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Sample records for direct detection signals

  1. Detection of directional eye movements based on the electrooculogram signals through an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkaymaz, Hande; Ozer, Mahmut; Orak, İlhami Muharrem

    2015-01-01

    The electrooculogram signals are very important at extracting information about detection of directional eye movements. Therefore, in this study, we propose a new intelligent detection model involving an artificial neural network for the eye movements based on the electrooculogram signals. In addition to conventional eye movements, our model also involves the detection of tic and blinking of an eye. We extract only two features from the electrooculogram signals, and use them as inputs for a feed-forwarded artificial neural network. We develop a new approach to compute these two features, which we call it as a movement range. The results suggest that the proposed model have a potential to become a new tool to determine the directional eye movements accurately

  2. Peaked signals from dark matter velocity structures in direct detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Rafael F.; Weiner, Neal

    2010-06-01

    In direct dark matter detection experiments, conventional elastic scattering of WIMPs results in exponentially falling recoil spectra. In contrast, theories of WIMPs with excited states can lead to nuclear recoil spectra that peak at finite recoil energies ER. The peaks of such signals are typically fairly broad, with ΔER/Epeak ~ 1. We show that in the presence of dark matter structures with low velocity dispersion, such as streams or clumps, peaks from up-scattering can become extremely narrow with FWHM of a few keV only. This differs dramatically from the conventionally expected WIMP spectrum and would, once detected, open the possibility to measure the dark matter velocity structure with high accuracy. As an intriguing example, we confront the observed cluster of 3 events near 42 keV from the CRESST commissioning run with this scenario. Inelastic dark matter particles with a wide range of parameters are capable of producing such a narrow peak. We calculate the possible signals at other experiments, and find that such particles could also give rise to the signal at DAMA, although not from the same stream. Over some range of parameters, a signal would be visible at xenon experiments. We show that such dark matter peaks are a very clear signal and can be easily disentangled from potential backgrounds, both terrestrial or due to WIMP down-scattering, by an enhanced annual modulation in both the amplitude of the signal and its spectral shape.

  3. Peaked signals from dark matter velocity structures in direct detection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Rafael F.; Weiner, Neal

    2010-01-01

    In direct dark matter detection experiments, conventional elastic scattering of WIMPs results in exponentially falling recoil spectra. In contrast, theories of WIMPs with excited states can lead to nuclear recoil spectra that peak at finite recoil energies E R . The peaks of such signals are typically fairly broad, with ΔE R /E peak ∼ 1. We show that in the presence of dark matter structures with low velocity dispersion, such as streams or clumps, peaks from up-scattering can become extremely narrow with FWHM of a few keV only. This differs dramatically from the conventionally expected WIMP spectrum and would, once detected, open the possibility to measure the dark matter velocity structure with high accuracy. As an intriguing example, we confront the observed cluster of 3 events near 42 keV from the CRESST commissioning run with this scenario. Inelastic dark matter particles with a wide range of parameters are capable of producing such a narrow peak. We calculate the possible signals at other experiments, and find that such particles could also give rise to the signal at DAMA, although not from the same stream. Over some range of parameters, a signal would be visible at xenon experiments. We show that such dark matter peaks are a very clear signal and can be easily disentangled from potential backgrounds, both terrestrial or due to WIMP down-scattering, by an enhanced annual modulation in both the amplitude of the signal and its spectral shape

  4. Receiver Signal to Noise Ratios for IPDA Lidars Using Sine-wave and Pulsed Laser Modulation and Direct Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar can be used to remotely measure the column density of gases in the path to a scattering target [1]. The total column gas molecular density can be derived from the ratio of the laser echo signal power with the laser wavelength on the gas absorption line (on-line) to that off the line (off-line). 80th coherent detection and direct detection IPDA lidar have been used successfully in the past in horizontal path and airborne remote sensing measurements. However, for space based measurements, the signal propagation losses are often orders of magnitude higher and it is important to use the most efficient laser modulation and detection technique to minimize the average laser power and the electrical power from the spacecraft. This paper gives an analysis the receiver signal to noise ratio (SNR) of several laser modulation and detection techniques versus the average received laser power under similar operation environments. Coherent detection [2] can give the best receiver performance when the local oscillator laser is relatively strong and the heterodyne mixing losses are negligible. Coherent detection has a high signal gain and a very narrow bandwidth for the background light and detector dark noise. However, coherent detection must maintain a high degree of coherence between the local oscillator laser and the received signal in both temporal and spatial modes. This often results in a high system complexity and low overall measurement efficiency. For measurements through atmosphere the coherence diameter of the received signal also limits the useful size of the receiver telescope. Direct detection IPDA lidars are simpler to build and have fewer constraints on the transmitter and receiver components. They can use much larger size 'photon-bucket' type telescopes to reduce the demands on the laser transmitter. Here we consider the two most widely used direct detection IPDA lidar techniques. The first technique uses two CW

  5. Machine Learning Techniques for Optical Performance Monitoring from Directly Detected PDM-QAM Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Jakob; Wass, Jesper; Piels, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Linear signal processing algorithms are effective in dealing with linear transmission channel and linear signal detection, while the nonlinear signal processing algorithms, from the machine learning community, are effective in dealing with nonlinear transmission channel and nonlinear signal...... detection. In this paper, a brief overview of the various machine learning methods and their application in optical communication is presented and discussed. Moreover, supervised machine learning methods, such as neural networks and support vector machine, are experimentally demonstrated for in-band optical...

  6. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective...... on the amplitude of the signal. The other algorithm was based on information of the signal in the frequency domain, and it focused on synchronisation of the electrical activity in a single muscle during the seizure. Results: The amplitude-based algorithm reliably detected seizures in 2 of the patients, while...... the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  7. A novel SNP analysis method to detect copy number alterations with an unbiased reference signal directly from tumor samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaFramboise William A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability in cancer leads to abnormal genome copy number alterations (CNA as a mechanism underlying tumorigenesis. Using microarrays and other technologies, tumor CNA are detected by comparing tumor sample CN to normal reference sample CN. While advances in microarray technology have improved detection of copy number alterations, the increase in the number of measured signals, noise from array probes, variations in signal-to-noise ratio across batches and disparity across laboratories leads to significant limitations for the accurate identification of CNA regions when comparing tumor and normal samples. Methods To address these limitations, we designed a novel "Virtual Normal" algorithm (VN, which allowed for construction of an unbiased reference signal directly from test samples within an experiment using any publicly available normal reference set as a baseline thus eliminating the need for an in-lab normal reference set. Results The algorithm was tested using an optimal, paired tumor/normal data set as well as previously uncharacterized pediatric malignant gliomas for which a normal reference set was not available. Using Affymetrix 250K Sty microarrays, we demonstrated improved signal-to-noise ratio and detected significant copy number alterations using the VN algorithm that were validated by independent PCR analysis of the target CNA regions. Conclusions We developed and validated an algorithm to provide a virtual normal reference signal directly from tumor samples and minimize noise in the derivation of the raw CN signal. The algorithm reduces the variability of assays performed across different reagent and array batches, methods of sample preservation, multiple personnel, and among different laboratories. This approach may be valuable when matched normal samples are unavailable or the paired normal specimens have been subjected to variations in methods of preservation.

  8. Optimized velocity distributions for direct dark matter detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Rappelt, Andreas, E-mail: ibarra@tum.de, E-mail: andreas.rappelt@tum.de [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-08-01

    We present a method to calculate, without making assumptions about the local dark matter velocity distribution, the maximal and minimal number of signal events in a direct detection experiment given a set of constraints from other direct detection experiments and/or neutrino telescopes. The method also allows to determine the velocity distribution that optimizes the signal rates. We illustrate our method with three concrete applications: i) to derive a halo-independent upper limit on the cross section from a set of null results, ii) to confront in a halo-independent way a detection claim to a set of null results and iii) to assess, in a halo-independent manner, the prospects for detection in a future experiment given a set of current null results.

  9. Generation and coherent detection of QPSK signal using a novel method of digital signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Hu, Bingliang; He, Zhen-An; Xie, Wenjia; Gao, Xiaohui

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate an optical quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signal transmitter and an optical receiver for demodulating optical QPSK signal with homodyne detection and digital signal processing (DSP). DSP on the homodyne detection scheme is employed without locking the phase of the local oscillator (LO). In this paper, we present an extracting one-dimensional array of down-sampling method for reducing unwanted samples of constellation diagram measurement. Such a novel scheme embodies the following major advantages over the other conventional optical QPSK signal detection methods. First, this homodyne detection scheme does not need strict requirement on LO in comparison with linear optical sampling, such as having a flat spectral density and phase over the spectral support of the source under test. Second, the LabVIEW software is directly used for recovering the QPSK signal constellation without employing complex DSP circuit. Third, this scheme is applicable to multilevel modulation formats such as M-ary PSK and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) or higher speed signals by making minor changes.

  10. Loop-induced dark matter direct detection signals from gamma-ray lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Haisch, Ulrich; Kahlhoefer, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Improved limits as well as tentative claims for dark matter annihilation into gamma-ray lines have been presented recently. We study the direct detection cross section induced from dark matter annihilation into two photons in a model-independent fashion, assuming no additional couplings between...... dark matter and nuclei. We find a striking non-standard recoil spectrum due to different destructively interfering contributions to the dark matter nucleus scattering cross section. While in the case of s-wave annihilation the current sensitivity of direct detection experiments is insufficient...... to compete with indirect detection searches, for p-wave annihilation the constraints from direct searches are comparable. This will allow to test dark matter scenarios with p-wave annihilation that predict a large di-photon annihilation cross section in the next generation of experiments....

  11. Direct detection of the optical field beyond single polarization mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Di; Sun, Chuanbowen; Shieh, William

    2018-02-05

    Direct detection is traditionally regarded as a detection method that recovers only the optical intensity. Compared with coherent detection, it owns a natural advantage-the simplicity-but lacks a crucial capability of field recovery that enables not only the multi-dimensional modulation, but also the digital compensation of the fiber impairments linear with the optical field. Full-field detection is crucial to increase the capacity-distance product of optical transmission systems. A variety of methods have been investigated to directly detect the optical field of the single polarization mode, which normally sends a carrier traveling with the signal for self-coherent detection. The crux, however, is that any optical transmission medium supports at least two propagating modes (e.g. single mode fiber supports two polarization modes), and until now there is no direct detection that can recover the complete set of optical fields beyond one polarization, due to the well-known carrier fading issue after mode demultiplexing induced by the random mode coupling. To avoid the fading, direct detection receivers should recover the signal in an intensity space isomorphic to the optical field without loss of any degrees of freedom, and a bridge should be built between the field and its isomorphic space for the multi-mode field recovery. Based on this thinking, we propose, for the first time, the direct detection of dual polarization modes by a novel receiver concept, the Stokes-space field receiver (SSFR) and its extension, the generalized SSFR for multiple spatial modes. The idea is verified by a dual-polarization field recovery of a polarization-multiplexed complex signal over an 80-km single mode fiber transmission. SSFR can be applied to a much wider range of fields beyond optical communications such as coherent sensing and imaging, where simple field recovery without an extra local laser is desired for enhanced system performance.

  12. Signal processing for passive detection and classification of underwater acoustic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kil Woo

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation examines signal processing for passive detection, classification and tracking of underwater acoustic signals for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. First, we consider the problem of passive acoustic detection of a diver in a shallow water environment. A frequency-domain multi-band matched-filter approach to swimmer detection is presented. The idea is to break the frequency contents of the hydrophone signals into multiple narrow frequency bands, followed by time averaged (about half of a second) energy calculation over each band. Then, spectra composed of such energy samples over the chosen frequency bands are correlated to form a decision variable. The frequency bands with highest Signal/Noise ratio are used for detection. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated for experimental data collected for a diver in the Hudson River. We also propose a new referenceless frequency-domain multi-band detector which, unlike other reference-based detectors, does not require a diver specific signature. Instead, our detector matches to a general feature of the diver spectrum in the high frequency range: the spectrum is roughly periodic in time and approximately flat when the diver exhales. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using experimental data collected from the Hudson River. Moreover, we present detection, classification and tracking of small vessel signals. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification and tracking. This dissertation presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise) acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship

  13. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Anthony D; Declaris, Nicholas

    1971-01-01

    Detection of Signals in Noise serves as an introduction to the principles and applications of the statistical theory of signal detection. The book discusses probability and random processes; narrowband signals, their complex representation, and their properties described with the aid of the Hilbert transform; and Gaussian-derived processes. The text also describes the application of hypothesis testing for the detection of signals and the fundamentals required for statistical detection of signals in noise. Problem exercises, references, and a supplementary bibliography are included after each c

  14. Halo-independent direct detection of momentum-dependent dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherry, J. F.; Frandsen, M. T.; Shoemaker, I. M.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the momentum dependence of dark matter interactions with nuclei can be probed in direct detection experiments without knowledge of the dark matter velocity distribution. This is one of the few properties of DM microphysics that can be determined with direct detection alone, given...... a signal of dark matter in multiple direct detection experiments with different targets. Long-range interactions arising from the exchange of a light mediator are one example of momentum-dependent DM. For data produced from the exchange of a massless mediator we find for example that the mediator mass can...

  15. Dark matter spin determination with directional direct detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catena, Riccardo; Conrad, Jan; Döring, Christian; Ferella, Alfredo Davide; Krauss, Martin B.

    2018-01-01

    If dark matter has spin 0, only two WIMP-nucleon interaction operators can arise as leading operators from the nonrelativistic reduction of renormalizable single-mediator models for dark matter-quark interactions. Based on this crucial observation, we show that about 100 signal events at next generation directional detection experiments can be enough to enable a 2 σ rejection of the spin 0 dark matter hypothesis in favor of alternative hypotheses where the dark matter particle has spin 1 /2 or 1. In this context, directional sensitivity is crucial since anisotropy patterns in the sphere of nuclear recoil directions depend on the spin of the dark matter particle. For comparison, about 100 signal events are expected in a CF4 detector operating at a pressure of 30 torr with an exposure of approximately 26,000 cubic-meter-detector days for WIMPs of 100 GeV mass and a WIMP-fluorine scattering cross section of 0.25 pb. Comparable exposures require an array of cubic meter time projection chamber detectors.

  16. Vibrotactile Detection, Identification and Directional Perception of signal-Processed Sounds from Environmental Events: A Pilot Field Evaluation in Five Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Ranjbar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Conducting field tests of a vibrotactile aid for deaf/deafblind persons for detection, identification and directional perception of environmental sounds. Methods: Five deaf (3F/2M, 22–36 years individuals tested the aid separately in a home environment (kitchen and in a traffic environment. Their eyes were blindfolded and they wore a headband and holding a vibrator for sound identification. In the headband, three microphones were mounted and two vibrators for signalling direction of the sound source. The sounds originated from events typical for the home environment and traffic. The subjects were inexperienced (events unknown and experienced (events known. They identified the events in a home and traffic environment, but perceived sound source direction only in traffic. Results: The detection scores were higher than 98% both in the home and in the traffic environment. In the home environment, identification scores varied between 25%-58% when the subjects were inexperienced and between 33%-83% when they were experienced. In traffic, identification scores varied between 20%-40% when the subjects were inexperienced and between 22%-56% when they were experienced. The directional perception scores varied between 30%-60% when inexperienced and between 61%-83% when experienced. Discussion: The vibratory aid consistently improved all participants’ detection, identification and directional perception ability.

  17. Rejuvenating direct modulation and direct detection for modern optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Di; Li, An; Chen, Xi; Hu, Qian; Shieh, William

    2018-02-01

    High-speed transoceanic optical fiber transmission using direct modulation (DM) and direct detection (DD) was one of the most stirring breakthroughs for telecommunication in 1990s, which drove the internet as a global phenomenon. However, the later evolution of optical coherent communications in 2000s gradually took over the long-haul applications, due to its superior optical spectral efficiency. Nowadays, DM-DD systems are dominant mainly in cost- and power-sensitive short-reach applications, because of its natural characteristics-the simplicity. This paper reviews the recent advances of DM-DD transceivers from both hardware and signal processing perspectives. It introduces a variety of modified DM and/or DD systems for 3 application scenarios: very-short-reach interconnect with little fiber channel impact; single or a few spans of fiber transmission up to several hundred km; and distance beyond the 2nd scenario. Besides the DM-DD and multi-dimension DM-DD with polarization diversity, this paper focuses on how to rejuvenate traditional DM and DD technologies in order to bridge the transmission application gap between DM-DD and coherent transceivers, using technologies such as dispersion compensation, signal field recovery from the intensity-only DD receiver, and complex direct modulation with coherent detection. More than 30 years since the birth, DM and DD still hold indispensable roles in modern optical communications.

  18. Astrophysical limitations to the identification of dark matter: Indirect neutrino signals vis-a-vis direct detection recoil rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    A convincing identification of dark matter (DM) particles can probably be achieved only through a combined analysis of different detections strategies, which provides an effective way of removing degeneracies in the parameter space of DM models. In practice, however, this program is made complicated by the fact that different strategies depend on different physical quantities, or on the same quantities but in a different way, making the treatment of systematic errors rather tricky. We discuss here the uncertainties on the recoil rate in direct-detection experiments and on the muon rate induced by neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, and we show that, contrarily to the local DM density or overall cross section scale, irreducible astrophysical uncertainties affect the two rates in a different fashion, therefore limiting our ability to reconstruct the parameters of the dark matter particles. By varying within their respective errors astrophysical parameters such as the escape velocity and the velocity dispersion of dark matter particles, we show that the uncertainty on the relative strength of the neutrino and direct-detection signal is as large as a factor of 2 for typical values of the parameters, but can be even larger in some circumstances.

  19. Dark matter direct detection with non-Maxwellian velocity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlen, Michael; Weiner, Neal; Diemand, Jürg; Moore, Ben; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Madau, Piero; Zemp, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    The velocity distribution function of dark matter particles is expected to show significant departures from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. This can have profound effects on the predicted dark matter - nucleon scattering rates in direct detection experiments, especially for dark matter models in which the scattering is sensitive to the high velocity tail of the distribution, such as inelastic dark matter (iDM) or light (few GeV) dark matter (LDM), and for experiments that require high energy recoil events, such as many directionally sensitive experiments. Here we determine the velocity distribution functions from two of the highest resolution numerical simulations of Galactic dark matter structure (Via Lactea II and GHALO), and study the effects for these scenarios. For directional detection, we find that the observed departures from Maxwell-Boltzmann increase the contrast of the signal and change the typical direction of incoming DM particles. For iDM, the expected signals at direct detection experiments are changed dramatically: the annual modulation can be enhanced by more than a factor two, and the relative rates of DAMA compared to CDMS can change by an order of magnitude, while those compared to CRESST can change by a factor of two. The spectrum of the signal can also change dramatically, with many features arising due to substructure. For LDM the spectral effects are smaller, but changes do arise that improve the compatibility with existing experiments. We find that the phase of the modulation can depend upon energy, which would help discriminate against background should it be found

  20. Statistical theory of signal detection

    CERN Document Server

    Helstrom, Carl Wilhelm; Costrell, L; Kandiah, K

    1968-01-01

    Statistical Theory of Signal Detection, Second Edition provides an elementary introduction to the theory of statistical testing of hypotheses that is related to the detection of signals in radar and communications technology. This book presents a comprehensive survey of digital communication systems. Organized into 11 chapters, this edition begins with an overview of the theory of signal detection and the typical detection problem. This text then examines the goals of the detection system, which are defined through an analogy with the testing of statistical hypotheses. Other chapters consider

  1. "Utilizing" signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Spencer K; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-09-01

    What do inferring what a person is thinking or feeling, judging a defendant's guilt, and navigating a dimly lit room have in common? They involve perceptual uncertainty (e.g., a scowling face might indicate anger or concentration, for which different responses are appropriate) and behavioral risk (e.g., a cost to making the wrong response). Signal detection theory describes these types of decisions. In this tutorial, we show how incorporating the economic concept of utility allows signal detection theory to serve as a model of optimal decision making, going beyond its common use as an analytic method. This utility approach to signal detection theory clarifies otherwise enigmatic influences of perceptual uncertainty on measures of decision-making performance (accuracy and optimality) and on behavior (an inverse relationship between bias magnitude and sensitivity optimizes utility). A "utilized" signal detection theory offers the possibility of expanding the phenomena that can be understood within a decision-making framework. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Assembly of gamma radiation detection with directivity properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, M.; Talpalariu, C.

    2016-01-01

    An assembly of gamma radiation detection with directivity properties and small size enables the development of portable equipment or robots specialized in finding and signaling radioactively contaminated areas in case of nuclear incidents or decommissioning of nuclear installations. Directivity characteristic of the assembly of gamma radiation detection is very important when aiming to build an equipment for searching radioactively contaminated areas. In order to obtain a suitable directivity characteristics in terms of detection of gamma rays, it was necessary to construct a lead collimator with a cylindrical shape. The detector, preamplifier and amplifier pulse were placed inside the collimator and pulse discriminator circuit and power source were placed beside the collimator, all being disposed within the housing cylindrical experimental. A PIN photodiode type was used as a detector of gamma radiation. (authors)

  3. Halo-independent direct detection of momentum-dependent dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, John F. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Frandsen, Mads T.; Shoemaker, Ian M., E-mail: jcherry@lanl.gov, E-mail: frandsen@cp3-origins.net, E-mail: shoemaker@cp3-origins.net [CP3-Origins and the Danish Institute for Advanced Study, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2014-10-01

    We show that the momentum dependence of dark matter interactions with nuclei can be probed in direct detection experiments without knowledge of the dark matter velocity distribution. This is one of the few properties of DM microphysics that can be determined with direct detection alone, given a signal of dark matter in multiple direct detection experiments with different targets. Long-range interactions arising from the exchange of a light mediator are one example of momentum-dependent DM. For data produced from the exchange of a massless mediator we find for example that the mediator mass can be constrained to be ∼< 10 MeV for DM in the 20-1000 GeV range in a halo-independent manner.

  4. Halo-independent direct detection of momentum-dependent dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, John F.; Frandsen, Mads T.; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the momentum dependence of dark matter interactions with nuclei can be probed in direct detection experiments without knowledge of the dark matter velocity distribution. This is one of the few properties of DM microphysics that can be determined with direct detection alone, given a signal of dark matter in multiple direct detection experiments with different targets. Long-range interactions arising from the exchange of a light mediator are one example of momentum-dependent DM. For data produced from the exchange of a massless mediator we find for example that the mediator mass can be constrained to be ∼< 10 MeV for DM in the 20-1000 GeV range in a halo-independent manner

  5. Signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tholomier, M.

    1985-01-01

    In a scanning electron microscope, whatever is the measured signal, the same set is found: incident beam, sample, signal detection, signal amplification. The resulting signal is used to control the spot luminosity with the observer cathodoscope. This is synchronized with the beam scanning on the sample; on the cathodoscope, the image in secondary electrons, backscattered electrons,... of the sample surface is reconstituted. The best compromise must be found between a register time low enough to remove eventual variations (under the incident beam) of the nature of the observed phenomenon, and a good spatial resolution of the image and a signal-to-noise ratio high enough. The noise is one of the basic limitations of the scanning electron microscope performance. The whose measurement line must be optimized to reduce it [fr

  6. Signal analysis for failure detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpaglione, M.C.; Perez, L.V.; Rubio, D.A.; Czibener, D.; D'Attellis, C.E.; Brudny, P.I.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Several methods for analysis of acoustic emission signals are presented. They are mainly oriented to detection of changes in noisy signals and characterization of higher amplitude discrete pulses or bursts. The aim was to relate changes and events with failure, crack or wear in materials, being the final goal to obtain automatic means of detecting such changes and/or events. Performance evaluation was made using both simulated and laboratory test signals. The methods being presented are the following: 1. Application of the Hopfield Neural Network (NN) model for classifying faults in pipes and detecting wear of a bearing. 2. Application of the Kohonnen and Back Propagation Neural Network model for the same problem. 3. Application of Kalman filtering to determine time occurrence of bursts. 4. Application of a bank of Kalman filters (KF) for failure detection in pipes. 5. Study of amplitude distribution of signals for detecting changes in their shape. 6. Application of the entropy distance to measure differences between signals. (author). 10 refs, 11 figs

  7. A performance comparison of direct- and indirect-detection flat-panel imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Partridge, M; Müller, L

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the performance of a direct- and an indirect-detection amorphous silicon flat-panel X-ray imager is presented for a 6 MV beam. Experimental measurements of the noise characteristics, image lag, spectral response, spatial resolution and quantum efficiency are described, compared and discussed. The two systems are comprised of 512x512 pixel, 400 mu m pitch, arrays of a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes and thin-film transistors. In the direct-detection system, X-rays interact to produce electron/hole pairs directly in the silicon photodiodes. For the indirect-detection system, a phosphor screen converts energy from the incident X-rays into visible light, which is then detected by the photodiodes. Both systems are shown to be quantum noise limited, with the total electronic noise in the detector 10-15 times smaller than the Poisson noise level in detected signal. The measured lag for both systems is 1.0+-0.1% or less in the first frame with subsequent signals decaying exponentially with frame read-out, with...

  8. Direct detection of the inflationary gravitational-wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Kamionkowski, Marc; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-01-01

    Inflation generically predicts a stochastic background of gravitational waves over a broad range of frequencies, from those accessible with cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, to those accessible directly with gravitational-wave detectors, like NASA's Big-Bang Observer (BBO) or Japan's Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observer (DECIGO), both currently under study. Here we investigate the detectability of the inflationary gravitational-wave background at BBO/DECIGO frequencies. To do so, we survey a range of slow-roll inflationary models consistent with constraints from the CMB and large-scale structure (LSS). We go beyond the usual assumption of power-law power spectra, which may break down given the 16 orders of magnitude in frequency between the CMB and direct detection, and solve instead the inflationary dynamics for four classes of inflaton potentials. Direct detection is possible in a variety of inflationary models, although probably not in any in which the gravitational-wave signal does not appear in the CMB polarization. However, direct detection by BBO/DECIGO can help discriminate between inflationary models that have the same slow-roll parameters at CMB/LSS scales

  9. Detection and processing of phase modulated optical signals at 40 Gbit/s and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Yan

    the amplitude regeneration capability based on FWM in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). The first reported experimental demonstration of amplitude equalization of 40 Gbit/s RZ-DPSK signals using a 500 m long HNLF is presented. Using four possible phase levels to carry the information, DQPSK allows generation......This thesis addresses demodulation in direct detection systems and signal processing of high speed phase modulated signals in future all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) communication systems where differential phase shift keying (DPSK) or differential quadrature phase shift keying...... (DQPSK) are used to transport information. All-optical network functionalities -such as optical labeling, wavelength conversion and signal regeneration- are experimentally investigated. Direct detection of phase modulated signals requires phase-to-intensity modulation conversion in a demodulator...

  10. Signals of composite electroweak-neutral Dark Matter: LHC/direct detection interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Rychkov, Slava; Torre, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    In a strong-coupling picture of ElectroWeak Symmetry Breaking, a composite electroweak-neutral state in the TeV mass range, carrying a global (quasi-)conserved charge, makes a plausible Dark Matter (DM) candidate, with the ongoing direct DM searches being precisely sensitive to the expected signals. To exploit the crucial interplay between direct DM searches and the LHC, we consider a composite iso-singlet vector V, mixed with the hypercharge gauge field, as the essential mediator of the interaction between the DM particle and the nucleus. Based on a suitable effective chiral Lagrangian, we give the expected properties and production rates of V, showing its possible discovery at the maximal LHC energy with about 100 fb -1 of integrated luminosity.

  11. Direct RNA detection without nucleic acid purification and PCR: Combining sandwich hybridization with signal amplification based on branched hybridization chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a convenient, robust and low-cost RNA detection system suitable for high-throughput applications. This system uses a highly specific sandwich hybridization to capture target RNA directly onto solid support, followed by on-site signal amplification via 2-dimensional, branched hybridizing chain polymerization through toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction. The assay uses SYBR Green to detect targets at concentrations as low as 1 pM, without involving nucleic acid purification or any enzymatic reaction, using ordinary oligonucleotides without modification or labeling. The system was demonstrated in the detection of malaria RNA in blood and GAPDH gene expression in cell lysate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J. M., E-mail: lewisj@ufl.edu; Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Murer, D. [Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd., 8045 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  13. Solar neutrinos as a signal and background in direct-detection experiments searching for sub-GeV dark matter with electron recoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Rouven; Sholapurkar, Mukul; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2018-05-01

    Direct-detection experiments sensitive to low-energy electron recoils from sub-GeV dark matter interactions will also be sensitive to solar neutrinos via coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNS), since the recoiling nucleus can produce a small ionization signal. Solar neutrinos constitute both an interesting signal in their own right and a potential background to a dark matter search that cannot be controlled or reduced by improved shielding, material purification and handling, or improved detector design. We explore these two possibilities in detail for semiconductor (silicon and germanium) and xenon targets, considering several possibilities for the unmeasured ionization efficiency at low energies. For dark-matter-electron-scattering searches, neutrinos start being an important background for exposures larger than ˜1 - 10 kg -years in silicon and germanium, and for exposures larger than ˜0.1 - 1 kg -year in xenon. For the absorption of bosonic dark matter (dark photons and axion-like particles) by electrons, neutrinos are most relevant for masses below ˜1 keV and again slightly more important in xenon. Treating the neutrinos as a signal, we find that the CNS of 8B neutrinos can be observed with ˜2 σ significance with exposures of ˜2 , 7, and 20 kg-years in xenon, germanium, and silicon, respectively, assuming there are no other backgrounds. We give an example for how this would constrain nonstandard neutrino interactions. Neutrino components at lower energy can only be detected if the ionization efficiency is sufficiently large. In this case, observing pep neutrinos via CNS requires exposures ≳10 - 100 kg -years in silicon or germanium (˜1000 kg -years in xenon), and observing CNO neutrinos would require an order of magnitude more exposure. Only silicon could potentially detect 7Be neutrinos. These measurements would allow for a direct measurement of the electron-neutrino survival probability over a wide energy range.

  14. Confidence Measurement in the Light of Signal Detection Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eMassoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We compare three alternative methods for eliciting retrospective confidence in the context of a simple perceptual task: the Simple Confidence Rating (a direct report on a numerical scale, the Quadratic Scoring Rule (a post-wagering procedure and the Matching Probability (a generalization of the no-loss gambling method. We systematically compare the results obtained with these three rules to the theoretical confidence levels that can be inferred from performance in the perceptual task using Signal Detection Theory. We find that the Matching Probability provides better results in that respect. We conclude that Matching Probability is particularly well suited for studies of confidence that use Signal Detection Theory as a theoretical framework.

  15. “UTILIZING” SIGNAL DETECTION THEORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Spencer K.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-01-01

    What do inferring what a person is thinking or feeling, deciding to report a symptom to your doctor, judging a defendant’s guilt, and navigating a dimly lit room have in common? They involve perceptual uncertainty (e.g., a scowling face might indicate anger or concentration, which engender different appropriate responses), and behavioral risk (e.g., a cost to making the wrong response). Signal detection theory describes these types of decisions. In this tutorial we show how, by incorporating the economic concept of utility, signal detection theory serves as a model of optimal decision making, beyond its common use as an analytic method. This utility approach to signal detection theory highlights potentially enigmatic influences of perceptual uncertainty on measures of decision-making performance (accuracy and optimality) and on behavior (a functional relationship between bias and sensitivity). A “utilized” signal detection theory offers the possibility of expanding the phenomena that can be understood within a decision-making framework. PMID:25097061

  16. Direct detection of second harmonic and its use in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.; Guzman, C.S.; Graeff, C.F.O.; Baffa, O.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, the possible use of the second harmonic EPR signal from irradiated alanine for low radiation dose (∼1 Gy) was explored, aiming applications to HDR brachytherapy and teletherapy. The second harmonic signal was directly detected after overmodulation. A batch of DL-alanine/paraffin small cylindrical pellets was made. A VARIAN E-4 X-Band EPR spectrometer with optimized operation parameters like microwave power and modulation amplitude to obtain a signal with the highest amplitude was used. The modulation frequency and modulation amplitude were 100 kHz and 1.25 mT (to overmodulate the signal) respectively. The second harmonic signal was directly detected at twice the modulation frequency. One group of dosimeters was irradiated with a 192 Ir brachytherapy source and the other in a 10 MeV X-rays linear accelerator, both group at a dose range: 0.5 - 15 Gy. The second harmonic signal showed better resolution than the first harmonic one making possible a more easy localization of the signal. Moreover, for both types of radiation, the dose-response curve showed a good linear behavior for the dose range indicated. (author)

  17. Dark matter direct detection signals inferred from a cosmological N-body simulation with baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, F.-S.; Nezri, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Teyssier, R.

    2010-01-01

    We extract at redshift z = 0 a Milky Way sized object including gas, stars and dark matter (DM) from a recent, high-resolution cosmological N-body simulation with baryons. Its resolution is sufficient to witness the formation of a rotating disk and bulge at the center of the halo potential, therefore providing a realistic description of the birth and the evolution of galactic structures in the ΛCDM cosmology paradigm. The phase-space structure of the central galaxy reveals that, throughout a thick region, the dark halo is co-rotating on average with the stellar disk. At the Earth's location, the rotating component, sometimes called dark disk in the literature, is characterized by a minimum lag velocity v lag ≅ 75 km/s, in which case it contributes to around 25% of the total DM local density, whose value is ρ DM ≅ 0.37GeV/cm 3 . The velocity distributions also show strong deviations from pure Gaussian and Maxwellian distributions, with a sharper drop of the high velocity tail. We give a detailed study of the impact of these features on the predictions for DM signals in direct detection experiments. In particular, the question of whether the modulation signal observed by DAMA is or is not excluded by limits set by other experiments (CDMS, XENON and CRESST...) is re-analyzed and compared to the case of a standard Maxwellian halo. We consider spin-independent interactions for both the elastic and the inelastic scattering scenarios. For the first time, we calculate the allowed regions for DAMA and the exclusion limits of other null experiments directly from the velocity distributions found in the simulation. We then compare these results with the predictions of various analytical distributions. We find that the compatibility between DAMA and the other experiments is improved. In the elastic scenario, the DAMA modulation signal is slightly enhanced in the so-called channeling region, as a result of several effects that include a departure from a Maxwellian

  18. Detectability of CO2 Flux Signals by a Space-Based Lidar Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Dorit M.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Schaefer, Kevin; Doney, Scott; Michalak, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) offer novel and distinctive opportunities for improving our quantitative understanding of the carbon cycle. Prospective observations include those from space-based lidar such as the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Here we explore the ability of such a mission to detect regional changes in CO2 fluxes. We investigate these using three prototypical case studies, namely the thawing of permafrost in the Northern High Latitudes, the shifting of fossil fuel emissions from Europe to China, and changes in the source-sink characteristics of the Southern Ocean. These three scenarios were used to design signal detection studies to investigate the ability to detect the unfolding of these scenarios compared to a baseline scenario. Results indicate that the ASCENDS mission could detect the types of signals investigated in this study, with the caveat that the study is based on some simplifying assumptions. The permafrost thawing flux perturbation is readily detectable at a high level of significance. The fossil fuel emission detectability is directly related to the strength of the signal and the level of measurement noise. For a nominal (lower) fossil fuel emission signal, only the idealized noise-free instrument test case produces a clearly detectable signal, while experiments with more realistic noise levels capture the signal only in the higher (exaggerated) signal case. For the Southern Ocean scenario, differences due to the natural variability in the ENSO climatic mode are primarily detectable as a zonal increase.

  19. Weak wide-band signal detection method based on small-scale periodic state of Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jian; Yan, Xiao-peng; Li, Ping; Hao, Xin-hong

    2018-03-01

    The conventional Duffing oscillator weak signal detection method, which is based on a strong reference signal, has inherent deficiencies. To address these issues, the characteristics of the Duffing oscillatorʼs phase trajectory in a small-scale periodic state are analyzed by introducing the theory of stopping oscillation system. Based on this approach, a novel Duffing oscillator weak wide-band signal detection method is proposed. In this novel method, the reference signal is discarded, and the to-be-detected signal is directly used as a driving force. By calculating the cosine function of a phase space angle, a single Duffing oscillator can be used for weak wide-band signal detection instead of an array of uncoupled Duffing oscillators. Simulation results indicate that, compared with the conventional Duffing oscillator detection method, this approach performs better in frequency detection intervals, and reduces the signal-to-noise ratio detection threshold, while improving the real-time performance of the system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61673066).

  20. Directionality and signal amplification in cryogenic dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, T.

    1996-05-01

    A mounting body of evidence suggests that most of the mass in our universe is not contained in stars, but rather exists in some non- luminous form. The evidence comes independently from astronomical observation, cosmological theory, and particle physics. All of this missing mass is collectively referred to as dark matter. In this thesis we discuss two ways to improve the performance of dark matter detectors based on the measurement of ballistic phonons. First, we address the issue of signal identification through solitons. Secondly, we discuss a method for lowering the detection threshold and improving the energy sensitivity: amplifying phonons through the evaporation of helium atoms from a superfluid film coating the target and the adsorption of the evaporated atoms onto a helium-free substrate. A phonon amplifier would also be of use in many other applications in which a few phonons are to be measured at low temperatures. Factors contributing to the low amplifier gains achieved thus far are described and proposals for avoiding them are analyzed and discussed. 101 refs., 30 figs., 2 tabs

  1. A performance comparison of direct- and indirect-detection flat-panel imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, M.; Hesse, B.-M.; Mueller, L.

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the performance of a direct- and an indirect-detection amorphous silicon flat-panel X-ray imager is presented for a 6 MV beam. Experimental measurements of the noise characteristics, image lag, spectral response, spatial resolution and quantum efficiency are described, compared and discussed. The two systems are comprised of 512x512 pixel, 400 μm pitch, arrays of a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes and thin-film transistors. In the direct-detection system, X-rays interact to produce electron/hole pairs directly in the silicon photodiodes. For the indirect-detection system, a phosphor screen converts energy from the incident X-rays into visible light, which is then detected by the photodiodes. Both systems are shown to be quantum noise limited, with the total electronic noise in the detector 10-15 times smaller than the Poisson noise level in detected signal. The measured lag for both systems is 1.0±0.1% or less in the first frame with subsequent signals decaying exponentially with frame read-out, with a half-life of between 3.3 and 3.8 frames. Both systems are demonstrated to have a pronounced sensitivity to low-energy multiply scattered photons, although this is shown to be effectively filtered out using a 2 mm copper build-up plate. The direct-detection system, with the 2 mm Cu build-up, shows greater sensitivity to scattered radiation than the indirect system. The spatial resolutions of both systems were effectively equal with an f 50 of 0.25 mm -1 when pixels are binned 2x2, although a slight contribution from optical scattering in the phosphor screen is seen for the indirect-detection system. The quantum efficiency of the direct-detection system is a factor of 0.45 lower than that of the indirect-detection system. The application of these detectors to megavoltage CT is discussed, with the conclusion that the indirect-detection system is to be preferred

  2. Spectrally efficient polarization multiplexed direct-detection OFDM system without frequency gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chia-Chien; Zeng, Wei-Siang; Lin, Chun-Ting

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a spectrally efficient direct-detection orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (DD-OFDM) system. In addition to polarization-division multiplexing, removing the frequency gap further improves the spectral efficiency of the OFDM system. The frequency gap between a reference carrier and OFDM subcarriers avoids subcarrier-to-subcarrier beating interference (SSBI) in traditional DD-OFDM systems. Without dynamic polarization control, the resulting interference after square-law direct detection in the proposed gap-less system is polarization-dependent and composed of linear inter-carrier interference (ICI) and nonlinear SSBI. Thus, this work proposes an iterative multiple-input multiple-output detection scheme to remove the mixed polarization-dependent interference. Compared to the previous scheme, which only removes ICI, the proposed scheme can further eliminate SSBI to achieve the improvement of ∼ 7 dB in signal-to-noise ratio. Without the need for polarization control, we successfully utilize 7-GHz bandwidth to transmit a 39.5-Gbps polarization multiplexed OFDM signal over 100 km.

  3. Direct modulation and detection link using polybinary signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, L.F.; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Peucheret, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on a spectral efficient optical fiber link by using a novel seven-level polybinary signaling at 14.32 Gbps achieving a potential 7.95 b/s/Hz with very little complexity and processing footprint.......This paper presents experimental results on a spectral efficient optical fiber link by using a novel seven-level polybinary signaling at 14.32 Gbps achieving a potential 7.95 b/s/Hz with very little complexity and processing footprint....

  4. [Detection of surface EMG signal using active electrode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Peng, Chenglin; Wu, Baoming; Wang, He

    2003-09-01

    Research of surface electromyogram(EMG) signal is important in rehabilitation medicine, sport medicine and clinical diagnosis, accurate detection of signal is the base of quantitative analysis of surface EMG signal. In this article were discussed how to reduce possible noise in the detection of surface EMG. Considerations on the design of electrode unit were presented. Instrumentation amplifier AD620 was employed to design a bipolar active electrode for use in surface EMG detection. The experiments showed that active electrode could be used to improve signal/noise ratio, reduce noise and detect surface EMG signal effectively.

  5. Spectral integration in binaural signal detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breebaart, D.J.; Par, van de S.L.J.D.E.; Kohlrausch, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    For both monaural and binaural masking, the spectral content of the masker and of the signal to be detected are important stimulus properties influencing the detection process. It is generally accepted that the auditory system separates the incoming signals in several frequency bands. It is not

  6. Compressive Sensing of Roller Bearing Faults via Harmonic Detection from Under-Sampled Vibration Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang; Hou, Wei; Wang, Huaqing; Luo, Ganggang; Ma, Jianwei

    2015-10-09

    The Shannon sampling principle requires substantial amounts of data to ensure the accuracy of on-line monitoring of roller bearing fault signals. Challenges are often encountered as a result of the cumbersome data monitoring, thus a novel method focused on compressed vibration signals for detecting roller bearing faults is developed in this study. Considering that harmonics often represent the fault characteristic frequencies in vibration signals, a compressive sensing frame of characteristic harmonics is proposed to detect bearing faults. A compressed vibration signal is first acquired from a sensing matrix with information preserved through a well-designed sampling strategy. A reconstruction process of the under-sampled vibration signal is then pursued as attempts are conducted to detect the characteristic harmonics from sparse measurements through a compressive matching pursuit strategy. In the proposed method bearing fault features depend on the existence of characteristic harmonics, as typically detected directly from compressed data far before reconstruction completion. The process of sampling and detection may then be performed simultaneously without complete recovery of the under-sampled signals. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by simulations and experiments.

  7. Automatic detection of service initiation signals used in bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eLoth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognising the intention of others is important in all social interactions, especially in the service domain. Enabling a bartending robot to serve customers is particularly challenging as the system has to recognise the social signals produced by customers and respond appropriately. Detecting whether a customer would like to order is essential for the service encounter to succeed. This detection is particularly challenging in a noisy environment with multiple customers. Thus, a bartending robot has to be able to distinguish between customers intending to order, chatting with friends or just passing by. In order to study which signals customers use to initiate a service interaction in a bar, we recorded real-life customer-staff interactions in several German bars. These recordings were used to generate initial hypotheses about the signals customers produce when bidding for the attention of bar staff. Two experiments using snapshots and short video sequences then tested the validity of these hypothesised candidate signals. The results revealed that bar staff responded to a set of two non-verbal signals: first, customers position themselves directly at the bar counter and, secondly, they look at a member of staff. Both signals were necessary and, when occurring together, sufficient. The participants also showed a strong agreement about when these cues occurred in the videos. Finally, a signal detection analysis revealed that ignoring a potential order is deemed worse than erroneously inviting customers to order. We conclude that a these two easily recognisable actions are sufficient for recognising the intention of customers to initiate a service interaction, but other actions such as gestures and speech were not necessary, and b the use of reaction time experiments using natural materials is feasible and provides ecologically valid results.

  8. Automatic detection of service initiation signals used in bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Sebastian; Huth, Kerstin; De Ruiter, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the intention of others is important in all social interactions, especially in the service domain. Enabling a bartending robot to serve customers is particularly challenging as the system has to recognize the social signals produced by customers and respond appropriately. Detecting whether a customer would like to order is essential for the service encounter to succeed. This detection is particularly challenging in a noisy environment with multiple customers. Thus, a bartending robot has to be able to distinguish between customers intending to order, chatting with friends or just passing by. In order to study which signals customers use to initiate a service interaction in a bar, we recorded real-life customer-staff interactions in several German bars. These recordings were used to generate initial hypotheses about the signals customers produce when bidding for the attention of bar staff. Two experiments using snapshots and short video sequences then tested the validity of these hypothesized candidate signals. The results revealed that bar staff responded to a set of two non-verbal signals: first, customers position themselves directly at the bar counter and, secondly, they look at a member of staff. Both signals were necessary and, when occurring together, sufficient. The participants also showed a strong agreement about when these cues occurred in the videos. Finally, a signal detection analysis revealed that ignoring a potential order is deemed worse than erroneously inviting customers to order. We conclude that (a) these two easily recognizable actions are sufficient for recognizing the intention of customers to initiate a service interaction, but other actions such as gestures and speech were not necessary, and (b) the use of reaction time experiments using natural materials is feasible and provides ecologically valid results.

  9. Sound card based digital correlation detection of weak photoelectrical signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Guanghui; Wang Jiangcheng

    2005-01-01

    A simple and low-cost digital correlation method is proposed to investigate weak photoelectrical signals, using a high-speed photodiode as detector, which is directly connected to a programmably triggered sound card analogue-to-digital converter and a personal computer. Two testing experiments, autocorrelation detection of weak flickering signals from a computer monitor under background of noisy outdoor stray light and cross-correlation measurement of the surface velocity of a motional tape, are performed, showing that the results are reliable and the method is easy to implement

  10. Plasma dark matter direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, J.D.; Foot, R., E-mail: j.clarke5@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: rfoot@unimelb.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia (Australia)

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter in spiral galaxies like the Milky Way may take the form of a dark plasma. Hidden sector dark matter charged under an unbroken U(1)' gauge interaction provides a simple and well defined particle physics model realising this possibility. The assumed U(1)' neutrality of the Universe then implies (at least) two oppositely charged dark matter components with self-interactions mediated via a massless 'dark photon' (the U(1)' gauge boson). In addition to nuclear recoils such dark matter can give rise to keV electron recoils in direct detection experiments. In this context, the detailed physical properties of the dark matter plasma interacting with the Earth is required. This is a complex system, which is here modelled as a fluid governed by the magnetohydrodynamic equations. These equations are numerically solved for some illustrative examples, and implications for direct detection experiments discussed. In particular, the analysis presented here leaves open the intriguing possibility that the DAMA annual modulation signal is due primarily to electron recoils (or even a combination of electron recoils and nuclear recoils). The importance of diurnal modulation (in addition to annual modulation) as a means of probing this kind of dark matter is also emphasised.

  11. Working Group 3: Greenhouse signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.; Ellsaesser, H.; Groisman, P.Ya.; Grotch, S.; Jenkins, G.; Karoly, D.; Riches, M.; Santer, B.; Schoenwiese, C.; Vinnikov, K.; Zwiers, F.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative efforts to detect the greenhouse-gas signal (GHG) in nature are in their infancy. The reasons for this state of affairs are numerous. It is only in the last few years that GCMs have advanced to the point where their simulations of GHG signals might be marginally believable. Without reasonably good a priori predictions of expected GHG signals from the models, the detection problem is moot. The observational data sets describing changes in the global climate system over the last 50-100 years needed for adequate detection studies have also only come into existence in the last five years. Finally, no coherent, generally-agreed-on detection strategy has been developed by the scientific community interested in the GHG problem. The lack of adequate model predictions and observational sets are largely responsible for this latter condition. The rudimentary detection efforts that have been conducted have generally been based on recognizing the fingerprint of GHG signals in the oceans and atmosphere. GCM results for 1 x 2 x CO 2 equilibrium runs have been used to search for GHG effects induced in tropospheric air and ocean surface temperature fields since the early 1900s. No significant effect has been found

  12. Signal anomaly detection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, V.M.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Gloeckler, O.

    1988-08-01

    As part of a comprehensive signal validation system, we have developed a signal anomaly detector, without specifically establishing the cause of the anomaly. A signal recorded from process instrumentation is said to have an anomaly, if during steady-state operation, the deviation in the level of the signal, its root-mean-square (RMS) value, or its statistical distribution changes by a preset value. This deviation could be an unacceptable increase or a decrease in the quantity being monitored. An anomaly in a signal may be characterized by wideband or single-frequency noise, bias error, pulse-type error, nonsymmetric behavior, or a change in the signal bandwidth. Various signatures can be easily computed from data samples and compared against specified threshold values. We want to point out that in real processes, pulses can appear with different time widths, and at different rates of change of the signal. Thus, in characterizing an anomaly as a pulse-type, the fastest pulse width is constrained by the signal sampling interval. For example, if a signal is sampled at 100 Hz, we will not be able to detect pulses occurring at kHz rates. Discussion with utility and Combustion Engineering personnel indicated that it is not practical to detect pulses having a narrow time width. 9 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs

  13. A formal language to describe a wide class of failure detection and signal validation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racz, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    1996-01-01

    In the present article we make the first step towards the implementation of a user-friendly, object-oriented system devoted to failure detection and signal validation purposes. After overviewing different signal modelling, residual making and hypothesis testing procedures, a mathematical tool is suggested to describe a general failure detection problem. Three different levels of the abstraction are distinguished; direct examination, preliminary decision support mechanism and indirect examination. Possible scenarios are introduced depending both on the objective properties of the investigated signal and the particular requirements prescribed by the expert himself. Finally it is showed how to build up systematically a complete, general failure detection procedure. (author).

  14. Signal classification for acoustic neutrino detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, M.; Anton, G.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Richardt, C.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on signal classification for deep-sea acoustic neutrino detection. In the deep sea, the background of transient signals is very diverse. Approaches like matched filtering are not sufficient to distinguish between neutrino-like signals and other transient signals with similar signature, which are forming the acoustic background for neutrino detection in the deep-sea environment. A classification system based on machine learning algorithms is analysed with the goal to find a robust and effective way to perform this task. For a well-trained model, a testing error on the level of 1% is achieved for strong classifiers like Random Forest and Boosting Trees using the extracted features of the signal as input and utilising dense clusters of sensors instead of single sensors.

  15. Toward multimodal signal detection of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Rave; DuMouchel, William; Schuemie, Martijn; Bodenreider, Olivier; Friedman, Carol; Horvitz, Eric; Ripple, Anna; Sorbello, Alfred; White, Ryen W; Winnenburg, Rainer; Shah, Nigam H

    2017-12-01

    Improving mechanisms to detect adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is key to strengthening post-marketing drug safety surveillance. Signal detection is presently unimodal, relying on a single information source. Multimodal signal detection is based on jointly analyzing multiple information sources. Building on, and expanding the work done in prior studies, the aim of the article is to further research on multimodal signal detection, explore its potential benefits, and propose methods for its construction and evaluation. Four data sources are investigated; FDA's adverse event reporting system, insurance claims, the MEDLINE citation database, and the logs of major Web search engines. Published methods are used to generate and combine signals from each data source. Two distinct reference benchmarks corresponding to well-established and recently labeled ADRs respectively are used to evaluate the performance of multimodal signal detection in terms of area under the ROC curve (AUC) and lead-time-to-detection, with the latter relative to labeling revision dates. Limited to our reference benchmarks, multimodal signal detection provides AUC improvements ranging from 0.04 to 0.09 based on a widely used evaluation benchmark, and a comparative added lead-time of 7-22 months relative to labeling revision dates from a time-indexed benchmark. The results support the notion that utilizing and jointly analyzing multiple data sources may lead to improved signal detection. Given certain data and benchmark limitations, the early stage of development, and the complexity of ADRs, it is currently not possible to make definitive statements about the ultimate utility of the concept. Continued development of multimodal signal detection requires a deeper understanding the data sources used, additional benchmarks, and further research on methods to generate and synthesize signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. System and Method for Multi-Wavelength Optical Signal Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, Thomas D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The system and method for multi-wavelength optical signal detection enables the detection of optical signal levels significantly below those processed at the discrete circuit level by the use of mixed-signal processing methods implemented with integrated circuit technologies. The present invention is configured to detect and process small signals, which enables the reduction of the optical power required to stimulate detection networks, and lowers the required laser power to make specific measurements. The present invention provides an adaptation of active pixel networks combined with mixed-signal processing methods to provide an integer representation of the received signal as an output. The present invention also provides multi-wavelength laser detection circuits for use in various systems, such as a differential absorption light detection and ranging system.

  17. Spectrally-efficient 168 Gb/s/λ WDM 64-QAM single-sideband Nyquist-subcarrier modulation with Kramers-Kronig direct-detection receivers \\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhe; Erkılınç , M. Sezer; Shi, Kai; Sillekens, Eric; Galdino, Lidia; Xu, Tianhua; Thomsen, Benn C.; Byvel, Polina; Killey, Robert I.

    2018-01-01

    Due to their simple and cost-effective transceiver architecture, single-polarization and single-photodiode based direct-detection (DD) systems offer advantages for metropolitan area network and data-center interconnect applications. Single-sideband subcarrier modulation (SSB SCM) signaling with direct detection has the potential to achieve high information spectral density (ISD) but its performance can be significantly degraded by signal-signal beat interference (SSBI). The recently proposed ...

  18. Joint Direction-of-Departure and Direction-of-Arrival Estimation in a UWB MIMO Radar Detecting Targets with Fluctuating Radar Cross Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idnin Pasya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a joint direction-of-departure (DOD and direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation in a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO radar utilizing ultra wideband (UWB signals in detecting targets with fluctuating radar cross sections (RCS. The UWB MIMO radar utilized a combination of two-way MUSIC and majority decision based on angle histograms of estimated DODs and DOAs at each frequency of the UWB signal. The proposed angle estimation scheme was demonstrated to be effective in detecting targets with fluctuating RCS, compared to conventional spectra averaging method used in subband angle estimations. It was found that a wider bandwidth resulted in improved estimation performance. Numerical simulations along with experimental evaluations in a radio anechoic chamber are presented.

  19. Coaxial direct-detection lidar-system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a coaxial direct-detection LIDAR system for measuring velocity, temperature and/or particulate density. The system comprises a laser source for emitting a laser light beam having a lasing center frequency along an emission path. The system further comprises an optical....... Finally, the system comprises a detector system arranged to receive the return signal from the optical delivery system, the detector system comprising a narrowband optical filter and a detector, the narrowband optical filter having a filter center frequency of a pass-band, wherein the center lasing...... frequency and/or the center filter frequency may be scanned. The invention further relates to an aircraft airspeed measurement device, and a wind turbine airspeed measurement device comprising the LIDAR system....

  20. Multilevel electrochemical signal detections of metalloprotein heterolayers for bioelectronic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong-Ho; Yoo, Si-Youl; Lee, Taek [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro(Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hun Joo [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeomro(Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Junhong [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong-Woo, E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro(Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeomro(Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-31

    In the present study, we investigated the simultaneous detection of multilevel electrochemical signals from various metalloprotein heterolayers for the bioelectronic devices. A layer-by-layer assembly method based on simple electrostatic interaction was introduced to form protein bilayers. The gold substrate was modified with poly (ethylene glycol) thiol acid as the precursor, which introduced negative charges to the surface. Based on the isoelectric point, net-charge controlled metalloproteins by pH adjustment were sequentially immobilized on this negatively charged substrate. The degree of protein immobilization on the gold substrate was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and the surface topology changes due to the protein immobilization were confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Redox signals in the protein layers were measured by cyclic voltammetry. As a result, various redox signals generated from different metalloproteins on a single electrode were monitored. This proposed method for the detection of multi-level electrochemical signals can be directly applied to bioelectronic devices that store multi-information in a single electrode. - Highlights: • We fabricated heterolayers composed of various metalloproteins. • Metalloproteins were immobilized by layer-by-layer assembly. • The degree of immobilization was controlled by the net charge of metalloproteins. • Various redox signals generated from heterolayers were well monitored.

