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Sample records for direct borohydride fuel

  1. hydrogel membrane as electrolyte for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) employing a poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membrane electrolyte (PHME) is reported. The DBFC employs an AB5 Misch metal alloy as anode and a goldplated stainless steel mesh as cathode in conjunction with aqueous alkaline solution of sodium borohydride as fuel and aqueous ...

  2. Electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum and gold electrodes: implications for direct borohydride fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenge, Elod

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of BH 4 - in 2 M NaOH on Pt and Au (i.e. catalytic and non-catalytic electrodes, respectively, for BH 4 - hydrolysis accompanied by H 2 evolution) has been studied by cyclic voltammetry, chrono-techniques (i.e., potentiometry, amperometry, coulometry) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In the case of Pt the cyclic voltammetry behaviour of BH 4 - is influenced by both, the catalytic hydrolysis of BH 4 - yielding H 2 (followed by electrooxidation of the latter at peak potentials between -0.7 and -0.9 V versus Ag/AgCl, KCl std ) and direct oxidation of BH 4 - at more positive potentials, i.e., between -0.15 and -0.05 V. Thiourea (TU, 1.5x10 -3 M) was an effective inhibitor of the catalytic hydrolysis associated with BH 4 - electrooxidation on Pt. Therefore, in the presence of TU, only the direct oxidation of BH 4 - has been detected, with peak potentials between -0.2 and 0 V. It is proposed that TU could improve the BH 4 - utilization efficiency and the coulombic efficiency of direct borohydride fuel cells using catalytic anodes. The electrooxidation of BH 4 - on Pt/TU is an overall four-electron process, instead of the maximum eight electrons reported for Au, and it is affected by adsorbed species such as BH 4 - (fractional surface coverage ∼0.3), TU and possibly reaction intermediates

  3. A comparison of sodium borohydride as a fuel for proton exchange membrane fuel cells and for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Jung-Ho

    Two types of fuel cell systems using NaBH 4 aqueous solution as a fuel are possible: the hydrogen/air proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) which uses onsite H 2 generated via the NaBH 4 hydrolysis reaction (B-PEMFC) at the anode and the direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) system which directly uses NaBH 4 aqueous solution at the anode and air at the cathode. Recently, research on these two types of fuel cells has begun to attract interest due to the various benefits of this liquid fuel for fuel cell systems for portable applications. It might therefore be relevant at this stage to evaluate the relative competitiveness of the two fuel cells. Considering their current technologies and the high price of NaBH 4, this paper evaluated and analyzed the factors influencing the relative favorability of each type of fuel cell. Their relative competitiveness was strongly dependent on the extent of the NaBH 4 crossover. When considering the crossover in DBFC systems, the total costs of the B-PEMFC system were the most competitive among the fuel cell systems. On the other hand, if the crossover problem were to be completely overcome, the total cost of the DBFC system generating six electrons (6e-DBFC) would be very similar to that of the B-PEMFC system. The DBFC system generating eight electrons (8e-DBFC) became even more competitive if the problem of crossover can be overcome. However, in this case, the volume of NaBH 4 aqueous solution consumed by the DBFC was larger than that consumed by the B-PEMFC.

  4. Electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum and gold electrodes: implications for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyenge, E. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2004-03-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of BH{sub 4}{sup -} in 2M NaOH on Pt and Au (i.e. catalytic and non-catalytic electrodes, respectively, for BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis accompanied by H{sub 2} evolution) has been studied by cyclic voltammetry, chrono-techniques (i.e., potentiometry, amperometry, coulometry) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In the case of Pt the cyclic voltammetry behaviour of BH{sub 4}{sup -} is influenced by both, the catalytic hydrolysis of BH{sub 4}{sup -} yielding H{sub 2} followed by electrooxidation of the latter at peak potentials between -0.7 and -0.9 V versus Ag/AgCl, KCl{sub std} and direct oxidation of BH{sub 4}{sup -} at more positive potentials, i.e., between -0.15 and -0.05 V. Thiourea (TU, 1.5 x 10{sup -3} M) was an effective inhibitor of the catalytic hydrolysis associated with BH{sub 4}{sup -} electrooxidation on Pt. Therefore, in the presence of TU, only the direct oxidation of BH{sub 4}{sup -} has been detected, with peak potentials between -0.2 and 0 V. It is proposed that TU could improve the BH{sub 4}{sup -} utilization efficiency and the coulombic efficiency of direct borohydride fuel cells using catalytic anodes. The electrooxidation of BH{sub 4}{sup -} on Pt/TU is an overall four-electron process, instead of the maximum eight electrons reported for Au, and it is affected by adsorbed species such as BH{sub 4}{sup -} (fractional surface coverage {approx}0.3), TU and possibly reaction intermediates. (author)

  5. A Self-Supported Direct Borohydride-Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K. Shukla

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A self-supported direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell system with internal manifolds and an auxiliary control unit is reported. The system, while operating under ambient conditions, delivers a peak power of 40 W with about 2 W to run the auxiliary control unit. A critical cause and effect analysis, on the data for single cells and stack, suggests the optimum concentrations of fuel and oxidant to be 8 wt. % NaBH4 and 2 M H2O2, respectively in extending the operating time of the system. Such a fuel cell system is ideally suited for submersible and aerospace applications where anaerobic conditions prevail.

