabilities while in the second stage the selection is influenced by nonlinear phenomena caused by the interactions between the neighboring cells. Comparison of these predictions with other existing theories of pattern formation and experimental results will be discussed.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Molten Flow in Directed Energy Deposition Using an Iterative Geometry Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Timothy J.; Rumpfkeil, Markus P.; Chaudhary, Anil

    2018-06-01

    The complex, multi-faceted physics of laser-based additive metals processing tends to demand high-fidelity models and costly simulation tools to provide predictions accurate enough to aid in selecting process parameters. Of particular difficulty is the accurate determination of melt pool shape and size, which are useful for predicting lack-of-fusion, as this typically requires an adequate treatment of thermal and fluid flow. In this article we describe a novel numerical simulation tool which aims to achieve a balance between accuracy and cost. This is accomplished by making simplifying assumptions regarding the behavior of the gas-liquid interface for processes with a moderate energy density, such as Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS). The details of the implementation, which is based on the solver simpleFoam of the well-known software suite OpenFOAM, are given here and the tool is verified and validated for a LENS process involving Ti-6Al-4V. The results indicate that the new tool predicts width and height of a deposited track to engineering accuracy levels.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Molten Flow in Directed Energy Deposition Using an Iterative Geometry Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Timothy J.; Rumpfkeil, Markus P.; Chaudhary, Anil

    2018-03-01

    The complex, multi-faceted physics of laser-based additive metals processing tends to demand high-fidelity models and costly simulation tools to provide predictions accurate enough to aid in selecting process parameters. Of particular difficulty is the accurate determination of melt pool shape and size, which are useful for predicting lack-of-fusion, as this typically requires an adequate treatment of thermal and fluid flow. In this article we describe a novel numerical simulation tool which aims to achieve a balance between accuracy and cost. This is accomplished by making simplifying assumptions regarding the behavior of the gas-liquid interface for processes with a moderate energy density, such as Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS). The details of the implementation, which is based on the solver simpleFoam of the well-known software suite OpenFOAM, are given here and the tool is verified and validated for a LENS process involving Ti-6Al-4V. The results indicate that the new tool predicts width and height of a deposited track to engineering accuracy levels.

  6. Numerical simulation of freckle formation in directional solidification of binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicelli, Sergio D.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Poirier, David R.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model of solidification is presented which simulates the formation of segregation models known as 'freckles' during directional solidification of binary alloys. The growth of the two-phase or dendritic zone is calculated by solving the coupled equations of momentum, energy, and solute transport, as well as maintaining the thermodynamic constraints dictated by the phase diagram of the alloy. Calculations for lead-tin alloys show that the thermosolutal convection in the dendritic zone during solidification can produce heavily localized inhomogeneities in the composition of the final alloy.

  7. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible Navier–Stokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This Navier–Stokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium

  8. The Second Futamura Projection for Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grobauer, Bernd; Yang, Zhe

    2001-01-01

    ', syntax-directed partial evaluation and TDPE, this derivation involves several conceptual and technical steps. These include a suitable formulation of the second Futamura projection and techniques for using TDPE to specialize type-indexed programs. In the context of the second Futamura projection, we also...... compare and relate TDPE with conventional offline partial evaluation. We demonstrate our technique with several examples, including compiler generation for Tiny, a prototypical imperative language....

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Compressible Reacting Boundary Layer using a Temporal Slow Growth Homogenization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalian, Victor; Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A DNS of a compressible, reacting boundary layer flow at Reθ ~ 430 was performed using a temporal slow-growth homogenization, for a multispecies flow model of air at supersonic regime. The overall scenario parameters are related to those of the flow over an ablating surface of a space capsule upon Earth's atmospheric re-entry. The simulation algorithm features Fourier spatial discretization in the streamwise and spanwise directions, B-splines in the wall normal direction, and is marched semi-implicitly in time using the SMR91 scheme. Flow statistics will be presented for relevant flow quantities, in particular those related with RANS modeling. Since analogous slow growth computations can be performed using RANS to predict the flow mean profiles, the use of data gathered from this type of simulation as a vehicle for the calibration and uncertainty quantification of RANS models will be discussed. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  10. Numerical simulation of boundary heat flow effects on directional solidification microstructure of a binary alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The boundary heat flow has important significance for the microstructures of directional solidified binary alloy. Interface evolution of the directional solidified microstructure with different boundary heat flow was discussed. In this study, only one interface was allowed to have heat flow, and Neumann boundary conditions were imposed at the other three interfaces. From the calculated results, it was found that different boundary heat flows will result in different microstructures. When the boundary heat flow equals to 20 W·cm-2, the growth of longitudinal side branches is accelerated and the growth of transverse side branches is restrained, and meanwhile, there is dendritic remelting in the calculation domain. When the boundary heat flow equals to 40 W·cm-2, the growths of the transverse and longitudinal side branches compete with each other, and when the boundary heat flow equals to 100-200 W·cm-2, the growth of transverse side branches dominates absolutely. The temperature field of dendritic growth was analyzed and the relation between boundary heat flow and temperature field was also investigated.

  11. Merging LIDAR digital terrain model with direct observed elevation points for urban flood numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Campo, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    In last years, the concern about the economical and lives loss due to urban floods has grown hand in hand with the numerical skills in simulating such events. The large amount of computational power needed in order to address the problem (simulating a flood in a complex terrain such as a medium-large city) is only one of the issues. Among them it is possible to consider the general lack of exhaustive observations during the event (exact extension, dynamic, water level reached in different parts of the involved area), needed for calibration and validation of the model, the need of considering the sewers effects, and the availability of a correct and precise description of the geometry of the problem. In large cities the topographic surveys are in general available with a number of points, but a complete hydraulic simulation needs a detailed description of the terrain on the whole computational domain. LIDAR surveys can achieve this goal, providing a comprehensive description of the terrain, although they often lack precision. In this work an optimal merging of these two sources of geometrical information, measured elevation points and LIDAR survey, is proposed, by taking into account the error variance of both. The procedure is applied to a flood-prone city over an area of 35 square km approximately starting with a DTM from LIDAR with a spatial resolution of 1 m, and 13000 measured points. The spatial pattern of the error (LIDAR vs points) is analysed, and the merging method is tested with a series of Jackknife procedures that take into account different densities of the available points. A discussion of the results is provided.

  12. Statistics for long irregular wave run-up on a plane beach from direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Senichev, Dmitry; Dutykh, Denys

    2017-04-01

    Very often for global and transoceanic events, due to the initial wave transformation, refraction, diffraction and multiple reflections from coastal topography and underwater bathymetry, the tsunami approaches the beach as a very long wave train, which can be considered as an irregular wave field. The prediction of possible flooding and properties of the water flow on the coast in this case should be done statistically taking into account the formation of extreme (rogue) tsunami wave on a beach. When it comes to tsunami run-up on a beach, the most used mathematical model is the nonlinear shallow water model. For a beach of constant slope, the nonlinear shallow water equations have rigorous analytical solution, which substantially simplifies the mathematical formulation. In (Didenkulova et al. 2011) we used this solution to study statistical characteristics of the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline and its horizontal velocity. The influence of the wave nonlinearity was approached by considering modifications of probability distribution of the moving shoreline and its horizontal velocity for waves of different amplitudes. It was shown that wave nonlinearity did not affect the probability distribution of the velocity of the moving shoreline, while the vertical displacement of the moving shoreline was affected substantially demonstrating the longer duration of coastal floods with an increase in the wave nonlinearity. However, this analysis did not take into account the actual transformation of irregular wave field offshore to oscillations of the moving shoreline on a slopping beach. In this study we would like to cover this gap by means of extensive numerical simulations. The modeling is performed in the framework of nonlinear shallow water equations, which are solved using a modern shock-capturing finite volume method. Although the shallow water model does not pursue the wave breaking and bore formation in a general sense (including the water surface

  13. Effect of higher order nonlinearity, directionality and finite water depth on wave statistics: Comparison of field data and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Leandro; Monbaliu, Jaak; Onorato, Miguel; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    This research is focused on the study of nonlinear evolution of irregular wave fields in water of arbitrary depth by comparing field measurements and numerical simulations.It is now well accepted that modulational instability, known as one of the main mechanisms for the formation of rogue waves, induces strong departures from Gaussian statistics. However, whereas non-Gaussian properties are remarkable when wave fields follow one direction of propagation over an infinite water depth, wave statistics only weakly deviate from Gaussianity when waves spread over a range of different directions. Over finite water depth, furthermore, wave instability attenuates overall and eventually vanishes for relative water depths as low as kh=1.36 (where k is the wavenumber of the dominant waves and h the water depth). Recent experimental results, nonetheless, seem to indicate that oblique perturbations are capable of triggering and sustaining modulational instability even if khthe aim of this research is to understand whether the combined effect of directionality and finite water depth has a significant effect on wave statistics and particularly on the occurrence of extremes. For this purpose, numerical experiments have been performed solving the Euler equation of motion with the Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM) and compared with data of short crested wave fields for different sea states observed at the Lake George (Australia). A comparative analysis of the statistical properties (i.e. density function of the surface elevation and its statistical moments skewness and kurtosis) between simulations and in-situ data provides a confrontation between the numerical developments and real observations in field conditions.

  14. A Unifying Approach to Goal-Directed Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Rhiger, Morten; Grobauer, Bernd

    2001-01-01

    Goal-directed evaluation, as embodied in Icon and Snobol, is built on the notions of backtracking and of generating successive results, and therefore it has always been something of a challenge to specify and implement. In this article, we address this challenge using computational monads and par...

  15. Formulation and Evaluation of Ascorbic acid Tablets by Direct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the tableting properties of microcrystalline starch (MCS) used as a direct compression excipient in the formulation of ascorbic acid tablets and to compare with the properties of tablets produced using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). METHODS: MCS was obtained by partial hydrolysis of cassava ( ...

  16. Numerical simulation of direct methanol fuel cells using lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavar, Mojtaba Aghajani; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol, P.O. Box 484 (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    In this study Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) as an alternative of conventional computational fluid dynamics method is used to simulate Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). A two dimensional lattice Boltzmann model with 9 velocities, D2Q9, is used to solve the problem. The computational domain includes all seven parts of DMFC: anode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers, membrane and cathode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers. The model has been used to predict the flow pattern and concentration fields of different species in both clear and porous channels to investigate cell performance. The results have been compared well with results in literature for flow in porous and clear channels and cell polarization curves of the DMFC at different flow speeds and feed methanol concentrations. (author)

  17. Design and numerical investigation of Savonius wind turbine with discharge flow directing capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahani, Mojtaba; Rabbani, Ali; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Savonius vertical axis wind turbines due to their capabilities and positive properties have gained a significant attention. The objective of this study is to design and model a Savonius-style vertical axis wind turbine with direct discharge flow capability in order to ventilate buildings...... to improve the discharge flow rate. Results indicate that the twist on Savonius wind rotor reduces the negative torque and improves its performance. According to the results, a twisted Savonius wind turbine with conical shaft is associated with 18% increase in power coefficient and 31% increase in discharge...... flowrate compared to simple Savonius wind turbine. Also, wind turbine with variable cut plane has a 12% decrease in power coefficient and 5% increase in discharge flow rate compared to simple Savonius wind turbine. Therefore, it can be inferred that twisted wind turbine with conical shaft indicated...

  18. Numerical and experimental investigation of direct solar crop dryer for farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem, M. W.; Habib, Khairul; Sulaiman, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    This article presents a theoretical and experimental investigation on effects of weather on direct solar crop drying technique. The SIMULINK tool was employed to analyze the energy balance equations of the transient system model. A prototype of the drying system was made and data were collected between the months of June and July in Perak, Malaysia. The contribution of intense sunny days was encouraging despite the wet season, and the wind velocity was dynamic during the period of investigation. However, high percentage of relative humidity was observed. This constitutes a hindrance to efficient drying process. The reported studies were silent on the effect of thick atmospheric moisture content on drying rate of agricultural products in tropic climate. This finding has revealed the mean values of insolation, wind speed, moisturized air, system performance efficiency and chili microscopy image morphology. The predicted and measured results were compared with good agreement.

  19. Numerical Modeling of a Jet Ignition Direct Injection (JI DI LPG Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Boretti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents indirectly validated simulations of the operation of a LPG engine fitted with Direct Injection (DI and Jet Ignition (JI. It is demonstrated that the engine may have diesel like efficiencies and load control by quantity of fuel injected.  As the liquid propane quickly evaporates after injection in the main chamber, the main chamber mixture may be much closer to stoichiometry than a diesel for a better specific power at low engine speeds. This design also works at the high engine speeds impossible for the diesel, as combustion within the main chamber is controlled by the turbulent mixing rather than the vaporization and diffusion processes of the injected fuel of the diesel. 

  20. Alternating-direction implicit numerical solution of the time-dependent, three-dimensional, single fluid, resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finan, C.H. III

    1980-12-01

    Resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described by a set of eight coupled, nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependent, partial differential equations. A computer code, IMP (Implicit MHD Program), has been developed to solve these equations numerically by the method of finite differences on an Eulerian mesh. In this model, the equations are expressed in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates, making the code applicable to a variety of coordinate systems. The Douglas-Gunn algorithm for Alternating-Direction Implicit (ADI) temporal advancement is used to avoid the limitations in timestep size imposed by explicit methods. The equations are solved simultaneously to avoid syncronization errors.

  1. Applications of Operator-Splitting Methods to the Direct Numerical Simulation of Particulate and Free-Surface Flows and to the Numerical Solution of the Two-Dimensional Elliptic Monge--Ampère Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Glowinski, R.; Dean, E.J.; Guidoboni, G.; Juárez, L.H.; Pan, T.-W.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to review some recent applications of operator-splitting methods. We will show that these methods are well-suited to the numerical solution of outstanding problems from various areas in Mechanics, Physics and Differential Geometry, such as the direct numerical simulation of particulate flow, free boundary problems with surface tension for incompressible viscous fluids, and the elliptic real Monge--Ampère equation. The results of numerical ...

  2. Directly comparing GW150914 with numerical solutions of Einstein's equations for binary black hole coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magaña; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, T.; Clark, M.; Fauchon-Jones, E.; Fong, H.; Healy, J.; Hemberger, D.; Hinder, I.; Husa, S.; Kalaghati, C.; Khan, S.; Kidder, L. E.; Kinsey, M.; Laguna, P.; London, L. T.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Ossokine, S.; Pannarale, F.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Scheel, M.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Vinuales, A. Vano; Zlochower, Y.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We compare GW150914 directly to simulations of coalescing binary black holes in full general relativity, including several performed specifically to reproduce this event. Our calculations go beyond existing semianalytic models, because for all simulations—including sources with two independent, precessing spins—we perform comparisons which account for all the spin-weighted quadrupolar modes, and separately which account for all the quadrupolar and octopolar modes. Consistent with the posterior distributions reported by Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016)] (at the 90% credible level), we find the data are compatible with a wide range of nonprecessing and precessing simulations. Follow-up simulations performed using previously estimated binary parameters most resemble the data, even when all quadrupolar and octopolar modes are included. Comparisons including only the quadrupolar modes constrain the total redshifted mass Mz∈[64 M⊙-82 M⊙] , mass ratio 1 /q =m2/m1∈[0.6 ,1 ], and effective aligned spin χeff∈[-0.3 ,0.2 ], where χeff=(S1/m1+S2/m2).L ^/M . Including both quadrupolar and octopolar modes, we find the mass ratio is even more tightly constrained. Even accounting for precession, simulations with extreme mass ratios and effective spins are highly inconsistent with the data, at any mass. Several nonprecessing and precessing simulations with similar mass ratio and χeff are consistent with the data. Though correlated, the components' spins (both in magnitude and directions) are not significantly constrained by the data: the data is consistent with simulations with component spin magnitudes a1 ,2 up to at least 0.8, with random orientations. Further detailed follow-up calculations are needed to determine if the data contain a weak imprint from transverse (precessing) spins. For nonprecessing binaries, interpolating between simulations, we reconstruct a posterior distribution consistent with previous results. The final black hole

  3. A Unifying Approach to Goal-Directed Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Grobauer, Bernd; Rhiger, Morten

    2001-01-01

    semantics coincides with Gudeman’s continuation semantics of Icon. We then compile Icon programs by specializing their interpreter (i.e., by using the first Futamura projection), using type-directed partial evaluation. Through various back ends, including a run-time code generator, we generate ML code, C......Goal-directed evaluation, as embodied in Icon and Snobol, is built on the notions of backtracking and of generating successive results, and therefore it has always been something of a challenge to specify and implement. In this article, we address this challenge using computational monads...... code, and OCaml byte code. Binding-time analysis and partial evaluation of the continuation-based interpreter automatically give rise to C programs that coincide with the result of Proebsting’s optimized compiler....

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of Dynamic Drainage and Imbibition to Investigate Capillary Pressure-Saturation-Interfacial Area Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konangi, S.; Palakurthi, N. K.; Karadimitriou, N.; Comer, K.; Ghia, U.

    2017-12-01

    We present results of pore-scale direct numerical simulations (DNS) of drainage and imbibition in a quasi-two-dimensional (40µm thickness) porous medium with a randomly distributed packing of cylindrical obstructions. The Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved in the pore space on an Eulerian mesh using the open-source finite-volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, OpenFOAM. The Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method is employed to track the evolution of the fluid-fluid interface; a static contact angle is used to account for wall adhesion. From the DNS data, we focus on the macroscopic capillary pressure-saturation (Pc-Sw) relation, which is known to be hysteretic, i.e., this relation is flow process (such as drainage, imbibition and scanning curves) and history dependent. In order to overcome the problem of hysteresis, extended theories of multiphase flow hypothesized that the inclusion of specific interfacial area as a state variable will result in a unique relation between capillary pressure, saturation and interfacial area (Pc-Sw-awn). We study the role of specific interfacial area on hysteresis in the macroscopic Pc-Sw relation under non-equilibrium (dynamic) conditions. Under dynamic conditions, capillary pressure depends on the rate of change of the wetting phase saturation, and the dynamic Pc-Sw relation includes the changes caused by viscous effects. Simulations of drainage and imbibition are performed for two capillary numbers by controlling the flow rate of the non-wetting (polydimenthlysiloxane oil) and wetting (water) fluids. From these simulations, the Pc-Sw curves will be estimated; the Pc-S-awn surface will be constructed to determine whether the data points from drainage and imbibition processes fall on a unique surface under transient conditions. Different macroscopic capillary pressure definitions based on phase-averaged pressures and interfacial area will be evaluated. Understanding macroscopic capillary pressure definitions and the uniqueness

  5. On numerical modeling of low-head direct chill ingot caster for magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainul Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive 3D turbulent CFD study has been carried out to simulate a Low-Head (LH vertical Direct Chill (DC rolling ingot caster for the common magnesium alloy AZ31. The model used in this study takes into account the coupled laminar/turbulent melt flow and solidification aspects of the process and is based on the control-volume finite-difference approach. Following the aluminum/magnesium DC casting industrial practices, the LH mold is taken as 30 mm with a hot top of 60 mm. The previously verified in-house code has been modified to model the present casting process. Important quantitative results are obtained for four casting speeds, for three inlet melt pouring temperatures (superheats and for three metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficients for the steady state operational phase of the caster. The variable cooling water temperatures reported by the industry are considered for the primary and secondary cooling zones during the simulations. Specifically, the temperature and velocity fields, sump depth and sump profiles, mushy region thickness, solid shell thickness at the exit of the mold and axial temperature profiles at the center and at three strategic locations at the surface of the slab are presented and discussed.

  6. Numerical studies of spray breakup in a gasoline direct injection (GDI engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafarmadar Samad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate Spray Breakup process of sprays injected from single and two-hole nozzles for gasoline direct Injection (GDI engines by using three dimensional CFD code. Spray characteristics were examined for spray tip penetration and other characteristics including: the vapor phase concentration distribution and droplet spatial distribution, which were acquired using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation. Results showed that as the hole-axis-angle (γ of the two-hole nozzle decreased, the droplet coalescence increased and vapor mass decreased. The spray with cone angle (θ0 5 deg for single hole nozzle has the longest spray tip penetration and the spray with the γ of 30 deg and spray cone angle θ0=30 deg for two hole nozzles had the shortest one. Also, when the spray cone angle (θ0 and hole-axis-angle (γ increased from 5 to 30 deg, the Sauter mean diameter (SMD decreased for both single-hole and two-hole nozzles used in this study. For a single-hole nozzle, when spray cone angle increased from 5 to 30 deg, the vaporization rate very much because of low level of coalescence. The result of model for tip penetration is good agreement with the corresponding experimental data in the literatures.

  7. Direct-injection strategies for a hydrogen-fueled engine : an optical and numerical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, S.; Salazar, V. [Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scarcelli, R.; Wallner, T. [Argonne National Lab, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Vehicles with hydrogen-fueled engines are competitive with systems based on fuel cells. There is a lack of fundamental knowledge about in-cylinder processes in hydrogen direct injection engines. This presentation discussed a study that used a variety of injector configurations to establish a broad database. A light-load conditions that can profit from stratification was investigated. Several results were presented, including the 5-hole nozzle produced an asymmetric jet pattern which may be good for late injection. Very lean regions in the wake of the transient jets were found to be similar to those found in diesel injection. The 13-hole nozzle demonstrated complete jet collapse, consistent with Schlieren imaging by Petersen. Stratification made efficiency sensitive to the targeting of the single-hole injector. Computational fluid dynamics with a commercially available code aimed to improve the process of design optimization. The simulation predicted less fuel dispersion than was experimentally measured. Details of the fuel penetration were captured. It was concluded that for the single-hole nozzle, the pre-spark fuel distribution is consistent with results from the fired engine. tabs., figs.

  8. Numerical Methods Application for Reinforced Concrete Elements-Theoretical Approach for Direct Stiffness Matrix Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Ciprian Catinas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A detailed theoretical and practical investigation of the reinforced concrete elements is due to recent techniques and method that are implemented in the construction market. More over a theoretical study is a demand for a better and faster approach nowadays due to rapid development of the calculus technique. The paper above will present a study for implementing in a static calculus the direct stiffness matrix method in order capable to address phenomena related to different stages of loading, rapid change of cross section area and physical properties. The method is a demand due to the fact that in our days the FEM (Finite Element Method is the only alternative to such a calculus and FEM are considered as expensive methods from the time and calculus resources point of view. The main goal in such a method is to create the moment-curvature diagram in the cross section that is analyzed. The paper above will express some of the most important techniques and new ideas as well in order to create the moment curvature graphic in the cross sections considered.

  9. Temporal direct numerical simulation of transitional natural-convection boundary layer under conditions of considerable external turbulence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, Alexey G; Smirnov, Evgueni M; Goryachev, Valery D

    2014-01-01

    Results of direct numerical simulations for time-developing air natural-convection boundary layer are presented. Computations have been performed assuming periodicity conditions in both the directions parallel to the vertical isothermal hot plate. The contribution is mainly focused on understanding of laminar–turbulent transition peculiarities in the case of perturbation action of external turbulence that is modeled by isotropic disturbances initially introduced into the computational domain. Special attention is paid to identification and analysis of evolving three-dimensional vortices that clearly manifest themselves through the whole stages of laminar–turbulent transition in the boundary layer. A comparison of computed profiles of mean velocity, mean temperature and fluctuation characteristics for turbulent regimes of convection with experimental data is performed as well. (paper)

  10. Evaluation and Visualization of Surface Defects - a Numerical and Experimental Study on Sheet-Metal Parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, A.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to predict surface defects in outer panels is of vital importance in the automotive industry, especially for brands in the premium car segment. Today, measures to prevent these defects can not be taken until a test part has been manufactured, which requires a great deal of time and expense. The decision as to whether a certain surface is of acceptable quality or not is based on subjective evaluation. It is quite possible to detect a defect by measurement, but it is not possible to correlate measured defects and the subjective evaluation. If all results could be based on the same criteria, it would be possible to compare a surface by both FE simulations, experiments and subjective evaluation with the same result.In order to find a solution concerning the prediction of surface defects, a laboratory tool was manufactured and analysed both experimentally and numerically. The tool represents the area around a fuel filler lid and the aim was to recreate surface defects, so-called 'teddy bear ears'. A major problem with the evaluation of such defects is that the panels are evaluated manually and to a great extent subjectivity is involved in the classification and judgement of the defects. In this study the same computer software was used for the evaluation of both the experimental and the numerical results. In this software the surface defects were indicated by a change in the curvature of the panel. The results showed good agreement between numerical and experimental results. Furthermore, the evaluation software gave a good indication of the appearance of the surface defects compared to an analysis done in existing tools for surface quality measurements. Since the agreement between numerical and experimental results was good, this indicates that these tools can be used for an early verification of surface defects in outer panels

  11. Evaluation of spacer grid spring characteristics by means of physical tests and numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schettino, Carlos Frederico Mattos, E-mail: carlosschettino@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Among all fuel assemblies' components, the spacer grids play an important structural role during the energy generation process, mainly due for its primary functional requirement, that is, to provide fuel rod support. The present work aims to evaluate the spring characteristics of a specific spacer grid design used in a PWR fuel assembly type 16 x 16. These spring characteristics comprises the load versus deflection capability and its spring rate, which are very important, and also mandatory, to be correctly established in order to preclude spacer grid spring and fuel rod cladding fretting during operation, as well as prevent an excessive fuel rod buckling. This study includes physical tests and numerical simulation. The tests were performed on an adapted load cell mechanical device, using as a specimen a single strap of the spacer grid. Three numerical models were prepared using the Finite Element Method, with the support of the commercial code ANSYS. One model was built to validate the simulation according to the performed physical test, the others were built inserting a gradient of temperature (Beginning Of Life hot condition) and to evaluate the spacer grid spring characteristics in End Of Life condition. The obtained results from physical test and numerical model have shown a good agreement between them, therefore validating the simulation. The obtained results from numerical models make available information regarding the spacer grid design purpose, such as the behavior of the fuel rod cladding support during operation. Therewith, these evaluations could be useful to improve the spacer grid design. (author)

  12. Evaluation of spacer grid spring characteristics by means of physical tests and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schettino, Carlos Frederico Mattos

    2017-01-01

    Among all fuel assemblies' components, the spacer grids play an important structural role during the energy generation process, mainly due for its primary functional requirement, that is, to provide fuel rod support. The present work aims to evaluate the spring characteristics of a specific spacer grid design used in a PWR fuel assembly type 16 x 16. These spring characteristics comprises the load versus deflection capability and its spring rate, which are very important, and also mandatory, to be correctly established in order to preclude spacer grid spring and fuel rod cladding fretting during operation, as well as prevent an excessive fuel rod buckling. This study includes physical tests and numerical simulation. The tests were performed on an adapted load cell mechanical device, using as a specimen a single strap of the spacer grid. Three numerical models were prepared using the Finite Element Method, with the support of the commercial code ANSYS. One model was built to validate the simulation according to the performed physical test, the others were built inserting a gradient of temperature (Beginning Of Life hot condition) and to evaluate the spacer grid spring characteristics in End Of Life condition. The obtained results from physical test and numerical model have shown a good agreement between them, therefore validating the simulation. The obtained results from numerical models make available information regarding the spacer grid design purpose, such as the behavior of the fuel rod cladding support during operation. Therewith, these evaluations could be useful to improve the spacer grid design. (author)

  13. Interaction of a Mach 2.25 turbulent boundary layer with a fluttering panel using direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodony, Daniel; Ostoich, Christopher; Geubelle, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between a thin metallic panel and a Mach 2.25 turbulent boundary layer is investigated using a direct numerical simulation approach for coupled fluid-structure problems. The solid solution uses a finite-strain, finite-deformation formulation, while the direct numerical simulation of the boundary layer uses a finite-difference compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The initially laminar boundary layer contains low amplitude unstable eigenmodes that grow in time and excite traveling bending waves in the panel. As the boundary layer transitions to a fully turbulent state, with Reθ ~ 1200 , the panel's bending waves coalesce into a standing wave pattern exhibiting flutter with a final amplitude approximately 20 times the panel thickness. The corresponding panel deflection is roughly 25 wall units and reaches across the sonic line in the boundary layer profile. Once it reaches a limit cycle state, the panel/boundary layer system is examined in detail where it is found that turbulence statistics, especially the main Reynolds stress - , appear to be modified by the presence of the compliant panel, the effect of which is forgotten within one integral length downstream of the panel. Supported by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory Air Vehicles Directorate under contract number FA8650-06-2-3620.

  14. Tokamak electron heat transport by direct numerical simulation of small scale turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labit, B.