  1. Signal existence verification (SEV) for GPS low received power signal detection using the time-frequency approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Sun, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    The detection of low received power of global positioning system (GPS) signals in the signal acquisition process is an important issue for GPS applications. Improving the miss-detection problem of low received power signal is crucial, especially for urban or indoor environments. This paper proposes a signal existence verification (SEV) process to detect and subsequently verify low received power GPS signals. The SEV process is based on the time-frequency representation of GPS signal, and it can capture the characteristic of GPS signal in the time-frequency plane to enhance the GPS signal acquisition performance. Several simulations and experiments are conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed method for low received power signal detection. The contribution of this work is that the SEV process is an additional scheme to assist the GPS signal acquisition process in low received power signal detection, without changing the original signal acquisition or tracking algorithms.

  2. Direct and indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter; Detection directe et indirecte de matiere sombre supersymetrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayet, F

    2001-09-01

    A substantial body of astrophysical evidence supports the existence of non-baryonic dark matter in the universe. One of the leading dark matter candidates is the neutralino predicted by the supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics. Different detectors have been designed for the detection, either indirect or direct, of the neutralino. Related to indirect detection, the present work has been performed in the context of the AMS experiment. A precursor version of the spectrometer was flown on the space shuttle Discovery in June 1998. The detector included an Aerogel Threshold Cherenkov counter (ATC) to identify antiprotons, whose spectrum may be used to infer a neutralino signal. The analysis of the ATC data is presented including an evaluation of the flight performance and a description of the optimization of the antiproton selection. An antiproton analysis is also reported. A phenomenological study allows us to investigate the discovery potential of this indirect method. This thesis also includes the development of a new detector (MACHe3) designed for direct neutralino search using a superfluid {sup 3}He bolometer operated at ultra low temperatures. The data analysis of the prototype cell is presented. A Monte Carlo simulation has been developed, in order to optimize the detector design for direct neutralino search. These results are compared with theoretical predictions of supersymmetric models, thus highlighting the discovery potential of this detector and its complementarity with existing devices. (author)

  3. Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter at direct detection experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Giudice, Gian F.; Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2018-01-01

    We explore a novel class of multi-particle dark sectors, called Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter (iBDM). These models are constructed by combining properties of particles that scatter off matter by making transitions to heavier states (Inelastic Dark Matter) with properties of particles that are produced with a large Lorentz boost in annihilation processes in the galactic halo (Boosted Dark Matter). This combination leads to new signals that can be observed at ordinary direct detection experimen...

  4. Intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Brinkløv, Signe; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    will increase signal directionality in the field along with intensity thus increasing sonar range. During the last phase of prey pursuit, vespertilionid bats broaden their echolocation beam considerably, probably to counter evasive maneuvers of eared prey. We highlight how multiple call parameters (frequency......The paper reviews current knowledge of intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals. Recent studies have revealed that echolocating bats can be much louder than previously believed. Bats previously dubbed "whispering" can emit calls with source levels up to 110 dB SPL at 10 cm......, duration, intensity, and directionality of echolocation signals) in unison define the search volume probed by bats and in turn how bats perceive their surroundings. Small changes to individual parameters can, in combination, drastically change the bat's perception, facilitating successful navigation...

  5. Signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    At the Specialists' Meeting on Sodium Boiling Detection organized by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency at Chester in the United Kingdom in 1981 various methods of detecting sodium boiling were reported. But, it was not possible to make a comparative assessment of these methods because the signal condition in each experiment was different from others. That is why participants of this meeting recommended that a benchmark test should be carried out in order to evaluate and compare signal processing methods for boiling detection. Organization of the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection was also recommended at the 16th meeting of the IWGFR. The CRP on Signal Processing Techniques for Sodium Boiling Noise Detection was set up in 1984. Eight laboratories from six countries have agreed to participate in this CRP. The overall objective of the programme was the development of reliable on-line signal processing techniques which could be used for the detection of sodium boiling in an LMFBR core. During the first stage of the programme a number of existing processing techniques used by different countries have been compared and evaluated. In the course of further work, an algorithm for implementation of this sodium boiling detection system in the nuclear reactor will be developed. It was also considered that the acoustic signal processing techniques developed for boiling detection could well make a useful contribution to other acoustic applications in the reactor. This publication consists of two parts. Part I is the final report of the co-ordinated research programme on signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection. Part II contains two introductory papers and 20 papers presented at four research co-ordination meetings since 1985. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 22 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  7. Unstable gravitino dark matter prospects for indirect and direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grefe, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We confront the signals expected from unstable gravitino dark matter with observations of indirect dark matter detection experiments in all possible cosmic-ray channels. For this purpose we calculate in detail the gravitino decay widths in theories with bilinear violation of R parity, particularly focusing on decay channels with three particles in the final state. Based on these calculations we predict the fluxes of gamma rays, charged cosmic rays and neutrinos expected from decays of gravitino dark matter. Although the predicted spectra could in principal explain the anomalies observed in the cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes as measured by PAMELA and Fermi LAT, we find that this possibility is ruled out by strong constraints from gamma-ray and antiproton observations. Therefore, we employ current data of indirect detection experiments to place strong constraints on the gravitino lifetime and the strength of R-parity violation. In addition, we discuss the prospects of forthcoming searches for a gravitino signal in the spectrum of cosmic-ray antideuterons, finding that they are in particular sensitive to rather low gravitino masses. Finally, we discuss in detail the prospects for detecting a neutrino signal from gravitino dark matter decays, finding that the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes like IceCube is competitive to observations in other cosmic ray channels, especially for rather heavy gravitinos. Moreover, we discuss the prospects for a direct detection of gravitino dark matter via R-parity violating inelastic scatterings off nucleons. We find that, although the scattering cross section is considerably enhanced compared to the case of elastic gravitino scattering, the expected signal is many orders of magnitude too small in order to hope for a detection in underground detectors. (orig.)

  8. Unstable gravitino dark matter prospects for indirect and direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grefe, Michael

    2011-11-15

    We confront the signals expected from unstable gravitino dark matter with observations of indirect dark matter detection experiments in all possible cosmic-ray channels. For this purpose we calculate in detail the gravitino decay widths in theories with bilinear violation of R parity, particularly focusing on decay channels with three particles in the final state. Based on these calculations we predict the fluxes of gamma rays, charged cosmic rays and neutrinos expected from decays of gravitino dark matter. Although the predicted spectra could in principal explain the anomalies observed in the cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes as measured by PAMELA and Fermi LAT, we find that this possibility is ruled out by strong constraints from gamma-ray and antiproton observations. Therefore, we employ current data of indirect detection experiments to place strong constraints on the gravitino lifetime and the strength of R-parity violation. In addition, we discuss the prospects of forthcoming searches for a gravitino signal in the spectrum of cosmic-ray antideuterons, finding that they are in particular sensitive to rather low gravitino masses. Finally, we discuss in detail the prospects for detecting a neutrino signal from gravitino dark matter decays, finding that the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes like IceCube is competitive to observations in other cosmic ray channels, especially for rather heavy gravitinos. Moreover, we discuss the prospects for a direct detection of gravitino dark matter via R-parity violating inelastic scatterings off nucleons. We find that, although the scattering cross section is considerably enhanced compared to the case of elastic gravitino scattering, the expected signal is many orders of magnitude too small in order to hope for a detection in underground detectors. (orig.)

  9. Fetal Cardiac Doppler Signal Processing Techniques: Challenges and Future Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abdulrahman Alnuaimi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The fetal Doppler Ultrasound (DUS is commonly used for monitoring fetal heart rate and can also be used for identifying the event timings of fetal cardiac valve motions. In early-stage fetuses, the detected Doppler signal suffers from noise and signal loss due to the fetal movements and changing fetal location during the measurement procedure. The fetal cardiac intervals, which can be estimated by measuring the fetal cardiac event timings, are the most important markers of fetal development and well-being. To advance DUS-based fetal monitoring methods, several powerful and well-advanced signal processing and machine learning methods have recently been developed. This review provides an overview of the existing techniques used in fetal cardiac activity monitoring and a comprehensive survey on fetal cardiac Doppler signal processing frameworks. The review is structured with a focus on their shortcomings and advantages, which helps in understanding fetal Doppler cardiogram signal processing methods and the related Doppler signal analysis procedures by providing valuable clinical information. Finally, a set of recommendations are suggested for future research directions and the use of fetal cardiac Doppler signal analysis, processing, and modeling to address the underlying challenges.

  10. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    McDonough, Robert N

    1995-01-01

    The Second Edition is an updated revision to the authors highly successful and widely used introduction to the principles and application of the statistical theory of signal detection. This book emphasizes those theories that have been found to be particularly useful in practice including principles applied to detection problems encountered in digital communications, radar, and sonar.Detection processing based upon the fast Fourier transform

  11. Echo detected EPR as a tool for detecting radiation-induced defect signals in pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoleo, Alfonso; Bortolussi, Claudia; Brustolon, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Archaeological fragments of pottery have been investigated by using CW-EPR and Echo Detected EPR (EDEPR). EDEPR allows to remove the CW-EPR dominant Fe(III) background spectrum, hiding much weaker signals potentially useful for dating purpose. EDEPR spectra attributed to a methyl radical and to feldspar defects have been recorded at room and low temperature for an Iron Age cooking ware (700 B.C.). A study on the dependence of EDEPR intensity over absorbed dose on a series of γ-irradiated brick samples (estimated age of 562 ± 140 B.C.) has confirmed the potential efficacy of the proposed method for spotting defect signals out of the strong iron background. - Highlights: → Fe(III) CW-EPR signals cover CW-EPR-detectable defects in ceramics. → Echo detected EPR gets rid of Fe(III) signals, disclosing defect signals. → Echo detected EPR detects defect signals even at relatively low doses.

  12. Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Shelton, Jessie, E-mail: jijifan1982@gmail.com, E-mail: katz.andrey@gmail.com, E-mail: jshelton137@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.

  13. Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Shelton, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints

  14. Signal processing for boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledwidge, T.J.; Black, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the KNS I loop at KfK Karlsruhe. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. (author). 6 refs, figs

  15. Head direction cell activity in mice: robust directional signal depends on intact otolith organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Ryan M.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    The head direction (HD) cell signal is a representation of an animal's perceived directional heading with respect to its environment. This signal appears to originate in the vestibular system, which includes the semicircular canals and otolith organs. Preliminary studies indicate the semicircular canals provide a necessary component of the HD signal, but involvement of otolithic information in the HD signal has not been tested. The present study was designed to determine the otolithic contribution to the HD signal, as well as to compare HD cell activity of mice to that of rats. HD cell activity in the anterodorsal thalamus was assessed in wild-type C57BL/6J and otoconia-deficient tilted mice during locomotion within a cylinder containing a prominent visual landmark. HD cell firing properties in C57BL/6J mice were generally similar to those in rats. However, in C57BL/6J mice, landmark rotation failed to demonstrate dominant control of the HD signal in 36% of the sessions. In darkness, directional firing became unstable during 42% of the sessions, but landmark control was not associated with HD signal stability in darkness. HD cells were identified in tilted mice, but directional firing properties were not as robust as those of C57BL/6J mice. Most HD cells in tilted mice were controlled by landmark rotation, but showed substantial signal degradation across trials. These results support current models that suggest otolithic information is involved in the perception of directional heading. Furthermore, compared to rats, the HD signal in mice appears to be less reliably anchored to prominent environmental cues. PMID:19176815

  16. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garny, Mathias; Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years

  17. Closing in on mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios with antiprotons and direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro; Pato, Miguel; Vogl, Stefan [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2012-07-15

    Over the last years both cosmic-ray antiproton measurements and direct dark matter searches have proved particularly effective in constraining the nature of dark matter candidates. The present work focusses on these two types of constraints in a minimal framework which features a Majorana fermion as the dark matter particle and a scalar that mediates the coupling to quarks. Considering a wide range of coupling schemes, we derive antiproton and direct detection constraints using the latest data and paying close attention to astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties. Both signals are strongly enhanced in the presence of degenerate dark matter and scalar masses, but we show that the effect is especially dramatic in direct detection. Accordingly, the latest direct detection limits take the lead over antiprotons. We find that antiproton and direct detection data set stringent lower limits on the mass splitting, reaching 19% at a 300 GeV dark matter mass for a unity coupling. Interestingly, these limits are orthogonal to ongoing collider searches at the Large Hadron Collider, making it feasible to close in on degenerate dark matter scenarios within the next years.

  18. Process Dissociation and Mixture Signal Detection Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T.

    2008-01-01

    The process dissociation procedure was developed in an attempt to separate different processes involved in memory tasks. The procedure naturally lends itself to a formulation within a class of mixture signal detection models. The dual process model is shown to be a special case. The mixture signal detection model is applied to data from a widely…

  19. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Given, Joanne E; Loane, Maria; Luteijn, Johannes Michiel

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate congenital anomaly (CA)-medication exposure associations produced by the new EUROmediCAT signal detection system and determine which require further investigation. METHODS: Data from 15 EUROCAT registries (1995-2011) with medication exposures at the chemical substance (5th level...

  20. Preliminary evaluation of second harmonic direct detection scheme for low-dose range in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Felipe; Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of a direct detection scheme of the second harmonic (2h) overmodulated signal from irradiated alanine in EPR dosimetry was studied. For this purpose, a group of DL-alanine/paraffin cylindrical pellets was produced. The dosimeters were irradiated with a 60 Co radiotherapy gamma source with doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Gy. The EPR measurements were carried out in a VARIAN-E4 spectrometer operating in X-band with optimized parameters to obtain highest amplitude signals of both harmonics. The 2h signal was detected directly at twice the modulation frequency. In preliminary results, the 2h showed some advantages over the 1h such as better resolution for doses below 1 Gy, better repeatability results and better linear behaviour in the dose range indicated. (author)

  1. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene

  2. Optical filtering in directly modulated/detected OOFDM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, C; Ortega, B; Wei, J L; Capmany, J

    2013-12-16

    This work presents a theoretical investigation on the performance of directly modulated/detected (DM/DD) optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OOFDM) systems subject to optical filtering. The impact of both linear and nonlinear distortion effects are taken into account to calculate the effective signal-to-noise ratio of each subcarrier. These results are then employed to optimize the design parameters of two simple optical filtering structures: a Mach Zehnder interferometer and a uniform fiber Bragg grating, leading to a significant optical power budget improvement given by 3.3 and 3dB, respectively. These can be further increased to 5.5 and 4.2dB respectively when balanced detection configurations are employed. We find as well that this improvement is highly dependent on the clipping ratio.

  3. High intensity signal of the posterior pituitary. A study with horizontal direction of frequency-encoding and fat suppression MR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the consistency of fat in the high intensity signals of the normal neurohypophysis and to differentiate the high signal of posterior pituitary from that of dorsum sella. Sagittal SE T1-weighted images with frequency encoding in the horizontal direction were used in order to differentiate the high signal of posterior pituitary and dorsum sella by the vertically-oriented chemical shift artifact. Material and methods: The sellae of 46 normal volunteers were imaged with a commercially available fat suppression technique and SE sequences with frequency encoding in vertical (25 cases) and horizontal (21 cases) axes. Results: The high signal intensity was absent in 9% of the normal volunteers with no predilection to any specific age group. None of the cases with posterior pituitary high intensity signals showed suppression of the signal with fat suppression technique. A fat suppression technique was helpful in documenting the hyperintensity in 7% of normal volunteers. Nineteen of the 21 (90%) cases with high signal intensity were detected by routine SE T1-weighted images, whereas 18 of the 19 (95%) cases were detected by imaging with frequency encoding in the horizontal direction. Conclusion: The high signal does not indicate the presence of fat. Fat suppression technique and a horizontal direction of frequency encoding help in differentiating the high signal of the neurohypophysis from that of dorsum sella. (orig.)

  4. Detection of Doppler Microembolic Signals Using High Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroun Geryes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust detection of the smallest circulating cerebral microemboli is an efficient way of preventing strokes, which is second cause of mortality worldwide. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is widely considered the most convenient system for the detection of microemboli. The most common standard detection is achieved through the Doppler energy signal and depends on an empirically set constant threshold. On the other hand, in the past few years, higher order statistics have been an extensive field of research as they represent descriptive statistics that can be used to detect signal outliers. In this study, we propose new types of microembolic detectors based on the windowed calculation of the third moment skewness and fourth moment kurtosis of the energy signal. During energy embolus-free periods the distribution of the energy is not altered and the skewness and kurtosis signals do not exhibit any peak values. In the presence of emboli, the energy distribution is distorted and the skewness and kurtosis signals exhibit peaks, corresponding to the latter emboli. Applied on real signals, the detection of microemboli through the skewness and kurtosis signals outperformed the detection through standard methods. The sensitivities and specificities reached 78% and 91% and 80% and 90% for the skewness and kurtosis detectors, respectively.

  5. Subsurface event detection and classification using Wireless Signal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Suk-Un; Ghazanfari, Ehsan; Cheng, Liang; Pamukcu, Sibel; Suleiman, Muhannad T

    2012-11-05

    Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs). The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events.

  6. Subsurface Event Detection and Classification Using Wireless Signal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhannad T. Suleiman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs. The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events.

  7. Optical intensity modulation direct detection versus heterodyne detection: A high-SNR capacity comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-09-15

    An optical wireless communications system which employs either intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IM-DD) or heterodyne detection (HD) is considered. IM-DD has lower complexity and cost than HD, but on the other hand, has lower capacity. It is therefore interesting to investigate the capacity gap between the two systems. The main focus of this paper is to investigate this gap at high SNR. Bounds on this gap are established for two cases: between IM-DD and HD, and between IM-DD and an HD-PAM which is an HD system employing pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM). While the gap between IM-DD and HD increases as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases, the gap between IM-DD and an HD-PAM is upper bounded by a constant at high SNR. © 2015 IEEE.

  8. Optical intensity modulation direct detection versus heterodyne detection: A high-SNR capacity comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    An optical wireless communications system which employs either intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IM-DD) or heterodyne detection (HD) is considered. IM-DD has lower complexity and cost than HD, but on the other hand, has lower capacity. It is therefore interesting to investigate the capacity gap between the two systems. The main focus of this paper is to investigate this gap at high SNR. Bounds on this gap are established for two cases: between IM-DD and HD, and between IM-DD and an HD-PAM which is an HD system employing pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM). While the gap between IM-DD and HD increases as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases, the gap between IM-DD and an HD-PAM is upper bounded by a constant at high SNR. © 2015 IEEE.

  9. Subliminal stimulation and somatosensory signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Sahani, Maneesh; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Only a small fraction of sensory signals is consciously perceived. The brain's perceptual systems may include mechanisms of feedforward inhibition that protect the cortex from subliminal noise, thus reserving cortical capacity and conscious awareness for significant stimuli. Here we provide a new view of these mechanisms based on signal detection theory, and gain control. We demonstrated that subliminal somatosensory stimulation decreased sensitivity for the detection of a subsequent somatosensory input, largely due to increased false alarm rates. By delivering the subliminal somatosensory stimulus and the to-be-detected somatosensory stimulus to different digits of the same hand, we show that this effect spreads across the sensory surface. In addition, subliminal somatosensory stimulation tended to produce an increased probability of responding "yes", whether the somatosensory stimulus was present or not. Our results suggest that subliminal stimuli temporarily reduce input gain, avoiding excessive responses to further small inputs. This gain control may be automatic, and may precede discriminative classification of inputs into signals or noise. Crucially, we found that subliminal inputs influenced false alarm rates only on blocks where the to-be-detected stimuli were present, and not on pre-test control blocks where they were absent. Participants appeared to adjust their perceptual criterion according to a statistical distribution of stimuli in the current context, with the presence of supraliminal stimuli having an important role in the criterion-setting process. These findings clarify the cognitive mechanisms that reserve conscious perception for salient and important signals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hall Sensor Output Signal Fault-Detection & Safety Implementation Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SangHun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. Recently BLDC motors have been popular in various industrial applications and electric mobility. In most brushless direct current (BLDC motor drives, there are three hall sensors as a position reference. Low resolution hall effect sensor is popularly used to estimate the rotor position because of its good comprehensive performance such as low cost, high reliability and sufficient precision. Various possible faults may happen in a hall effect sensor. This paper presents a fault-tolerant operation method that allows the control of a BLDC motor with one faulty hall sensor and presents the hall sensor output fault-tolerant control strategy. The situations considered are when the output from a hall sensor stays continuously at low or high levels, or a short-time pulse appears on a hall sensor signal. For fault detection, identification of a faulty signal and generating a substitute signal, this method only needs the information from the hall sensors. There are a few research work on hall effect sensor failure of BLDC motor. The conventional fault diagnosis methods are signal analysis, model based analysis and knowledge based analysis. The proposed method is signal based analysis using a compensation signal for reconfiguration and therefore fault diagnosis can be fast. The proposed method is validated to execute the simulation using PSIM.

  11. Detection of Transient Signals in Doppler Spectra

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Signal processing is used to detect transient signals in the presence of noise. Two embodiments are disclosed. In both embodiments, the time series from a remote...

  12. Direction detection thresholds of passive self-motion in artistic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Matthias; Haller, Katia; Moser, Ivan; Hossner, Ernst-Joachim; Mast, Fred W

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we compared direction detection thresholds of passive self-motion in the dark between artistic gymnasts and controls. Twenty-four professional female artistic gymnasts (ranging from 7 to 20 years) and age-matched controls were seated on a motion platform and asked to discriminate the direction of angular (yaw, pitch, roll) and linear (leftward-rightward) motion. Gymnasts showed lower thresholds for the linear leftward-rightward motion. Interestingly, there was no difference for the angular motions. These results show that the outstanding self-motion abilities in artistic gymnasts are not related to an overall higher sensitivity in self-motion perception. With respect to vestibular processing, our results suggest that gymnastic expertise is exclusively linked to superior interpretation of otolith signals when no change in canal signals is present. In addition, thresholds were overall lower for the older (14-20 years) than for the younger (7-13 years) participants, indicating the maturation of vestibular sensitivity from childhood to adolescence.

  13. Aiding the Detection of QRS Complex in ECG Signals by Detecting S Peaks Independently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabherwal, Pooja; Singh, Latika; Agrawal, Monika

    2018-03-30

    In this paper, a novel algorithm for the accurate detection of QRS complex by combining the independent detection of R and S peaks, using fusion algorithm is proposed. R peak detection has been extensively studied and is being used to detect the QRS complex. Whereas, S peaks, which is also part of QRS complex can be independently detected to aid the detection of QRS complex. In this paper, we suggest a method to first estimate S peak from raw ECG signal and then use them to aid the detection of QRS complex. The amplitude of S peak in ECG signal is relatively weak than corresponding R peak, which is traditionally used for the detection of QRS complex, therefore, an appropriate digital filter is designed to enhance the S peaks. These enhanced S peaks are then detected by adaptive thresholding. The algorithm is validated on all the signals of MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and noise stress database taken from physionet.org. The algorithm performs reasonably well even for the signals highly corrupted by noise. The algorithm performance is confirmed by sensitivity and positive predictivity of 99.99% and the detection accuracy of 99.98% for QRS complex detection. The number of false positives and false negatives resulted while analysis has been drastically reduced to 80 and 42 against the 98 and 84 the best results reported so far.

  14. Passive in-vehicle driver breath alcohol detection using advanced sensor signal acquisition and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungblad, Jonas; Hök, Bertil; Allalou, Amin; Pettersson, Håkan

    2017-05-29

    The research objective of the present investigation is to demonstrate the present status of passive in-vehicle driver breath alcohol detection and highlight the necessary conditions for large-scale implementation of such a system. Completely passive detection has remained a challenge mainly because of the requirements on signal resolution combined with the constraints of vehicle integration. The work is part of the Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety (DADSS) program aiming at massive deployment of alcohol sensing systems that could potentially save thousands of American lives annually. The work reported here builds on earlier investigations, in which it has been shown that detection of alcohol vapor in the proximity of a human subject may be traced to that subject by means of simultaneous recording of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) at the same location. Sensors based on infrared spectroscopy were developed to detect and quantify low concentrations of alcohol and CO 2 . In the present investigation, alcohol and CO 2 were recorded at various locations in a vehicle cabin while human subjects were performing normal in-step procedures and driving preparations. A video camera directed to the driver position was recording images of the driver's upper body parts, including the face, and the images were analyzed with respect to features of significance to the breathing behavior and breath detection, such as mouth opening and head direction. Improvement of the sensor system with respect to signal resolution including algorithm and software development, and fusion of the sensor and camera signals was successfully implemented and tested before starting the human study. In addition, experimental tests and simulations were performed with the purpose of connecting human subject data with repeatable experimental conditions. The results include occurrence statistics of detected breaths by signal peaks of CO 2 and alcohol. From the statistical data, the accuracy of breath alcohol

  15. The impact of signal normalization on seizure detection using line length features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logesparan, Lojini; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther; Casson, Alexander J

    2015-10-01

    Accurate automated seizure detection remains a desirable but elusive target for many neural monitoring systems. While much attention has been given to the different feature extractions that can be used to highlight seizure activity in the EEG, very little formal attention has been given to the normalization that these features are routinely paired with. This normalization is essential in patient-independent algorithms to correct for broad-level differences in the EEG amplitude between people, and in patient-dependent algorithms to correct for amplitude variations over time. It is crucial, however, that the normalization used does not have a detrimental effect on the seizure detection process. This paper presents the first formal investigation into the impact of signal normalization techniques on seizure discrimination performance when using the line length feature to emphasize seizure activity. Comparing five normalization methods, based upon the mean, median, standard deviation, signal peak and signal range, we demonstrate differences in seizure detection accuracy (assessed as the area under a sensitivity-specificity ROC curve) of up to 52 %. This is despite the same analysis feature being used in all cases. Further, changes in performance of up to 22 % are present depending on whether the normalization is applied to the raw EEG itself or directly to the line length feature. Our results highlight the median decaying memory as the best current approach for providing normalization when using line length features, and they quantify the under-appreciated challenge of providing signal normalization that does not impair seizure detection algorithm performance.

  16. Detection of weak optical signals with a laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovskii, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    Detection of weak and extremely weak light signals amplified by linear and four-wave mixing laser amplifiers is analyzed. Photoelectron distributions are found for different input photon statistics over a wide range of gain. Signal-to-noise ratios are calculated and analyzed for preamplification schemes using linear and four-wave mixing amplifiers. Calculations show that the high signal-to-noise ratio (much higher than unity), ensuring reliable detection of weak input signals, can be attained only with a four-wave mixing preamplification scheme. Qualitative dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio on the quantum statistical properties of both signal and idler waves is demonstrated

  17. Detection of Noise in Composite Step Signal Pattern by Visualizing Signal Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaman Verma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Step Composite Signals is the combination of vital informative signals that are compressed and coded to produce a predefined test image on a display device. It carries the desired sequence of information from source to destination. This information may be transmitted as digital signal, video information or data signal required as an input for the destination module. For testing of display panels, Composite Test Signals are the most important attribute of test signal transmission system. In the current research paper we present an approach for the noise detection in Composite Step Signal by analysing Composite Step Signal waveforms. The analysis of the signal waveforms reveals that the noise affected components of the signal and subsequently noise reduction process is initiated which targets noisy signal component only. Thus the quality of signal is not compromised during noise reduction process.

  18. Improving signal to noise in labeled biological specimens using energy-filtered TEM of sections with a drift correction strategy and a direct detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Ranjan; Bouwer, James C; Mackey, Mason R; Bushong, Eric; Peltier, Steven T; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Ellisman, Mark H

    2014-06-01

    Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy techniques are regularly used to build elemental maps of spatially distributed nanoparticles in materials and biological specimens. When working with thick biological sections, electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques involving core-loss electrons often require exposures exceeding several minutes to provide sufficient signal to noise. Image quality with these long exposures is often compromised by specimen drift, which results in blurring and reduced resolution. To mitigate drift artifacts, a series of short exposure images can be acquired, aligned, and merged to form a single image. For samples where the target elements have extremely low signal yields, the use of charge coupled device (CCD)-based detectors for this purpose can be problematic. At short acquisition times, the images produced by CCDs can be noisy and may contain fixed pattern artifacts that impact subsequent correlative alignment. Here we report on the use of direct electron detection devices (DDD's) to increase the signal to noise as compared with CCD's. A 3× improvement in signal is reported with a DDD versus a comparably formatted CCD, with equivalent dose on each detector. With the fast rolling-readout design of the DDD, the duty cycle provides a major benefit, as there is no dead time between successive frames.

  19. Understanding WIMP-baryon interactions with direct detection: a roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Peter, Annika H.G.

    2014-01-01

    We study prospects of dark-matter direct-detection searches for probing non-relativistic effective theory for WIMP-baryon scattering. We simulate a large set of noisy recoil-energy spectra for different scattering scenarios (beyond the standard momentum-independent contact interaction), for Generation 2 and futuristic experiments. We analyze these simulations and quantify the probability of successfully identifying the operator governing the scattering, if a WIMP signal is observed. We find that the success rate depends on a combination of factors: the WIMP mass, the mediator mass, the type of interaction, and the experimental energy window. For example, for a 20 GeV WIMP, Generation 2 is only likely to identify the right operator if the interaction is Coulomb-like, and is unlikely to do so in any other case. For a WIMP with a mass of 200 GeV or higher, success is almost guaranteed. We also find that, regardless of the scattering model and the WIMP parameters, a single Generation 2 experiment is unlikely to successfully discern the momentum dependence of the underlying operator on its own, but prospects improve drastically when experiments with different target materials and energy windows are analyzed jointly. Furthermore, we examine the quality of parameter estimation and degeneracies in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the effective theory. We find in particular that the resulting WIMP mass estimates can be severely biased if data are analyzed assuming the standard (momentum-independent) operator while the actual operator has momentum-dependence. Finally, we evaluate the ultimate reach of direct detection, finding that the prospects for successful operator selection prior to reaching the irreducible backgrounds are excellent, if the signal is just below the current limits, but slim if Generation 2 does not report WIMP detection

  20. Allosteric conformational barcodes direct signaling in the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Csermely, Peter

    2013-09-03

    The cellular network is highly interconnected. Pathways merge and diverge. They proceed through shared proteins and may change directions. How are cellular pathways controlled and their directions decided, coded, and read? These questions become particularly acute when we consider that a small number of pathways, such as signaling pathways that regulate cell fates, cell proliferation, and cell death in development, are extensively exploited. This review focuses on these signaling questions from the structural standpoint and discusses the literature in this light. All co-occurring allosteric events (including posttranslational modifications, pathogen binding, and gain-of-function mutations) collectively tag the protein functional site with a unique barcode. The barcode shape is read by an interacting molecule, which transmits the signal. A conformational barcode provides an intracellular address label, which selectively favors binding to one partner and quenches binding to others, and, in this way, determines the pathway direction, and, eventually, the cell's response and fate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microphone detected ionacoustic signal from metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dioszeghy, T.; Szoekefalvi-Nagy, Z.; Biro, T.

    1986-12-01

    An experimental system for studying the radiation-induced acoustic signal generated by a modulated 2 MeV He + ion beam in metals is described. For detection, a closed cell on the rear side of the copper or aluminium sample, a half-inch condenser microphone, and a lock-in amplifier were employed. The signal was found to be proportional to beam current and particle energy, and inversely proportional to cell length. A decrease of the signal magnitude and an increase of the phase delay with increasing modulation frequency and sample thickness were also observed. (author)

  2. Signal anomaly detection using modified CUSUM [cumulative sum] method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, V.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Benedetti, M.

    1988-01-01

    An important aspect of detection of anomalies in signals is the identification of changes in signal behavior caused by noise, jumps, changes in band-width, sudden pulses and signal bias. A methodology is developed to identify, isolate and characterize these anomalies using a modification of the cumulative sum (CUSUM) approach. The new algorithm performs anomaly detection at three levels and is implemented on a general purpose computer. 7 refs., 4 figs

  3. MICROSLEEPS AND THEIR DETECTION FROM THE BIOLOGICAL SIGNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Holub

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsleeps (MS are a frequently discussed topic due to their fatal consequences. Their detection is necessary for the purpose of sleep laboratories, where they provide an option for the quantifying rate of sleep deprivation level and objective evaluation of subjective sleepiness. Many studies are dealing with this topic for automotive usage to design a fatigue countermeasure device. We made a research of recent attitude to the development of the automated MS detection methods. We created an overview of several MS detection approaches based on the measurement of biological signals. We also summarized the changes in EEG, EOG and ECG signals, which have been published over the last few years. The reproducible changes in the entire EEG spectrum, primarily with the increased activity of delta and theta, were noticed during a transition to fatigue. There were observed changes of blinking rate and reduction of eye movements during the fatigue tasks. MS correspond with variations in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular function, which can be quantified by HRV parameters. The decrease in HR, VLF, and LF/HF before falling asleep was revealed. EEG signal, especially its slow wave activity, considered to be the most predictive and reliable for the level of alertness. In spite of the detection from EEG signal is the most common method, EOG based approaches can also be very efficient and more driver-friendly. Besides, the signal processing in the time domain can improve the detection accuracy of the short events like MS.

  4. Sensitive detection of nanomechanical motion using piezoresistive signal downmixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargatin, I.; Myers, E.B.; Arlett, J.; Gudlewski, B.; Roukes, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a method of measuring rf-range resonance properties of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) with integrated piezoresistive strain detectors serving as signal downmixers. The technique takes advantage of the high strain sensitivity of semiconductor-based piezoresistors, while overcoming the problem of rf signal attenuation due to a high source impedance. Our technique also greatly reduces the effect of the cross-talk between the detector and actuator circuits. We achieve thermomechanical noise detection of cantilever resonance modes up to 71 MHz at room temperature, demonstrating that downmixed piezoresistive signal detection is a viable high-sensitivity method of displacement detection in high-frequency NEMS

  5. An Advanced Detecting Scheme against a Signal Distortion with a Smart Transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Jun Young; Kim, Young Mi

    2013-01-01

    The analog signal distortion could be detected. Also the data integrity for information security could be provided. The assurance of the integrity in digital information as well as analog signals is necessary. The above proposed schemes can be utilized for detecting the modification of the digital information or analog signal distortion without any of authentication. These effects have merits of the defenses for analog signals and cyber security in terms of information integrity. There are many kinds of measuring nuclear I and C system. Thus, the applicable algorithms may be different according to the lightness or the level of the security in each measuring system. In the future, finding and applying the efficient algorithms in each measuring systems in the nuclear power plant should be studied. As the I and C system will be gradually digitalized, the requirements for basic security concepts should be considered and applied. As IT technology has been much developed, measuring nuclear I and C (Instrument and Control) systems also is going to be evolving. At this point, the smart transmitter has been developed and tried to be applied. Recently, constructed nuclear power plants in Korea have adopted the smart meters. In case of Shin-Kori unit 3, about 59 safety grade smart transmitters and about 180 non-safety grade smart transmitters are used for measuring various signals. In the field of measuring nuclear I and C (Instrument and Control) systems, the cyber security problems can happen more. Thus, providing defense methods against possible cyber attacks are essential. In particular, the defense schemes for providing data information integrity will be essential. In addition, it is necessary to detect the analog signal distortion between the host smart transmitters and the client cabinet. In this paper, applicable one of directions and methods against the above two problems are proposed

  6. An Advanced Detecting Scheme against a Signal Distortion with a Smart Transmitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Jun Young; Kim, Young Mi [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The analog signal distortion could be detected. Also the data integrity for information security could be provided. The assurance of the integrity in digital information as well as analog signals is necessary. The above proposed schemes can be utilized for detecting the modification of the digital information or analog signal distortion without any of authentication. These effects have merits of the defenses for analog signals and cyber security in terms of information integrity. There are many kinds of measuring nuclear I and C system. Thus, the applicable algorithms may be different according to the lightness or the level of the security in each measuring system. In the future, finding and applying the efficient algorithms in each measuring systems in the nuclear power plant should be studied. As the I and C system will be gradually digitalized, the requirements for basic security concepts should be considered and applied. As IT technology has been much developed, measuring nuclear I and C (Instrument and Control) systems also is going to be evolving. At this point, the smart transmitter has been developed and tried to be applied. Recently, constructed nuclear power plants in Korea have adopted the smart meters. In case of Shin-Kori unit 3, about 59 safety grade smart transmitters and about 180 non-safety grade smart transmitters are used for measuring various signals. In the field of measuring nuclear I and C (Instrument and Control) systems, the cyber security problems can happen more. Thus, providing defense methods against possible cyber attacks are essential. In particular, the defense schemes for providing data information integrity will be essential. In addition, it is necessary to detect the analog signal distortion between the host smart transmitters and the client cabinet. In this paper, applicable one of directions and methods against the above two problems are proposed.

  7. Signal modulation in cold-dark-matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freese, K.; Frieman, J.; Gould, A.

    1988-01-01

    If weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP's) are the dark matter in the galactic halo, they may be detected in low-background ionization detectors now operating or with low-temperature devices under development. In detecting WIMP's of low mass or WIMP's with spin-dependent nuclear interactions (e.g., photinos), a principal technical difficulty appears to be achieving very low thresholds (approx. < keV) in large (∼ kg) detectors with low background noise. We present an analytic treatment of WIMP detection and show that the seasonal modulation of the signal can be used to detect WIMP's even at low-signal-to-background levels and thus without the necessity of going to very-low-energy thresholds. As a result, the prospects for detecting a variety of cold-dark-matter candidates may be closer at hand than previously thought. We discuss in detail the detector characteristics required for a number of WIMP candidates, and carefully work out expected event rates for several present and proposed detectors

  8. Automatic Smoker Detection from Telephone Speech Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorjam, Amir Hossein; Hesaraki, Soheila; Safavi, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an automatic smoking habit detection from spontaneous telephone speech signals. In this method, each utterance is modeled using i-vector and non-negative factor analysis (NFA) frameworks, which yield low-dimensional representation of utterances by applying factor analysis...... method is evaluated on telephone speech signals of speakers whose smoking habits are known drawn from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2008 and 2010 Speaker Recognition Evaluation databases. Experimental results over 1194 utterances show the effectiveness of the proposed approach...... for the automatic smoking habit detection task....

  9. A signal detection theory analysis of an unconscious perception effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S J; Theios, J; Jenison, R

    1999-07-01

    The independent observation model (Macmillan & Creelman, 1991) is fitted to detection-identification data collected under conditions of heavy masking. The model accurately predicts a quantitative relationship between stimulus detection and stimulus identification over a wide range of detection performance. This model can also be used to offer a signal detection interpretation of the common finding of above-chance identification following a missed signal. While our finding is not a new one, the stimuli used in this experiment (redundant three-letter strings) differ slightly from those used in traditional signal detection work. Also, the stimuli were presented very briefly and heavily masked, conditions typical in the study of unconscious perception effects.

  10. EXTRAGALACTIC DARK MATTER AND DIRECT DETECTION EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baushev, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent astronomical data strongly suggest that a significant part of the dark matter content of the Local Group and Virgo Supercluster is not incorporated into the galaxy halos and forms diffuse components of these galaxy clusters. A portion of the particles from these components may penetrate the Milky Way and make an extragalactic contribution to the total dark matter containment of our Galaxy. We find that the particles of the diffuse component of the Local Group are apt to contribute ∼12% to the total dark matter density near Earth. The particles of the extragalactic dark matter stand out because of their high speed (∼600 km s –1 ), i.e., they are much faster than the galactic dark matter. In addition, their speed distribution is very narrow (∼20 km s –1 ). The particles have an isotropic velocity distribution (perhaps, in contrast to the galactic dark matter). The extragalactic dark matter should provide a significant contribution to the direct detection signal. If the detector is sensitive only to the fast particles (v > 450 km s –1 ), then the signal may even dominate. The density of other possible types of the extragalactic dark matter (for instance, of the diffuse component of the Virgo Supercluster) should be relatively small and comparable with the average dark matter density of the universe. However, these particles can generate anomaly high-energy collisions in direct dark matter detectors.

  11. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN 16 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Christopher E.; Hunter, Roger C.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Campbell, Jennifer R.; Girouard, Forrest R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in 4 yr of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 111,800 stars which were observed for the entire interval and 85,522 stars which were observed for a subset of the interval. We found that 9743 targets contained at least one signal consistent with the signature of a transiting or eclipsing object where the criteria for detection are periodicity of the detected transits, adequate signal-to-noise ratio, and acceptance by a number of tests which reject false positive detections. When targets that had produced a signal were searched repeatedly, an additional 6542 signals were detected on 3223 target stars, for a total of 16,285 potential detections. Comparison of the set of detected signals with a set of known and vetted transit events in the Kepler field of view shows that the recovery rate for these signals is 96.9%. The ensemble properties of the detected signals are reviewed

  12. DETECTION OF POTENTIAL TRANSIT SIGNALS IN 16 QUARTERS OF KEPLER MISSION DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn; Burke, Christopher J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Li, Jie; Quintana, Elisa V.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Christopher E.; Hunter, Roger C.; Sanderfer, Dwight T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); Campbell, Jennifer R.; Girouard, Forrest R., E-mail: peter.tenenbaum@nasa.gov [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of a search for potential transit signals in 4 yr of photometry data acquired by the Kepler mission. The targets of the search include 111,800 stars which were observed for the entire interval and 85,522 stars which were observed for a subset of the interval. We found that 9743 targets contained at least one signal consistent with the signature of a transiting or eclipsing object where the criteria for detection are periodicity of the detected transits, adequate signal-to-noise ratio, and acceptance by a number of tests which reject false positive detections. When targets that had produced a signal were searched repeatedly, an additional 6542 signals were detected on 3223 target stars, for a total of 16,285 potential detections. Comparison of the set of detected signals with a set of known and vetted transit events in the Kepler field of view shows that the recovery rate for these signals is 96.9%. The ensemble properties of the detected signals are reviewed.

  13. Object Detection: Current and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eVerschae

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Object detection is a key ability required by most computer and robot vision systems. The latest research on this area has been making great progress in many directions. In the current manuscript we give an overview of past research on object detection, outline the current main research directions, and discuss open problems and possible future directions.

  14. Detection of oscillatory components in noise signals and its application to fast detection of sodium boiling in LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.

    1975-09-01

    In general, the surveillance of technical plants is performed by observating the mean value of measured signals. In this method not all information included in these signals is used. On the other hand - for example in a reactor - disturbances are possible which generate small oscillatory components in the measured signals. In general, these oscillatory components do not influence the mean value of the signals and consequently do not activate the conventional control system; however they can be found by analysis of the signal's noise component. For the detection of these oscillatory signals the observation of the frequency spectra of the noise signals is particularly advantageous because they produce peaks at the oscillation frequencies. In this paper a new detection system for the fast detection of suddenly appearing peaks in the frequency spectra of noise signals is presented. The prototype of a compact detection unit was developed which continuously computes the power spectral density (PSD) of noise signals and simultaneously supervises the PSD for peaks in the relevant frequency range. The detection method is not affected by the frequency dependance of the PSD and is applicable to any noise signal. General criteria were developed to enable the determination of the optimal detection system and its sensitivity. The upper limits of false alarm rate and detection time were taken into account. The detection criteria are applicable to all noise signals with approximately normally distributed amplitudes. Theoretical results were confirmed in a number of experiments; special experimental and theoretical parameter studies were done for the optimal detection of sodium boiling in LMFBR's. Computations based on these results showed that local and integral sodium boiling can be detected in a wide core range of SNR 300 by observing fluctuations of the neutron flux. In this connection it is important to point out that no additional core instrumentation is necessary because the

  15. On the direct detection of multi-component dark matter: sensitivity studies and parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Scaffidi, Andre; White, Martin; Williams, Anthony G.

    2017-11-01

    We study the case of multi-component dark matter, in particular how direct detection signals are modified in the presence of several stable weakly-interacting-massive particles. Assuming a positive signal in a future direct detection experiment, stemming from two dark matter components, we study the region in parameter space where it is possible to distinguish a one from a two-component dark matter spectrum. First, we leave as free parameters the two dark matter masses and show that the two hypotheses can be significantly discriminated for a range of dark matter masses with their splitting being the critical factor. We then investigate how including the effects of different interaction strengths, local densities or velocity dispersions for the two components modifies these conclusions. We also consider the case of isospin-violating couplings. In all scenarios, we show results for various types of nuclei both for elastic spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions. Finally, assuming that the two-component hypothesis is confirmed, we quantify the accuracy with which the parameters can be extracted and discuss the different degeneracies that occur. This includes studying the case in which only a single experiment observes a signal, and also the scenario of having two signals from two different experiments, in which case the ratios of the couplings to neutrons and protons may also be extracted.

  16. The application of signal detection theory to optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    The role of measurements of noncommuting quantum observables is considered in the detection of signals and estimation of signal parameters by quantum receivers. The restoration of images focused on a photosensitive surface is discussed for data as numbers of photoelectrons ejected from various parts of the surface. The detection of an image formed on a photosensitive surface in the presence of background illumination for similar data is also considered.

  17. MSSM A-funnel and the galactic center excess: prospects for the LHC and direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freese, Katherine [Nordita (Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics),KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Center for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Center,University of Stockholm,10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); López, Alejandro [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shah, Nausheen R. [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University,Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Shakya, Bibhushan [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-04-11

    The pseudoscalar resonance or “A-funnel' in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is a widely studied framework for explaining dark matter that can yield interesting indirect detection and collider signals. The well-known Galactic Center excess (GCE) at GeV energies in the gamma ray spectrum, consistent with annihilation of a ≲40 GeV dark matter particle, has more recently been shown to be compatible with significantly heavier masses following reanalysis of the background. In this paper, we explore the LHC and direct detection implications of interpreting the GCE in this extended mass window within the MSSM A-funnel framework. We find that compatibility with relic density, signal strength, collider constraints, and Higgs data can be simultaneously achieved with appropriate parameter choices. The compatible regions give very sharp predictions of 200–600 GeV CP-odd/even Higgs bosons at low tan β at the LHC and spin-independent cross sections ≈10{sup −11} pb at direct detection experiments. Regardless of consistency with the GCE, this study serves as a useful template of the strong correlations between indirect, direct, and LHC signatures of the MSSM A-funnel region.

  18. Signal Detection with Criterion Noise: Applications to Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Diaz, Michael; Wee, Serena

    2009-01-01

    A tacit but fundamental assumption of the theory of signal detection is that criterion placement is a noise-free process. This article challenges that assumption on theoretical and empirical grounds and presents the noisy decision theory of signal detection (ND-TSD). Generalized equations for the isosensitivity function and for measures of…

  19. Indirect detection of radiation sources through direct detection of radiolysis products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Fischer, Larry E [Los Gatos, CA; Felter, Thomas E [Livermore, CA

    2010-04-20

    A system for indirectly detecting a radiation source by directly detecting radiolytic products. The radiation source emits radiation and the radiation produces the radiolytic products. A fluid is positioned to receive the radiation from the radiation source. When the fluid is irradiated, radiolytic products are produced. By directly detecting the radiolytic products, the radiation source is detected.

  20. Subgraph detection using graph signals

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar

    2017-03-06

    In this paper we develop statistical detection theory for graph signals. In particular, given two graphs, namely, a background graph that represents an usual activity and an alternative graph that represents some unusual activity, we are interested in answering the following question: To which of the two graphs does the observed graph signal fit the best? To begin with, we assume both the graphs are known, and derive an optimal Neyman-Pearson detector. Next, we derive a suboptimal detector for the case when the alternative graph is not known. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical experiments.

  1. Subgraph detection using graph signals

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar; Leus, Geert

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we develop statistical detection theory for graph signals. In particular, given two graphs, namely, a background graph that represents an usual activity and an alternative graph that represents some unusual activity, we are interested in answering the following question: To which of the two graphs does the observed graph signal fit the best? To begin with, we assume both the graphs are known, and derive an optimal Neyman-Pearson detector. Next, we derive a suboptimal detector for the case when the alternative graph is not known. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical experiments.

  2. Raman Spectra of Nanodiamonds: New Treatment Procedure Directed for Improved Raman Signal Marker Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul R. Nigmatullin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs have shown to be promising agents in several industries, ranging from electronic to biomedical applications. These NDs are characterized by small particle size ranging from 3 to 6 nm, while having a reactive surface and a stable inert core. Nanodiamonds can exhibit novel intrinsic properties such as fluorescence, high refractive index, and unique Raman signal making them very attractive imaging agents. In this work, we used several nanodiamond preparations for Raman spectroscopic studies. We exposed these nanodiamonds to increasing temperature treatments at constant heating rates (425–575°C aiding graphite release. We wanted to correlate changes in the nanodiamond surface and properties with Raman signal which could be used as a detection marker. These observations would hold potential utility in biomedical imaging applications. First, the procedure of optimal linear smoothing was applied successfully to eliminate the high-frequency fluctuations and to extract the smoothed Raman spectra. After that we applied the secondary Fourier transform as the fitting function based on some significant set of frequencies. The remnant noise was described in terms of the beta-distribution function. We expect this data treatment to provide better results in biomolecule tracking using nanodiamond base Raman labeling.

  3. Modelling of polysomnographic respiratory measurements for artefact detection and signal restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnayake, S I; Abeyratne, U R; Hukins, C; Duce, B

    2008-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG), which incorporates measures of sleep with measures of EEG arousal, air flow, respiratory movement and oxygenation, is universally regarded as the reference standard in diagnosing sleep-related respiratory diseases such as obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Over 15 channels of physiological signals are measured from a subject undergoing a typical overnight PSG session. The signals often suffer from data losses, interferences and artefacts. In a typical sleep scoring session, artefact-corrupted signal segments are visually detected and removed from further consideration. This is a highly time-consuming process, and subjective judgement is required for the job. During typical sleep scoring sessions, the target is the detection of segments of diagnostic interest, and signal restoration is not utilized for distorted segments. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for artefact detection and signal restoration based on the redundancy among respiratory flow signals. We focus on the air flow (thermistor sensors) and nasal pressure signals which are clinically significant in detecting respiratory disturbances. The method treats the respiratory system and other organs that provide respiratory-related inputs/outputs to it (e.g., cardiovascular, brain) as a possibly nonlinear coupled-dynamical system, and uses the celebrated Takens embedding theorem as the theoretical basis for signal prediction. Nonlinear prediction across time (self-prediction) and signals (cross-prediction) provides us with a mechanism to detect artefacts as unexplained deviations. In addition to detection, the proposed method carries the potential to correct certain classes of artefacts and restore the signal. In this study, we categorize commonly occurring artefacts and distortions in air flow and nasal pressure measurements into several groups and explore the efficacy of the proposed technique in detecting/recovering them. The results we obtained from a database of clinical

  4. Simplified dark matter models with charged mediators: prospects for direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandick, Pearl; Sinha, Kuver; Teng, Fei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah,Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2016-10-05

    We consider direct detection prospects for a class of simplified models of fermionic dark matter (DM) coupled to left and right-handed Standard Model fermions via two charged scalar mediators with arbitrary mixing angle α. DM interactions with the nucleus are mediated by higher electromagnetic moments, which, for Majorana DM, is the anapole moment. After giving a full analytic calculation of the anapole moment, including its α dependence, and matching with limits in the literature, we compute the DM-nucleon scattering cross-section and show the LUX and future LZ constraints on the parameter space of these models. We then compare these results with constraints coming from Fermi-LAT continuum and line searches. Results in the supersymmetric limit of these simplified models are provided in all cases. We find that future direct detection experiments will be able to probe most of the parameter space of these models for O(100−200) GeV DM and lightest mediator mass ≲O(5%) larger than the DM mass. The direct detection prospects dwindle for larger DM mass and larger mass gap between the DM and the lightest mediator mass, although appreciable regions are still probed for O(200) GeV DM and lightest mediator mass ≲O(20%) larger than the DM mass. The direct detection bounds are also attenuated near certain “blind spots' in the parameter space, where the anapole moment is severely suppressed due to cancellation of different terms. We carefully study these blind spots and the associated Fermi-LAT signals in these regions.

  5. Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter at direct detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Gian F.; Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2018-05-01

    We explore a novel class of multi-particle dark sectors, called Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter (iBDM). These models are constructed by combining properties of particles that scatter off matter by making transitions to heavier states (Inelastic Dark Matter) with properties of particles that are produced with a large Lorentz boost in annihilation processes in the galactic halo (Boosted Dark Matter). This combination leads to new signals that can be observed at ordinary direct detection experiments, but require unconventional searches for energetic recoil electrons in coincidence with displaced multi-track events. Related experimental strategies can also be used to probe MeV-range boosted dark matter via their interactions with electrons inside the target material.

  6. Sensing Methods for Detecting Analog Television Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Song, Chunyi; Harada, Hiroshi

    This paper introduces a unified method of spectrum sensing for all existing analog television (TV) signals including NTSC, PAL and SECAM. We propose a correlation based method (CBM) with a single reference signal for sensing any analog TV signals. In addition we also propose an improved energy detection method. The CBM approach has been implemented in a hardware prototype specially designed for participating in Singapore TV white space (WS) test trial conducted by Infocomm Development Authority (IDA) of the Singapore government. Analytical and simulation results of the CBM method will be presented in the paper, as well as hardware testing results for sensing various analog TV signals. Both AWGN and fading channels will be considered. It is shown that the theoretical results closely match with those from simulations. Sensing performance of the hardware prototype will also be presented in fading environment by using a fading simulator. We present performance of the proposed techniques in terms of probability of false alarm, probability of detection, sensing time etc. We also present a comparative study of the various techniques.

  7. Enhanced detection of a low-frequency signal by using broad squeezed light and a bichromatic local oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Jin, Yuanbin; Yu, Xudong; Zhang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    We experimentally study a protocol of using the broadband high-frequency squeezed vacuum to detect the low-frequency signal. In this scheme, the lower sideband field of the squeezed light carries the low-frequency modulation signal, and the two strong coherent light fields are applied as the bichromatic local oscillator in the homodyne detection to measure the quantum entanglement of the upper and lower sideband for the broadband squeezed light. The power of one of the local oscillators for detecting the upper sideband can be adjusted to optimize the conditional variance in the low-frequency regime by subtracting the photocurrent of the upper sideband field of the squeezed light from that of the lower sideband field. By means of the quantum correlation of the upper and lower sideband for the broadband squeezed light, the low-frequency signal beyond the standard quantum limit is measured. This scheme is appropriate for enhancing the sensitivity of the low-frequency signal by the aid of the broad squeezed light, such as gravitational waves detection, and does not need to directly produce the low-frequency squeezing in an optical parametric process.