  6. hydrogel membrane as electrolyte for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    and hence attractive energy sources for future gene- ration. Among the various types of fuel cells, poly- mer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are especially promising due to their quick start-up capabilities under ambient conditions. But PEFCs suffer from carbon monoxide poisoning of platinum anode. 1–3 while using reformer ...

  7. Rare earth metal oxides as BH4-tolerance cathode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xuemin; WANG Yadong; GUO Feng; YAO Pei; PAN Mu

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth metal oxides (REMO) as cathode electrocatalysts in direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) were investigated.The REMO electrocatalysts tested showed favorable activity to the oxygen electro-reduction reaction and strong tolerance to the attack of BH4- in alkaline electrolytes.The simple membraneless DBFCs using REMO as cathode electrocatalyst and using hydrogen storage alloy as anodic electrocatalyst exhibited an open circuit of about 1 V and peak power of above 60 mW/cm2.The DBFC using Sm2O3 as cathode electrocatalyst showed a relatively better performance.The maximal power density of 76.2 mW/cm2 was obtained at the cell voltage of 0.52 V.

  8. The electrocatalytic application of RuO2 in direct borohydride fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Wei, Xiaozhu; Liu, Ce; Liu, Yongning

    2014-01-01

    A high electrocatalytic activity of RuO 2 has been found for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFCs). The electron transfer number n during the ORR changes from 3.58 to 3.86 and the percentage of the intermediate product H 2 O 2 decreases from 20.8% to 7.2% correspondingly when the disk potential scans negatively from −0.39 V to −0.8 V versus Hg/HgO. Peak power densities of 425 mW cm −2 has been obtained at 60 °C, when RuO 2 has been used as a cathodic catalyst in DBFCs. RuO 2 displays low sensitivity to the BH 4 − oxidation in DBFCs. Moreover, RuO 2 , as a cathodic catalyst, demonstrates a superb stability during a 200-h durability test. The identical X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the RuO 2 before and after the durability test also prove its stability. - Highlights: • RuO 2 exhibits oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in an alkaline solution. • RuO 2 provides 3.58–3.86 electron transfer number during the ORR. • Direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) with RuO 2 cathode displays a peak power density of 425 mW cm −2 at 60 °C. • DBFC with RuO 2 cathode exhibits a superb stability during a 200-h durability test

  9. Introducing catalyst in alkaline membrane for improved performance direct borohydride fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Haiying; Lin, Longxia; Chu, Wen; Jiang, Wei; He, Yan; Shi, Qiao; Deng, Yonghong; Ji, Zhenguo; Liu, Jiabin; Tao, Shanwen

    2018-01-01

    A catalytic material is introduced into the polymer matrix to prepare a novel polymeric alkaline electrolyte membrane (AEM) which simultaneously increases ionic conductivity, reduces the fuel cross-over. In this work, the hydroxide anion exchange membrane is mainly composed of poly(vinylalcohol) and alkaline exchange resin. CoCl2 is added into the poly(vinylalcohol) and alkaline exchange resin gel before casting the membrane to introduce catalytic materials. CoCl2 is converted into CoOOH after the reaction with KOH solution. The crystallinity of the polymer matrix decreases and the ionic conductivity of the composite membrane is notably improved by the introduction of Co-species. A direct borohydride fuel cell using the composite membrane exhibits an open circuit voltage of 1.11 V at 30 °C, which is notably higher than that of cells using other AEMs. The cell using the composite membrane achieves a maximum power density of 283 mW cm-2 at 60 °C while the cell using the membrane without Co-species only reaches 117 mW cm-2 at the same conditions. The outstanding performance of the cell using the composite membrane benefits from impregnation of the catalytic Co-species in the membrane, which not only increases the ionic conductivity but also reduces electrode polarization thus improves the fuel cell performance. This work provides a new approach to develop high-performance fuel cells through adding catalysts in the electrolyte membrane.