    2002-10-01

    electron normalized Larmor has been emphasized: the confinement time is inverse proportional to this parameter. Finally, the low dependence of turbulent transport with the magnetic shear and the inverse aspect ratio is also reported. Although the transport level observed in the simulations is low compared to the experiments, we have tried a direct confrontation with Tore Supra results. This tokamak is well designed to study the electron heat transport. Keeping most of the parameters from a well referenced Tore Supra shot, the nonlinear simulation gives a threshold quite close to the experimental one. The observed turbulent conductivity is a factor fifty lower than the experimental one. An important parameter can not be matched: the normalized Larmor radius, ρ * . This limitation has to be overcome in order to confirm this results. Finally, a rigorous confrontation between this result and gyrokinetic simulations has to conclude that the ETG instability cannot describe electron heat loses in tokamaks. (author)

  15. Key challenges in the combat of human trafficking : Evaluating the EU trafficking strategy and EU trafficking directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Alice; Rijken, Conny

    2016-01-01

    The problem of trafficking in human beings (THB) is still omnipresent in Europe, despite the numerous preventive and retributive actions taken. This article evaluates the two most important EU-instruments to combat trafficking: the EU Directive and the EU Strategy. Based on secondary analysis of

  16. Analytical and numerical construction of vertical periodic orbits about triangular libration points based on polynomial expansion relations among directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ying-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Zhai, Guan-Qiao; Zhang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Innovated by the nonlinear modes concept in the vibrational dynamics, the vertical periodic orbits around the triangular libration points are revisited for the Circular Restricted Three-body Problem. The ζ -component motion is treated as the dominant motion and the ξ and η -component motions are treated as the slave motions. The slave motions are in nature related to the dominant motion through the approximate nonlinear polynomial expansions with respect to the ζ -position and ζ -velocity during the one of the periodic orbital motions. By employing the relations among the three directions, the three-dimensional system can be transferred into one-dimensional problem. Then the approximate three-dimensional vertical periodic solution can be analytically obtained by solving the dominant motion only on ζ -direction. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, an accuracy study was carried out to validate the polynomial expansion (PE) method. As one of the applications, the invariant nonlinear relations in polynomial expansion form are used as constraints to obtain numerical solutions by differential correction. The nonlinear relations among the directions provide an alternative point of view to explore the overall dynamics of periodic orbits around libration points with general rules.

  17. EVALUATION OF SEISMIC PERFORMANCE OF RAMP TUNNEL STRUCTURE DURING LEVEL-2 EARTHQUAKE BY MASSIVE 3D NUMERICAL COMPUTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takemine; Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Hori, Muneo; Dobashi, Hiroshi; Ohbo, Naoto

    Quasi non-linear 3D FEM earthquake response analysises with level-2 earthquake are conducted for a ramp tunnel structure of Tokyo metropolitan express way central circular line the Yamate tunnel. Large-scale numerical computation with solid elements is highly required for examination of seismic response of large tunnel in case of level-2 earthquake. The results are obtained as follows: i) In level-2 earthquake, stress concentration in ramp tunnel becomes great near geological interface between two layers of high impedance contrast. ii) The response is not obtained as a superposition of two-dimensional responses which is an assumption in conventional design methods because the distribution of displacements in the direction of tunnel axis at cross-section of ramp tunnel structure near geological interface does not linearly distribute. iii) Evaluation of stress in addition to section force is desirable for the correct evaluation of the three-dimensional response of tunnel structure.

  18. Numerical evaluation of the statistical properties of a potential energy landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, E La; Sciortino, F; Tartaglia, P; Michele, C De; Mossa, S

    2003-01-01

    The techniques which allow the numerical evaluation of the statistical properties of the potential energy landscape for models of simple liquids are reviewed and critically discussed. Expressions for the liquid free energy and its vibrational and configurational components are reported. Finally, a possible model for the statistical properties of the landscape, which appears to describe correctly fragile liquids in the region where equilibrium simulations are feasible, is discussed

  19. COMETS2: An advanced MATLAB toolbox for the numerical analysis of electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chany; Jung, Young-Jin; Lee, Sang Jun; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2017-02-01

    Since there is no way to measure electric current generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) inside the human head through in vivo experiments, numerical analysis based on the finite element method has been widely used to estimate the electric field inside the head. In 2013, we released a MATLAB toolbox named COMETS, which has been used by a number of groups and has helped researchers to gain insight into the electric field distribution during stimulation. The aim of this study was to develop an advanced MATLAB toolbox, named COMETS2, for the numerical analysis of the electric field generated by tDCS. COMETS2 can generate any sizes of rectangular pad electrodes on any positions on the scalp surface. To reduce the large computational burden when repeatedly testing multiple electrode locations and sizes, a new technique to decompose the global stiffness matrix was proposed. As examples of potential applications, we observed the effects of sizes and displacements of electrodes on the results of electric field analysis. The proposed mesh decomposition method significantly enhanced the overall computational efficiency. We implemented an automatic electrode modeler for the first time, and proposed a new technique to enhance the computational efficiency. In this paper, an efficient toolbox for tDCS analysis is introduced (freely available at http://www.cometstool.com). It is expected that COMETS2 will be a useful toolbox for researchers who want to benefit from the numerical analysis of electric fields generated by tDCS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Evaluating next-generation sequencing for direct clinical diagnostics in diarrhoeal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Engsbro, A L Ø; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2017-01-01

    The accurate microbiological diagnosis of diarrhoea involves numerous laboratory tests and, often, the pathogen is not identified in time to guide clinical management. With next-generation sequencing (NGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in routine diagnostics. The aim of this study...... was to evaluate the potential of NGS-based diagnostics through direct sequencing of faecal samples. Fifty-eight clinical faecal samples were obtained from patients with diarrhoea as part of the routine diagnostics at Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark. Ten samples from healthy individuals were also included...

  1. Direct numerical simulation of ignition front propagation in a constant volume with temperature inhomogeneities. I. Fundamental analysis and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jacqueline H.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Sankaran, Ramanan [Reacting Flow Research Department, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9051, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Mason, Scott D. [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Im, Hong G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The influence of thermal stratification on autoignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed hydrogen/air chemistry with a view to providing better understanding and modeling of combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression-ignition engines. Numerical diagnostics are developed to analyze the mode of combustion and the dependence of overall ignition progress on initial mixture conditions. The roles of dissipation of heat and mass are divided conceptually into transport within ignition fronts and passive scalar dissipation, which modifies the statistics of the preignition temperature field. Transport within ignition fronts is analyzed by monitoring the propagation speed of ignition fronts using the displacement speed of a scalar that tracks the location of maximum heat release rate. The prevalence of deflagrative versus spontaneous ignition front propagation is found to depend on the local temperature gradient, and may be identified by the ratio of the instantaneous front speed to the laminar deflagration speed. The significance of passive scalar mixing is examined using a mixing timescale based on enthalpy fluctuations. Finally, the predictions of the multizone modeling strategy are compared with the DNS, and the results are explained using the diagnostics developed. (author)

  2. Numerical Investigation of T-joints with 3D Four Directional Braided Composite Fillers Under Tensile Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-kang; Liu, Zhen-guo; Hu, Long; Wang, Yi-bo; Lei, Bing; Huang, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Numerical studied on T-joints with three-dimensional four directional (3D4D) braided composite fillers was presented in this article. Compared with conventional unidirectional prepreg fillers, the 3D braided composite fillers have excellent ability to prevent crack from penetrating trigone fillers, which constantly occurred in the conventional fillers. Meanwhile, the 3D braided composite fillers had higher fiber volume fraction and eliminated the fiber folding problem in unidirectional prepreg fillers. The braiding technology and mechanical performance of 3D4D braided fillers were studied. The numerical model of carbon fiber T-joints with 3D4D braided composite fillers was built by finite element analysis software. The damage formation, extension and failing process of T-joints with 3D4D braided fillers under tensile load were investigated. Further investigation was extended to the effect of 3D4D braided fillers with different braiding angles on mechanical behavior of the T-joints. The study results revealed that the filling area was the weakest part of the T-joints where the damage first appeared and the crack then rapidly spread to the glue film around the filling area and the interface between over-laminate and soleplate. The 3D4D braided fillers were undamaged and the braiding angle change induced a little effect on the bearing capacity of T-joints.

  3. Convection methodology for fission track annealing: direct and inverse numerical simulations in the multi-exponential case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miellou, J.C.; Igli, H.; Grivet, M.; Rebetez, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    1994-01-01

    In minerals, the uranium fission tracks are sensitive to temperature and time. The consequence is that the etchable lengths are reduced. To simulate the phenomenon, at the last International Conference on Nuclear Tracks in solids at Beijing in 1992, we proposed a convection model for fission track annealing based on a reaction situation associated with only one activation energy. Moreover a simple inverse method based on the resolution of an ordinary differential equation was described, making it possible to retrace the thermal history in this mono-exponential situation. The aim of this paper is to consider a more involved class of models including multi-exponentials associated with several activation energies. We shall describe in this framework the modelling of the direct phenomenon and the resolution of the inverse problem. Results of numerical simulations and comparison with the mono-exponential case will be presented. 5 refs. (author)

  4. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  5. Direct numerical simulations of ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture with temperature and composition inhomogeneities relevant to HCCI and SCCI combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minh Bau; Yu, Gwang Hyeon; Lu, Tianfeng; Chung, Suk-Ho; Yoo, Chun Sang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of temperature and composition stratifications on the ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture at three initial mean temperatures under elevated pressure are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with a 58-species

  6. Numerical simulation of spray coalescence in an Eulerian framework: Direct quadrature method of moments and multi-fluid method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.O.; Laurent, F.; Massot, M.

    2008-01-01

    The scope of the present study is Eulerian modeling and simulation of polydisperse liquid sprays undergoing droplet coalescence and evaporation. The fundamental mathematical description is the Williams spray equation governing the joint number density function f(v,u;x,t) of droplet volume and velocity. Eulerian multi-fluid models have already been rigorously derived from this equation in Laurent et al. [F. Laurent, M. Massot, P. Villedieu, Eulerian multi-fluid modeling for the numerical simulation of coalescence in polydisperse dense liquid sprays, J. Comput. Phys. 194 (2004) 505-543]. The first key feature of the paper is the application of direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) introduced by Marchisio and Fox [D.L. Marchisio, R.O. Fox, Solution of population balance equations using the direct quadrature method of moments, J. Aerosol Sci. 36 (2005) 43-73] to the Williams spray equation. Both the multi-fluid method and DQMOM yield systems of Eulerian conservation equations with complicated interaction terms representing coalescence. In order to focus on the difficulties associated with treating size-dependent coalescence and to avoid numerical uncertainty issues associated with two-way coupling, only one-way coupling between the droplets and a given gas velocity field is considered. In order to validate and compare these approaches, the chosen configuration is a self-similar 2D axisymmetrical decelerating nozzle with sprays having various size distributions, ranging from smooth ones up to Dirac delta functions. The second key feature of the paper is a thorough comparison of the two approaches for various test-cases to a reference solution obtained through a classical stochastic Lagrangian solver. Both Eulerian models prove to describe adequately spray coalescence and yield a very interesting alternative to the Lagrangian solver. The third key point of the study is a detailed description of the limitations associated with each method, thus giving criteria for

  7. Evaluation of hip fracture risk in relation to fall direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankaku, Manabu; Kanzaki, Hideto; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Nakamura, Takashi

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate hip fracture risk in relation to fall direction, and to elucidate factors that influence the impact force in falls on the hip. Eight healthy volunteers performed deliberate falls in three directions (lateral, posterolateral and posterior) on a force platform covered by a mattress of 13 cm thickness. Fall descent motions and impact postures were examined by a three-dimensional analyzer. The maximum ground force reaction, velocity of the greater trochanter at impact, and activity of quadriceps and gluteus medius were measured. In all trials of lateral and posterolateral falls, but not of posterior falls, the subjects hit their greater trochanter directly on the mattress. The impact forces were between 2,000 N and 4,000 N. Posterolateral falls showed significantly higher velocity at impact than did posterior falls. The height and the lower limb length exhibited positive correlations with the impact force in all directions of fall. In the lateral fall, there was a positive correlation between the activity of quadriceps and the impact force. In view of the impact point, force, and velocity, the posterolateral fall seemed to carry the highest risk of hip fracture.

  8. From the direct numerical simulation to system codes-perspective for the multi-scale analysis of LWR thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale analysis of water-cooled reactor thermal hydraulics can be used to take advantage of increased computer power and improved simulation tools, including Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) (in both open and porous mediums), and system thermalhydraulic codes. This paper presents a general strategy for this procedure for various thermalhydraulic scales. A short state of the art is given for each scale, and the role of the scale in the overall multi-scale analysis process is defined. System thermalhydraulic codes will remain a privileged tool for many investigations related to safety. CFD in porous medium is already being frequently used for core thermal hydraulics, either in 3D modules of system codes or in component codes. CFD in open medium allows zooming on some reactor components in specific situations, and may be coupled to the system and component scales. Various modeling approaches exist in the domain from DNS to CFD which may be used to improve the understanding of flow processes, and as a basis for developing more physically based models for macroscopic tools. A few examples are given to illustrate the multi-scale approach. Perspectives for the future are drawn from the present state of the art and directions for future research and development are given

  9. Numerical simulation of the direct reduction of pellets in a rotary hearth furnace for zinc-containing metallurgical dust treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-liang; Jiang, Ze-yi; Zhang, Xin-xin; Wang, Peng; She, Xue-feng

    2013-07-01

    A mathematical model was established to describe the direct reduction of pellets in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF). In the model, heat transfer, mass transfer, and gas-solid chemical reactions were taken into account. The behaviors of iron metallization and dezincification were analyzed by the numerical method, which was validated by experimental data of the direct reduction of pellets in a Si-Mo furnace. The simulation results show that if the production targets of iron metallization and dezincification are up to 80% and 90%, respectively, the furnace temperature for high-temperature sections must be set higher than 1300°C. Moreover, an undersupply of secondary air by 20% will lead to a decline in iron metallization rate of discharged pellets by 10% and a decrease in dezincing rate by 13%. In addition, if the residence time of pellets in the furnace is over 20 min, its further extension will hardly lead to an obvious increase in production indexes under the same furnace temperature curve.

  10. Numerical modeling for the electromagnetic non-destructive evaluation: application to the non-destructive evaluation of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travassos, L.

    2007-06-01

    Concrete is the most common building material and accounts for a large part of the systems that are necessary for a country to operate smoothly including buildings, roads, and bridges. Nondestructive testing is one of the techniques that can be used to assess the structural condition. It provides non perceptible information that conventional techniques of evaluation unable to do. The main objective of this work is the numerical simulation of a particular technique of nondestructive testing: the radar. The numerical modeling of the radar assessment of concrete structures make it possible to envisage the behavior of the system and its capacity to detect defects in various configurations. To achieve this objective, it was implemented electromagnetic wave propagation models in concrete structures, by using various numerical techniques to examine different aspects of the radar inspection. First of all, we implemented the finite-difference time-domain method in 3D which allows to take into account concrete characteristics such as porosity, salt content and the degree of saturation of the mixture by using Debye models. In addition, a procedure to improve the radiation pattern of bow-tie antennas is presented. This approach involves the Moment Method in conjunction with the Multi objective Genetic Algorithm. Finally, we implemented imaging algorithms which can perform fast and precise characterization of buried targets in inhomogeneous medium by using three different methods. The performance of the proposed algorithms is confirmed by numerical simulations. (author)

  11. Numerical evaluation of Auger recombination coefficients in relaxed and strained germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominici, Stefano [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Bertazzi, Francesco; Goano, Michele [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); IEIIT-CNR, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2016-05-23

    The potential applications of germanium and its alloys in infrared silicon-based photonics have led to a renewed interest in their optical properties. In this letter, we report on the numerical determination of Auger coefficients at T = 300 K for relaxed and biaxially strained germanium. We use a Green's function based model that takes into account all relevant direct and phonon-assisted processes and perform calculations up to a strain level corresponding to the transition from indirect to direct energy gap. We have considered excess carrier concentrations ranging from 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. For use in device level simulations, we also provide fitting formulas for the calculated electron and hole Auger coefficients as functions of carrier density.

  12. Evaluation of different numerical methodologies for dispersion of air pollutants in an urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumovic, D.; Crowther, J.M.; Stevanovic, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1950 the world population has more than doubled but meanwhile the global number of cars has increased by a factor of 10. In that same period the fraction of people living in urban areas has increased by a factor of 4. Apart from large point-sources of local air pollution, traffic induced pollution is now the most significant contributor to urban air quality in city centres, particularly for carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen and fine particulate matter. Until recently, pollutant dispersion in urban areas has usually been numerically investigated by using empirical models, such as the Gaussian plume model, or by extensions of this technique to line sources and multiple sources. More recently, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have been attempted but have been mainly two-dimensional and often encompassing only a single street canyon. This paper provides a comprehensive, critical evaluation of dispersion of pollutants in urban areas. A three-dimensional flow model has been set-up for a staggered crossroad, using the Navier-Stokes equations and the conservation equation for species concentration. The effect of using several different turbulence models, including the k-ε model, modifications and extensions, has been investigated. Cartesian coordinates have been used in connection with the Partial Solution Algorithm (PARSOL) and Body Fitted Coordinates (BFC). The effects of several different numerical algorithms for discretization of differential equations have also been studied. More than thirty cases are analysed, and the main results are compared with wind tunnel experiments. The numerical results are presented as non-dimensional values to facilitate comparison between experimental and numerical studies. It has been shown that the numerical studies have been able to simulate the air-flow in urban areas and confirm, qualitatively, the previous field observations and wind tunnel results. This success encouraged the authors to extend such

  13. Evaluation of different numerical methodologies for dispersion of air pollutants in an urban environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumovic, D.; Crowther, J.M. [Glasgow Caledonian Univ., School of Built and Natural Environment, Glasgow (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: dmumov10@caledonian.ac.uk; Stevanovic, Z. [Univ. of Belgrade, Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2003-07-01

    Since 1950 the world population has more than doubled but meanwhile the global number of cars has increased by a factor of 10. In that same period the fraction of people living in urban areas has increased by a factor of 4. Apart from large point-sources of local air pollution, traffic induced pollution is now the most significant contributor to urban air quality in city centres, particularly for carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen and fine particulate matter. Until recently, pollutant dispersion in urban areas has usually been numerically investigated by using empirical models, such as the Gaussian plume model, or by extensions of this technique to line sources and multiple sources. More recently, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have been attempted but have been mainly two-dimensional and often encompassing only a single street canyon. This paper provides a comprehensive, critical evaluation of dispersion of pollutants in urban areas. A three-dimensional flow model has been set-up for a staggered crossroad, using the Navier-Stokes equations and the conservation equation for species concentration. The effect of using several different turbulence models, including the k-{epsilon} model, modifications and extensions, has been investigated. Cartesian coordinates have been used in connection with the Partial Solution Algorithm (PARSOL) and Body Fitted Coordinates (BFC). The effects of several different numerical algorithms for discretization of differential equations have also been studied. More than thirty cases are analysed, and the main results are compared with wind tunnel experiments. The numerical results are presented as non-dimensional values to facilitate comparison between experimental and numerical studies. It has been shown that the numerical studies have been able to simulate the air-flow in urban areas and confirm, qualitatively, the previous field observations and wind tunnel results. This success encouraged the authors to extend

  14. Type Directed Partial Evaluation for Level-1 Shift and Reset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danko Ilik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an implementation in the Coq proof assistant of type directed partial evaluation (TDPE algorithms for call-by-name and call-by-value versions of shift and reset delimited control operators, and in presence of strong sum types. We prove that the algorithm transforms well-typed programs to ones in normal form. These normal forms can not always be arrived at using the so far known equational theories. The typing system does not allow answer-type modification for function types and allows delimiters to be set on at most one atomic type. The semantic domain for evaluation is expressed in Constructive Type Theory as a dependently typed monadic structure combining Kripke models and continuation passing style translations.

  15. Numerical evaluation of state boundary surface through rotation of principal stress axes in sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadrnejad, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    In applying shear stress to saturated soil with arbitrary stress paths, the prediction of the exact value of strains is difficult because of mainly its stress path dependent nature. Rotation of the principal stress axes during shearing of the soil is a feature of stress paths associated with many field loading situations. A proper understanding of the effects of principal stress rotation on soil behavior can be provided if the anisotropy existing prior to stress rotation and induced anisotropy due to plastic flow in soil are clearly understood and modeled. A multi laminate based model for soil is developed and used to compute and present the influence of rotation of principal stress axes on the plastic behavior of soil. This is fulfilled by distributing the effects of boundary condition changes into several predefined sampling orientations at one point and summing the micro-results up as the macro-result. The validity of the presented model examined by comparing numerical and test results showing the mentioned aspect. In this paper, the state boundary surface is numerically obtained by a multi laminate based model capable of predicting the behavior of sand under the influences of rotation of the direction of principal stress axes and induced anisotropy. the predicted numerical results are tally in agreement with experiments

  16. Numerical evaluation of two-center integrals over Slater type orbitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, S. A., E-mail: slaykurt@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Natural Sciences Institute, Ondokuz Mayıs University, 55139, Samsun (Turkey); Yükçü, N., E-mail: nyukcu@gmail.com [Department of Energy Systems Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Adıyaman University, 02040, Adıyaman (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    Slater Type Orbitals (STOs) which one of the types of exponential type orbitals (ETOs) are used usually as basis functions in the multicenter molecular integrals to better understand physical and chemical properties of matter. In this work, we develop algorithms for two-center overlap and two-center two-electron hybrid and Coulomb integrals which are calculated with help of translation method for STOs and some auxiliary functions by V. Magnasco’s group. We use Mathematica programming language to produce algorithms for these calculations. Numerical results for some quantum numbers are presented in the tables. Consequently, we compare our obtained numerical results with the other known literature results and other details of evaluation method are discussed.

  17. Numerical evaluation of two-center integrals over Slater type orbitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurt, S. A.; Yükçü, N.

    2016-01-01

    Slater Type Orbitals (STOs) which one of the types of exponential type orbitals (ETOs) are used usually as basis functions in the multicenter molecular integrals to better understand physical and chemical properties of matter. In this work, we develop algorithms for two-center overlap and two-center two-electron hybrid and Coulomb integrals which are calculated with help of translation method for STOs and some auxiliary functions by V. Magnasco’s group. We use Mathematica programming language to produce algorithms for these calculations. Numerical results for some quantum numbers are presented in the tables. Consequently, we compare our obtained numerical results with the other known literature results and other details of evaluation method are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of wave power by integrating numerical models and measures at the Port of Civitavecchia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladini de Mendoza, Francesco; Bonamano, Simone; Carli, Filippo Maria; Marcelli, Marco; Danelli, Andrea; Peviani, Maximo Aurelio; Burgio, Calogero

    2015-01-01

    An assessment of the available wave power at regional and local scale was carried out. Two hot spots of higher wave power level were identified and characterized along the coastline of northern Latium Region, near the 'Torre Valdaliga' power plant and in proximity of Civitavecchia’s breakwater, where the presence of a harbour and an electric power plant allows wave energy exploitation. The evaluation process was implemented through measurements, and numerical model assessment and validation. The integration of wave gauges measurements with numerical simulations made it possible to estimate the wave power on the extended area near shore. A down scaling process allowed to proceed from regional to local scale providing increased resolution thanks to highly detailed bathymetry.

  19. On the numerical evaluation of algebro-geometric solutions to integrable equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalla, C; Klein, C

    2012-01-01

    Physically meaningful periodic solutions to certain integrable partial differential equations are given in terms of multi-dimensional theta functions associated with real Riemann surfaces. Typical analytical problems in the numerical evaluation of these solutions are studied. In the case of hyperelliptic surfaces efficient algorithms exist even for almost degenerate surfaces. This allows the numerical study of solitonic limits. For general real Riemann surfaces, the choice of a homology basis adapted to the anti-holomorphic involution is important for a convenient formulation of the solutions and smoothness conditions. Since existing algorithms for algebraic curves produce a homology basis not related to automorphisms of the curve, we study symplectic transformations to an adapted basis and give explicit formulae for M-curves. As examples we discuss solutions of the Davey–Stewartson and the multi-component nonlinear Schrödinger equations

  20. Combined experimental and numerical evaluation of a prototype nano-PCM enhanced wallboard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Lu, Jue; Soroushian, Parviz; Shrestha, Som

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Field-testing of a nano-PCM wallboard under varying weather conditions. • Numerical model validation and annual simulations of PCM wallboard performance. • Reduced cooling electricity consumption results from PCM wallboard. • PCM wallboard reduces peak cooling loads with implications on power plant capacity. • PCM performance was sensitive to building temperature set point for cooling. - Abstract: In the United States, forty-eight (48) percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change materials (PCMs) in building envelopes can enhance the energy efficiency of buildings and reduce energy consumption. Experimental testing and numerical modeling of PCM-enhanced envelope components are two important aspects of the evaluation of their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM supported by expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which are highly conductive and allow enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution. The nano-PCM is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. A wall with cellulose cavity insulation and a prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboard was built and tested in a natural exposure test (NET) facility in a hot-humid climate location. The test wall contained the PCM wallboard and a regular gypsum wallboard, for a side-by-side annual comparison study. Further, numerical modeling of the wall containing the nano-PCM wallboard was performed to determine its actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The model was first validated using experimental data, and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis evaluating the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced wallboard

  1. Evaluation of bone surrogates for indirect and direct ballistic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bir, Cynthia; Andrecovich, Chris; DeMaio, Marlene; Dougherty, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of injury for fractures to long bones has been studied for both direct ballistic loading as well as indirect. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted on both post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) and animal surrogates which have constraints in terms of storage, preparation and testing. The identification of a validated bone surrogate for use in forensic, medical and engineering testing would provide the ability to investigate ballistic loading without these constraints. Two specific bone surrogates, Sawbones and Synbone, were evaluated in comparison to PMHS for both direct and indirect ballistic loading. For the direct loading, the mean velocity to produce fracture was 121 ± 19 m/s for the PMHS, which was statistically different from the Sawbones (140 ± 7 m/s) and Synbone (146 ± 3 m/s). The average distance to fracture in the indirect loading was .70 cm for the PMHS. The Synbone had a statistically similar average distance to fracture (.61 cm, p=0.54) however the Sawbones average distance to fracture was statistically different (.41 cm, pballistic testing was not identified and future work is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating the risks of clinical research: direct comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rid, Annette; Abdoler, Emily; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Pine, Daniel S; Wendler, David

    2014-09-01

    Many guidelines and regulations allow children and adolescents to be enrolled in research without the prospect of clinical benefit when it poses minimal risk. However, few systematic methods exist to determine when research risks are minimal. This situation has led to significant variation in minimal risk judgments, raising concern that some children are not being adequately protected. To address this concern, we describe a new method for implementing the widely endorsed "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk. This standard defines research risks as minimal when they do not exceed the risks posed by daily life activities or routine examinations. This study employed a conceptual and normative analysis, and use of an illustrative example. Different risks are composed of the same basic elements: Type, likelihood, and magnitude of harm. Hence, one can compare the risks of research and the risks of daily life by comparing the respective basic elements with each other. We use this insight to develop a systematic method, direct comparative analysis, for implementing the "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk. The method offers a way of evaluating research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities, such as the risk of experiencing anxiety, stress, or other psychological harm. We thus illustrate how direct comparative analysis can be applied in practice by using it to evaluate whether the anxiety induced by a respiratory CO2 challenge poses minimal or greater than minimal risks in children and adolescents. Direct comparative analysis is a systematic method for applying the "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk to research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities. It thereby offers a method to protect children and adolescents in research, while ensuring that important studies are not blocked because of unwarranted concerns about research risks.

  3. Procedure for the direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows in plane channels and annuli and its application in the development of turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, U

    1973-10-01

    Thesis. Submitted to Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe (West Germany). A numerical difference scheme is described to simulate threedimensional, time- dependent, turbulent flows of incompressible fluids at high Reynolds numbers in a plane channel and in concertric annuli. Starting from the results of Deardorff, the NavierStokes equations, averaged over grid volumes, are integrated. For description of the subgrid scale motion a novel model has been developed which takes into account strongly inhomogeneous turbulence and grid volumes of unequal side lengths. The premises used in the model are described and discussed. Stability criteria are established for this method and for similar difference schemes. For computation of the pressure field the appropriate Poisson's equation is solved accurately, except for rounding errors, by Fast Fourier Transform. The procedure implemented in the TURBIT-1 program is used to simulate turbulent flows in a plane channel and an annulus of 5: 1 ratio of radii. For both types of flow, different cases are realized with a maximum number of grid volumes of 65536. For rather small grid volume numbers the numerical results are in good agreement with experimental values. Especially the velocity profile and the mean velocity fluctuations are computed with significantly better accuracy than in earlier, direct simulations. The energy --length-scale model and the pressurestrain correlation are used as examples to show that the method may be used successfully to evaluate the parameters of turbulence models. Earlier results are reviewed and proposals for future research are made. (auth)

  4. Numerically evaluating the bispectrum in curved field-space— with PyTransport 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronayne, John W.; Mulryne, David J.

    2018-01-01

    We extend the transport framework for numerically evaluating the power spectrum and bispectrum in multi-field inflation to the case of a curved field-space metric. This method naturally accounts for all sub- and super-horizon tree level effects, including those induced by the curvature of the field-space. We present an open source implementation of our equations in an extension of the publicly available PyTransport code. Finally we illustrate how our technique is applied to examples of inflationary models with a non-trivial field-space metric.