  8. A signal amplification assay for HSV type 1 viral DNA detection using nanoparticles and direct acoustic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond Richard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acid based recognition of viral sequences can be used together with label-free biosensors to provide rapid, accurate confirmation of viral infection. To enhance detection sensitivity, gold nanoparticles can be employed with mass-sensitive acoustic biosensors (such as a quartz crystal microbalance by either hybridising nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates to complimentary surface-immobilised ssDNA probes on the sensor, or by using biotin-tagged target oligonucleotides bound to avidin-modified nanoparticles on the sensor. We have evaluated and refined these signal amplification assays for the detection from specific DNA sequences of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV type 1 and defined detection limits with a 16.5 MHz fundamental frequency thickness shear mode acoustic biosensor. Results In the study the performance of semi-homogeneous and homogeneous assay formats (suited to rapid, single step tests were evaluated utilising different diameter gold nanoparticles at varying DNA concentrations. Mathematical models were built to understand the effects of mass transport in the flow cell, the binding kinetics of targets to nanoparticles in solution, the packing geometries of targets on the nanoparticle, the packing of nanoparticles on the sensor surface and the effect of surface shear stiffness on the response of the acoustic sensor. This lead to the selection of optimised 15 nm nanoparticles that could be used with a 6 minute total assay time to achieve a limit of detection sensitivity of 5.2 × 10-12 M. Larger diameter nanoparticles gave poorer limits of detection than smaller particles. The limit of detection was three orders of magnitude lower than that observed using a hybridisation assay without nanoparticle signal amplification. Conclusions An analytical model was developed to determine optimal nanoparticle diameter, concentration and probe density, which allowed efficient and rapid optimisation of assay parameters

  9. Demonstration of DFT-spread 256QAM-OFDM signal transmission with cost-effective directly modulated laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Yu, Jianjun; Fang, Yuan; Dong, Ze; Li, Xinying; Chen, Lin

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrated a 256-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (256QAM) direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) transmission system utilizing a cost-effective directly modulated laser (DML). Intra-symbol frequency-domain averaging (ISFA) is applied to suppress in-band noise while the channel response estimation and Discrete Fourier Transform-spread (DFT-spread) is used to reduce the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the transmitted OFDM signal. The bit-error ratio (BER) of 15-Gbit/s 256QAM-OFDM signal has been measured after 20-km SSMF transmission that is less than 7% forward-error-correction (FEC) threshold of 3.8 × 10(-3) as the launch power into fiber is set at 6dBm. For 11.85-Gbit/s 256QAM-OFDM signal, with the aid of ISFA-based channel estimation and PAPR reduction enabled by DFT-spread, the BER after 20-km SSMF transmission can be improved from 6.4 × 10(-3) to 6.8 × 10(-4) when the received optical power is -6dBm.

  10. Frequency hopping signal detection based on wavelet decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yang; Chen, Xihao; Zhu, Rui

    2017-07-01

    Frequency hopping (FH) signal is widely adopted by military communications as a kind of low probability interception signal. Therefore, it is very important to research the FH signal detection algorithm. The existing detection algorithm of FH signals based on the time-frequency analysis cannot satisfy the time and frequency resolution requirement at the same time due to the influence of window function. In order to solve this problem, an algorithm based on wavelet decomposition and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) was proposed. The proposed algorithm removes the noise of the received signals by wavelet decomposition and detects the FH signals by Hilbert-Huang transform. Simulation results show the proposed algorithm takes into account both the time resolution and the frequency resolution. Correspondingly, the accuracy of FH signals detection can be improved.

  11. Compressive Detection Using Sub-Nyquist Radars for Sparse Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the compression detection problem using sub-Nyquist radars, which is well suited to the scenario of high bandwidths in real-time processing because it would significantly reduce the computational burden and save power consumption and computation time. A compressive generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT detector for sparse signals is proposed for sub-Nyquist radars without ever reconstructing the signal involved. The performance of the compressive GLRT detector is analyzed and the theoretical bounds are presented. The compressive GLRT detection performance of sub-Nyquist radars is also compared to the traditional GLRT detection performance of conventional radars, which employ traditional analog-to-digital conversion (ADC at Nyquist sampling rates. Simulation results demonstrate that the former can perform almost as well as the latter with a very small fraction of the number of measurements required by traditional detection in relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR cases.

  12. Spectral Correlation of Multicarrier Modulated Signals and Its Application for Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Haijian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral correlation theory for cyclostationary time-series signals has been studied for decades. Explicit formulas of spectral correlation function for various types of analog-modulated and digital-modulated signals are already derived. In this paper, we investigate and exploit the cyclostationarity characteristics for two kinds of multicarrier modulated (MCM signals: conventional OFDM and filter bank based multicarrier (FBMC signals. The spectral correlation characterization of MCM signal can be described by a special linear periodic time-variant (LPTV system. Using this LPTV description, we have derived the explicit theoretical formulas of nonconjugate and conjugate cyclic autocorrelation function (CAF and spectral correlation function (SCF for OFDM and FBMC signals. According to theoretical spectral analysis, Cyclostationary Signatures (CS are artificially embedded into MCM signal and a low-complexity signature detector is, therefore, presented for detecting MCM signal. Theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of this CS detector compared to traditionary energy detector.

  13. The erroneous signals of detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmer, Pete C; Ehlman, Sean M; McNamara, John M; Sih, Andrew

    2017-10-25

    Signal detection theory has influenced the behavioural sciences for over 50 years. The theory provides a simple equation that indicates numerous 'intuitive' results; e.g. prey should be more prone to take evasive action (in response to an ambiguous cue) if predators are more common. Here, we use analytical and computational models to show that, in numerous biological scenarios, the standard results of signal detection theory do not apply; more predators can result in prey being less responsive to such cues. The standard results need not apply when the probability of danger pertains not just to the present, but also to future decisions. We identify how responses to risk should depend on background mortality and autocorrelation, and that predictions in relation to animal welfare can also be reversed from the standard theory. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. A Signal Detection Theory Approach to Evaluating Oculometer Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorella, Kara; Lynn, William, III; Barry, John S.; Kelly, Lon; Shih, Ming-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Currently, data quality is described in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy and precision [Holmqvist et al. in press]. While this approach provides precise errors in pixels, or visual angle, often experiments are more concerned with whether subjects'points of gaze can be said to be reliable with respect to experimentally-relevant areas of interest. This paper proposes a method to characterize oculometer data quality using Signal Detection Theory (SDT) [Marcum 1947]. SDT classification results in four cases: Hit (correct report of a signal), Miss (failure to report a ), False Alarm (a signal falsely reported), Correct Reject (absence of a signal correctly reported). A technique is proposed where subjects' are directed to look at points in and outside of an AOI, and the resulting Points of Gaze (POG) are classified as Hits (points known to be internal to an AOI are classified as such), Misses (AOI points are not indicated as such), False Alarms (points external to AOIs are indicated as in the AOI), or Correct Rejects (points external to the AOI are indicated as such). SDT metrics describe performance in terms of discriminability, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper presentation will provide the procedure for conducting this assessment and an example of data collected for AOIs in a simulated flightdeck environment.

  15. Receiver bandwidth effects on complex modulation and detection using directly modulated lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Feng; Che, Di; Shieh, William

    2016-05-01

    Directly modulated lasers (DMLs) have long been employed for short- and medium-reach optical communications due to their low cost. Recently, a new modulation scheme called complex modulated DMLs has been demonstrated showing a significant optical signal to noise ratio sensitivity enhancement compared with the traditional intensity-only detection scheme. However, chirp-induced optical spectrum broadening is inevitable in complex modulated systems, which may imply a need for high-bandwidth receivers. In this Letter, we study the impact of receiver bandwidth effects on the performance of complex modulation and coherent detection systems based on DMLs. We experimentally demonstrate that such systems exhibit a reasonable tolerance for the reduced receiver bandwidth. For 10 Gbaud 4-level pulse amplitude modulation signals, the required electrical bandwidth is as low as 8.5 and 7.5 GHz for 7% and 20% forward error correction, respectively. Therefore, it is feasible to realize DML-based complex modulated systems using cost-effective receivers with narrow bandwidth.

  16. Layered ACO-OFDM for intensity-modulated direct-detection optical wireless transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Chen; Guo, Xuhan; Wang, Zhaocheng; Cunningham, David G; White, Ian H

    2015-05-04

    Layered asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) with high spectral efficiency is proposed in this paper for optical wireless transmission employing intensity modulation with direct detection. In contrast to the conventional ACO-OFDM, which only utilizes odd subcarriers for modulation, leading to an obvious spectral efficiency loss, in layered ACO-OFDM, the subcarriers are divided into different layers and modulated by different kinds of ACO-OFDM, which are combined for simultaneous transmission. In this way, more subcarriers are used for data transmission and the spectral efficiency is improved. An iterative receiver is also proposed for layered ACO-OFDM, where the negative clipping distortion of each layer is subtracted once it is detected so that the signals from different layers can be recovered. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed scheme can improve the spectral efficiency by up to 2 times compared with conventional ACO-OFDM approaches with the same modulation order. Meanwhile, simulation results confirm a considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain over ACO-OFDM at the same spectral efficiency.

  17. First Direct-Detection Constraints on eV-Scale Hidden-Photon Dark Matter with DAMIC at SNOLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Amidei, D.; Bertou, X.; Butner, M.; Cancelo, G.; Castañeda Vázquez, A.; Cervantes Vergara, B. A.; Chavarria, A. E.; Chavez, C. R.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Estrada, J.; Fernandez Moroni, G.; Gaïor, R.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hernández Torres, K. P.; Izraelevitch, F.; Kavner, A.; Kilminster, B.; Lawson, I.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Liao, J.; Matalon, A.; Mello, V. B. B.; Molina, J.; Privitera, P.; Ramanathan, K.; Sarkis, Y.; Schwarz, T.; Settimo, M.; Sofo Haro, M.; Thomas, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Tiouchichine, E.; Torres Machado, D.; Trillaud, F.; You, X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-04-05

    We present direct detection constraints on the absorption of hidden-photon dark matter with particle masses in the range 1.2-30 eV$c^{-2}$ with the DAMIC experiment at SNOLAB. Under the assumption that the local dark matter is entirely constituted of hidden photons, the sensitivity to the kinetic mixing parameter $\\kappa$ is competitive with constraints from solar emission, reaching a minimum value of 2.2$\\times$$10^{-14}$ at 17 eV$c^{-2}$. These results are the most stringent direct detection constraints on hidden-photon dark matter with masses 3-12 eV$c^{-2}$ and the first demonstration of direct experimental sensitivity to ionization signals $<$12 eV from dark matter interactions.

  18. Experimental demonstration of 608Gbit/s short reach transmission employing half-cycle 16QAM Nyquist-SCM signal and direct detection with 25Gbps EML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kangping; Zhou, Xian; Wang, Yiguang; Wang, Liang; Yuan, Jinhui; Yu, Changyuan; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao

    2016-10-31

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated an IM/DD short reach transmission system with a total capacity of 608Gbit/s (net capacity of 565.4Gbit/s exclude 7% FEC overhead) employing half-cycle 16QAM Nyquist-SCM signal and 25Gbps EML at O band. Direct detection-faster than Nyquist (DD-FTN) technique was employed to compensate channel impairments. Number of taps of DD-LMS and tap coefficient of post filter in DD-FTN were experimentally studied for different baud rates. Single-lane 152Gbit/s transmission over 10km of SSMF was experimentally demonstrated. Employing a 4-lanes LAN-WDM architecture, a total capacity of 608Gbit/s transmission over 2km was successfully achieved with a receiver sensitivity lower than -4dBm. To the best of authors' knowledge, this is the highest reported baud rate of half-cycle 16QAM Nyquist-SCM signal and the highest bit rate employing IM/DD and 25Gbps EML in a four lanes LAN-WDM architecture for short reach systems in the O band.

  19. FARADAY CUP AWARD: High Sensitivity Tune Measurement using Direct Diode Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M

    2012-01-01

    Direct Diode Detection (3D) is a technique developed at CERN initially for the LHC tune measurement system, to reach a sensitivity allowing observation of beam betatron oscillations with amplitudes below a micrometre. In this technique simple peak diode detectors are used to convert short beam pulses from a beam position pick-up into slowly varying signals. Their DC components, constituting a large background related to beam offsets, are suppressed by series capacitors, while the small signals related to beam oscillations are passed to the subsequent stages for amplification and filtering. As the demodulated beam oscillation signals are already in the kHz range, their processing is simple and they can be digitised with high resolution audio ADCs. This paper presents the history as well as the adventures of the 3D development and prototyping, along with some technical details. It documents a very efficient collaboration between CERN and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), with contributions from other labora...

  20. Three different signal amplification strategies for the impedimetric sandwich detection of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaña, Cristina; Valle, Manel del, E-mail: manel.delvalle@uab.cat

    2016-03-17

    In this work, we report a comparative study on three highly specific amplification strategies for the ultrasensitive detection of thrombin with the use of aptamer sandwich protocol. The protocol consisted on the use of a first thrombin aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface, the recognition of thrombin protein, and the reaction with a second biotinylated thrombin aptamer forming the sandwich. Through the exposed biotin end, three variants have been tested to amplify the electrochemical impedance signal. The strategies included (a) silver enhancement treatment, (b) gold enhancement treatment and (c) insoluble product produced by the combination of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The properties of the sensing surface were probed by electrochemical impedance measurements in the presence of the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox marker. Insoluble product strategy and silver enhancement treatment resulted in the lowest detection limit (0.3 pM), while gold enhancement method resulted in the highest reproducibility, 8.8% RSD at the pM thrombin concentration levels. Results of silver and gold enhancement treatment also permitted direct inspection by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Highlights: • Aptasensor to detect thrombin reaching the femtomolar level. • Biosensing protocol employs two thrombin aptamers in a sandwich capture scheme. • Use of second biotinylated aptamer allows many amplification and detection variants. • Precipitation reaction provides the highest signal amplification of ca. 3 times. • Double recognition event improves remarkably selectivity for thrombin detection.

  1. Three different signal amplification strategies for the impedimetric sandwich detection of thrombin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocaña, Cristina; Valle, Manel del

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study on three highly specific amplification strategies for the ultrasensitive detection of thrombin with the use of aptamer sandwich protocol. The protocol consisted on the use of a first thrombin aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface, the recognition of thrombin protein, and the reaction with a second biotinylated thrombin aptamer forming the sandwich. Through the exposed biotin end, three variants have been tested to amplify the electrochemical impedance signal. The strategies included (a) silver enhancement treatment, (b) gold enhancement treatment and (c) insoluble product produced by the combination of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The properties of the sensing surface were probed by electrochemical impedance measurements in the presence of the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox marker. Insoluble product strategy and silver enhancement treatment resulted in the lowest detection limit (0.3 pM), while gold enhancement method resulted in the highest reproducibility, 8.8% RSD at the pM thrombin concentration levels. Results of silver and gold enhancement treatment also permitted direct inspection by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Highlights: • Aptasensor to detect thrombin reaching the femtomolar level. • Biosensing protocol employs two thrombin aptamers in a sandwich capture scheme. • Use of second biotinylated aptamer allows many amplification and detection variants. • Precipitation reaction provides the highest signal amplification of ca. 3 times. • Double recognition event improves remarkably selectivity for thrombin detection.

  2. A Fast Detection Algorithm for the X-Ray Pulsar Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the X-ray pulsar signal is important for the autonomous navigation system using X-ray pulsars. In the condition of short observation time and limited number of photons for detection, the noise does not obey the Gaussian distribution. This fact has been little considered extant. In this paper, the model of the X-ray pulsar signal is rebuilt as the nonhomogeneous Poisson distribution and, in the condition of a fixed false alarm rate, a fast detection algorithm based on maximizing the detection probability is proposed. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed detection algorithm.

  3. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Information about medication safety in pregnancy is inadequate. We aimed to develop a signal detection methodology to routinely identify unusual associations between medications and congenital anomalies using data collected by 15 European congenital anomaly registries. METHODS: EUROmedi...... for 40 385 medication anomaly combinations in the data. Simes multiple testing procedure with a 50% false discovery rate (FDR) identified associations least likely to be due to chance and those associations with more than two cases with the exposure and the anomaly were selected for further investigation...

  4. Direct detection with dark mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, David; Surujon, Ze' ev [C. N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Tsai, Yuhsin [Physics Department, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We introduce dark mediator Dark Matter (dmDM) where the dark and visible sectors are connected by at least one light mediator ϕ carrying the same dark charge that stabilizes DM. ϕ is coupled to the Standard Model via an operator q{sup ¯}qϕϕ{sup ⁎}/Λ, and to dark matter via a Yukawa coupling y{sub χ}χ{sup c¯}χϕ. Direct detection is realized as the 2→3 process χN→χ{sup ¯}Nϕ at tree-level for m{sub ϕ}≲10 keV and small Yukawa coupling, or alternatively as a loop-induced 2→2 process χN→χN. We explore the direct-detection consequences of this scenario and find that a heavy O(100 GeV) dmDM candidate fakes different O(10 GeV) standard WIMPs in different experiments. Large portions of the dmDM parameter space are detectable above the irreducible neutrino background and not yet excluded by any bounds. Interestingly, for the m{sub ϕ} range leading to novel direct detection phenomenology, dmDM is also a form of Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM), which resolves inconsistencies between dwarf galaxy observations and numerical simulations.

  5. On the feasibility of self-mixing interferometer sensing for detection of the surface electrocardiographic signal using a customized electro-optic phase modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakar, A Ashrif A; Lim, Yah Leng; Wilson, Stephen J; Fuentes, Miguel; Bertling, Karl; Taimre, Thomas; Rakić, Aleksandar D; Bosch, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing offers an attractive option for detection of surface biopotentials in human subjects where electromagnetically noisy environments exist or safety requirements dictate a high degree of galvanic isolation. Such circumstances may be found in modern magnetic resonance imaging systems for example. The low signal amplitude and high source impedance of typical biopotentials have made optical transduction an uncommon sensing approach. We propose a solution consisting of an electro-optic phase modulator as a transducer, coupled to a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and the self-mixing signal detected via a photodiode. This configuration is physically evaluated with respect to synthesized surface electrocardiographic (EKG) signals of varying amplitudes and using differing optical feedback regimes. Optically detected EKG signals using strong optical feedback show the feasibility of this approach and indicate directions for optimization of the electro-optic transducer for improved signal-to-noise ratios. This may provide a new means of biopotential detection suited for environments characterized by harsh electromagnetic interference. (paper)

  6. Signal Detection Framework Using Semantic Text Mining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsan, Sithu D.

    2009-01-01

    Signal detection is a challenging task for regulatory and intelligence agencies. Subject matter experts in those agencies analyze documents, generally containing narrative text in a time bound manner for signals by identification, evaluation and confirmation, leading to follow-up action e.g., recalling a defective product or public advisory for…

  7. Adaptive Fourier decomposition based R-peak detection for noisy ECG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ze Wang; Chi Man Wong; Feng Wan

    2017-07-01

    An adaptive Fourier decomposition (AFD) based R-peak detection method is proposed for noisy ECG signals. Although lots of QRS detection methods have been proposed in literature, most detection methods require high signal quality. The proposed method extracts the R waves from the energy domain using the AFD and determines the R-peak locations based on the key decomposition parameters, achieving the denoising and the R-peak detection at the same time. Validated by clinical ECG signals in the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database, the proposed method shows better performance than the Pan-Tompkin (PT) algorithm in both situations of a native PT and the PT with a denoising process.

  8. First Direct-Detection Constraints on eV-Scale Hidden-Photon Dark Matter with DAMIC at SNOLAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Amidei, D; Bertou, X; Butner, M; Cancelo, G; Castañeda Vázquez, A; Cervantes Vergara, B A; Chavarria, A E; Chavez, C R; de Mello Neto, J R T; D'Olivo, J C; Estrada, J; Fernandez Moroni, G; Gaïor, R; Guardincerri, Y; Hernández Torres, K P; Izraelevitch, F; Kavner, A; Kilminster, B; Lawson, I; Letessier-Selvon, A; Liao, J; Matalon, A; Mello, V B B; Molina, J; Privitera, P; Ramanathan, K; Sarkis, Y; Schwarz, T; Settimo, M; Sofo Haro, M; Thomas, R; Tiffenberg, J; Tiouchichine, E; Torres Machado, D; Trillaud, F; You, X; Zhou, J

    2017-04-07

    We present direct detection constraints on the absorption of hidden-photon dark matter with particle masses in the range 1.2-30  eV c^{-2} with the DAMIC experiment at SNOLAB. Under the assumption that the local dark matter is entirely constituted of hidden photons, the sensitivity to the kinetic mixing parameter κ is competitive with constraints from solar emission, reaching a minimum value of 2.2×10^{-14} at 17  eV c^{-2}. These results are the most stringent direct detection constraints on hidden-photon dark matter in the galactic halo with masses 3-12  eV c^{-2} and the first demonstration of direct experimental sensitivity to ionization signals dark matter interactions.

  9. Integrated Giant Magnetoresistance Technology for Approachable Weak Biomagnetic Signal Detections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-Min; Hu, Liang; Fu, Xin

    2018-01-07

    With the extensive applications of biomagnetic signals derived from active biological tissue in both clinical diagnoses and human-computer-interaction, there is an increasing need for approachable weak biomagnetic sensing technology. The inherent merits of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and its high integration with multiple technologies makes it possible to detect weak biomagnetic signals with micron-sized, non-cooled and low-cost sensors, considering that the magnetic field intensity attenuates rapidly with distance. This paper focuses on the state-of-art in integrated GMR technology for approachable biomagnetic sensing from the perspective of discipline fusion between them. The progress in integrated GMR to overcome the challenges in weak biomagnetic signal detection towards high resolution portable applications is addressed. The various strategies for 1/ f noise reduction and sensitivity enhancement in integrated GMR technology for sub-pT biomagnetic signal recording are discussed. In this paper, we review the developments of integrated GMR technology for in vivo/vitro biomagnetic source imaging and demonstrate how integrated GMR can be utilized for biomagnetic field detection. Since the field sensitivity of integrated GMR technology is being pushed to fT/Hz 0.5 with the focused efforts, it is believed that the potential of integrated GMR technology will make it preferred choice in weak biomagnetic signal detection in the future.

  10. Can we use PCA to detect small signals in noisy data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, Jakob; Rusz, Ján

    2017-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is among the most commonly applied dimension reduction techniques suitable to denoise data. Focusing on its limitations to detect low variance signals in noisy data, we discuss how statistical and systematical errors occur in PCA reconstructed data as a function of the size of the data set, which extends the work of Lichtert and Verbeeck, (2013) [16]. Particular attention is directed towards the estimation of bias introduced by PCA and its influence on experiment design. Aiming at the denoising of large matrices, nullspace based denoising (NBD) is introduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuous emotion detection using EEG signals and facial expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleymani, Mohammad; Asghari-Esfeden, Sadjad; Pantic, Maja; Fu, Yun

    Emotions play an important role in how we select and consume multimedia. Recent advances on affect detection are focused on detecting emotions continuously. In this paper, for the first time, we continuously detect valence from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and facial expressions in response to

  12. Detection and Processing Techniques of FECG Signal for Fetal Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan MA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fetal electrocardiogram (FECG signal contains potentially precise information that could assist clinicians in making more appropriate and timely decisions during labor. The ultimate reason for the interest in FECG signal analysis is in clinical diagnosis and biomedical applications. The extraction and detection of the FECG signal from composite abdominal signals with powerful and advance methodologies are becoming very important requirements in fetal monitoring. The purpose of this review paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and developed algorithms on FECG signal detection and analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the FECG signal and its nature for fetal monitoring. A comparative study has been carried out to show the performance and accuracy of various methods of FECG signal analysis for fetal monitoring. Finally, this paper further focused some of the hardware implementations using electrical signals for monitoring the fetal heart rate. This paper opens up a passage for researchers, physicians, and end users to advocate an excellent understanding of FECG signal and its analysis procedures for fetal heart rate monitoring system.

  13. Nasal chemosensory cells use bitter taste signaling to detect irritants and bacterial signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizzano, Marco; Gulbransen, Brian D; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Clapp, Tod R; Herman, Jake P; Sibhatu, Hiruy M; Churchill, Mair E A; Silver, Wayne L; Kinnamon, Sue C; Finger, Thomas E

    2010-02-16

    The upper respiratory tract is continually assaulted with harmful dusts and xenobiotics carried on the incoming airstream. Detection of such irritants by the trigeminal nerve evokes protective reflexes, including sneezing, apnea, and local neurogenic inflammation of the mucosa. Although free intra-epithelial nerve endings can detect certain lipophilic irritants (e.g., mints, ammonia), the epithelium also houses a population of trigeminally innervated solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) that express T2R bitter taste receptors along with their downstream signaling components. These SCCs have been postulated to enhance the chemoresponsive capabilities of the trigeminal irritant-detection system. Here we show that transduction by the intranasal solitary chemosensory cells is necessary to evoke trigeminally mediated reflex reactions to some irritants including acyl-homoserine lactone bacterial quorum-sensing molecules, which activate the downstream signaling effectors associated with bitter taste transduction. Isolated nasal chemosensory cells respond to the classic bitter ligand denatonium as well as to the bacterial signals by increasing intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, these same substances evoke changes in respiration indicative of trigeminal activation. Genetic ablation of either G alpha-gustducin or TrpM5, essential elements of the T2R transduction cascade, eliminates the trigeminal response. Because acyl-homoserine lactones serve as quorum-sensing molecules for gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, detection of these substances by airway chemoreceptors offers a means by which the airway epithelium may trigger an epithelial inflammatory response before the bacteria reach population densities capable of forming destructive biofilms.

  14. Direct detection of light anapole and magnetic dipole DM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Gondolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We present comparisons of direct detection data for ''light WIMPs'' with an anapole moment interaction (ADM) and a magnetic dipole moment interaction (MDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) for the dark halo of our galaxy and in a halo-independent manner. In the SHM analysis we find that a combination of the 90% CL LUX and CDMSlite limits or the new 90% CL SuperCDMS limit by itself exclude the parameter space regions allowed by DAMA, CoGeNT and CDMS-II-Si data for both ADM and MDM. In our halo-independent analysis the new LUX bound excludes the same potential signal regions as the previous XENON100 bound. Much of the remaining signal regions is now excluded by SuperCDMS, while the CDMSlite limit is much above them. The situation is of strong tension between the positive and negative search results both for ADM and MDM. We also clarify the confusion in the literature about the ADM scattering cross section

  15. An aptamer-based biosensing platform for highly sensitive detection of platelet-derived growth factor via enzyme-mediated direct electrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Kun; Xiang Yang; Zhang Liqun; Chen Qinghai; Fu Weiling

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase used for signal generation in aptasensor. ► Using novel nanocomposite for immobilization and signal amplification. ► Sensitive electrochemical detection of platelet-derived growth factor. - Abstract: In this work, a new label-free electrochemical aptamer-based sensor (aptasensor) was constructed for detection of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) based on the direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD). For this proposed aptasensor, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-protected graphene-gold nanoparticles (P-Gra-GNPs) composite was firstly coated on electrode surface to form the interface with biocompatibility and huge surface area for the adsorption of GOD layer. Subsequently, gold nanoclusters (GNCs) were deposited on the surface of GOD to capture PDGF binding aptamer (PBA). Finally, GOD as a blocking reagent was employed to block the remaining active sites of the GNCs and avoid the nonspecific adsorption. With the direct electron transfer of double layer GOD membranes, the aptasensor showed excellent electrochemical response and the peak current decreased linearly with increasing logarithm of PDGF concentration from 0.005 nM to 60 nM with a relatively low limit of detection of 1.7 pM. The proposed aptasensor exhibited high specificity, good reproducibility and long-term stability, which provided a new promising technique for aptamer-based protein detection.

  16. Parametric roll resonance monitoring using signal-based detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Falkenberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Extreme roll motion of ships can be caused by several phenomena, one of which is parametric roll resonance. Several incidents occurred unexpectedly around the millennium and caused vast fiscal losses on large container vessels. The phenomenon is now well understood and some consider parametric roll...... algorithms in real conditions, and to evaluate the frequency of parametric roll events on the selected vessels. Detection performance is scrutinised through the validation of the detected events using owners’ standard methods, and supported by available wave radar data. Further, a bivariate statistical...... analysis of the outcome of the signal-based detectors is performed to assess the real life false alarm probability. It is shown that detection robustness and very low false warning rates are obtained. The study concludes that small parametric roll events are occurring, and that the proposed signal...

  17. Direct 13C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fürtig, Boris; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina; Kovacs, Helena; Schwalbe, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond 1 H detection. Here, we develop 13 C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for 13 C direct detection allows correlations of donor–acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed 13 C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics.

  18. An Alternative Method for Tilecal Signal Detection and Amplitude Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotto-Maior Peralva, B; The ATLAS collaboration; Manhães de Andrade Filho, L; Manoel de Seixas, J

    2011-01-01

    The Barrel Hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS (Tilecal) is a detector used in the reconstruction of hadrons, jets, muons and missing transverse energy from the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It comprises 10,000 channels in four readout partitions and each calorimeter cell is made of two readout channels for redundancy. The energy deposited by the particles produced in the collisions is read out by the several readout channels and its value is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm, which reconstructs the amplitude and the time of the digitized signal pulse sampled every 25 ns. This work deals with signal detection and amplitude estimation for the Tilecal under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. It explores the applicability (at the cell level) of a Matched Filter (MF), which is known to be the optimal signal detector in terms of the SNR. Moreover, it investigates the impact of signal detection when summing both signals from the same cell before estimating the amplitude, ...

  19. Detecting impact signal in mechanical fault diagnosis under chaotic and Gaussian background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinfeng; Duan, Jie; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Huiyong; Xie, Julan; Chen, Hanwen

    2018-01-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. Traditional methods, such like stochastic resonance (SR), which using noise to enhance weak signals instead of suppressing noise, failed in chaotic background. Neural network, which use reference sequence to estimate and reconstruct the background noise, failed in white Gaussian noise. To solve these problems, a novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting impact signal buried under heavy chaotic and Gaussian background noise is proposed. First, the proposed method obtains the virtual reference sequence by constructing the Hankel data matrix. Then an M-order optimal FIR filter is designed, which can minimize the output power of background noise and pass the weak periodic signal undistorted. Finally, detection and reconstruction of the weak periodic signal are achieved from the output SBNR (signal to background noise ratio). The simulation shows, compared with the stochastic resonance (SR) method, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in chaotic noise background while stochastic resonance (SR) method cannot. Compared with the neural network method, (a) the proposed method does not need a reference sequence while neural network method needs one; (b) the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in white Gaussian noise background while the neural network method fails, in chaotic noise background, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal under a lower SBNR (about 8-17 dB lower) than the neural network method; (c) the proposed method can reconstruct the weak periodic signal precisely.

  20. Measurement of Rank and Other Properties of Direct and Scattered Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svante Björklund

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed an experiment for low-cost indoor measurements of rank and other properties of direct and scattered signals with radar interference suppression in mind. The signal rank is important also in many other applications, for example, DOA (Direction of Arrival estimation, estimation of the number of and location of transmitters in electronic warfare, and increasing the capacity in wireless communications. In real radar applications, such measurements can be very expensive, for example, involving airborne radars with array antennas. We have performed the measurements in an anechoic chamber with several transmitters, a receiving array antenna, and a moving reflector. Our experiment takes several aspects into account: transmitted signals with different correlation, decorrelation of the signals during the acquisition interval, covariance matrix estimation, noise eigenvalue spread, calibration, near-field compensation, scattering in a rough surface, and good control of the influencing factors. With our measurements we have observed rank, DOA spectrum, and eigenpatterns of direct and scattered signals. The agreement of our measured properties with theoretic and simulated results in the literature shows that our experiment is realistic and sound. The detailed description of our experiment could serve as help for conducting other well-controlled experiments.

  1. DETECT: a MATLAB toolbox for event detection and identification in time series, with applications to artifact detection in EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhern, Vernon; Hairston, W David; Robbins, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor and recording technology have allowed scientists to acquire very large time-series datasets. Researchers often analyze these datasets in the context of events, which are intervals of time where the properties of the signal change relative to a baseline signal. We have developed DETECT, a MATLAB toolbox for detecting event time intervals in long, multi-channel time series. Our primary goal is to produce a toolbox that is simple for researchers to use, allowing them to quickly train a model on multiple classes of events, assess the accuracy of the model, and determine how closely the results agree with their own manual identification of events without requiring extensive programming knowledge or machine learning experience. As an illustration, we discuss application of the DETECT toolbox for detecting signal artifacts found in continuous multi-channel EEG recordings and show the functionality of the tools found in the toolbox. We also discuss the application of DETECT for identifying irregular heartbeat waveforms found in electrocardiogram (ECG) data as an additional illustration.

  2. DETECT: a MATLAB toolbox for event detection and identification in time series, with applications to artifact detection in EEG signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Lawhern

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sensor and recording technology have allowed scientists to acquire very large time-series datasets. Researchers often analyze these datasets in the context of events, which are intervals of time where the properties of the signal change relative to a baseline signal. We have developed DETECT, a MATLAB toolbox for detecting event time intervals in long, multi-channel time series. Our primary goal is to produce a toolbox that is simple for researchers to use, allowing them to quickly train a model on multiple classes of events, assess the accuracy of the model, and determine how closely the results agree with their own manual identification of events without requiring extensive programming knowledge or machine learning experience. As an illustration, we discuss application of the DETECT toolbox for detecting signal artifacts found in continuous multi-channel EEG recordings and show the functionality of the tools found in the toolbox. We also discuss the application of DETECT for identifying irregular heartbeat waveforms found in electrocardiogram (ECG data as an additional illustration.

  3. Enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and adenosine triphosphate by dendritic DNA concatamer-based signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Lin, Ying; Liu, Tao; Cheng, Chuanbin; Wei, Wenji; Wang, Li; Li, Feng

    2014-06-15

    Hybridization chain reaction (HCR) strategy has been well developed for the fabrication of various biosensing platforms for signal amplification. Herein, a novel enzyme-free and label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensing platform for the detection of target DNA and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was firstly proposed, in which three auxiliary DNA probes were ingeniously designed to construct the dendritic DNA concatamer via HCR strategy and used as hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex) carrier for signal amplification. With the developed dendritic DNA concatamer-based signal amplification strategy, the DNA biosensor could achieve an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and ATP with a superior detection limit as low as 5 aM and 20 fM, respectively, and also demonstrate a high selectivity for DNA and ATP detection. The currently proposed dendritic DNA concatamer opens a promising direction to construct ultrasensitive DNA biosensing platform for biomolecular detection in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine, which offers the distinct advantages of simplicity and cost efficiency owing to no need of any kind of enzyme, chemical modification or labeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A graph signal filtering-based approach for detection of different edge types on airborne lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Eda; Vural, Elif; Alatan, Aydin

    2017-10-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning is a well-known remote sensing technology, which provides a dense and highly accurate, yet unorganized point cloud of earth surface. During the last decade, extracting information from the data generated by airborne LiDAR systems has been addressed by many studies in geo-spatial analysis and urban monitoring applications. However, the processing of LiDAR point clouds is challenging due to their irregular structure and 3D geometry. In this study, we propose a novel framework for the detection of the boundaries of an object or scene captured by LiDAR. Our approach is motivated by edge detection techniques in vision research and it is established on graph signal filtering which is an exciting and promising field of signal processing for irregular data types. Due to the convenient applicability of graph signal processing tools on unstructured point clouds, we achieve the detection of the edge points directly on 3D data by using a graph representation that is constructed exclusively to answer the requirements of the application. Moreover, considering the elevation data as the (graph) signal, we leverage aerial characteristic of the airborne LiDAR data. The proposed method can be employed both for discovering the jump edges on a segmentation problem and for exploring the crease edges on a LiDAR object on a reconstruction/modeling problem, by only adjusting the filter characteristics.

  5. Detection of electron magnetic circular dichroism signals under zone axial diffraction geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dongsheng [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Rusz, Jan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Cai, Jianwang [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Jing, E-mail: jzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-10-15

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique provides us a new opportunity to explore magnetic properties in the transmission electron microscope. However, specific diffraction geometry is the major limitation. Only the two-beam and three-beam case are demonstrated in the experiments until now. Here, we present the more general case of zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry through which the EMCD signals can be detected even with the very strong sensitivity to dynamical diffraction conditions. Our detailed calculations and well-controlled diffraction conditions lead to experiments in agreement with theory. The effect of dynamical diffraction conditions on EMCD signals are discussed both in theory and experiments. Moreover, with the detailed analysis of dynamical diffraction effects, we experimentally obtain the separate EMCD signals for each crystallographic site in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, which is also applicable for other materials and cannot be achieved by site-specific EMCD and XMCD technique directly. Our work extends application of more general diffraction geometries and will further promote the development of EMCD technique. - Highlights: • The zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry is presented for EMCD technique. • The detailed calculations for EMCD signals under ZA case are conducted. • The EMCD signals are obtained under the ZA case in the experiments. • The effect of dynamical effect on EMCD signals under ZA case is discussed. • Site-specific EMCD signals of Fe in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} are obtained by specific ZA conditions.

  6. Expert AE signal arrival detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chlada, Milan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, 3/4 (2011), s. 191-205 ISSN 1741-8410. [NDT in PROGRESS /4./. Praha, 05.11.2007-07.11.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274; GA ČR GA101/07/1518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * signal arrival detection Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.inderscience.com/search/index.php?mainAction=search& action =record&rec_id=43215&prevQuery=&ps=10&m=or

  7. “UTILIZING” SIGNAL DETECTION THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Spencer K.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2014-01-01

    What do inferring what a person is thinking or feeling, deciding to report a symptom to your doctor, judging a defendant’s guilt, and navigating a dimly lit room have in common? They involve perceptual uncertainty (e.g., a scowling face might indicate anger or concentration, which engender different appropriate responses), and behavioral risk (e.g., a cost to making the wrong response). Signal detection theory describes these types of decisions. In this tutorial we show how, by incorporating ...

  8. Advanced radar detection schemes under mismatched signal models

    CERN Document Server

    Bandiera, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive detection of signals embedded in correlated Gaussian noise has been an active field of research in the last decades. This topic is important in many areas of signal processing such as, just to give some examples, radar, sonar, communications, and hyperspectral imaging. Most of the existing adaptive algorithms have been designed following the lead of the derivation of Kelly's detector which assumes perfect knowledge of the target steering vector. However, in realistic scenarios, mismatches are likely to occur due to both environmental and instrumental factors. When a mismatched signal

  9. Signal Detection Theory-Based Information Processing for the Detection of Breast Cancer at Microwave Frequencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nolte, Loren

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis is that one can use signal detection theory to improve the performance in detecting tumors in the breast by using this theory to develop task-oriented information processing techniques...

  10. Detection of weak transitions in signal dynamics using recurrence time statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.B.; Cao Yinhe; Gu Lingyun; Harris, J.G.; Principe, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Signal detection in noisy and nonstationary environments is very challenging. In this Letter, we study why the two types of recurrence times [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3178] may be very useful for detecting weak transitions in signal dynamics. We particularly emphasize that the recurrence times of the second type may be more powerful in detecting transitions with very low energy. These features are illustrated by studying a number of speech signals with fricatives and plosives. We have also shown that the recurrence times of the first type, nevertheless, has the distinguished feature of being more robust to the noise level and less sensitive to the parameter change of the algorithm. Since throughout our study, we have not explored any features unique to the speech signals, the results shown here may indicate that these tools may be useful in many different applications

  11. BURAR: Detection and signal processing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Radulian, Mircea; Popa, Mihaela

    2004-01-01

    Since July 2002, a new seismic monitoring station, the Bucovina Seismic Array (BURAR), has been installed in the northern part of Romania, in a joint effort of the Air Force Technical Applications Center, USA, and the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania. The array consists of 10 seismic sensors (9 short-period and one broad band) located in boreholes and distributed in a 5 x 5 km area. At present, the seismic data are continuously recorded by BURAR and transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Centre (ROM N DC), at Bucharest and to the National Data Center of USA, in Florida. The statistical analysis for the seismic information gathered at ROM N DC by the BURAR in the August 2002 - December 2003 time interval points out a much better efficiency of the BURAR system in detecting teleseismic events and local events occurred in the N-NE part of Romanian territory, in comparison with the actual Romanian Telemetered Network. Furthermore, the BURAR monitoring system has proven to be an important source of reliable data for NIEP efforts in elaborating of the seismic bulletins. Signal processing capability of the system provides useful information in order to improve the location of the local seismic events, using the array beamforming facility. This method increases significantly the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic signal by summing up the coherent signals from the array components. In this way, eventual source nucleation phases can be detected. At the same time, using the slowness and backazimuth estimations by f-k analysis, locations for the seismic events can be performed based only on the information recorded by the BURAR array, acting like a single seismic station recording system. Additionally, f-k analysis techniques are useful in the local site effects estimation and interpretation of the local geological structure. (authors)

  12. System and method for detection of dispersed broadband signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.; Dunham, M.E.

    1999-06-08

    A system and method for detecting the presence of dispersed broadband signals in real time are disclosed. The present invention utilizes a bank of matched filters for detecting the received dispersed broadband signals. Each matched filter uses a respective robust time template that has been designed to approximate the dispersed broadband signals of interest, and each time template varies across a spectrum of possible dispersed broadband signal time templates. The received dispersed broadband signal x(t) is received by each of the matched filters, and if one or more matches occurs, then the received data is determined to have signal data of interest. This signal data can then be analyzed and/or transmitted to Earth for analysis, as desired. The system and method of the present invention will prove extremely useful in many fields, including satellite communications, plasma physics, and interstellar research. The varying time templates used in the bank of matched filters are determined as follows. The robust time domain template is assumed to take the form w(t)=A(t)cos[l brace]2[phi](t)[r brace]. Since the instantaneous frequency f(t) is known to be equal to the derivative of the phase [phi](t), the trajectory of a joint time-frequency representation of x(t) is used as an approximation of [phi][prime](t). 10 figs.

  13. Directly Detecting MeV-Scale Dark Matter Via Solar Reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Haipeng; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef; Ritz, Adam

    2018-04-06

    If dark matter (DM) particles are lighter than a few   MeV/c^{2} and can scatter off electrons, their interaction within the solar interior results in a considerable hardening of the spectrum of galactic dark matter received on Earth. For a large range of the mass versus cross section parameter space, {m_{e},σ_{e}}, the "reflected" component of the DM flux is far more energetic than the end point of the ambient galactic DM energy distribution, making it detectable with existing DM detectors sensitive to an energy deposition of 10-10^{3}  eV. After numerically simulating the small reflected component of the DM flux, we calculate its subsequent signal due to scattering on detector electrons, deriving new constraints on σ_{e} in the MeV and sub-MeV range using existing data from the XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX-II, and XENON1T experiments, as well as making projections for future low threshold direct detection experiments.

  14. Directly Detecting MeV-Scale Dark Matter Via Solar Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Haipeng; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef; Ritz, Adam

    2018-04-01

    If dark matter (DM) particles are lighter than a few MeV /c2 and can scatter off electrons, their interaction within the solar interior results in a considerable hardening of the spectrum of galactic dark matter received on Earth. For a large range of the mass versus cross section parameter space, {me,σe}, the "reflected" component of the DM flux is far more energetic than the end point of the ambient galactic DM energy distribution, making it detectable with existing DM detectors sensitive to an energy deposition of 10 -103 eV . After numerically simulating the small reflected component of the DM flux, we calculate its subsequent signal due to scattering on detector electrons, deriving new constraints on σe in the MeV and sub-MeV range using existing data from the XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX-II, and XENON1T experiments, as well as making projections for future low threshold direct detection experiments.

  15. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Ritz, Emily [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada); Ahmed, Mumdooh A. M. [Suez University, The Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Bamm, Vladimir V.; Harauz, George [University of Guelph, Biophysics Interdepartmental Group (Canada); Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir, E-mail: vladizha@uoguelph.ca [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  16. An aptamer-based biosensing platform for highly sensitive detection of platelet-derived growth factor via enzyme-mediated direct electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Kun; Xiang Yang; Zhang Liqun; Chen Qinghai [Laboratory of the Clinical Experimental Base of Biosensor and Microarray, Center of Molecule and Gene Diagnosis, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Fu Weiling, E-mail: weilingfu@yahoo.com [Laboratory of the Clinical Experimental Base of Biosensor and Microarray, Center of Molecule and Gene Diagnosis, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2013-01-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase used for signal generation in aptasensor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using novel nanocomposite for immobilization and signal amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitive electrochemical detection of platelet-derived growth factor. - Abstract: In this work, a new label-free electrochemical aptamer-based sensor (aptasensor) was constructed for detection of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) based on the direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD). For this proposed aptasensor, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-protected graphene-gold nanoparticles (P-Gra-GNPs) composite was firstly coated on electrode surface to form the interface with biocompatibility and huge surface area for the adsorption of GOD layer. Subsequently, gold nanoclusters (GNCs) were deposited on the surface of GOD to capture PDGF binding aptamer (PBA). Finally, GOD as a blocking reagent was employed to block the remaining active sites of the GNCs and avoid the nonspecific adsorption. With the direct electron transfer of double layer GOD membranes, the aptasensor showed excellent electrochemical response and the peak current decreased linearly with increasing logarithm of PDGF concentration from 0.005 nM to 60 nM with a relatively low limit of detection of 1.7 pM. The proposed aptasensor exhibited high specificity, good reproducibility and long-term stability, which provided a new promising technique for aptamer-based protein detection.

  17. Extraction of ECG signal with adaptive filter for hearth abnormalities detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnip, Mardi; Saragih, Rijois. I. E.; Dharma, Abdi; Esti Kusumandari, Dwi; Turnip, Arjon; Sitanggang, Delima; Aisyah, Siti

    2018-04-01

    This paper demonstrates an adaptive filter method for extraction ofelectrocardiogram (ECG) feature in hearth abnormalities detection. In particular, electrocardiogram (ECG) is a recording of the heart's electrical activity by capturing a tracingof cardiac electrical impulse as it moves from the atrium to the ventricles. The applied algorithm is to evaluate and analyze ECG signals for abnormalities detection based on P, Q, R and S peaks. In the first phase, the real-time ECG data is acquired and pre-processed. In the second phase, the procured ECG signal is subjected to feature extraction process. The extracted features detect abnormal peaks present in the waveform. Thus the normal and abnormal ECG signal could be differentiated based on the features extracted.

  18. arXiv Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter at Direct Detection Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian F.; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2018-05-10

    We explore a novel class of multi-particle dark sectors, called Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter (iBDM). These models are constructed by combining properties of particles that scatter off matter by making transitions to heavier states (Inelastic Dark Matter) with properties of particles that are produced with a large Lorentz boost in annihilation processes in the galactic halo (Boosted Dark Matter). This combination leads to new signals that can be observed at ordinary direct detection experiments, but require unconventional searches for energetic recoil electrons in coincidence with displaced multi-track events. Related experimental strategies can also be used to probe MeV-range boosted dark matter via their interactions with electrons inside the target material.

  19. Method of shaping of direction-characterization of sensitivity of ionizing radiation detection probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnecki, J.; Jaszczuk, J.; Kruczyk, M.; Slapa, M.; Wroblewski, T.

    1986-01-01

    A method of shaping of direction-characterization of sensitivity of the ionizing radiation detection probe, especially equipped with small gamma detectors is described. Two detectors are placed coaxially in the bases of the cylindrical shield. One of them is uncovered in the highest degree and the second is not covered to a maximum. The signals from them are processed on the standarized sequences of electrical impulses (taking into account the heights and the widths of the amplitude). 2 figs., 1 tab. (A.S.)

  20. Detecting malicious chaotic signals in wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ranjit Kumar; Kumari, Sangeeta

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, an e-epidemic Susceptible-Infected-Vaccinated (SIV) model has been proposed to analyze the effect of node immunization and worms attacking dynamics in wireless sensor network. A modified nonlinear incidence rate with cyrtoid type functional response has been considered using sleep and active mode approach. Detailed stability analysis and the sufficient criteria for the persistence of the model system have been established. We also established different types of bifurcation analysis for different equilibria at different critical points of the control parameters. We performed a detailed Hopf bifurcation analysis and determine the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions using center manifold theorem. Numerical simulations are carried out to confirm the theoretical results. The impact of the control parameters on the dynamics of the model system has been investigated and malicious chaotic signals are detected. Finally, we have analyzed the effect of time delay on the dynamics of the model system.

  1. Directional support value of Gaussian transformation for infrared small target detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changcai; Ma, Jiayi; Qi, Shengxiang; Tian, Jinwen; Zheng, Sheng; Tian, Xin

    2015-03-20

    Robust small target detection is one of the key techniques in IR search and tracking systems for self-defense or attacks. In this paper we present a robust solution for small target detection in a single IR image. The key ideas of the proposed method are to use the directional support value of Gaussian transform (DSVoGT) to enhance the targets, and use the multiscale representation provided by DSVoGT to reduce the false alarm rate. The original image is decomposed into sub-bands in different orientations by convolving the image with the directional support value filters, which are deduced from the weighted mapped least-squares-support vector machines (LS-SVMs). Based on the sub-band images, a support value of Gaussian matrix is constructed, and the trace of this matrix is then defined as the target measure. The corresponding multiscale correlations of the target measures are computed for enhancing target signal while suppressing the background clutter. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method on real IR images and compare the results against those obtained from standard detection approaches, including the top-hat filter, max-mean filter, max-median filter, min-local-Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) filter, as well as LS-SVM. The experimental results on various cluttered background images show that the proposed method outperforms other detectors.

  2. Direction of Radio Finding via MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) Algorithm for Hardware Design System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng

    2017-10-01

    Concept of radio direction finding systems, which use radio direction finding is based on digital signal processing algorithms. Thus, the radio direction finding system becomes capable to locate and track signals by the both. Performance of radio direction finding significantly depends on effectiveness of digital signal processing algorithms. The algorithm uses the Direction of Arrival (DOA) algorithms to estimate the number of incidents plane waves on the antenna array and their angle of incidence. This manuscript investigates implementation of the DOA algorithms (MUSIC) on the uniform linear array in the presence of white noise. The experiment results exhibit that MUSIC algorithm changed well with the radio direction.

  3. What is the probability that direct detection experiments have observed dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Schwetz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In Dark Matter direct detection we are facing the situation of some experiments reporting positive signals which are in conflict with limits from other experiments. Such conclusions are subject to large uncertainties introduced by the poorly known local Dark Matter distribution. We present a method to calculate an upper bound on the joint probability of obtaining the outcome of two potentially conflicting experiments under the assumption that the Dark Matter hypothesis is correct, but completely independent of assumptions about the Dark Matter distribution. In this way we can quantify the compatibility of two experiments in an astrophysics independent way. We illustrate our method by testing the compatibility of the hints reported by DAMA and CDMS-Si with the limits from the LUX and SuperCDMS experiments. The method does not require Monte Carlo simulations but is mostly based on using Poisson statistics. In order to deal with signals of few events we introduce the so-called ''signal length'' to take into account energy information. The signal length method provides a simple way to calculate the probability to obtain a given experimental outcome under a specified Dark Matter and background hypothesis

  4. Analytical formulation of directly modulated OOFDM signals transmitted over an IM/DD dispersive link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, C; Ortega, B; Wei, J L; Tang, J; Capmany, J

    2013-03-25

    We provide an analytical study on the propagation effects of a directly modulated OOFDM signal through a dispersive fiber and subsequent photo-detection. The analysis includes the effects of the laser operation point and the interplay between chromatic dispersion and laser chirp. The final expression allows to understand the physics behind the transmission of a multi-carrier signal in the presence of residual frequency modulation and the description of the induced intermodulation distortion gives us a detailed insight into the diferent intermodulation products which impair the recovered signal at the receiver-end side. Numerical comparisons between transmission simulations results and those provided by evaluating the expression obtained are carried out for different laser operation points. Results obtained by changing the fiber length, laser parameters and using single mode fiber with negative and positive dispersion are calculated in order to demonstrate the validity and versatility of the theory provided in this paper. Therefore, a novel analytical formulation is presented as a versatile tool for the description and study of IM/DD OOFDM systems with variable design parameters.

  5. Ultrasonic signal analysis according to laser ultrasound generation position for the detection of delamination in composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Kyung Min; Choi In Young; Kim, Seong Jong; Kang, Young June [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gil Dong [GP Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic should be inspected in the fabrication process to enhance quality by preventing defects, such as delamination and voids. Conventional ultrasonic evaluation methods cannot be applied during the fabrication process because they require contact measurement by a transducer. Thus, an optical method using a laser was employed in this study for non-contact ultrasonic evaluation. Ultrasonic signals were generated by a pulsed laser and received by using a laser interferometer. First, an ultrasonic signal was generated from the back side of a material sample with artificial internal defects in the composite. The ultrasonic signal directed through the interior of the specimen was then detected at the front side. After determining the locations of the internal defects, the defects were quantitatively evaluated from the front side of the composite by using ultrasonic signal generation and reception.

  6. Small Displacement Detection of Biological Signals Using the Cyclic Frequency Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new signal processing method called the Cyclic Frequency method is proposed for small displacement detection of vital signals such as heart rate and respiration using the CW radar method. We have presented experimental results of small displacement detection to confirm the validity of the method. The displacement amplitude 2.5 mm can be detected with a propagation frequency of 24.15 GHz. We may increase the propagation frequency for smaller displacement amplitude or target velocity.

  7. Direct {sup 13}C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fürtig, Boris, E-mail: fuertig@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ), Institute of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology (Germany); Kovacs, Helena [Bruker BioSpin (Switzerland); Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ), Institute of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond {sup 1}H detection. Here, we develop {sup 13}C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for {sup 13}C direct detection allows correlations of donor–acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed {sup 13}C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics.

  8. Detection of multiple AE signal by triaxial hodogram analysis; Sanjiku hodogram ho ni yoru taju acoustic emission no kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, K; Yamashita, T [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    In order to evaluate dynamic behavior of underground cracks, analysis and detection were attempted on multiple acoustic emission (AE) events. The multiple AE is a phenomenon in which multiple AE signals generated by underground cracks developed in an extremely short time interval are superimposed, and observed as one AE event. The multiple AE signal consists of two AE signals, whereas the second P-wave is supposed to have been inputted before the first S-wave is inputted. The first P-wave is inputted first, where linear three-dimensional particle movements are observed, but the movements are made random due to scattering and sensor characteristics. When the second P-wave is inputted, the linear particle movements are observed again, but are superimposed with the existing input signals and become multiple AE, which creates poor S/N ratio. The multiple AE detection determines it a multiple AE event when three conditions are met, i. e. a condition of equivalent time interval of a maximum value in a scalogram analysis, a condition of P-wave vibrating direction, and a condition of the linear particle movement. Seventy AE signals observed in the Kakkonda geothermal field were analyzed and AE signals that satisfy the multiple AE were detected. However, further development is required on an analysis method with high resolution for the time. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Theoretical antineutrino detection, direction and ranging at long distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jocher, Glenn R., E-mail: gjocher@integrity-apps.com [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Bondy, Daniel A., E-mail: dbondy@integrity-apps.com [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Dobbs, Brian M., E-mail: Brian.M.Dobbs.ctr@nga.mil [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Dye, Stephen T., E-mail: sdye@phys.hawaii.edu [College of Natural Sciences, Hawaii Pacific University, Kaneohe, HI 96744 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Georges, James A., E-mail: James.A.Georges.ctr@nga.mil [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Learned, John G., E-mail: jgl@phys.hawaii.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Mulliss, Christopher L., E-mail: Christopher.L.Mulliss.ctr@nga.mil [Integrity Applications Incorporated, 15020 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA, 20151 (United States); Usman, Shawn, E-mail: Shawn.Usman@nga.mil [InnoVision Basic and Applied Research Office, Sensor Geopositioning Center, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, 7500 GEOINT Dr., Springfield, VA, 22150 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    In this paper we introduce the concept of what we call “NUDAR” (NeUtrino Direction and Ranging), making the point that measurements of the observed energy and direction vectors can be employed to passively deduce the exact three-dimensional location and thermal power of geophysical and anthropogenic neutrino sources from even a single detector. Earlier studies have presented the challenges of long-range detection, dominated by the unavoidable inverse-square falloff in neutrinos, which force the use of kiloton scale detectors beyond a few kilometers. Earlier work has also presented the case for multiple detectors, and has reviewed the background challenges. We present the most precise background estimates to date, all handled in full three dimensions, as functions of depth and geographical location. For the present calculations, we consider a hypothetical 138 kiloton detector which can be transported to an ocean site and deployed to an operational depth. We present a Bayesian estimation framework to incorporate any a priori knowledge of the reactor that we are trying to detect, as well as the estimated uncertainty in the background and the oscillation parameters. Most importantly, we fully employ the knowledge of the reactor spectrum and the distance-dependent effects of neutrino oscillations on such spectra. The latter, in particular, makes possible determination of range from one location, given adequate signal statistics. Further, we explore the rich potential of improving detection with even modest improvements in individual neutrino direction determination. We conclude that a 300 MW{sub th} reactor can indeed be geolocated, and its operating power estimated with one or two detectors in the hundred kiloton class at ranges out to a few hundred kilometers. We note that such detectors would have natural and non-interfering utility for scientific studies of geo-neutrinos, neutrino oscillations, and astrophysical neutrinos. This motivates the development of cost

  10. Signal detection without finite-energy limits to quantum resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Aina, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    We show that there are extremely simple signal detection schemes where the finiteness of energy resources places no limit on the resolution. On the contrary, larger resolution can be obtained with lower energy. To this end the generator of the signal-dependent transformation encoding the signal information on the probe state must be different from the energy. We show that the larger the deviation of the probe state from being the minimum-uncertainty state, the better the resolution.

  11. Bias and discriminability during emotional signal detection in melancholic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyett, Matthew; Parker, Gordon; Breakspear, Michael

    2014-04-27

    Cognitive disturbances in depression are pernicious and so contribute strongly to the burden of the disorder. Cognitive function has been traditionally studied by challenging subjects with modality-specific psychometric tasks and analysing performance using standard analysis of variance. Whilst informative, such an approach may miss deeper perceptual and inferential mechanisms that potentially unify apparently divergent emotional and cognitive deficits. Here, we sought to elucidate basic psychophysical processes underlying the detection of emotionally salient signals across individuals with melancholic and non-melancholic depression. Sixty participants completed an Affective Go/No-Go (AGN) task across negative, positive and neutral target stimuli blocks. We employed hierarchical Bayesian signal detection theory (SDT) to model psychometric performance across three equal groups of those with melancholic depression, those with a non-melancholic depression and healthy controls. This approach estimated likely response profiles (bias) and perceptual sensitivity (discriminability). Differences in the means of these measures speak to differences in the emotional signal detection between individuals across the groups, while differences in the variance reflect the heterogeneity of the groups themselves. Melancholic participants showed significantly decreased sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli compared to those in the non-melancholic group, and also had a significantly lower discriminability than healthy controls during the detection of neutral signals. The melancholic group also showed significantly higher variability in bias to both positive and negative emotionally salient material. Disturbances of emotional signal detection in melancholic depression appear dependent on emotional context, being biased during the detection of positive stimuli, consistent with a noisier representation of neutral stimuli. The greater heterogeneity of the bias across the melancholic

  12. Detection method based on Kalman filter for high speed rail defect AE signal on wheel-rail rolling rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiushi; Shen, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Nondestructive test (NDT) of rails has been carried out intermittently in traditional approaches, which highly restricts the detection efficiency under rapid development of high speed railway nowadays. It is necessary to put forward a dynamic rail defect detection method for rail health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) as a practical real-time detection technology takes advantage of dynamic AE signal emitted from plastic deformation of material. Detection capacities of AE on rail defects have been verified due to its sensitivity and dynamic merits. Whereas the application under normal train service circumstance has been impeded by synchronous background noises, which are directly linked to the wheel speed. In this paper, surveys on a wheel-rail rolling rig are performed to investigate defect AE signals with varying speed. A dynamic denoising method based on Kalman filter is proposed and its detection effectiveness and flexibility are demonstrated by theory and computational results. Moreover, after comparative analysis of modelling precision at different speeds, it is predicted that the method is also applicable for high speed condition beyond experiments.

  13. Fibrin-Enhanced Canonical Wnt Signaling Directs Plasminogen Expression in Cementoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ur Rahman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cementum is a mineralized layer on the tooth’s root surface and facilitates the biomechanical anchoring of fibrous connective tissues as a part of tooth-supportive complexes. Previously, we observed that OCCM30 cementoblasts cultured on fibrin matrices underwent apoptosis due to fibrin degradation through the expression of proteases. Here, we demonstrated that OCCM30 on fibrin matrices (OCCM30-fibrin enhanced canonical Wnt signaling, which directed to plasminogen expression. The OCCM30-fibrin showed higher levels of Wnt3a expression, nuclear translocation of β-catenin, and T-cell factor (TCF optimal motif (TOP reporter activity than the cells on tissue culture dishes (OCCM30-TCD, indicating that the OCCM30-fibrin enhanced canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Also, OCCM30-fibrin expressed biomineralization-associated markers at higher levels than OCCM30-TCD, of which levels were further increased with LiCl, a Wnt signaling activator. The OCCM30 cementoblasts simultaneously showed that high levels of plasminogen, a critical component of fibrinolysis, were expressed in the OCCM30-fibrin. Activation of canonical Wnt signaling with LiCl treatment or with forced lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF1-expression increased the expression of plasminogen. On the contrary, the inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling with siRNAs against Wnt3a or β-catenin abrogated fibrin-enhanced plasminogen expression. Furthermore, there are three conserved putative response elements for the LEF1/β-catenin complex in the plasminogen proximal promoter regions (−900 to +54. Site-directed mutations and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that canonical Wnt signaling directed plasminogen expression. Taken together, this study suggests that fibrin-based materials can modulate functional periodontal formations in controlling cementoblast differentiation and fibrin degradation.

  14. Detecting effects of donepezil on visual selective attention using signal detection parameters in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldi, Nancy S; White, Richard E C; Schaefer, Lynn A

    2005-05-01

    Attentional function is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, attention is mediated by acetylcholine. But, despite the widespread use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChE-I) to augment available acetylcholine in AD, measures of attentional function have not been used to assess the drug response. We hypothesized that as cholinergic augmentation impacts directly on the attentional system, higher-order measures of visual selective attention would be sensitive to effects of treatment using an AChE-I (donepezil hydrochloride). We also sought to determine whether these attentional measures were more sensitive to treatment than other measures of cognitive function. Seventeen patients with AD (8 untreated, 9 treated with donepezil) were contrasted on performance of a selective cancellation task. Two signal detection parameters were used as outcome measures: decision strategy (beta, beta) and discriminability (d-prime, d'). Standard screening and cognitive domain measures of vigilance, language, memory, and executive function were also contrasted. Treated patients judged stimuli more conservatively (p = 0.29) by correctly endorsing targets and rejecting false alarms. They also discriminated targets from distractors more easily (p = 0.58). The screening and neuropsychological measures failed to differentiate the groups. Higher-order attentional measures captured the effects of donepezil treatment in small groups of patients with AD. The results suggest that cholinergic availability may directly affect the attentional system, and that these selective attention measures are sensitive markers to detect treatment response. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Direct detection of second harmonic and its use in alanine/EPR dosimetry; Deteccao direta do segundo harmonico e seu uso na dosimetria alanina/RPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.; Guzman, C.S.; Graeff, C.F.O.; Baffa, O. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica]. E-mail: chen@dfm.ffclrp.usp.br

    2001-07-01

    In this work, the possible use of the second harmonic EPR signal from irradiated alanine for low radiation dose ({approx}1 Gy) was explored, aiming applications to HDR brachytherapy and teletherapy. The second harmonic signal was directly detected after overmodulation. A batch of DL-alanine/paraffin small cylindrical pellets was made. A VARIAN E-4 X-Band EPR spectrometer with optimized operation parameters like microwave power and modulation amplitude to obtain a signal with the highest amplitude was used. The modulation frequency and modulation amplitude were 100 kHz and 1.25 mT (to overmodulate the signal) respectively. The second harmonic signal was directly detected at twice the modulation frequency. One group of dosimeters was irradiated with a {sup 192} Ir brachytherapy source and the other in a 10 MeV X-rays linear accelerator, both group at a dose range: 0.5 - 15 Gy. The second harmonic signal showed better resolution than the first harmonic one making possible a more easy localization of the signal. Moreover, for both types of radiation, the dose-response curve showed a good linear behavior for the dose range indicated. (author)

  16. Cophylogenetic signal is detectable in pollination interactions across ecological scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Matthew C; Cagua, Edgar Fernando; Stouffer, Daniel B

    2017-10-01

    That evolutionary history can influence the way that species interact is a basic tenet of evolutionary ecology. However, when the role of evolution in determining ecological interactions is investigated, focus typically centers on just one side of the interaction. A cophylogenetic signal, the congruence of evolutionary history across both sides of an ecological interaction, extends these previous explorations and provides a more complete picture of how evolutionary patterns influence the way species interact. To date, cophylogenetic signal has most typically been studied in interactions that occur between fine taxonomic clades that show high intimacy. In this study, we took an alternative approach and made an exhaustive assessment of cophylogeny in pollination interactions. To do so, we assessed the strength of cophylogenetic signal at four distinct scales of pollination interaction: (1) across plant-pollinator associations globally, (2) in local pollination communities, (3) within the modular structure of those communities, and (4) in individual modules. We did so using a globally distributed dataset comprised of 54 pollination networks, over 4000 species, and over 12,000 interactions. Within these data, we detected cophylogenetic signal at all four scales. Cophylogenetic signal was found at the level of plant-pollinator interactions on a global scale and in the majority of pollination communities. At the scale defined by the modular structure within those communities, however, we observed a much weaker cophylogenetic signal. Cophylogenetic signal was detectable in a significant proportion of individual modules and most typically when within-module phylogenetic diversity was low. In sum, the detection of cophylogenetic signal in pollination interactions across scales provides a new dimension to the story of how past evolution shapes extant pollinator-angiosperm interactions. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  17. Detecting modulated signals in modulated noise: (II) neural thresholds in the songbird forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Mark A; Buschermöhle, Michael; Klump, Georg M

    2007-10-01

    Sounds in the real world fluctuate in amplitude. The vertebrate auditory system exploits patterns of amplitude fluctuations to improve signal detection in noise. One experimental paradigm demonstrating these general effects has been used in psychophysical studies of 'comodulation detection difference' (CDD). The CDD effect refers to the fact that thresholds for detecting a modulated, narrowband noise signal are lower when the envelopes of flanking bands of modulated noise are comodulated with each other, but fluctuate independently of the signal compared with conditions in which the envelopes of the signal and flanking bands are all comodulated. Here, we report results from a study of the neural correlates of CDD in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We manipulated: (i) the envelope correlations between a narrowband noise signal and a masker comprised of six flanking bands of noise; (ii) the signal onset delay relative to masker onset; (iii) signal duration; and (iv) masker spectrum level. Masked detection thresholds were determined from neural responses using signal detection theory. Across conditions, the magnitude of neural CDD ranged between 2 and 8 dB, which is similar to that reported in a companion psychophysical study of starlings [U. Langemann & G.M. Klump (2007) Eur. J. Neurosci., 26, 1969-1978]. We found little evidence to suggest that neural CDD resulted from the across-channel processing of auditory grouping cues related to common envelope fluctuations and synchronous onsets between the signal and flanking bands. We discuss a within-channel model of peripheral processing that explains many of our results.

  18. Onset Detection in Surface Electromyographic Signals: A Systematic Comparison of Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Flachenecker

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Various methods to determine the onset of the electromyographic activity which occurs in response to a stimulus have been discussed in the literature over the last decade. Due to the stochastic characteristic of the surface electromyogram (SEMG, onset detection is a challenging task, especially in weak SEMG responses. The performance of the onset detection methods were tested, mostly by comparing their automated onset estimations to the manually determined onsets found by well-trained SEMG examiners. But a systematic comparison between methods, which reveals the benefits and the drawbacks of each method compared to the other ones and shows the specific dependence of the detection accuracy on signal parameters, is still lacking. In this paper, several classical threshold-based approaches as well as some statistically optimized algorithms were tested on large samples of simulated SEMG data with well-known signal parameters. Rating between methods is performed by comparing their performance to that of a statistically optimal maximum likelihood estimator which serves as reference method. In addition, performance was evaluated on real SEMG data obtained in a reaction time experiment. Results indicate that detection behavior strongly depends on SEMG parameters, such as onset rise time, signal-to-noise ratio or background activity level. It is shown that some of the threshold-based signal-power-estimation procedures are very sensitive to signal parameters, whereas statistically optimized algorithms are generally more robust.

  19. Current status of direct dark matter detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianglai; Chen, Xun; Ji, Xiangdong

    2017-03-01

    Much like ordinary matter, dark matter might consist of elementary particles, and weakly interacting massive particles are one of the prime suspects. During the past decade, the sensitivity of experiments trying to directly detect them has improved by three to four orders of magnitude, but solid evidence for their existence is yet to come. We overview the recent progress in direct dark matter detection experiments and discuss future directions.

  20. Detection of chaotic dynamics in human gait signals from mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelMarco, Stephen; Deng, Yunbin

    2017-05-01

    The ubiquity of mobile devices offers the opportunity to exploit device-generated signal data for biometric identification, health monitoring, and activity recognition. In particular, mobile devices contain an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) that produces acceleration and rotational rate information from the IMU accelerometers and gyros. These signals reflect motion properties of the human carrier. It is well-known that the complexity of bio-dynamical systems gives rise to chaotic dynamics. Knowledge of chaotic properties of these systems has shown utility, for example, in detecting abnormal medical conditions and neurological disorders. Chaotic dynamics has been found, in the lab, in bio-dynamical systems data such as electrocardiogram (heart), electroencephalogram (brain), and gait data. In this paper, we investigate the following question: can we detect chaotic dynamics in human gait as measured by IMU acceleration and gyro data from mobile phones? To detect chaotic dynamics, we perform recurrence analysis on real gyro and accelerometer signal data obtained from mobile devices. We apply the delay coordinate embedding approach from Takens' theorem to reconstruct the phase space trajectory of the multi-dimensional gait dynamical system. We use mutual information properties of the signal to estimate the appropriate delay value, and the false nearest neighbor approach to determine the phase space embedding dimension. We use a correlation dimension-based approach together with estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent to make the chaotic dynamics detection decision. We investigate the ability to detect chaotic dynamics for the different one-dimensional IMU signals, across human subject and walking modes, and as a function of different phone locations on the human carrier.

  1. The impact of baryons on the direct detection of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Chris [Department of Physics, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Savage, Christopher; Freese, Katherine [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Valluri, Monica [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stinson, Gregory S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Bailin, Jeremy, E-mail: ckelso@unf.edu, E-mail: chris@savage.name, E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu, E-mail: ktfreese@umich.edu, E-mail: stinson@mpia.de, E-mail: jbailin@ua.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The spatial and velocity distributions of dark matter particles in the Milky Way Halo affect the signals expected to be observed in searches for dark matter. Results from direct detection experiments are often analyzed assuming a simple isothermal distribution of dark matter, the Standard Halo Model (SHM). Yet there has been skepticism regarding the validity of this simple model due to the complicated gravitational collapse and merger history of actual galaxies. In this paper we compare the SHM to the results of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation to investigate whether or not the SHM is a good representation of the true WIMP distribution in the analysis of direct detection data. We examine two Milky Way-like galaxies from the MaGICC cosmological simulations (a) with dark matter only and (b) with baryonic physics included. The inclusion of baryons drives the shape of the DM halo to become more spherical and makes the velocity distribution of dark matter particles less anisotropic especially at large heliocentric velocities, thereby making the SHM a better fit. We also note that we do not find a significant disk-like rotating dark matter component in either of the two galaxy halos with baryons that we examine, suggesting that dark disks are not a generic prediction of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We conclude that in the Solar neighborhood, the SHM is in fact a good approximation to the true dark matter distribution in these cosmological simulations (with baryons) which are reasonable representations of the Milky Way, and hence can also be used for the purpose of dark matter direct detection calculations.

  2. Beamspace dual signal space projection (bDSSP): a method for selective detection of deep sources in MEG measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Adachi, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Hiroshi K.; Cai, Chang; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has a well-recognized weakness at detecting deeper brain activities. This paper proposes a novel algorithm for selective detection of deep sources by suppressing interference signals from superficial sources in MEG measurements. Approach. The proposed algorithm combines the beamspace preprocessing method with the dual signal space projection (DSSP) interference suppression method. A prerequisite of the proposed algorithm is prior knowledge of the location of the deep sources. The proposed algorithm first derives the basis vectors that span a local region just covering the locations of the deep sources. It then estimates the time-domain signal subspace of the superficial sources by using the projector composed of these basis vectors. Signals from the deep sources are extracted by projecting the row space of the data matrix onto the direction orthogonal to the signal subspace of the superficial sources. Main results. Compared with the previously proposed beamspace signal space separation (SSS) method, the proposed algorithm is capable of suppressing much stronger interference from superficial sources. This capability is demonstrated in our computer simulation as well as experiments using phantom data. Significance. The proposed bDSSP algorithm can be a powerful tool in studies of physiological functions of midbrain and deep brain structures.

  3. Stochastic model for detection of signals in noise

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Stanley A.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years ago Birdsall, Tanner, and colleagues made rapid progress in developing signal detection theory into a powerful psychophysical tool. One of their major insights was the utility of adding external noise to the signals of interest. These methods have been enhanced in recent years by the addition of multipass and classification-image methods for opening up the black box. There remain a number of as yet unresolved issues. In particular, Birdsall developed a theorem that large amounts o...

  4. Signal Detection, Target Tracking and Differential Geometry Applications to Statistical Inference

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rao, C

    1997-01-01

    Signal detection and target tracking. A novel method known as polynomial rooting approach is proposed to obtain estimates of frequencies, amplitudes and noise variance of two-dimensional exponential signals...

  5. A Novel Approach of Sensitive Infrared Signal Detection for Space Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an innovative frequency up-conversion device that will efficiently convert the infrared signals into visible/near-infrared signals to enable detection of...

  6. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare, E-mail: amilazzo@ncmir.ucsd.edu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Moldovan, Grigore [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lanman, Jason [Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Klienfelder, Stuart [University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Xuong, Nguyen-Huu [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  7. Characterization of a direct detection device imaging camera for transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Moldovan, Grigore; Lanman, Jason; Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C.; Klienfelder, Stuart; Peltier, Steven T.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Kirkland, Angus I.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2010-01-01

    The complete characterization of a novel direct detection device (DDD) camera for transmission electron microscopy is reported, for the first time at primary electron energies of 120 and 200 keV. Unlike a standard charge coupled device (CCD) camera, this device does not require a scintillator. The DDD transfers signal up to 65 lines/mm providing the basis for a high-performance platform for a new generation of wide field-of-view high-resolution cameras. An image of a thin section of virus particles is presented to illustrate the substantially improved performance of this sensor over current indirectly coupled CCD cameras.

  8. Direct Position Determination of Multiple Radio Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common methods for position determination of radio signal emitters such as communications or radar transmitters are based on measuring a specified parameter such as angle of arrival (AOA or time of arrival (TOA of the signal. The measured parameters are then used to estimate the transmitter's location. Since the measurements are done at each base station independently, without using the constraint that the AOA/TOA estimates at different base stations should correspond to the same transmitter's location, this is a suboptimal location determination technique. Further, if the number of array elements at each base station is , and the signal waveforms are unknown, the number of cochannel simultaneous transmitters that can be localized by AOA is limited to . Also, most AOA algorithms fail when the sources are not well angularly separated. We propose a technique that uses exactly the same data as the common AOA methods but the position determination is direct. The proposed method can handle more than cochannel simultaneous signals. Although there are many stray parameters, only a two-dimensional search is required for a planar geometry. The technique provides a natural solution to the measurements sources association problem that is encountered in AOA-based location systems. In addition to new algorithms, we provide analytical performance analysis, Cramér-Rao bounds and Monte Carlo simulations. We demonstrate that the proposed approach frequently outperforms the traditional AOA methods for unknown as well as known signal waveforms.

  9. Detection of Artificially Generated Seismic Signals Using Balloon-Borne Infrasound Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Siddharth; Komjathy, Attila; Pauken, Michael T.; Cutts, James A.; Garcia, Raphael F.; Mimoun, David; Cadu, Alexandre; Sournac, Anthony; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Lai, Voon Hui; Bowman, Daniel C.

    2018-04-01

    We conducted an experiment in Pahrump, Nevada, in June 2017, where artificial seismic signals were created using a seismic hammer, and the possibility of detecting them from their acoustic signature was examined. In this work, we analyze the pressure signals recorded by highly sensitive barometers deployed on the ground and on tethers suspended from balloons. Our signal processing results show that wind noise experienced by a barometer on a free-flying balloon is lower compared to one on a moored balloon. This has never been experimentally demonstrated in the lower troposphere. While seismoacoustic signals were not recorded on the hot air balloon platform owing to operational challenges, we demonstrate the detection of seismoacoustic signals on our moored balloon platform. Our results have important implications for performing seismology in harsh surface environments such as Venus through atmospheric remote sensing.

  10. Using the PLUM procedure of SPSS to fit unequal variance and generalized signal detection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T

    2003-02-01

    The recent addition of aprocedure in SPSS for the analysis of ordinal regression models offers a simple means for researchers to fit the unequal variance normal signal detection model and other extended signal detection models. The present article shows how to implement the analysis and how to interpret the SPSS output. Examples of fitting the unequal variance normal model and other generalized signal detection models are given. The approach offers a convenient means for applying signal detection theory to a variety of research.

  11. Unsupervised Event Characterization and Detection in Multichannel Signals: An EEG application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Mur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new unsupervised method to automatically characterize and detect events in multichannel signals. This method is used to identify artifacts in electroencephalogram (EEG recordings of brain activity. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated and compared with a supervised method. To this end an example of the performance of the algorithm to detect artifacts is shown. The results show that although both methods obtain similar classification, the proposed method allows detecting events without training data and can also be applied in signals whose events are unknown a priori. Furthermore, the proposed method provides an optimal window whereby an optimal detection and characterization of events is found. The detection of events can be applied in real-time.

  12. A method of simulating intensity modulation-direct detection WDM systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jing; YAO Jian-quan; LI En-bang

    2005-01-01

    In the simulation of Intensity Modulation-Direct Detection WDM Systems,when the dispersion and nonlinear effects play equally important roles,the intensity fluctuation caused by cross-phase modulation may be overestimated as a result of the improper step size.Therefore,the step size in numerical simulation should be selected to suppress false XPM intensity modulation (keep it much less than signal power).According to this criterion,the step size is variable along the fiber.For a WDM system,the step size depends on the channel separation.Different type of transmission fiber has different step size.In the split-step Fourier method,this criterion can reduce simulation time,and when the step size is bigger than 100 meters,the simulation accuracy can also be improved.

  13. Infrasonic detection performance in presence of nuisance signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbit, Maurice; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Che, Il-young; Le Pichon, Alexis; Nouvellet, Adrien; Park, Junghyun; Roueff, Francois

    2014-05-01

    The infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) consists of sixty stations deployed all over the World by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The IMS has been designed to reliably detect, at least by two stations, an explosion greater than 1 kiloton located anywhere on the Earth [1]. Each station is an array of at least four microbarometers with an aperture of 1 to 3 km. The first important issue is to detect the presence of the signal of interest (SOI) embedded in noise. The detector is commonly based on the property that the SOI provides coherent observations on the sensors but not the noise. The statistic of test, called F-stat [2], [5], [6] , calculated in a time cell a few seconds, is commonly used for this purpose. In this paper, we assume that a coherent source is permanently present arriving from an unknown direction of arrivals (DOA). The typical case is the presence of microbaroms or the presence of wind. This source is seen as a nuisance signal (NS). In [4], [3] authors assume that a time cell without the SOI (CH0) is available, whereas a following time cell is considered as the cell under test (CUT). Therefore the DOA and the SNR of the NS can be estimated. If the signal-to-noise ration SNR of the NS is large enough, the distribution of the F-stat under the absence of SOI is known to be a non central Fisher. It follows that the threshold can be performed from a given value of the FAR. The major drawback to keep the NS is that the NS could hide the SOI, this phenomena is similar to the leakage which is a well-known phenomena in the Fourier analysis. An other approach consists to use the DOA estimate of the NS to mitigate the NS by spatial notch filter in the frequency domain. On this approach a new algorithm is provided. To illustrate, numerical results on synthetical and real data are presented, in term of Receiver Operating Characteristic ROC curves. REFERENCES [1] Christie D.R. and Campus P., The IMS

  14. Adaptive endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Wanchun; Shi Ren

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analysis of auto-correlation function, the notion of the distance between auto-correlation function was quoted, and the characterization of the noise and the signal with noise were discussed by using the distance. Then, the method of auto- adaptable endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated similarity was summed up. The steps of implementation and determining of the thresholds were presented in detail. The experimental results that were compared with the methods based on artificial detecting show that this method has higher sensitivity even in a low signal with noise ratio circumstance

  15. Fast optical signal not detected in awake behaving monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Vanduffel, Wim; Deng, Hong Ping; Ekstrom, Leeland; Boas, David A; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2009-04-01

    While the ability of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure cerebral hemodynamic evoked responses (slow optical signal) is well established, its ability to measure non-invasively the 'fast optical signal' is still controversial. Here, we aim to determine the feasibility of performing NIRS measurements of the 'fast optical signal' or Event-Related Optical Signals (EROS) under optimal experimental conditions in awake behaving macaque monkeys. These monkeys were implanted with a 'recording well' to expose the dura above the primary visual cortex (V1). A custom-made optical probe was inserted and fixed into the well. The close proximity of the probe to the brain maximized the sensitivity to changes in optical properties in the cortex. Motion artifacts were minimized by physical restraint of the head. Full-field contrast-reversing checkerboard stimuli were presented to monkeys trained to perform a visual fixation task. In separate sessions, two NIRS systems (CW4 and ISS FD oximeter), which previously showed the ability to measure the fast signal in human, were used. In some sessions EEG was acquired simultaneously with the optical signal. The increased sensitivity to cortical optical changes with our experimental setup was quantified with 3D Monte Carlo simulations on a segmented MRI monkey head. Averages of thousands of stimuli in the same animal, or grand averages across the two animals and across repeated sessions, did not lead to detection of the fast optical signal using either amplitude or phase of the optical signal. Hemodynamic responses and visual evoked potentials were instead always detected with single trials or averages of a few stimuli. Based on these negative results, despite the optimal experimental conditions, we doubt the usefulness of non-invasive fast optical signal measurements with NIRS.

  16. A web-based quantitative signal detection system on adverse drug reaction in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai; Deng, Jianxiong; Chen, Wenge; Wang, Suzhen; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Guanquan

    2009-07-01

    To establish a web-based quantitative signal detection system for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) based on spontaneous reporting to the Guangdong province drug-monitoring database in China. Using Microsoft Visual Basic and Active Server Pages programming languages and SQL Server 2000, a web-based system with three software modules was programmed to perform data preparation and association detection, and to generate reports. Information component (IC), the internationally recognized measure of disproportionality for quantitative signal detection, was integrated into the system, and its capacity for signal detection was tested with ADR reports collected from 1 January 2002 to 30 June 2007 in Guangdong. A total of 2,496 associations including known signals were mined from the test database. Signals (e.g., cefradine-induced hematuria) were found early by using the IC analysis. In addition, 291 drug-ADR associations were alerted for the first time in the second quarter of 2007. The system can be used for the detection of significant associations from the Guangdong drug-monitoring database and could be an extremely useful adjunct to the expert assessment of very large numbers of spontaneously reported ADRs for the first time in China.

  17. Amplitude-aware permutation entropy: Illustration in spike detection and signal segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azami, Hamed; Escudero, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Signal segmentation and spike detection are two important biomedical signal processing applications. Often, non-stationary signals must be segmented into piece-wise stationary epochs or spikes need to be found among a background of noise before being further analyzed. Permutation entropy (PE) has been proposed to evaluate the irregularity of a time series. PE is conceptually simple, structurally robust to artifacts, and computationally fast. It has been extensively used in many applications, but it has two key shortcomings. First, when a signal is symbolized using the Bandt-Pompe procedure, only the order of the amplitude values is considered and information regarding the amplitudes is discarded. Second, in the PE, the effect of equal amplitude values in each embedded vector is not addressed. To address these issues, we propose a new entropy measure based on PE: the amplitude-aware permutation entropy (AAPE). AAPE is sensitive to the changes in the amplitude, in addition to the frequency, of the signals thanks to it being more flexible than the classical PE in the quantification of the signal motifs. To demonstrate how the AAPE method can enhance the quality of the signal segmentation and spike detection, a set of synthetic and realistic synthetic neuronal signals, electroencephalograms and neuronal data are processed. We compare the performance of AAPE in these problems against state-of-the-art approaches and evaluate the significance of the differences with a repeated ANOVA with post hoc Tukey's test. In signal segmentation, the accuracy of AAPE-based method is higher than conventional segmentation methods. AAPE also leads to more robust results in the presence of noise. The spike detection results show that AAPE can detect spikes well, even when presented with single-sample spikes, unlike PE. For multi-sample spikes, the changes in AAPE are larger than in PE. We introduce a new entropy metric, AAPE, that enables us to consider amplitude information in the

  18. Limiter discriminator detection of M-ary FSK signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseka, John P.

    1990-10-01

    The performance of limiter discriminator detection of M-ary FSK signals is analyzed at arbitrary modulation indices. It is shown that the error rate performance of limiter discriminator detection can be significantly improved by increasing the modulation index above 1/M. The optimum modulation index that minimizes the overall error probability is determined for the cases M = 2, 4 and 8. The analysis is carried out for wideband and bandlimited channels with Gaussian and second-order Butterworth filters. It is shown that the optimum modulation index depends on the signal/noise ratio (SNR), in a wideband channel, and on both SNR and time-bandwidth product in a bandlimited channel. Finally, it is shown that the optimum sampling instance in presence of a nonzero phase IF filter can be approximately determined by using only the worst case symbol pattern.

  19. Deep convolutional neural network for the automated detection and diagnosis of seizure using EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Oh, Shu Lih; Hagiwara, Yuki; Tan, Jen Hong; Adeli, Hojjat

    2017-09-27

    An encephalogram (EEG) is a commonly used ancillary test to aide in the diagnosis of epilepsy. The EEG signal contains information about the electrical activity of the brain. Traditionally, neurologists employ direct visual inspection to identify epileptiform abnormalities. This technique can be time-consuming, limited by technical artifact, provides variable results secondary to reader expertise level, and is limited in identifying abnormalities. Therefore, it is essential to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to automatically distinguish the class of these EEG signals using machine learning techniques. This is the first study to employ the convolutional neural network (CNN) for analysis of EEG signals. In this work, a 13-layer deep convolutional neural network (CNN) algorithm is implemented to detect normal, preictal, and seizure classes. The proposed technique achieved an accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity of 88.67%, 90.00% and 95.00%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Organization of signal flow in directed networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bányai, M; Bazsó, F; Négyessy, L

    2011-01-01

    Confining an answer to the question of whether and how the coherent operation of network elements is determined by the network structure is the topic of our work. We map the structure of signal flow in directed networks by analysing the degree of edge convergence and the overlap between the in- and output sets of an edge. Definitions of convergence degree and overlap are based on the shortest paths, thus they encapsulate global network properties. Using the defining notions of convergence degree and overlapping set we clarify the meaning of network causality and demonstrate the crucial role of chordless circles. In real-world networks the flow representation distinguishes nodes according to their signal transmitting, processing and control properties. The analysis of real-world networks in terms of flow representation was in accordance with the known functional properties of the network nodes. It is shown that nodes with different signal processing, transmitting and control properties are randomly connected at the global scale, while local connectivity patterns depart from randomness. The grouping of network nodes according to their signal flow properties was unrelated to the network's community structure. We present evidence that the signal flow properties of small-world-like, real-world networks cannot be reconstructed by algorithms used to generate small-world networks. Convergence degree values were calculated for regular oriented trees, and the probability density function for networks grown with the preferential attachment mechanism. For Erdos–Rényi graphs we calculated the probability density function of both convergence degrees and overlaps

  1. A Universal Fast Colorimetric Method for DNA Signal Detection with DNA Strand Displacement and Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA or gene signal detection is of great significance in many fields including medical examination, intracellular molecular monitoring, and gene disease signal diagnosis, but detection of DNA or gene signals in a low concentration with instant visual results remains a challenge. In this work, a universal fast and visual colorimetric detection method for DNA signals is proposed. Specifically, a DNA signal amplification “circuit” based on DNA strand displacement is firstly designed to amplify the target DNA signals, and then thiol modified hairpin DNA strands and gold nanoparticles are used to make signal detection results visualized in a colorimetric manner. If the target DNA signal exists, the gold nanoparticles aggregate and settle down with color changing from dark red to grey quickly; otherwise, the gold nanoparticles’ colloids remain stable in dark red. The proposed method provides a novel way to detect quickly DNA or gene signals in low concentrations with instant visual results. When applied in real-life, it may provide a universal colorimetric method for gene disease signal diagnosis.

  2. Collider, direct and indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, Howard; Park, Eun-Kyung; Tata, Xerxes

    2009-01-01

    We present an overview of supersymmetry (SUSY) searches, both at collider experiments and via searches for dark matter (DM). We focus on three DM possibilities in the SUSY context: the thermally produced neutralino, a mixture of axion and axino, and the gravitino, and compare and contrast signals that may be expected at colliders, in direct detection (DD) experiments searching of DM relics left over from the Big Bang, and indirect detection (ID) experiments designed to detect the products of DM annihilations within the solar interior or galactic halo. Detection of DM particles using multiple strategies provides complementary information that may shed light on the new physics associated with the DM sector. In contrast to the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model where the measured cold DM relic density restricts us to special regions mostly on the edge of the m 0 -m 1/2 plane, the entire parameter plane becomes allowed if the universality assumption is relaxed in models with just one additional parameter. Then, thermally produced neutralinos with a well-tempered mix of wino, bino and higgsino components, or with a mass adjusted so that their annihilation in the early Universe is Higgs-resonance-enhanced, can be the DM. Well-tempered neutralinos typically yield heightened rates for DD and ID experiments compared with generic predictions from mSUGRA. If instead DM consists of axinos (possibly together with axions) or gravitinos, then there exists the possibility of detection of quasi-stable next-to-lightest SUSY particles at colliding beam experiments, with especially striking consequences if the next-lightest-supersymmetric-particle (NLSP) is charged, but no DD or ID detection. The exception for mixed axion/axino DM is that DD of axions may be possible.

  3. Development Of Signal Detection For Radar Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theingi Win Hlaing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the performance of target detection in the presence of sea clutter. Radar detection of a background of unwanted clutter due to echoes from sea clutter or land is a problem of interest in the radar field. Radar detector has been developed by assuming the radar clutter is Gaussian distributed. However as technology emerges the radar distribution is seen to deviates from the Gaussian assumption. Thus detectors designs based on Gaussian assumption are no longer optimum for detection in non-Gaussian nature. The theory of target detection in Gaussian distributed clutter has been well established and the closed form of the detection performances can be easily obtained. However that is not the case in non-Gaussian clutter distributions. The operation of radar detection is determined by radar detection theory with different types of Swerling target models such as Swerling I II III IV and V. By using MATLAB these signal detection techniques are developed.

  4. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  5. Machine Learning for Optical Performance Monitoring from Directly Detected PDM-QAM Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wass, J.; Thrane, Jakob; Piels, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Supervised machine learning methods are applied and demonstrated experimentally for inband OSNR estimation and modulation format classification in optical communication systems. The proposed methods accurately evaluate coherent signals up to 64QAM using only intensity information....

  6. Adaptive endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Wanchun; Shi Ren

    2000-01-01

    There are certain shortcomings for the endpoint detection by time-waveform envelope and/or by checking the travel table (both labelled as the artificial detection method). Based on the analysis of the auto-correlation function, the notion of the distance between auto-correlation functions was quoted, and the characterizations of the noise and the signal with noise were discussed by using the distance. Then, the method of auto-adaptable endpoint detection of seismic signal based on auto-correlated similarity was summed up. The steps of implementation and determining of the thresholds were presented in detail. The experimental results that were compared with the methods based on artificial detecting show that this method has higher sensitivity even in a low SNR circumstance

  7. Evaluation of signal processing for boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.L.; Ledwidge, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the co-ordinated research programme on the detection of sodium boiling some further analysis has been performed on the data from the test loop in Karlsruhe and some preliminary analysis of the data from the BOR 60 experiment. The work on the Karlsruhe data is concerned with the search for a reliable method by which the quality of signal processing strategies may be compared. The results show that the three novel methods previously reported are all markedly superior to the mean square method which is used as a benchmark. The three novel methods are nth order differentiation in the frequency domain, the mean square prediction based on nth order conditional expectation and the nth order probability density function. A preliminary analysis on the data from the BOR 60 reactor shows that 4th order differentiation is adequate for the detection of signals derived from a pressure transducer and that the map of spurious trip probability (S) and the probability of missing an event (M) is consistent with the theoretical model proposed herein, and the suggested procedures for evaluating the quality of detection strategies. (author). 15 figs, 1 tab

  8. Tunable Signal-Off and Signal-On Electrochemical Cisplatin Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yao; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2017-09-19

    We report the first electrochemical cisplatin sensor fabricated with a thiolated and methylene blue (MB)-modified oligo-adenine (A)-guanine (G) DNA probe. Depending on the probe coverage, the sensor can behave as a signal-off or signal-on sensor. For the high-coverage sensor, formation of intrastrand Pt(II)-AG adducts rigidifies the oligo-AG probe, resulting in a concentration-dependent decrease in the MB signal. For the low-coverage sensor, the increase in probe-to-probe spacing enables binding of cisplatin via the intrastrand GNG motif (N = A), generating a bend in the probe which results in an increase in the MB current. Although both high-coverage signal-off and low-coverage signal-on sensors are capable of detecting cisplatin, the signal-on sensing mechanism is better suited for real time analysis of cisplatin. The low-coverage sensor has a lower limit of detection, wider optimal AC frequency range, and faster response time. It has high specificity for cisplatin and potentially other Pt(II) drugs and does not cross-react with satraplatin, a Pt(IV) prodrug. It is also selective enough to be employed directly in 50% saliva and 50% urine. This detection strategy may offer a new approach for sensitive and real time analysis of cisplatin in clinical samples.

  9. Resonance detection of EEG signals using two-layer wavelet analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, H. M; Odeh, F.S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the hybrid quadrature mirror filter (HQMF) algorithm applied to the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal during mental activity. The information contents of this signal, i.e., its medical diagnosis, lie in its power spectral density (PSD). The HQMF algorithm is a modified technique that is based on the shape and the details of the signal. If applied efficiently, the HQMF algorithm will produce much better results than conventional wavelet methods in detecting (diagnosing) the information of the EEG signal from its PSD. This technique is applicable not only to EEG signals, but is highly recommended to compression analysis and de noising techniques. (authors). 16 refs., 9 figs

  10. BURAR: Detection and signal processing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Radulian, Mircea; Popa, Mihaela

    2004-01-01

    Since July 2002, a new seismic monitoring station, the Bucovina Seismic Array (BURAR), has been installed in the northern part of Romania, in a joint effort of the Air Force Technical Applications Center, USA, and the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania. The array consists of 10 seismic sensors (9 short-period and one broad band) located in boreholes and distributed in a 5 x 5 km 2 area. At present, the seismic data are continuously recorded by BURAR and transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Centre (ROM N DC), in Bucharest and to the National Data Center of USA, in Florida. The statistical analysis for the seismic information gathered at ROM N DC by the BURAR in the August 2002 - December 2003 time interval points out a much better efficiency of the BURAR system in detecting teleseismic events and local events occurred in the N-NE part of Romanian territory, in comparison with the actual Romanian Telemetered Network. Furthermore, the BURAR monitoring system has proven to be an important source of reliable data for NIEP efforts in issuing the seismic bulletins. Signal processing capability of the system provides useful information in order to improve the location of the local seismic events, using the array beamforming procedure. This method increases significantly the signal-to-noise ratio by summing up the coherent signals from the array components. In this way, possible source nucleation phases can be detected. At the same time, using the slowness and back azimuth estimations by f-k analysis, locations for the seismic events can be established based only on the information recorded by the BURAR array, acting like a single seismic station recording system. (authors)

  11. Readout technologies for directional WIMP Dark Matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battat, J.B.R.; Irastorza, I.G.; Aleksandrov, A.; Asada, T.; Baracchini, E.; Billard, J.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Buonaura, A.; Burdge, K.; Cebrián, S.

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a compelling but technologically challenging strategy to provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Most directional detectors aim to reconstruct the dark-matter-induced nuclear recoil tracks, either in gas or solid targets. The main challenge with directional detection is the need for high spatial resolution over large volumes, which puts strong requirements on the readout technologies. In this paper we review the various detector readout technologies used by directional detectors. In particular, we summarize the challenges, advantages and drawbacks of each approach, and discuss future prospects for these technologies.

  12. An energy kurtosis demodulation technique for signal denoising and bearing fault detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wilson; Lee, Hewen

    2013-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are commonly used in rotary machinery. Reliable bearing fault detection techniques are very useful in industries for predictive maintenance operations. Bearing fault detection still remains a very challenging task especially when defects occur on rotating bearing components because the fault-related features are non-stationary in nature. In this work, an energy kurtosis demodulation (EKD) technique is proposed for bearing fault detection especially for non-stationary signature analysis. The proposed EKD technique firstly denoises the signal by using a maximum kurtosis deconvolution filter to counteract the effect of signal transmission path so as to highlight defect-associated impulses. Next, the denoised signal is modulated over several frequency bands; a novel signature integration strategy is proposed to enhance feature characteristics. The effectiveness of the proposed EKD fault detection technique is verified by a series of experimental tests corresponding to different bearing conditions. (paper)

  13. Synthesis of a multi-functional DNA nanosphere barcode system for direct cell detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangwoo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2017-09-28

    Nucleic acid-based technologies have been applied to numerous biomedical applications. As a novel material for target detection, DNA has been used to construct a barcode system with a range of structures. This paper reports multi-functionalized DNA nanospheres (DNANSs) by rolling circle amplification (RCA) with several functionalized nucleotides. DNANSs with a barcode system were designed to exhibit fluorescence for coding enhanced signals and contain biotin for more functionalities, including targeting through the biotin-streptavidin (biotin-STA) interaction. Functionalized deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) were mixed in the RCA process and functional moieties can be expressed on the DNANSs. The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies (anti-EGFR Abs) can be conjugated on DNANSs for targeting cancer cells specifically. As a proof of concept, the potential of the multi-functional DNANS barcode was demonstrated by direct cell detection as a simple detection method. The DNANS barcode provides a new route for the simple and rapid selective recognition of cancer cells.

  14. Early detection of structual changes in random signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Yoshiteru; Yokota, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    Early detection of structual changes in observed random signal is very important from the point of system diagnosis. In this paper, the following procedures are applied to this problem and the results are compared. (1) auto-regressive model to random signal to calculate the prediction error, i.e., the defference between observed and predicted values. (2) auto-regressive method to caluculate the sum of the prediction error. (3) a method is based on AIC (Akaike Information Criterion). Simulation is made of these procedures, indicating their merits and demerits as a diagostic tools. (author)

  15. Edge detection of magnetic anomalies using analytic signal of tilt angle (ASTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamdar, K.; Ansari, A. H.; Ghorbani, A.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic is a commonly used geophysical technique to identify and image potential subsurface targets. Interpretation of magnetic anomalies is a complex process due to the superposition of multiple magnetic sources, presence of geologic and cultural noise and acquisition and positioning error. Both the vertical and horizontal derivatives of potential field data are useful; horizontal derivative, enhance edges whereas vertical derivative narrow the width of anomaly and so locate source bodies more accurately. We can combine vertical and horizontal derivative of magnetic field to achieve analytic signal which is independent to body magnetization direction and maximum value of this lies over edges of body directly. Tilt angle filter is phased-base filter and is defined as angle between vertical derivative and total horizontal derivative. Tilt angle value differ from +90 degree to -90 degree and its zero value lies over body edge. One of disadvantage of this filter is when encountering with deep sources the detected edge is blurred. For overcome this problem many authors introduced new filters such as total horizontal derivative of tilt angle or vertical derivative of tilt angle which Because of using high-order derivative in these filters results may be too noisy. If we combine analytic signal and tilt angle, a new filter termed (ASTA) is produced which its maximum value lies directly over body edge and is easer than tilt angle to delineate body edge and no complicity of tilt angle. In this work new filter has been demonstrated on magnetic data from an area in Sar- Cheshme region in Iran. This area is located in 55 degree longitude and 32 degree latitude and is a copper potential region. The main formation in this area is Andesith and Trachyandezite. Magnetic surveying was employed to separate the boundaries of Andezite and Trachyandezite from adjacent area. In this regard a variety of filters such as analytic signal, tilt angle and ASTA filter have been applied which

  16. Quench detection/protection of an HTS coil by AE signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, M.; Nanato, N.; Aoki, D.; Kato, T.; Murase, S.

    2011-01-01

    A quench detection/protection system based on measuring AE signals was developed. The system was tested for a Bi2223 coil. Temperature rise after a quench occurrence was restrained at very low value. The normal zone propagation velocities in high T c superconductors are slow at high operation temperature and therefore local and excessive temperature rise generates at quench occurrence, and then the superconductors are degraded or burned. Therefore it is essential to detect the temperature rise in high T c superconducting (HTS) coils as soon as possible and protect them. The authors have presented a quench detection method for HTS coils by time-frequency visualization of AE signals and have shown its usefulness for a HTS coil with height and outer diameter of 40-50 mm. In this paper, the authors present a quench detection/protection system based on superior method in quench detection time to the previous method and show its usefulness for a larger HTS coil (height and outer diameter: 160-190 mm) than the previous coil.

  17. Direct and long-term detection of gene doping in conventional blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiter, T; Zimmermann, M; Fragasso, A; Hudemann, J; Niess, A M; Bitzer, M; Lauer, U M; Simon, P

    2011-03-01

    The misuse of somatic gene therapy for the purpose of enhancing athletic performance is perceived as a coming threat to the world of sports and categorized as 'gene doping'. This article describes a direct detection approach for gene doping that gives a clear yes-or-no answer based on the presence or absence of transgenic DNA in peripheral blood samples. By exploiting a priming strategy to specifically amplify intronless DNA sequences, we developed PCR protocols allowing the detection of very small amounts of transgenic DNA in genomic DNA samples to screen for six prime candidate genes. Our detection strategy was verified in a mouse model, giving positive signals from minute amounts (20 μl) of blood samples for up to 56 days following intramuscular adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer, one of the most likely candidate vector systems to be misused for gene doping. To make our detection strategy amenable for routine testing, we implemented a robust sample preparation and processing protocol that allows cost-efficient analysis of small human blood volumes (200 μl) with high specificity and reproducibility. The practicability and reliability of our detection strategy was validated by a screening approach including 327 blood samples taken from professional and recreational athletes under field conditions.

  18. A Modified Adaptive Stochastic Resonance for Detecting Faint Signal in Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengwei Li

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an approach is presented to detect faint signals with strong noises in sensors by stochastic resonance (SR. We adopt the power spectrum as the evaluation tool of SR, which can be obtained by the fast Fourier transform (FFT. Furthermore, we introduce the adaptive filtering scheme to realize signal processing automatically. The key of the scheme is how to adjust the barrier height to satisfy the optimal condition of SR in the presence of any input. For the given input signal, we present an operable procedure to execute the adjustment scheme. An example utilizing one audio sensor to detect the fault information from the power supply is given. Simulation results show that th

  19. Fiber-optic Michelson interferometer fixed in a tilted tube for direction-dependent ultrasonic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Qiao, Xueguang; Li, JiaCheng; Shao, Zhihua; Tong, Rongxin; Rong, Qiangzhou

    2017-01-01

    A fiber-optic interferometer is proposed and demonstrated experimentally for ultrasonic detection. The sensor consists of a compact Michelson interferometer (MI), which is fixed in a tilted-tube end-face (45°). Thin gold films are used for the reflective coatings of two arms and one of the interference arms is etched serving as the sensing arm. The spectral sideband filter technique is used to interrogate the continuous and pulse ultrasonic signals (with frequency of 300 KHz). Furthermore, because of the asymmetrical structure of the sensor, it presents strong direction-dependent ultrasonic sensitivity, such that the sensor can be considered a vector detector. The experimental results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to ultrasonic signals, and thus it can be a candidate for ultrasonic imaging of seismic physical models.

  20. Direct versus indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers the slides that were presented during the workshop 'direct versus indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter'(about 30 contributions). This workshop intended to bring together people from the particle theory community, astrophysicists and cosmologists, as well as experimentalists involved in the detection of dark matter. The aim is to generate a discussion about current and future strategies for detection of SUSY dark matter (with focus, but not exclusively, on neutralinos). Complementarities between accelerator, direct and indirect searches as well as a comparison between the uncertainties in direct and indirect searches of dark matter, are supposed to be discussed. Among the issues which will be addressed are: -) the crucial questions related to the structure of galaxies (local dark matter density, clumping, anomalous velocity distributions, etc.) ; -) the possibilities offered by the present and future experimental facilities for direct and indirect (photon, neutrino) searches; -) the potential for the discovery of SUSY at LHC and beyond; and -) the parameterization of the SUSY breaking models beyond the minimal versions

  1. Direct Detection of Biotinylated Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric strategies to identify protein subpopulations involved in specific biological functions rely on covalently tagging biotin to proteins using various chemical modification methods. The biotin tag is primarily used for enrichment of the targeted subpopulation for subsequent mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. A limitation of these strategies is that MS analysis does not easily discriminate unlabeled contaminants from the labeled protein subpopulation under study. To solve this problem, we developed a flexible method that only relies on direct MS detection of biotin-tagged proteins called “Direct Detection of Biotin-containing Tags” (DiDBiT). Compared with conventional targeted proteomic strategies, DiDBiT improves direct detection of biotinylated proteins ∼200 fold. We show that DiDBiT is applicable to several protein labeling protocols in cell culture and in vivo using cell permeable NHS-biotin and incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid, azidohomoalanine (AHA), into newly synthesized proteins, followed by click chemistry tagging with biotin. We demonstrate that DiDBiT improves the direct detection of biotin-tagged newly synthesized peptides more than 20-fold compared to conventional methods. With the increased sensitivity afforded by DiDBiT, we demonstrate the MS detection of newly synthesized proteins labeled in vivo in the rodent nervous system with unprecedented temporal resolution as short as 3 h. PMID:25117199

  2. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system.

  3. Stochastic Resonance in an Underdamped System with Pinning Potential for Weak Signal Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2015-08-28

    Stochastic resonance (SR) has been proved to be an effective approach for weak sensor signal detection. This study presents a new weak signal detection method based on a SR in an underdamped system, which consists of a pinning potential model. The model was firstly discovered from magnetic domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic strips. We analyze the principle of the proposed underdamped pinning SR (UPSR) system, the detailed numerical simulation and system performance. We also propose the strategy of selecting the proper damping factor and other system parameters to match a weak signal, input noise and to generate the highest output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, we have verified its effectiveness with both simulated and experimental input signals. Results indicate that the UPSR performs better in weak signal detection than the conventional SR (CSR) with merits of higher output SNR, better anti-noise and frequency response capability. Besides, the system can be designed accurately and efficiently owing to the sensibility of parameters and potential diversity. The features also weaken the limitation of small parameters on SR system.

  4. Anomalous Signal Detection in ELF Band Electromagnetic Wave using Multi-layer Neural Network with Wavelet Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Akitoshi; Yasukawa, Hiroshi; Takumi, Ichi; Hata, Masayasu

    It is well known that electromagnetic waves radiated from the earth's crust are useful for predicting earthquakes. We analyze the electromagnetic waves received at the extremely low frequency band of 223Hz. These observed signals contain the seismic radiation from the earth's crust, but also include several undesired signals. Our research focuses on the signal detection technique to identify an anomalous signal corresponding to the seismic radiation in the observed signal. Conventional anomalous signal detections lack a wide applicability due to their assumptions, e.g. the digital data have to be observed at the same time or the same sensor. In order to overcome the limitation related to the observed signal, we proposed the anomalous signals detection based on a multi-layer neural network which is trained by digital data observed during a span of a day. In the neural network approach, training data do not need to be recorded at the same place or the same time. However, some noises, which have a large amplitude, are detected as the anomalous signal. This paper develops a multi-layer neural network to decrease the false detection of the anomalous signal from the electromagnetic wave. The training data for the proposed network is the decomposed signal of the observed signal during several days, since the seismic radiations are often recorded from several days to a couple of weeks. Results show that the proposed neural network is useful to achieve the accurate detection of the anomalous signal that indicates seismic activity.

  5. Dual-Process Theory and Signal-Detection Theory of Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixted, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Two influential models of recognition memory, the unequal-variance signal-detection model and a dual-process threshold/detection model, accurately describe the receiver operating characteristic, but only the latter model can provide estimates of recollection and familiarity. Such estimates often accord with those provided by the remember-know…

  6. Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis to constrain dark matter properties with directional detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, J.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D.

    2011-01-01

    Directional detection is a promising dark matter search strategy. Indeed, weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-induced recoils would present a direction dependence toward the Cygnus constellation, while background-induced recoils exhibit an isotropic distribution in the Galactic rest frame. Taking advantage of these characteristic features, and even in the presence of a sizeable background, it has recently been shown that data from forthcoming directional detectors could lead either to a competitive exclusion or to a conclusive discovery, depending on the value of the WIMP-nucleon cross section. However, it is possible to further exploit these upcoming data by using the strong dependence of the WIMP signal with: the WIMP mass and the local WIMP velocity distribution. Using a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of recoil events, we show for the first time the possibility to constrain the unknown WIMP parameters, both from particle physics (mass and cross section) and Galactic halo (velocity dispersion along the three axis), leading to an identification of non-baryonic dark matter.

  7. Response inhibition signals and miscoding of direction in dorsomedial striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Bryden

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to inhibit action is critical for everyday behavior and is affected by a variety of disorders. Behavioral control and response inhibition is thought to depend on a neural circuit that includes the dorsal striatum, yet the neural signals that lead to response inhibition and its failure are unclear. To address this issue, we recorded from neurons in rat dorsomedial striatum (mDS in a novel task in which rats responded to a spatial cue that signaled that reward would be delivered either to the left or to the right. On 80% of trials rats were instructed to respond in the direction cued by the light (GO. On 20% of trials a second light illuminated instructing the rat to refrain from making the cued movement and move in the opposite direction (STOP. Many neurons in mDS encoded direction, firing more or less strongly for GO movements made ipsilateral or contralateral to the recording electrode. Neurons that fired more strongly for contralateral GO responses were more active when rats were faster, showed reduced activity on STOP trials, and miscoded direction on errors, suggesting that when these neurons were overly active, response inhibition failed. Neurons that decreased firing for contralateral movement were excited during trials in which the rat was required to stop the ipsilateral movement. For these neurons activity was reduced when errors were made and was negatively correlated with movement time suggesting that when these neurons were less active on STOP trials, response inhibition failed. Finally, the activity of a significant number of neurons represented a global inhibitory signal, firing more strongly during response inhibition regardless of response direction. Breakdown by cell type suggests that putative medium spiny neurons tended to fire more strongly under STOP trials, whereas putative interneurons exhibited both activity patterns. 

  8. An attempt to detect the greenhouse-gas signal in a transient GCM simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the GISS model forced by transient greenhouse-gas (GHG) increases are used to demonstrate methods of detecting the theoretically predicted GHG signal. The signal predicted to occur in the surface temperature of the world's ocean since 1958 is not found in the observations but this is not surprising since the signal was small in the first place. The main result of the study is to demonstrate many of the key issues/difficulties that attend the detection problem

  9. PMD compensation in fiber-optic communication systems with direct detection using LDPC-coded OFDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2007-04-02

    The possibility of polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) compensation in fiber-optic communication systems with direct detection using a simple channel estimation technique and low-density parity-check (LDPC)-coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) is demonstrated. It is shown that even for differential group delay (DGD) of 4/BW (BW is the OFDM signal bandwidth), the degradation due to the first-order PMD can be completely compensated for. Two classes of LDPC codes designed based on two different combinatorial objects (difference systems and product of combinatorial designs) suitable for use in PMD compensation are introduced.