  5. Influence of polymer additives on turbulent energy cascading in forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence studied by direct numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feng-Chen; Cai Wei-Hua; Zhang Hong-Na; Wang Yue

    2012-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) were performed for the forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence (FHIT) with/without polymer additives in order to elaborate the characteristics of the turbulent energy cascading influenced by drag-reducing effects. The finite elastic non-linear extensibility-Peterlin model (FENE-P) was used as the conformation tensor equation for the viscoelastic polymer solution. Detailed analyses of DNS data were carried out in this paper for the turbulence scaling law and the topological dynamics of FHIT as well as the important turbulent parameters, including turbulent kinetic energy spectra, enstrophy and strain, velocity structure function, small-scale intermittency, etc. A natural and straightforward definition for the drag reduction rate was also proposed for the drag-reducing FHIT based on the decrease degree of the turbulent kinetic energy. It was found that the turbulent energy cascading in the FHIT was greatly modified by the drag-reducing polymer additives. The enstrophy and the strain fields in the FHIT of the polymer solution were remarkably weakened as compared with their Newtonian counterparts. The small-scale vortices and the small-scale intermittency were all inhibited by the viscoelastic effects in the FHIT of the polymer solution. However, the scaling law in a fashion of extended self-similarity for the FHIT of the polymer solution, within the presently simulated range of Weissenberg numbers, had no distinct differences compared with that of the Newtonian fluid case

  6. Comparison of one-dimensional probabilistic finite element method with direct numerical simulation of dynamically loaded heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Material response to dynamic loading is often dominated by microstructure such as grain topology, porosity, inclusions, and defects; however, many models rely on assumptions of homogeneity. We use the probabilistic finite element method (WK Liu, IJNME, 1986) to introduce local uncertainty to account for material heterogeneity. The PFEM uses statistical information about the local material response (i.e., its expectation, coefficient of variation, and autocorrelation) drawn from knowledge of the microstructure, single crystal behavior, and direct numerical simulation (DNS) to determine the expectation and covariance of the system response (velocity, strain, stress, etc). This approach is compared to resolved grain-scale simulations of the equivalent system. The microstructures used for the DNS are produced using Monte Carlo simulations of grain growth, and a sufficient number of realizations are computed to ensure a meaningful comparison. Finally, comments are made regarding the suitability of one-dimensional PFEM for modeling material heterogeneity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of open channel flow over smooth-to-rough and rough-to-smooth step changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, Amirreza; Chung, Daniel; Hutchins, Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are reported for open channel flow over streamwise-alternating patches of smooth and fully rough walls. Owing to the streamwise periodicity, the flow configuration is composed of a step change from smooth to rough, and a step change from rough to smooth. The friction Reynolds number varies from 443 over the smooth patch to 715 over the rough patch. The flow is thoroughly studied by mean and fluctuation profiles, and spectrograms. The detailed flow from DNS reveals discrepancies of up to 50% among the various definitions of the internal-layer thickness, with apparent power-law exponents differing by up to 60%. The definition based on the logarithmic slope of the velocity profile, as proposed by Chamorro et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol., vol. 130, 2009, pp. 29-41), is most consistent with the physical notion of the internal layer; this is supported by the defect similarity based on this internal-layer thickness, and the streamwise homogeneity of the dissipation length-scale within this internal layer. The statistics inside this internal-layer, and the growth of the internal layer itself, are minimally affected by the streamwise periodicity when the patch length is at least six times the channel height.

  8. Model reduction for the dynamics and control of large structural systems via neutral network processing direct numerical optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becus, Georges A.; Chan, Alistair K.

    1993-01-01

    Three neural network processing approaches in a direct numerical optimization model reduction scheme are proposed and investigated. Large structural systems, such as large space structures, offer new challenges to both structural dynamicists and control engineers. One such challenge is that of dimensionality. Indeed these distributed parameter systems can be modeled either by infinite dimensional mathematical models (typically partial differential equations) or by high dimensional discrete models (typically finite element models) often exhibiting thousands of vibrational modes usually closely spaced and with little, if any, damping. Clearly, some form of model reduction is in order, especially for the control engineer who can actively control but a few of the modes using system identification based on a limited number of sensors. Inasmuch as the amount of 'control spillover' (in which the control inputs excite the neglected dynamics) and/or 'observation spillover' (where neglected dynamics affect system identification) is to a large extent determined by the choice of particular reduced model (RM), the way in which this model reduction is carried out is often critical.

  9. DIRECT EVALUATION OF THE HELIUM ABUNDANCES IN OMEGA CENTAURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H., E-mail: dupree@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: eavrett@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    A direct measure of the helium abundances from the near-infrared transition of He I at 1.08 {mu}m is obtained for two nearly identical red giant stars in the globular cluster Omega Centauri. One star exhibits the He I line; the line is weak or absent in the other star. Detailed non-local thermal equilibrium semi-empirical models including expansion in spherical geometry are developed to match the chromospheric H{alpha}, H{beta}, and Ca II K lines, in order to predict the helium profile and derive a helium abundance. The red giant spectra suggest a helium abundance of Y {<=} 0.22 (LEID 54064) and Y = 0.39-0.44 (LEID 54084) corresponding to a difference in the abundance {Delta}Y {>=} 0.17. Helium is enhanced in the giant star (LEID 54084) that also contains enhanced aluminum and magnesium. This direct evaluation of the helium abundances gives observational support to the theoretical conjecture that multiple populations harbor enhanced helium in addition to light elements that are products of high-temperature hydrogen burning. We demonstrate that the 1.08 {mu}m He I line can yield a helium abundance in cool stars when constraints on the semi-empirical chromospheric model are provided by other spectroscopic features.

  10. Performance analysis and evaluation of direct phase measuring deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Zonghua; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2018-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) shape measurement of specular objects plays an important role in intelligent manufacturing applications. Phase measuring deflectometry (PMD)-based methods are widely used to obtain the 3D shapes of specular surfaces because they offer the advantages of a large dynamic range, high measurement accuracy, full-field and noncontact operation, and automatic data processing. To enable measurement of specular objects with discontinuous and/or isolated surfaces, a direct PMD (DPMD) method has been developed to build a direct relationship between phase and depth. In this paper, a new virtual measurement system is presented and is used to optimize the system parameters and evaluate the system's performance in DPMD applications. Four system parameters are analyzed to obtain accurate measurement results. Experiments are performed using simulated and actual data and the results confirm the effects of these four parameters on the measurement results. Researchers can therefore select suitable system parameters for actual DPMD (including PMD) measurement systems to obtain the 3D shapes of specular objects with high accuracy.

  11. Numerical evaluation of electromagnetic force induced in high Tc superconductor with grain boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Toda, Saburo; Maeda, Koutaro

    1996-01-01

    After high T c superconducting material was discovered, its superconducting characteristic has been improved so that its critical current density becomes comparable with that of metal alloy superconductors. Together with this progress of the high T c material, it is considered to apply the materials to generating levitation force in combination with permanent magnets. In this case, it becomes very important to evaluate quantitatively the electromagnetic force for designing of the devices. Some researches have used numerical analysis to evaluate the force, where the grain boundary was ignored or treated as nonconducting. In the real materials, however, some part of the screening current can pass through the grain boundary. In this paper, therefore, two dimensional electromagnetic analysis was performed with a new method to treat the grain boundaries, and its effect on the levitation force was discussed

  12. Evaluation of dynamic characteristics of hard rock based on numerical simulations of in situ rock tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Yuya; Ikusada, Koji; Jiang, Yujing

    2009-01-01

    In situ rock tests of hard rock of conglomerate in which discontinuities in high angle are dominant were conducted. In this study, in order to confirm the validity of the test results and the test condition, and in order to elucidate the deformation behaviour and the mechanism of shear strength of the rock mass, the numerical simulations of the in situ rock tests by using distinct element method were performed. As a result, it was clarified that the behaviour of the rock mass strongly depends on both geometrical distribution of discontinuities and those mechanical properties. It is thought that a series of evaluation processes showed in this study contribute to improve the reliability of the dynamic characteristic evaluation of the rock mass. (author)

  13. Numerical simulation of thermal behaviors of a clothed human body with evaluation of indoor solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Aihua; Luo, Jie; Li, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar radiation evaluation is integrated with the thermal transfer in clothed humans. • Thermal models are developed for clothed humans exposed in indoor solar radiation. • The effect of indoor solar radiation on humans can be predicted in different situations in living. • The green solar energy can be efficiently utilized in the building development. - Abstract: Solar radiation is a valuable green energy, which is important in achieving a successful building design for thermal comfort in indoor environment. This paper considers solar radiation indoors into the transient thermal transfer models of a clothed human body and offers a new numerical method to analyze the dynamic thermal status of a clothed human body under different solar radiation incidences. The evaluation model of solar radiation indoors and a group of coupled thermal models of the clothed human body are developed and integrated. The simulation capacities of these integrated models are validated through a comparison between the predicted results and the experimental data in reference. After that, simulation cases are also conducted to show the influence of solar radiation on the thermal status of individual clothed body segments when the human body is staying indoors in different seasons. This numerical simulation method provides a useful tool to analyze the thermal status of clothed human body under different solar radiation incidences indoors and thus enables the architect to efficiently utilize the green solar energy in building development.

  14. Numerical evaluation of experimental models to investigate the dynamic behavior of the ITER tokamak assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Takeda, N.; Nakahira, M.; Shimizu, K.; Nakamura, T.

    2003-01-01

    The most recent assessment method to evaluate the dynamic behavior of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak assembly is outlined. Three experimental models, including a 1/5.8-scale tokamak model, have been considered to validate the numerical analysis methods for dynamic events, particularly seismic ones. The experimental model has been evaluated by numerical calculations and the results are presented. In the calculations, equivalent linearization has been applied for the non-linear characteristics of the support flange connection, caused by the effects of the bolt-fastening and the friction between the flanges. The detailed connecting conditions for the support flanges have been developed and validated for the analysis. Using the conditions, the eigen-mode analysis has shown that the first and second eigen-mode are horizontal vibration modes with the natural frequency of 39 Hz, while the vertical vibration mode is the fourth mode with the natural frequency of 86 Hz. Dynamic analysis for seismic events has shown the maximum acceleration of approximately twofold larger than that of the applied acceleration, and the maximum stress of 104 MPa found in the flange connecting bolt. These values will be examined comparing with experimental results in order to validate the analysis methods

  15. Numerical evaluation of experimental models to investigate the dynamic behavior of the ITER tokamak assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M. E-mail: masanori_onozuka@mhi.co.jp; Takeda, N.; Nakahira, M.; Shimizu, K.; Nakamura, T

    2003-09-01

    The most recent assessment method to evaluate the dynamic behavior of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak assembly is outlined. Three experimental models, including a 1/5.8-scale tokamak model, have been considered to validate the numerical analysis methods for dynamic events, particularly seismic ones. The experimental model has been evaluated by numerical calculations and the results are presented. In the calculations, equivalent linearization has been applied for the non-linear characteristics of the support flange connection, caused by the effects of the bolt-fastening and the friction between the flanges. The detailed connecting conditions for the support flanges have been developed and validated for the analysis. Using the conditions, the eigen-mode analysis has shown that the first and second eigen-mode are horizontal vibration modes with the natural frequency of 39 Hz, while the vertical vibration mode is the fourth mode with the natural frequency of 86 Hz. Dynamic analysis for seismic events has shown the maximum acceleration of approximately twofold larger than that of the applied acceleration, and the maximum stress of 104 MPa found in the flange connecting bolt. These values will be examined comparing with experimental results in order to validate the analysis methods.

  16. Evaluation of conceptual and numerical models for arsenic mobilization and attenuation during managed aquifer recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Ilka; Prommer, Henning; Simmons, Craig T; Post, Vincent; Stuyfzand, Pieter J

    2010-07-01

    Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) is promoted as an attractive technique to meet growing water demands. An impediment to MAR applications, where oxygenated water is recharged into anoxic aquifers, is the potential mobilization of trace metals (e.g., arsenic). While conceptual models for arsenic transport under such circumstances exist, they are generally not rigorously evaluated through numerical modeling, especially at field-scale. In this work, geochemical data from an injection experiment in The Netherlands, where the introduction of oxygenated water into an anoxic aquifer mobilized arsenic, was used to develop and evaluate conceptual and numerical models of arsenic release and attenuation under field-scale conditions. Initially, a groundwater flow and nonreactive transport model was developed. Subsequent reactive transport simulations focused on the description of the temporal and spatial evolution of the redox zonation. The calibrated model was then used to study and quantify the transport of arsenic. In the model that best reproduced field observations, the fate of arsenic was simulated by (i) release via codissolution of arsenopyrite, stoichiometrically linked to pyrite oxidation, (ii) kinetically controlled oxidation of dissolved As(III) to As(V), and (iii) As adsorption via surface complexation on neo-precipitated iron oxides.

  17. Heat treatment of whole milk by the direct joule effect--experimental and numerical approaches to fouling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillaudeau, L; Winterton, P; Leuliet, J C; Tissier, J P; Maury, V; Semet, F; Debreyne, P; Berthou, M; Chopard, F

    2006-12-01

    The development of alternative technologies such as the direct Joule effect to pasteurize and sterilize food products is of great scientific and industrial interest. Our objective was 1) to gain insight into the ability to ensure ultra-high-temperature treatment of milk and 2) to investigate the links among thermal, hydraulic, and electrical phenomena in relation to fouling in a direct Joule effect heater. The ohmic heater [OH; E perpendicular to v (where E is the electrical field and v is the velocity); P (power) = 15 kW] was composed of 5 flat rectangular cells [e (space between the plate and electrode) = 15 mm, w (wall) = 76 mm, and L (length of the plate in plate heat exchanger or electrode) = 246 mm]--3 active cells to ensure heating and 2 (at the extremities) for electrical insulation and the recovery of leakage currents. In the first step, the thermal performance of the OH was investigated vs. the flow regimen [50 conductivity of fluids (0.1 thermal approach (thermal and electrical balance, modeling of the temperature profile of a fluid) and local analysis of the wall temperature of the electrode. An empirical correlation was established to estimate the temperature gradient, T(w)-T(b) (where T(w) is the wall temperature and T(b) is the product temperature) under clean conditions (without fouling) and was used to define operating conditions for pure-volume and direct-resistance heating. In the second step, the ability of OH to ensure the ultra-high-temperature treatment of whole milk was investigated and compared with a plate heat exchanger. Special care was taken to investigate the heat transfer phenomena occurring over a range of temperatures from 105 to 138 degrees C. This temperature range corresponds to the part of the process made critical by protein and mineral fouling. The objectives were 1) to demonstrate the ability of an OH to ensure heat treatment of milk, 2) to study the thermal and hydraulic performance with an increasing power and temperature

  18. The study of the effects of sea-spray drops on the marine atmospheric boundary layer by direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2018-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of turbulent exchange processes occurring in the atmospheric marine boundary layer are of primary importance for their correct parameterization in large-scale prognostic models. These processes are complicated, especially at sufficiently strong wind forcing conditions, by the presence of sea-spray drops which are torn off the crests of sufficiently steep surface waves by the wind gusts. Natural observations indicate that mass fraction of sea-spray drops increases with wind speed and their impact on the dynamics of the air in the vicinity of the sea surface can become quite significant. Field experiments, however, are limited by insufficient accuracy of the acquired data and are in general costly and difficult. Laboratory modeling presents another route to investigate the spray-mediated exchange processes in much more detail as compared to the natural experiments. However, laboratory measurements, contact as well as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) methods, also suffer from inability to resolve the dynamics of the near-surface air-flow, especially in the surface wave troughs. In this report, we present a first attempt to use Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as tool for investigation of the drops-mediated momentum, heat and moisture transfer in a turbulent, droplet-laden air flow over a wavy water surface. DNS is capable of resolving the details of the transfer processes and do not involve any closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (LES and RANS) simulations. Thus DNS provides a basis for improving parameterizations in LES and RANS closure models and further development of large-scale prognostic models. In particular, we discuss numerical results showing the details of the modification of the air flow velocity, temperature and relative humidity fields by multidisperse, evaporating drops. We use Eulerian-Lagrangian approach where the equations for the air-flow fields are solved in a Eulerian frame whereas

  19. Detuned resonances of Tollmien-Schlichting waves in an airfoil boundary layer: Experiment, theory, and direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würz, W.; Sartorius, D.; Kloker, M.; Borodulin, V. I.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Smorodsky, B. V.

    2012-09-01

    Transition prediction in two-dimensional laminar boundary layers developing on airfoil sections at subsonic speeds and very low turbulence levels is still a challenge. The commonly used semi-empirical prediction tools are mainly based on linear stability theory and do not account for nonlinear effects present unavoidably starting with certain stages of transition. One reason is the lack of systematic investigations of the weakly nonlinear stages of transition, especially of the strongest interactions of the instability modes predominant in non-self-similar boundary layers. The present paper is devoted to the detailed experimental, numerical, and theoretical study of weakly nonlinear subharmonic resonances of Tollmien-Schlichting waves in an airfoil boundary layer, representing main candidates for the strongest mechanism of these initial nonlinear stages. The experimental approach is based on phase-locked hot-wire measurements under controlled disturbance conditions using a new disturbance source being capable to produce well-defined, complex wave compositions in a wide range of streamwise and spanwise wave numbers. The tests were performed in a low-turbulence wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of Re = 0.7 × 106. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) were utilized to provide a detailed comparison for the test cases. The results of weakly nonlinear theory (WNT) enabled a profound understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms observed in the experiments and DNS. The data obtained in experiment, DNS and WNT agree basically and provide a high degree of reliability of the results. Interactions occurring between components of various initial frequency-wavenumber spectra of instability waves are investigated by systematic variation of parameters. It is shown that frequency-detuned and spanwise-wavenumber-detuned subharmonic-type resonant interactions have an extremely large spectral width. Similar to results obtained for self-similar base flows it is found that the

  20. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: models of terms in the Reynolds stress budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dritselis, Chris D, E-mail: dritseli@mie.uth.gr [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece)

    2017-04-15

    In the first part of this study (Dritselis 2016 Fluid Dyn. Res. 48 015507), the Reynolds stress budgets were evaluated through point-particle direct numerical simulations (pp-DNSs) for the particle-laden turbulent flow in a vertical channel with two- and four-way coupling effects. Here several turbulence models are assessed by direct comparison of the particle contribution terms to the budgets, the dissipation rate, the pressure-strain rate, and the transport rate with the model expressions using the pp-DNS data. It is found that the models of the particle sources to the equations of fluid turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate cannot represent correctly the physics of the complex interaction between turbulence and particles. A relatively poor performance of the pressure-strain term models is revealed in the particulate flows, while the algebraic models for the dissipation rate of the fluid turbulence kinetic energy and the transport rate terms can adequately reproduce the main trends due to the presence of particles. Further work is generally needed to improve the models in order to account properly for the momentum exchange between the two phases and the effects of particle inertia, gravity and inter-particle collisions. (paper)

  1. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: models of terms in the Reynolds stress budgets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritselis, Chris D

    2017-01-01

    In the first part of this study (Dritselis 2016 Fluid Dyn. Res. 48 015507), the Reynolds stress budgets were evaluated through point-particle direct numerical simulations (pp-DNSs) for the particle-laden turbulent flow in a vertical channel with two- and four-way coupling effects. Here several turbulence models are assessed by direct comparison of the particle contribution terms to the budgets, the dissipation rate, the pressure-strain rate, and the transport rate with the model expressions using the pp-DNS data. It is found that the models of the particle sources to the equations of fluid turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate cannot represent correctly the physics of the complex interaction between turbulence and particles. A relatively poor performance of the pressure-strain term models is revealed in the particulate flows, while the algebraic models for the dissipation rate of the fluid turbulence kinetic energy and the transport rate terms can adequately reproduce the main trends due to the presence of particles. Further work is generally needed to improve the models in order to account properly for the momentum exchange between the two phases and the effects of particle inertia, gravity and inter-particle collisions. (paper)

  2. Aerothermal and aeroelastic response prediction of aerospace structures in high-speed flows using direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostoich, Christopher Mark

    due to a dome-induced horseshoe vortex scouring the panel's surface. Comparisons with reduced-order models of heat transfer indicate that they perform with varying levels of accuracy around some portions of the geometry while completely failing to predict significant heat loads in re- gions where the dome-influenced flow impacts the ceramic panel. Cumulative effects of flow-thermal coupling at later simulation times on the reduction of panel drag and surface heat transfer are quantified. The second fluid-structure study investigates the interaction between a thin metallic panel and a Mach 2.25 turbulent boundary layer with an ini- tial momentum thickness Reynolds number of 1200. A transient, non-linear, large deformation, 3D finite element solver is developed to compute the dynamic response of the panel. The solver is coupled at the fluid-structure interface with the compressible Navier-Stokes solver, the latter of which is used for a direct numerical simulation of the turbulent boundary layer. In this approach, no simplifying assumptions regarding the structural solution or turbulence modeling are made in order to get detailed solution data. It is found that the thin panel state evolves into a flutter type response char- acterized by high-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations into the flow. The oscillating panel disturbs the supersonic flow by introducing compression waves, modifying the turbulence, and generating fluctuations in the power exiting the top of the flow domain. The work in this thesis serves as a step forward in structural response prediction in high-speed flows. The results demonstrate the ability of high- fidelity numerical approaches to serve as a guide for reduced-order model improvement and as well as provide accurate and detailed solution data in scenarios where experimental approaches are difficult or impossible.

  3. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molins, Sergi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Trebotich, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Steefel, Carl I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division; Shen, Chaopeng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division

    2012-03-30

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO2. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. In this study we investigate the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is composed of high-performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1-D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high-resolution model is used to demonstrate that nonuniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. In conclusion, the effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  4. Direct numerical simulations of the ignition of lean primary reference fuel/air mixtures with temperature inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minhbau

    2013-10-01

    The effects of fuel composition, thermal stratification, and turbulence on the ignition of lean homogeneous primary reference fuel (PRF)/air mixtures under the conditions of constant volume and elevated pressure are investigated by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with a new 116-species reduced kinetic mechanism. Two-dimensional DNSs were performed in a fixed volume with a two-dimensional isotropic velocity spectrum and temperature fluctuations superimposed on the initial scalar fields with different fuel compositions to elucidate the influence of variations in the initial temperature fluctuation and turbulence intensity on the ignition of three different lean PRF/air mixtures. In general, it was found that the mean heat release rate increases slowly and the overall combustion occurs fast with increasing thermal stratification regardless of the fuel composition under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. In addition, the effect of the fuel composition on the ignition characteristics of PRF/air mixtures was found to vanish with increasing thermal stratification. Chemical explosive mode (CEM), displacement speed, and Damköhler number analyses revealed that the high degree of thermal stratification induces deflagration rather than spontaneous ignition at the reaction fronts, rendering the mean heat release rate more distributed over time subsequent to thermal runaway occurring at the highest temperature regions in the domain. These analyses also revealed that the vanishing of the fuel effect under the high degree of thermal stratification is caused by the nearly identical propagation characteristics of deflagrations of different PRF/air mixtures. It was also found that high intensity and short-timescale turbulence can effectively homogenize mixtures such that the overall ignition is apt to occur by spontaneous ignition. These results suggest that large thermal stratification leads to smooth operation of homogeneous charge compression-ignition (HCCI

  5. Statistical characteristics of falling-film flows: A synergistic approach at the crossroads of direct numerical simulations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charogiannis, Alexandros; Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Markides, Christos N.

    2017-12-01

    We scrutinize the statistical characteristics of liquid films flowing over an inclined planar surface based on film height and velocity measurements that are recovered simultaneously by application of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), respectively. Our experiments are complemented by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of liquid films simulated for different conditions so as to expand the parameter space of our investigation. Our statistical analysis builds upon a Reynolds-like decomposition of the time-varying flow rate that was presented in our previous research effort on falling films in [Charogiannis et al., Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 014002 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.014002], and which reveals that the dimensionless ratio of the unsteady term to the mean flow rate increases linearly with the product of the coefficients of variation of the film height and bulk velocity, as well as with the ratio of the Nusselt height to the mean film height, both at the same upstream PLIF/PTV measurement location. Based on relations that are derived to describe these results, a methodology for predicting the mass-transfer capability (through the mean and standard deviation of the bulk flow speed) of these flows is developed in terms of the mean and standard deviation of the film thickness and the mean flow rate, which are considerably easier to obtain experimentally than velocity profiles. The errors associated with these predictions are estimated at ≈1.5 % and 8% respectively in the experiments and at <1 % and <2 % respectively in the DNSs. Beyond the generation of these relations for the prediction of important film flow characteristics based on simple flow information, the data provided can be used to design improved heat- and mass-transfer equipment reactors or other process operation units which exploit film flows, but also to develop and validate multiphase flow models in other physical and technological settings.

  6. Turbulence Generation Using Localized Sources of Energy: Direct Numerical Simulations and the Effects of Thermal Non-Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqui, Agustin Francisco

    Turbulence in high-speed flows is an important problem in aerospace applications, yet extremely difficult from a theoretical, computational and experimental perspective. A main reason for the lack of complete understanding is the difficulty of generating turbulence in the lab at a range of speeds which can also include hypersonic effects such as thermal non-equilibrium. This work studies the feasibility of a new approach to generate turbulence based on laser-induced photo-excitation/dissociation of seeded molecules. A large database of incompressible and compressible direct numerical simulations (DNS) has been generated to systematically study the development and evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence. Governing parameters and the conditions necessary for the establishment of turbulence, as well as the length and time scales associated with such process, are identified. For both the compressible and incompressible experiments a minimum Reynolds number is found to be needed for the flow to evolve towards fully developed turbulence. Additionally, for incompressible cases a minimum time scale is required, while for compressible cases a minimum distance from the grid and limit on the maximum temperature introduced are required. Through an extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, as well as spectral dynamics, the primary mechanisms leading to turbulence are shown. As commonly done in compressible turbulence, dilatational and solenoidal components are separated to understand the effect of acoustics on the development of turbulence. Finally, a large database of forced isotropic turbulence has been generated to study the effect of internal degrees of freedom on the evolution of turbulence.

  7. Study of coherent structures of turbulence with large wall-normal gradients in thermophysical properties using direct numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinink, Shawn K.; Yaras, Metin I.

    2015-01-01

    Forced-convection heat transfer in a heated working fluid at a thermodynamic state near its pseudocritical point is poorly predicted by correlations calibrated with data at subcritical temperatures and pressures. This is suggested to be primarily due to the influence of large wall-normal thermophysical property gradients that develop in proximity of the pseudocritical point on the concentration of coherent turbulence structures near the wall. The physical mechanisms dominating this influence remain poorly understood. In the present study, direct numerical simulation is used to study the development of coherent vortical structures within a turbulent spot under the influence of large wall-normal property gradients. A turbulent spot rather than a fully turbulent boundary layer is used for the study, for the coherent structures of turbulence in a spot tend to be in a more organized state which may allow for more effective identification of cause-and-effect relationships. Large wall-normal gradients in thermophysical properties are created by heating the working fluid which is near the pseudocritical thermodynamic state. It is found that during improved heat transfer, wall-normal gradients in density accelerate the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mechanism in the shear layer enveloping low-speed streaks, causing it to roll up into hairpin vortices at a faster rate. It is suggested that this occurs by the baroclinic vorticity generation mechanism which accelerates the streamwise grouping of vorticity during shear layer roll-up. The increased roll-up frequency leads to reduced streamwise spacing between hairpin vortices in wave packets. The density gradients also promote the sinuous instability mode in low-speed streaks. The resulting oscillations in the streaks in the streamwise-spanwise plane lead to locally reduced spanwise spacing between hairpin vortices forming over adjacent low-speed streaks. The reduction in streamwise and spanwise spacing between

  8. Study of Particle Rotation Effect in Gas-Solid Flows using Direct Numerical Simulation with a Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyung [Tuskegee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States); Fan, Liang-Shih [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Zhou, Qiang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Yang, Hui [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A new and efficient direct numerical method with second-order convergence accuracy was developed for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The method combines the state-of-the-art immersed boundary method (IBM), the multi-direct forcing method, and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). First, the multi-direct forcing method is adopted in the improved IBM to better approximate the no-slip/no-penetration (ns/np) condition on the surface of particles. Second, a slight retraction of the Lagrangian grid from the surface towards the interior of particles with a fraction of the Eulerian grid spacing helps increase the convergence accuracy of the method. An over-relaxation technique in the procedure of multi-direct forcing method and the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme in the coupled fluid-particle interaction were applied. The use of the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme helps the overall IB-LBM achieve the second order accuracy and provides more accurate predictions of the translational and rotational motion of particles. The preexistent code with the first-order convergence rate is updated so that the updated new code can resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order convergence rate. The updated code has been validated with several benchmark applications. The efficiency of IBM and thus the efficiency of IB-LBM were improved by reducing the number of the Lagragian markers on particles by using a new formula for the number of Lagrangian markers on particle surfaces. The immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IBLBM) has been shown to predict correctly the angular velocity of a particle. Prior to examining drag force exerted on a cluster of particles, the updated IB-LBM code along with the new formula for the number of Lagrangian markers has been further validated by solving several theoretical problems. Moreover, the unsteadiness of the drag force is examined when a

  9. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of Rock Dynamic Test with Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of rock dynamic properties by split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB was experimentally and numerically evaluated with ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The effects of different diameters, different loading rates, and different propagation distances on wave dispersion of input bars in SHPB with rectangle and half-sine wave loadings were analyzed. The results show that the dispersion effect on the diameter of input bar, loading rate, and propagation distance under half-sine waveform loading is ignorable compared with the rectangle wave loading. Moreover, the degrees of stress uniformity under rectangle and half-sine input wave loadings are compared in SHPB tests, and the time required for stress uniformity is calculated under different above-mentioned loadings. It is confirmed that the stress uniformity can be realized more easily using the half-sine pulse loading compared to the rectangle pulse loading, and this has significant advantages in the dynamic test of rock-like materials. Finally, the Holmquist-Johnson-Concrete constitutive model is introduced to simulate the failure mechanism and failure and fragmentation characteristics of rock under different strain rates. And the numerical results agree with that obtained from the experiment, which confirms the effectiveness of the model and the method.

  10. Evaluation of the flow forces on an open centre directional control valve by means of a computational fluid dynamic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirante, R.; Del Vescovo, G.; Lippolis, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is the evaluation of the driving forces acting on a 4/3 hydraulic open center directional control valve spool by means of a complete numerical analysis. In a previous paper by the same authors, the valve was inserted in a closed hydraulic circuit and was tested with different pump flow rate values to obtain experimental results about the driving forces. The experimental results are used in this paper to evaluate and validate the numerical analysis of the valve. The obtained numerical results show important differences between an open center valve and a closed center one, the latter being extensively analyzed in the literature. The numerical analysis is performed by using the commercial code 'Fluent', and the numerical results show the complete flow field inside the valve. The aim of this analysis is to evaluate the valve fluid dynamic performance, exploiting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques, in order to give the reliable indications needed to define the valve design criteria and avoid expensive experimental tests

  11. A numerical model to evaluate the flow distribution in a large solar collector field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bava, Federico; Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a numerical model to evaluate the flow distribution in a large solar collector field, with solar collectors connected both in series and in parallel. The boundary conditions of the systems, such as flow rate, temperature, fluid type and layout of the collector field can...... be easily changed in the model. The model was developed in Matlab and the calculated pressure drop and flow distribution were compared with measurements from a solar collector field. A good agreement between model and measurements was found. The model was then used to study the flow distribution...... in different conditions. Balancing valves proved to be an effective way to achieve uniform flow distribution also in conditions different from those for which the valves were regulated. For small solar collector fields with limited number of collector rows connected in parallel, balancing valves...

  12. Evaluation of the tripolar electrode stimulation method by numerical analysis and animal experiments for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, S; Sakajiri, M; Ifukube, T; Matsushima, J

    1997-01-01

    We have proposed the Tripolar Electrode Stimulation Method (TESM) which may enable us to narrow the stimulation region and to move continuously the stimulation site for the cochlear implants. We evaluated whether or not TESM works according to a theory based on numerical analysis using the auditory nerve fiber model. In this simulation, the sum of the excited model fibers were compared with the compound actions potentials obtained from animal experiments. As a result, this experiment showed that TESM could narrow a stimulation region by controlling the sum of the currents emitted from the electrodes on both sides, and continuously move a stimulation site by changing the ratio of the currents emitted from the electrodes on both sides.

  13. Numerical evaluation of virtual corrections to multi-jet production in massless QCD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, S.; Yundin, V.; Biedermann, B.

    2013-01-01

    title: NJet. Catalogue identifier: AEPF_v1_0. Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPF_v1_0.html. Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3. No. of lines in distributed program......, including test data, etc.: 250047. No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2138947. Distribution format: tar.gz. Programming language: C++, Python. Computer: PC/Workstation. Operating system: No specific requirements - tested on Scientific Linux 5.2. and Mac OS X 10.......7.4. Classification: 11.5. External routines: QCDLoop (http://qcdloop.fnal.gov/), qd (http://crd.lbl.gov/dhbailey/mpdist/), both included in the distribution file. Nature of problem:. Evaluation of virtual corrections for multi-jet production in massless QCD. Solution method:. Purely numerical approach based on tree...

  14. Evaluation and Numerical Simulation of Tsunami for Coastal Nuclear Power Plants of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Pavan K.; Singh, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Recent tsunami generated on December 26, 2004 due to Sumatra earthquake of magnitude 9.3 resulted in inundation at the various coastal sites of India. The site selection and design of Indian nuclear power plants demand the evaluation of run up and the structural barriers for the coastal plants: Besides it is also desirable to evaluate the early warning system for tsunami-genic earthquakes. The tsunamis originate from submarine faults, underwater volcanic activities, sub-aerial landslides impinging on the sea and submarine landslides. In case of a submarine earthquake-induced tsunami the wave is generated in the fluid domain due to displacement of the seabed. There are three phases of tsunami: generation, propagation, and run-up. Reactor Safety Division (RSD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has initiated computational simulation for all the three phases of tsunami source generation, its propagation and finally run up evaluation for the protection of public life, property and various industrial infrastructures located on the coastal regions of India. These studies could be effectively utilized for design and implementation of early warning system for coastal region of the country apart from catering to the needs of Indian nuclear installations. This paper presents some results of tsunami waves based on different analytical/numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. (authors)

  15. Ultra-fast evaluation of protein energies directly from sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevorg Grigoryan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure, function, stability, and many other properties of a protein in a fixed environment are fully specified by its sequence, but in a manner that is difficult to discern. We present a general approach for rapidly mapping sequences directly to their energies on a pre-specified rigid backbone, an important sub-problem in computational protein design and in some methods for protein structure prediction. The cluster expansion (CE method that we employ can, in principle, be extended to model any computable or measurable protein property directly as a function of sequence. Here we show how CE can be applied to the problem of computational protein design, and use it to derive excellent approximations of physical potentials. The approach provides several attractive advantages. First, following a one-time derivation of a CE expansion, the amount of time necessary to evaluate the energy of a sequence adopting a specified backbone conformation is reduced by a factor of 10(7 compared to standard full-atom methods for the same task. Second, the agreement between two full-atom methods that we tested and their CE sequence-based expressions is very high (root mean square deviation 1.1-4.7 kcal/mol, R2 = 0.7-1.0. Third, the functional form of the CE energy expression is such that individual terms of the expansion have clear physical interpretations. We derived expressions for the energies of three classic protein design targets-a coiled coil, a zinc finger, and a WW domain-as functions of sequence, and examined the most significant terms. Single-residue and residue-pair interactions are sufficient to accurately capture the energetics of the dimeric coiled coil, whereas higher-order contributions are important for the two more globular folds. For the task of designing novel zinc-finger sequences, a CE-derived energy function provides significantly better solutions than a standard design protocol, in comparable computation time. Given these advantages

  16. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    In oil and gas industry, soil particles, crude oil, natural gas, particle-laden liquids, and seawater can carry various highly aggressive elements, which accelerate the material degradation of component surfaces by combination of slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear mechanisms. This material degradation results into the loss of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, and impact strength; leading to detachment, delamination, cracking, and ultimately premature failure of components. Since the failure of high valued equipment needs considerable cost and time to be repaired or replaced, minimizing the tribological failure of equipment under aggressive environment has been gaining increased interest. It is widely recognized that effective management of degradation mechanisms will contribute towards the optimization of maintenance, monitoring, and inspection costs. The hardfacing techniques have been widely used to enhance the resistance of surfaces against degradation mechanisms. Applying a surface coating improves wear and corrosion resistance and ensures reliability and long-term performance of coated parts. A protective layer or barrier on the components avoids the direct mechanical and chemical contacts of tool surfaces with process media and will reduce the material loss and ultimately its failure. Laser cladding as an advanced hardfacing technique has been widely used for industrial applications in order to develop a protective coating with desired material properties. During the laser cladding, coating material is fused into the base material by means of a laser beam in order to rebuild a damaged part's surface or to enhance its surface function. In the hardfacing techniques such as atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF), and laser cladding, mixing of coating materials with underneath surface has to be minimized in order to utilize the properties of the coating material most effectively. In this regard, laser cladding offers

  17. Tracking of large-scale structures in turbulent channel with direct numerical simulation of low Prandtl number passive scalar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiselj, Iztok

    2014-12-01

    Channel flow DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) at friction Reynolds number 180 and with passive scalars of Prandtl numbers 1 and 0.01 was performed in various computational domains. The "normal" size domain was ˜2300 wall units long and ˜750 wall units wide; size taken from the similar DNS of Moser et al. The "large" computational domain, which is supposed to be sufficient to describe the largest structures of the turbulent flows was 3 times longer and 3 times wider than the "normal" domain. The "very large" domain was 6 times longer and 6 times wider than the "normal" domain. All simulations were performed with the same spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the standard and large computational domains shows the velocity field statistics (mean velocity, root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuations, and turbulent Reynolds stresses) that are within 1%-2%. Similar agreement is observed for Pr = 1 temperature fields and can be observed also for the mean temperature profiles at Pr = 0.01. These differences can be attributed to the statistical uncertainties of the DNS. However, second-order moments, i.e., RMS temperature fluctuations of standard and large computational domains at Pr = 0.01 show significant differences of up to 20%. Stronger temperature fluctuations in the "large" and "very large" domains confirm the existence of the large-scale structures. Their influence is more or less invisible in the main velocity field statistics or in the statistics of the temperature fields at Prandtl numbers around 1. However, these structures play visible role in the temperature fluctuations at low Prandtl number, where high temperature diffusivity effectively smears the small-scale structures in the thermal field and enhances the relative contribution of large-scales. These large thermal structures represent some kind of an echo of the large scale velocity structures: the highest temperature-velocity correlations are not observed between the instantaneous temperatures and

  18. Evaluation of a numerical model's ability to predict bed load transport observed in braided river experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javernick, Luke; Redolfi, Marco; Bertoldi, Walter

    2018-05-01

    New data collection techniques offer numerical modelers the ability to gather and utilize high quality data sets with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such data sets are currently needed for calibration, verification, and to fuel future model development, particularly morphological simulations. This study explores the use of high quality spatial and temporal data sets of observed bed load transport in braided river flume experiments to evaluate the ability of a two-dimensional model, Delft3D, to predict bed load transport. This study uses a fixed bed model configuration and examines the model's shear stress calculations, which are the foundation to predict the sediment fluxes necessary for morphological simulations. The evaluation is conducted for three flow rates, and model setup used highly accurate Structure-from-Motion (SfM) topography and discharge boundary conditions. The model was hydraulically calibrated using bed roughness, and performance was evaluated based on depth and inundation agreement. Model bed load performance was evaluated in terms of critical shear stress exceedance area compared to maps of observed bed mobility in a flume. Following the standard hydraulic calibration, bed load performance was tested for sensitivity to horizontal eddy viscosity parameterization and bed morphology updating. Simulations produced depth errors equal to the SfM inherent errors, inundation agreement of 77-85%, and critical shear stress exceedance in agreement with 49-68% of the observed active area. This study provides insight into the ability of physically based, two-dimensional simulations to accurately predict bed load as well as the effects of horizontal eddy viscosity and bed updating. Further, this study highlights how using high spatial and temporal data to capture the physical processes at work during flume experiments can help to improve morphological modeling.

  19. OCT evaluation of directional atherectomy compared to balloon angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Lendel, Vasili; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Directional atherectomy (DA) is one of the most commonly used modalities for the treatment of obstructive femoropopliteal peripheral arterial disease (PAD), especially in patients with large and calcified atherosclerotic plaques. The effect of directional atherectomy to the vascular wall compared to balloon angioplasty by optical coherence tomography (OCT) has not been previously described. We present the first case of OCT after directional atherectomy with SilverHawk followed by angiosculpt balloon angioplasty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical evaluation of weld overlay applied to a pressurized water reactor nozzle mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabello, Emerson G.; Silva, Luiz L.; Gomes, Paulo T.V., E-mail: egr@cdtn.b, E-mail: silvall@cdtn.b, E-mail: gomespt@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Integridade Estrutural

    2011-07-01

    The primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is a major mechanism of failure in the primary circuit of PWR type nuclear power plants. The PWSCC is associated with the presence of corrosive environment, the susceptibility to corrosion cracking of the materials involved and the tensile stresses presence. Residual stresses generated during dissimilar materials welding can contribute to PWSCC. An alternative to the PWSCC mitigation is the application of external weld layers in the regions of greatest susceptibility to corrosion cracking. This process, called Weld Overlay (WOL), has been widely used in regions of dissimilar weld (low alloy steel and stainless steel with nickel alloy addition) of nozzles and pipes on the primary circuit in order to promote internal compressive stresses on the wall of these components. This paper presents the steps required to the numerical stress evaluation (by finite element method) during the dissimilar materials welding as well as application of Weld Overlay process in a nozzle mock-up. Thus, one can evaluate the effectiveness of the application of weld overlay process to internal compressive stress generation on the wall nozzle. (author)

  1. Numerical evaluation of magnetic absolute measurements with arbitrarily distributed DI-fluxgate theodolite orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunke, Heinz-Peter; Matzka, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    At geomagnetic observatories the absolute measurements are needed to determine the calibration parameters of the continuously recording vector magnetometer (variometer). Absolute measurements are indispensable for determining the vector of the geomagnetic field over long periods of time. A standard DI (declination, inclination) measuring scheme for absolute measurements establishes routines in magnetic observatories. The traditional measuring schema uses a fixed number of eight orientations (Jankowski et al., 1996).We present a numerical method, allowing for the evaluation of an arbitrary number (minimum of five as there are five independent parameters) of telescope orientations. Our method provides D, I and Z base values and calculated error bars of them.A general approach has significant advantages. Additional measurements may be seamlessly incorporated for higher accuracy. Individual erroneous readings are identified and can be discarded without invalidating the entire data set. A priori information can be incorporated. We expect the general method to also ease requirements for automated DI-flux measurements. The method can reveal certain properties of the DI theodolite which are not captured by the conventional method.Based on the alternative evaluation method, a new faster and less error-prone measuring schema is presented. It avoids needing to calculate the magnetic meridian prior to the inclination measurements.Measurements in the vicinity of the magnetic equator are possible with theodolites and without a zenith ocular.The implementation of the method in MATLAB is available as source code at the GFZ Data Center Brunke (2017).

  2. Numerical evaluation of magnetic absolute measurements with arbitrarily distributed DI-fluxgate theodolite orientations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-P. Brunke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At geomagnetic observatories the absolute measurements are needed to determine the calibration parameters of the continuously recording vector magnetometer (variometer. Absolute measurements are indispensable for determining the vector of the geomagnetic field over long periods of time. A standard DI (declination, inclination measuring scheme for absolute measurements establishes routines in magnetic observatories. The traditional measuring schema uses a fixed number of eight orientations (Jankowski et al., 1996.We present a numerical method, allowing for the evaluation of an arbitrary number (minimum of five as there are five independent parameters of telescope orientations. Our method provides D, I and Z base values and calculated error bars of them.A general approach has significant advantages. Additional measurements may be seamlessly incorporated for higher accuracy. Individual erroneous readings are identified and can be discarded without invalidating the entire data set. A priori information can be incorporated. We expect the general method to also ease requirements for automated DI-flux measurements. The method can reveal certain properties of the DI theodolite which are not captured by the conventional method.Based on the alternative evaluation method, a new faster and less error-prone measuring schema is presented. It avoids needing to calculate the magnetic meridian prior to the inclination measurements.Measurements in the vicinity of the magnetic equator are possible with theodolites and without a zenith ocular.The implementation of the method in MATLAB is available as source code at the GFZ Data Center Brunke (2017.

  3. Numerical evaluation of weld overlay applied to a pressurized water reactor nozzle mock-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabello, Emerson G.; Silva, Luiz L.; Gomes, Paulo T.V.

    2011-01-01

    The primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is a major mechanism of failure in the primary circuit of PWR type nuclear power plants. The PWSCC is associated with the presence of corrosive environment, the susceptibility to corrosion cracking of the materials involved and the tensile stresses presence. Residual stresses generated during dissimilar materials welding can contribute to PWSCC. An alternative to the PWSCC mitigation is the application of external weld layers in the regions of greatest susceptibility to corrosion cracking. This process, called Weld Overlay (WOL), has been widely used in regions of dissimilar weld (low alloy steel and stainless steel with nickel alloy addition) of nozzles and pipes on the primary circuit in order to promote internal compressive stresses on the wall of these components. This paper presents the steps required to the numerical stress evaluation (by finite element method) during the dissimilar materials welding as well as application of Weld Overlay process in a nozzle mock-up. Thus, one can evaluate the effectiveness of the application of weld overlay process to internal compressive stress generation on the wall nozzle. (author)

  4. Numerical evaluation of integrals containing a spherical Bessel function by product integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, D.R.; Parke, W.C.; Maximon, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    A method is developed for numerical evaluation of integrals with k-integration range from 0 to infinity that contain a spherical Bessel function j/sub l/(kr) explicitly. The required quadrature weights are easily calculated and the rate of convergence is rapid: only a relatively small number of quadrature points is needed: for an accurate evaluation even when r is large. The quadrature rule is obtained by the method of product integration. With the abscissas chosen to be those of Clenshaw--Curtis and the Chebyshev polynomials as the interpolating polynomials, quadrature weights are obtained that depend on the spherical Bessel function. An inhomogenous recurrence relation is derived from which the weights can be calculated without accumulation of roundoff error. The procedure is summarized as an easily implementable algorithm. Questions of convergence are discussed and the rate of convergence demonstrated for several test integrals. Alternative procedures are given for generating the integration weights and an error analysis of the method is presented

  5. Evaluation of Probe-Induced Flow Distortion of Campbell CSAT3 Sonic Anemometers by Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Sadiq; De Roo, Frederik; Foken, Thomas; Mauder, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    The Campbell CSAT3 sonic anemometer is one of the most popular instruments for turbulence measurements in basic micrometeorological research and ecological applications. While measurement uncertainty has been characterized by field experiments and wind-tunnel studies in the past, there are conflicting estimates, which motivated us to conduct a numerical experiment using large-eddy simulation to evaluate the probe-induced flow distortion of the CSAT3 anemometer under controlled conditions, and with exact knowledge of the undisturbed flow. As opposed to wind-tunnel studies, we imposed oscillations in both the vertical and horizontal velocity components at the distinct frequencies and amplitudes found in typical turbulence spectra in the surface layer. The resulting flow-distortion errors for the standard deviations of the vertical velocity component range from 3 to 7%, and from 1 to 3% for the horizontal velocity component, depending on the azimuth angle. The magnitude of these errors is almost independent of the frequency of wind speed fluctuations, provided the amplitude is typical for surface-layer turbulence. A comparison of the corrections for transducer shadowing proposed by both Kaimal et al. (Proc Dyn Flow Conf, 551-565, 1978) and Horst et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 155:371-395, 2015) show that both methods compensate for a larger part of the observed error, but do not sufficiently account for the azimuth dependency. Further numerical simulations could be conducted in the future to characterize the flow distortion induced by other existing types of sonic anemometers for the purposes of optimizing their geometry.

  6. Evaluating time-lapse ERT for monitoring DNAPL remediation via numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, C.; Karaoulis, M.; Gerhard, J.; Tsourlos, P.; Giannopoulos, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) remain a challenging geoenvironmental problem in the near subsurface. Numerous thermal, chemical, and biological treatment methods are being applied at sites but without a non-destructive, rapid technique to map the evolution of DNAPL mass in space and time, the degree of remedial success is difficult to quantify. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has long been presented as highly promising in this context but has not yet become a practitioner's tool due to challenges in interpreting the survey results at real sites where the initial condition (DNAPL mass, DNAPL distribution, subsurface heterogeneity) is typically unknown. Recently, a new numerical model was presented that couples DNAPL and ERT simulation at the field scale, providing a tool for optimizing ERT application and interpretation at DNAPL sites (Power et al., 2011, Fall AGU, H31D-1191). The objective of this study is to employ this tool to evaluate the effectiveness of time-lapse ERT to monitor DNAPL source zone remediation, taking advantage of new inversion methodologies that exploit the differences in the target over time. Several three-dimensional releases of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs into heterogeneous clayey sand at the field scale were generated, varying in the depth and complexity of the source zone (target). Over time, dissolution of the DNAPL in groundwater was simulated with simultaneous mapping via periodic ERT surveys. Both surface and borehole ERT surveys were conducted for comparison purposes. The latest four-dimensional ERT inversion algorithms were employed to generate time-lapse isosurfaces of the DNAPL source zone for all cases. This methodology provided a qualitative assessment of the ability of ERT to track DNAPL mass removal for complex source zones in realistically heterogeneous environments. In addition, it provided a quantitative comparison between the actual DNAPL mass removed and that interpreted by ERT as a function of depth below

  7. Numerical evaluation of flow through a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Filho, Jose A.; Santos, Andre A.C.; Navarro, Moyses A.; Ribeiro, Felipe Lopes

    2011-01-01

    The High-temperature Gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is a Next Generation Nuclear System that has a good chance to be used as energy generation source in the near future owing to its potential capacity to supply hydrogen without greenhouse gas emission for the future humanity. Recently, improvements in the HTGR design led to the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept in which the outlet temperature of the coolant gas reaches to 1000 deg C increasing the efficiency of the hydrogen and electricity generation. Among the core concepts emerging in the VHTR development stands out the prismatic block which uses coated fuel microspheres named TRISO pressed into cylinders and assembled in hexagonal graphite blocks staked to form columns. The graphite blocks contain flow channels around the fuel cylinders for the helium coolant. In this study an analysis is performed using the CFD code CFX 13.0 on a prismatic fuel assembly in order to investigate its thermo-fluid dynamic performance. The simulations were made in a 1/12 fuel element model of the GT-MHR design which was developed by General Atomics. A numerical mesh verification process based on the Grid Convergence Index (GCI) was performed using five progressively refined meshes to assess the numerical uncertainty of the simulation and determine adequate mesh parameters. An analysis was also performed to evaluate different methods to define the inlet and outlet boundary conditions. In this study simulations of models with and without inlet and outlet plena were compared, showing that the presence of the plena offers a more realistic flow distribution. (author)

  8. The mechanical properties of human dentin for 3-D finite element modeling: Numerical and analytical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzebieluch, Wojciech; Będziński, Romuald; Czapliński, Tomasz; Kaczmarek, Urszula

    2017-07-01

    The FEM is often used in investigations of dentin loading conditions; however, its anisotropy is mostly neglected. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the anisotropy and the elastic properties of an equivalent homogenous material model of human dentin as well as to compare isotropic and anisotropic dentin FE-models. Analytical and numerical dentin homogenization according to Luciano and Barbero was performed and E-modulus (E), Poisson's ratios (v) G-modulus (G) were calculated. The E-modulus of the dentin matrix was 28.0 GPa, Poisson's ratio (v) was 0.3; finite element models of orthotropic and isotropic dentin were created, loaded and compared using Ansys® 14.5 and CodeAster® 11.2 software. Anisotropy of the dentin ranged from 6.9 to 35.2%. E-modulus and G-modulus were as follows: E1 = 22.0-26.0 GPa, E2/E3 = 15.7-23.0 GPa; G12/G13 = 6.96-9.35 GPa and G23 = 6.08-8.09 GPa (highest values in the superficial layer). In FEM analysis of the displacement values were higher in the isotropic than in the orthotropic model, reaching up to 16% by shear load, 37% by compression and 23% in the case of shear with bending. Strain values were higher in the isotropic model, up to 35% for the shear load, 31% for compression and 35% in the case of shear with bending. The decrease in the volumetric fraction and diameter of tubules increased the G and E values. Anisotropy of the dentin applied during FEM analysis decreased the displacements and strain values. The numerical and analytical homogenization of dentin showed similar results.

  9. Numerical modelling evaluation for the microclimate of an outdoor urban form in Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. Elnabawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve outdoor thermal comfort it is necessary to understand the interactions between the prevailing climate, the urban form and roughness. The near surface boundary layer is directly influenced by local irradiative and convective exchange processes due to the presence of a variety of different surfaces, sheltering elements and obstacles to air flow leading to distinctive micro-scale climates. The paper presents a micro-scale numerical model for an outdoor urban form for a hot summer’s day in Al-Muizz street located at the Islamic quarter of Cairo, where a few studies have attempted to study these conditions in vernacular settings in hot arid areas where the continuously evolving urban patterns and shaded environments were perceived to produce more pedestrian friendly outdoor environments. In situ measurements are used to validate the ENVI-met results which showed an overall agreement with the observed ones, representing adequate mean radiant temperature (Tmrt which is one of the most important meteorological parameters governing human energy balance and has therefore a strong influence on thermal sensation of the pedestrians using the open public spaces and generating a micro-climatic map as an initial step in addressing the urgent need for a modelling platform accessible to urban designers, architects, and decision makers towards sustainable urban forms.

  10. Evaluating Self-directed Learning Skills in SALC Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Noguchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is one of the last contributions to the column which followed the self-directed learning curriculum renewal project being conducted at Kanda University of International Studies in Japan. Junko Noguchi unpacks the complicated issue of assessing self-directed learning.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of the By-Pass Flow in a Catalytic Plate Reactor for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Haftor Örn; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Numerical and experimental study is performed to evaluate the reactant by-pass flow in a catalytic plate reactor with a coated wire mesh catalyst for steam reforming of methane for hydrogen generation. By-pass of unconverted methane is evaluated under different wire mesh catalyst width to reactor...

  12. OCT evaluation of directional atherectomy compared to balloon angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Lendel, Vasili; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Directional atherectomy (DA) is one of the most commonly used modalities for the treatment of obstructive femoropopliteal peripheral arterial disease (PAD), especially in patients with large and calcified atherosclerotic plaques. The effect of directional atherectomy to the vascular wall compared to balloon angioplasty by optical coherence tomography (OCT) has not been previously described. We present the first case of OCT after directional atherectomy with SilverHawk followed by angiosculpt balloon angioplasty. - Highlights: • Directional atherectomy avoids the vascular mechanical damage caused by angioplasty balloons and the exposure of stent struts or the potential of stent fracture with stents. • OCT can accurately assess the effect of endovacular interventions to the vessel wall. • Although angiographic results after directional atherectomy are acceptable, OCT use demonstrated suboptimal improvement of the MLA requiring additional balloon angioplasty. • Longer studies are needed to define whether the improved OCT results with angioplasty compared to DA may offer better clinical outcomes.

  13. OCT evaluation of directional atherectomy compared to balloon angioplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos [Citizens Memorial Hospital Heart and Vascular Institute, Bolivar, MO (United States); Lendel, Vasili [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Cilingiroglu, Mehmet, E-mail: mcilingiroglu@yahoo.com [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Koc University, School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    Directional atherectomy (DA) is one of the most commonly used modalities for the treatment of obstructive femoropopliteal peripheral arterial disease (PAD), especially in patients with large and calcified atherosclerotic plaques. The effect of directional atherectomy to the vascular wall compared to balloon angioplasty by optical coherence tomography (OCT) has not been previously described. We present the first case of OCT after directional atherectomy with SilverHawk followed by angiosculpt balloon angioplasty. - Highlights: • Directional atherectomy avoids the vascular mechanical damage caused by angioplasty balloons and the exposure of stent struts or the potential of stent fracture with stents. • OCT can accurately assess the effect of endovacular interventions to the vessel wall. • Although angiographic results after directional atherectomy are acceptable, OCT use demonstrated suboptimal improvement of the MLA requiring additional balloon angioplasty. • Longer studies are needed to define whether the improved OCT results with angioplasty compared to DA may offer better clinical outcomes.

  14. Evaluation of the successive approximations method for acoustic streaming numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, S O; Minas, G; Miranda, J M

    2016-05-01

    This work evaluates the successive approximations method commonly used to predict acoustic streaming by comparing it with a direct method. The successive approximations method solves both the acoustic wave propagation and acoustic streaming by solving the first and second order Navier-Stokes equations, ignoring the first order convective effects. This method was applied to acoustic streaming in a 2D domain and the results were compared with results from the direct simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The velocity results showed qualitative agreement between both methods, which indicates that the successive approximations method can describe the formation of flows with recirculation. However, a large quantitative deviation was observed between the two methods. Further analysis showed that the successive approximation method solution is sensitive to the initial flow field. The direct method showed that the instantaneous flow field changes significantly due to reflections and wave interference. It was also found that convective effects contribute significantly to the wave propagation pattern. These effects must be taken into account when solving the acoustic streaming problems, since it affects the global flow. By adequately calculating the initial condition for first order step, the acoustic streaming prediction by the successive approximations method can be improved significantly.