  10. Pipeline Defects Detection Using MFL Signals and Self Quotient Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Ho; Choi, Doo Hyun; Rho, Yong Woo

    2010-01-01

    Defects positioning of underground gas pipelines using MFL(magnetic flux leakage) inspection which is one of non-destructive evaluation techniques is proposed in this paper. MFL signals acquired from MFL PIG(pipeline inspection gauge) have nonlinearity and distortion caused by various extemal disturbances. SQI(self quotient image), a compensation technique for nonlinearity and distortion of MFL signal, is used to correct positioning of pipeline defects. Through the experiments using artificial defects carved in the KOGAS pipeline simulation facility, it is found that the performance of proposed defect detection is greatly improved compared to that of the conventional DCT(discrete cosine transform) coefficients based detection

  11. Anisotropic dark matter distribution functions and impact on WIMP direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Schwetz, Thomas; Catena, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Dark matter N-body simulations suggest that the velocity distribution of dark matter is anisotropic. In this work we employ a mass model for the Milky Way whose parameters are determined from a fit to kinematical data. Then we adopt an ansatz for the dark matter phase space distribution which allows to construct self-consistent halo models which feature a degree of anisotropy as a function of the radius such as suggested by the simulations. The resulting velocity distributions are then used for an analysis of current data from dark matter direct detection experiments. We find that velocity distributions which are radially biased at large galactocentric distances (up to the virial radius) lead to an increased high velocity tail of the local dark matter distribution. This affects the interpretation of data from direct detection experiments, especially for dark matter masses around 10 GeV, since in this region the high velocity tail is sampled. We find that the allowed regions in the dark matter mass-cross section plane as indicated by possible hints for a dark matter signal reported by several experiments as well as conflicting exclusion limits from other experiments shift in a similar way when the halo model is varied. Hence, it is not possible to improve the consistency of the data by referring to anisotropic halo models of the type considered in this work

  12. An estimation method for echo signal energy of pipe inner surface longitudinal crack detection by 2-D energy coefficients integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shiyuan, E-mail: redaple@bit.edu.cn; Sun, Haoyu, E-mail: redaple@bit.edu.cn; Xu, Chunguang, E-mail: redaple@bit.edu.cn; Cao, Xiandong, E-mail: redaple@bit.edu.cn; Cui, Liming, E-mail: redaple@bit.edu.cn; Xiao, Dingguo, E-mail: redaple@bit.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China NO.5 Zhongguancun South Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-03-31

    The echo signal energy is directly affected by the incident sound beam eccentricity or angle for thick-walled pipes inner longitudinal cracks detection. A method for analyzing the relationship between echo signal energy between the values of incident eccentricity is brought forward, which can be used to estimate echo signal energy when testing inside wall longitudinal crack of pipe, using mode-transformed compression wave adaptation of shear wave with water-immersion method, by making a two-dimension integration of “energy coefficient” in both circumferential and axial directions. The calculation model is founded for cylinder sound beam case, in which the refraction and reflection energy coefficients of different rays in the whole sound beam are considered different. The echo signal energy is calculated for a particular cylinder sound beam testing different pipes: a beam with a diameter of 0.5 inch (12.7mm) testing a φ279.4mm pipe and a φ79.4mm one. As a comparison, both the results of two-dimension integration and one-dimension (circumferential direction) integration are listed, and only the former agrees well with experimental results. The estimation method proves to be valid and shows that the usual method of simplifying the sound beam as a single ray for estimating echo signal energy and choosing optimal incident eccentricity is not so appropriate.

  13. The Signal and Noise Analysis of Direct Conversion EHM Transceivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayegh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct conversion modulator-demodulator with even harmonic mixers with emphasis on noise analysis is presented. The circuits consist of even harmonic mixers (EHMs realized with antiparallel diode pairs (APDPs. We evaluate the different levels of I/Q imbalances and DC offsets and use signal space concepts to analyze the bit error rate (BER of the proposed transceiver using M-ary QAM schemes. Moreover, the simultaneous analysis of the signal and noise has been presented.

  14. Directly detecting isospin-violating dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Chris; Kumar, Jason; Marfatia, Danny; Sandick, Pearl

    2018-03-01

    We consider the prospects for multiple dark matter direct detection experiments to determine if the interactions of a dark matter candidate are isospin-violating. We focus on theoretically well-motivated examples of isospin-violating dark matter (IVDM), including models in which dark matter interactions with nuclei are mediated by a dark photon, a Z , or a squark. We determine that the best prospects for distinguishing IVDM from the isospin-invariant scenario arise in the cases of dark photon-or Z -mediated interactions, and that the ideal experimental scenario would consist of large exposure xenon- and neon-based detectors. If such models just evade current direct detection limits, then one could distinguish such models from the standard isospin-invariant case with two detectors with of order 100 ton-year exposure.

  15. ASSESSING ASTROPHYSICAL UNCERTAINTIES IN DIRECT DETECTION WITH GALAXY SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloane, Jonathan D.; Buckley, Matthew R.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Governato, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    We study the local dark matter velocity distribution in simulated Milky Way-mass galaxies, generated at high resolution with both dark matter and baryons. We find that the dark matter in the solar neighborhood is influenced appreciably by the inclusion of baryons, increasing the speed of dark matter particles compared to dark matter-only simulations. The gravitational potential due to the presence of a baryonic disk increases the amount of high velocity dark matter, resulting in velocity distributions that are more similar to the Maxwellian Standard Halo Model than predicted from dark matter-only simulations. Furthermore, the velocity structures present in baryonic simulations possess a greater diversity than expected from dark matter-only simulations. We show that the impact on the direct detection experiments LUX, DAMA/Libra, and CoGeNT using our simulated velocity distributions, and explore how resolution and halo mass within the Milky Way’s estimated mass range impact the results. A Maxwellian fit to the velocity distribution tends to overpredict the amount of dark matter in the high velocity tail, even with baryons, and thus leads to overly optimistic direct detection bounds on models that are dependent on this region of phase space for an experimental signal. Our work further demonstrates that it is critical to transform simulated velocity distributions to the lab frame of reference, due to the fact that velocity structure in the solar neighborhood appears when baryons are included. There is more velocity structure present when baryons are included than in dark matter-only simulations. Even when baryons are included, the importance of the velocity structure is not as apparent in the Galactic frame of reference as in the Earth frame.

  16. ASSESSING ASTROPHYSICAL UNCERTAINTIES IN DIRECT DETECTION WITH GALAXY SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloane, Jonathan D.; Buckley, Matthew R.; Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Governato, Fabio [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We study the local dark matter velocity distribution in simulated Milky Way-mass galaxies, generated at high resolution with both dark matter and baryons. We find that the dark matter in the solar neighborhood is influenced appreciably by the inclusion of baryons, increasing the speed of dark matter particles compared to dark matter-only simulations. The gravitational potential due to the presence of a baryonic disk increases the amount of high velocity dark matter, resulting in velocity distributions that are more similar to the Maxwellian Standard Halo Model than predicted from dark matter-only simulations. Furthermore, the velocity structures present in baryonic simulations possess a greater diversity than expected from dark matter-only simulations. We show that the impact on the direct detection experiments LUX, DAMA/Libra, and CoGeNT using our simulated velocity distributions, and explore how resolution and halo mass within the Milky Way’s estimated mass range impact the results. A Maxwellian fit to the velocity distribution tends to overpredict the amount of dark matter in the high velocity tail, even with baryons, and thus leads to overly optimistic direct detection bounds on models that are dependent on this region of phase space for an experimental signal. Our work further demonstrates that it is critical to transform simulated velocity distributions to the lab frame of reference, due to the fact that velocity structure in the solar neighborhood appears when baryons are included. There is more velocity structure present when baryons are included than in dark matter-only simulations. Even when baryons are included, the importance of the velocity structure is not as apparent in the Galactic frame of reference as in the Earth frame.

  17. Underwater Acoustic Signal Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Culver, Richard L; Sibul, Leon H; Bradley, David L

    2007-01-01

    .... The research is directed toward passive sonar detection and classification, continuous wave (CW) and broadband signals, shallow water operation, both platform-mounted and distributed systems, and frequencies below 1 kHz...

  18. Interference Cancellation Technique Based on Discovery of Spreading Codes of Interference Signals and Maximum Correlation Detection for DS-CDMA System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, Ranga; Yokoyama, Mitsuo; Uehara, Hideyuki

    This paper presents a novel interference cancellation (IC) scheme for both synchronous and asynchronous direct-sequence code-division multiple-access (DS-CDMA) wireless channels. In the DS-CDMA system, the multiple access interference (MAI) and the near-far problem (NFP) are the two factors which reduce the capacity of the system. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm that is able to detect all interference signals as an individual MAI signal by maximum correlation detection. It is based on the discovery of all the unknowing spreading codes of the interference signals. Then, all possible MAI patterns so called replicas are generated as a summation of interference signals. And the true MAI pattern is found by taking correlation between the received signal and the replicas. Moreover, the receiver executes MAI cancellation in a successive manner, removing all interference signals by single-stage. Numerical results will show that the proposed IC strategy, which alleviates the detrimental effect of the MAI and the near-far problem, can significantly improve the system performance. Especially, we can obtain almost the same receiving characteristics as in the absense of interference for asynchrnous system when received powers are equal. Also, the same performances can be seen under any received power state for synchronous system.

  19. Direct and Indirect Dark Matter Detection in Gauge Theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Farinaldo [Federal Univ. of Paraba (Brazil)

    2013-01-01

    The Dark matter (DM) problem constitutes a key question at the interface among Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology. The observational data which have been accumulated in the last years point to an existence of non baryonic amount of DM. Since the Standard Model (SM) does not provide any candidate for such non-baryonic DM, the evidence of DM is a major indication for new physics beyond the SM. We will study in this work one of the most popular DM candidates, the so called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles) from a direct and indirect detection perspective. In order to approach the direct and indirect dection of DM in the context of Particle Physics in a more pedagogic way, we will begin our discussion talking about a minimal extension of the SM. Later we will work on the subject in a 3-3-1 model. Next, we will study the role of WIMPs in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. Lastly, we will look for indirect DM signals in the center of our galaxy using the NASA Satellite, called Fermi-LAT. Through a comprehensive analysis of the data events observed by Fermi-LAT and some background models, we will constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section for several annihilation channels and dark matter halo profiles.

  20. Direct detection of exothermic dark matter with light mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang [Chongqing University of Posts & Telecommunications,Chongqing, 400065 (China); Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University,Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences,Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Huang, Da; Lee, Chun-Hao [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University,Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wang, Qing [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University,Beijing, 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter,Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-08-05

    We study the dark matter (DM) direct detection for the models with the effects of the isospin-violating couplings, exothermic scatterings, and/or the lightness of the mediator, proposed to relax the tension between the CDMS-Si signals and null experiments. In the light of the new updates of the LUX and CDMSlite data, we find that many of the previous proposals are now ruled out, including the Ge-phobic exothermic DM model and the Xe-phobic DM one with a light mediator. We also examine the exothermic DM models with a light mediator but without the isospin violation, and we are unable to identify any available parameter space that could simultaneously satisfy all the experiments. The only models that can partially relax the inconsistencies are the Xe-phobic exothermic DM models with or without a light mediator. But even in this case, a large portion of the CDMS-Si regions of interest has been constrained by the LUX and SuperCDMS data.

  1. Fault detection of a spur gear using vibration signal with multivariable statistical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songpon Klinchaeam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a condition monitoring technique of a spur gear fault detection using vibration signal analysis based on time domain. Vibration signals were acquired from gearboxes and used to simulate various faults on spur gear tooth. In this study, vibration signals were applied to monitor a normal and various fault conditions of a spur gear such as normal, scuffing defect, crack defect and broken tooth. The statistical parameters of vibration signal were used to compare and evaluate the value of fault condition. This technique can be applied to set alarm limit of the signal condition based on statistical parameter such as variance, kurtosis, rms and crest factor. These parameters can be used to set as a boundary decision of signal condition. From the results, the vibration signal analysis with single statistical parameter is unclear to predict fault of the spur gears. The using at least two statistical parameters can be clearly used to separate in every case of fault detection. The boundary decision of statistical parameter with the 99.7% certainty ( 3   from 300 referenced dataset and detected the testing condition with 99.7% ( 3   accuracy and had an error of less than 0.3 % using 50 testing dataset.

  2. Direct versus indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers the slides that were presented during the workshop 'direct versus indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter'(about 30 contributions). This workshop intended to bring together people from the particle theory community, astrophysicists and cosmologists, as well as experimentalists involved in the detection of dark matter. The aim is to generate a discussion about current and future strategies for detection of SUSY dark matter (with focus, but not exclusively, on neutralinos). Complementarities between accelerator, direct and indirect searches as well as a comparison between the uncertainties in direct and indirect searches of dark matter, are supposed to be discussed. Among the issues which will be addressed are: -) the crucial questions related to the structure of galaxies (local dark matter density, clumping, anomalous velocity distributions, etc.) ; -) the possibilities offered by the present and future experimental facilities for direct and indirect (photon, neutrino) searches; -) the potential for the discovery of SUSY at LHC and beyond; and -) the parameterization of the SUSY breaking models beyond the minimal versions.

  3. Weak signal detection: A discrete window of opportunity for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weak signal detection' as a potential opportunity to fill this void. Method: Combining futures and complexity theory, we reflect on two pilot case studies that involved the Archetype Extraction technique and the SenseMakerw CollectorTM tool.

  4. Method for Establishing Direction of Arrival by Use of Signals of Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-29

    digital converter (ADC). The analog-to-digital converter sampling process that locks the relative time features of the digital signal processing...path and is sampled by the ADC. The ADC sampling process locks the relative time properties of the individual signals components arriving at...that signal. For each wave vector, the angles that define the direction of arrival are assumed to be identical at each RF port phase center in the

  5. A Detection Algorithm for the BOC Signal Based on Quadrature Channel Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Qian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problem of detecting a BOC signal, which uses a long-period pseudo random sequence, an algorithm is presented based on quadrature channel correlation. The quadrature channel correlation method eliminates the autocorrelation component of the carrier wave, allowing for the extraction of the absolute autocorrelation peaks of the BOC sequence. If the same lag difference and height difference exist for the adjacent peaks, the BOC signal can be detected effectively using a statistical analysis of the multiple autocorrelation peaks. The simulation results show that the interference of the carrier wave component is eliminated and the autocorrelation peaks of the BOC sequence are obtained effectively without demodulation. The BOC signal can be detected effectively when the SNR is greater than −12 dB. The detection ability can be improved further by increasing the number of sampling points. The higher the ratio of the square wave subcarrier speed to the pseudo random sequence speed is, the greater the detection ability is with a lower SNR. The algorithm presented in this paper is superior to the algorithm based on the spectral correlation.

  6. A Root-MUSIC-Like Direction Finding Method for Cyclostationary Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yide Wang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new root-MUSIC-like direction finding algorithm that exploits cyclostationarity in order to improve the direction-of-arrival estimation. The proposed cyclic method is signal selective, it allows to increase the resolution power and the noise robustness significantly, and it is also able to handle more sources than the number of sensors. Computer simulations are used to show the performance of the algorithm.

  7. Detection and Classification of Whale Acoustic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yin

    This dissertation focuses on two vital challenges in relation to whale acoustic signals: detection and classification. In detection, we evaluated the influence of the uncertain ocean environment on the spectrogram-based detector, and derived the likelihood ratio of the proposed Short Time Fourier Transform detector. Experimental results showed that the proposed detector outperforms detectors based on the spectrogram. The proposed detector is more sensitive to environmental changes because it includes phase information. In classification, our focus is on finding a robust and sparse representation of whale vocalizations. Because whale vocalizations can be modeled as polynomial phase signals, we can represent the whale calls by their polynomial phase coefficients. In this dissertation, we used the Weyl transform to capture chirp rate information, and used a two dimensional feature set to represent whale vocalizations globally. Experimental results showed that our Weyl feature set outperforms chirplet coefficients and MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients) when applied to our collected data. Since whale vocalizations can be represented by polynomial phase coefficients, it is plausible that the signals lie on a manifold parameterized by these coefficients. We also studied the intrinsic structure of high dimensional whale data by exploiting its geometry. Experimental results showed that nonlinear mappings such as Laplacian Eigenmap and ISOMAP outperform linear mappings such as PCA and MDS, suggesting that the whale acoustic data is nonlinear. We also explored deep learning algorithms on whale acoustic data. We built each layer as convolutions with either a PCA filter bank (PCANet) or a DCT filter bank (DCTNet). With the DCT filter bank, each layer has different a time-frequency scale representation, and from this, one can extract different physical information. Experimental results showed that our PCANet and DCTNet achieve high classification rate on the whale

  8. Can the Existence of Dark Energy be Directly Detected?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-23

    The majority of astronomers and physicists accept the reality of dark energy and also believe that it can only be studied indirectly through observation of the motions of stars and galaxies. In this paper I open the experimental question of whether it is possible to directly detect dark energy through the presence of dark energy density. Two thirds of this paper outlines the major aspects of dark energy density as now comprehended by the astronomical and physics community. The final third summarizes various proposals for direct detection of dark energy density or its possible effects. At this time I do not have a fruitful answer to the question: Can the Existence of Dark Energy Be Directly Detected?

  9. Real-time bicycle detection at signalized intersections using thermal imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaert, Robin

    2013-02-01

    More and more governments and authorities around the world are promoting the use of bicycles in cities, as this is healthy for the bicyclist and improves the quality of life in general. Safety and efficiency of bicyclists has become a major focus. To achieve this, there is a need for a smarter approach towards the control of signalized intersections. Various traditional detection technologies, such as video, microwave radar and electromagnetic loops, can be used to detect vehicles at signalized intersections, but none of these can consistently separate bikes from other traffic, day and night and in various weather conditions. As bikes should get a higher priority and also require longer green time to safely cross the signalized intersection, traffic managers are looking for alternative detection systems that can make the distinction between bicycles and other vehicles near the stop bar. In this paper, the drawbacks of a video-based approach are presented, next to the benefits of a thermal-video-based approach for vehicle presence detection with separation of bicycles. Also, the specific technical challenges are highlighted in developing a system that combines thermal image capturing, image processing and output triggering to the traffic light controller in near real-time and in a single housing.

  10. Detection of myasthenia gravis using electrooculography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Boulos, M I; Murray, B J; Krishnan, S; Katzberg, H; Umapathy, K

    2016-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder resulting from skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. An early common symptom is fatigable weakness of the extrinsic ocular muscles; if symptoms remain confined to the ocular muscles after a few years, this is classified as ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG). Diagnosis of MG when there are mild, isolated ocular symptoms can be difficult, and currently available diagnostic techniques are insensitive, non-specific or technically cumbersome. In addition, there are no accurate biomarkers to follow severity of ocular dysfunction in MG over time. Single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) and repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) offers a way of detecting and measuring ocular muscle dysfunction in MG, however, challenges of these methods include a poor signal to noise ratio in quantifying eye muscle weakness especially in mild cases. This paper presents one of the attempts to use the electric potentials from the eyes or electrooculography (EOG) signals but obtained from three different forms of sleep testing to differentiate MG patients from age- and gender-matched controls. We analyzed 8 MG patients and 8 control patients and demonstrated a difference in the average eye movements detected between the groups. A classification accuracy as high as 68.8% was achieved using a linear discriminant analysis based classifier.

  11. Can Technical Analysis Signals Detect Price Reactions Around Earnings Announcement?: Evidence from Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Dedhy Sulistiawan; Jogiyanto Hartono

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether technical analysis signals can detect price reactions before and after earnings announcement dates in Indonesian stock market. Earnings announcements produce reactions, both before and after the announcements. Informed investors may use private information before earnings announcements (Christophe, Ferri and Angel, 2004; Porter, 1992). Using technical analysis signals, this study expects that retail investors (uninformed investors) can detect preannouncements react...

  12. Model-independent determination of the WIMP mass from direct dark matter detection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, Manuel; Shan, Chung-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are one of the leading candidates for dark matter. We develop a model-independent method for determining the mass m χ of the WIMP by using data (i.e. measured recoil energies) of direct detection experiments. Our method is independent of the as yet unknown WIMP density near the Earth, of the form of the WIMP velocity distribution, as well as of the WIMP–nucleus cross section. However, it requires positive signals from at least two detectors with different target nuclei. In a background-free environment, m χ ∼50 GeV could in principle be determined with an error of ∼35% with only 2 × 50 events; in practice, upper and lower limits on the recoil energy of signal events, imposed to reduce backgrounds, can increase the error. The method also loses precision if m χ significantly exceeds the mass of the heaviest target nucleus used

  13. Movement and respiration detection using statistical properties of the FMCW radar signal

    KAUST Repository

    Kiuru, Tero

    2016-07-26

    This paper presents a 24 GHz FMCW radar system for detection of movement and respiration using change in the statistical properties of the received radar signal, both amplitude and phase. We present the hardware and software segments of the radar system as well as algorithms with measurement results for two distinct use-cases: 1. FMCW radar as a respiration monitor and 2. a dual-use of the same radar system for smart lighting and intrusion detection. By using change in statistical properties of the signal for detection, several system parameters can be relaxed, including, for example, pulse repetition rate, power consumption, computational load, processor speed, and memory space. We will also demonstrate, that the capability to switch between received signal strength and phase difference enables dual-use cases with one requiring extreme sensitivity to movement and the other robustness against small sources of interference. © 2016 IEEE.

  14. Influence of multi-microphone signal enhancement algorithms on auditory movement detection in acoustically complex situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbeck, Micha; Hartog, Laura; Grimm, Giso

    2017-01-01

    The influence of hearing aid (HA) signal processing on the perception of spatially dynamic sounds has not been systematically investigated so far. Previously, we observed that interfering sounds impaired the detectability of left-right source movements and reverberation that of near-far source...... movements for elderly hearing-impaired (EHI) listeners (Lundbeck et al., 2017). Here, we explored potential ways of improving these deficits with HAs. To that end, we carried out acoustic analyses to examine the impact of two beamforming algorithms and a binaural coherence-based noise reduction scheme...... on the cues underlying movement perception. While binaural cues remained mostly unchanged, there were greater monaural spectral changes and increases in signal-to-noise ratio and direct-to-reverberant sound ratio as a result of the applied processing. Based on these findings, we conducted a listening test...

  15. Transmission and signal loss in mask designs for a dual neutron and gamma imager applied to mobile standoff detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Hayward, Jason P.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Blackston, Matthew A.; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    In order to design a next-generation, dual neutron and gamma imager for mobile standoff detection which uses coded aperture imaging as its primary detection modality, the following design parameters have been investigated for gamma and neutron radiation incident upon a hybrid, coded mask: (1) transmission through mask elements for various mask materials and thicknesses; and (2) signal attenuation in the mask versus angle of incidence. Each of these parameters directly affects detection significance, as quantified by the signal-to-noise ratio. The hybrid mask consists of two or three layers: organic material for fast neutron attenuation and scattering, Cd for slow neutron absorption (if applied), and one of three of the following photon or photon and slow neutron attenuating materials—Linotype alloy, CLYC, or CZT. In the MCNP model, a line source of gamma rays (100–2500 keV), fast neutrons (1000–10,000 keV) or thermal neutrons was positioned above the hybrid mask. The radiation penetrating the mask was simply tallied at the surface of an ideal detector, which was located below the surface of the last mask layer. The transmission was calculated as the ratio of the particles transmitted through the fixed aperture to the particles passing through the closed mask. In order to determine the performance of the mask considering relative motion between the source and detector, simulations were used to calculate the signal attenuation for incident radiation angles of 0–50°. The results showed that a hybrid mask can be designed to sufficiently reduce both transmission through the mask and signal loss at large angles of incidence, considering both gamma ray and fast neutron radiations. With properly selected material thicknesses, the signal loss of a hybrid mask, which is necessarily thicker than the mask required for either single mode imaging, is not a setback to the system's detection significance

  16. Minimizing Detection Probability Routing in Ad Hoc Networks Using Directional Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Towsley Don

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In a hostile environment, it is important for a transmitter to make its wireless transmission invisible to adversaries because an adversary can detect the transmitter if the received power at its antennas is strong enough. This paper defines a detection probability model to compute the level of a transmitter being detected by a detection system at arbitrary location around the transmitter. Our study proves that the probability of detecting a directional antenna is much lower than that of detecting an omnidirectional antenna if both the directional and omnidirectional antennas provide the same Effective Isotropic Radiated Power (EIRP in the direction of the receiver. We propose a Minimizing Detection Probability (MinDP routing algorithm to find a secure routing path in ad hoc networks where nodes employ directional antennas to transmit data to decrease the probability of being detected by adversaries. Our study shows that the MinDP routing algorithm can reduce the total detection probability of deliveries from the source to the destination by over 74%.

  17. Direct detection of a single evoked action potential with MRS in Lumbricus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawsky, Alexander J; Dingledine, Raymond; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2012-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) measures neural activity indirectly by detecting the signal change associated with the hemodynamic response following brain activation. In order to alleviate the temporal and spatial specificity problems associated with fMRI, a number of attempts have been made to detect neural magnetic fields (NMFs) with MRI directly, but have thus far provided conflicting results. In this study, we used MR to detect axonal NMFs in the median giant fiber of the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, by examining the free induction decay (FID) with a sampling interval of 0.32 ms. The earthworm nerve cords were isolated from the vasculature and stimulated at the threshold of action potential generation. FIDs were acquired shortly after the stimulation, and simultaneous field potential recordings identified the presence or absence of single evoked action potentials. FIDs acquired when the stimulus did not evoke an action potential were summed as background. The phase of the background-subtracted FID exhibited a systematic change, with a peak phase difference of (-1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-5) radians occurring at a time corresponding to the timing of the action potential. In addition, we calculated the possible changes in the FID magnitude and phase caused by a simulated action potential using a volume conductor model. The measured phase difference matched the theoretical prediction well in both amplitude and temporal characteristics. This study provides the first evidence for the direct detection of a magnetic field from an evoked action potential using MR. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Two-phase xenon detector with gas amplification and electroluminescent signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, D.Yu.; Burenkov, A.A.; Grishkin, Yu.L.; Kovalenko, A.G.; Lebedenko, V.N.; Stekhanov, V.N.

    2008-01-01

    An optical technique for detecting ionization electrons produced during ionization of the liquid phase has been experimentally tested in two-phase (liquid-gas) xenon. The effects of gas and electroluminescent amplifications at the wire anode are simultaneously used for detection. This method allows construction of a supersensitive detector of small ionization signals-down to those corresponding to the detection of single electrons [ru

  19. Enhancement of crack detection in stud bolts of nuclear reactor by ultrasonic signal processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Oh, W.D.; Choi, S.W.; Park, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    'Full-text:' The stud bolts is one of the most critical parts for safety of reactor vessels in the nuclear power plants. However, in the application of ultrasonic technique for crack detection in stud bolt, some difficulties encountered are classification of crack signal from the signals reflected from threads part in stud bolt. In this study, shadow effect technique combined with new signal processing method is Investigated to enhance the detectability of small crack initiated from root of thread in stud bolt. The key idea of signal processing is based on the fact that the shape of waveforms from the threads is uniform since the shape of the threads in a bolt is same. If some cracks exist in the thread, the flaw signals are different to the reference signals. It is demonstrated that the small flaws are efficiently detected by novel ultrasonic technique combined with this new signal processing concept. (author)

  20. Coherent spectral amplitude coded label detection for DQPSK payload signals in packet-switched metropolitan area networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee

    2011-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of a frequency swept local oscillator-based spectral amplitude coding (SAC) label detection for DQPSK signals after 40km of fiber transmission. Label detection was performed for a 10.7Gbaud DQPSK signal labeled with a SAC label composed of four......-frequency tones with 500MHz spectral separation. Successful label detection and recognition is achieved with the aid of digital signal processing that allows for substantial reduction of the complexity of the detection optical front-end....

  1. Detection of anomalous signals in temporally correlated data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J. O.

    2010-12-01

    Detection of transient tectonic signals in data obtained from large geodetic networks requires the ability to detect signals that are both temporally and spatially coherent. In this report I will describe a modification to an existing method that estimates both the coefficients of temporally correlated noise model and an efficient filter based on the noise model. This filter, when applied to the original time-series, effectively whitens (or flattens) the power spectrum. The filtered data provide the means to calculate running averages which are then used to detect deviations from the background trends. For large networks, time-series of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be easily constructed since, by filtering, each of the original time-series has been transformed into one that is closer to having a Gaussian distribution with a variance of 1.0. Anomalous intervals may be identified by counting the number of GPS sites for which the SNR exceeds a specified value. For example, during one time interval, if there were 5 out of 20 time-series with SNR>2, this would be considered anomalous; typically, one would expect at 95% confidence that there would be at least 1 out of 20 time-series with an SNR>2. For time intervals with an anomalously large number of high SNR, the spatial distribution of the SNR is mapped to identify the location of the anomalous signal(s) and their degree of spatial clustering. Estimating the filter that should be used to whiten the data requires modification of the existing methods that employ maximum likelihood estimation to determine the temporal covariance of the data. In these methods, it is assumed that the noise components in the data are a combination of white, flicker and random-walk processes and that they are derived from three different and independent sources. Instead, in this new method, the covariance matrix is constructed assuming that only one source is responsible for the noise and that source can be represented as a white

  2. Criteria for assessing the quality of signal processing techniques for acoustic leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, R.; Singh, O.P.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the criteria used in the first IAEA coordinated research programme to assess the quality of signal processing techniques for sodium boiling noise detection are highlighted. Signal processing techniques, using new features sensitive to boiling and a new approach for achieving higher reliability of detection, which were developed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research are also presented. 10 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Discriminating dark matter candidates using direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belanger, G.; Nezri, E.; Pukhov, A.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the predictions for both the spin-dependent and spin-independent direct detection rates in a variety of new particle physics models with dark matter candidates. We show that a determination of both spin-independent and spin-dependent amplitudes on protons and neutrons can in principle discriminate different candidates of dark matter up to a few ambiguities. We emphasize the importance of making measurements with different spin-dependent sensitive detector materials and the need for significant improvement of the detector sensitivities. Scenarios where exchange of new colored particles contributes significantly to the elastic scattering cross sections are often the most difficult to identify, the LHC should give an indication whether such scenarios are relevant for direct detection.

  4. Wind measurement via direct detection lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afek, I.; Sela, N.; Narkiss, N.; Shamai, G.; Tsadka, S.

    2013-10-01

    Wind sensing Lidar is considered a promising technology for high quality wind measurements required for various applications such as hub height wind resource assessment, power curve measurements and advanced, real time, forward looking turbine control. Until recently, the only available Lidar technology was based on coherent Doppler shift detection, whose market acceptance has been slow primarily due to its exuberant price. Direct detection Lidar technology provides an alternative to remote sensing of wind by incorporating high precision measurement, a robust design and an affordable price tag.

  5. Direct 13C NMR Detection in HPLC Hyphenation Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Johansen, Kenneth; Nyberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Solid phase extraction (SPE) was introduced as a crucial step in the HPLC-SPE-NMR technique to enable online analyte enrichment from which proton-detected NMR experiments on submicrogram amounts from complex mixtures were possible. However, the significance of direct-detected (13)C NMR experiments...... application of HPLC-SPE-NMR analysis using direct-detected (13)C NMR spectra. HPLC column loading, accumulative SPE trappings, and the effect of different elution solvents were evaluated and optimized. A column loading of approximately 600 mug of a prefractionated triterpenoid mixture, six trappings...

  6. Direct Detection of Polarized, Scattered Light from Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Gregory

    super-Earth with the highest expected polarimetric signal-to- noise ratio. These exoplanets should all produce detectable polarization, and they present unique opportunities to study the atmospheres of wildly different exoplanets. Extending the PI s (Laughlin) Monte Carlo ray-tracing code, and utilizing the Co-I s (Fortney) experience in modeling exoplanet atmospheres, we propose to fund a graduate student to model the polarization data obtained from POLISH2 and invert the above variables. This is because they affect the amplitude and shape of the periodic variability in the polarization state of light from the system. Indeed, the discovery of spherical, sulfuric acid droplets suspended in the Venusian atmosphere was made forty years ago with Mie scattering models to fit polarimetric measurements. The PI s ray-tracing code, which has been used to model the rapid heating of the eccentric HD 80606b exoplanet, currently includes Rayleigh scattering and alkali metal absorption in a self-consistent manner. The direct detection of exoplanets as well as characterization of their atmospheric compositions and structure is directly related to the goals of the Origins program and to the NASA 2010 Science Plan, which emphasizes exploration of exoplanets and exoplanetary systems.

  7. Detection of the scintillation light emitted from direct-bandgap compound semiconductors by a Si avalanche photodiode at 150 mK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumune, Takashi; Takayama, Nobuyasu; Maehata, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Kenji; Umeno, Takahiro

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the direct-bandgap compound semiconductor materials are irradiated by α particles emitted from 241 Am for the detection of scintillation light at the temperature of 150 mK. For the irradiation experiment, two disk shaped samples were fabricated from an epoxy resin mixed with the powder of PbI 2 and CuI, respectively. Each disk-samples was cooled down to 150 mK by a compact liquid helium-free dilution refrigerator. A Si avalanche photodiode (APD) was employed for detecting the scintillation light emitted from the disk-sample inside the refrigerator. The detection signal current of Si APD was converted into the voltage pulses by a charge sensitive preamplifier. The voltage pulses of the scintillation light emitted from the direct-bandgap semiconductors were observed at the temperature of 150 mK. (author)

  8. Echographic detectability of optoacoustic signals from low-concentration PEG-coated gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversano, Francesco; Soloperto, Giulia; Greco, Antonio; Ragusa, Andrea; Casciaro, Ernesto; Chiriacò, Fernanda; Demitri, Christian; Gigli, Giuseppe; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Casciaro, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of gold nanorod (GNR)-enhanced optoacoustic imaging employing a conventional echographic device and to determine the most effective operative configuration in order to assure optoacoustic effectiveness, nanoparticle stability, and imaging procedure safety. The most suitable laser parameters were experimentally determined in order to assure nanoparticle stability during the optoacoustic imaging procedures. The selected configuration was then applied to a novel tissue-mimicking phantom, in which GNR solutions covering a wide range of low concentrations (25-200 pM) and different sample volumes (50-200 μL) were exposed to pulsed laser irradiation. GNR-emitted optoacoustic signals were acquired either by a couple of single-element ultrasound probes or by an echographic transducer. Off-line analysis included: (a) quantitative evaluation of the relationships between GNR concentration, sample volume, phantom geometry, and amplitude of optoacoustic signals propagating along different directions; (b) echographic detection of "optoacoustic spots," analyzing their intensity, spatial distribution, and clinical exploitability. MTT measurements performed on two different cell lines were also used to quantify biocompatibility of the synthesized GNRs in the adopted doses. Laser irradiation at 30 mJ/cm(2) for 20 seconds resulted in the best compromise among the requirements of effectiveness, safety, and nanoparticle stability. Amplitude of GNR-emitted optoacoustic pulses was proportional to both sample volume and concentration along each considered propagation direction for all the tested boundary conditions, providing an experimental confirmation of isotropic optoacoustic emission. Average intensity of echographically detected spots showed similar behavior, emphasizing the presence of an "ideal" GNR concentration (100 pM) that optimized optoacoustic effectiveness. The tested GNRs also exhibited high biocompatibility over the entire considered

  9. Detecting double compression of audio signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Shi, Yun Q.; Huang, Jiwu

    2010-01-01

    MP3 is the most popular audio format nowadays in our daily life, for example music downloaded from the Internet and file saved in the digital recorder are often in MP3 format. However, low bitrate MP3s are often transcoded to high bitrate since high bitrate ones are of high commercial value. Also audio recording in digital recorder can be doctored easily by pervasive audio editing software. This paper presents two methods for the detection of double MP3 compression. The methods are essential for finding out fake-quality MP3 and audio forensics. The proposed methods use support vector machine classifiers with feature vectors formed by the distributions of the first digits of the quantized MDCT (modified discrete cosine transform) coefficients. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. To the best of our knowledge, this piece of work is the first one to detect double compression of audio signal.

  10. Detecting Volcanic Ash Plumes with GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Larson, K. M.; Palo, S. E.; Mattia, M.; Rossi, M.; Coltelli, M.; Roesler, C.; Fee, D.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are commonly placed near volcanic sites to measure ground deformation. In addition to the carrier phase data used to measure ground position, these receivers also record Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) data. Larson (2013) showed that attenuations in SNR data strongly correlate with ash emissions at a series of eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. This finding has been confirmed at eruptions for Tongariro, Mt Etna, Mt Shindake, and Sakurajima. In each of these detections, very expensive geodetic quality GNSS receivers were used. If low-cost GNSS instruments could be used instead, a networked array could be deployed and optimized for plume detection and tomography. The outputs of this sensor array could then be used by both local volcanic observatories and Volcano Ash Advisory Centers. Here we will describe progress in developing such an array. The sensors we are working with are intended for navigation use, and thus lack the supporting power and communications equipment necessary for a networked system. Reliably providing those features is major challenge for the overall sensor design. We have built prototypes of our Volcano Ash Plume Receiver (VAPR), with solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and onboard data storage for preliminary testing. We will present results of our field tests of both receivers and antennas. A second critical need for our array is a reliable detection algorithm. We have tested our algorithm on data from recent eruptions and have incorporated the noise characteristics of the low-cost GNSS receiver. We have also developed a simulation capability so that the receivers can be deployed to optimize vent crossing GNSS signals.

  11. A novel time-domain signal processing algorithm for real time ventricular fibrillation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, G E; Scarone, N C; Liscovsky, P O; Rotter, P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an application of a novel algorithm for real time detection of ECG pathologies, especially ventricular fibrillation. It is based on segmentation and labeling process of an oversampled signal. After this treatment, analyzing sequence of segments, global signal behaviours are obtained in the same way like a human being does. The entire process can be seen as a morphological filtering after a smart data sampling. The algorithm does not require any ECG digital signal pre-processing, and the computational cost is low, so it can be embedded into the sensors for wearable and permanent applications. The proposed algorithms could be the input signal description to expert systems or to artificial intelligence software in order to detect other pathologies.

  12. A novel time-domain signal processing algorithm for real time ventricular fibrillation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, G. E.; Scarone, N. C.; Liscovsky, P. O.; Rotter S/N, P.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents an application of a novel algorithm for real time detection of ECG pathologies, especially ventricular fibrillation. It is based on segmentation and labeling process of an oversampled signal. After this treatment, analyzing sequence of segments, global signal behaviours are obtained in the same way like a human being does. The entire process can be seen as a morphological filtering after a smart data sampling. The algorithm does not require any ECG digital signal pre-processing, and the computational cost is low, so it can be embedded into the sensors for wearable and permanent applications. The proposed algorithms could be the input signal description to expert systems or to artificial intelligence software in order to detect other pathologies.

  13. Signal post-processing for acoustic velocimeters: detecting and replacing spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi

    2011-01-01

    Time series recorded by acoustic velocimeters are often affected by a combination of factors, including turbulent velocity fluctuations, Doppler noise and signal aliasing. Although it is not possible to find a comprehensive threshold for identifying spurious data, the present work attempts to describe an effective technique for detecting spikes. This technique is based on transforming data into wavelet space and thresholding the wavelet basis by a consistent threshold. The universal threshold modified by a robust scale estimator such as Q n is proven to work extremely well. The suggested methods for replacing identified spikes combine times series analyses (linear time series modelling or a Kalman predictor) with a straightforward method, polynomial interpolation, to generate substitutions retaining both the trends and the fluctuations in the surrounding clean data. Then, tests were performed to reveal the influence of replacing methods on the total number of detected spikes, required iterations and physical properties of the restored signal. From the overall results, it is inferred that using the wavelet-Q n as the detecting module and integrating it with linear time series modelling/Kalman filtering as the replacement module constitutes an effective despiking algorithm. This methodology is capable of restoring the contaminated signal in such a way that its statistical and physical properties correlate well with those of the original record

  14. Detection of Artificially Generated Seismic Signals using Balloon-borne Infrasound Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamoorthy, Siddharth; Komjathy, Attila; Pauken, Michael T.; Cutts, James A.; Garcia, Raphael F.; Mimoun, David; Cadu, Alexandre; Sournac, Anthony; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Lai, Voon Hui; Bowman, Daniel C.

    2018-01-01

    We conducted an experiment in Pahrump, Nevada, in June 2017, where artificial seismic signals were created using a seismic hammer, and the possibility of detecting them from their acoustic signature was examined. In this work, we analyze the pressure signals recorded by highly sensitive barometers deployed on the ground and on tethers suspended from balloons. Our signal processing results show that wind noise experienced by a barometer on a free‐flying balloon is lower compared to one on a mo...

  15. Classification methods to detect sleep apnea in adults based on respiratory and oximetry signals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M B; Chow, C M; Su, S W

    2018-03-26

    Sleep apnea (SA), a common sleep disorder, can significantly decrease the quality of life, and is closely associated with major health risks such as cardiovascular disease, sudden death, depression, and hypertension. The normal diagnostic process of SA using polysomnography is costly and time consuming. In addition, the accuracy of different classification methods to detect SA varies with the use of different physiological signals. If an effective, reliable, and accurate classification method is developed, then the diagnosis of SA and its associated treatment will be time-efficient and economical. This study aims to systematically review the literature and present an overview of classification methods to detect SA using respiratory and oximetry signals and address the automated detection approach. Sixty-two included studies revealed the application of single and multiple signals (respiratory and oximetry) for the diagnosis of SA. Both airflow and oxygen saturation signals alone were effective in detecting SA in the case of binary decision-making, whereas multiple signals were good for multi-class detection. In addition, some machine learning methods were superior to the other classification methods for SA detection using respiratory and oximetry signals. To deal with the respiratory and oximetry signals, a good choice of classification method as well as the consideration of associated factors would result in high accuracy in the detection of SA. An accurate classification method should provide a high detection rate with an automated (independent of human action) analysis of respiratory and oximetry signals. Future high-quality automated studies using large samples of data from multiple patient groups or record batches are recommended.

  16. Pipe-flange detection with GPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonomo, Néstor; De la Vega, Matías; Martinelli, Patricia; Osella, Ana

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an application of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) method for detecting pipe flanges. A case history is described in which GPR was successfully used to locate pipe flanges along an 8 km metal pipeline, using a fixed-offset methodology, from the ground surface. Summaries of numerical simulations and in situ tests, performed before the definitive prospecting to evaluate the feasibility of detection, are included. Typical GPR signals are analysed and several examples shown. Constant-time sections of data volumes and migration are evaluated with the goal of distinguishing flange signals from rock signals in unclear situations. The applied methodology was effective for detecting the pipe flanges in relatively short times, with accuracies below 10 cm in the horizontal direction and 20 cm in the vertical direction

  17. Analysis Spectrum of ECG Signal and QRS Detection during Running on Treadmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agung Suhendra, M.; Ilham R., M.; Simbolon, Artha I.; Faizal A., M.; Munandar, A.

    2018-03-01

    The heart is an important organ in our metabolism in which it controls circulatory and oxygen. The heart exercise is needed one of them using the treadmill to prevent health. To analysis, it using electrocardiograph (ECG) to investigating and diagnosing anomalies of the heart. In this paper, we would like to analysis ECG signals during running on the treadmill with kinds of speeds. There are two analysis ECG signals i.e. QRS detection and power spectrum density (PSD). The result of PSD showed that subject 3 has highly for all subject and the result of QRS detection using pan Tomkins algorithm that a percentage of failed detection is an approaching to 0 % for all subject.

  18. Singularity detection by wavelet approach: application to electrocardiogram signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Bushra; Beya, Ouadi; Fauvet, Eric; Laligant, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In signal processing, the region of abrupt changes contains the most of the useful information about the nature of the signal. The region or the points where these changes occurred are often termed as singular point or singular region. The singularity is considered to be an important character of the signal, as it refers to the discontinuity and interruption present in the signal and the main purpose of the detection of such singular point is to identify the existence, location and size of those singularities. Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is used to analyze the cardiovascular activity in the human body. However the presence of noise due to several reasons limits the doctor's decision and prevents accurate identification of different pathologies. In this work we attempt to analyze the ECG signal with energy based approach and some heuristic methods to segment and identify different signatures inside the signal. ECG signal has been initially denoised by empirical wavelet shrinkage approach based on Steins Unbiased Risk Estimate (SURE). At the second stage, the ECG signal has been analyzed by Mallat approach based on modulus maximas and Lipschitz exponent computation. The results from both approaches has been discussed and important aspects has been highlighted. In order to evaluate the algorithm, the analysis has been done on MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database; a set of ECG data records sampled at a rate of 360 Hz with 11 bit resolution over a 10mv range. The results have been examined and approved by medical doctors.

  19. Lightweight MAC-Spoof Detection Exploiting Received Signal Power and Median Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papini, Davide

    2011-01-01

    this kind of attack based on signal power monitoring. The main contribution of our work is the introduction of a median l- ter that enables the detection of the attack by looking at the variance of the signal power. We take into account two types of references for the samples, time and number of frames......IEEE 802.11 networks are subject to MAC-spoof attacks. An attacker can easily steal the identity of a legitimate station, even Access Points, thus enabling him to take full control over network basic mech- anisms or even access restricted resources. In this paper we propose a method to detect...

  20. Epileptic seizure detection in EEG signal with GModPCA and support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Abeg Kumar; Banka, Haider

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders caused by recurrent seizures. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) record neural activity and can detect epilepsy. Visual inspection of an EEG signal for epileptic seizure detection is a time-consuming process and may lead to human error; therefore, recently, a number of automated seizure detection frameworks were proposed to replace these traditional methods. Feature extraction and classification are two important steps in these procedures. Feature extraction focuses on finding the informative features that could be used for classification and correct decision-making. Therefore, proposing effective feature extraction techniques for seizure detection is of great significance. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a dimensionality reduction technique used in different fields of pattern recognition including EEG signal classification. Global modular PCA (GModPCA) is a variation of PCA. In this paper, an effective framework with GModPCA and Support Vector Machine (SVM) is presented for epileptic seizure detection in EEG signals. The feature extraction is performed with GModPCA, whereas SVM trained with radial basis function kernel performed the classification between seizure and nonseizure EEG signals. Seven different experimental cases were conducted on the benchmark epilepsy EEG dataset. The system performance was evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation. In addition, we prove analytically that GModPCA has less time and space complexities as compared to PCA. The experimental results show that EEG signals have strong inter-sub-pattern correlations. GModPCA and SVM have been able to achieve 100% accuracy for the classification between normal and epileptic signals. Along with this, seven different experimental cases were tested. The classification results of the proposed approach were better than were compared the results of some of the existing methods proposed in literature. It is also found that the time and space

  1. A deafening flash! Visual interference of auditory signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnidge, Christopher; Cecconi Marcotti, Claudia; Freeman, Elliot

    2017-03-01

    In some people, visual stimulation evokes auditory sensations. How prevalent and how perceptually real is this? 22% of our neurotypical adult participants responded 'Yes' when asked whether they heard faint sounds accompanying flash stimuli, and showed significantly better ability to discriminate visual 'Morse-code' sequences. This benefit might arise from an ability to recode visual signals as sounds, thus taking advantage of superior temporal acuity of audition. In support of this, those who showed better visual relative to auditory sequence discrimination also had poorer auditory detection in the presence of uninformative visual flashes, though this was independent of awareness of visually-evoked sounds. Thus a visually-evoked auditory representation may occur subliminally and disrupt detection of real auditory signals. The frequent natural correlation between visual and auditory stimuli might explain the surprising prevalence of this phenomenon. Overall, our results suggest that learned correspondences between strongly correlated modalities may provide a precursor for some synaesthetic abilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Designing lymphocyte functional structure for optimal signal detection: voilà, T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noest, A J

    2000-11-21

    One basic task of immune systems is to detect signals from unknown "intruders" amidst a noisy background of harmless signals. To clarify the functional importance of many observed lymphocyte properties, I ask: What properties would a cell have if one designed it according to the theory of optimal detection, with minimal regard for biological constraints? Sparse and reasonable assumptions about the statistics of available signals prove sufficient for deriving many features of the optimal functional structure, in an incremental and modular design. The use of one common formalism guarantees that all parts of the design collaborate to solve the detection task. Detection performance is computed at several stages of the design. Comparison between design variants reveals e.g. the importance of controlling the signal integration time. This predicts that an appropriate control mechanism should exist. Comparing the design to reality, I find a striking similarity with many features of T cells. For example, the formalism dictates clonal specificity, serial receptor triggering, (grades of) anergy, negative and positive selection, co-stimulation, high-zone tolerance, and clonal production of cytokines. Serious mismatches should be found if T cells were hindered by mechanistic constraints or vestiges of their (co-)evolutionary history, but I have not found clear examples. By contrast, fundamental mismatches abound when comparing the design to immune systems of e.g. invertebrates. The wide-ranging differences seem to hinge on the (in)ability to generate a large diversity of receptors. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Differential and directional estrogenic signaling pathways induced by enterolignans and their precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhu

    Full Text Available Mammalian lignans or enterolignans are metabolites of plant lignans, an important category of phytochemicals. Although they are known to be associated with estrogenic activity, cell signaling pathways leading to specific cell functions, and especially the differences among lignans, have not been explored. We examined the estrogenic activity of enterolignans and their precursor plant lignans and cell signaling pathways for some cell functions, cell cycle and chemokine secretion. We used DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells to examine the similarities, as well as the differences, among enterolignans, enterolactone and enterodiol, and their precursors, matairesinol, pinoresinol and sesamin. The profiles showed moderate to high levels of correlation (R values: 0.44 to 0.81 with that of estrogen (17β-estradiol or E2. Significant correlations were observed among lignans (R values: 0.77 to 0.97, and the correlations were higher for cell functions related to enzymes, signaling, proliferation and transport. All the enterolignans/precursors examined showed activation of the Erk1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways, indicating the involvement of rapid signaling through the non-genomic estrogen signaling pathway. However, when their effects on specific cell functions, cell cycle progression and chemokine (MCP-1 secretion were examined, positive effects were observed only for enterolactone, suggesting that signals are given in certain directions at a position closer to cell functions. We hypothesized that, while estrogen signaling is initiated by the enterolignans/precursors examined, their signals are differentially and directionally modulated later in the pathways, resulting in the differences at the cell function level.

  4. Delay Pressure Detection Method to Eliminate Pump Pressure Interference on the Downhole Mud Pressure Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of applying delay pressure detection method to eliminate mud pump pressure interference on the downhole mud pressure signals is studied. Two pressure sensors mounted on the mud pipe in some distance apart are provided to detect the downhole mud continuous pressure wave signals on the surface according to the delayed time produced by mud pressure wave transmitting between the two sensors. A mathematical model of delay pressure detection is built by analysis of transmission path between mud pump pressure interference and downhole mud pressure signals. Considering pressure signal transmission characteristics of the mud pipe, a mathematical model of ideal low-pass filter for limited frequency band signal is introduced to study the pole frequency impact on the signal reconstruction and the constraints of pressure sensor distance are obtained by pole frequencies analysis. Theoretical calculation and numerical simulation show that the method can effectively eliminate mud pump pressure interference and the downhole mud continuous pressure wave signals can be reconstructed successfully with a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in the condition of satisfying the constraints of pressure sensor distance.

  5. Optimizing a Synthetic Signaling System, Using Mathematical Modeling to Direct Experimental Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-05

    arsenic , toluene, lead, DDT, mercury, etc.). The synthetic signaling system then be used to trigger a phytoremediation process upon detection of these...transferred to soil and allowed to set seed. The T1 generation will yield plants heterozygous and homozygous for the synthetic signaling system, allowing...compounds, either by breaking them down or transporting them to the aerial tissue where they can be harvested and removed from the soil

  6. Towards understanding thermal history of the Universe through direct and indirect detection of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roszkowski, Leszek; Trojanowski, Sebastian [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Hoża 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Turzyński, Krzysztof, E-mail: leszek.roszkowski@ncbj.gov.pl, E-mail: sebastian.trojanowski@uci.edu, E-mail: Krzysztof-Jan.Turzynski@fuw.edu.pl [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-10-01

    We examine the question to what extent prospective detection of dark matter by direct and indirect- detection experiments could shed light on what fraction of dark matter was generated thermally via the freeze-out process in the early Universe. By simulating putative signals that could be seen in the near future and using them to reconstruct WIMP dark matter properties, we show that, in a model- independent approach this could only be achieved in a thin sliver of the parameter space. However, with additional theoretical input the hypothesis about the thermal freeze-out as the dominant mechanism for generating dark matter can potentially be verified. We illustrate this with two examples: an effective field theory of dark matter with a vector messenger and a higgsino or wino dark matter within the MSSM.

  7. Automatic Threshold Determination for a Local Approach of Change Detection in Long-Term Signal Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hewson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CUSUM (cumulative sum is a well-known method that can be used to detect changes in a signal when the parameters of this signal are known. This paper presents an adaptation of the CUSUM-based change detection algorithms to long-term signal recordings where the various hypotheses contained in the signal are unknown. The starting point of the work was the dynamic cumulative sum (DCS algorithm, previously developed for application to long-term electromyography (EMG recordings. DCS has been improved in two ways. The first was a new procedure to estimate the distribution parameters to ensure the respect of the detectability property. The second was the definition of two separate, automatically determined thresholds. One of them (lower threshold acted to stop the estimation process, the other one (upper threshold was applied to the detection function. The automatic determination of the thresholds was based on the Kullback-Leibler distance which gives information about the distance between the detected segments (events. Tests on simulated data demonstrated the efficiency of these improvements of the DCS algorithm.

  8. A non-linear algorithm for current signal filtering and peak detection in SiPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putignano, M; Intermite, A; Welsch, C P

    2012-01-01

    Read-out of Silicon Photomultipliers is commonly achieved by means of charge integration, a method particularly susceptible to after-pulsing noise and not efficient for low level light signals. Current signal monitoring, characterized by easier electronic implementation and intrinsically faster than charge integration, is also more suitable for low level light signals and can potentially result in much decreased after-pulsing noise effects. However, its use is to date limited by the need of developing a suitable read-out algorithm for signal analysis and filtering able to achieve current peak detection and measurement with the needed precision and accuracy. In this paper we present an original algorithm, based on a piecewise linear-fitting approach, to filter the noise of the current signal and hence efficiently identifying and measuring current peaks. The proposed algorithm is then compared with the optimal linear filtering algorithm for time-encoded peak detection, based on a moving average routine, and assessed in terms of accuracy, precision, and peak detection efficiency, demonstrating improvements of 1÷2 orders of magnitude in all these quality factors.

  9. Weak signal transmission in complex networks and its application in detecting connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoming; Liu, Zonghua; Li, Baowen

    2009-10-01

    We present a network model of coupled oscillators to study how a weak signal is transmitted in complex networks. Through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, we find that the response of other nodes to the weak signal decays exponentially with their topological distance to the signal source and the coupling strength between two neighboring nodes can be figured out by the responses. This finding can be conveniently used to detect the topology of unknown network, such as the degree distribution, clustering coefficient and community structure, etc., by repeatedly choosing different nodes as the signal source. Through four typical networks, i.e., the regular one dimensional, small world, random, and scale-free networks, we show that the features of network can be approximately given by investigating many fewer nodes than the network size, thus our approach to detect the topology of unknown network may be efficient in practical situations with large network size.