  15. Numerical evaluation of acoustic characteristics and their damping of a thrust chamber using a constant-volume bomb model

    OpenAIRE

    Jianxiu QIN; Huiqiang ZHANG; Bing WANG

    2018-01-01

    In order to numerically evaluate the acoustic characteristics of liquid rocket engine thrust chambers by means of a computational fluid dynamics method, a mathematical model of an artificial constant-volume bomb is proposed in this paper. A localized pressure pulse with a very high amplitude can be imposed on specified regions in a combustion chamber, the numerical procedure of which is described. Pressure oscillations actuated by the released constant-volume bomb can then be analyzed via Fas...

  16. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: budgets of Reynolds stress and streamwise enstrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritselis, Chris D

    2016-01-01

    The budgets of the Reynolds stress and streamwise enstrophy are evaluated through direct numerical simulations for the turbulent particle-laden flow in a vertical channel with momentum exchange between the two phases. The influence of the dispersed particles on the budgets is examined through a comparison of the particle-free and the particle-laden cases at the same Reynolds number of Re b = 5600 based on the bulk fluid velocity and the distance between the channel walls. Results are obtained for particle ensembles with four response times in simulations with and without streamwise gravity and inter-particle collisions at average mass (volume) fractions of 0.2 (2.7 × 10 −5 ) and 0.5 (6.8 × 10 −5 ). The particle feedback force on the flow of the carrier phase is modeled by a point-force approximation (PSIC-method). It is shown that all the terms in the budgets of the Reynolds stress components are decreased in the presence of particles. The level of reduction depends on the particle response time and it is higher under the effects of gravity and inter-particle collisions. A considerable reduction in all the terms of the streamwise enstrophy budget is also observed. In particular, all production mechanisms, and mainly vortex stretching, are inhibited in the particulate flows and thus the production of streamwise vorticity is significantly damped. A further insight into the direct particle effects on the fluid turbulence is provided by analyzing in detail the fluid–fluid, fluid–particle and particle–particle correlations, and the spectra of the fluid–particle energy exchange rate. The present results indicate that the turbulence production, dissipation and pressure–strain term are generally large quantities, but their summation is relatively small and comparable to the fluid–particle direct energy exchange rate. Consequently, the particle contribution can potentially increase or decrease the fluctuating fluid velocities and eventually control the

  17. Numerical study of turbulence-influence mechanism on arc characteristics in an air direct current circuit breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingliang; Yang, Fei; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Qi, Yang; Cui, Yufei; Liu, Zirui; Guo, Anxiang

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the numerical investigation of arc characteristics in an air direct current circuit breaker (air DCCB). Using magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) theory, 3D laminar model and turbulence model are constructed and calculated. The standard k-epsilon model is utilized to consider the turbulence effect in the arc chamber of the DCCB. Several important phenomena are found: the arc column in the turbulence-model case is more extensive, moves much more slowly than the counterpart in the laminar-model case, and shows stagnation at the entrance of the chamber, unlike in the laminar-model case. Moreover, the arc voltage in the turbulence-model case is much lower than in the laminar-model case. However, the results in the turbulence-model case show a much better agreement with the results of the breaking experiments under DC condition than in the laminar-model case, which is contradictory to the previous conclusions from the arc researches of both the low-voltage circuit breaker and the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) nozzle. First, in the previous air-arc research of the low-voltage circuit breaker, it is assumed that the air plasma inside the chamber is in the state of laminar, and the laminar-model application gives quite satisfactory results compared with the experiments, while in this paper, the laminar-model application works badly. Second, the turbulence-model application in the arc research of the SF6-nozzle performs much better and gives higher arc voltage than the laminar-model application does, whereas in this paper, the turbulence-model application predicts lower arc voltage than the laminar-model application does. Based on the analysis of simulation results in detail, the mechanism of the above phenomena is revealed. The transport coefficients are strongly changed by turbulence, which will enhance the arc diffusion and make the arc volume much larger. Consequently, the arc appearance and the distribution of Lorentz force in the turbulence-model case

  18. Numerical study of turbulence-influence mechanism on arc characteristics in an air direct current circuit breaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Mingliang; Yang, Fei, E-mail: yfei2007@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Qi, Yang; Cui, Yufei [State Key Lab of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710049 (China); Liu, Zirui [State Grid Shaanxi Electric Power Company, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Guo, Anxiang [Electric Power Research Institute of State Grid Shaanxi Electric Power Company, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2016-04-15

    This paper focuses on the numerical investigation of arc characteristics in an air direct current circuit breaker (air DCCB). Using magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) theory, 3D laminar model and turbulence model are constructed and calculated. The standard k-epsilon model is utilized to consider the turbulence effect in the arc chamber of the DCCB. Several important phenomena are found: the arc column in the turbulence-model case is more extensive, moves much more slowly than the counterpart in the laminar-model case, and shows stagnation at the entrance of the chamber, unlike in the laminar-model case. Moreover, the arc voltage in the turbulence-model case is much lower than in the laminar-model case. However, the results in the turbulence-model case show a much better agreement with the results of the breaking experiments under DC condition than in the laminar-model case, which is contradictory to the previous conclusions from the arc researches of both the low-voltage circuit breaker and the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) nozzle. First, in the previous air-arc research of the low-voltage circuit breaker, it is assumed that the air plasma inside the chamber is in the state of laminar, and the laminar-model application gives quite satisfactory results compared with the experiments, while in this paper, the laminar-model application works badly. Second, the turbulence-model application in the arc research of the SF6-nozzle performs much better and gives higher arc voltage than the laminar-model application does, whereas in this paper, the turbulence-model application predicts lower arc voltage than the laminar-model application does. Based on the analysis of simulation results in detail, the mechanism of the above phenomena is revealed. The transport coefficients are strongly changed by turbulence, which will enhance the arc diffusion and make the arc volume much larger. Consequently, the arc appearance and the distribution of Lorentz force in the turbulence-model case

  19. Evaluation of Competence of Medical Students in Performing Direct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical practice had significant eye problems. This demands that .... hoped this will form a template for feature longitudinal studies directed .... drops (P < 0.002, 2 yates corrected). ... Hean S, Craddock D, O'Halloran C. Learning theories and.

  20. Numerical Investigation on the Performance of an Automotive Thermoelectric Generator with Exhaust-Module-Coolant Direct Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiping; Tang, Yulin; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2018-06-01

    Energy conservation and environmental protection have typically been a concern of research. Researchers have confirmed that in automotive engines, just 12-25% of the fuel energy converts into effective work and 30-40% gets wasted in the form of exhaust. Saidur et al. (Energy Policy 37:3650, 2009) and Hasanuzzaman et al. (Energy 36:233, 2011). It will be significant to enhance fuel availability and decrease environmental pollution if the waste heat in the exhaust could be recovered. Thermoelectric generators (TEGs), which can translate heat into electricity, have become a topic of interest for vehicle exhaust waste heat recovery. In conventional automotive TEGs, the thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are arranged between the exhaust tank and the coolant tank. The TEMs do not contact the hot exhaust and coolant, which leads to low heat transfer efficiency. Moreover, to provide enough packing force to keep good contact with the exhaust tank and the coolant tank, the framework required is so robust that the TEGs become too heavy. Therefore, in current study, an automotive TEG was designed which included one exhaust channel, one coolant channel and several TEMs. In the TEG, the TEMs which contacted the exhaust and coolant directly were inserted into the walls of each coolant channel. To evaluate the performance of the automotive TEG, the flow field and temperature field were computed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Based on the temperature distribution obtained by CFD and the performance parameters of the modules, the total power generation was obtained by some proved empirical formulas. Compared with conventional automotive TEGs, the power generation per unit volume exhaust was boosted.

  1. Numerical Investigation on the Performance of an Automotive Thermoelectric Generator with Exhaust-Module-Coolant Direct Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiping; Tang, Yulin; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2017-12-01

    Energy conservation and environmental protection have typically been a concern of research. Researchers have confirmed that in automotive engines, just 12-25% of the fuel energy converts into effective work and 30-40% gets wasted in the form of exhaust. Saidur et al. (Energy Policy 37:3650, 2009) and Hasanuzzaman et al. (Energy 36:233, 2011). It will be significant to enhance fuel availability and decrease environmental pollution if the waste heat in the exhaust could be recovered. Thermoelectric generators (TEGs), which can translate heat into electricity, have become a topic of interest for vehicle exhaust waste heat recovery. In conventional automotive TEGs, the thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are arranged between the exhaust tank and the coolant tank. The TEMs do not contact the hot exhaust and coolant, which leads to low heat transfer efficiency. Moreover, to provide enough packing force to keep good contact with the exhaust tank and the coolant tank, the framework required is so robust that the TEGs become too heavy. Therefore, in current study, an automotive TEG was designed which included one exhaust channel, one coolant channel and several TEMs. In the TEG, the TEMs which contacted the exhaust and coolant directly were inserted into the walls of each coolant channel. To evaluate the performance of the automotive TEG, the flow field and temperature field were computed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Based on the temperature distribution obtained by CFD and the performance parameters of the modules, the total power generation was obtained by some proved empirical formulas. Compared with conventional automotive TEGs, the power generation per unit volume exhaust was boosted.

  2. Numerical evaluation of Feynman loop integrals by reduction to tree graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, T.

    2007-12-01

    We present a method for the numerical evaluation of loop integrals, based on the Feynman Tree Theorem. This states that loop graphs can be expressed as a sum of tree graphs with additional external on-shell particles. The original loop integral is replaced by a phase space integration over the additional particles. In cross section calculations and for event generation, this phase space can be sampled simultaneously with the phase space of the original external particles. Since very sophisticated matrix element generators for tree graph amplitudes exist and phase space integrations are generically well understood, this method is suited for a future implementation in a fully automated Monte Carlo event generator. A scheme for renormalization and regularization is presented. We show the construction of subtraction graphs which cancel ultraviolet divergences and present a method to cancel internal on-shell singularities. Real emission graphs can be naturally included in the phase space integral of the additional on-shell particles to cancel infrared divergences. As a proof of concept, we apply this method to NLO Bhabha scattering in QED. Cross sections are calculated and are in agreement with results from conventional methods. We also construct a Monte Carlo event generator and present results. (orig.)

  3. Numerical evaluation of Feynman loop integrals by reduction to tree graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinschmidt, T.

    2007-12-15

    We present a method for the numerical evaluation of loop integrals, based on the Feynman Tree Theorem. This states that loop graphs can be expressed as a sum of tree graphs with additional external on-shell particles. The original loop integral is replaced by a phase space integration over the additional particles. In cross section calculations and for event generation, this phase space can be sampled simultaneously with the phase space of the original external particles. Since very sophisticated matrix element generators for tree graph amplitudes exist and phase space integrations are generically well understood, this method is suited for a future implementation in a fully automated Monte Carlo event generator. A scheme for renormalization and regularization is presented. We show the construction of subtraction graphs which cancel ultraviolet divergences and present a method to cancel internal on-shell singularities. Real emission graphs can be naturally included in the phase space integral of the additional on-shell particles to cancel infrared divergences. As a proof of concept, we apply this method to NLO Bhabha scattering in QED. Cross sections are calculated and are in agreement with results from conventional methods. We also construct a Monte Carlo event generator and present results. (orig.)

  4. A numerical study on the performance evaluation of ventilation systems for indoor radon reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Hoon Chae; Choi, Hang Seok; Cho, Seung Yeon; Jeong, Tae Young; Roh, Sung Cheoul [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Numerical simulations were conducted using computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the effect of ventilation conditions on radon ({sup 222}Rn) reduction performance in a residential building. The results indicate that at the same ventilation rate, a mechanical ventilation system is more effective in reducing indoor radon than a natural ventilation system. For the same ventilation type, the indoor radon concentration decreases as the ventilation rate increases. When the air change per hour (ACH) was 1, the indoor radon concentration was maintained at less than 100 Bq/m{sup 3}. However, when the ACH was lowered to 0.01, the average indoor radon concentration in several rooms exceeded 148 Bq/ m{sup 3}. The angle of the inflow air was found to affect the indoor air stream and consequently the distribution of the radon concentration. Even when the ACH was 1, the radon concentrations of some areas were higher than 100 Bq/m{sup 3} for inflow air angles of 5 .deg. and 175 .deg.

  5. Numerical and experimental evaluation of residual strains induced by pulsed laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touvrey, C.; Bruyere, V.; Namy, P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the residual strains induced by different welding processes during the assembly of two Ti6Al4V thin sheets. Several welding configurations and two means (pulsed laser and continuous one) are tested. The first part of the study intends to experimentally quantify strains induced by laser-matter interaction when one of the plates can freely bend. In this configuration the residual stresses are minimum, and consequently the strains measurement constitute a good indicator of the mechanical evolution. The displacements are in-situ reported thanks to a mechanical sensor. The second part of the study is dedicated to the numerical modeling of the processes. Unfortunately, the model is not completely predictive and appears to be oversimplified to describe the measured distortion. As it appears difficult to model the laser-matter interaction (especially in the case of many impacts recovering), we have adopted an equivalent approach to simulate the thermal evolution within the work pieces. An optimization procedure has been developed to determine an equivalent thermal flux, which leads to a melted zone shape in good agreement with experimental evaluations. The thermo-mechanical problem is computed by means of the finite elements software COMSOL Multiphysics. The results are compared to experimental data (displacement measurements) throughout the complete simulation. We plan to apply the complete model for more complex geometries, involving the generation of residual stresses. (authors)

  6. Operation control of fluids pumping in curved pipes during annular flow: a numerical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Andrade

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To generate projects which provide significant volume recovery from heavy oils reservoirs and improve existing projects, is important to develop new production and transport technologies, especially in the scenario of offshore fields. The core-flow technique is one of new technologies used in heavy oil transportation. This core-flow pattern is characterized by a water pellicle that is formed close or adjacent to the inner wall of the pipe, functioning as a lubricant. The oil flows in the center of the pipe causing a reduction in longitudinal pressure drop. In this sense, this work presents a numerical study of heavy oil annular flow (core-flow assisted by computational tool ANSYS CFX® Release 12.0. It was used a three-dimensional, transient and isothermal mathematical model considered by the mixture and turbulence - models to address the water-heavy oil two-phase flow, assuming laminar flow for oil phase and turbulent flow for water phase. Results of the pressure, velocity and volume fraction distributions of the phases and the pressure drop for different operation conditions are presented and evaluated. It was observed that the oil core flowing eccentrically in the pipe and stops of the water flux considerably increases the pressure drop in the pipe after the restart of the pump.

  7. Numerical evaluation of fluid mixing phenomena in boiling water reactor using advanced interface tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low. (author)

  8. Evaluating acute pain intensity relief: challenges when using an 11-point numerical rating scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauny, Jean-Marc; Paquet, Jean; Lavigne, Gilles; Marquis, Martin; Daoust, Raoul

    2016-02-01

    Percentage of pain intensity difference (PercentPID) is a recognized way of evaluating pain relief with an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS) but is not without flaws. A new metric, the slope of relative pain intensity difference (SlopePID), which consists in dividing PercentPID by the time between 2 pain measurements, is proposed. This study aims to validate SlopePID with 3 measures of subjective pain relief: a 5-category relief scale (not, a little, moderate, very, complete), a 2-category relief question ("I'm relieved," "I'm not relieved"), and a single-item question, "Wanting other medication to treat pain?" (Yes/No). This prospective cohort study included 361 patients in the emergency department who had an initial acute pain NRS > 3 and a pain intensity assessment within 90 minutes after analgesic administration. Mean age was 50.2 years (SD = 19.3) and 59% were women. Area under the curves of receiver operating characteristic curves analyses revealed similar discriminative power for PercentPID (0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.88) and SlopePID (0.82; 95% CI, 0.77-0.86). Considering the "very" category from the 5-category relief scale as a substantial relief, the average cutoff for substantial relief was a decrease of 64% (95% CI, 59-69) for PercentPID and of 49% per hour (95% CI, 44-54) for SlopePID. However, when a cutoff criterion of 50% was used as a measure of pain relief for an individual patient, PercentPID underestimated pain-relieved patients by 12.1% (P pain intensity at baseline was an odd number compared with an even number (32.9% vs 45.0%, respectively). SlopePID should be used instead of PercentPID as a metric to evaluate acute pain relief on a 0 to 10 NRS.

  9. Direct Integration: Training Software Developers to Conduct Usability Evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mikael B.; Stage, Jan

    2008-01-01

    is based on an empirical study where 36 teams with a total of 234 first-year university students on software development and design educations were trained in a simple approach for user-based website usability testing that was taught in a 40 hour course. This approach supported them in planning, conducting......Many improvements of the interplay between usability evaluation and software development rely either on better methods for conducting usability evaluations or on better formats for presenting evaluation results in ways that are useful for software designers and developers. Both approaches involve...... a complete division of work between developers and evaluators, which is an undesirable complexity for many software development projects. This paper takes a different approach by exploring to what extent software developers and designers can be trained to carry out their own usability evaluations. The paper...

  10. Cantonese versus Canadian Evaluation of Directive and Non-Directive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxer, Peter H.

    1989-01-01

    Examined differences between Canadian and Cantonese university students who read transcripts of Carl Rogers and Albert Ellis counseling sessions and rated these counselors on directiveness, forcefulness, repetitiveness, sensitivity, politeness, and willingness to see either Ellis or Rogers. Found Canadians more willing to see Rogers than Chinese…

  11. 46 Evaluating Foreign Direct Investment and Africa's Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa to several factors discouraging foreign direct investment. Suggestions and ... in the economy of African states and what reasons account for such impacts. ..... information to second-guess market signals (prices) and because powerful interest ..... over 115 million people using cell phones in Nigeria, we do not have any ...

  12. Evaluation of numerical weather predictions performed in the context of the project DAPHNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegoulias, Ioannis; Pytharoulis, Ioannis; Bampzelis, Dimitris; Karacostas, Theodore

    2014-05-01

    The region of Thessaly in central Greece is one of the main areas of agricultural production in Greece. Severe weather phenomena affect the agricultural production in this region with adverse effects for farmers and the national economy. For this reason the project DAPHNE aims at tackling the problem of drought by means of weather modification through the development of the necessary tools to support the application of a rainfall enhancement program. In the present study the numerical weather prediction system WRF-ARW is used, in order to assess its ability to represent extreme weather phenomena in the region of Thessaly. WRF is integrated in three domains covering Europe, Eastern Mediterranean and Central-Northern Greece (Thessaly and a large part of Macedonia) using telescoping nesting with grid spacing of 15km, 5km and 1.667km, respectively. The cases examined span throughout the transitional and warm period (April to September) of the years 2008 to 2013, including days with thunderstorm activity. Model results are evaluated against all available surface observations and radar products, taking into account the spatial characteristics and intensity of the storms. Preliminary results indicate a good level of agreement between the simulated and observed fields as far as the standard parameters (such as temperature, humidity and precipitation) are concerned. Moreover, the model generally exhibits a potential to represent the occurrence of the convective activity, but not its exact spatiotemporal characteristics. Acknowledgements This research work has been co-financed by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund) and Greek national funds, through the action "COOPERATION 2011: Partnerships of Production and Research Institutions in Focused Research and Technology Sectors" (contract number 11SYN_8_1088 - DAPHNE) in the framework of the operational programme "Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship" and Regions in Transition (OPC II, NSRF 2007-2013)

  13. Numerical Evaluation of Parameter Correlation in the Hartmann-Tran Line Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Erin M.; Reed, Zachary; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2017-06-01

    The partially correlated quadratic, speed-dependent hard-collision profile (pCqSDHCP), for simplicity referred to as the Hartmann-Tran profile (HTP), has been recommended as a generalized lineshape for high resolution spectroscopy. The HTP parameterizes complex collisional effects such as Dicke narrowing, speed dependent narrowing, and correlations between velocity-changing and dephasing collisions, while also simplifying to simpler profiles that are widely used, such as the Voigt profile. As advanced lineshape profiles are adopted by more researchers, it is important to understand the limitations that data quality has on the ability to retrieve physically meaningful parameters using sophisticated lineshapes that are fit to spectra of finite signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, spectra were simulated using the HITRAN Application Programming Interface (HAPI) across a full range of line parameters. Simulated spectra were evaluated to quantify the precision with which fitted lineshape parameters can be determined at a given signal-to-noise ratio, focusing on the numerical correlation between the retrieved Dicke narrowing frequency and the velocity-changing and dephasing collisions correlation parameter. Tran, H., N. Ngo, and J.-M. Hartmann, Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer 2013. 129: p. 89-100. Tennyson, et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 2014, 86: p. 1931-1943. Kochanov, R.V., et al., Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer 2016. 177: p. 15-30. Tran, H., N. Ngo, and J.-M. Hartmann, Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer 2013. 129: p. 199-203.

  14. A numerical evaluation of prediction accuracy of CO2 absorber model for various reaction rate coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the CO2 absorber column using mono-ethanolamine (MEA solution as chemical solvent are predicted by a One-Dimensional (1-D rate based model in the present study. 1-D Mass and heat balance equations of vapor and liquid phase are coupled with interfacial mass transfer model and vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The two-film theory is used to estimate the mass transfer between the vapor and liquid film. Chemical reactions in MEA-CO2-H2O system are considered to predict the equilibrium pressure of CO2 in the MEA solution. The mathematical and reaction kinetics models used in this work are calculated by using in-house code. The numerical results are validated in the comparison of simulation results with experimental and simulation data given in the literature. The performance of CO2 absorber column is evaluated by the 1-D rate based model using various reaction rate coefficients suggested by various researchers. When the rate of liquid to gas mass flow rate is about 8.3, 6.6, 4.5 and 3.1, the error of CO2 loading and the CO2 removal efficiency using the reaction rate coefficients of Aboudheir et al. is within about 4.9 % and 5.2 %, respectively. Therefore, the reaction rate coefficient suggested by Aboudheir et al. among the various reaction rate coefficients used in this study is appropriate to predict the performance of CO2 absorber column using MEA solution. [Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0017220].

  15. Evaluating Direct Manipulation Operations for Constraint-Based Layout

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidler , Clemens; Lutteroth , Christof; Stuerzlinger , Wolfgang; Weber , Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Part 11: Interface Layout and Data Entry; International audience; Layout managers are used to control the placement of widgets in graphical user interfaces (GUIs). Constraint-based layout managers are more powerful than other ones. However, they are also more complex and their layouts are prone to problems that usually require direct editing of constraints. Today, designers commonly use GUI builders to specify GUIs. The complexities of traditional approaches to constraint-based layouts pose c...

  16. Numerical modeling of debris avalanches at Nevado de Toluca (Mexico): implications for hazard evaluation and mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, F.; Capra, L.; Groppelli, G.; Norini, G.

    2007-05-01

    The present study concerns the numerical modeling of debris avalanches on the Nevado de Toluca Volcano (Mexico) using TITAN2D simulation software, and its application to create hazard maps. Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic to dacitic stratovolcano of Late Pliocene-Holocene age, located in central México near to the cities of Toluca and México City; its past activity has endangered an area with more than 25 million inhabitants today. The present work is based upon the data collected during extensive field work finalized to the realization of the geological map of Nevado de Toluca at 1:25,000 scale. The activity of the volcano has developed from 2.6 Ma until 10.5 ka with both effusive and explosive events; the Nevado de Toluca has presented long phases of inactivity characterized by erosion and emplacement of debris flow and debris avalanche deposits on its flanks. The largest epiclastic events in the history of the volcano are wide debris flows and debris avalanches, occurred between 1 Ma and 50 ka, during a prolonged hiatus in eruptive activity. Other minor events happened mainly during the most recent volcanic activity (less than 50 ka), characterized by magmatic and tectonic-induced instability of the summit dome complex. According to the most recent tectonic analysis, the active transtensive kinematics of the E-W Tenango Fault System had a strong influence on the preferential directions of the last three documented lateral collapses, which generated the Arroyo Grande and Zaguàn debris avalanche deposits towards E and Nopal debris avalanche deposit towards W. The analysis of the data collected during the field work permitted to create a detailed GIS database of the spatial and temporal distribution of debris avalanche deposits on the volcano. Flow models, that have been performed with the software TITAN2D, developed by GMFG at Buffalo, were entirely based upon the information stored in the geological database. The modeling software is built upon equations

  17. Combined free-stream disturbance measurements and receptivity studies in hypersonic wind tunnels by means of a slender wedge probe and direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alexander; Schülein, Erich; Petervari, René; Hannemann, Klaus; Ali, Syed R. C.; Cerminara, Adriano; Sandham, Neil D.

    2018-05-01

    Combined free-stream disturbance measurements and receptivity studies in hypersonic wind tunnels were conducted by means of a slender wedge probe and direct numerical simulation. The study comprises comparative tunnel noise measurements at Mach 3, 6 and 7.4 in two Ludwieg tube facilities and a shock tunnel. Surface pressure fluctuations were measured over a wide range of frequencies and test conditions including harsh test environments not accessible to measurement techniques such as pitot probes and hot-wire anemometry. Quantitative results of the tunnel noise are provided in frequency ranges relevant for hypersonic boundary layer transition. In combination with the experimental studies, direct numerical simulations of the leading-edge receptivity to fast and slow acoustic waves were performed for the slender wedge probe at conditions corresponding to the experimental free-stream conditions. The receptivity to fast acoustic waves was found to be characterized by an early amplification of the induced fast mode. For slow acoustic waves an initial decay was found close to the leading edge. At all Mach numbers, and for all considered frequencies, the leading-edge receptivity to fast acoustic waves was found to be higher than the receptivity to slow acoustic waves. Further, the effect of inclination angles of the acoustic wave with respect to the flow direction was investigated. The combined numerical and experimental approach in the present study confirmed the previous suggestion that the slow acoustic wave is the dominant acoustic mode in noisy hypersonic wind tunnels.

  18. Sustainability performance evaluation: Literature review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyüközkan, Gülçin; Karabulut, Yağmur

    2018-07-01

    Current global economic activities are increasingly being perceived as unsustainable. Despite the high number of publications, sustainability science remains highly dispersed over diverse approaches and topics. This article aims to provide a structured overview of sustainability performance evaluation related publications and to document the current state of literature, categorize publications, analyze and link trends, as well as highlight gaps and provide research recommendations. 128 articles between 2007 and 2018 are identified. The results suggest that sustainability performance evaluation models shall be more balanced, suitable criteria and their interrelations shall be well defined and subjectivity of qualitative criteria inherent to sustainability indicators shall be considered. To address this subjectivity, group decision-making techniques and other analytical methods that can deal with uncertainty, conflicting indicators, and linguistic evaluations can be used in future works. By presenting research gaps, this review stimulates researchers to establish practically applicable sustainability performance evaluation frameworks to help assess and compare the degree of sustainability, leading to more sustainable business practices. The review is unique in defining corporate sustainability performance evaluation for the first time, exploring the gap between sustainability accounting and sustainability assessment, and coming up with a structured overview of innovative research recommendations about integrating analytical assessment methods into conceptual sustainability frameworks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Numerical simulation of the 2002 Northern Rhodes Slide (Greece) and evaluation of the generated tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniboni, Filippo; Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Tinti, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Small landslides are very common along the submarine margins, due to steep slopes and continuous material deposition that increment mass instability and supply collapse occurrences, even without earthquake triggering. This kind of events can have relevant consequences when occurring close to the coast, because they are characterized by sudden change of velocity and relevant speed achievement, reflecting into high tsunamigenic potential. This is the case for example of the slide of Rhodes Island (Greece), named Northern Rhodes Slide (NRS), where unusual 3-4 m waves were registered on 24 March 2002, provoking some damage in the coastal stretch of the city of Rhodes (Papadopoulos et al., 2007). The event was not associated with earthquake occurrence, and eyewitnesses supported the hypothesis of a non-seismic source for the tsunami, placed 1 km offshore. Subsequent marine geophysical surveys (Sakellariou et al., 2002) evidenced the presence of several detachment niches at about 300-400 m depth along the northern steep slope, one of which can be considered responsible of the observed tsunami, fitting with the previously mentioned supposition. In this work, that is carried out in the frame of the European funded project NearToWarn, we evaluated the tsunami effects due to the NRS by means of numerical modelling: after having reconstructed the sliding body basing on morphological assumptions (obtaining an esteemed volume of 33 million m3), we simulated the sliding motion through the in-house built code UBO-BLOCK1, adopting a Lagrangian approach and splitting the sliding mass into a "chain" of interacting blocks. This provides the complete dynamics of the landslide, including the shape changes that relevantly influence the tsunami generation. After the application of an intermediate code, accounting for the slide impulse filtering through the water depth, the tsunami propagation in the sea around the island of Rhodes and up to near coasts of Turkey was simulated via the

  20. Imaging of bone tumors: evaluation of direct magnification radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, T.M.; Hillmann, A.; Erlemann, R.; Groenefeld, A.; Haeussler, M.; Heppe, A.E.; Vestring, T.; Peters, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the potentials of magnification radiography as compared with conventional radiography in diagnosing bone tumors. Design and patients. Sixty-two patients with primary bone tumors and tumorlike lesions underwent radiography with both conventional (non-magnified) and magnification (fivefold) techniques. All radiographs were analyzed by four radiologists and the findings correlated with the histopathology findings. The microfocal X-ray unit used for magnification radiography had a focal spot size of 20-130 μm. Digital luminescence radiography was employed with magnification, while normal film-screen systems were used with conventional radiography. Results. The diagnosis of benign and malignant lesions as well as the individual tumor diagnosis were determined with higher accuracy using magnification compared with conventional radiography (88% vs 75% and 71% vs 52%, p<0.01). Margins of destruction, periosteal reactions and matrix patterns were evaluated with higher certainty by all of the radiologists (p<0.01). Conclusion. Magnification radiography may improve the evaluation and diagnosis of bone tumors. (orig.). With 6 tabs

  1. Performance evaluation of direct methanol fuel cells for portable applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, R.; Dincer, I.; Naterer, G.F. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Berg, P. [Faculty of Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    This study examines the feasibility of powering a range of portable devices with a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The analysis includes a comparison between a Li-ion battery and DMFC to supply the power for a laptop, camcorder and a cell phone. A parametric study of the systems for an operational period of 4 years is performed. Under the assumptions made for both the Li-ion battery and DMFC system, the battery cost is lower than the DMFC during the first year of operation. However, by the end of 4 years of operational time, the DMFC system would cost less. The weight and cost comparisons show that the fuel cell system occupies less space than the battery to store a higher amount of energy. The weight of both systems is almost identical. Finally, the CO{sub 2} emissions can be decreased by a higher exergetic efficiency of the DMFC, which leads to improved sustainability. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Fenton Process in Removal of Direct Red 81

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Baghapour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dyes are visible materials and are considered as one of the hazardous components that make up the industrial waste. Dye compounds in natural water, even in very low concentrations, will lead to environmental problems. Azo dyes are compounds with one or more –N=N– groups and are used in textile industry. Because of its low price, solubility, and stability, azo dyes are widely used in the textile industry. Direct Red 81 (DR81 is one of the azo dyes, which is removed from bodies of water, using various methods. This study aimed to assess DR81 dye removal by Fenton oxidation and the effects of various parameters on this process. Methods: Decolorization tests by Fenton oxidation were performed at dye concentrations of 50, 500, 100 and 1000 mg/L; hydrogen peroxide concentrations of 0, 10, 30, 60 and 120 mg/L; iron (II sulfate heptahydrate concentrations of 0, 3, 5, 20 and 50 mg/L; and pH levels of 3, 5, 7 and 10 for durations of 5, 10, 20, 30, 60 and 180 minutes. Results: The optimal condition occurred at a dye concentration of 20 mg/L, hydrogen peroxide concentration of 120 mg/L, bivalent iron concentration of 100 mg/L, pH of 3, and duration of 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the maximum dye removal rate was 88.98%. Conclusion: The results showed that DR81 could be decomposed and removed by Fenton oxidation. In addition, the removal of Direct Red 81 (DR81 depends on several factors such as dye concentration, reaction time, concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and iron, and pH

  3. Research for developing precise tsunami evaluation methods. Probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis/numerical simulation method with dispersion and wave breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The present report introduces main results of investigations on precise tsunami evaluation methods, which were carried out from the viewpoint of safety evaluation for nuclear power facilities and deliberated by the Tsunami Evaluation Subcommittee. A framework for the probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA) based on logic tree is proposed and calculation on the Pacific side of northeastern Japan is performed as a case study. Tsunami motions with dispersion and wave breaking were investigated both experimentally and numerically. The numerical simulation method is verified for its practicability by applying to a historical tsunami. Tsunami force is also investigated and formulae of tsunami pressure acting on breakwaters and on building due to inundating tsunami are proposed. (author)

  4. Evaluating communication to optimise consumer-directed energy efficiency interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Awareness campaigns, education and training programmes, label schemes and smart metering are all initiatives based on the principle that more and better information will encourage consumers to use less energy. Initiatives of this type can realise efficiency savings of up to 30%, and are likely to remain politically popular while preferred by the public to legislation or fines. While widespread, such programmes can have mixed performance, with savings often not reaching potential. This article investigates whether existing theoretical models can usefully be combined for evaluations of such message-oriented programmes. To do this it examines relationships between the variables of the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) and Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) using empirical data from participants exposed to energy behaviour change projects. Analysis revealed that when used together, the theories may offer insight into the impact of messaging. While a single exploratory study can only describe what has occurred, it offers initial evidence to advocate further analysis of the potential of the combined framework. The author offers an illustration of how the framework might be utilised by other schemes by example of its application to a major EU project to save energy in Europe’s public buildings. - Highlights: • Consumer energy saving schemes have huge potential as a route to emissions reduction. • Mixed performance could be addressed by focus on impact of communication. • Evidence from exploratory study supports case for proposed evaluation framework. • Framework is illustrated at varying stages: planning, mid-term, and impact

  5. Continuity of the direct and inverse problems in one-dimensional scattering theory and numerical solution of the inverse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, C.A. de.

    1976-09-01

    We propose an algorithm for computing the potential V(x) associated to the one-dimensional Schroedinger operator E identical to - d 2 /dx 2 + V(x) -infinite < x< infinite from knowledge of the S.matrix, more exactly, of one of the reelection coefficients. The convergence of the algorithm is guaranteed by the stability results obtained for both the direct and inverse problems

  6. Directly comparing GW150914 with numerical solutions of Einstein’s equations for binary black hole coalescence

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Berger, B. K.; Billingsley, G.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Brunett, S.

    2016-01-01

    We compare GW150914 directly to simulations of coalescing binary black holes in full general relativity, including several performed specifically to reproduce this event. Our calculations go beyond existing semianalytic models, because for all simulations—including sources with two independent, precessing spins—we perform comparisons which account for all the spin-weighted quadrupolar modes, and separately which account for all the quadrupolar and octopolar modes. Consistent with the posterio...

  7. Numerical evaluation of path-integral solutions to Fokker-Planck equations. II. Restricted stochastic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    A path-integral solution is derived for processes described by nonlinear Fokker-Plank equations together with externally imposed boundary conditions. This path-integral solution is written in the form of a path sum for small time steps and contains, in addition to the conventional volume integral, a surface integral which incorporates the boundary conditions. A previously developed numerical method, based on a histogram representation of the probability distribution, is extended to a trapezoidal representation. This improved numerical approach is combined with the present path-integral formalism for restricted processes and is show t give accurate results. 35 refs., 5 figs

  8. Numerical Evaluation of Size Effect on the Stress-Strain Behaviour of Geotextile-Reinforced Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinpour, I.; Mirmoradi, S.H.; Barari, Amin

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of sample size on the stress-strain behavior and strength characteristics of geotextile reinforced sand using the finite element numerical analysis. The effect of sample size was investigated by studying the effects of varying the number of geotextile layers, the con......This paper studies the effect of sample size on the stress-strain behavior and strength characteristics of geotextile reinforced sand using the finite element numerical analysis. The effect of sample size was investigated by studying the effects of varying the number of geotextile layers...... on the mechanical behavior of reinforced sand decreases with an increase in the sample size....

  9. Direct numerical simulation of circular-cap bubbles in low viscous liquids using counter diffusion lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seungyeob, E-mail: syryu@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngin; Yoon, Juhyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sungho, E-mail: sunghoko@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We directly simulate circular-cap bubbles in low viscous liquids. • The counter diffusion multiphase lattice Boltzmann method is proposed. • The present method is validated through benchmark tests and experimental results. • The high-Reynolds-number bubbles can be simulated without any turbulence models. • The present method is feasible for the direct simulation of bubbly flows. -- Abstract: The counter diffusion lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to directly simulate rising circular-cap bubbles in low viscous liquids. A counter diffusion model for single phase flows has been extended to multiphase flows, and the implicit formulation is converted into an explicit one for easy calculation. Bubbles at high Reynolds numbers ranging from O(10{sup 2}) to O(10{sup 4}) are simulated successfully without any turbulence models, which cannot be done for the existing LBM versions. The characteristics of the circular-cap bubbles are studied for a wide range of Morton numbers and compared with the previous literature. Calculated results agree with the theoretical and experimental data. Consequently, the wake phenomena of circular-cap bubbles and bubble induced turbulence are presented.

  10. Numerical evaluation of the water saturation in a high level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benet, L.V.; Bouillet, Ch.; Tulita, C.; Wendling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. This work is a contribution of the ANDRA's program of numerical simulations of the evolution in time of hydrogeological flows in a radioactive waste repository in deep clay formations. This study aims at evaluating the water contact areas with steel for corrosion modeling in a High-Level radioactive waste disposal, from the building to the total saturation, more than 100 000 years later [HSPA6b]. Energy release by radioactive spent fuel and thermal expansion of the interstitial water is taken into account in the models. Thermal transfers in the porous media and free convection in the gaps (Navier-Stokes equations) are computed with a linear Finite Element scheme. The mass transfers in the porous media are solved with a P0-P1 Mixed Finite Element method (Richard's equations during exploitation and two phases flow equations after the closure). All numerical simulations are performed with the Cast3M code (http://wwwcast3m. cea.fr/). During the exploitation, the H-L radioactive waste storage cell is not supposed to be hermetically closed. The pressure in the storage cell remains atmospheric and mass transfers towards the main gallery are possible. So a seepage boundary condition is used on excavation surface in order to provide evolution in time of saturation limit along the storage cell. For each cell of the boundary mesh: - No water flux is imposed in contact with unsaturated media. - Atmospheric pressure is imposed in contact with saturated media. A relative humidity of 50% is imposed for the atmosphere in the gallery. Vapour diffusive flux is implemented in Richard's equations with a suction pressure formula according to Kelvin law. Temperature impact on vapour flux is neglected. Vapour diffusive flux is significant in the concrete wall of gallery due to the ventilation. The free convection steady state in the gap is solved at different times of the thermal transient to evaluate location of

  11. Evaluating theories of bird song learning: implications for future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margoliash, D

    2002-12-01

    Studies of birdsong learning have stimulated extensive hypotheses at all levels of behavioral and physiological organization. This hypothesis building is valuable for the field and is consistent with the remarkable range of issues that can be rigorously addressed in this system. The traditional instructional (template) theory of song learning has been challenged on multiple fronts, especially at a behavioral level by evidence consistent with selectional hypotheses. In this review I highlight the caveats associated with these theories to better define the limits of our knowledge and identify important experiments for the future. The sites and representational forms of the various conceptual entities posited by the template theory are unknown. The distinction between instruction and selection in vocal learning is not well established at a mechanistic level. There is as yet insufficient neurophysiological data to choose between competing mechanisms of error-driven learning and reinforcement learning. Both may obtain for vocal learning. The possible role of sleep in acoustic or procedural memory consolidation, while supported by some physiological observations, does not yet have support in the behavioral literature. The remarkable expansion of knowledge in the past 20 years and the recent development of new technologies for physiological and behavioral experiments should permit direct tests of these theories in the coming decade.

  12. Evaluating Blended and Flipped Instruction in Numerical Methods at Multiple Engineering Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Renee; Kaw, Autar; Lou, Yingyan; Scott, Andrew; Besterfield-Sacre, Mary

    2018-01-01

    With the literature calling for comparisons among technology-enhanced or active-learning pedagogies, a blended versus flipped instructional comparison was made for numerical methods coursework using three engineering schools with diverse student demographics. This study contributes to needed comparisons of enhanced instructional approaches in STEM…

  13. Numerical investigations of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in a simple three-storey atrium building and thermal comfort evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Oosthuizen, Patrick H.

    2013-01-01

    The numerical investigations of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation and thermal comfort evaluation in a simple three-storey atrium building as a part of the passive ventilation strategy was undertaken using a validated Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model. The Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) modeling approach with the SST-k–ω turbulence model and the discrete transfer radiation model (DTRM) was used for the numerical investigations. The steady-state governing equations were solved using a commercial solver FLUENT©. Various flow situations of the buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in the building during day and night time were examined. The numerical results obtained for the airflow rates, airflow patterns and temperature distributions inside the building are presented in this paper. Using the numerical results, the well-known thermal comfort indices PMV (predicted mean vote) and PPD (predicted percentage of dissatisfied) were calculated for the evaluation of the thermal comfort conditions in the occupied regions of the building. It was noticed that thermal conditions prevailing in the occupied areas of the building as a result of using the buoyancy-driven ventilation were mostly in comfort zone. From the study of the night time ventilation, it was found that hot water (80 °C) circulation (heated by solar collectors during daytime) along the chimney walls during night time and heat sources present in the building can be useful in inducing night ventilation airflows in the building as a part of the passive ventilation strategy. -- Highlights: • A simple three-storey atrium building. • Numerical modeling of buoyancy-driven ventilation flow in the building. • Effect of solar intensity and geographical location on ventilation. • CFD predictions were used to calculate thermal comfort indices. • Evaluation of thermal comfort conditions for the occupants

  14. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokaltun, Seckin [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Munroe, Norman [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Subramaniam, Shankar [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  15. Numerical evaluation and optimization of depth-oriented temperature measurements for the investigation of thermal influences on groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Mandy; Haendel, Falk; Epting, Jannis; Binder, Martin; Müller, Matthias; Huggenberger, Peter; Liedl, Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Increasing groundwater temperatures have been observed in many urban areas such as London (UK), Tokyo (Japan) and also in Basel (Switzerland). Elevated groundwater temperatures are a result of different direct and indirect thermal impacts. Groundwater heat pumps, building structures located within the groundwater and district heating pipes, among others, can be addressed to direct impacts, whereas indirect impacts result from the change in climate in urban regions (i.e. reduced wind, diffuse heat sources). A better understanding of the thermal processes within the subsurface is urgently needed for decision makers as a basis for the selection of appropriate measures to reduce the ongoing increase of groundwater temperatures. However, often only limited temperature data is available that derives from measurements in conventional boreholes, which differ in construction and instrumental setup resulting in measurements that are often biased and not comparable. For three locations in the City of Basel models were implemented to study selected thermal processes and to investigate if heat-transport models can reproduce thermal measurements. Therefore, and to overcome the limitations of conventional borehole measurements, high-resolution depth-oriented temperature measurement systems have been introduced in the urban area of Basel. In total seven devices were installed with up to 16 sensors which are located in the unsaturated and saturated zone (0.5 to 1 m separation distance). Measurements were performed over a period of 4 years (ongoing) and provide sufficient data to set up and calibrate high-resolution local numerical heat transport models which allow studying selected local thermal processes. In a first setup two- and three-dimensional models were created to evaluate the impact of the atmosphere boundary on groundwater temperatures (see EGU Poster EGU2013-9230: Modelling Strategies for the Thermal Management of Shallow Rural and Urban Groundwater bodies). For Basel

  16. Numerical Evaluation of the Use of Aluminum Particles for Enhancing Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Stability

    OpenAIRE

    David Greatrix

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms typically necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. On the mitigation side, one in practice sees the use of inert or reactive particles for the suppression of pressure wave ...

  17. Structural performance of an IP2 package in free drop test conditions: Numerical and experimental evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Frano, Rosa; Pugliese, Giovanni; Nasta, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Vertical free drop test. • Qualification of an IP2 type Italian packaging. • Numerical and experimental investigation of the package integrity. • Demonstration the Italian packaging meets safety requirements. - Abstract: The casks or packaging systems used for the transportation of nuclear materials, especially spent fuel elements, have to be designed according to rigorous acceptance requirements, like the IAEA ones, in order to provide protection to human beings and environment against radiation exposure and contamination. This study deals with the free drop test of an Italian design packaging system to be used for the transportation of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. Impact drop experiments were performed in the Lab. Scalbatraio of the DICI – University of Pisa. Dynamic analyses too have been carried out, by refined models of both the cask and target surface to predict the effects of the impact shock (vertical drop) on the package. The experimental tests and numerical analyses are thoroughly compared, presented and discussed. The numerical approach shows to be suitable to reproduce with good reliability the test situations and results

  18. Direct numerical simulations of ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture with temperature and composition inhomogeneities relevant to HCCI and SCCI combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minh Bau

    2015-12-01

    The effects of temperature and composition stratifications on the ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture at three initial mean temperatures under elevated pressure are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with a 58-species reduced mechanism. Two-dimensional DNSs are performed by varying several key parameters: initial mean temperature, T0, and the variance of temperature and equivalence ratio (T\\' and φ\\') with different T-φcorrelations. It is found that for cases with φ\\' only, the overall combustion occurs more quickly and the mean heat release rate (HRR) increases more slowly with increasing φ\\' regardless of T0. For cases with T\\' only, however, the overall combustion is retarded/advanced in time with increasing T\\' for low/high T0 relative to the negative-temperature coefficient (NTC) regime resulting from a longer/shorter overall ignition delay of the mixture. For cases with uncorrelated T-φfields, the mean HRR is more distributed over time compared to the corresponding cases with T\\' or φ\\' only. For negatively-correlated cases, however, the temporal evolution of the overall combustion exhibits quite non-monotonic behavior with increasing T\\' and φ\\' depending on T0. All of these characteristics are found to be primarily related to the 0-D ignition delays of initial mixtures, the relative timescales between 0-D ignition delay and turbulence, and the dominance of the deflagration mode during the ignition. These results suggest that an appropriate combination of T\\' and φ\\' together with a well-prepared T-φdistribution can alleviate an excessive pressure-rise rate (PRR) and control ignition-timing in homogeneous charge compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion. In addition, critical species and reactions for the ignition of n-heptane/air mixture through the whole ignition process are estimated by comparing the temporal evolution of the mean mass fractions of important species with the overall reaction pathways of n

  19. MicroHH 1.0: a computational fluid dynamics code for direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; van Stratum, Bart J. H.; Heus, Thijs; Gibbs, Jeremy A.; Fedorovich, Evgeni; Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes MicroHH 1.0, a new and open-source (www.microhh.org) computational fluid dynamics code for the simulation of turbulent flows in the atmosphere. It is primarily made for direct numerical simulation but also supports large-eddy simulation (LES). The paper covers the description of the governing equations, their numerical implementation, and the parameterizations included in the code. Furthermore, the paper presents the validation of the dynamical core in the form of convergence and conservation tests, and comparison of simulations of channel flows and slope flows against well-established test cases. The full numerical model, including the associated parameterizations for LES, has been tested for a set of cases under stable and unstable conditions, under the Boussinesq and anelastic approximations, and with dry and moist convection under stationary and time-varying boundary conditions. The paper presents performance tests showing good scaling from 256 to 32 768 processes. The graphical processing unit (GPU)-enabled version of the code can reach a speedup of more than an order of magnitude for simulations that fit in the memory of a single GPU.

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Waves Interacting with a Shock Wave in a Quasi-1D Convergent-Divergent Nozzle Using an Unstructured Finite Volume Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trong T.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a very small amplitude acoustic wave interacting with a shock wave in a quasi-1D convergent-divergent nozzle is performed using an unstructured finite volume algorithm with a piece-wise linear, least square reconstruction, Roe flux difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. First, the spatial accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated for steady flows with and without the normal shock by running the simulation with a sequence of successively finer meshes. Then the accuracy of the Roe flux difference splitting near the sonic transition point is examined for different reconstruction schemes. Finally, the unsteady numerical solutions with the acoustic perturbation are presented and compared with linear theory results.

  1. Direct Numerical Modeling of E-Cloud Driven Instability of a Bunch Train in the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vay, J.-L.; Furman, M.A.; Venturini, M.

    2011-01-01

    The simulation package WARP-POSINST was recently upgraded for handling multiple bunches and modeling concurrently the electron cloud buildup and its effect on the beam, allowing for direct self-consistent simulation of bunch trains generating, and interacting with, electron clouds. We have used the WARP-POSINST package on massively parallel supercomputers to study the buildup and interaction of electron clouds with a proton bunch train in the CERN SPS accelerator. Results suggest that a positive feedback mechanism exists between the electron buildup and the e-cloud driven transverse instability, leading to a net increase in predicted electron density. Electron clouds have been shown to trigger fast growing instabilities on proton beams circulating in the SPS and other accelerators. So far, simulations of electron cloud buildup and their effects on beam dynamics have been performed separately. This is a consequence of the large computational cost of the combined calculation due to large space and time scale disparities between the two processes. We have presented the latest improvements of the simulation package WARP-POSINST for the simulation of self-consistent ecloud effects, including mesh refinement, and generation of electrons from gas ionization and impact at the pipe walls. We also presented simulations of two consecutive bunches interacting with electrons clouds in the SPS, which included generation of secondary electrons. The distribution of electrons in front of the first beam was initialized from a dump taken from a preceding buildup calculation using the POSINST code. In this paper, we present an extension of this work where one full batch of 72 bunches is simulated in the SPS, including the entire buildup calculation and the self-consistent interaction between the bunches and the electrons.

  2. Incorporating the information from direct and indirect neighbors into fitness evaluation enhances the cooperation in the social dilemmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Menglong; Wang, Juan; Kong, Lingcong; An, Kang; Bi, Tao; Guo, Baohong; Dong, Enzeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •A novel fitness evaluation method integrating environmental information is presented. •The introduction of neighbors’ payoff favors the promotion of cooperation in the PDG. •The role of direct neighbors becomes much more prominent. •In the SDG, the cooperative behavior is also improved by this new mechanism. -- Abstract: We propose an improved fitness evaluation method to investigate the evolution of cooperation in the spatial social dilemmas. In our model, a focal player’s fitness is calculated as the linear combination of his own payoff, the average payoffs of direct and indirect neighbors in which two independent selection parameters (α and β) are used to control the proportion of various payoff contribution to the current fitness. Then, the fitness-based strategy update rule is still Fermi-like, and asynchronous update is adopted here. A large plethora of numerical simulations are performed to validate the behaviors of the current model, and the results unambiguously demonstrate that the cooperation level is greatly enhanced by introducing the payoffs from the surrounding players. In particular, the influence of direct neighbors become more evident when compared with indirect neighbors since the correlation between focal players and their direct neighbors is much closer. Current outcomes are significant for us to further illustrate the origin and emergence of cooperation within a wide variety of natural and man-made systems

  3. Numerical evaluation of stress intensity factor for vessel and pipe subjected to thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.W.; Lee, H.Y.; Yoo, B.

    1994-01-01

    The thermal weight function method and the finite element method were employed in the numerical computation of the stress intensity factor for a cracked vessel and the cracked pipe subjected to thermal shock. A wall subjected to thermal shock was analyzed, and it has been shown that the effect of thermal shock on the stress intensity factor is dominant for the crack with small crack length to thickness ratio. Convection at the crack face had an influence on the stress intensity factor in the early stage of thermal shock. (Author)

  4. Evaluation of the Reference Numerical Parameters of the Monthly Method in ISO 13790 Considering S/V Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jeong Kwak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have investigated the accuracy of the numerical parameters in the application of the quasi steady-state calculation method. The aim of this study is to derive the reference numerical parameters of the ISO 13790 monthly method by reflecting the surface-to-volume (S/V ratio and the characteristics of the structures. The calculation process was established, and the parameters necessary to derive the reference numerical parameters were calculated based on the input data prepared for the established calculation processes. The reference numerical parameters were then derived through regression analyses of the calculated parameters and the time constant. The parameters obtained from an apartment building and the parameters of the international standard were both applied to the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP and EnergyPlus programs, and the results were analyzed in order to evaluate the validity of the results. The analysis revealed that the calculation results based on the parameters derived from this study yielded lower error rates than those based on the default parameters in ISO 13790. However, the differences were shown to be negligible in the case of high heat capacity.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of supercritical gas flow in complex nanoporous media: Elucidating the relationship between permeability and pore space geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, C. J.; Prodanovic, M.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mudrocks and shales are currently a significant source of natural gas and understanding the basic transport properties of these formations is critical to predicting long-term production, however, the nanoporous nature of mudrocks presents a unique challenge. Mudrock pores are predominantly in the range of 1-100 nm, and within this size range the flow of gas at reservoir conditions will fall within the slip-flow and early transition-flow regime (0.001 clays). Here we present a local effective viscosity lattice Boltzmann model (LEV-LBM) constructed for flow simulation in the slip- and early-transition flow regimes, adapted here for complex geometries. At the macroscopic scale the LEV-LBM is parameterized with local effective viscosities at each node to capture the variance of the mean free path of gas molecules in a bounded system. The LEV-LBM is first validated in simple tube geometries, where excellent agreement with linearized Boltzmann solutions is found for Knudsen numbers up to 1.0. The LEV-LBM is then employed to quantify the length effect on the apparent permeability of tubes, which suggests pore network modeling of flow in the slip and early-transition regime will result in overestimation unless the length effect is considered. Furthermore, the LEV-LBM is used to evaluate the predictive value of commonly measured pore geometry characteristics such as porosity, pore size distribution, and specific solid surface area for the calculation of permeability. We show that bundle of tubes models grossly overestimate apparent permeability, as well as underestimate the increase in apparent permeability with decreasing pressure as a result of excluding topology and pore shape from calculations.

  6. Does surface roughness influence the primary stability of acetabular cups? A numerical and experimental biomechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Galland, Alexandre; Rosa, Benoît; Le Corroller, Thomas; Pithioux, Martine; Argenson, Jean-Noël; Chabrand, Patrick; Parratte, Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    Most acetabular cups implanted today are press-fit impacted cementless. Anchorage begins with the primary stability given by insertion of a slightly oversized cup. This primary stability is key to obtaining bone ingrowth and secondary stability. We tested the hypothesis that primary stability of the cup is related to surface roughness of the implant, using both an experimental and a numerical models to analyze how three levels of surface roughness (micro, macro and combined) affect the primary stability of the cup. We also investigated the effect of differences in diameter between the cup and its substrate, and of insertion force, on the cups' primary stability. The results of our study show that primary stability depends on the surface roughness of the cup. The presence of macro-roughness on the peripheral ring is found to decrease primary stability; there was excessive abrasion of the substrate, damaging it and leading to poor primary stability. Numerical modeling indicates that oversizing the cup compared to its substrate has an impact on primary stability, as has insertion force. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The numerical evaluation on non-radiative multiphonon transition rate from different electronic bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Bangfen.

    1985-10-01

    A numerical calculation on the non-radiative multiphonon transition probability based on the adiabatic approximation (AA) and the static approximation (SA) has been accomplished in a model of two electronic levels coupled to one phonon mode. The numerical results indicate that the spectra based on different approximations are generally different apart from those vibrational levels which are far below the classical crossing point. For large electron-phonon coupling constant, the calculated transition rates based on AA are more reliable; on the other hand, for small transition coupling the transition rates near or beyond the cross region are quite different for two approximations. In addition to the diagonal non-adiabatic potential, the mixing and splitting of the original static potential sheets are responsible for the deviation of the transition rates based on different approximations. The relationship between the transition matrix element and the vibrational level shift, the Huang-Rhys factor, the separation of the electronic levels and the electron-phonon coupling is analysed and discussed. (author)

  8. Numerical Evaluation of the Use of Aluminum Particles for Enhancing Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Greatrix

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms typically necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. On the mitigation side, one in practice sees the use of inert or reactive particles for the suppression of pressure wave development in the motor chamber flow. With the focus of the present study placed on reactive particles, a numerical internal ballistic model incorporating relevant elements, such as a transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to axial pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of using aluminum particles within the central internal flow (particles whose surfaces nominally regress with time, as a function of current particle size, as they move downstream as a means of suppressing instability-related symptoms in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the loading percentage and starting size of the aluminum particles have a significant influence on reducing the resulting transient pressure wave magnitude.

  9. A numerical analysis to evaluate Betz's Law for vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thönnißen, F.; Marnett, M.; Roidl, B.; Schröder, W.

    2016-09-01

    The upper limit for the energy conversion rate of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) is known as the Betz limit. Often this limit is also applied to vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT). However, a literature review reveals that early analytical and recent numerical approaches predicted values for the maximum power output of VAWTs close to or even higher than the Betz limit. Thus, it can be questioned whether the application of Betz's Law to VAWTs is justified. To answer this question, the current approach combines a free vortex model with a 2D inviscid panel code to represent the flow field of a generic VAWT. To ensure the validity of the model, an active blade pitch control system is used to avoid flow separation. An optimal pitch curve avoiding flow separation is determined for one specific turbine configuration by applying an evolutionary algorithm. The analysis yields a net power output that is slightly (≈6%) above the Betz limit. Besides the numerical result of an increased energy conversion rate, especially the identification of two physical power increasing mechanisms shows, that the application of Betz's Law to VAWTs is not justified.

  10. Numerical Analysis of Indoor Sound Quality Evaluation Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tuan Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoors sound field distribution is important to Room Acoustics, but the field suffers numerous problems, for example, multipath propagation and scattering owing to sound absorption by furniture and other aspects of décor. Generally, an ideal interior space must have a sound field with clear quality. This provides both the speaker and the listener with a pleasant conversational environment. This investigation uses the Finite Element Method to assess the acoustic distribution based on the indoor space and chamber volume. In this situation, a fixed sound source at different frequencies is used to simulate the acoustic characteristics of the indoor space. This method considers the furniture and decoration sound absorbing material and thus different sound absorption coefficients and configurations. The preliminary numerical simulation provides a method that can forecast the distribution of sound in an indoor room in complex situations. Consequently, it is possible to arrange interior furnishings and appliances to optimize acoustic distribution and environmental friendliness. Additionally, the analytical results can also be used to calculate the Reverberation Time and speech intelligibility for specified indoor space.