  10. Continuous detection of weak sensory signals in afferent spike trains: the role of anti-correlated interspike intervals in detection performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goense, J B M; Ratnam, R

    2003-10-01

    An important problem in sensory processing is deciding whether fluctuating neural activity encodes a stimulus or is due to variability in baseline activity. Neurons that subserve detection must examine incoming spike trains continuously, and quickly and reliably differentiate signals from baseline activity. Here we demonstrate that a neural integrator can perform continuous signal detection, with performance exceeding that of trial-based procedures, where spike counts in signal- and baseline windows are compared. The procedure was applied to data from electrosensory afferents of weakly electric fish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus), where weak perturbations generated by small prey add approximately 1 spike to a baseline of approximately 300 spikes s(-1). The hypothetical postsynaptic neuron, modeling an electrosensory lateral line lobe cell, could detect an added spike within 10-15 ms, achieving near ideal detection performance (80-95%) at false alarm rates of 1-2 Hz, while trial-based testing resulted in only 30-35% correct detections at that false alarm rate. The performance improvement was due to anti-correlations in the afferent spike train, which reduced both the amplitude and duration of fluctuations in postsynaptic membrane activity, and so decreased the number of false alarms. Anti-correlations can be exploited to improve detection performance only if there is memory of prior decisions.

  11. Detection of driving fatigue by using noncontact EMG and ECG signals measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rongrong; Wang, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Driver fatigue can be detected by constructing a discriminant mode using some features obtained from physiological signals. There exist two major challenges of this kind of methods. One is how to collect physiological signals from subjects while they are driving without any interruption. The other is to find features of physiological signals that are of corresponding change with the loss of attention caused by driver fatigue. Driving fatigue is detected based on the study of surface electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiograph (ECG) during the driving period. The noncontact data acquisition system was used to collect physiological signals from the biceps femoris of each subject to tackle the first challenge. Fast independent component analysis (FastICA) and digital filter were utilized to process the original signals. Based on the statistical analysis results given by Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z test, the peak factor of EMG (p fatigue of drivers. The discriminant criterion of fatigue was obtained from the training samples by using Mahalanobis distance, and then the average classification accuracy was given by 10-fold cross-validation. The results showed that the method proposed in this paper can give well performance in distinguishing the normal state and fatigue state. The noncontact, onboard vehicle drivers' fatigue detection system was developed to reduce fatigue-related risks.

  12. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-10-30

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  13. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  14. Design of Meter-Scale Antenna and Signal Detection System for Underground Magnetic Resonance Sounding in Mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian; Fan, Tiehu; Tian, Baofeng; Jiang, Chuandong

    2018-03-13

    Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) is a novel geophysical method to detect groundwater directly. By applying this method to underground projects in mines and tunnels, warning information can be provided on water bodies that are hidden in front prior to excavation and thus reduce the risk of casualties and accidents. However, unlike its application to ground surfaces, the application of MRS to underground environments is constrained by the narrow space, quite weak MRS signal, and complex electromagnetic interferences with high intensities in mines. Focusing on the special requirements of underground MRS (UMRS) detection, this study proposes the use of an antenna with different turn numbers, which employs a separated transmitter and receiver. We designed a stationary coil with stable performance parameters and with a side length of 2 m, a matching circuit based on a Q-switch and a multi-stage broad/narrowband mixed filter that can cancel out most electromagnetic noise. In addition, noises in the pass-band are further eliminated by adopting statistical criteria and harmonic modeling and stacking, all of which together allow weak UMRS signals to be reliably detected. Finally, we conducted a field case study of the UMRS measurement in the Wujiagou Mine in Shanxi Province, China, with known water bodies. Our results show that the method proposed in this study can be used to obtain UMRS signals in narrow mine environments, and the inverted hydrological information generally agrees with the actual situation. Thus, we conclude that the UMRS method proposed in this study can be used for predicting hazardous water bodies at a distance of 7-9 m in front of the wall for underground mining projects.

  15. Design of Meter-Scale Antenna and Signal Detection System for Underground Magnetic Resonance Sounding in Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Yi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS is a novel geophysical method to detect groundwater directly. By applying this method to underground projects in mines and tunnels, warning information can be provided on water bodies that are hidden in front prior to excavation and thus reduce the risk of casualties and accidents. However, unlike its application to ground surfaces, the application of MRS to underground environments is constrained by the narrow space, quite weak MRS signal, and complex electromagnetic interferences with high intensities in mines. Focusing on the special requirements of underground MRS (UMRS detection, this study proposes the use of an antenna with different turn numbers, which employs a separated transmitter and receiver. We designed a stationary coil with stable performance parameters and with a side length of 2 m, a matching circuit based on a Q-switch and a multi-stage broad/narrowband mixed filter that can cancel out most electromagnetic noise. In addition, noises in the pass-band are further eliminated by adopting statistical criteria and harmonic modeling and stacking, all of which together allow weak UMRS signals to be reliably detected. Finally, we conducted a field case study of the UMRS measurement in the Wujiagou Mine in Shanxi Province, China, with known water bodies. Our results show that the method proposed in this study can be used to obtain UMRS signals in narrow mine environments, and the inverted hydrological information generally agrees with the actual situation. Thus, we conclude that the UMRS method proposed in this study can be used for predicting hazardous water bodies at a distance of 7–9 m in front of the wall for underground mining projects.

  16. A signal detection-item response theory model for evaluating neuropsychological measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael L; Brown, Gregory G; Gur, Ruben C; Moore, Tyler M; Patt, Virginie M; Risbrough, Victoria B; Baker, Dewleen G

    2018-02-05

    Models from signal detection theory are commonly used to score neuropsychological test data, especially tests of recognition memory. Here we show that certain item response theory models can be formulated as signal detection theory models, thus linking two complementary but distinct methodologies. We then use the approach to evaluate the validity (construct representation) of commonly used research measures, demonstrate the impact of conditional error on neuropsychological outcomes, and evaluate measurement bias. Signal detection-item response theory (SD-IRT) models were fitted to recognition memory data for words, faces, and objects. The sample consisted of U.S. Infantry Marines and Navy Corpsmen participating in the Marine Resiliency Study. Data comprised item responses to the Penn Face Memory Test (PFMT; N = 1,338), Penn Word Memory Test (PWMT; N = 1,331), and Visual Object Learning Test (VOLT; N = 1,249), and self-report of past head injury with loss of consciousness. SD-IRT models adequately fitted recognition memory item data across all modalities. Error varied systematically with ability estimates, and distributions of residuals from the regression of memory discrimination onto self-report of past head injury were positively skewed towards regions of larger measurement error. Analyses of differential item functioning revealed little evidence of systematic bias by level of education. SD-IRT models benefit from the measurement rigor of item response theory-which permits the modeling of item difficulty and examinee ability-and from signal detection theory-which provides an interpretive framework encompassing the experimentally validated constructs of memory discrimination and response bias. We used this approach to validate the construct representation of commonly used research measures and to demonstrate how nonoptimized item parameters can lead to erroneous conclusions when interpreting neuropsychological test data. Future work might include the

  17. Direct Dark Matter Detection through the use of a Xenon Based TPC Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jonathan; Akerib, Daniel; LZ group at SLAC

    2018-01-01

    The vast majority of matter in the universe is unaccounted for. Only 15% of the universe's mass density is visible matter, while the other 85% is Dark Matter (DM). The Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) is currently the frontrunner of the DM candidates. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) and next generation LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiments are designed to directly detect WIMPs. Both experiments are xenon-based Time Projection Chambers (TPC) used to observe possible WIMP interactions. These interactions produce photons and electrons with the photons being collected in a set of two photomultiplier tube (PMT) arrays and the electrons drifted upwards in the detector by a strong electric field to create a secondary production of photons in gaseous xenon. These two populations of photons are classified as S1 and S2 signals, respectively. Using these signals we reconstruct the energy and position of the interaction and in doing so we can eliminate background events that would otherwise “light up” the detector. My participation in the experiment, while at SLAC, was the creation of the grids that produce the large electric field, along with additional lab activities aimed at testing the grids. While at Stan State, I work on background modeling in order to distinguish a possible WIMP signal from ambient backgrounds.

  18. High efficiency processing for reduced amplitude zones detection in the HRECG signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarte, N.; Álvarez, A.; Balacco, J.; Mercado, G.; Gonzalez, A.; Dugarte, E.; Olivares, A.

    2016-04-01

    Summary - This article presents part of a more detailed research proposed in the medium to long term, with the intention of establishing a new philosophy of electrocardiogram surface analysis. This research aims to find indicators of cardiovascular disease in its early stage that may go unnoticed with conventional electrocardiography. This paper reports the development of a software processing which collect some existing techniques and incorporates novel methods for detection of reduced amplitude zones (RAZ) in high resolution electrocardiographic signal (HRECG).The algorithm consists of three stages, an efficient processing for QRS detection, averaging filter using correlation techniques and a step for RAZ detecting. Preliminary results show the efficiency of system and point to incorporation of techniques new using signal analysis with involving 12 leads.

  19. Understanding driver behavior at grade crossings through signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report uses signal detection theory (SDT) to model motorists decisionmaking strategies at grade crossings in order to understand the factors that influence such decisions and to establish a framework for evaluating the impact of proposed coun...

  20. Understanding driver behavior at grade crossings through signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    This report uses signal detection theory (SDT) to model motorists decisionmaking strategies at grade crossings in order to understand the factors that influence such decisions and to establish a framework for evaluating the impact of proposed coun...

  1. Branched-DNA signal amplification combined with paper chromatography hybridization assay and used in hepatitis B virus DNA detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, F.Z.; Liu, L.X.; Wang, W.Q.; Sun, S. H.; Liu, L.B.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleic acids detection method is vital to the clinical pathogen diagnosis. The established method can be classified into target direct amplification and signal amplification format according to the target DNA or RNA being directly amplified or not. Those methods have advantages and disadvantages respectively in the clinical application. In the United States of American, branched-DNA as a strong signal amplifier is broadly used in the quantification of the nucleic acids. To gain satisfied sensitivity, some expensive label molecular and instruments should be adopted. Personnel should be special trained to perform. Hence, those can't be widely carried out in the Third World. To avoid those disadvantages, we used the branched-DNA amplifier in the paper chromatography hybridization assay. Methods: Branched DNA signal amplifier and series of probes complementary to the nucleic acid sequence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been synthesized. HBV-DNA or it's capture probe were immobilized on the high flow nitrocellulose strip. Having loaded at one end of the strip in turn, probes or HBV-DNA in the hybridization solution migrate to the opposite end of the strip by capillary forces and hybridizes to the immobilized DNA. The branched-DNA signal amplifier and probe labeled with biotin or 32P were then loaded. Through streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase (SA-AP) conjugate and NBT/BCIP ( the specific chromogenic substrate of AP) or autoradiography, the result can be visualized by color reaction or image production on the X-ray film. Results: The sensitivity of this HBV-DNA detection method used probe labeled with biotin and 32P are 1ng and 10pg. The method using the probe labeled with biotin is simple and rapid (2h) without depending on special instruments, it also avoids the pollution of EtBr which can lead to tumor. And the method using the probe labeled with 32P is simple and sensitive, with the exception of long time autoradiography and the inconvenient isotopic disposal

  2. Re-configurable digital receiver for optically envelope detected half cycle BPSK and MSK radio-on-fiber signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Prince, Kamau; Zibar, Darko

    2011-01-01

    We present the first known integration of a digital receiver into optically envelope detection radio-on-fiber systems. We also present a re-configurable scheme for two different types of optically envelope detected wireless signals while keeping the complexity of used optical components low. Our...... novel digital receiver consists of a digital signal processing unit integrating functions such as filtering, peak-powers detection, symbol synchronization and signal demodulation for optically envelope detected half-cycle binary phase-shift-keying and minimum-shift-keying signals. Furthermore, radio......-frequency signal down-conversion is not required in our proposed approach; simplifying evens more the optical receiver front-end. We experimentally demonstrate error-free optical transmission (bit-error rate corresponding to 10−3 related to FEC-compatible levels) for both 416.6 Mbit/s half-cycle binary phase...

  3. A signaling model of foreign direct investment attraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de C. Griebeler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Foreign direct investors face uncertainty about government's type of the host country. In a two period game, we allow the host country's government to mitigate such uncertainty by sending a signal through fiscal policy. Our main finding states that a populist government may mimic a conservative one in order to attract foreign direct investment (FDI, and this choice depends mainly on its impatience degree and the originally planned FDI stock. We highlight the role of the government's reputation in attracting foreign capital and thus provide some policy implications. Moreover, our model explains why some governments considered to be populist adopt conservative policies in the beginning of its terms of office. Resumo: Investidores estrangeiros diretos são incertos sobre o tipo do governo do país onde desejam investir. Em um jogo de dois períodos, permitimos que o governo de tal país mitigue essa incerteza ao enviar um sinal através da política fiscal. Nosso principal resultado estabelece que um governo populista pode imitar um conservador a fim de atrair investimento estrangeiro direto (IED, e essa escolha depende principalmente do grau de impaciência e do estoque de IED originalmente planejado. Destacamos o papel da reputação do governo em atrair capital externo e assim fornecemos algumas recomendações de política. Além disso, nosso modelo explica porque alguns governos considerados populistas adotam políticas conservadores no início do seus mandatos. JEL classification: F41, F34, C72, Keywords: Signaling, Foreign direct investment, Game theory, Palavras-chave: Sinalização, Investimento estrangeiro direto, Teoria dos jogos

  4. Inverted dipole feature in directional detection of exothermic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gondolo, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Directional dark matter detection attempts to measure the direction of motion of nuclei recoiling after having interacted with dark matter particles in the halo of our Galaxy. Due to Earth's motion with respect to the Galaxy, the dark matter flux is concentrated around a preferential direction. An anisotropy in the recoil direction rate is expected as an unmistakable signature of dark matter. The average nuclear recoil direction is expected to coincide with the average direction of dark matter particles arriving to Earth. Here we point out that for a particular type of dark matter, inelastic exothermic dark matter, the mean recoil direction as well as a secondary feature, a ring of maximum recoil rate around the mean recoil direction, could instead be opposite to the average dark matter arrival direction. Thus, the detection of an average nuclear recoil direction opposite to the usually expected direction would constitute a spectacular experimental confirmation of this type of dark matter.

  5. Effect of sample storage time on detection of hybridization signals in Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Muller, Katia; Sato, Sandra; Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Long-term sample storage can affect the intensity of the hybridization signals provided by molecular diagnostic methods that use chemiluminescent detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different storage times on the hybridization signals of 13 bacterial species detected by the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method using whole-genomic DNA probes. Ninety-six subgingival biofilm samples were collected from 36 healthy subjects, and the intensity of hybridization signals was evaluated at 4 different time periods: (1) immediately after collecting (n = 24) and (2) after storage at -20 °C for 6 months (n = 24), (3) for 12 months (n = 24), and (4) for 24 months (n = 24). The intensity of hybridization signals obtained from groups 1 and 2 were significantly higher than in the other groups (p  0.05). The Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method was suitable to detect hybridization signals from all groups evaluated, and the intensity of signals decreased significantly after long periods of sample storage.

  6. Detecting and characterizing N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules by thin-layer chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Paul D.; Ping, Gao; Daly, Sean L.; Cha, Chung; Cronan, John E.; Rinehart, Kenneth L.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    1997-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria regulate gene expression in response to their population size by sensing the level of acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules which they produce and liberate to the environment. We have developed an assay for these signals that couples separation by thin-layer chromatography with detection using Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring lacZ fused to a gene that is regulated by autoinduction. With the exception of N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone, the reporter detected acyl-homoserine lactones with 3-oxo-, 3-hydroxy-, and 3-unsubstituted side chains of all lengths tested. The intensity of the response was proportional to the amount of the signal molecule chromatographed. Each of the 3-oxo- and the 3-unsubstituted derivatives migrated with a unique mobility. Using the assay, we showed that some bacteria produce as many as five detectable signal molecules. Structures could be assigned tentatively on the basis of mobility and spot shape. The dominant species produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci chromatographed with the properties of N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, a structure that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. An isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens produced five detectable species, three of which had novel chromatographic properties. These were identified as the 3-hydroxy- forms of N-hexanoyl-, N-octanoyl-, and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone. The assay can be used to screen cultures of bacteria for acyl-homoserine lactones, for quantifying the amounts of these molecules produced, and as an analytical and preparative aid in determining the structures of these signal molecules. PMID:9177164

  7. Optical spectral reshaping for directly modulated 4-pulse amplitude modulation signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozolins, Oskars; Da Ros, Francesco; Cristofori, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    The tremendous traffic growth in intra/inter-datacenters requires low-cost high-speed integrated solutions [1]. To enable a significantly reduced footprint directly modulated lasers (DMLs) have been proposed instead of large external modulators. However, it is challenging to use DMLs due to their......The tremendous traffic growth in intra/inter-datacenters requires low-cost high-speed integrated solutions [1]. To enable a significantly reduced footprint directly modulated lasers (DMLs) have been proposed instead of large external modulators. However, it is challenging to use DMLs due...... (PAM) [3] signals. However, moving to 4-PAM,many of the impressive demonstrations reported so far rely heavily on off-line digital signal processing (DSP), which increases latency, power consumption and cost. In this talk, we report on (i) a detailed numerical analysis on the complex transfer function...... of the optical filter for optical spectral reshaping in case of pulse amplitude modulation and(ii) an experimental demonstration of real-time dispersion-uncompensated transmission of 10-GBd and 14-GBd 4-PAM signals up to 10- and 26-km SSMF. This is achieved by combining a commercial 10-Gb/s DML with optical...

  8. Electrochemical detection of uric acid using ruthenium-dioxide-coated carbon nanotube directly grown onto Si wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Ting; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lin, Chung-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly grown onto a Si substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition were used in uric acid (UA) detection. The process is simple and formation is easy without the need for additional chemical treatments. However, CNTs lack selectivity and sensitivity to UA. To enhance the electrochemical analysis, ruthenium oxide was used as a catalytic mediator in the modification of electrodes. The electrochemical results show that RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs can strengthen the UA signal. The peak currents of RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs linearly increase with increasing UA concentration, meaning that they can work as electrodes for UA detection. The lowest detection limit and highest sensitivity were 55 nM and 4.36 µA/µM, respectively. Moreover, the characteristics of RuO2 nanostructures coated onto CNTs were examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy.

  9. A method for detecting nonlinear determinism in normal and epileptic brain EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghdadi, Amir H; Fazel-Rezai, Reza; Aghakhani, Yahya

    2007-01-01

    A robust method of detecting determinism for short time series is proposed and applied to both healthy and epileptic EEG signals. The method provides a robust measure of determinism through characterizing the trajectories of the signal components which are obtained through singular value decomposition. Robustness of the method is shown by calculating proposed index of determinism at different levels of white and colored noise added to a simulated chaotic signal. The method is shown to be able to detect determinism at considerably high levels of additive noise. The method is then applied to both intracranial and scalp EEG recordings collected in different data sets for healthy and epileptic brain signals. The results show that for all of the studied EEG data sets there is enough evidence of determinism. The determinism is more significant for intracranial EEG recordings particularly during seizure activity.

  10. Balanced detection for self-mixing interferometry to improve signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changming; Norgia, Michele; Li, Kun

    2018-01-01

    We apply balanced detection to self-mixing interferometry for displacement and vibration measurement, using two photodiodes for implementing a differential acquisition. The method is based on the phase opposition of the self-mixing signal measured between the two laser diode facet outputs. The balanced signal obtained by enlarging the self-mixing signal, also by canceling of the common-due noises mainly due to disturbances on laser supply and transimpedance amplifier. Experimental results demonstrate the signal-to-noise ratio significantly improves, with almost twice signals enhancement and more than half noise decreasing. This method allows for more robust, longer-distance measurement systems, especially using fringe-counting.

  11. Detection of non-stationary leak signals at NPP primary circuit by cross-correlation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimanskij, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    A leak-detection system employing high-temperature microphones has been developed for the RBMK and ATR (Japan) reactors. Further improvement of the system focused on using cross-correlation analysis of the spectral components of the signal to detect a small leak at an early stage of development. Since envelope processes are less affected by distortions than are wave processes, they give a higher-degree of correlation and can be used to detect leaks with lower signal-noise ratios. Many simulation tests performed at nuclear power plants have shown that the proposed methods can be used to detect and find the location of a small leak [ru

  12. On-line detection of apnea/hypopnea events using SpO2 signal: a rule-based approach employing binary classifier models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koley, Bijoy Laxmi; Dey, Debangshu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an online method for automatic detection of apnea/hypopnea events, with the help of oxygen saturation (SpO2) signal, measured at fingertip by Bluetooth nocturnal pulse oximeter. Event detection is performed by identifying abnormal data segments from the recorded SpO2 signal, employing a binary classifier model based on a support vector machine (SVM). Thereafter the abnormal segment is further analyzed to detect different states within the segment, i.e., steady, desaturation, and resaturation, with the help of another SVM-based binary ensemble classifier model. Finally, a heuristically obtained rule-based system is used to identify the apnea/hypopnea events from the time-sequenced decisions of these classifier models. In the developmental phase, a set of 34 time domain-based features was extracted from the segmented SpO2 signal using an overlapped windowing technique. Later, an optimal set of features was selected on the basis of recursive feature elimination technique. A total of 34 subjects were included in the study. The results show average event detection accuracies of 96.7% and 93.8% for the offline and the online tests, respectively. The proposed system provides direct estimation of the apnea/hypopnea index with the help of a relatively inexpensive and widely available pulse oximeter. Moreover, the system can be monitored and accessed by physicians through LAN/WAN/Internet and can be extended to deploy in Bluetooth-enabled mobile phones.

  13. Observer performance in detecting multiple radiographic signals: prediction and analysis using a generalized ROC approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, C.E.; Starr, S.J.; Lusted, L.B.

    1975-01-01

    The theories of decision processes and signal detection provide a framework for the evaluation of observer performance. Some radiologic procedures involve a search for multiple similar lesions, as in gallstone or pneumoconiosis examinations. A model is presented which attempts to predict, from the conventional receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve describing the detectability of a single visual signal in a radiograph, observer performance in an experiment requiring detection of more than one such signal. An experiment is described which tests the validity of this model for the case of detecting the presence of zero, one, or two low-contrast radiographic images of a two-mm.-diameter lucite bead embedded in radiographic mottle. Results from six observers, including three radiologists, confirm the validity of the model and suggest that human observer performance for relatively complex detection tasks can be predicted from the results of simpler experiments

  14. The use of balanced homodyne and squeezed states for detecting weak optical signals in a Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Aryeh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of using squeezed states and balanced homodyne detection of optical signals in a Michelson interferometer is discussed. The present analysis describes photon statistics measurements effects related to quadrature balanced homodyne detection showing the advantage of using this scheme for detecting weak optical signals.

  15. Determination of ammonium in river water and sewage samples by capillary zone electrophoresis with direct UV detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Keiichi; Ito, Hideyuki; Kimura, Kenichi; Yokota, Kuriko; Saito, Keiitsu; Chayama, Kenji; Takeda, Sahori; Wakida, Shin-ichi

    2006-02-17

    We developed capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with direct UV detection for determination of ammonium in environmental water samples. Ammonium in the samples was partly converted into ammonia in the alkaline background electrolyte (BGE) during migration and was detected by molecular absorption of ammonia at 190 nm in approximately 7 min. The limit of detection (LOD) for ammonium was 0.24 mg/l (as nitrogen) at a signal-to-noise ratio of three. The respective values of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of peak area, peak height, and migration time for ammonium were 2.1, 1.8, and 0.46%. Major alkali and alkaline earth metal ions coexisting in the samples did not interfere with ammonium determination by the proposed method. The proposed method determined ammonium in surface water and sewage samples. The results were compared to those obtained using ion chromatography (IC).

  16. Experiment on Synchronous Timing Signal Detection from ISDB-T Terrestrial Digital TV Signal with Application to Autonomous Distributed ITS-IVC Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Yoshio; Kumagai, Taichi; Takemoto, Atsushi; Fujii, Takeo; Ito, Kenji; Suzuki, Noriyoshi

    A novel timing synchronizing scheme is proposed for use in inter-vehicle communication (IVC) with an autonomous distributed intelligent transport system (ITS). The scheme determines the timing of packet signal transmission in the IVC network and employs the guard interval (GI) timing in the orthogonal frequency divisional multiplexing (OFDM) signal currently used for terrestrial broadcasts in the Japanese digital television system (ISDB-T). This signal is used because it is expected that the automotive market will demand the capability for cars to receive terrestrial digital TV broadcasts in the near future. The use of broadcasts by automobiles presupposes that the on-board receivers are capable of accurately detecting the GI timing data in an extremely low carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) condition regardless of a severe multipath environment which will introduce broad scatter in signal arrival times. Therefore, we analyzed actual broadcast signals received in a moving vehicle in a field experiment and showed that the GI timing signal is detected with the desired accuracy even in the case of extremely low-CNR environments. Some considerations were also given about how to use these findings.

  17. An Evaluation of the Acoustic Signal processing Techniques for Sodium-Water Reaction Detection in KALIMER-600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Seop; Seong, S. H.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, S. O.; Lee, M. K.

    2005-02-01

    KALIMER-600 is a pool type fast breeder reactor using liquid sodium as a coolant. Although it has the several advantages such as long-term fuel cycle and enhanced safety concepts, it is possible to leak the secondary side water/steam into sodium boundary. This event could make the plant abnormal condition. One of the major design issues in KALIMER-600 is, therefore, to develop the system which can early detect the sodium-water reaction to protect the sodium-water reaction event. After evaluating the various signal processing techniques for passive acoustic leak detection, we have proposed the early leak detection logics. the signal processing techniques for evaluation were the spectral estimation using the linear modeling, the estimation error of linear modeling, the system adaptation rate using an adaptive signal processing, and the background noise cancellation using adaptive and fixed filtering. As the analysis results regarding the stationary and the cross-correlation of leak signals and background noises, the two signal systems met a wide-dense stationary process and there was only the week cross correlation relationship between two signals. It is ,therefore, possible to use the linear/harmonic modeling of signal systems, and the leak signal in sensor outputs can be discriminated. As the results of the evaluation of the various spectral estimation methods, the spectral estimation method based on autoregressive modeling was more practical comparing with other methods in the sodium-water reaction detection. The passive acoustic leak detection logics were suggested based on above evaluations. the logics consist of 3 levels; transient identification, leak determination and leak symptom identification. The simulation results using sodium-water reaction signals showed that it was possible to determine the leak at above -3dB of SNR, while between -3 dB and -10 dB of SNR the logics determined the leak symptom identification. The detection sensitivity can be enhanced

  18. Signal Detection of Imipenem Compared to Other Drugs from Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyounghoon; Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Kwon, Kyoung Eun; Jin, Xue Mei; Lee, Joongyub; Yang, Bo Ram; Park, Byung Joo

    2017-05-01

    To detect signals of adverse drug events after imipenem treatment using the Korea Institute of Drug Safety & Risk Management-Korea adverse event reporting system database (KIDS-KD). We performed data mining using KIDS-KD, which was constructed using spontaneously reported adverse event (AE) reports between December 1988 and June 2014. We detected signals calculated the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component of imipenem. We defined a signal as any AE that satisfied all three indices. The signals were compared with drug labels of nine countries. There were 807582 spontaneous AEs reports in the KIDS-KD. Among those, the number of antibiotics related AEs was 192510; 3382 reports were associated with imipenem. The most common imipenem-associated AE was the drug eruption; 353 times. We calculated the signal by comparing with all other antibiotics and drugs; 58 and 53 signals satisfied the three methods. We compared the drug labelling information of nine countries, including the USA, the UK, Japan, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, Canada, and South Korea, and discovered that the following signals were currently not included in drug labels: hypokalemia, cardiac arrest, cardiac failure, Parkinson's syndrome, myocardial infarction, and prostate enlargement. Hypokalemia was an additional signal compared with all other antibiotics, and the other signals were not different compared with all other antibiotics and all other drugs. We detected new signals that were not listed on the drug labels of nine countries. However, further pharmacoepidemiologic research is needed to evaluate the causality of these signals. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  19. Application of signal processing techniques for islanding detection of distributed generation in distribution network: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, Safdar; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Arof, Hamzah; Laghari, J.A.; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pros & cons of conventional islanding detection techniques (IDTs) are discussed. • Signal processing techniques (SPTs) ability in detecting islanding is discussed. • SPTs ability in improving performance of passive techniques are discussed. • Fourier, s-transform, wavelet, HHT & tt-transform based IDTs are reviewed. • Intelligent classifiers (ANN, ANFIS, Fuzzy, SVM) application in SPT are discussed. - Abstract: High penetration of distributed generation resources (DGR) in distribution network provides many benefits in terms of high power quality, efficiency, and low carbon emissions in power system. However, efficient islanding detection and immediate disconnection of DGR is critical in order to avoid equipment damage, grid protection interference, and personnel safety hazards. Islanding detection techniques are mainly classified into remote, passive, active, and hybrid techniques. From these, passive techniques are more advantageous due to lower power quality degradation, lower cost, and widespread usage by power utilities. However, the main limitations of these techniques are that they possess a large non detection zones and require threshold setting. Various signal processing techniques and intelligent classifiers have been used to overcome the limitations of passive islanding. Signal processing techniques, in particular, are adopted due to their versatility, stability, cost effectiveness, and ease of modification. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of signal processing techniques used to improve common passive islanding detection techniques. A performance comparison between the signal processing based islanding detection techniques with existing techniques are also provided. Finally, this paper outlines the relative advantages and limitations of the signal processing techniques in order to provide basic guidelines for researchers and field engineers in determining the best method for their system

  20. Performance Analysis of Recurrence Matrix Statistics for the Detection of Deterministic Signals in Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michalowicz, Joseph V; Nichols, Jonathan M; Bucholtz, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the limitations to detecting deterministic signals in the presence of noise, especially additive, white Gaussian noise, is of importance for the design of LPI systems and anti-LPI signal defense...

  1. CHIRP-Like Signals: Estimation, Detection and Processing A Sequential Model-Based Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Chirp signals have evolved primarily from radar/sonar signal processing applications specifically attempting to estimate the location of a target in surveillance/tracking volume. The chirp, which is essentially a sinusoidal signal whose phase changes instantaneously at each time sample, has an interesting property in that its correlation approximates an impulse function. It is well-known that a matched-filter detector in radar/sonar estimates the target range by cross-correlating a replicant of the transmitted chirp with the measurement data reflected from the target back to the radar/sonar receiver yielding a maximum peak corresponding to the echo time and therefore enabling the desired range estimate. In this application, we perform the same operation as a radar or sonar system, that is, we transmit a “chirp-like pulse” into the target medium and attempt to first detect its presence and second estimate its location or range. Our problem is complicated by the presence of disturbance signals from surrounding broadcast stations as well as extraneous sources of interference in our frequency bands and of course the ever present random noise from instrumentation. First, we discuss the chirp signal itself and illustrate its inherent properties and then develop a model-based processing scheme enabling both the detection and estimation of the signal from noisy measurement data.

  2. Wall lizards display conspicuous signals to conspecifics and reduce detection by avian predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Visual signals are often under conflicting selection to be hidden from predators while being conspicuous to mates and rivals. Here, we investigated whether 3 different island populations of Aegean wall lizards (Podarcis erhardii) with variable coloration among diverse island habitats exhibit simultaneous camouflage and sexual signals. We examined whether signals appear better tuned to conspecific vision as opposed to that of avian predators, and whether background-matching camouflage and sexual signals are partitioned to specific body regions. This could facilitate both covert sexual signaling and camouflage according to the viewing perspectives of predators and conspecifics. We found that lizards typically appeared twice as conspicuous to conspecifics than to avian predators against the same visual background, largely due to lizards’ enhanced sensitivity to ultraviolet, suggesting that P. erhardii signals are tuned to conspecific vision to reduce detection by predators. Males were more conspicuous than females to both predators and conspecifics. In 2 populations, male backs were relatively more camouflaged to predators compared to signaling flanks, whereas in females, exposed and concealed surfaces were camouflaged to predators and generally did not differ in background matching. These findings indicate that lizard coloration evolves under the competing demands of natural and sexual selection to promote signals that are visible to conspecifics while being less perceptible to avian predators. They also elucidate how interactions between natural and sexual selection influence signal detectability and partitioning to different body regions, highlighting the importance of considering receiver vision, viewing perspectives, and signaling environments in studies of signal evolution. PMID:25419083

  3. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC Stromswold; AJ Peurrung; RR Hansen; PL Reeder

    2000-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron detection is the detection of fast neutrons before they are moderated to thermal energy. We have investigated two approaches for using proton-recoil in plastic scintillators to detect fast neutrons and distinguish them from gamma-ray interactions. Both approaches use the difference in travel speed between neutrons and gamma rays as the basis for separating the types of events. In the first method, we examined the pulses generated during scattering in a plastic scintillator to see if they provide a means for distinguishing fast-neutron events from gamma-ray events. The slower speed of neutrons compared to gamma rays results in the production of broader pulses when neutrons scatter several times within a plastic scintillator. In contrast, gamma-ray interactions should produce narrow pulses, even if multiple scattering takes place, because the time between successive scattering is small. Experiments using a fast scintillator confirmed the presence of broader pulses from neutrons than from gamma rays. However, the difference in pulse widths between neutrons and gamma rays using the best commercially available scintillators was not sufficiently large to provide a practical means for distinguishing fast neutrons and gamma rays on a pulse-by-pulse basis. A faster scintillator is needed, and that scintillator might become available in the literature. Results of the pulse-width studies were presented in a previous report (peurrung et al. 1998), and they are only summarized here

  4. Customized Multiwavelets for Planetary Gearbox Fault Detection Based on Vibration Sensor Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lue Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Planetary gearboxes exhibit complicated dynamic responses which are more difficult to detect in vibration signals than fixed-axis gear trains because of the special gear transmission structures. Diverse advanced methods have been developed for this challenging task to reduce or avoid unscheduled breakdown and catastrophic accidents. It is feasible to make fault features distinct by using multiwavelet denoising which depends on the feature separation and the threshold denoising. However, standard and fixed multiwavelets are not suitable for accurate fault feature detections because they are usually independent of the measured signals. To overcome this drawback, a method to construct customized multiwavelets based on the redundant symmetric lifting scheme is proposed in this paper. A novel indicator which combines kurtosis and entropy is applied to select the optimal multiwavelets, because kurtosis is sensitive to sharp impulses and entropy is effective for periodic impulses. The improved neighboring coefficients method is introduced into multiwavelet denoising. The vibration signals of a planetary gearbox from a satellite communication antenna on a measurement ship are captured under various motor speeds. The results show the proposed method could accurately detect the incipient pitting faults on two neighboring teeth in the planetary gearbox.

  5. Electrochemical immunoassay for thyroxine detection using cascade catalysis as signal amplified enhancer and multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere as signal tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying, E-mail: yingzhuo@swu.edu.cn; Chai, Yaqin; Yu, Yanqing; Liao, Ni; Yuan, Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn

    2013-08-06

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A reusable electrochemical immunosensor is developed for thyroxine detection. •Cascade catalysis as signal amplified enhancer. •Multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere as signal tag. •The novel strategy has the advantages of high sensitivity, good selectivity and reproducibility. -- Abstract: This paper constructed a reusable electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of thyroxine at an ultralow concentration using cascade catalysis of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and glucose oxidase (GOx) as signal amplified enhancer. It is worth pointing out that numerous Cyt c and GOx were firstly carried onto the double-stranded DNA polymers based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR), and then the amplified responses could be achieved by cascade catalysis of Cyt c and GOx recycling with the help of glucose. Moreover, multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere was synthesized and used as signal tag, which not only exhibited good mechanical properties, large surface area and an excellent electron transfer rate of graphene, but also possessed excellent redox activity and desirable magnetic property. With a sandwich-type immunoreaction, the proposed cascade catalysis amplification strategy could greatly enhance the sensitivity for the detection of thyroxine. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear ranged from 0.05 pg mL{sup −1} to 5 ng mL{sup −1} and a low detection limit down to 15 fg mL{sup −1}. Importantly, the proposed method offers promise for reproducible and cost-effective analysis of biological samples.

  6. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinki Kim

    Full Text Available Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod.

  7. Feature Optimize and Classification of EEG Signals: Application to Lie Detection Using KPCA and ELM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Junfeng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available EEG signals had been widely used to detect liars recent years. To overcome the shortcomings of current signals processing, kernel principal component analysis (KPCA and extreme learning machine (ELM was combined to detect liars. We recorded the EEG signals at Pz from 30 randomly divided guilty and innocent subjects. Each five Probe responses were averaged within subject and then extracted wavelet features. KPCA was employed to select feature subset with deduced dimensions based on initial wavelet features, which was fed into ELM. To date, there is no perfect solution for the number of its hidden nodes (NHN. We used grid searching algorithm to select simultaneously the optimal values of the dimension of feature subset and NHN based on cross- validation method. The best classification mode was decided with the optimal searching values. Experimental results show that for EEG signals from the experiment of lie detection, KPCA_ELM has higher classification accuracy with faster training speed than other widely-used classification modes, which is especially suitable for online EEG signals processing system.

  8. Detection without deflection? A hypothesis for direct sensing of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    level, the pressure component of a sound signal is more readily detected ... gives rise to a slowly propagating travelling wave, a wave of displacement on the ..... partial pressure of gas dissolved in sea water stays constant at about the level ...... of Corti (Midwinter Meeting, Florida, Association for Research in Otolaryngology).

  9. Regularized non-stationary morphological reconstruction algorithm for weak signal detection in microseismic monitoring: methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weilin; Wang, Runqiu; Chen, Yangkang

    2018-05-01

    Microseismic signal is typically weak compared with the strong background noise. In order to effectively detect the weak signal in microseismic data, we propose a mathematical morphology based approach. We decompose the initial data into several morphological multiscale components. For detection of weak signal, a non-stationary weighting operator is proposed and introduced into the process of reconstruction of data by morphological multiscale components. The non-stationary weighting operator can be obtained by solving an inversion problem. The regularized non-stationary method can be understood as a non-stationary matching filtering method, where the matching filter has the same size as the data to be filtered. In this paper, we provide detailed algorithmic descriptions and analysis. The detailed algorithm framework, parameter selection and computational issue for the regularized non-stationary morphological reconstruction (RNMR) method are presented. We validate the presented method through a comprehensive analysis through different data examples. We first test the proposed technique using a synthetic data set. Then the proposed technique is applied to a field project, where the signals induced from hydraulic fracturing are recorded by 12 three-component geophones in a monitoring well. The result demonstrates that the RNMR can improve the detectability of the weak microseismic signals. Using the processed data, the short-term-average over long-term average picking algorithm and Geiger's method are applied to obtain new locations of microseismic events. In addition, we show that the proposed RNMR method can be used not only in microseismic data but also in reflection seismic data to detect the weak signal. We also discussed the extension of RNMR from 1-D to 2-D or a higher dimensional version.

  10. How to detect a cuckoo egg : A signal-detection theory model for recognition and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Girones, MA; Lotem, A

    This article presents a model of egg rejection in cases of brood parasitism. The model is developed in three stages in the framework of signal-detection theory. We first assume that the behavior of host females is adapted to the relevant parameters concerning the appearance of the eggs they lay. In

  11. Detection of auditory signals in quiet and noisy backgrounds while performing a visuo-spatial task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha W Rawool

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The ability to detect important auditory signals while performing visual tasks may be further compounded by background chatter. Thus, it is important to know how task performance may interact with background chatter to hinder signal detection. Aim: To examine any interactive effects of speech spectrum noise and task performance on the ability to detect signals. Settings and Design: The setting was a sound-treated booth. A repeated measures design was used. Materials and Methods: Auditory thresholds of 20 normal adults were determined at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz in the following conditions presented in a random order: (1 quiet with attention; (2 quiet with a visuo-spatial task or puzzle (distraction; (3 noise with attention and (4 noise with task. Statistical Analysis: Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA with three repeated factors (quiet versus noise, visuo-spatial task versus no task, signal frequency. Results: MANOVA revealed significant main effects for noise and signal frequency and significant noise–frequency and task–frequency interactions. Distraction caused by performing the task worsened the thresholds for tones presented at the beginning of the experiment and had no effect on tones presented in the middle. At the end of the experiment, thresholds (4 kHz were better while performing the task than those obtained without performing the task. These effects were similar across the quiet and noise conditions. Conclusion: Detection of auditory signals is difficult at the beginning of a distracting visuo-spatial task but over time, task learning and auditory training effects can nullify the effect of distraction and may improve detection of high frequency sounds.

  12. A new algorithm for epilepsy seizure onset detection and spread estimation from EEG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Rincón, Antonio; Pereyra, Marcelo; D'Giano, Carlos; Batatia, Hadj; Risk, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is a main public health issue. Patients suffering from this disease often exhibit different physical characterizations, which result from the synchronous and excessive discharge of a group of neurons in the cerebral cortex. Extracting this information using EEG signals is an important problem in biomedical signal processing. In this work we propose a new algorithm for seizure onset detection and spread estimation in epilepsy patients. The algorithm is based on a multilevel 1-D wavelet decomposition that captures the physiological brain frequency signals coupled with a generalized gaussian model. Preliminary experiments with signals from 30 epilepsy crisis and 11 subjects, suggest that the proposed methodology is a powerful tool for detecting the onset of epilepsy seizures with his spread across the brain.

  13. Dendritic spikes amplify the synaptic signal to enhance detection of motion in a simulation of the direction-selective ganglion cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Schachter

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The On-Off direction-selective ganglion cell (DSGC in mammalian retinas responds most strongly to a stimulus moving in a specific direction. The DSGC initiates spikes in its dendritic tree, which are thought to propagate to the soma with high probability. Both dendritic and somatic spikes in the DSGC display strong directional tuning, whereas somatic PSPs (postsynaptic potentials are only weakly directional, indicating that spike generation includes marked enhancement of the directional signal. We used a realistic computational model based on anatomical and physiological measurements to determine the source of the enhancement. Our results indicate that the DSGC dendritic tree is partitioned into separate electrotonic regions, each summing its local excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to initiate spikes. Within each local region the local spike threshold nonlinearly amplifies the preferred response over the null response on the basis of PSP amplitude. Using inhibitory conductances previously measured in DSGCs, the simulation results showed that inhibition is only sufficient to prevent spike initiation and cannot affect spike propagation. Therefore, inhibition will only act locally within the dendritic arbor. We identified the role of three mechanisms that generate directional selectivity (DS in the local dendritic regions. First, a mechanism for DS intrinsic to the dendritic structure of the DSGC enhances DS on the null side of the cell's dendritic tree and weakens it on the preferred side. Second, spatially offset postsynaptic inhibition generates robust DS in the isolated dendritic tips but weak DS near the soma. Third, presynaptic DS is apparently necessary because it is more robust across the dendritic tree. The pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms together can overcome the local intrinsic DS. These local dendritic mechanisms can perform independent nonlinear computations to make a decision, and there could be analogous mechanisms within

  14. Dendritic spikes amplify the synaptic signal to enhance detection of motion in a simulation of the direction-selective ganglion cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Michael J; Oesch, Nicholas; Smith, Robert G; Taylor, W Rowland

    2010-08-19

    The On-Off direction-selective ganglion cell (DSGC) in mammalian retinas responds most strongly to a stimulus moving in a specific direction. The DSGC initiates spikes in its dendritic tree, which are thought to propagate to the soma with high probability. Both dendritic and somatic spikes in the DSGC display strong directional tuning, whereas somatic PSPs (postsynaptic potentials) are only weakly directional, indicating that spike generation includes marked enhancement of the directional signal. We used a realistic computational model based on anatomical and physiological measurements to determine the source of the enhancement. Our results indicate that the DSGC dendritic tree is partitioned into separate electrotonic regions, each summing its local excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to initiate spikes. Within each local region the local spike threshold nonlinearly amplifies the preferred response over the null response on the basis of PSP amplitude. Using inhibitory conductances previously measured in DSGCs, the simulation results showed that inhibition is only sufficient to prevent spike initiation and cannot affect spike propagation. Therefore, inhibition will only act locally within the dendritic arbor. We identified the role of three mechanisms that generate directional selectivity (DS) in the local dendritic regions. First, a mechanism for DS intrinsic to the dendritic structure of the DSGC enhances DS on the null side of the cell's dendritic tree and weakens it on the preferred side. Second, spatially offset postsynaptic inhibition generates robust DS in the isolated dendritic tips but weak DS near the soma. Third, presynaptic DS is apparently necessary because it is more robust across the dendritic tree. The pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms together can overcome the local intrinsic DS. These local dendritic mechanisms can perform independent nonlinear computations to make a decision, and there could be analogous mechanisms within cortical circuitry.

  15. Detection and classification of defects in ultrasonic NDE signals using time-frequency representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qidwai, Uvais; Costa, Antonio H.; Chen, C. H.

    2000-05-01

    The ultrasonic wave, generated by a piezoelectric transducer coupled to the test specimen, propagates through the material and part of its energy is reflected when it encounters an non-homogeneity or discontinuity in its path, while the remainder is reflected by the back surface of the test specimen. Defect echo signals are masked by the characteristics of the measuring instruments, the propagation paths taken by the ultrasonic wave, and are corrupted by additive noise. This leads to difficulties in comparing and analyzing signals, particularly in automated defect identification systems employing different transducers. Further, the multi-component nature of material defects can add to the complexity of the defect identification criteria. With many one-dimensional (1-D) approaches, the multi-component defects can not be detected. Another drawback is that these techniques are not very robust for sharp ultrasonic peaks especially in a very hazardous environment. This paper proposes a technique based on the time-frequency representations (TFRs) of the real defect signals corresponding to artificially produced defects of various geometries in metals. Cohen's class (quadratic) TFRs with Gaussian kernels are then used to represent the signals in the time-frequency (TF) plane. Once the TFR is obtained, various image processing morphological techniques are applied to the TFR (e.g. region of interest masking, edge detection, and profile separation). Based on the results of these operations, a binary image is produced which, in turn, leads to a novel set of features. Using these new features, defects have not only been detected but also classified as flat-cut, angular-cut, and circular-drills. Moreover, with some modifications of the threshold levels of the TFR kernel design, our technique can be used in relatively hostile environments with SNRs as low as 0 dB. Another important characteristic of our approach is the detection of multiple defects. This consists of detection of

  16. EUROmediCAT signal detection: an evaluation of selected congenital anomaly‐medication associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given, Joanne E.; Loane, Maria; Luteijn, Johannes M.; Morris, Joan K.; de Jong van den Berg, Lolkje T.W.; Garne, Ester; Addor, Marie‐Claude; Barisic, Ingeborg; de Walle, Hermien; Gatt, Miriam; Klungsoyr, Kari; Khoshnood, Babak; Latos‐Bielenska, Anna; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J.; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Tucker, David; Wiesel, Awi

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate congenital anomaly (CA)‐medication exposure associations produced by the new EUROmediCAT signal detection system and determine which require further investigation. Methods Data from 15 EUROCAT registries (1995–2011) with medication exposures at the chemical substance (5th level of Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical classification) and chemical subgroup (4th level) were analysed using a 50% false detection rate. After excluding antiepileptics, antidiabetics, antiasthmatics and SSRIs/psycholeptics already under investigation, 27 associations were evaluated. If evidence for a signal persisted after data validation, a literature review was conducted for prior evidence of human teratogenicity. Results Thirteen out of 27 CA‐medication exposure signals, based on 389 exposed cases, passed data validation. There was some prior evidence in the literature to support six signals (gastroschisis and levonorgestrel/ethinylestradiol (OR 4.10, 95% CI 1.70–8.53; congenital heart disease/pulmonary valve stenosis and nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (OR 5.01, 95% CI 1.99–14.20/OR 28.20, 95% CI 4.63–122.24); complete absence of a limb and pregnen (4) derivatives (OR 6.60, 95% CI 1.70–22.93); hypospadias and pregnadien derivatives (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.10–1.76); hypospadias and synthetic ovulation stimulants (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.28–2.70). Antipropulsives produced a signal for syndactyly while the literature revealed a signal for hypospadias. There was no prior evidence to support the remaining six signals involving the ordinary salt combinations, propulsives, bulk‐forming laxatives, hydrazinophthalazine derivatives, gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues and selective serotonin agonists. Conclusion Signals which strengthened prior evidence should be prioritized for further investigation, and independent evidence sought to confirm the remaining signals. Some chance associations are expected and confounding by indication is possible. PMID

  17. Robust QRS peak detection by multimodal information fusion of ECG and blood pressure signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Quan; Bai, Yong; Erol, Yusuf Bugra; Salas-Boni, Rebeca; Zhang, Xiaorong; Hu, Xiao

    2016-11-01

    QRS peak detection is a challenging problem when ECG signal is corrupted. However, additional physiological signals may also provide information about the QRS position. In this study, we focus on a unique benchmark provided by PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 and Physiological Measurement focus issue: robust detection of heart beats in multimodal data, which aimed to explore robust methods for QRS detection in multimodal physiological signals. A dataset of 200 training and 210 testing records are used, where the testing records are hidden for evaluating the performance only. An information fusion framework for robust QRS detection is proposed by leveraging existing ECG and ABP analysis tools and combining heart beats derived from different sources. Results show that our approach achieves an overall accuracy of 90.94% and 88.66% on the training and testing datasets, respectively. Furthermore, we observe expected performance at each step of the proposed approach, as an evidence of the effectiveness of our approach. Discussion on the limitations of our approach is also provided.

  18. Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, Peter; Dahl, Carl Eric

    2011-01-01

    We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

  19. Processing of Instantaneous Angular Speed Signal for Detection of a Diesel Engine Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Charchalis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of diesel engine performance under its operating is critical for the prediction of malfunction development and subsequently functional failure detection. Analysis of instantaneous angular speed (IAS of the crankshaft is considered as one of the nonintrusive and effective methods of the detection of combustion quality deterioration. In this paper results of experimental verification of fuel system's malfunction detecting, using optical encoder for IAS recording are presented. The implemented method relies on the comparison of measurement results, recorded under healthy and faulty conditions of the engine. Elaborated dynamic model of angular speed variations enables us to build templates of engine behavior. Recorded during experiment, values of cylinder pressure were taken for the approximation of pressure basic waveform. The main task of data processing is smoothing the raw angular speed signal. The noise is due to sensor mount vibrations, signal emitter machining, engine body vibrations, and crankshaft torsional vibrations. Smoothing of the measurement data was carried out by the implementation of the Savitzky-Golay filter. Measured signal after smoothing was compared with the model of IAS run.

  20. Hypercharged dark matter and direct detection as a probe of reheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Brian; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2014-03-14

    The lack of new physics at the LHC so far weakens the argument for TeV scale thermal dark matter. On the other hand, heavier, nonthermal dark matter is generally difficult to test experimentally. Here we consider the interesting and generic case of hypercharged dark matter, which can allow for heavy dark matter masses without spoiling testability. Planned direct detection experiments will be able to see a signal for masses up to an incredible 1010  GeV, and this can further serve to probe the reheating temperature up to about 109  GeV, as determined by the nonthermal dark matter relic abundance. The Z-mediated nature of the dark matter scattering may be determined in principle by comparing scattering rates on different detector nuclei, which in turn can reveal the dark matter mass. We will discuss the extent to which future experiments may be able to make such a determination.

  1. Evaluation of bistable systems versus matched filters in detecting bipolar pulse signals

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Fabing; Abbott, Derek; Gao, Qisheng

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a thorough evaluation of a bistable system versus a matched filter in detecting bipolar pulse signals. The detectability of the bistable system can be optimized by adding noise, i.e. the stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon. This SR effect is also demonstrated by approximate statistical detection theory of the bistable system and corresponding numerical simulations. Furthermore, the performance comparison results between the bistable system and the matched filter show that...

  2. Halo-independent analysis of direct detection data for light WIMPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Gondolo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We present a halo-independent analysis of direct detection data on ''light WIMPs'', i.e. weakly interacting massive particles with mass close to or below 10 GeV/c 2 . We include new results from silicon CDMS detectors (bounds and excess events), the latest CoGeNT acceptances, and recent measurements of low sodium quenching factors in NaI crystals. We focus on light WIMPs with spin-independent isospin-conserving and isospin-violating interactions with nucleons. For these dark matter candidates we find that a low quenching factor would make the DAMA modulation incompatible with a reasonable escape velocity for the dark matter halo, and that the tension among experimental data tightens in both the isospin-conserving and isospin-violating scenarios. We also find that a new although milder tension appears between the CoGeNT and DAMA annual modulations on one side and the silicon excess events on the other, in that it seems difficult to interpret them as the modulated and unmodulated aspects of the same WIMP dark matter signal

  3. Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD) Manual v.1.2 The capability of an inspection system is established by applications of various methodologies to determine the probability of detection (POD). One accepted metric of an adequate inspection system is that there is 95% confidence that the POD is greater than 90% (90/95 POD). Design of experiments for validating probability of detection capability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) systems (DOEPOD) is a methodology that is implemented via software to serve as a diagnostic tool providing detailed analysis of POD test data, guidance on establishing data distribution requirements, and resolving test issues. DOEPOD demands utilization of observance of occurrences. The DOEPOD capability has been developed to provide an efficient and accurate methodology that yields observed POD and confidence bounds for both Hit-Miss or signal amplitude testing. DOEPOD does not assume prescribed POD logarithmic or similar functions with assumed adequacy over a wide range of flaw sizes and inspection system technologies, so that multi-parameter curve fitting or model optimization approaches to generate a POD curve are not required. DOEPOD applications for supporting inspector qualifications is included.

  4. A common signal detection model accounts for both perception and discrimination of the watercolor effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinck, Frédéric; Knoblauch, Kenneth

    2012-03-21

    Establishing the relation between perception and discrimination is a fundamental objective in psychophysics, with the goal of characterizing the neural mechanisms mediating perception. Here, we show that a procedure for estimating a perceptual scale based on a signal detection model also predicts discrimination performance. We use a recently developed procedure, Maximum Likelihood Difference Scaling (MLDS), to measure the perceptual strength of a long-range, color, filling-in phenomenon, the Watercolor Effect (WCE), as a function of the luminance ratio between the two components of its generating contour. MLDS is based on an equal-variance, gaussian, signal detection model and yields a perceptual scale with interval properties. The strength of the fill-in percept increased 10-15 times the estimate of the internal noise level for a 3-fold increase in the luminance ratio. Each observer's estimated scale predicted discrimination performance in a subsequent paired-comparison task. A common signal detection model accounts for both the appearance and discrimination data. Since signal detection theory provides a common metric for relating discrimination performance and neural response, the results have implications for comparing perceptual and neural response functions.

  5. Analysis of the theoretical bias in dark matter direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catena, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Fitting the model ''A'' to dark matter direct detection data, when the model that underlies the data is ''B'', introduces a theoretical bias in the fit. We perform a quantitative study of the theoretical bias in dark matter direct detection, with a focus on assumptions regarding the dark matter interactions, and velocity distribution. We address this problem within the effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle. We analyze 24 benchmark points in the parameter space of the theory, using frequentist and Bayesian statistical methods. First, we simulate the data of future direct detection experiments assuming a momentum/velocity dependent dark matter-nucleon interaction, and an anisotropic dark matter velocity distribution. Then, we fit a constant scattering cross section, and an isotropic Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution to the simulated data, thereby introducing a bias in the analysis. The best fit values of the dark matter particle mass differ from their benchmark values up to 2 standard deviations. The best fit values of the dark matter-nucleon coupling constant differ from their benchmark values up to several standard deviations. We conclude that common assumptions in dark matter direct detection are a source of potentially significant bias

  6. Image processing for an automatic detection of defect signals from electromagnetic cartographies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, B.; Marqueste, L.; Birac, C.