  11. Numerical model for atmospheric diffusion analysis and evaluation of effective dose for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sada, Koichi; Michioka, Takenobu; Ichikawa, Yoichi; Komiyama, Sumito

    2009-01-01

    A numerical simulation method has been developed to predict atmospheric flow and stack gas diffusion, considering the buildings and complex terrain located near and relatively far from a stack, respectively. The turbulence closure technique was used for flow calculation, some calculation grids on the ground near a stack were treated as buildings, and stack gas diffusion was predicted using the Lagrangian particle model. The calculated flow and stack gas diffusion results were compared with those obtained by wind tunnel experiments under actual terrain containing buildings. Effective stack height was estimated by comparing the surface concentration along the plume axis with those under a flat-plate condition, and it was apparent that the effective stack heights estimated by calculations were almost the same as those obtained by the wind tunnel experiment. Then, the effective dose and relative concentration of stack gas were calculated using the effective stack heights obtained by a numerical model. Almost the same effective dose and relative concentration were obtained when compared with those using the effective stack height obtained by wind tunnel experiment. (author)

  12. U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center Grain Evaluation Software to Numerically Predict Linear Burn Regression for Solid Propellant Grain Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    ENGINEERING CENTER GRAIN EVALUATION SOFTWARE TO NUMERICALLY PREDICT LINEAR BURN REGRESSION FOR SOLID PROPELLANT GRAIN GEOMETRIES Brian...distribution is unlimited. AD U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Munitions Engineering Technology Center Picatinny...U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER GRAIN EVALUATION SOFTWARE TO NUMERICALLY PREDICT LINEAR BURN REGRESSION FOR SOLID

  13. Evaluation of direct membrane filtration and direct forward osmosis as concepts for compact and energy-positive municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Tobias; Bajraktari, Niada; Davidsson, Åsa; Vogel, Jörg; Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Jansen, Jes la Cour; Jönsson, Karin

    2018-02-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment commonly involves mechanical, biological and chemical treatment steps to protect humans and the environment from adverse effects. Membrane technology has gained increasing attention as an alternative to conventional wastewater treatment due to increased urbanization. Among the available membrane technologies, microfiltration (MF) and forward osmosis (FO) have been selected for this study due to their specific characteristics, such as compactness and efficient removal of particles. In this study, two treatment concepts were evaluated with regard to their specific electricity, energy and area demands. Both concepts would fulfil the Swedish discharge demands for small- and medium-sized wastewater treatment plants at full scale: (1) direct MF and (2) direct FO with seawater as the draw solution. The framework of this study is based on a combination of data obtained from bench- and pilot-scale experiments applying direct MF and FO, respectively. Additionally, available complementary data from a Swedish full-scale wastewater treatment plant and the literature were used to evaluate the concepts in depth. The results of this study indicate that both concepts are net positive with respect to electricity and energy, as more biogas can be produced compared to that using conventional wastewater treatment. Furthermore, the specific area demand is significantly reduced. This study demonstrates that municipal wastewater could be treated in a more energy- and area-efficient manner with techniques that are already commercially available and with future membrane technology.

  14. Potential of Ventilation Radiators: Performance evaluation by numerical, analytical and experimental means

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myhren, Jonn Are

    2011-07-01

    give combined energy savings for heating and ventilation of 14-30 % in a system utilising a heat pump. - supply water temperatures as low as 35 deg. C could increase potential for utilising low temperature heat sources such as sun-, ground-, water- or waste-heat. This would be particularly relevant to new-built 'green' energy-efficient buildings, but several advantages may apply to retrofit applications as well. - Successful application of ventilation radiators requires understanding of relevant building factors, and the appropriate number, positioning and size of radiators for best effect. Evaluation studies must be made at the level of the building as a whole, not just for the heating-ventilation system. This work demonstrated that increased use of well-designed ventilation radiator arrangements can help to meet regulations issued in 2008 by the Swedish Dept. of Housing (Boverket BBR 16) and goals set in the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) in the same year

  15. Development of a 3D numerical model to evaluate the Stromboli NW flank instability in relation to magma intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuani, T.; Merri, A.

    2009-04-01

    A stress-strain analysis of the Stromboli volcano was performed using a three-dimensional explicit finite difference numerical code (FLAC 3D, ITASCA, 2005), to evaluate the effects associated to the presence of magma pressure in magmatic conduit and to foresee the evolution of the magmatic feeding complex. The simulations considered both the ordinary state for the Stromboli, characterized by a partial fill of the active dyke with regular emission of gas and lava fountains and the paroxysmal conditions observed during the March 2007's eruptive crisis, with the magma level in the active dyke reaching the topographic surface along the Sciara del Fuoco depression. The modeling contributes to identify the most probable directions of propagation of new dikes, and the effects of their propagation on the stability of the volcano edifice. The numerical model extends 6 x 6 x 2.6 km3, with a mesh resolution of 100 m, adjusting the grid to fit the shape of the object to be modeled. An elasto-plastic constitutive law was adopted and an homogeneous Mohr-Coulomb strength criterion was chosen for the volcanic cone, assuming one lithotechnical unit (alternation of lava and breccia layers "lava-breccia unit"- Apuani et al 2005). The dykes are represented as discontinuities of the grid, and are modeled by means of interfaces. The magmatic pressure is imposed to the model as normal pressure applied on both sides of the interfaces. The magmastatic pressure was calculated as Pm=d•h, where d is the magma unit weight assumed equal to 25 KN/m3, and h (m) is the height of the magma column. Values of overpressure between 0 and 1 MPa were added to simulate the paroxysmal eruption. The simulation was implemented in successive stages, assuming the results of the previous stages as condition for the next one. A progressive propagation of the dike was simulated, in accordance with the stress conditions identified step by step, and in accordance with the evidences detected by in situ survey, and

  16. Evaluation of CFD numerical models for the study of the flow of water from the RMB pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, Bruno Leonhardt; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos; Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Schweizer, Fernando Lage Araujo

    2013-01-01

    In this work two numerical models were developed for the study of the flow in the pool of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor-RMB using two computer codes: FLUENT and CFX. The codes presents big differences that may affect the results and performance of the simulation. An example is the mesh, which can be fully composed of regular hexahedral and present local refinement in FLUENT, due to the implementation of the solution focused on the element, which is not possible in CFX, which takes a node-centric solution. The temperature profiles were evaluated over the time of simulation. The research and the defining of an appropriate and optimized numerical model will be of fundamental importance for the RMB hot water layer project

  17. Numerical Evaluation on the Different Shapes of Gravelly Sand Columns to Increase the Loading Capacity of Soft Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghzili Sif Allah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement on soft clay by the installation of stone column is one of the most popular methods followed worldwide. Different analytical and numerical solutions have already been developed for understanding the load transfer mechanism of soft soil reinforced with stone column. This study investigated a bearing capacity of the gravelly sand column, installed in soft clay bed at 15kpa of undrained shear strength. The column variable of length and diameter ratio at 7, 8 and 9 were evaluated. On top of that, the combination of two diameters in single column was tested and the uniform diameter was used as a control. In the numerical analysis, Mohrcoulomb model was adopted in the idealization of the behaviour of the gravelly sand column and soft clay materials. The results revealed that the optimum design that gave the highest loading capacity of the combination 11=12 of column diameter was the length and diameter ratio of 8.

  18. Flow characteristics and performance evaluation of butterfly valves using numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, S Y; Shin, M S; Yoon, J Y

    2010-01-01

    The industrial butterfly valves have been applied to various fields that transport fluid in volume, especially water supply and drainage pipeline for flow control. The butterfly valves in various shapes are manufactured, but a fitting performance comparison is not made up. For this reason, we carried out numerical analysis of some kind of butterfly valves for water supply and drainage pipeline using commercial CFD code FLUENT, and made a comparative study of these results. Also, the flow coefficient, the loss coefficient, and pressure distribution of valves according to valve opening rate were compared each other and the influence of these design variables on valve performance were checked over. Through flow around the valve disk, such as pressure distribution, flow pattern, velocity vectors, and form of vortex, we grasped flow characteristics.

  19. Numerical evaluation of an innovative cup layout for open volumetric solar air receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnoli, Mattia; Savoldi, Laura; Zanino, Roberto; Zaversky, Fritz

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes an innovative volumetric solar absorber design to be used in high-temperature air receivers of solar power tower plants. The innovative absorber, a so-called CPC-stacked-plate configuration, applies the well-known principle of a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for the first time in a volumetric solar receiver, heating air to high temperatures. The proposed absorber configuration is analyzed numerically, applying first the open-source ray-tracing software Tonatiuh in order to obtain the solar flux distribution on the absorber's surfaces. Next, a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of a representative single channel of the innovative receiver is performed, using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent. The solution of the conjugate heat transfer problem shows that the behavior of the new absorber concept is promising, however further optimization of the geometry will be necessary in order to exceed the performance of the classical absorber designs.

  20. An evaluation of solution algorithms and numerical approximation methods for modeling an ion exchange process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Sunyoung; Huang, Jingfang; Boyer, Treavor H.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-07-01

    The focus of this work is on the modeling of an ion exchange process that occurs in drinking water treatment applications. The model formulation consists of a two-scale model in which a set of microscale diffusion equations representing ion exchange resin particles that vary in size and age are coupled through a boundary condition with a macroscopic ordinary differential equation (ODE), which represents the concentration of a species in a well-mixed reactor. We introduce a new age-averaged model (AAM) that averages all ion exchange particle ages for a given size particle to avoid the expensive Monte-Carlo simulation associated with previous modeling applications. We discuss two different numerical schemes to approximate both the original Monte-Carlo algorithm and the new AAM for this two-scale problem. The first scheme is based on the finite element formulation in space coupled with an existing backward difference formula-based ODE solver in time. The second scheme uses an integral equation based Krylov deferred correction (KDC) method and a fast elliptic solver (FES) for the resulting elliptic equations. Numerical results are presented to validate the new AAM algorithm, which is also shown to be more computationally efficient than the original Monte-Carlo algorithm. We also demonstrate that the higher order KDC scheme is more efficient than the traditional finite element solution approach and this advantage becomes increasingly important as the desired accuracy of the solution increases. We also discuss issues of smoothness, which affect the efficiency of the KDC-FES approach, and outline additional algorithmic changes that would further improve the efficiency of these developing methods for a wide range of applications.

  1. Parallel direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows in rotor-stator cavities. Comparison with k-{epsilon} modeling; Simulation numerique directe parallele d`ecoulements turbulents en cavites rotor-stator comparaisons avec les modilisations k-{epsilon}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, R.; Le Quere, P.; Daube, O. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Orsay (France)

    1997-12-31

    Turbulent flows between a fixed disc and a rotating disc are encountered in various applications like turbo-machineries or torque converters of automatic gear boxes. These flows are characterised by particular physical phenomena mainly due to the effects of rotation (Coriolis and inertia forces) and thus, classical k-{epsilon}-type modeling gives approximative results. The aim of this work is to study these flows using direct numerical simulation in order to provide precise information about the statistical turbulent quantities and to improve the k-{epsilon} modeling in the industrial MATHILDA code of the ONERA and used by SNECMA company (aerospace industry). The results presented are restricted to the comparison between results obtained with direct simulation and results obtained with the MATHILDA code in the same configuration. (J.S.) 8 refs.

  2. Performance Evaluation of Various Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage of A Solar Cooker via Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Tarwidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, thermal performance of various phase change materials (PCMs used as thermal energy storage in a solar cooker has been investigated numerically. Heat conduction equations in cylindrical domain are used to model heat transfer of the PCMs. Mathematical model of phase change problem in the PCM storage encompasses heat conduction equations in solid and liquid region separated by moving solid-liquid interface. The phase change problem is solved by reformulating heat conduction equations with emergence of moving boundary into an enthalpy equation. Numerical solution of the enthalpy equation is obtained by implementing Godunov method and verified by analytical solution of one-dimensional case. Stability condition of the numerical scheme is also discussed. Thermal performance of various PCMs is evaluated via the stored energy and temperature history. The simulation results show that phase change material with the best thermal performance during the first 2.5 hours of energy extraction is shown by erythritol. Moreover, magnesium chloride hexahydrate can maintain temperature of the PCM storage in the range of 110-116.7°C for more than 4 hours while magnesium nitrate hexahydrate is effective only for one hour with the PCM storage temperature around 121-128°C. Among the PCMs that have been tested, it is only erythritol that can cook 10 kg of the loaded water until it reaches 100°C for about 3.5 hours. Article History: Received June 22nd 2016; Received in revised form August 26th 2016; Accepted Sept 1st 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Tarwidi, D., Murdiansyah, D.T, Ginanja, N. (2016 Performance Evaluation of Various Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage of A Solar Cooker via Numerical Simulation. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(3, 199-210. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.3.199-210

  3. Evaluation of Impact of Coagulant Type on Operation Parameters in Direct Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Torabian

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous advantages have been reported on PAC (poly aluminum chloride used as a coagulant over other coagulants such as alum and ferric chloride used in conventional water treatment process with medium and high turbidity levels. These include lower amounts of PACL required specially in removing turbidity, larger floc grain formation, reduced floc sedimentation time, lower sludge production, and relaxation of the need for pH adjustment by lime, among others. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of different coagulants such as ferric chloride and PACL on direct filtration and to identify the most effective material based on both turbidity and particle removal efficiencies. A perfectly experimental pilot system, including raw water preparation, coagulation, flocculation, distribution measurement, and filtration units, was designed and used. Raw water turbidity level in the experimental pilot was below 10 NTU. The effects of various parameters such as coagulant type, filtration rate, and coagulant dosage on the performance of the filter were investigated. The results obtained from several filtration cycles under different conditions indicated that average effluent turbidity level, effluent particle numbers, effluent turbidity variation graph, and effluent particle graph were lower throughout the filtration cycle when PACL was used compared to when ferric chloride was used as the coagulant. Increasing filtration rate led to increased turbidity and particle number. Addition of 2 mg/l of PACL (poor coagulation and flocculation scenario was compared with addition of 5 mg/l of ferric chloride (strong coagulation and flocculation scenario. The results indicated that higher average values of turbidity removal but lower turbidity and particle removal efficiencies obtained in the case of the poor coagulation and flocculation scenario.

  4. Direct numerical simulation and modeling of turbulent natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot; Simulation numerique directe et modelisation de la convection naturelle turbulente dans un canal differentiellement chauffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjemadi, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are the direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot and the improvements of second-order turbulence modelling. A three-dimensional direct numerical simulation code has been developed in order to gain a better understanding of turbulence properties in natural convection flows. This code has been validated in several physical configurations: non-stratified natural convection flows (conduction solution), stratified natural convection flows (double boundary layer solution), transitional and turbulent Poiseuille flows. For the conduction solution, the turbulent regime was reached at a Rayleigh number of 1*10{sup 5} and 5.4*10{sup 5}. A detailed analysis of these results has revealed the principal qualities of the available models but has also pointed our their shortcomings. This data base has been used in order to improve the triple correlations transport models and to select the turbulent time scales suitable for such flows. (author). 122 refs., figs., tabs., 4 appends.

  5. Numerical study on human model shape and grid dependency for indoor thermal comfort evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jin Won; Choi, Yun Ho [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hong [LIG Nexl Co. Ltd, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Various computer-simulated person (CSP) models have been used to represent occupants in indoor airflow simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Despite the capability of CFD to predict temperature and velocity fields in an automotive cabin or a room in a building, it is more difficult to evaluate the degree of thermal comfort considered by the CSP models. Up to now, the shapes of CSP models and their grid characteristics have not been studied for the evaluation of indoor thermal comfort. In this paper, the effects of the human model's shape and the physical characteristics of the grids are studied. The FLUENT code is used for analysis, and the predicted mean vote (PMV), predicted percentage dissatisfied (PPD), and equivalent homogeneous temperature (EHT) values are used for the evaluation and comparison of thermal comfort. The computational results show that the CSP shape and grid features do not affect the global flow fields or the evaluations of PMV and PPD. However, more precise results are obtained from the evaluation of thermal comfort by EHT when detailed human models with a prism grid are used.

  6. Numerical study on human model shape and grid dependency for indoor thermal comfort evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jin Won; Choi, Yun Ho; Park, Jae Hong

    2013-01-01

    Various computer-simulated person (CSP) models have been used to represent occupants in indoor airflow simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Despite the capability of CFD to predict temperature and velocity fields in an automotive cabin or a room in a building, it is more difficult to evaluate the degree of thermal comfort considered by the CSP models. Up to now, the shapes of CSP models and their grid characteristics have not been studied for the evaluation of indoor thermal comfort. In this paper, the effects of the human model's shape and the physical characteristics of the grids are studied. The FLUENT code is used for analysis, and the predicted mean vote (PMV), predicted percentage dissatisfied (PPD), and equivalent homogeneous temperature (EHT) values are used for the evaluation and comparison of thermal comfort. The computational results show that the CSP shape and grid features do not affect the global flow fields or the evaluations of PMV and PPD. However, more precise results are obtained from the evaluation of thermal comfort by EHT when detailed human models with a prism grid are used.

  7. Asymptotic analysis, direct numerical simulation and modeling of premixed turbulent flame-wall interaction; Etude asymptotique, simulation numerique directe et modelisation de l`interaction flamme turbulente premelangee-paroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneaux, G.

    1996-05-20

    Premixed turbulent flame-wall interaction is studied using theoretical and numerical analysis. Laminar interactions are first investigated through a literature review. This gives a characterization of the different configurations of interaction and justifies the use of simplified kinetic schemes to study the interaction. Calculations are then performed using Direct Numerical Simulation with a one-step chemistry model, and are compared with good agreements to asymptotic analysis. Flame-wall distances and wall heat fluxes obtained are compared successfully with those of the literature. Heat losses decrease the consumption rate, leading to extinction at the maximum of wall heat flux. It is followed by a flame retreat, when the fuel diffuses into the reaction zone, resulting in low unburnt hydrocarbon levels. Then, turbulent regime is investigated, using two types of Direct Numerical Simulations: 2D variable density and 3D constant density. Similar results are obtained: the local turbulent flame behavior is identical to a laminar interaction, and tongues of fresh gases are expelled from the wall region, near zones of quenching. In the 2D simulations, minimal flame-wall distances and maximum wall heat fluxes are similar to laminar values. However, the structure of the turbulence in the 3D calculations induces smaller flame-wall distances and higher wall heat fluxes. Finally, a flame-wall interaction model is built and validated. It uses the flamelet approach, where the flame is described in terms of consumption speed and flame surface density. This model is simplified to produce a law of the wall, which is then included in a averaged CFD code (Kiva2-MB). It is validated in an engine calculation. (author) 36 refs.

  8. Numerical evaluation of energy barriers and magnetic relaxation in interacting nanostructured magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana A.; Chantrell, Roy W.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a model to quantify long-time thermally induced magnetization reversal in magnetic systems with distributed properties. Two algorithms, based on kinetic and Metropolis Monte Carlo are introduced. While the former requires the constant recalculation of all energy barriers and is useful when the interactions are weak, the latter uses the Metropolis Monte Carlo to estimate the magnetization trajectory and, consequently, only the most probable transition rates are evaluated. The ridge optimization method is used to evaluate the energy barriers in a multidimensional energy landscape. The algorithms are applied to a granular system modeled by means of Voronoi polyhedra and having random in-plane anisotropy

  9. Numerical evaluation of acoustic characteristics and their damping of a thrust chamber using a constant-volume bomb model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiu QIN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to numerically evaluate the acoustic characteristics of liquid rocket engine thrust chambers by means of a computational fluid dynamics method, a mathematical model of an artificial constant-volume bomb is proposed in this paper. A localized pressure pulse with a very high amplitude can be imposed on specified regions in a combustion chamber, the numerical procedure of which is described. Pressure oscillations actuated by the released constant-volume bomb can then be analyzed via Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT, and their modes can be identified according to the theoretical acoustic eigenfrequencies of the thrust chamber. The damping performances of the corresponding acoustic modes are evaluated by the half-power bandwidth method. The predicted acoustic characteristics and their damping for a special engine combustor agree well with the experimental data, validating the mathematical model and its numerical procedures. A small-thrust liquid rocket engine chamber is then analyzed by the present model. The First Longitudinal (1L acoustic mode can be excited easily and is hard to be damped. The axial position of the central constant-volume bomb has little influence on the amplitude and damping capacity of the First Radial (1R and 1L acoustic modes. Tangential acoustic modes can only be triggered by an off-centered constant-volume bomb, among which the First Tangential (1T mode is the strongest and regarded as the most harmful one. The amplitude of the 1L acoustic mode is smaller, but its damping factor is larger, as a constant-volume bomb is imposed approaching the injector face. These results are contributed to evaluate the acoustic characteristics and their damping of the combustion chamber. Keywords: Acoustic mode, Constant-volume bomb, Damping characteristics, Damping factor, Half-power bandwidth, Pressure oscillation

  10. Numerical evaluation of the bispectrum in multiple field inflation—the transport approach with code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Mafalda; Frazer, Jonathan [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, D-22603, Hamburg (Germany); Mulryne, David J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Seery, David, E-mail: mafalda.dias@desy.de, E-mail: jonathan.frazer@desy.de, E-mail: d.mulryne@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: D.Seery@sussex.ac.uk [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-01

    We present a complete framework for numerical calculation of the power spectrum and bispectrum in canonical inflation with an arbitrary number of light or heavy fields. Our method includes all relevant effects at tree-level in the loop expansion, including (i) interference between growing and decaying modes near horizon exit; (ii) correlation and coupling between species near horizon exit and on superhorizon scales; (iii) contributions from mass terms; and (iv) all contributions from coupling to gravity. We track the evolution of each correlation function from the vacuum state through horizon exit and the superhorizon regime, with no need to match quantum and classical parts of the calculation; when integrated, our approach corresponds exactly with the tree-level Schwinger or 'in-in' formulation of quantum field theory. In this paper we give the equations necessary to evolve all two- and three-point correlation functions together with suitable initial conditions. The final formalism is suitable to compute the amplitude, shape, and scale dependence of the bispectrum in models with | f {sub NL}| of order unity or less, which are a target for future galaxy surveys such as Euclid, DESI and LSST. As an illustration we apply our framework to a number of examples, obtaining quantitatively accurate predictions for their bispectra for the first time. Two accompanying reports describe publicly-available software packages that implement the method.

  11. Numerical evaluation of the bispectrum in multiple field inflation—the transport approach with code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Mafalda; Frazer, Jonathan; Mulryne, David J.; Seery, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a complete framework for numerical calculation of the power spectrum and bispectrum in canonical inflation with an arbitrary number of light or heavy fields. Our method includes all relevant effects at tree-level in the loop expansion, including (i) interference between growing and decaying modes near horizon exit; (ii) correlation and coupling between species near horizon exit and on superhorizon scales; (iii) contributions from mass terms; and (iv) all contributions from coupling to gravity. We track the evolution of each correlation function from the vacuum state through horizon exit and the superhorizon regime, with no need to match quantum and classical parts of the calculation; when integrated, our approach corresponds exactly with the tree-level Schwinger or 'in-in' formulation of quantum field theory. In this paper we give the equations necessary to evolve all two- and three-point correlation functions together with suitable initial conditions. The final formalism is suitable to compute the amplitude, shape, and scale dependence of the bispectrum in models with | f NL | of order unity or less, which are a target for future galaxy surveys such as Euclid, DESI and LSST. As an illustration we apply our framework to a number of examples, obtaining quantitatively accurate predictions for their bispectra for the first time. Two accompanying reports describe publicly-available software packages that implement the method.

  12. Analytical and Numerical Evaluation of Limit States of MSE Wall Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drusa Marián

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Simplification of the design of Mechanically Stabilized Earth wall structures (MSE wall or MSEW is now an important factor that helps us not only to save a time and costs, but also to achieve the desired results more reliably. It is quite common way in practice, that the designer of a section of motorway or railway line gives order for design to a supplier of geosynthetics materials. However, supplier company has experience and skills, but a general designer does not review the safety level of design and its efficiency, and is simply incorporating into the overall design of the construction project. Actually, large number of analytical computational methods for analysis and design of MSE walls or similar structures are known. The problem of these analytical methods is the verification of deformations and global stability of structure. The article aims to clarify two methods of calculating the internal stability of MSE wall and their comparison with FEM numerical model. Comparison of design approaches allows us to draft an effective retaining wall and tells us about the appropriateness of using a reinforcing element.

  13. Supply of the numerical simulation for the evaluation of the sonic boom of meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henneton, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, infra-sound is one survey technique monitoring nuclear explosions. These ones have to be distinguished from natural sources of infra-sound like atmospheric meteorite entries. With a view to investigate meteorites as an infra-sound source, finite volume simulations of the hypersonic flow are performed at sufficiently far distances to reach the acoustic regime. They are then matched to a nonlinear ray tracing method to propagate the signal within the atmosphere down to the ground. For perfect gases, this approach allows us to validate the theoretical model based on simplifying assumptions. More realistic simulations in real gases at thermochemical equilibrium, show a major modification of the pressure field in the near field but a moderate influence for infra-sound at the ground level. Numerical results are compared to infra-sound and seismic measurements in the case of the well-documented meteorite of Carancas (Peru, 2007). This confrontation highlights a good agreement for the spectrum of the waveform but a large overestimation of the overpressure at receptors located near the impact crater. This study also allowed us to propose a new entry trajectory for the meteorite, and to identify one of the recorded signals as a sonic boom. (author) [fr

  14. Numerical evaluation of the bispectrum in multiple field inflation. The transport approach with code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Mafalda; Mulryne, David J.; Seery, David

    2016-09-01

    We present a complete framework for numerical calculation of the power spectrum and bispectrum in canonical inflation with an arbitrary number of light or heavy fields. Our method includes all relevant effects at tree-level in the loop expansion, including (i) interference between growing and decaying modes near horizon exit; (ii) correlation and coupling between species near horizon exit and on superhorizon scales; (iii) contributions from mass terms; and (iv) all contributions from coupling to gravity. We track the evolution of each correlation function from the vacuum state through horizon exit and the superhorizon regime, with no need to match quantum and classical parts of the calculation; when integrated, our approach corresponds exactly with the tree-level Schwinger or 'in-in' formulation of quantum field theory. In this paper we give the equations necessary to evolve all two- and three-point correlation functions together with suitable initial conditions. The final formalism is suitable to compute the amplitude, shape, and scale dependence of the bispectrum in models with vertical stroke f_N_L vertical stroke of order unity or less, which are a target for future galaxy surveys such as Euclid, DESI and LSST. As an illustration we apply our framework to a number of examples, obtaining quantitatively accurate predictions for their bispectra for the first time. Two accompanying reports describe publicly-available software packages that implement the method.

  15. Numerical evaluation of the bispectrum in multiple field inflation. The transport approach with code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Mafalda [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). Astronomy Centre; Frazer, Jonathan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Basque Country Univ., Bilbao (Spain). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain); Mulryne, David J. [Queen Mary Univ., London (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Seery, David [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). Astronomy Centre

    2016-09-15

    We present a complete framework for numerical calculation of the power spectrum and bispectrum in canonical inflation with an arbitrary number of light or heavy fields. Our method includes all relevant effects at tree-level in the loop expansion, including (i) interference between growing and decaying modes near horizon exit; (ii) correlation and coupling between species near horizon exit and on superhorizon scales; (iii) contributions from mass terms; and (iv) all contributions from coupling to gravity. We track the evolution of each correlation function from the vacuum state through horizon exit and the superhorizon regime, with no need to match quantum and classical parts of the calculation; when integrated, our approach corresponds exactly with the tree-level Schwinger or 'in-in' formulation of quantum field theory. In this paper we give the equations necessary to evolve all two- and three-point correlation functions together with suitable initial conditions. The final formalism is suitable to compute the amplitude, shape, and scale dependence of the bispectrum in models with vertical stroke f{sub NL} vertical stroke of order unity or less, which are a target for future galaxy surveys such as Euclid, DESI and LSST. As an illustration we apply our framework to a number of examples, obtaining quantitatively accurate predictions for their bispectra for the first time. Two accompanying reports describe publicly-available software packages that implement the method.

  16. Evaluation of physics-based numerical modelling for diverse design architecture of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A. K.; Catalan, Jorge; Camacho, Diana; Martinez, Miguel; Hodges, D.

    2017-08-01

    Solution processed organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite based solar cells are emerging as a new cost effective photovoltaic technology. In the context of increasing the power conversion efficiency (PCE) and sustainability of perovskite solar cells (PSC) devices, we comprehensively analyzed a physics-based numerical modelling for doped and un-doped PSC devices. Our analytics emphasized the role of different charge carrier layers from the view point of interfacial adhesion and its influence on charge extraction rate and charge recombination mechanism. Morphological and charge transport properties of perovskite thin film as a function of device architecture are also considered to investigate the photovoltaic properties of PSC. We observed that photocurrent is dominantly influenced by interfacial recombination process and photovoltage has functional relationship with defect density of perovskite absorption layer. A novel contour mapping method to understand the characteristics of current density-voltage (J-V) curves for each device as a function of perovskite layer thickness provide an important insight about the distribution spectrum of photovoltaic properties. Functional relationship of device efficiency and fill factor with absorption layer thickness are also discussed.

  17. Numerical Evaluation of Dynamic Response for Flexible Composite Structures under Slamming Impact for Naval Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoon, O. H.; Tarfaoui, M.; El Moumen, A.; Benyahia, H.; Nachtane, M.

    2018-06-01

    The deformable composite structures subjected to water-entry impact can be caused a phenomenon called hydroelastic effect, which can modified the fluid flow and estimated hydrodynamic loads comparing with rigid body. This is considered very important for ship design engineers to predict the global and the local hydrodynamic loads. This paper presents a numerical model to simulate the slamming water impact of flexible composite panels using an explicit finite element method. In order to better describe the hydroelastic influence and mechanical properties, composite materials panels with different stiffness and under different impact velocities with deadrise angle of 100 have been studied. In the other hand, the inertia effect was observed in the early stage of the impact that relative to the loading rate. Simulation results have been indicated that the lower stiffness panel has a higher hydroelastic effect and becomes more important when decreasing of the deadrise angle and increasing the impact velocity. Finally, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data and the analytical approaches of the rigid body to describe the behavior of the hydroelastic influence.

  18. Study on mixing behavior in a tee piping and numerical analyses for evaluation of thermal striping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, H.; Igarashi, M.; Kawashima, S.; Kimura, N.; Hayashi, K.

    2009-01-01

    Water experiments were carried out for thermal hydraulic aspects of thermal striping in a mixing tee, which has main to branch diameter ratio of 3. Detailed temperature and velocity fields were measured by a movable thermocouple tree and particle image velocimetry. Flow patterns in the tee were classified into three groups; wall jet, deflecting jet, and impinging jet, which had their own temperature fluctuation profiles, depending on a momentum ratio between the main and branch pipes. Non-dimensional power spectrum density (PSD) of temperature fluctuation showed a unique profile, when the momentum ratio was identical. Numerical simulation based on finite difference method showed alternative vortex development, like Karman vortex series, behind the jet from the branch pipe in the wall jet case. The prominent frequency of the temperature fluctuation in the calculation was 0.2 of St number based on the branch pipe diameter and in good agreement with the experimental results. Mixing behavior in the tee was characterized by the relatively large vortex structures defined by the diameters and the velocities in the pipes

  19. Experimental Analysis and Evaluation of the Numerical Prediction of Wake Characteristics of Tidal Stream Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuquan Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand tidal stream turbine performance and flow field, if tidal energy is to advance. The operating condition of a tidal stream turbine with a supporting structure has a significant impact on its performance and wake recovery. The aim of this work is to provide an understanding of turbine submerged depth that governs the downstream wake structure and its recovery to the free-stream velocity profile. An experimentally validated numerical model, based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD tool, was present to obtain longitudinal, transverse and vertical velocity profiles. Wake characteristics measurements have been carried out in an open channel at Hohai University. The results indicate that varying the turbine proximity to the water surface introduces differential mass flow rate around the rotor that could make the wake persist differently downstream. CFD shows the same predicted wake recovery tendency with the experiments, and an agreement from CFD and experiments is good in the far-wake region. The results presented demonstrate that CFD is a good tool to simulate the performance of tidal turbines particularly in the far-wake region and that the turbine proximity to the water surface has an effect on the wake recovery.

  20. A direct method for numerical solution of a class of nonlinear Volterra integro-differential equations and its application to the nonlinear fission and fusion reactor kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Yasuaki; Ise, Takeharu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Itoh, Yasuyuki

    1975-12-01

    A new method has been developed for numerical solution of a class of nonlinear Volterra integro-differential equations with quadratic nonlinearity. After dividing the domain of the variable into subintervals, piecewise approximations are applied in the subintervals. The equation is first integrated over a subinterval to obtain the piecewise equation, to which six approximate treatments are applied, i.e. fully explicit, fully implicit, Crank-Nicolson, linear interpolation, quadratic and cubic spline. The numerical solution at each time step is obtained directly as a positive root of the resulting algebraic quadratic equation. The point reactor kinetics with a ramp reactivity insertion, linear temperature feedback and delayed neutrons can be described by one of this type of nonlinear Volterra integro-differential equations. The algorithm is applied to the Argonne benchmark problem and a model problem for a fast reactor without delayed neutrons. The fully implicit method has been found to be unconditionally stable in the sense that it always gives the positive real roots. The cubic spline method is divergent, and the other four methods are intermediate in between. From the estimation of the stability, convergency, accuracy and CPU time, it is concluded that the Crank-Nicolson method is best, then the linear interpolation method comes closely next to it. Discussions are also made on the possibility of applying the algorithm to the fusion reactor kinetics in the form of a nonlinear partial differential equation. (auth.)

  1. Direct numerical simulation of a compressible boundary-layer flow past an isolated three-dimensional hump in a high-speed subsonic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, D.; Moxey, D.; Sherwin, S. J.; Kravtsova, M. A.; Ruban, A. I.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we study the boundary-layer separation produced in a high-speed subsonic boundary layer by a small wall roughness. Specifically, we present a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a two-dimensional boundary-layer flow over a flat plate encountering a three-dimensional Gaussian-shaped hump. This work was motivated by the lack of DNS data of boundary-layer flows past roughness elements in a similar regime which is typical of civil aviation. The Mach and Reynolds numbers are chosen to be relevant for aeronautical applications when considering small imperfections at the leading edge of wings. We analyze different heights of the hump: The smaller heights result in a weakly nonlinear regime, while the larger result in a fully nonlinear regime with an increasing laminar separation bubble arising downstream of the roughness element and the formation of a pair of streamwise counterrotating vortices which appear to support themselves.

  2. Analysis of Auto ignition of Hydrogen-Air Mixture using Direct Numerical Simulation; Analisis de la Autoignicion de Mezclas Hidrogeno-Aire mediante Simulacion Numerica directa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Vera, I.; Paola, G. de; Jimenez Sanchez, C.

    2008-07-01

    This document reproduces the final project of Ignacio Hernandez Vera, presented on September 25, 2008, for the obtention of the engineer degree of the Carlos III University of Madrid. A study on the auto ignition process of different hydrogen-air mixtures for different simple geometries is carried out by means of direct numerical simulation. Auto ignition time is compared for different configurations and it is discussed the influence that different parameters have on it, such as temperature or transport phenomena. Afterwards a new reduced chemical mechanism for the simulation of this phenomenon is tested and assessed. Finally the mixing and ignition process is tackled using different mixture fractions and its implications on the construction of combustion models briefly discussed. (Author) 15 refs.

  3. Effect of Pore Size and Pore Connectivity on Unidirectional Capillary Penetration Kinetics in 3-D Porous Media using Direct Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, An; Palakurthi, Nikhil; Konangi, Santosh; Comer, Ken; Jog, Milind

    2017-11-01

    The physics of capillary flow is used widely in multiple fields. Lucas-Washburn equation is developed by using a single pore-sized capillary tube with continuous pore connection. Although this equation has been extended to describe the penetration kinetics into porous medium, multiple studies have indicated L-W does not accurately predict flow patterns in real porous media. In this study, the penetration kinetics including the effect of pore size and pore connectivity will be closely examined since they are expected to be the key factors effecting the penetration process. The Liquid wicking process is studied from a converging and diverging capillary tube to the complex virtual 3-D porous structures with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) using the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) method within the OpenFOAM CFD Solver. Additionally Porous Medium properties such as Permeability (k) , Tortuosity (τ) will be also analyzed.

  4. Three-Dimensional Numerical Evaluation of Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridouane, El Hassan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bianchi, Marcus V.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This study describes a detailed 3D computational fluid dynamics model that evaluates the thermal performance of uninsulated wall assemblies. It accounts for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation and allows for material property variations with temperature. This research was presented at the ASME 2011 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exhibition; Denver, Colorado; November 11-17, 2011

  5. Evaluating vibration performance of a subsea pump module by full-scale testing and numerical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, P.J.G. van; Pereboom, H.P.; Slot, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Prior to subsea installation, a subsea system has to be tested to verify whether it performs in accordance with specifications and component specific performance evaluation criteria. It is important to verify that the assembled components work in accordance with the assumptions and design criteria

  6. Models for Numerical Evaluation of Variable Speed Different Wind Generator Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Chen, Zhe; Polinder, H.

    2007-01-01

    of different wind generator systems, the other presents the optimization results and evaluation of variable speed wind generator systems. In this report, firstly, it gives an overview of various wind generator topologies, including their advantages and disadvantages, market status and developing trends. Next...

  7. Evaluating the Instructional Architecture of Web-Based Learning Tools (WBLTs): Direct Instruction vs. Constructivism Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Web-based learning tools (WBLTs), also known as learning objects, have been evaluated with a wide range of metrics, but rarely with respect to pedagogical design. The current study evaluated the impact of instructional architecture (direct instruction vs. constructive-based) on middle (n = 333)

  8. Direct evaluation of free energy for large system through structure integration approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kazuhito; Tanaka, Ryohei; Yuge, Koretaka

    2015-09-30

    We propose a new approach, 'structure integration', enabling direct evaluation of configurational free energy for large systems. The present approach is based on the statistical information of lattice. Through first-principles-based simulation, we find that the present method evaluates configurational free energy accurately in disorder states above critical temperature.

  9. Design and evaluation of the computer-based training program Calcularis for enhancing numerical cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja eKäser

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the design and a first pilot evaluation of the computer-based training program Calcularis for children with developmental dyscalculia (DD or difficulties in learning mathematics. The program has been designed according to insights on the typical and atypical development of mathematical abilities. The learning process is supported through multimodal cues, which encode different properties of numbers. To offer optimal learning conditions, a user model completes the program and allows flexible adaptation to a child’s individual learning and knowledge profile. 32 children with difficulties in learning mathematics completed the 6 to 12-weeks computer training. The children played the game for 20 minutes per day for 5 days a week. The training effects were evaluated using neuropsychological tests. Generally, children benefited significantly from the training regarding number representation and arithmetic operations. Furthermore, children liked to play with the program and reported that the training improved their mathematical abilities.

  10. Numerical simulation of turbulence flow in a Kaplan turbine -Evaluation on turbine performance prediction accuracy-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, P.; Kurosawa, S.

    2014-03-01

    The understanding and accurate prediction of the flow behaviour related to cavitation and pressure fluctuation in a Kaplan turbine are important to the design work enhancing the turbine performance including the elongation of the operation life span and the improvement of turbine efficiency. In this paper, high accuracy turbine and cavitation performance prediction method based on entire flow passage for a Kaplan turbine is presented and evaluated. Two-phase flow field is predicted by solving Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations expressed by volume of fluid method tracking the free surface and combined with Reynolds Stress model. The growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles are modelled by the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The prediction accuracy is evaluated by comparing with the model test results of Ns 400 Kaplan model turbine. As a result that the experimentally measured data including turbine efficiency, cavitation performance, and pressure fluctuation are accurately predicted. Furthermore, the cavitation occurrence on the runner blade surface and the influence to the hydraulic loss of the flow passage are discussed. Evaluated prediction method for the turbine flow and performance is introduced to facilitate the future design and research works on Kaplan type turbine.

  11. Numerical simulation of turbulence flow in a Kaplan turbine -Evaluation on turbine performance prediction accuracy-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P; Kurosawa, S

    2014-01-01

    The understanding and accurate prediction of the flow behaviour related to cavitation and pressure fluctuation in a Kaplan turbine are important to the design work enhancing the turbine performance including the elongation of the operation life span and the improvement of turbine efficiency. In this paper, high accuracy turbine and cavitation performance prediction method based on entire flow passage for a Kaplan turbine is presented and evaluated. Two-phase flow field is predicted by solving Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations expressed by volume of fluid method tracking the free surface and combined with Reynolds Stress model. The growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles are modelled by the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The prediction accuracy is evaluated by comparing with the model test results of Ns 400 Kaplan model turbine. As a result that the experimentally measured data including turbine efficiency, cavitation performance, and pressure fluctuation are accurately predicted. Furthermore, the cavitation occurrence on the runner blade surface and the influence to the hydraulic loss of the flow passage are discussed. Evaluated prediction method for the turbine flow and performance is introduced to facilitate the future design and research works on Kaplan type turbine

  12. Numerical evaluation of multipass welding temperature field in API 5L X80 steel welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nóbrega

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many are the metallurgical changes suffered by materials when subjected to welding thermal cycle, promoting a considerable influence on the welded structures thermo mechanical properties. In project phase, one alternative for evaluating the welding cycle variable, would be the employment of computational methods through simulation. So, this paper presents an evaluation of the temperature field in a multipass welding of API 5L X80 steel used for oil and gas transportation, using the ABAQUS ® software, based on Finite Elements Method (FEM. During the simulation complex phenomena are considerable including: Variation in physical and mechanical properties of materials as a function of temperature, welding speed and the different mechanisms of heat exchange with the environment (convection and radiation were used. These considerations allow a more robust mathematical modeling for the welding process. An analytical heat source proposed by Goldak, to model the heat input in order to characterize the multipass welding through the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process on root and the SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding process for the filling passes were used. So, it was possible to evaluate the effect of each welding pass on the welded joint temperature field, through the temperature peaks and cooling rates values during the welding process.

  13. Evaluation of behaviors of earth and rockfill dams during construction and initial impounding using instrumentation data and numerical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rashidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the behavior of Gavoshan dam was evaluated during construction and the first impounding. A two-dimensional (2D numerical analysis was conducted based on a finite difference method on the largest cross-section of the dam using the results of instrument measurements and back analysis. These evaluations will be completed in the case that back analysis is carried out in order to control the degree of the accuracy and the level of confidence of the measured behavior since each of the measurements could be controlled by comparing it to the result obtained from the numerical model. Following that, by comparing the results of the numerical analysis with the measured values, it is indicated that there is a proper consistency between these two values. Moreover, it was observed that the dam performance was suitable regarding the induced pore water pressure, the pore water pressure ratio ru, settlement, induced stresses, arching degree, and hydraulic fracturing probability during the construction and initial impounding periods. The results demonstrated that the maximum settlement of the core was 238 cm at the end of construction. In the following 6 years after construction (initial impounding and exploitation period, the accumulative settlement of the dam was 270 cm. It is clear that 88% of the total settlement of the dam took place during dam construction. The reason is that the clay core was smashed in the wet side, i.e. the optimum moisture content. Whereas the average curving ratio was 0.64 during dam construction; at the end of the initial impounding, the maximum amount of curving ratio in the upstream was 0.81, and the minimum (critical amount in the downstream was 0.52. It was also concluded that this dam is safe in comparison with the behaviors of other similar dams in the world.

  14. Review on chemical processes around the facilities in deep underground and study on numerical approach to evaluate them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Masataka

    2003-01-01

    The facilities for radioactive waste repositories are constructed in deep underground. Various chemical reactions including microbial activities may affect the long-term performance of the barrier system. An advancement of the evaluation method for the long-term behavior of barrier materials is desired. One of the efficient approaches is numerical simulation based on modeling of chemical processes. In the first part of this report, chemical processes and microbial reactions that can affect the performance of facilities in deep underground are reviewed. For example, dissolution and precipitation of minerals composing bentonite and rock are caused by highly alkaline water from cementitious materials. Numerical approaches to the chemical processes are also studied. Most chemical processes are reactions between groundwater (or solutes in it) and minerals composing barrier materials. So they can be simulated by coupled reaction rate transport analyses. Some analysis codes are developed and applied to problems in radioactive waste disposal. Microbial reaction rate can be modeled using the growth equation of microorganisms. In order to evaluate the performance of the barrier system after altered by chemical processes, not only the change in composition but also properties of altered materials is required to be obtained as output of numerical simulation. If the relationships between reaction rate and material properties are obtained, time history and spatial distribution of material properties can also be obtained by the coupled reaction rate transport analysis. At present, modeling study on the relationships between them is not sufficient, and obtaining such relationships using both theoretical and experimental approaches are also an important research target. (author)

  15. Contribution to the study of the behaviour of solid particles in a confined turbulent flow using direct numerical simulation; Contribution a l'etude du comportement de particules solides en ecoulement turbulent confine par simulation numerique directe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaud, P.

    2001-11-01

    The theme of this numerical thesis is on the behavior of solid particles embedded in a non-homogeneous and non-isotropic turbulent gas flow as the one tacking place in a plane channel. The turbulence is generated through the direct numerical simulation of Navier-Stokes equations discretized by formally second order in time and space finite difference operators. This Eulerian vision of the incompressible gas flow is completed by a Lagrangian formulation allowing to follow solid particles. In this formulation, the considered forces are the non-linear drag and the Saffman lift both corrected for wall effects. Furthermore, depending on the test cases studied, particle bouncing forces on the wall, gravity or electrostatic forces are taken into account. A three-dimensional Hermitian interpolation highlight the special care spend on the determination of the fluid velocity at the solid particle location. The first code application is dedicated to solid particles dispersion inside an horizontal channel, or in a channel operated in a weightlessness state. The huge amount of data from the Lagrangian tracking is reduced to the integral times of the turbulence seen by the solid particles on their trajectories. Those times are crucial in Lagrangian methods associated with a low numerical cost compared with the ones used in the present study. Among those methods, the one based on Langevin type equations have the best potential to handle industrial type problems. Nevertheless, this method needs to rebuild the fluid velocity fluctuations seen by the solid particles on their trajectories. This technic is able to reproduce the crossing trajectory effect, the inertial effect and the continuity effect, only if the integral times of the turbulence seen are known. Till now, those times were known thanks to a semi-empirical correlation from direct numerical simulation in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (Wang and Stock 1993). However, although these conditions, this correlation was

  16. Three-Dimensional Numerical Evaluation of Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Wall Assemblies: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridouane, E. H.; Bianchi, M.

    2011-11-01

    This study describes a detailed three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the thermal performance of uninsulated wall assemblies accounting for conduction through framing, convection, and radiation. The model allows for material properties variations with temperature. Parameters that were varied in the study include ambient outdoor temperature and cavity surface emissivity. Understanding the thermal performance of uninsulated wall cavities is essential for accurate prediction of energy use in residential buildings. The results can serve as input for building energy simulation tools for modeling the temperature dependent energy performance of homes with uninsulated walls.

  17. Numerical generalized vibration density of states evaluation for inelastic neutron scattering in solid matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kazmianec, V; Aranghel, D

    2002-01-01

    A computational method for improved evaluation of the generalized vibration density of states (GVDS) is proposed. It is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FPT) technique and gives the possibility for more precise analyses of the neutron double differential scattering cross section. The method was applied to zirconium hydride investigation. The results were presented for ZrH sub 1 sub . sub 6 U sub 0 sub . sub 3 sub 2 sample at various temperatures on time-of-flight (TOF) Spectrometry at IBR-2 reactor of JINR-Dubna and were compared to GVDS values obtained by traditional single-phonon approximation method

  18. The numerical evaluation of the minimal outlet area of the safety valve in the pipelines of cryogenic installations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The flow of cold helium in pipes is a fundamental issue of any cryogenic installation. Pipelines for helium transportation can reach lengths of hundreds of meters. The proper selection of size for individual pipelines and safety valves is a crucial part in the consideration of costs for the entire installation and its safe operation. The size of the safety valve must be properly designed in order to avoid a dangerous pressure buildup during normal operation, as well as in the case of emergency. The most commonly occurring dangerous situation is an undesired heat flux in the helium as a result of a broken insulation. In this case, the heat flux can be very intense and the buildup of the pressure in the pipe can be very rapid. In the present work, numerical calculations were used to evaluate the buildup of pressure and temperature in the pipe, in the case of a sudden and intense heat flux. The main goal of the applied numerical procedure was to evaluate the proper sizes of the safety valves in order to avoid a...

  19. Evaluation of the numerical wave model (SWAN) for wave simulation in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpınar, Adem; van Vledder, Gerbrant Ph.; Kömürcü, Murat İhsan; Özger, Mehmet

    2012-12-01

    This study summaries the implementation of the SWAN model forced by the ECMWF ERA Interim dataset reanalyzed 10 m winds over the Black Sea which will be used to study the wind-wave climate and wave energy potential in the region, and its verification. The SWAN model results were compared with directional buoy measurements at three locations along the north and south coasts of the Black Sea, parametric model results based on the JONSWAP growth relations, and the results of previous studies. The SWAN model has been applied in a third generation and non-stationary mode with spherical coordinates. The linear and exponential growth from wind input, depth-induced wave breaking, bottom friction, whitecapping, four-wave (for deep water) and triad-wave (for shallow water) nonlinear interactions have been activated in the simulations. The results of this study indicate that agreement between simulated and observed wave parameters is satisfactory and it is slightly more accurate than the results of the previous studies. However, it still has lower estimates for the maximum values of both wave parameters. These lower estimates are probably due to too low wind speeds in the applied ECMWF wind fields, which is probably caused by orographic effects, and due to the relatively course resolution in time and space of the ECMWF (ERA-Interim) wind fields for the Black Sea.

  20. Evaluation method for core thermohydraulics during natural circulation in fast reactors numerical predictions of inter-wrapper flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, H.; Kimura, N.; Miyakoshi, H.; Nagasawa, K.

    2001-01-01

    Decay heat removal using natural circulation is one of the important functions for the safety of fast reactors. As a decay heat removal system, direct reactor auxiliary cooling system has been selected in current designs of fast reactors. In this design, dumped heat exchanger provides cold sodium and it covers the reactor core outlet. The cold sodium can penetrate into the gap region between the subassemblies. This gap flow is referred as inter-wrapper flow (IWF). A numerical estimation method for such natural circulation phenomena in a reactor core has been developed, which models each subassembly as a rectangular duct with gap region between the subassemblies and also the upper plenum in a reactor vessel. This numerical simulation method was verified based on experimental data of a sodium test using 7- subassembly core model and also a water test which simulates IWF using the 1/12 sector model of a reactor core. We applied the estimation method to the natural circulation in a 600 MW class fast reactor. The temperature in the core strongly depended on IWF, flow redistribution in the core, and inter-subassembly heat transfer. It is desired for prediction methods on the natural circulation to simulate these phenomena. (author)

  1. Coupling Numerical Methods and Analytical Models for Ducted Turbines to Evaluate Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford Knight

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrokinetic turbines extract energy from currents in oceans, rivers, and streams. Ducts can be used to accelerate the flow across the turbine to improve performance. The objective of this work is to couple an analytical model with a Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS computational fluid dynamics (CFD solver to evaluate designs. An analytical model is derived for ducted turbines. A steady-state moving reference frame solver is used to analyze both the freestream and ducted turbine. A sliding mesh solver is examined for the freestream turbine. An efficient duct is introduced to accelerate the flow at the turbine. Since the turbine is optimized for operation in the freestream and not within the duct, there is a decrease in efficiency due to duct-turbine interaction. Despite the decrease in efficiency, the power extracted by the turbine is increased. The analytical model under-predicts the flow rejection from the duct that is predicted by CFD since the CFD predicts separation but the analytical model does not. Once the mass flow rate is corrected, the model can be used as a design tool to evaluate how the turbine-duct pair reduces mass flow efficiency. To better understand this phenomenon, the turbine is also analyzed within a tube with the analytical model and CFD. The analytical model shows that the duct’s mass flow efficiency reduces as a function of loading, showing that the system will be more efficient when lightly loaded. Using the conclusions of the analytical model, a more efficient ducted turbine system is designed. The turbine is pitched more heavily and the twist profile is adapted to the radial throat velocity profile.

  2. Novel investigation of the different Omni-direction-guide-vane angles effects on the urban vertical axis wind turbine output power via three-dimensional numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahizare, B.; Nik-Ghazali, N.; Chong, W.T.; Tabatabaeikia, S.; Izadyar, Nima; Esmaeilzadeh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of the Omni-direction-guide-vane impacts on the VAWT performance. • Obtain the best position of the guide vane angles in order to achieve the maximum performance. • Validation of the 3D computational fluid dynamics with experimental data. • Acquire the optimal Omni-direction-guide-vane based on numerical simulation results. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to present the effects of different Omni-direction-guide-vane (ODGV) angles on the performance of the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). For this purpose, five different straight-bladed VAWTs have been simulated via three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Hence, the VAWT without ODGV covering, were simulated and validated via CFD and experimental fluid dynamics (EFD) data, respectively in the first step. Indeed, grid and time step independency test as well as the effect of domain size, have been conducted and a suitable agreement was found based on comparison of the CFD and EFD results. In the next step, the VAWT was shrouded by ODGV cover and the whole system was simulated for 52 angles of the ODGV in four different tip speed ratios (TSR), to investigate the impact of guide vanes angles on the VAWT performance. Results of this study indicated that output power of the VAWT with α = 20° and β = 55° ODGV guide vanes, was improved 40.9%, 36.5%, 35.3% and 33.2%, respectively in four different TSR including 0.745, 1.091, 1.901 and 2.53.

  3. Evaluation of Thin Plate Hydrodynamic Stability through a Combined Numerical Modeling and Experimental Effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tentner, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bojanowski, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Solbrekken, G [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Jesse, C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Kennedy, J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Rivers, J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Schnieders, G. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2017-05-01

    An experimental and computational effort was undertaken in order to evaluate the capability of the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation tools to describe the deflection of a Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) fuel element plate redesigned for conversion to lowenriched uranium (LEU) fuel due to hydrodynamic forces. Experiments involving both flat plates and curved plates were conducted in a water flow test loop located at the University of Missouri (MU), at conditions and geometries that can be related to the MURR LEU fuel element. A wider channel gap on one side of the test plate, and a narrower on the other represent the differences that could be encountered in a MURR element due to allowed fabrication variability. The difference in the channel gaps leads to a pressure differential across the plate, leading to plate deflection. The induced plate deflection the pressure difference induces in the plate was measured at specified locations using a laser measurement technique. High fidelity 3-D simulations of the experiments were performed at MU using the computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+ coupled with the structural mechanics code ABAQUS. Independent simulations of the experiments were performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) using the STAR-CCM+ code and its built-in structural mechanics solver. The simulation results obtained at MU and ANL were compared with the corresponding measured plate deflections.

  4. Numerical evaluation of human exposure to WiMax patch antenna in tablet or laptop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siervo, Beatrice; Morelli, Maria Sole; Landini, Luigi; Hartwig, Valentina

    2018-04-30

    The use of wireless communication devices, such as tablets or laptops, is increasing among children. Only a few studies assess specific energy absorption rate (SAR) due to exposure from wireless-enabled tablets and laptops, in particular with Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMax) technology. This paper reports the estimation of the interaction between an E-shaped patch antenna (3.5 GHz) and human models, by means of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Specifically, four different human models (young adult male, young adult female, pre-teenager female, male child) in different exposure conditions (antenna at different distances from the human model, in different positions, and orientations) were considered and whole-body, 10 and 1 g local SAR and magnetic field value (Bmax) were evaluated. From our results, in some worst-case scenarios involving male and female children's exposure, the maximum radiofrequency energy absorption (hot spots) is located in more sensitive organs such as eye, genitals, and breast. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Numerical simulation and analysis of electromagnetic-wave absorption of a plasma slab created by a direct-current discharge with gridded anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengxun; Tian, Ruihuan; Eliseev, S. I.; Bekasov, V. S.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present investigation of a direct-current discharge with a gridded anode from the point of view of using it as a means of creating plasma coating that could efficiently absorb incident electromagnetic (EM) waves. A single discharge cell consists of two parallel plates, one of which (anode) is gridded. Electrons emitted from the cathode surface are accelerated in the short interelectrode gap and are injected into the post-anode space, where they lose acquired energy on ionization and create plasma. Numerical simulations were used to investigate the discharge structure and obtain spatial distributions of plasma density in the post-anode space. The numerical model of the discharge was based on a simple hybrid approach which takes into account non-local ionization by fast electrons streaming from the cathode sheath. Specially formulated transparency boundary conditions allowed performing simulations in 1D. Simulations were carried out in air at pressures of 10 Torr and higher. Analysis of the discharge structure and discharge formation is presented. It is shown that using cathode materials with lower secondary emission coefficients can allow increasing the thickness of plasma slabs for the same discharge current, which can potentially enhance EM wave absorption. Spatial distributions of electron density obtained during simulations were used to calculate attenuation of an incident EM wave propagating perpendicularly to the plasma slab boundary. It is shown that plasma created by means of a DC discharge with a gridded anode can efficiently absorb EM waves in the low frequency range (6-40 GHz). Increasing gas pressure results in a broader range of wave frequencies (up