    1994-01-01

    As the population of nuclear power plants ages, new defects are appearing in steam generator tubes (stress corrosion, corrosion pitting and intergranular corrosion). For more sophisticated expert appraisal of these defects, tubes can be examined by multifrequency eddy-current testing with an absolute coil (diameter value of 1 mm). A device, consisting of a push-puller mechanism and a motor-driven probe carrying this absolute coil, gives a helical movement to scan the inner surface of the tube. The signals obtained can be represented in the form of cartographies (3D representation in which the coordinates are the circumference, the length and amplitude of the X or Y component at a given frequency). The detection of defect signals by visual examination of these eddy-current cartographies is not always reproducible. The article describes an image processing procedure for the detection of defect signals which leads to a better reproductibility for more safety

  7. The detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, P; Odermatt, P; Etterlin, M; Lerch, T; Frei, M; Farhat, M

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes an experimental approach for the detection of cavitation in hydraulic machines by use of ultrasonic signal analysis. Instead of using the high frequency pulses (typically 1MHz) only for transit time measurement different other signal characteristics are extracted from the individual signals and its correlation function with reference signals in order to gain knowledge of the water conditions. As the pulse repetition rate is high (typically 100Hz), statistical parameters can be extracted of the signals. The idea is to find patterns in the parameters by a classifier that can distinguish between the different water states. This classification scheme has been applied to different cavitation sections: a sphere in a water flow in circular tube at the HSLU in Lucerne, a NACA profile in a cavitation tunnel and a Francis model test turbine both at LMH in Lausanne. From the signal raw data several statistical parameters in the time and frequency domain as well as from the correlation function with reference signals have been determined. As classifiers two methods were used: neural feed forward networks and decision trees. For both classification methods realizations with lowest complexity as possible are of special interest. It is shown that three signal characteristics, two from the signal itself and one from the correlation function are in many cases sufficient for the detection capability. The final goal is to combine these results with operating point, vibration, acoustic emission and dynamic pressure information such that a distinction between dangerous and not dangerous cavitation is possible

  8. Detection of Fatigue Damage by Using High Frequency Nonlinear Laser Ultrasonic Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Kyu; Park, Nak Kyu; Baik, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Yong Moo; Cha, Byung Heon

    2012-01-01

    The detection of fatigue damage for the components of a nuclear power plant is one of key techniques to prevent a catastrophic accident and the subsequent severe losses. Specifically, it is preferred to detect at an early stage of the fatigue damage. If the fatigue damage that is in danger of growing into a fracture is accurately detected, an appropriate treatment could be carried out to improve the condition. Although most engineers and designers take precautions against fatigue, some breakdowns of nuclear power plant components still occur due to fatigue damage. It is considered that ultrasound testing technique is the most promising method to detect the fatigue damage in many nondestructive testing methods. Laser ultrasound has attracted attention as a noncontact testing technique. Especially, laser ultrasonic signal has wide band frequency spectrum which can provide more accurate information for a testing material. The conventional linear ultrasonic technique is sensitive to gross defects or opened cracks whereas it is less sensitive to evenly distributed micro-cracks or degradation. An alternative technique to overcome this limitation is nonlinear ultrasound. The principal difference between linear and nonlinear technique is that in the latter the existence and characteristics of defects are often related to an acoustic signal whose frequency differs from that of the input signal. This is related to the radiation and propagation of finite amplitude, especially high power, ultrasound and its interaction with discontinuities, such as cracks, interfaces and voids. Since material failure or degradation is usually preceded by some kind of nonlinear mechanical behavior before significant plastic deformation or material damage occurs. The presence of nonlinear terms in the wave equation causes intense acoustic waves to generate new waves at frequencies which are multiples of the initial sound wave frequency. The nonlinear effect can exert a strong effect on the

  9. Hippo signalling directs intestinal fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    le Bouteiller, Marie Catherine M; Jensen, Kim Bak

    2015-01-01

    Hippo signalling has been associated with many important tissue functions including the regulation of organ size. In the intestinal epithelium differing functions have been proposed for the effectors of Hippo signalling, YAP and TAZ1. These are now shown to have a dual role in the intestinal...

  10. Directional detection of dark matter with two-dimensional targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kahn, Yonatan; Lisanti, Mariangela; Tully, Christopher G.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2017-09-01

    We propose two-dimensional materials as targets for direct detection of dark matter. Using graphene as an example, we focus on the case where dark matter scattering deposits sufficient energy on a valence-band electron to eject it from the target. We show that the sensitivity of graphene to dark matter of MeV to GeV mass can be comparable, for similar exposure and background levels, to that of semiconductor targets such as silicon and germanium. Moreover, a two-dimensional target is an excellent directional detector, as the ejected electron retains information about the angular dependence of the incident dark matter particle. This proposal can be implemented by the PTOLEMY experiment, presenting for the first time an opportunity for directional detection of sub-GeV dark matter.

  11. Correntropy measures to detect daytime sleepiness from EEG signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melia, Umberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Caminal, Pere; Guaita, Marc; Montserrat, Josep M; Vilaseca, Isabel; Salamero, Manel; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is one of the main symptoms of several sleep related disorders and has a great impact on patients’ lives. While many studies have been carried out in order to assess daytime sleepiness, automatic EDS detection still remains an open problem. In this work, a novel approach to this issue based on correntropy function analysis of EEG signals was proposed in order to detect patients suffering from EDS. Multichannel EEG signals were recorded during five Maintenance of Wakefulness Tests (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) alternated throughout the day for patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing (SDB). A group of 20 patients with EDS was compared with a group of 20 patients without daytime sleepiness (WDS), by analyzing 60 s EEG windows in a waking state. Measures obtained from the cross-correntropy function (CCORR) and auto-correntropy function (ACORR) were calculated in the EEG frequency bands: δ, 0.1–4 Hz; θ, 4–8 Hz; α, 8–12 Hz; β, 12–30 Hz; total band TB, 0.1–45 Hz. These functions permitted the quantification of complex signal properties and the non-linear couplings between different areas of the scalp. Statistical differences between EDS and WDS groups were mainly found in the β band during MSLT events (p-value < 0.0001). The WDS group presented more complexity in the occipital zone than the EDS group, while a stronger nonlinear coupling between the occipital and frontal regions was detected in EDS patients than in the WDS group. At best, ACORR and CCORR measures yielded sensitivity and specificity above 80% and the area under ROC curve (AUC) was above 0.85 in classifying EDS and WDS patients. These performances represent an improvement with respect to classical EEG indices applied in the same database (sensitivity and specificity were never above 80% and AUC was under 0.75). (paper)

  12. Multi-GNSS high-rate RTK, PPP and novel direct phase observation processing method: application to precise dynamic displacement detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paziewski, Jacek; Sieradzki, Rafal; Baryla, Radoslaw

    2018-03-01

    This paper provides the methodology and performance assessment of multi-GNSS signal processing for the detection of small-scale high-rate dynamic displacements. For this purpose, we used methods of relative (RTK) and absolute positioning (PPP), and a novel direct signal processing approach. The first two methods are recognized as providing accurate information on position in many navigation and surveying applications. The latter is an innovative method for dynamic displacement determination with the use of GNSS phase signal processing. This method is based on the developed functional model with parametrized epoch-wise topocentric relative coordinates derived from filtered GNSS observations. Current regular kinematic PPP positioning, as well as medium/long range RTK, may not offer coordinate estimates with subcentimeter precision. Thus, extended processing strategies of absolute and relative GNSS positioning have been developed and applied for displacement detection. The study also aimed to comparatively analyze the developed methods as well as to analyze the impact of combined GPS and BDS processing and the dependence of the results of the relative methods on the baseline length. All the methods were implemented with in-house developed software allowing for high-rate precise GNSS positioning and signal processing. The phase and pseudorange observations collected with a rate of 50 Hz during the field test served as the experiment’s data set. The displacements at the rover station were triggered in the horizontal plane using a device which was designed and constructed to ensure a periodic motion of GNSS antenna with an amplitude of ~3 cm and a frequency of ~4.5 Hz. Finally, a medium range RTK, PPP, and direct phase observation processing method demonstrated the capability of providing reliable and consistent results with the precision of the determined dynamic displacements at the millimeter level. Specifically, the research shows that the standard deviation of

  13. Cell fate in the Arabidopsis root meristem determined by directional signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, C; Willemsen, V; Hage, W; Weisbeek, P; Scheres, B

    1995-11-02

    Postembryonic development in plants is achieved by apical meristems. Surgical studies and clonal analysis have revealed indirectly that cells in shoot meristems have no predictable destiny and that position is likely to play a role in the acquisition of cell identity. In contrast to animal systems, there has been no direct evidence for inductive signalling in plants until now. Here we present evidence for such signalling using laser ablation of cells in the root meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana. Although these cells show rigid clonal relationships, we now demonstrate that it is positional control that is most important in the determination of cell fate. Positional signals can be perpetuated from more mature to initial cells to guide the pattern of meristem cell differentiation. This offers an alternative to the general opinion that meristems are the source of patterning information.

  14. MMSE-based algorithm for joint signal detection, channel and noise variance estimation for OFDM systems

    CERN Document Server

    Savaux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an algorithm for the detection of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in a cognitive radio context by means of a joint and iterative channel and noise estimation technique. Based on the minimum mean square criterion, it performs an accurate detection of a user in a frequency band, by achieving a quasi-optimal channel and noise variance estimation if the signal is present, and by estimating the noise level in the band if the signal is absent. Organized into three chapters, the first chapter provides the background against which the system model is pr

  15. SIG-VISA: Signal-based Vertically Integrated Seismic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D.; Mayeda, K. M.; Myers, S. C.; Russell, S.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional seismic monitoring systems rely on discrete detections produced by station processing software; however, while such detections may constitute a useful summary of station activity, they discard large amounts of information present in the original recorded signal. We present SIG-VISA (Signal-based Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis), a system for seismic monitoring through Bayesian inference on seismic signals. By directly modeling the recorded signal, our approach incorporates additional information unavailable to detection-based methods, enabling higher sensitivity and more accurate localization using techniques such as waveform matching. SIG-VISA's Bayesian forward model of seismic signal envelopes includes physically-derived models of travel times and source characteristics as well as Gaussian process (kriging) statistical models of signal properties that combine interpolation of historical data with extrapolation of learned physical trends. Applying Bayesian inference, we evaluate the model on earthquakes as well as the 2009 DPRK test event, demonstrating a waveform matching effect as part of the probabilistic inference, along with results on event localization and sensitivity. In particular, we demonstrate increased sensitivity from signal-based modeling, in which the SIGVISA signal model finds statistical evidence for arrivals even at stations for which the IMS station processing failed to register any detection.

  16. All-Optical envelope detection and fiber transmission of wireless signals by external injection of a DFB laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prince, Kamau; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2008-01-01

    We outline a novel method for all-optical envelope detection of wireless signals by exploiting cross-gain modulation effects in a distributed feedback laser operating with optical injection. We successfully demonstrate envelope detection of a 20-GHz carrier amplitude-shift-keying modulated signal...

  17. The phase-space structure of a dark-matter halo: Implications for dark-matter direct detection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmi, Amina; White, Simon D.M.; Springel, Volker

    2002-01-01

    We study the phase-space structure of a dark-matter halo formed in a high resolution simulation of a ΛCDM cosmology. Our goal is to quantify how much substructure is left over from the inhomogeneous growth of the halo, and how it may affect the signal in experiments aimed at detecting the dark matter particles directly. If we focus on the equivalent of 'solar vicinity', we find that the dark matter is smoothly distributed in space. The probability of detecting particles bound within dense lumps of individual mass less than 10 7 M · h -1 is small, less than 10 -2 . The velocity ellipsoid in the solar neighborhood deviates only slightly from a multivariate Gaussian, and can be thought of as a superposition of thousands of kinematically cold streams. The motions of the most energetic particles are, however, strongly clumped and highly anisotropic. We conclude that experiments may safely assume a smooth multivariate Gaussian distribution to represent the kinematics of dark-matter particles in the solar neighborhood. Experiments sensitive to the direction of motion of the incident particles could exploit the expected anisotropy to learn about the recent merging history of our Galaxy

  18. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Foroughi Abari, Farzad; Mann, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both...... leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift...... has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2....

  19. Evaluation of two methods for direct detection of Fusarium spp. in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Mariana G; van der Heijden, Inneke M; Perdigão, Lauro; Taira, Cleison; Costa, Silvia F; Levin, Anna S

    2016-04-01

    Fusarium is a waterborne fungus that causes severe infections especially in patients with prolonged neutropenia. Traditionally, the detection of Fusarium in water is done by culturing which is difficult and time consuming. A faster method is necessary to prevent exposure of susceptible patients to contaminated water. The objective of this study was to develop a molecular technique for direct detection of Fusarium in water. A direct DNA extraction method from water was developed and coupled to a genus-specific PCR, to detect 3 species of Fusarium (verticillioides, oxysporum and solani). The detection limits were 10 cells/L and 1 cell/L for the molecular and culture methods, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first method developed to detect Fusarium directly from water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A low noise photoelectric signal acquisition system applying in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qilin; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Xinghua; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Binquan; Hu, Zhaohui

    2017-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope serves as a new generation of strong support for the development of high-tech weapons, it solves the core problem that limits the development of the long-playing seamless navigation and positioning. In the NMR gyroscope, the output signal with atomic precession frequency is detected by the probe light, the final crucial photoelectric signal of the probe light directly decides the quality of the gyro signal. But the output signal has high sensitivity, resolution and measurement accuracy for the photoelectric detection system. In order to detect the measured signal better, this paper proposed a weak photoelectric signal rapid acquisition system, which has high SNR and the frequency of responded signal is up to 100 KHz to let the weak output signal with high frequency of the NMR gyroscope can be detected better.

  1. The effect of stimulus modality on signal detection: implications for assessing the safety of in-vehicle technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merat, Natasha; Jamson, A Hamish

    2008-02-01

    This study examined the effect of two in-vehicle information systems (IVIS) on signal detection in the visual, auditory, and tactile modalities; established whether the detrimental effects of an IVIS on driving could be quantified by these detection tasks; and examined the effect of stimulus modality on signal detection. The peripheral detection task has been used widely for assessing the effects of an IVIS on driving. However, performance on this task relies on drivers' ability to see a series of LEDs, which can be problematic in field tests (e.g., on sunny days). Participants responded to one of three detection tasks during a simulated driving experiment. The effect of IVIS interaction on these detection tasks was also measured. Reduced performance in the detection tasks was assumed to indicate a decline in drivers' ability to handle sudden events in the driving task. Response time to all detection tasks increased by around 200 ms when drivers performed the IVIS tasks, as compared with baseline driving. Analyses of variance and comparison of effect sizes showed the effects of these two IVISs to be the same across the three detection tasks. These detection tasks are useful for quantifying the safety of an IVIS during driving. The absence of a difference in signal detection by modality suggests that performance on these tasks relies on general attentional resources and is not modality specific. The signal detection tasks employed here should be further investigated for their suitability in assessing the safety of in-vehicle systems.

  2. Novel ST-MUSIC-based spectral analysis for detection of ULF geomagnetic signals anomalies associated with seismic events in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Chavez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the analysis of ultra-low-frequency (ULF geomagnetic signals in order to detect seismic anomalies has been reported in several works. Yet, they, although having promising results, present problems for their detection since these anomalies are generally too much weak and embedded in high noise levels. In this work, a short-time multiple signal classification (ST-MUSIC, which is a technique with high-frequency resolution and noise immunity, is proposed for the detection of seismic anomalies in the ULF geomagnetic signals. Besides, the energy (E of geomagnetic signals processed by ST-MUSIC is also presented as a complementary parameter to measure the fluctuations between seismic activity and seismic calm period. The usefulness and effectiveness of the proposal are demonstrated through the analysis of a synthetic signal and five real signals with earthquakes. The analysed ULF geomagnetic signals have been obtained using a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer at the Juriquilla station, which is localized in Queretaro, Mexico (geographic coordinates: longitude 100.45° E and latitude 20.70° N. The results obtained show the detection of seismic perturbations before, during, and after the main shock, making the proposal a suitable tool for detecting seismic precursors.

  3. High-Performance Signal Detection for Adverse Drug Events using MapReduce Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Xu, Linhao; Wang, Chen; Mao, Xianling; Peng, Bo; Pan, Yue

    2010-11-13

    Post-marketing pharmacovigilance is important for public health, as many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are unknown when those drugs were approved for marketing. However, due to the large number of reported drugs and drug combinations, detecting ADE signals by mining these reports is becoming a challenging task in terms of computational complexity. Recently, a parallel programming model, MapReduce has been introduced by Google to support large-scale data intensive applications. In this study, we proposed a MapReduce-based algorithm, for common ADE detection approach, Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), and tested it in mining spontaneous ADE reports from FDA. The purpose is to investigate the possibility of using MapReduce principle to speed up biomedical data mining tasks using this pharmacovigilance case as one specific example. The results demonstrated that MapReduce programming model could improve the performance of common signal detection algorithm for pharmacovigilance in a distributed computation environment at approximately liner speedup rates.

  4. Transmission Property of Directly Modulated Signals Enhanced by a Micro-ring Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Yi; Lorences Riesgo, Abel; Seoane, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    A silicon micro-ring resonator is used to enhance the modulation speed of a 10-Gbit/s directly modulated laser to 40 Gbit/s. The generated signal is transmitted error free over 4.5 km SSMF. Dispersion tolerance is also studied....

  5. Anti-impulse-noise Edge Detection via Anisotropic Morphological Directional Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Peng-Lang; Wang, Fu-Ping

    2017-07-13

    Traditional differential-based edge detection suffers from abrupt degradation in performance when images are corrupted by impulse noises. The morphological operators such as the median filters and weighted median filters possess the intrinsic ability to counteract impulse noise. In this paper, by combining the biwindow configuration with weighted median filters, anisotropic morphological directional derivatives (AMDD) robust to impulse noise are proposed to measure the local grayscale variation around a pixel. For ideal step edges, the AMDD spatial response and directional representation are derived. The characteristics and edge resolution of two kinds of typical biwindows are analyzed thoroughly. In terms of the AMDD spatial response and directional representation of ideal step edges, the spatial matched filter is used to extract the edge strength map (ESM) from the AMDDs of an image. The spatial and directional matched filters are used to extract the edge direction map (EDM). Embedding the extracted ESM and EDM into the standard route of the differential-based edge detection, an anti-impulse-noise AMDD-based edge detector is constructed. It is compared with the existing state-of-the-art detectors on a recognized image dataset for edge detection evaluation. The results show that it attains competitive performance in noise-free and Gaussian noise cases and the best performance in impulse noise cases.

  6. Halo-Independent Direct Detection Analyses Without Mass Assumptions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Adam J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the $m_\\chi-\\sigma_n$ plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the $v_{min}-\\tilde{g}$ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from $v_{min}$ to nuclear recoil momentum ($p_R$), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call $\\tilde{h}(p_R)$. The entire family of conventional halo-independent $\\tilde{g}(v_{min})$ plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single $\\tilde{h}(p_R)$ plot through a simple re...

  7. A comparison of directed search target detection versus in-scene target detection in Worldview-2 datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, S.

    2015-05-01

    Since the events of September 11, 2001, the intelligence focus has moved from large order-of-battle targets to small targets of opportunity. Additionally, the business community has discovered the use of remotely sensed data to anticipate demand and derive data on their competition. This requires the finer spectral and spatial fidelity now available to recognize those targets. This work hypothesizes that directed searches using calibrated data perform at least as well as inscene manually intensive target detection searches. It uses calibrated Worldview-2 multispectral images with NEF generated signatures and standard detection algorithms to compare bespoke directed search capabilities against ENVI™ in-scene search capabilities. Multiple execution runs are performed at increasing thresholds to generate detection rates. These rates are plotted and statistically analyzed. While individual head-to-head comparison results vary, 88% of the directed searches performed at least as well as in-scene searches with 50% clearly outperforming in-scene methods. The results strongly support the premise that directed searches perform at least as well as comparable in-scene searches.

  8. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Huang, S L; Wang, S; Zhao, W

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of wave detection signals.

  9. CMOS-based avalanche photodiodes for direct particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapels, Christopher J.; Squillante, Michael R.; Lawrence, William G.; Augustine, Frank L.; Christian, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology are augmenting Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) as imaging devices and cameras in some demanding optical imaging applications. Radiation Monitoring Devices are investigating the APS concept for nuclear detection applications and has successfully migrated avalanche photodiode (APD) pixel fabrication to a CMOS environment, creating pixel detectors that can be operated with internal gain as proportional detectors. Amplification of the signal within the diode allows identification of events previously hidden within the readout noise of the electronics. Such devices can be used to read out a scintillation crystal, as in SPECT or PET, and as direct-conversion particle detectors. The charge produced by an ionizing particle in the epitaxial layer is collected by an electric field within the diode in each pixel. The monolithic integration of the readout circuitry with the pixel sensors represents an improved design compared to the current hybrid-detector technology that requires wire or bump bonding. In this work, we investigate designs for CMOS APD detector elements and compare these to typical values for large area devices. We characterize the achievable detector gain and the gain uniformity over the active area. The excess noise in two different pixel structures is compared. The CMOS APD performance is demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra of X-rays from 55 Fe

  10. Development and deployment of the Collimated Directional Radiation Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckes, Amber L.; Barzilov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The Collimated Directional Radiation Detection System (CDRDS) is capable of imaging radioactive sources in two dimensions (as a directional detector). The detection medium of the CDRDS is a single Cs2LiYCl6:Ce3+ scintillator cell enriched in 7Li (CLYC-7). The CLYC-7 is surrounded by a heterogeneous high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and lead (Pb) collimator. These materials make-up a coded aperture inlaid in the collimator. The collimator is rotated 360° by a stepper motor which enables time-encoded imaging of a radioactive source. The CDRDS is capable of spectroscopy and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) of photons and fast neutrons. The measurements of a radioactive source are carried out in discrete time steps that correlate to the angular rotation of the collimator. The measurement results are processed using a maximum likelihood expectation (MLEM) algorithm to create an image of the measured radiation. This collimator design allows for the directional detection of photons and fast neutrons simultaneously by utilizing only one CLYC-7 scintillator. Directional detection of thermal neutrons can also be performed by utilizing another suitable scintillator. Moreover, the CDRDS is portable, robust, and user friendly. This unit is capable of utilizing wireless data transfer for possible radiation mapping and network-centric applications. The CDRDS was tested by performing laboratory measurements with various gamma-ray and neutron sources.

  11. Low modulation index RF signal detection for a passive UHF RFID transponder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhongqi; Zhang Chun; Li Yongming; Wang Zhihua

    2009-01-01

    In a typical RFID system the reader transmits modulated RF power to provide both data and energy for the passive transponder. Low modulation index RF energy is preferable for an adequate tag power supply and increase in communication range but gives rise to difficulties for near-field conventional demodulation. Therefore, a novel ASK demodulator for minimum 20% modulation index RF signal detection over a range of 23 dB is presented. Thanks to the proposed innovative divisional linear conversion from the power into voltage signal, the detection sensitivity is ensured over a wide power range with low power consumption of 8.6 μW. The chip is implemented in UMC 0.18 μm mix-mode CMOS technology, and the chip area is 0.06 mm 2 .

  12. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: Vector mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: m DM , M med, g DM and g q , the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establish an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (≲5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. In conclusion, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches

  13. Exploring light mediators with low-threshold direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahlhoefer, Felix [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology; Kulkarni, Suchita [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Wild, Sebastian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We explore the potential of future cryogenic direct detection experiments to determine the properties of the mediator that communicates the interactions between dark matter and nuclei. Due to their low thresholds and large exposures, experiments like CRESST-III, SuperCDMS SNOLAB and EDELWEISS-III will have excellent capability to reconstruct mediator masses in the MeV range for a large class of models. Combining the information from several experiments further improves the parameter reconstruction, even when taking into account additional nuisance parameters related to background uncertainties and the dark matter velocity distribution. These observations may offer the intriguing possibility of studying dark matter self-interactions with direct detection experiments.

  14. Evading direct dark matter detection in Higgs portal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcadi, Giorgio [Max Planck Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Gross, Christian, E-mail: christian.gross@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Lebedev, Oleg [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Pokorski, Stefan [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, PL-02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Toma, Takashi [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-06-10

    Many models of Higgs portal Dark Matter (DM) find themselves under pressure from increasingly tight direct detection constraints. In the framework of gauge field DM, we study how such bounds can be relaxed while retaining the thermal WIMP paradigm. When the hidden sector gauge symmetry is broken via the Higgs mechanism, the hidden sector generally contains unstable states which are lighter than dark matter. These states provide DM with an efficient annihilation channel. As a result, the DM relic abundance and the direct detection limits are controlled by different parameters, and the two can easily be reconciled. This simple setup realizes the idea of “secluded” dark matter naturally.

  15. Exploring light mediators with low-threshold direct detection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahlhoefer, Felix

    2017-11-01

    We explore the potential of future cryogenic direct detection experiments to determine the properties of the mediator that communicates the interactions between dark matter and nuclei. Due to their low thresholds and large exposures, experiments like CRESST-III, SuperCDMS SNOLAB and EDELWEISS-III will have excellent capability to reconstruct mediator masses in the MeV range for a large class of models. Combining the information from several experiments further improves the parameter reconstruction, even when taking into account additional nuisance parameters related to background uncertainties and the dark matter velocity distribution. These observations may offer the intriguing possibility of studying dark matter self-interactions with direct detection experiments.

  16. Optimizing signal recycling for detecting a stochastic gravitational-wave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Duo; Christensen, Nelson

    2018-06-01

    Signal recycling is applied in laser interferometers such as the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO) to increase their sensitivity to gravitational waves. In this study, signal recycling configurations for detecting a stochastic gravitational wave background are optimized based on aLIGO parameters. Optimal transmission of the signal recycling mirror (SRM) and detuning phase of the signal recycling cavity under a fixed laser power and low-frequency cutoff are calculated. Based on the optimal configurations, the compatibility with a binary neutron star (BNS) search is discussed. Then, different laser powers and low-frequency cutoffs are considered. Two models for the dimensionless energy density of gravitational waves , the flat model and the model, are studied. For a stochastic background search, it is found that an interferometer using signal recycling has a better sensitivity than an interferometer not using it. The optimal stochastic search configurations are typically found when both the SRM transmission and the signal recycling detuning phase are low. In this region, the BNS range mostly lies between 160 and 180 Mpc. When a lower laser power is used the optimal signal recycling detuning phase increases, the optimal SRM transmission increases and the optimal sensitivity improves. A reduced low-frequency cutoff gives a better sensitivity limit. For both models of , a typical optimal sensitivity limit on the order of 10‑10 is achieved at a reference frequency of Hz.

  17. Optimal Noise Enhanced Signal Detection in a Unified Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new framework for variable detectors is formulated in order to solve different noise enhanced signal detection optimal problems, where six different disjoint sets of detector and discrete vector pairs are defined according to the two inequality-constraints on detection and false-alarm probabilities. Then theorems and algorithms constructed based on the new framework are presented to search the optimal noise enhanced solutions to maximize the relative improvements of the detection and the false-alarm probabilities, respectively. Further, the optimal noise enhanced solution of the maximum overall improvement is obtained based on the new framework and the relationship among the three maximums is presented. In addition, the sufficient conditions for improvability or non-improvability under the two certain constraints are given. Finally, numerous examples are presented to illustrate the theoretical results and the proofs of the main theorems are given in the Appendix.

  18. Early detection of pharmacovigilance signals with automated methods based on false discovery rates: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ismaïl; Thiessard, Frantz; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Haramburu, Françoise; Kreft-Jais, Carmen; Bégaud, Bernard; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale

    2012-06-01

    Improving the detection of drug safety signals has led several pharmacovigilance regulatory agencies to incorporate automated quantitative methods into their spontaneous reporting management systems. The three largest worldwide pharmacovigilance databases are routinely screened by the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval of proportional reporting ratio (PRR₀₂.₅), the 2.5% quantile of the Information Component (IC₀₂.₅) or the 5% quantile of the Gamma Poisson Shrinker (GPS₀₅). More recently, Bayesian and non-Bayesian False Discovery Rate (FDR)-based methods were proposed that address the arbitrariness of thresholds and allow for a built-in estimate of the FDR. These methods were also shown through simulation studies to be interesting alternatives to the currently used methods. The objective of this work was twofold. Based on an extensive retrospective study, we compared PRR₀₂.₅, GPS₀₅ and IC₀₂.₅ with two FDR-based methods derived from the Fisher's exact test and the GPS model (GPS(pH0) [posterior probability of the null hypothesis H₀ calculated from the Gamma Poisson Shrinker model]). Secondly, restricting the analysis to GPS(pH0), we aimed to evaluate the added value of using automated signal detection tools compared with 'traditional' methods, i.e. non-automated surveillance operated by pharmacovigilance experts. The analysis was performed sequentially, i.e. every month, and retrospectively on the whole French pharmacovigilance database over the period 1 January 1996-1 July 2002. Evaluation was based on a list of 243 reference signals (RSs) corresponding to investigations launched by the French Pharmacovigilance Technical Committee (PhVTC) during the same period. The comparison of detection methods was made on the basis of the number of RSs detected as well as the time to detection. Results comparing the five automated quantitative methods were in favour of GPS(pH0) in terms of both number of detections of true signals and

  19. Rapid detection of NBOME's and other NPS on blotter papers by direct ATR-FTIR spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Neto, José

    2015-07-01

    Blotter paper is among the most common forms of consumption of new psychotropic substances (NPS), formerly referred as designer drugs. In many cases, users are misled to believe they are taking LSD when, in fact, they are taking newer and less known drugs like the NBOMEs or other substituted phenethylamines. We report our findings in quick testing of blotter papers for illicit substances like NBOMEs and other NPS by taking ATR-FTIR spectra directly from blotters seized on the streets, without any sample preparation. Both sides (front and back) of each blotter were tested. Collected data were analyzed by single- and multi-component spectral matching and submitted to chemometric discriminant analysis. Our results showed that, on 66.7% of the cases analyzed, seized blotters contained one or more types of NBOMEs, confirming the growing presence of this novel substances on the market. Matching IR signals were detected on both or just one side of the blotters and showed variable strength. Although no quantitative analysis was made, detection of these substances by the proposed approach serves as indication of variable and possibly higher dosages per blotter when compared to LSD, which showed to be below the detection limit of the applied method. Blotters containing a mescaline-like compound, later confirmed by GC-MS and LC-MS to be MAL (methallylescaline), a substance very similar to mescaline, were detected among the samples tested. Validity of direct ATR-FTIR testing was confirmed by checking the obtained results against independent GC-MS or LC-MS results for the same cases/samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultra Wideband Signal Detection with a Schottky Diode Based Envelope Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Cimoli, Bruno; Valdecasa, Guillermo Silva

    error correction threshold are achieved for wireless distances of 20 cm and 50 cm at respective data rates of 2.5 Gbit/s and 1.25 Gbit/s. uwb transmission is one of the most attractive alternatives for low-power high-speed wireless communication systems over short distances, its popularity stemming from....... The receiver is able to detect an ultra-wideband signal compliant with the Federal Communications Commission (fcc) regulations for uwb transmission and consisting of a 2.5 Gbit/s non-return-to-zero (nrz) data signal on a 6.9 GHz carrier after 20 cm wireless transmission. Bit error rates (ber) below the forward...... its interoperability with existing wireless services and its license free operation. The latter is conditioned on meeting a number of standards and regulations for maximum radiated powers, designed to ensure the former by defining uwb signals as signals with large bandwidths in the frequency range...

  1. Leak detection in gas pipeline by acoustic and signal processing - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, N. F.; Ghazali, M. F.; Amin, M. M.; Hamat, A. M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The pipeline system is the most important part in media transport in order to deliver fluid to another station. The weak maintenance and poor safety will contribute to financial losses in term of fluid waste and environmental impacts. There are many classifications of techniques to make it easier to show their specific method and application. This paper's discussion about gas leak detection in pipeline system using acoustic method will be presented in this paper. The wave propagation in the pipeline is a key parameter in acoustic method when the leak occurs and the pressure balance of the pipe will generated by the friction between wall in the pipe. The signal processing is used to decompose the raw signal and show in time- frequency. Findings based on the acoustic method can be used for comparative study in the future. Acoustic signal and HHT is the best method to detect leak in gas pipelines. More experiments and simulation need to be carried out to get the fast result of leaking and estimation of their location.

  2. Suggestibility and signal detection performance in hallucination-prone students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alganami, Fatimah; Varese, Filippo; Wagstaff, Graham F; Bentall, Richard P

    2017-03-01

    Auditory hallucinations are associated with signal detection biases. We examine the extent to which suggestions influence performance on a signal detection task (SDT) in highly hallucination-prone and low hallucination-prone students. We also explore the relationship between trait suggestibility, dissociation and hallucination proneness. In two experiments, students completed on-line measures of hallucination proneness (the revised Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale; LSHS-R), trait suggestibility (Inventory of Suggestibility) and dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale-II). Students in the upper and lower tertiles of the LSHS-R performed an auditory SDT. Prior to the task, suggestions were made pertaining to the number of expected targets (Experiment 1, N = 60: high vs. low suggestions; Experiment 2, N = 62, no suggestion vs. high suggestion vs. no voice suggestion). Correlational and regression analyses indicated that trait suggestibility and dissociation predicted hallucination proneness. Highly hallucination-prone students showed a higher SDT bias in both studies. In Experiment 1, both bias scores were significantly affected by suggestions to the same degree. In Experiment 2, highly hallucination-prone students were more reactive to the high suggestion condition than the controls. Suggestions may affect source-monitoring judgments, and this effect may be greater in those who have a predisposition towards hallucinatory experiences.

  3. Detecting and Predicting Muscle Fatigue during Typing By SEMG Signal Processing and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghoochani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Repetitive strain injuries are one of the most prevalent problems in occupational diseases. Repetition, vibration and bad postures of the extremities are physical risk factors related to work that can cause chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Repetitive work on a computer with low level contraction requires the posture to be maintained for a long time, which can cause muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue in shoulders and neck is one of the most prevalent problems reported with computer users especially during typing. Surface electromyography (SEMG signals are used for detecting muscle fatigue as a non-invasive method. Material and Methods: Nine healthy females volunteered for signal recoding during typing. EMG signals were recorded from the trapezius muscle, which is subjected to muscle fatigue during typing.  After signal analysis and feature extraction, detecting and predicting muscle fatigue was performed by using the MLP artificial neural network. Results: Recorded signals were analyzed in time and frequency domains for feature extraction. Results of classification showed that the MLP neural network can detect and predict muscle fatigue during typing with 80.79 % ± 1.04% accuracy. Conclusion: Intelligent classification and prediction of muscle fatigue can have many applications in human factors engineering (ergonomics, rehabilitation engineering and biofeedback equipment for mitigating the injuries of repetitive works.

  4. Signal Detection using ICA: Application to Chat Room Topic Spotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenda, Thomas; Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    signals with weak a priori assumptions in multimedia contexts. ICA of real world data is typically performed without knowledge of the number of non-trivial independent components, hence, it is of interest to test hypotheses concerning the number of components or simply to test whether a given set...... can detect meaningful context structures in a chat room log file....

  5. Low-dose electron energy-loss spectroscopy using electron counting direct detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maigné, Alan; Wolf, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    Since the development of parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have been the default detectors for EELS. With the recent development of electron-counting direct-detection cameras, micrographs can be acquired under very low electron doses at significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. In spectroscopy, in particular in combination with a monochromator, the signal can be extremely weak and the detection limit is principally defined by noise introduced by the detector. Here we report the use of an electron-counting direct-detection camera for EEL spectroscopy. We studied the oxygen K edge of amorphous ice and obtained a signal noise ratio up to 10 times higher than with a conventional CCD.We report the application of electron counting to record time-resolved EEL spectra of a biological protein embedded in amorphous ice, revealing chemical changes observed in situ while exposed by the electron beam. A change in the fine structure of nitrogen K and the carbon K edges were recorded during irradiation. A concentration of 3 at% nitrogen was detected with a total electron dose of only 1.7 e-/Å2, extending the boundaries of EELS signal detection at low electron doses.

  6. An Algorithm for Detection of DVB-T Signals Based on Their Second-Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jallon Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose in this paper a detection algorithm based on a cost function that jointly tests the correlation induced by the cyclic prefix and the fact that this correlation is time-periodic. In the first part of the paper, the cost function is introduced and some analytical results are given. In particular, the noise and multipath channel impacts on its values are theoretically analysed. In a second part of the paper, some asymptotic results are derived. A first exploitation of these results is used to build a detection test based on the false alarm probability. These results are also used to evaluate the impact of the number of cycle frequencies taken into account in the cost function on the detection performances. Thanks to numerical estimations, we have been able to estimate that the proposed algorithm detects DVB-T signals with an SNR of  dB. As a comparison, and in the same context, the detection algorithm proposed by the 802.22 WG in 2006 is able to detect these signals with an SNR of  dB.

  7. Weak signal detection: A discrete window of opportunity for achieving 'Vision 90:90:90'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Christopher J; Aphane, Marota; Delobelle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    UNAIDS' Vision 90:90:90 is a call to 'end AIDS'. Developing predictive foresight of the unpredictable changes that this journey will entail could contribute to the ambition of 'ending AIDS'. There are few opportunities for managing unpredictable changes. We introduce 'weak signal detection' as a potential opportunity to fill this void. Combining futures and complexity theory, we reflect on two pilot case studies that involved the Archetype Extraction technique and the SenseMaker(®) Collector(™) tool. Both the piloted techniques have the potentials to surface weak signals--but there is room for improvement. A management response to a complex weak signal requires pattern management, rather than an exclusive focus on behaviour management. Weak signal detection is a window of opportunity to improve resilience to unpredictable changes in the HIV/AIDS landscape that can both reduce the risk that emerges from the changes and increase the visibility of opportunities to exploit the unpredictable changes that could contribute to 'ending AIDS'.

  8. Near-IR Direct Detection of Water Vapor in Tau Bootis b

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-24

    unknown orbital inclination. Treating the τ Boo system as a high flux ratio double-lined spectroscopic binary permits the direct measurement of the...the atmosphere of a non-transiting hot Jupiter, τ Boo b. Key words: planets and satellites: atmospheres – techniques: spectroscopic 1. INTRODUCTION...sensitivity required for these detections. Despite the agreement between the two groups, the direct detection of exoplanets, especially τ Boo b, has

  9. Directly detecting isospin-violating dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Kelso, Chris; Kumar, Jason; Marfatia, Danny; Sandick, Pearl

    2018-01-01

    We consider the prospects for multiple dark matter direct detection experiments to determine if the interactions of a dark matter candidate are isospin-violating. We focus on theoretically well-motivated examples of isospin-violating dark matter (IVDM), including models in which dark matter interactions with nuclei are mediated by a dark photon, a Z, or a squark. We determine that the best prospects for distinguishing IVDM from the isospin-invariant scenario arise in the cases of dark photon–...

  10. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: thuzhangyu@foxmail.com; Huang, S. L., E-mail: huangsling@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, S.; Zhao, W. [State Key Laboratory of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  11. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  12. Dark matter directional detection in non-relativistic effective theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    We extend the formalism of dark matter directional detection to arbitrary one-body dark matter-nucleon interactions. The new theoretical framework generalizes the one currently used, which is based on 2 types of dark matter-nucleon interaction only. It includes 14 dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions, and the Radon transform of the first 2 moments of the dark matter velocity distribution. We calculate the recoil energy spectra at dark matter directional detectors made of CF 4 , CS 2 and 3 He for the 14 dark matter-nucleon interactions, using nuclear response functions recently obtained through numerical nuclear structure calculations. We highlight the new features of the proposed theoretical framework, and present our results for a spherical dark matter halo and for a stream of dark matter particles. This study lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter directional detection experiments

  13. Augmented Reality for Real-Time Detection and Interpretation of Colorimetric Signals Generated by Paper-Based Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Steven M; Doménech-Sánchez, Antonio; de la Rica, Roberto

    2017-06-23

    Colorimetric tests are becoming increasingly popular in point-of-need analyses due to the possibility of detecting the signal with the naked eye, which eliminates the utilization of bulky and costly instruments only available in laboratories. However, colorimetric tests may be interpreted incorrectly by nonspecialists due to disparities in color perception or a lack of training. Here we solve this issue with a method that not only detects colorimetric signals but also interprets them so that the test outcome is understandable for anyone. It consists of an augmented reality (AR) app that uses a camera to detect the colored signals generated by a nanoparticle-based immunoassay, and that yields a warning symbol or message when the concentration of analyte is higher than a certain threshold. The proposed method detected the model analyte mouse IgG with a limit of detection of 0.3 μg mL -1 , which was comparable to the limit of detection afforded by classical densitometry performed with a nonportable device. When adapted to the detection of E. coli, the app always yielded a "hazard" warning symbol when the concentration of E. coli in the sample was above the infective dose (10 6 cfu mL -1 or higher). The proposed method could help nonspecialists make a decision about drinking from a potentially contaminated water source by yielding an unambiguous message that is easily understood by anyone. The widespread availability of smartphones along with the inexpensive paper test that requires no enzymes to generate the signal makes the proposed assay promising for analyses in remote locations and developing countries.

  14. Effectiveness of direct and indirect radionuclide cystography in detecting vesicoureteral reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, J.J.; Kruglik, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    A modified of the direct radionuclide cystography technique to include filling, voiding, and postvoiding phases of the examination permitted a simulated comparison between direct and indirect radionuclide cystography. One hundred thirty-seven examples of reflux were documented with this technique. Of these, 96 instances of reflux (70 percent) were recorded during two or more phases and thus would have been detected by either technique. Twenty-nine examples (21 percent) were only detected during filling and thus would have been missed by the indirect radionuclide technique and by some roentgenographic techniques. Only 12 examples (9 percent) were detected during the voiding phase only. The modified direct method of radionuclide cystography, which continuously monitors the urinary tracts during filling, voiding, and postvoiding, is offered as the best current technique for assessing visicoureteral reflus

  15. Low modulation index RF signal detection for a passive UHF RFID transponder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhongqi [Department of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Chun; Li Yongming; Wang Zhihua, E-mail: liu-zq04@mails.tsinghua.edu.c [Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-09-15

    In a typical RFID system the reader transmits modulated RF power to provide both data and energy for the passive transponder. Low modulation index RF energy is preferable for an adequate tag power supply and increase in communication range but gives rise to difficulties for near-field conventional demodulation. Therefore, a novel ASK demodulator for minimum 20% modulation index RF signal detection over a range of 23 dB is presented. Thanks to the proposed innovative divisional linear conversion from the power into voltage signal, the detection sensitivity is ensured over a wide power range with low power consumption of 8.6 {mu}W. The chip is implemented in UMC 0.18 {mu}m mix-mode CMOS technology, and the chip area is 0.06 mm{sup 2}.

  16. Chaos weak signal detecting algorithm and its application in the ultrasonic Doppler bloodstream speed measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H Y; Lv, J T; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, L G; Li, J

    2005-01-01

    At the present time, the ultrasonic Doppler measuring means has been extensively used in the human body's bloodstream speed measuring. The ultrasonic Doppler measuring means can achieve the measuring of liquid flux by detecting Doppler frequency shift of ultrasonic in the process of liquid spread. However, the detected sound wave is a weak signal that is flooded in the strong noise signal. The traditional measuring method depends on signal-to-noise ratio. Under the very low signal-to-noise ratio or the strong noise signal background, the signal frequency is not measured. This article studied on chaotic movement of Duffing oscillator and intermittent chaotic characteristic on chaotic oscillator of Duffing equation. In the light of the range of the bloodstream speed of human body and the principle of Doppler shift, the paper determines the frequency shift range. An oscillator array including many oscillators is designed according to it. The reflected ultrasonic frequency information can be ascertained accurately by the intermittent chaos quality of the oscillator. The signal-to-noise ratio of -26.5 dB is obtained by the result of the experiment. Compared with the tradition the frequency method compare, the dependence to signal-to-noise ratio is lowered consumedly. The measuring precision of the bloodstream speed is heightened

  17. Dual fiber Bragg gratings configuration-based fiber acoustic sensor for low-frequency signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Wang, Shun; Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming

    2014-11-01

    We propose and fabricate a new type fiber acoustic sensor based on dual fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) configuration. The acoustic sensor head is constructed by putting the sensing cells enclosed in an aluminum cylinder space built by two Cband FBGs and a titanium diaphragm of 50 um thickness. One end of each FBG is longitudinally adhered to the diaphragm by UV glue. Both of the two FBGs are employed for reflecting light. The dual FBGs play roles not only as signal transmission system but also as sensing component, and they demodulate each other's optical signal mutually during the measurement. Both of the two FBGs are pre-strained and the output optical power experiences fluctuation in a linear relationship along with a variation of axial strain and surrounding acoustic interference. So a precise approach to measure the frequency and sound pressure of the acoustic disturbance is achieved. Experiments are performed and results show that a relatively flat frequency response in a range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz with the average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) above 21 dB is obtained. The maximum sound pressure sensitivity of 11.35mV/Pa is achieved with the Rsquared value of 0.99131 when the sound pressure in the range of 87.7-106.6dB. It has potential applications in low frequency signal detection. Owing to its direct self-demodulation method, the sensing system reveals the advantages of easy to demodulate, good temperature stability and measurement reliability. Besides, performance of the proposed sensor could be improved by optimizing the parameters of the sensor, especially the diaphragm.

  18. No special K! A signal detection framework for the strategic regulation of memory accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Philip A

    2007-02-01

    Two experiments investigated criterion setting and metacognitive processes underlying the strategic regulation of accuracy on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) using Type-2 signal detection theory (SDT). In Experiment 1, report bias was manipulated by penalizing participants either 0.25 (low incentive) or 4 (high incentive) points for each error. Best guesses to unanswered items were obtained so that Type-2 signal detection indices of discrimination and bias could be calculated. The same incentive manipulation was used in Experiment 2, only the test was computerized, confidence ratings were taken so that receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves could be generated, and feedback was manipulated. The results of both experiments demonstrated that SDT provides a viable alternative to A. Koriat and M. Goldsmith's (1996c) framework of monitoring and control and reveals information about the regulation of accuracy that their framework does not. For example, ROC analysis indicated that the threshold model implied by formula scoring is inadequate. Instead, performance on the SAT should be modeled with an equal-variance Gaussian, Type-2 signal detection model. ((c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. A direct detection of Escherichia coli genomic DNA using gold nanoprobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situation like diagnosis of clinical and forensic samples there exists a need for highly sensitive, rapid and specific DNA detection methods. Though conventional DNA amplification using PCR can provide fast results, it is not widely practised in diagnostic laboratories partially because it requires skilled personnel and expensive equipment. To overcome these limitations nanoparticles have been explored as signalling probes for ultrasensitive DNA detection that can be used in field applications. Among the nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have been extensively used mainly because of its optical property and ability to get functionalized with a variety of biomolecules. Results We report a protocol for the use of gold nanoparticles functionalized with single stranded oligonucleotide (AuNP- oligo probe as visual detection probes for rapid and specific detection of Escherichia coli. The AuNP- oligo probe on hybridization with target DNA containing complementary sequences remains red whereas test samples without complementary DNA sequences to the probe turns purple due to acid induced aggregation of AuNP- oligo probes. The color change of the solution is observed visually by naked eye demonstrating direct and rapid detection of the pathogenic Escherichia coli from its genomic DNA without the need for PCR amplification. The limit of detection was ~54 ng for unamplified genomic DNA. The method requires less than 30 minutes to complete after genomic DNA extraction. However, by using unamplified enzymatic digested genomic DNA, the detection limit of 11.4 ng was attained. Results of UV-Vis spectroscopic measurement and AFM imaging further support the hypothesis of aggregation based visual discrimination. To elucidate its utility in medical diagnostic, the assay was validated on clinical strains of pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from local hospitals and spiked urine samples. It was found to be 100% sensitive and proves to

  20. Multiple signal amplified electrochemiluminescent immunoassay for brombuterol detection using gold nanoparticles and polyamidoamine dendrimers-silver nanoribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Tiantian; Hu, Liuyi; Zhao, Kang; Deng, Anping, E-mail: denganping@suda.edu.cn; Li, Jianguo, E-mail: lijgsd@suda.edu.cn

    2016-11-16

    Electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunosensor with multiple signal amplification was designed based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM) and silver-cysteine hybrid nanoribbon (SNR). Low toxic L-cysteine capped CdSe QDs was chosen as the ECL signal probe. To verify the proposed ultrasensitive ECL immunosensor for β-adrenergic agonists (β-AA), we detected Brombuterol (Brom) as a proof-of-principle analyte. Therein, AuNPs as the substrate can simplify the experiment process, accelerate the electron transfer rate, and carry more coating antigen (Ag-OVA) to enlarge ECL signal. On one hand, SNR on the surface of electrode can avoid the aggregation of AuNPs, and SNR-PAMAM-AuNPs also can be acted as a good accelerator for electron transfer. On the other hand, PAMAM (16 -NH{sub 2}) functionalized SNR (SNR-PAMAM) with numerous amino groups could be employed to bond abundant actived QDs to further amplify ECL signal. The new immunosensor can offer a simple, reliable, rapid, and selective detection for Brom, which have a dynamic range of 0.005–700 ng mL{sup −1} with a low detection limit at 1.5 pg mL{sup −1}. The proposed biosensor will extend the application of nanomaterials in ECL immunoassays and open a new road for the detection of Brom and other β-AA in the future. - Highlights: • A multiple signal amplification ECL immunosensor of eco-friendly CdSe QDs for brombuterol determination was developed. • Besides substrates, AuNPs and PAMAM-SNR were creatively used to accelerate the electron transport between electrode and QDs. • SNR-PAMAM with numerous amino groups also could be employed to bond abundant actived QDs to amplify ECL signal. • Competitive immunoassay was performed with ECL to detect small molecules of brombuterol. • It provided a method for detecting Brom and enlarged the usage of QDs, AuNPs and SNR-PAMAM in ECL biosensing.

  1. Multiple signal amplified electrochemiluminescent immunoassay for brombuterol detection using gold nanoparticles and polyamidoamine dendrimers-silver nanoribbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Tiantian; Hu, Liuyi; Zhao, Kang; Deng, Anping; Li, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunosensor with multiple signal amplification was designed based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM) and silver-cysteine hybrid nanoribbon (SNR). Low toxic L-cysteine capped CdSe QDs was chosen as the ECL signal probe. To verify the proposed ultrasensitive ECL immunosensor for β-adrenergic agonists (β-AA), we detected Brombuterol (Brom) as a proof-of-principle analyte. Therein, AuNPs as the substrate can simplify the experiment process, accelerate the electron transfer rate, and carry more coating antigen (Ag-OVA) to enlarge ECL signal. On one hand, SNR on the surface of electrode can avoid the aggregation of AuNPs, and SNR-PAMAM-AuNPs also can be acted as a good accelerator for electron transfer. On the other hand, PAMAM (16 -NH_2) functionalized SNR (SNR-PAMAM) with numerous amino groups could be employed to bond abundant actived QDs to further amplify ECL signal. The new immunosensor can offer a simple, reliable, rapid, and selective detection for Brom, which have a dynamic range of 0.005–700 ng mL"−"1 with a low detection limit at 1.5 pg mL"−"1. The proposed biosensor will extend the application of nanomaterials in ECL immunoassays and open a new road for the detection of Brom and other β-AA in the future. - Highlights: • A multiple signal amplification ECL immunosensor of eco-friendly CdSe QDs for brombuterol determination was developed. • Besides substrates, AuNPs and PAMAM-SNR were creatively used to accelerate the electron transport between electrode and QDs. • SNR-PAMAM with numerous amino groups also could be employed to bond abundant actived QDs to amplify ECL signal. • Competitive immunoassay was performed with ECL to detect small molecules of brombuterol. • It provided a method for detecting Brom and enlarged the usage of QDs, AuNPs and SNR-PAMAM in ECL biosensing.

  2. Power budget of direct-detection ultra-dense WDM-Nyquist-SCM PON with low-complexity SSBI mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeiro, Ricardo O. J.; Alves, Tiago M. F.; Cartaxo, Adolfo V. T.

    2017-07-01

    The power budget (PB) of a direct-detection ultra-dense wavelength division/subcarrier multiplexing (SCM) passive optical network (PON) is assessed numerically for downstream, when a low-complexity iterative signal-to-signal beat interference (SSBI) mitigation technique is employed. Each SCM signal, inserted in a 12.5 GHz width optical channel, is comprised of two or three electrically generated and multiplexed 16-quadrature-amplitude-modulation (QAM) or 32-QAM Nyquist pulse-shaped subcarriers, each with a 7% forward error correction bit rate of 10.7 Gbit/s. The PB and maximum number of optical network units (ONUs) served by each optical line terminal (OLT) are compared with and without SSBI mitigation. When SSBI mitigation is realized, PB gains up to 4.5 dB are attained relative to the PB in the absence of SSBI mitigation. The PB gain enabled by the SSBI mitigation technique proposed in this work increases the number of ONUs served per OLT at least by a factor of 2, for the cases of higher spectral efficiency. In particular, for a SCM signal comprised of three subcarriers, the maximum number of ONUs served per OLT is between 2 and 32, and between 8 and 64, in the absence of SSBI mitigation, and when SSBI mitigation is employed, respectively, depending on the fiber length (up to 50 km) and order of QAM.

  3. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2017-05-11

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.

  4. [Design of High Frequency Signal Detecting Circuit of Human Body Impedance Used for Ultrashort Wave Diathermy Apparatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xu; Wang, Yunguang; Cheng, Haiping; Chong, Xiaochen

    2016-02-01

    The present circuit was designed to apply to human tissue impedance tuning and matching device in ultra-short wave treatment equipment. In order to judge if the optimum status of circuit parameter between energy emitter circuit and accepter circuit is in well syntony, we designed a high frequency envelope detect circuit to coordinate with automatic adjust device of accepter circuit, which would achieve the function of human tissue impedance matching and tuning. Using the sampling coil to receive the signal of amplitude-modulated wave, we compared the voltage signal of envelope detect circuit with electric current of energy emitter circuit. The result of experimental study was that the signal, which was transformed by the envelope detect circuit, was stable and could be recognized by low speed Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and was proportional to the electric current signal of energy emitter circuit. It could be concluded that the voltage, transformed by envelope detect circuit can mirror the real circuit state of syntony and realize the function of human tissue impedance collecting.

  5. High-speed ultra-wideband wireless signals over fiber systems: photonic generation and DSP detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2009-01-01

    We firstly review the efforts in the literature on ultra-wideband (UWB)-over-fiber systems. Secondly, we present experimental results on photonic generation of high-speed UWB signals by both direct modulation and external optical injecting an uncooled semiconductor laser. Furthermore, we introduce...... the use of digital signal processing (DSP) technology to receive the generated UWB signal at 781.25 Mbit/s. Error-free transmission is achieved....

  6. Ascertaining directionality information from incident nuclear radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambault, Brian C. [Purdue University (United States); Lapinskas, Joseph R. [QSA Global, Inc. (United States); Wang Jing; Webster, Jeffrey A. [Purdue University (United States); McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A and M University (United States); Taleyarkhan, Rusi P., E-mail: rusi@purdue.edu [Purdue University (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Use of tensioned metastable fluids for detection of fast neutron radiation. > Monitored neutrons with 100% gamma photon blindness capability. > Monitored direction of incoming neutron radiation from special nuclear material emissions. > Ascertained directionality of neutron source to within 30 deg. and with 80% confidence with 2000 detection events at rate of 30-40 per second. > Conducted successful blind test for determining source of neutrons from a hidden neutron emitting source. > Compared results with MCNP5-COMSOL based multi-physics model. - Abstract: Unprecedented capabilities for the detection of nuclear particles via tailored resonant acoustic systems such as the acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detection (ATMFD) systems were assessed for determining directionality of incoming fast neutrons. This paper presents advancements that expand on these accomplishments, thereby increasing the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on demand enlargement of the detector sensitive volume. Advances in the development of ATMFD systems were accomplished utilizing a combination of experimentation and theoretical modeling. Modeling methodologies include Monte-Carlo based nuclear particle transport using MCNP5 and multi-physics based assessments accounting for acoustic, structural, and electromagnetic coupling of the ATMFD system via COMSOL's multi-physics simulation platform. Benchmarking and qualification studies have been conducted with a 1 Ci Pu-Be neutron-gamma source. These results show that the specific ATMFD system used for this study can enable detection of directionality of incoming fast neutrons from the neutron source to within 30{sup o} with 80% confidence; this required {approx}2000 detection events which could be collected within {approx}50 s at a detection rate of {approx}30-40 per second. Blind testing was

  7. Ascertaining directionality information from incident nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Lapinskas, Joseph R.; Wang Jing; Webster, Jeffrey A.; McDeavitt, Sean; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Use of tensioned metastable fluids for detection of fast neutron radiation. → Monitored neutrons with 100% gamma photon blindness capability. → Monitored direction of incoming neutron radiation from special nuclear material emissions. → Ascertained directionality of neutron source to within 30 deg. and with 80% confidence with 2000 detection events at rate of 30-40 per second. → Conducted successful blind test for determining source of neutrons from a hidden neutron emitting source. → Compared results with MCNP5-COMSOL based multi-physics model. - Abstract: Unprecedented capabilities for the detection of nuclear particles via tailored resonant acoustic systems such as the acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detection (ATMFD) systems were assessed for determining directionality of incoming fast neutrons. This paper presents advancements that expand on these accomplishments, thereby increasing the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on demand enlargement of the detector sensitive volume. Advances in the development of ATMFD systems were accomplished utilizing a combination of experimentation and theoretical modeling. Modeling methodologies include Monte-Carlo based nuclear particle transport using MCNP5 and multi-physics based assessments accounting for acoustic, structural, and electromagnetic coupling of the ATMFD system via COMSOL's multi-physics simulation platform. Benchmarking and qualification studies have been conducted with a 1 Ci Pu-Be neutron-gamma source. These results show that the specific ATMFD system used for this study can enable detection of directionality of incoming fast neutrons from the neutron source to within 30 o with 80% confidence; this required ∼2000 detection events which could be collected within ∼50 s at a detection rate of ∼30-40 per second. Blind testing was successfully

  8. The Diurnal Variation of the Wimp Detection Event Rates in Directional Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D

    2009-01-01

    The recent WMAP data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Modern particle theories naturally provide viable cold dark matter candidates with masses in the GeV-TeV region. Supersymmetry provides the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), theories in extra dimensions supply the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) etc. The nature of dark matter can only be unraveled only by its direct detection in the laboratory. All such candidates will be called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). In any case the direct dark matter search, which amounts to detecting the recoiling nucleus, following its collision with WIMP, is central to particle physics and cosmology. In this work we briefly review the theoretical elements relevant to the direct dark matter detection experiments, paying particular attention to directional experiments. i.e experiments in which, not only the energy but the direction of the recoiling nucleus is ob...

  9. Acquisition of electrical signals using commercial electronic components for detection system of Lead ion in distilled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiyanto; Yasin, M.; Rusydi, F.

    2018-03-01

    Development of lead ion detection systems is expected to have an advantage in terms of simplicity of the device and easy for concentration analysis of a lead ion with very high performance. One important part of lead ion detection systems are electrical signal acquisition parts. The electrical signal acquisition part uses the main electronic components: non inverting op-amplifier, instrumentation amplifier, multiplier circuit and logarithmic amplifier. Here will be shown the performance of lead ion detection systems when the existing electrical signal processors use commercial electronic components. The results that can be drawn from this experimental were the lead ion sensor that has been developed can be used to detect lead ions with a sensitivity of 10.48 mV/ppm with the linearity 97.11% and had a measurement range of 0.1 ppm to 80 ppm.

  10. Realization of rapid debugging for detection circuit of optical fiber gas sensor: Using an analog signal source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Changbin; Chang, Jun; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Cunguang

    2015-03-01

    An optical fiber gas sensor mainly consists of two parts: optical part and detection circuit. In the debugging for the detection circuit, the optical part usually serves as a signal source. However, in the debugging condition, the optical part can be easily influenced by many factors, such as the fluctuation of ambient temperature or driving current resulting in instability of the wavelength and intensity for the laser; for dual-beam sensor, the different bends and stresses of the optical fiber will lead to the fluctuation of the intensity and phase; the intensity noise from the collimator, coupler, and other optical devices in the system will also result in the impurity of the optical part based signal source. In order to dramatically improve the debugging efficiency of the detection circuit and shorten the period of research and development, this paper describes an analog signal source, consisting of a single chip microcomputer (SCM), an amplifier circuit, and a voltage-to-current conversion circuit. It can be used to realize the rapid debugging detection circuit of the optical fiber gas sensor instead of optical part based signal source. This analog signal source performs well with many other advantages, such as the simple operation, small size, and light weight.

  11. Evaluating the impact of grade crossing safety factors through signal detection theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    The purpose of this effort was to apply signal detection theory to descriptively model the impact : of five grade crossing safety factors to understand their effect on driver decision making. The : safety factors consisted of: improving commercial mo...

  12. Fault Detection in High Speed Helical Gears Considering Signal Processing Method in Real Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ali Tabatabai Adnani

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, in order to detect the fault of the gearmeshs, two engaged gears based on research department of a major automotive company have been modeled. First off, by using the CATIA software the fault was induced to the output gear. Then, the faulty gearmesh and non-faulty gearmesh is modeled to find the fault pattern to predict and estimate the failure of the gearmesh. The induced defect is according to the frequently practical fault that takes place to the teeth of gears. In order to record the acceleration signals to calculate the decomposition algorithm, mount the accelerometer on accessible place of the output shaft to recognize the pattern. Then, for more realistic simulation, noise is added to the output signal. At the first step by means of Butterworth low pass digital, the noise has to be removed from signals after that by using the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD, signals have decomposed into the Instinct Mode Function (IMF and every IMF were tested by using the Instantaneous Frequency (IF in way of Hillbert Transform (HT. For this purpose a code was developed in MATLAB software. Then, in order to detect the presence of the fault the frequency spectrum of IMF's are created and defect is detected in gearmesh frequency of the spectrum.

  13. Implication of two-coupled differential Van der Pol Duffing oscillator in weak signal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Hanghang; Xu Xuemei; Yang Bingchu; Yin Linzi

    2016-01-01

    The principle of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator for state transition and for determining critical value is described, which has been studied to indicate that the application of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator in weak signal detection is feasible. On the basis of this principle, an improved two-coupled differential Van der Pol Duffing oscillator is proposed which can identify signals under any frequency and ameliorate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The analytical methods of the proposed model and the construction of the proposed oscillator are introduced in detail. Numerical experiments on the properties of the proposed oscillator compared with those of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator are carried out. Our numerical simulations have confirmed the analytical treatment. The results demonstrate that this novel oscillator has better detection performance than the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator. (author)

  14. Implication of Two-Coupled Differential Van der Pol Duffing Oscillator in Weak Signal Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hang-hang; Xu, Xue-mei; Yang, Bing-chu; Yin, Lin-zi

    2016-04-01

    The principle of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator for state transition and for determining critical value is described, which has been studied to indicate that the application of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator in weak signal detection is feasible. On the basis of this principle, an improved two-coupled differential Van der Pol Duffing oscillator is proposed which can identify signals under any frequency and ameliorate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The analytical methods of the proposed model and the construction of the proposed oscillator are introduced in detail. Numerical experiments on the properties of the proposed oscillator compared with those of the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator are carried out. Our numerical simulations have confirmed the analytical treatment. The results demonstrate that this novel oscillator has better detection performance than the Van der Pol Duffing oscillator.

  15. A multifunctional molecularly imprinted polymer-based biosensor for direct detection of doxycycline in food samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashley, Jon; Feng, Xiaotong; Sun, Yi

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new type of multifunctional molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) composite as an all-in-one biosensor for the low-cost, rapid and sensitive detection of doxycycline in pig plasma. The MIP composite consisted of a magnetic core for ease of manipulation, and a shell...... of fluorescent MIPs for selective recognition of doxycycline. By simply incorporating a small amount of fluorescent monomer (fluorescein-Oacrylate), the fluorescent MIP layer was successfully grafted onto the magnetic core via a surface imprinting technique. The resultant MIP composites showed significant....... The multifunctional MIP composites were used to directly extract doxycycline from spiked pig plasma samples and quantify the antibiotics based on the quenched fluorescence signals. Recoveries of doxycycline were found in the range of 88–107%....

  16. Observations and modeling of the elastogravity signals preceding direct seismic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Martin; Ampuero, Jean Paul; Juhel, Kévin; Bernard, Pascal; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Barsuglia, Matteo

    2017-12-01

    After an earthquake, the earliest deformation signals are not expected to be carried by the fastest (P) elastic waves but by the speed-of-light changes of the gravitational field. However, these perturbations are weak and, so far, their detection has not been accurate enough to fully understand their origins and to use them for a highly valuable rapid estimate of the earthquake magnitude. We show that gravity perturbations are particularly well observed with broadband seismometers at distances between 1000 and 2000 kilometers from the source of the 2011, moment magnitude 9.1, Tohoku earthquake. We can accurately model them by a new formalism, taking into account both the gravity changes and the gravity-induced motion. These prompt elastogravity signals open the window for minute time-scale magnitude determination for great earthquakes.

  17. On the electric signal direction indicator for teh control of road traffic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An electronic signal direction indicator (ESDI) for the control of road traffic has been designed, constructed and studied. The construction was done using 555 timer IC, a transistor-transistor logic compatible device that can operate in several modes as the major active element. The ESDI system circuit is reliable, satisfactorily ...

  18. Mental-disorder detection using chaos and nonlinear dynamical analysis of photoplethysmographic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Tuan D.; Thang, Truong Cong; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Sugiyama, Masahide

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Chaos and nonlinear dynamical analysis are applied for mental-disorder detection. • Experimental results show significant detection improvement with feature synergy. • Proposed approach is effective for analysis of photoplethysmographic signals. • Proposed approach is promising for developing automated mental-health systems. -- Abstract: Mental disorder can be defined as a psychological disturbance of thought or emotion. In particular, depression is a mental disease which can ultimately lead to death from suicide. If depression is identified, it can be treated with medication and psychotherapy. However, the diagnosis of depression is difficult and there are currently no any quick and reliable medical tests to detect if someone is depressed. This is because the exact cause of depression is still unknown given the belief that depression results in chemical brain changes, genetic disorder, stress, or the combination of these problems. Photoplethysmography has recently been realized as a non-invasive optical technique that can give new insights into the physiology and pathophysiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems. We present in this paper an automated mental-disorder detection approach in a general sense based on a novel synergy of chaos and nonlinear dynamical methods for the analysis of photoplethysmographic finger pulse waves of mental and control subjects. Such an approach can be applied for automated detection of depression as a special case. Because of the computational effectiveness of the studied methods and low cost of generation of the physiological signals, the proposed automated detection of mental illness is feasible for real-life applications including self-assessment, self-monitoring, and computerized health care

  19. Research on Healthy Anomaly Detection Model Based on Deep Learning from Multiple Time-Series Physiological Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health is vital to every human being. To further improve its already respectable medical technology, the medical community is transitioning towards a proactive approach which anticipates and mitigates risks before getting ill. This approach requires measuring the physiological signals of human and analyzes these data at regular intervals. In this paper, we present a novel approach to apply deep learning in physiological signals analysis that allows doctor to identify latent risks. However, extracting high level information from physiological time-series data is a hard problem faced by the machine learning communities. Therefore, in this approach, we apply model based on convolutional neural network that can automatically learn features from raw physiological signals in an unsupervised manner and then based on the learned features use multivariate Gauss distribution anomaly detection method to detect anomaly data. Our experiment is shown to have a significant performance in physiological signals anomaly detection. So it is a promising tool for doctor to identify early signs of illness even if the criteria are unknown a priori.

  20. Hybrid PAPR reduction scheme with Huffman coding and DFT-spread technique for direct-detection optical OFDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Miao; Chen, Ming; Zhou, Hui; Wan, Qiuzhen; Jiang, LeYong; Yang, Lin; Zheng, Zhiwei; Chen, Lin

    2018-01-01

    High peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the transmit signal is a major drawback in optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OOFDM) system. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel hybrid scheme, combined the Huffman coding and Discrete Fourier Transmission-Spread (DFT-spread), in order to reduce high PAPR in a 16-QAM short-reach intensity-modulated and direct-detection OOFDM (IMDD-OOFDM) system. The experimental results demonstrated that the hybrid scheme can reduce the PAPR by about 1.5, 2, 3 and 6 dB, and achieve 1.5, 1, 2.5 and 3 dB receiver sensitivity improvement compared to clipping, DFT-spread and Huffman coding and original OFDM signals, respectively, at an error vector magnitude (EVM) of -10 dB after transmission over 20 km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF). Furthermore, the throughput gain can be of the order of 30% by using the hybrid scheme compared with the cases of without applying the Huffman coding.

  1. Movement and respiration detection using statistical properties of the FMCW radar signal

    KAUST Repository

    Kiuru, Tero; Metso, Mikko; Jardak, Seifallah; Pursula, Pekka; Hakli, Janne; Hirvonen, Mervi; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 24 GHz FMCW radar system for detection of movement and respiration using change in the statistical properties of the received radar signal, both amplitude and phase. We present the hardware and software segments of the radar

  2. Joint Iterative Carrier Synchronization and Signal Detection for Dual Carrier 448 Gb/s PDM 16-QAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Carvalho, Luis; Estaran Tolosa, Jose Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Soft decision driven joint carrier synchronization and signal detection, employing expectation maximization, is experimentally demonstrated. Employing soft decisions offers an improvement of 0.5 dB compared to hard decision digital PLL based carrier synchronization and demodulation.......Soft decision driven joint carrier synchronization and signal detection, employing expectation maximization, is experimentally demonstrated. Employing soft decisions offers an improvement of 0.5 dB compared to hard decision digital PLL based carrier synchronization and demodulation....

  3. Bilinear Time-frequency Analysis for Lamb Wave Signal Detected by Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenxiu; Liu, Guoqiang; Xia, Hui; Xia, Zhengwu

    2018-03-01

    Accurate acquisition of the detection signal travel time plays a very important role in cross-hole tomography. The experimental platform of aluminum plate under the perpendicular magnetic field is established and the bilinear time-frequency analysis methods, Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) and the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD), are applied to analyse the Lamb wave signals detected by electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). By extracting the same frequency component of the time-frequency spectrum as the excitation frequency, the travel time information can be obtained. In comparison with traditional linear time-frequency analysis method such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), the bilinear time-frequency analysis method PWVD is more appropriate in extracting travel time and recognizing patterns of Lamb wave.

  4. Detection of AE signals from a HTS tape during quenching in a solid cryogen-cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.; Song, J.B.; Kim, J.H.; Lee, J.H.; Kim, H.M.; Kim, W.S.; Na, J.B.; Ko, T.K.; Lee, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) technique is suitable for detecting the presence of thermal and mechanical stress in superconductors, which have adverse effects on the stability of their application systems. However, the detection of AE signals from a HTS tape in a bath of liquid cryogen (such as liquid nitrogen, LN 2 ) has not been reported because of its low signal to noise ratio due to the noise from the boiling liquid cryogen. In order to obtain the AE signals from the HTS tapes during quenching, this study carried out repetitive quench tests for YBCO coated conductor (CC) tapes in a cooling system using solid nitrogen (SN 2 ). This paper examined the performance of the AE sensor in terms of the amplitudes of the AE signals in the SN 2 cooling system.

  5. A comparison of signal detection theory to the objective threshold/strategic model of unconscious perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Steven J; Fisk, Gary D

    2011-08-01

    A key problem in unconscious perception research is ruling out the possibility that weak conscious awareness of stimuli might explain the results. In the present study, signal detection theory was compared with the objective threshold/strategic model as explanations of results for detection and identification sensitivity in a commonly used unconscious perception task. In the task, 64 undergraduate participants detected and identified one of four briefly displayed, visually masked letters. Identification was significantly above baseline (i.e., proportion correct > .25) at the highest detection confidence rating. This result is most consistent with signal detection theory's continuum of sensory states and serves as a possible index of conscious perception. However, there was limited support for the other model in the form of a predicted "looker's inhibition" effect, which produced identification performance that was significantly below baseline. One additional result, an interaction between the target stimulus and type of mask, raised concerns for the generality of unconscious perception effects.

  6. Diagnosis of faults in rolling element bearings by using directional spectra of vibration signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Po; Lee, Chong Won

    1999-01-01

    Backward and forward defect frequencies of rolling element bearing are experimentally investigated utilizing the two-sided directional spectra of the complex-valued vibration signals measured from the outer ring of defective bearings. The experimental results show that the directional zoom spectrum is superior to the conventional spectrum in identification of bearing defect frequencies, in particular the inner race defect frequencies

  7. Light Magnetic Dark Matter in Direct Detection Searches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kouvaris, Christoforos; Panci, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We study a fermionic Dark Matter particle carrying magnetic dipole moment and analyze its impact on direct detection experiments. In particular we show that it can accommodate the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST experimental results. Assuming conservative bounds, this candidate is shown not to be ruled out...

  8. Fisher information and Shannon entropy for on-line detection of transient signal high-values in laser Doppler flowmetry signals of healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humeau, Anne; Trzepizur, Wojciech; Abraham, Pierre; Rousseau, David; Chapeau-Blondeau, Francois

    2008-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is an easy-to-use method for the assessment of microcirculatory blood flow in tissues. However, LDF recordings very often present TRAnsient Signal High-values (TRASH), generally of a few seconds. These TRASH can come from tissue motions, optical fibre movements, movements of the probe head relative to the tissue, etc. They often lead to difficulties in signal global interpretations. In order to test the possibility of detecting automatically these TRASH for their removal, we process noisy and noiseless LDF signals with two indices from information theory, namely Fisher information and Shannon entropy. For this purpose, LDF signals from 13 healthy subjects are recorded at rest, during vascular occlusion of 3 min, and during post-occlusive hyperaemia. Computation of Fisher information and Shannon entropy values shows that, when calibrated, these two indices can be complementary to detect TRASH and be insensitive to the rapid increases of blood flow induced by post-occlusive hyperaemia. Moreover, the real-time algorithm has the advantage of being easy to implement and does not require any frequency analysis. This study opens new fields of application for Fisher information and Shannon entropy: LDF 'denoising'

  9. Detection capability of a pulsed Ground Penetrating Radar utilizing an oscilloscope and Radargram Fusion Approach for optimal signal quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Daniel; Schoebel, Joerg

    2015-07-01

    In scientific research pulsed radars often employ a digital oscilloscope as sampling unit. The sensitivity of an oscilloscope is determined in general by means of the number of digits of its analog-to-digital converter and the selected full scale vertical setting, i.e., the maximal voltage range displayed. Furthermore oversampling or averaging of the input signal may increase the effective number of digits, hence the sensitivity. Especially for Ground Penetrating Radar applications high sensitivity of the radar system is demanded since reflection amplitudes of buried objects are strongly attenuated in ground. Hence, in order to achieve high detection capability this parameter is one of the most crucial ones. In this paper we analyze the detection capability of our pulsed radar system utilizing a Rohde & Schwarz RTO 1024 oscilloscope as sampling unit for Ground Penetrating Radar applications, such as detection of pipes and cables in the ground. Also effects of averaging and low-noise amplification of the received signal prior to sampling are investigated by means of an appropriate laboratory setup. To underline our findings we then present real-world radar measurements performed on our GPR test site, where we have buried pipes and cables of different types and materials in different depths. The results illustrate the requirement for proper choice of the settings of the oscilloscope for optimal data recording. However, as we show, displaying both strong signal contributions due to e.g., antenna cross-talk and direct ground bounce reflection as well as weak reflections from objects buried deeper in ground requires opposing trends for the oscilloscope's settings. We therefore present our Radargram Fusion Approach. By means of this approach multiple radargrams recorded in parallel, each with an individual optimized setting for a certain type of contribution, can be fused in an appropriate way in order to finally achieve a single radargram which displays all

  10. Directional genomic hybridization for chromosomal inversion discovery and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, F Andrew; Zimmerman, Erin; Robinson, Bruce; Cornforth, Michael N; Bedford, Joel S; Goodwin, Edwin H; Bailey, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are a source of structural variation within the genome that figure prominently in human disease, where the importance of translocations and deletions is well recognized. In principle, inversions-reversals in the orientation of DNA sequences within a chromosome-should have similar detrimental potential. However, the study of inversions has been hampered by traditional approaches used for their detection, which are not particularly robust. Even with significant advances in whole genome approaches, changes in the absolute orientation of DNA remain difficult to detect routinely. Consequently, our understanding of inversions is still surprisingly limited, as is our appreciation for their frequency and involvement in human disease. Here, we introduce the directional genomic hybridization methodology of chromatid painting-a whole new way of looking at structural features of the genome-that can be employed with high resolution on a cell-by-cell basis, and demonstrate its basic capabilities for genome-wide discovery and targeted detection of inversions. Bioinformatics enabled development of sequence- and strand-specific directional probe sets, which when coupled with single-stranded hybridization, greatly improved the resolution and ease of inversion detection. We highlight examples of the far-ranging applicability of this cytogenomics-based approach, which include confirmation of the alignment of the human genome database and evidence that individuals themselves share similar sequence directionality, as well as use in comparative and evolutionary studies for any species whose genome has been sequenced. In addition to applications related to basic mechanistic studies, the information obtainable with strand-specific hybridization strategies may ultimately enable novel gene discovery, thereby benefitting the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of human disease states and disorders including cancer, autism, and idiopathic infertility.

  11. Detection and Interpretation of Fluorescence Signals Generated by Excitable Cells and Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Anthony J.

    Part 1: High-Sensitivity Amplifiers for Detecting Fluorescence . Monitoring electrical activity and Cai 2+ transients in biological tissues and individual cells increasingly utilizes optical sensors based on voltage-dependent and Cai 2+-dependent fluorescent dyes. However, achieving satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) often requires increased illumination intensities and/or dye concentrations, which results in photo-toxicity, photo-bleaching and other adverse effects limiting the utility of optical recordings. The most challenging are the recordings from individual cardiac myocytes and neurons. Here we demonstrate that by optimizing a conventional transimpedance topology one can achieve a 10-20 fold increase of sensitivity with photodiode-based recording systems (dependent on application). We provide a detailed comparative analysis of the dynamic and noise characteristics of different transimpedance amplifier topologies as well as the example(s) of their practical implementation. Part 2: Light-Scattering Models for Interpretation of Fluorescence Data. Current interest in understanding light transport in cardiac tissue has been motivated in part by increased use of voltage-sensitive and Ca i2+-sensitive fluorescent probes to map electrical impulse propagation and Cai2+-transients in the heart. The fluorescent signals are recorded using such probes represent contributions from different layers of myocardial tissue and are greatly affected by light scattering. The interpretation of these signals thus requires deconvolution which would not be possible without detailed models of light transport in the respective tissue. Which involves the experimental measurements of the absorption, scattering, and anisotropy coefficients, mua, mu s, and g respectively. The aim of the second part of our thesis was to derive a new method for deriving these parameters from high spatial resolution measurements of forward-directed flux (FDF). To this end, we carried out high spatial

  12. Pilot Signal Design and Direct Ranging Methods for Radio Localization Using OFDM Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Lishuai

    Having accurate localization capability is becoming important for existing and future terrestrial wireless communication systems, in particular for orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) systems, such as WiMAX, wireless local area network, long-term evolution (LTE) and its extension LTE......-Advanced. To obtain accurate position estimates, not only advanced estimation algorithms are needed but also the transmitted signals should be scrutinized. In this dissertation, we investigate how to design OFDM pilot signals and propose and evaluate high accuracy ranging techniques with tractable computational....... For scenarios where the number of path components is unknown and these components are not necessary separable, we propose a direct ranging technique using the received frequency-domain OFDM pilot signals. Compared to conventional (two-step) ranging methods, which estimate intermediate parameters...

  13. Mine detection using SF-GPR: A signal processing approach for resolution enhancement and clutter reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Brian; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Larsen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Proper clutter reduction is essential for Ground Penetrating Radar data since low signal-to-clutter ratio prevent correct detection of mine objects. A signal processing approach for resolution enhancement and clutter reduction used on Stepped-Frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (SF-GPR) data is pr....... The clutter reduction method is based on basis function decomposition of the SF-GPR time-series from which the clutter and the signal are separated....

  14. Leak detection in pipelines through spectral analysis of pressure signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza A.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and test of a technique for leak detection in pipelines is presented. The technique is based on the spectral analysis of pressure signals measured in pipeline sections where the formation of stationary waves is favoured, allowing leakage detection during the start/stop of pumps. Experimental tests were performed in a 1250 m long pipeline for various operational conditions of the pipeline (liquid flow rate and leakage configuration. Pressure transients were obtained by four transducers connected to a PC computer. The obtained results show that the spectral analysis of pressure transients, together with the knowledge of reflection points provide a simple and efficient way of identifying leaks during the start/stop of pumps in pipelines.

  15. Direct detection of neutralino dark matter in the NMSSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerdeno, David G

    2006-01-01

    The direct detection of neutralino dark matter is analysed in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM). Sizable values for the neutralino detection cross section, within the reach of dark matter detectors, are attainable, due to the exchange of very light Higgses, which have a significant singlet composition. The lightest neutralino exhibits a large singlino-Higgsino composition, and a mass in the range 50 ∼ χ -0 1 ∼< 100 GeV

  16. A Feasibility Study on Detection of Insider Threats based on Human Bio-signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Young A; Yim, Man-Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The insider threat means that trusted workers in an organization might carry out harmful acts from the negligent use of classified data to potentially sabotage the workplace. Surveys and studies conducted over the last decade have consistently shown the critical nature of the insider threats problem, in both government and private sectors. The shortcomings of existing systems, such as mental self-assessment and peer review, are very subjective, biased-assessments and employed infrequently. To overcome these limitations, this study investigates the feasibility of detecting and predicting an insider threat by using human biodata, from smart wearable devices. This paper showed the feasibility of predicting and detecting insider threats using EEG, GSR and ECG signals. In the section 2.1, two research hypotheses were established to identify the significant difference on EEG, GSR and ECG signals when the subject decided bad action and is the placed in deceit situation. These hypotheses were tested using two kinds of pilot experiments in the form of input (stimulus) and output (checking response of physiological signals and reaction time)

  17. The proportion of patient reports of suspected ADRs to signal detection in the Netherlands : case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hunsel, Florence; Talsma, Attje; van Puijenbroek, Eugène; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; van Grootheest, Kees

    Aim To determine the contribution of patients' adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports to signals detection, through a study of the signals sent by Lareb to the Dutch Medicines Evaluation Board. Methods The percentage of patient's ADR reports contributing to generate signals of adverse drug reactions

  18. Intercellular signaling through secreted proteins induces free-energy gradient-directed cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Sutherland, Alex; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2016-05-17

    Controlling cell migration is important in tissue engineering and medicine. Cell motility depends on factors such as nutrient concentration gradients and soluble factor signaling. In particular, cell-cell signaling can depend on cell-cell separation distance and can influence cellular arrangements in bulk cultures. Here, we seek a physical-based approach, which identifies a potential governed by cell-cell signaling that induces a directed cell-cell motion. A single-cell barcode chip (SCBC) was used to experimentally interrogate secreted proteins in hundreds of isolated glioblastoma brain cancer cell pairs and to monitor their relative motions over time. We used these trajectories to identify a range of cell-cell separation distances where the signaling was most stable. We then used a thermodynamics-motivated analysis of secreted protein levels to characterize free-energy changes for different cell-cell distances. We show that glioblastoma cell-cell movement can be described as Brownian motion biased by cell-cell potential. To demonstrate that the free-energy potential as determined by the signaling is the driver of motion, we inhibited two proteins most involved in maintaining the free-energy gradient. Following inhibition, cell pairs showed an essentially random Brownian motion, similar to the case for untreated, isolated single cells.

  19. Less-simplified models of dark matter for direct detection and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Arghya [Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research Institute,Allahabad - 211019 (India); Kowalska, Kamila; Roszkowski, Leszek; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Williams, Andrew J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research,Hoża 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-04-29

    We construct models of dark matter with suppressed spin-independent scattering cross section utilizing the existing simplified model framework. Even simple combinations of simplified models can exhibit interference effects that cause the tree level contribution to the scattering cross section to vanish, thus demonstrating that direct detection limits on simplified models are not robust when embedded in a more complicated and realistic framework. In general for fermionic WIMP masses ≳10 GeV direct detection limits on the spin-independent scattering cross section are much stronger than those coming from the LHC. However these model combinations, which we call less-simplified models, represent situations where LHC searches become more competitive than direct detection experiments even for moderate dark matter mass. We show that a complementary use of several searches at the LHC can strongly constrain the direct detection blind spots by setting limits on the coupling constants and mediators’ mass. We derive the strongest limits for combinations of vector + scalar, vector + “squark”, and “squark” + scalar mediator, and present the corresponding projections for the LHC 14 TeV for a number of searches: mono-jet, jets + missing energy, and searches for heavy vector resonances.

  20. Less-simplified models of dark matter for direct detection and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Arghya; Kowalska, Kamila; Roszkowski, Leszek; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Williams, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    We construct models of dark matter with suppressed spin-independent scattering cross section utilizing the existing simplified model framework. Even simple combinations of simplified models can exhibit interference effects that cause the tree level contribution to the scattering cross section to vanish, thus demonstrating that direct detection limits on simplified models are not robust when embedded in a more complicated and realistic framework. In general for fermionic WIMP masses ≳10 GeV direct detection limits on the spin-independent scattering cross section are much stronger than those coming from the LHC. However these model combinations, which we call less-simplified models, represent situations where LHC searches become more competitive than direct detection experiments even for moderate dark matter mass. We show that a complementary use of several searches at the LHC can strongly constrain the direct detection blind spots by setting limits on the coupling constants and mediators’ mass. We derive the strongest limits for combinations of vector + scalar, vector + “squark”, and “squark” + scalar mediator, and present the corresponding projections for the LHC 14 TeV for a number of searches: mono-jet, jets + missing energy, and searches for heavy vector resonances.

  1. Less-simplified models of dark matter for direct detection and the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Arghya; Kowalska, Kamila; Roszkowski, Leszek; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Williams, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    We construct models of dark matter with suppressed spin-independent scattering cross section utilizing the existing simplified model framework. Even simple combinations of simplified models can exhibit interference effects that cause the tree level contribution to the scattering cross section to vanish, thus demonstrating that direct detection limits on simplified models are not robust when embedded in a more complicated and realistic framework. In general for fermionic WIMP masses ≳ 10 GeV direct detection limits on the spin-independent scattering cross section are much stronger than those coming from the LHC. However these model combinations, which we call less-simplified models, represent situations where LHC searches become more competitive than direct detection experiments even for moderate dark matter mass. We show that a complementary use of several searches at the LHC can strongly constrain the direct detection blind spots by setting limits on the coupling constants and mediators' mass. We derive the strongest limits for combinations of vector + scalar, vector + "squark", and "squark" + scalar mediator, and present the corresponding projections for the LHC 14 TeV for a number of searches: mono-jet, jets + missing energy, and searches for heavy vector resonances.

  2. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  3. Signal processing techniques for damage detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and embedded ultrasonic structural radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingyu; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2004-07-01

    Embedded ultrasonic structural radar (EUSR) algorithm is developed for using piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) array to detect defects within a large area of a thin-plate specimen. Signal processing techniques are used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages, and thereby to determine the location of the defects with the EUSR algorithm. In our research, the transient tone-burst wave propagation signals are generated and collected by the embedded PWAS. Then, with signal processing, the frequency contents of the signals and the time of flight of individual frequencies are determined. This paper starts with an introduction of embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm. Then we will describe the signal processing methods used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages. The signal processing methods being used include the wavelet denoising, the cross correlation, and Hilbert transform. Though hardware device can provide averaging function to eliminate the noise coming from the signal collection process, wavelet denoising is included to ensure better signal quality for the application in real severe environment. For better recognition of time of flight, cross correlation method is used. Hilbert transform is applied to the signals after cross correlation in order to extract the envelope of the signals. Signal processing and EUSR are both implemented by developing a graphical user-friendly interface program in LabView. We conclude with a description of our vision for applying EUSR signal analysis to structural health monitoring and embedded nondestructive evaluation. To this end, we envisage an automatic damage detection application utilizing embedded PWAS, EUSR, and advanced signal processing.

  4. A Hybrid Wavelet-Based Method for the Peak Detection of Photoplethysmography Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyi Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The noninvasive peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 and the pulse rate can be extracted from photoplethysmography (PPG signals. However, the accuracy of the extraction is directly affected by the quality of the signal obtained and the peak of the signal identified; therefore, a hybrid wavelet-based method is proposed in this study. Firstly, we suppressed the partial motion artifacts and corrected the baseline drift by using a wavelet method based on the principle of wavelet multiresolution. And then, we designed a quadratic spline wavelet modulus maximum algorithm to identify the PPG peaks automatically. To evaluate this hybrid method, a reflective pulse oximeter was used to acquire ten subjects’ PPG signals under sitting, raising hand, and gently walking postures, and the peak recognition results on the raw signal and on the corrected signal were compared, respectively. The results showed that the hybrid method not only corrected the morphologies of the signal well but also optimized the peaks identification quality, subsequently elevating the measurement accuracy of SpO2 and the pulse rate. As a result, our hybrid wavelet-based method profoundly optimized the evaluation of respiratory function and heart rate variability analysis.

  5. A Hybrid Wavelet-Based Method for the Peak Detection of Photoplethysmography Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyi; Jiang, Shanqing; Jiang, Shan; Wu, Jiang; Xiong, Wenji; Diao, Shu

    2017-01-01

    The noninvasive peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and the pulse rate can be extracted from photoplethysmography (PPG) signals. However, the accuracy of the extraction is directly affected by the quality of the signal obtained and the peak of the signal identified; therefore, a hybrid wavelet-based method is proposed in this study. Firstly, we suppressed the partial motion artifacts and corrected the baseline drift by using a wavelet method based on the principle of wavelet multiresolution. And then, we designed a quadratic spline wavelet modulus maximum algorithm to identify the PPG peaks automatically. To evaluate this hybrid method, a reflective pulse oximeter was used to acquire ten subjects' PPG signals under sitting, raising hand, and gently walking postures, and the peak recognition results on the raw signal and on the corrected signal were compared, respectively. The results showed that the hybrid method not only corrected the morphologies of the signal well but also optimized the peaks identification quality, subsequently elevating the measurement accuracy of SpO 2 and the pulse rate. As a result, our hybrid wavelet-based method profoundly optimized the evaluation of respiratory function and heart rate variability analysis.

  6. A Hybrid Wavelet-Based Method for the Peak Detection of Photoplethysmography Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanqing; Jiang, Shan; Wu, Jiang; Xiong, Wenji

    2017-01-01

    The noninvasive peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and the pulse rate can be extracted from photoplethysmography (PPG) signals. However, the accuracy of the extraction is directly affected by the quality of the signal obtained and the peak of the signal identified; therefore, a hybrid wavelet-based method is proposed in this study. Firstly, we suppressed the partial motion artifacts and corrected the baseline drift by using a wavelet method based on the principle of wavelet multiresolution. And then, we designed a quadratic spline wavelet modulus maximum algorithm to identify the PPG peaks automatically. To evaluate this hybrid method, a reflective pulse oximeter was used to acquire ten subjects' PPG signals under sitting, raising hand, and gently walking postures, and the peak recognition results on the raw signal and on the corrected signal were compared, respectively. The results showed that the hybrid method not only corrected the morphologies of the signal well but also optimized the peaks identification quality, subsequently elevating the measurement accuracy of SpO2 and the pulse rate. As a result, our hybrid wavelet-based method profoundly optimized the evaluation of respiratory function and heart rate variability analysis. PMID:29250135

  7. On the Feasibility of Gap Detection of Power Transformer Partial Discharge UHF Signals: Gap Propagation Characteristics of Electromagnetic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the transformer electromagnetic gap propagation characteristics. The influence of gap size is also analyzed, and the results experimentally verified. The obtained results indicated that the gap propagation characteristics of electromagnetic wave signals radiated by the partial discharge (PD source in different directions are substantially different. The intensity of the electromagnetic wave in the gap reaches a maximum at a gap height of 1 cm; and inside the gap, the intensity of the electromagnetic wave depicted an increasing trend at the tail area of the gap. Finally, from the obtained results, some suggestions on where to install sensors in practical systems for ultra high frequency (UHF PD signal detection in the transformer gap are provided. The obtained results confirmed the feasibility of using this approach. These results can be seen as a benchmark and a challenge for further research in this field.

  8. Spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for signal detection from image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caucci, Luca; Barrett, Harrison H; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J

    2009-06-22

    Detection of signals in noisy images is necessary in many applications, including astronomy and medical imaging. The optimal linear observer for performing a detection task, called the Hotelling observer in the medical literature, can be regarded as a generalization of the familiar prewhitening matched filter. Performance on the detection task is limited by randomness in the image data, which stems from randomness in the object, randomness in the imaging system, and randomness in the detector outputs due to photon and readout noise, and the Hotelling observer accounts for all of these effects in an optimal way. If multiple temporal frames of images are acquired, the resulting data set is a spatio-temporal random process, and the Hotelling observer becomes a spatio-temporal linear operator. This paper discusses the theory of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer and estimation of the required spatio-temporal covariance matrices. It also presents a parallel implementation of the observer on a cluster of Sony PLAYSTATION 3 gaming consoles. As an example, we consider the use of the spatio-temporal Hotelling observer for exoplanet detection.

  9. Design of a surface-scanning coil detector for direct bacteria detection on food surfaces using a magnetoelastic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yating; Wikle, Howard C.; Wang, Zhenyu; Horikawa, Shin; Best, Steve; Cheng, Zhongyang; Dyer, Dave F.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2013-09-01

    The real-time, in-situ bacteria detection on food surfaces was achieved by using a magnetoelastic biosensor combined with a surface-scanning coil detector. This paper focuses on the coil design for signal optimization. The coil was used to excite the sensor's vibration and detect its resonant frequency signal. The vibrating sensor creates a magnetic flux change around the coil, which then produces a mutual inductance. In order to enhance the signal amplitude, a theory of the sensor's mutual inductance with the measurement coil is proposed. Both theoretical calculations and experimental data showed that the working length of the coil has a significant effect on the signal amplitude. For a 1 mm-long sensor, a coil with a working length of 1.3 mm showed the best signal amplitude. The real-time detection of Salmonella bacteria on a fresh food surface was demonstrated using this new technology.

  10. An Algorithm for Detection of DVB-T Signals Based on Their Second-Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Jallon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose in this paper a detection algorithm based on a cost function that jointly tests the correlation induced by the cyclic prefix and the fact that this correlation is time-periodic. In the first part of the paper, the cost function is introduced and some analytical results are given. In particular, the noise and multipath channel impacts on its values are theoretically analysed. In a second part of the paper, some asymptotic results are derived. A first exploitation of these results is used to build a detection test based on the false alarm probability. These results are also used to evaluate the impact of the number of cycle frequencies taken into account in the cost function on the detection performances. Thanks to numerical estimations, we have been able to estimate that the proposed algorithm detects DVB-T signals with an SNR of −12 dB. As a comparison, and in the same context, the detection algorithm proposed by the 802.22 WG in 2006 is able to detect these signals with an SNR of −8 dB.

  11. Identification, detection, and validation of vibrating structures: a signal processing approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candy, J.V.; Lager, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    This report discusses the application of modern signal processing techniques to characterize parameters governing the vibrational response of a structure. Simulated response data is used to explore the feasibility of applying these techniques to various structural problems. On-line estimator/indentifiers are used to estimate structural parameters, validate designed structures, and detect structural failure when used with a detector

  12. Vismodegib, an antagonist of hedgehog signaling, directly alters taste molecular signaling in taste buds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyekyung; Cong, Wei-na; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Egan, Josephine M

    2015-01-01

    Vismodegib, a highly selective inhibitor of hedgehog (Hh) pathway, is an approved treatment for basal-cell carcinoma. Patients on treatment with vismodegib often report profound alterations in taste sensation. The cellular mechanisms underlying the alterations have not been studied. Sonic Hh (Shh) signaling is required for cell growth and differentiation. In taste buds, Shh is exclusively expressed in type IV taste cells, which are undifferentiated basal cells and the precursors of the three types of taste sensing cells. Thus, we investigated if vismodegib has an inhibitory effect on taste cell turnover because of its known effects on Hh signaling. We gavaged C57BL/6J male mice daily with either vehicle or 30 mg/kg vismodegib for 15 weeks. The gustatory behavior and immunohistochemical profile of taste cells were examined. Vismodegib-treated mice showed decreased growth rate and behavioral responsivity to sweet and bitter stimuli, compared to vehicle-treated mice. We found that vismodegib-treated mice had significant reductions in taste bud size and numbers of taste cells per taste bud. Additionally, vismodegib treatment resulted in decreased numbers of Ki67- and Shh-expressing cells in taste buds. The numbers of phospholipase Cβ2- and α-gustducin-expressing cells, which contain biochemical machinery for sweet and bitter sensing, were reduced in vismodegib-treated mice. Furthermore, vismodegib treatment resulted in reduction in numbers of T1R3, glucagon-like peptide-1, and glucagon-expressing cells, which are known to modulate sweet taste sensitivity. These results suggest that inhibition of Shh signaling by vismodegib treatment directly results in alteration of taste due to local effects in taste buds

  13. Echographic detectability of optoacoustic signals from low-concentration PEG-coated gold nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conversano F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Conversano,1 Giulia Soloperto,1 Antonio Greco,1 Andrea Ragusa,1,2 Ernesto Casciaro,1 Fernanda Chiriacò,1 Christian Demitri,3 Giuseppe Gigli,2–5 Alfonso Maffezzoli,3 Sergio Casciaro11National Research Council, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Lecce, Italy; 2National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-NANO, Lecce, Italy; 3University of Salento, Department of Engineering for Innovation, Lecce, Italy; 4Italian Institute of Technology – Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnology (CBN-IIT, Arnesano, Italy; 5University of Salento, Department of Mathematics and Physics ‘Ennio De Giorgi’, Lecce, ItalyPurpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of gold nanorod (GNR-enhanced optoacoustic imaging employing a conventional echographic device and to determine the most effective operative configuration in order to assure optoacoustic effectiveness, nanoparticle stability, and imaging procedure safety.Methods: The most suitable laser parameters were experimentally determined in order to assure nanoparticle stability during the optoacoustic imaging procedures. The selected configuration was then applied to a novel tissue-mimicking phantom, in which GNR solutions covering a wide range of low concentrations (25–200 pM and different sample volumes (50–200 µL were exposed to pulsed laser irradiation. GNR-emitted optoacoustic signals were acquired either by a couple of single-element ultrasound probes or by an echographic transducer. Off-line analysis included: (a quantitative evaluation of the relationships between GNR concentration, sample volume, phantom geometry, and amplitude of optoacoustic signals propagating along different directions; (b echographic detection of “optoacoustic spots,” analyzing their intensity, spatial distribution, and clinical exploitability. MTT measurements performed on two different cell lines were also used to quantify biocompatibility of the synthesized GNRs in the adopted doses.Results: Laser irradiation at

  14. Direct detection of antihydrogen atoms using a BGO crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei-shi, 184-8588 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Kuroda, N., E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Ohtsuka, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Tajima, M.; Torii, H.A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Zurlo, N. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Matsuda, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, 153-8902 Tokyo (Japan); Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Venturelli, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universitá di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, Brescia 25133 (Italy); Yamazaki, Y. [Atomic Physics Research Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan)

    2016-12-21

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed a detector consisting of a large size BGO crystal to detect an atomic antihydrogen beam, and performed the direct detection of antihydrogen atoms. Energy spectra from antihydrogen annihilation on the BGO crystal are discussed in comparison to simulation results from the GEANT4 toolkit. Background mainly originating from cosmic rays were strongly suppressed by analyzing the energy deposited in the BGO and requiring a multiplicity of charged pions. Thus antihydrogen events were identified.

  15. Improving signal-to-noise in the direct imaging of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with MLOCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Yang, Bin; Canovas, Hector; de Boer, Jozua; Casassus, Simon; Ménard, François; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Liu, Michael C.; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new algorithm designed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of point and extended source detections around bright stars in direct imaging data.One of our innovations is that we insert simulated point sources into the science images, which we then try to recover with maximum S/N. This improves the S/N of real point sources elsewhere in the field. The algorithm, based on the locally optimized combination of images (LOCI) method, is called Matched LOCI or MLOCI. We show with Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) data on HD 135344 B and Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) data on several stars that the new algorithm can improve the S/N of point source detections by 30-400% over past methods. We also find no increase in false detections rates. No prior knowledge of candidate companion locations is required to use MLOCI. On the other hand, while non-blind applications may yield linear combinations of science images that seem to increase the S/N of true sources by a factor >2, they can also yield false detections at high rates. This is a potential pitfall when trying to confirm marginal detections or to redetect point sources found in previous epochs. These findings are relevant to any method where the coefficients of the linear combination are considered tunable, e.g., LOCI and principal component analysis (PCA). Thus we recommend that false detection rates be analyzed when using these techniques. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  16. Signal detection by active, noisy hair bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Salvi, Joshua D.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Vertebrate ears employ hair bundles to transduce mechanical movements into electrical signals, but their performance is limited by noise. Hair bundles are substantially more sensitive to periodic stimulation when they are mechanically active, however, than when they are passive. We developed a model of active hair-bundle mechanics that predicts the conditions under which a bundle is most sensitive to periodic stimulation. The model relies only on the existence of mechanotransduction channels and an active adaptation mechanism that recloses the channels. For a frequency-detuned stimulus, a noisy hair bundle's phase-locked response and degree of entrainment as well as its detection bandwidth are maximized when the bundle exhibits low-amplitude spontaneous oscillations. The phase-locked response and entrainment of a bundle are predicted to peak as functions of the noise level. We confirmed several of these predictions experimentally by periodically forcing hair bundles held near the onset of self-oscillation. A hair bundle's active process amplifies the stimulus preferentially over the noise, allowing the bundle to detect periodic forces less than 1 pN in amplitude. Moreover, the addition of noise can improve a bundle's ability to detect the stimulus. Although, mechanical activity has not yet been observed in mammalian hair bundles, a related model predicts that active but quiescent bundles can oscillate spontaneously when they are loaded by a sufficiently massive object such as the tectorial membrane. Overall, this work indicates that auditory systems rely on active elements, composed of hair cells and their mechanical environment, that operate on the brink of self-oscillation.

  17. Overview of frequency bandwidth determination techniques of useful signal in case of leaks detection by correlation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faerman, V A; Avramchuk, V S; Luneva, E E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an overview of useful signal detection methods on the background of intense noise and limits determination methods of useful signal is presented. The following features are considered: peculiarities of usage of correlation analysis, cross-amplitude spectrum, coherence function, cross-phase spectrum, time-frequency correlation function in case of frequency limits determination as well as leaks detection in pipelines. The possibility of using time-frequency correlation function for solving above named issues is described. Time- frequency correlation function provides information about the signals correlation for each of the investigated frequency bands. Data about location of peaks on the surface plot of a time- frequency correlation function allows making an assumption about the spectral composition of useful signal and its frequency boundaries

  18. Detection of the ODMR signal of a nitrogen vacancy centre in nanodiamond in propagating surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baiaty, Zahraa; Cumming, Benjamin P.; Gan, Xiaosong; Gu, Min

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate that the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) signal of a nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre can be coupled to propagating surface plasmons for the detection of the NV centre spin states, and of external magnetic fields. By coupling the spin dependent luminescence signal of a NV centre in a nanodiamond (ND) to a chemically synthesized silver nanowire, we demonstrate the readout of the ODMR signal as a reduction in the surface plasmon polariton intensity, with improved contrast in comparison to the emission from the NV centre. Furthermore, on the application of a permanent magnetic field from zero to 13 G, we demonstrate that the Zeeman splitting of the magnetic spin states of the nitrogen vacancy centre ground states can also be detected in the coupled surface plasmons. This is an important step in the development of a compact on-chip information processing system utilizing the nitrogen vacancy in nanodiamond as an on-chip source with efficient magnetometry sensing properties.

  19. Efficient feature for classification of eye movements using electrooculography signals

    OpenAIRE

    Phukpattaranont Pornchai; Aungsakul Siriwadee; Phinyomark Angkoon; Limsakul Chusak

    2016-01-01

    Electrooculography (EOG) signal is widely and successfully used to detect activities of human eye. The advantages of the EOG-based interface over other conventional interfaces have been presented in the last two decades; however, due to a lot of information in EOG signals, the extraction of useful features should be done before the classification task. In this study, an efficient feature extracted from two directional EOG signals: vertical and horizontal si...

  20. A robust indicator based on singular value decomposition for flaw feature detection from noisy ultrasonic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ximing; Wang, Zhe; Kang, Yihua; Pu, Haiming; Deng, Zhiyang

    2018-05-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) has been proven to be an effective de-noising tool for flaw echo signal feature detection in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, the uncertainty in the arbitrary manner of the selection of an effective singular value weakens the robustness of this technique. Improper selection of effective singular values will lead to bad performance of SVD de-noising. What is more, the computational complexity of SVD is too large for it to be applied in real-time applications. In this paper, to eliminate the uncertainty in SVD de-noising, a novel flaw indicator, named the maximum singular value indicator (MSI), based on short-time SVD (STSVD), is proposed for flaw feature detection from a measured signal in ultrasonic NDE. In this technique, the measured signal is first truncated into overlapping short-time data segments to put feature information of a transient flaw echo signal in local field, and then the MSI can be obtained from the SVD of each short-time data segment. Research shows that this indicator can clearly indicate the location of ultrasonic flaw signals, and the computational complexity of this STSVD-based indicator is significantly reduced with the algorithm proposed in this paper. Both simulation and experiments show that this technique is very efficient for real-time application in flaw detection from noisy data.

  1. Analysis of acoustic cardiac signals for heart rate variability and murmur detection using nonnegative matrix factorization-based hierarchical decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Ghafoor; Koch, Peter; Papadias, Constantinos B.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of heart rate variability (HRV) via cardiac auscultation examination can be a useful and inexpensive tool which, however, is challenging in the presence of pathological signals and murmurs. The aim of this research is to analyze acoustic cardiac signals for HRV and murmur detection...

  2. Chiron: translating nanopore raw signal directly into nucleotide sequence using deep learning

    KAUST Repository

    Teng, Haotian; Cao, Minh Duc; Hall, Michael B; Duarte, Tania; Wang, Sheng; Coin, Lachlan J M

    2018-01-01

    Sequencing by translocating DNA fragments through an array of nanopores is a rapidly maturing technology that offers faster and cheaper sequencing than other approaches. However, accurately deciphering the DNA sequence from the noisy and complex electrical signal is challenging. Here, we report Chiron, the first deep learning model to achieve end-to-end basecalling and directly translate the raw signal to DNA sequence without the error-prone segmentation step. Trained with only a small set of 4,000 reads, we show that our model provides state-of-the-art basecalling accuracy, even on previously unseen species. Chiron achieves basecalling speeds of more than 2,000 bases per second using desktop computer graphics processing units.

  3. Chiron: translating nanopore raw signal directly into nucleotide sequence using deep learning

    KAUST Repository

    Teng, Haotian

    2018-04-10

    Sequencing by translocating DNA fragments through an array of nanopores is a rapidly maturing technology that offers faster and cheaper sequencing than other approaches. However, accurately deciphering the DNA sequence from the noisy and complex electrical signal is challenging. Here, we report Chiron, the first deep learning model to achieve end-to-end basecalling and directly translate the raw signal to DNA sequence without the error-prone segmentation step. Trained with only a small set of 4,000 reads, we show that our model provides state-of-the-art basecalling accuracy, even on previously unseen species. Chiron achieves basecalling speeds of more than 2,000 bases per second using desktop computer graphics processing units.

  4. Damage Detection Method of Wind Turbine Blade Using Acoustic Emission Signal Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Byeong Hee; Yoon, Dong JIn [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Seience, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Acoustic emission(AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect any further growth or expansion of preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this kind of technique, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures like a huge wind turbine blade. Therefore, it is required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. In this study, a new damage location method has been proposed by using signal napping algorithm, and an experimental verification is conducted by using small wind turbine blade specimen: a part of 750 kW real blade. The results show that this new signal mapping method has high advantages such as a flexibility for sensor location, improved accuracy, high detectability. The newly proposed method was compared with traditional AE source location method based on arrival time difference

  5. Heterodyne detection of CPFSK signals with and without wavelength conversion up to 5 Gb/s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud; Ebskamp, F.; Mikkelsen, Benny

    1993-01-01

    Detection of wavelength converted signals by a coherent continuous-phase frequency-shift-keying receiver is reported. The signals are wavelength converted over 35 nm, and record receiver sensitivities of -38.7 dBm at 4.0Gb/s and -35.6 dBm at 4.8Gb/s are obtained. Comparison between results...

  6. Hunting electroweakinos at future hadron colliders and direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortona, Giovanni Grilli di [SISSA - International School for Advanced Studies,Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Trieste,via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    We analyse the mass reach for electroweakinos at future hadron colliders and their interplay with direct detection experiments. Motivated by the LHC data, we focus on split supersymmetry models with different electroweakino spectra. We find for example that a 100 TeV collider may explore Winos up to ∼7 TeV in low scale gauge mediation models or thermal Wino dark matter around 3 TeV in models of anomaly mediation with long-lived Winos. We show moreover how collider searches and direct detection experiments have the potential to cover large part of the parameter space even in scenarios where the lightest neutralino does not contribute to the whole dark matter relic density.

  7. Integrated Optimization of Long-Range Underwater Signal Detection, Feature Extraction, and Classification for Nuclear Treaty Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuma, M.; Rorbech, V.; Prior, M.; Igel, C.

    2016-01-01

    We designed and jointly optimized an integrated signal processing chain for detection and classification of long-range passive-acoustic underwater signals recorded by the global geophysical monitoring network of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. Starting at the level of raw

  8. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ∼ 10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector

  9. Digital mammography: Signal-extraction strategies for computer-aided detection of microcalcifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.P.; Doi, K.; Metz, C.E.; Vyborny, C.J.; Lam, K.L.; Schmidt, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors found that the structured background of a mammogram can be removed effectively by either a difference-image technique (using a matched filter in combination with a median filter, a contrast-reversal filter, or a box-rim filter) or a visual response filter alone. Locally adaptive gray-level thresholding and region-growing techniques can then be employed to extract microcalcifications from the processed image. Signals are further distinguished from noise or artifacts by their size, contrast, and clustering properties. The authors studied the dependence of the detectability of microcalcifications on the various signal-extraction strategies. Potential application of the computer-aided system to mammography is assessed by its performance on clinical mammograms

  10. Experiments on Classification of Electroencephalography (EEG Signals in Imagination of Direction using Stacked Autoencoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Tomonaga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents classification methods for electroencephalography (EEG signals in imagination of direction measured by a portable EEG headset. In the authorsr previous studies, principal component analysis extracted significant features from EEG signals to construct neural network classifiers. To improve the performance, the authors have implemented a Stacked Autoencoder (SAE for the classification. The SAE carries out feature extraction and classification in a form of multi-layered neural network. Experimental results showed that the SAE outperformed the previous classifiers.