  10. Sodium borohydride as an additive to enhance the performance of direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lianqin; Fang, Xiang; Shen, Pei Kang [The Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Bambagioni, Valentina; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Bianchini, Claudio; Filippi, Jonathan; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Marchionni, Andrea; Vizza, Francesco [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici (ICCOM-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    The effect of adding small quantities (0.1-1 wt.%) of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) to the anolyte solution of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) with membrane-electrode assemblies constituted by nanosized Pd/C anode, Fe-Co cathode and anion-exchange membrane (Tokuyama A006) was investigated by means of various techniques. These include cyclic voltammetry, in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemistry, a study of the performance of monoplanar fuel cells and an analysis of the ethanol oxidation products. A comparison with fuel cells fed with aqueous solutions of ethanol proved unambiguously the existence of a promoting effect of NaBH{sub 4} on the ethanol oxidation. Indeed, the potentiodynamic curves of the ethanol-NaBH{sub 4} mixtures showed higher power and current densities, accompanied by a remarkable increase in the fuel consumption at comparable working time of the cell. A {sup 13}C and {sup 11}B {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}NMR analysis of the cell exhausts and an in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemical study showed that ethanol is converted selectively to acetate while the oxidation product of NaBH{sub 4} is sodium metaborate (NaBO{sub 2}). The enhancement of the overall cell performance has been explained in terms of the ability of NaBH{sub 4} to reduce the PdO layer on the catalyst surface. (author)

  11. The Performance of a Direct Borohydride/Peroxide Fuel Cell Using Graphite Felts as Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Yi Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A direct borohydride/peroxide fuel cell (DBPFC generates electrical power by recirculating liquid anolyte and catholyte between the stack and reservoirs, which is similar to the operation of flow batteries. To enhance the accessibility of the catalyst layer to the liquid anolyte/catholyte, graphite felts are employed as the porous diffusion layer of a single-cell DBPFC instead of carbon paper/cloth. The effects of the type of anode alkaline solution and operating conditions, including flow rate and temperature of the anolyte/catholyte, on DBPFC performance are investigated and discussed. The durability of the DBPFC is also evaluated by galvanostatic discharge at 0.1 A∙cm−2 for over 50 h. The results of this preliminary study show that a DBPFC with porous graphite electrodes can provide a maximum power density of 0.24 W∙cm−2 at 0.8 V. The performance of the DBPFC drops slightly after 50 h of operation; however, the discharge capacity shows no significant decrease.

  12. Preparation method of Ni@Pt/C nanocatalyst affects the performance of direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell: Improved power density and increased catalytic oxidation of borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mir Ghasem; Mahmoodi, Raana

    2017-08-15

    The Ni@Pt/C electrocatalysts were synthesized using two different methods: with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and without SDS. The metal loading in synthesized nanocatalysts was 20wt% and the molar ratio of Ni: Pt was 1:1. The structural characterizations of Ni@Pt/C electrocatalysts were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The electrocatalytic activity of Ni@Pt/C electrocatalysts toward BH 4 - oxidation in alkaline medium was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronopotentiometry (CP), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that Ni@Pt/C electrocatalyst synthesized without SDS has superior catalytic activity toward borohydride oxidation (22016.92Ag Pt -1 ) in comparison with a catalyst prepared in the presence of SDS (17766.15Ag Pt -1 ) in NaBH 4 0.1M at 25°C. The Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) used in fuel cell set-up was fabricated with catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) technique. The effect of Ni@Pt/C catalysts prepared with two methods as anode catalyst on the performance of direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell was studied. The maximum power density was obtained using Ni@Pt/C catalyst synthesized without SDS at 60°C, 1M NaBH 4 and 2M H 2 O 2 (133.38mWcm -2 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of colloidal Pd and Pd-alloys as anode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, M.H. [General Motors R and D Technical Center, Warren, MI (United States); Gyenge, E.L. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Northwood, D.O. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering

    2010-07-01

    An evaluation was conducted to assess the use of colloidal palladium (Pd) and Pd alloys as anode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell applications. A modified Bonneman method was used to investigate borohydride oxidation on supported Pd and Pd-alloy nano-electrocatalysts. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry, and single fuel cell test stations were used to determine Tafel slopes, exchange current densities, oxidation peak potentials, and fuel cell performance. The study also investigated the influence of temperature and oxidant flow and fuel flow rates on fuel cell performance. The study showed that the current density of the fuel cell increased with increases in temperature for all the investigated Pd electrocatalysts. However, the increase in current density was not as high as expected when fuel flow rates were increased. A current density of 50 mA cm{sup -2} was observed at 298 K with a Pd-Ir anode catalyst operating at a cell voltage of 0.5 V. 28 refs., 1 tab., 15 figs.

  14. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Macdonald, Charles L. B.; Northwood, Derek O.; Gyenge, Elod L.

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20 wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bönneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH 4 -, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH 4 - oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5 mg cm -2 colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47 V at 100 mA cm -2 and 333 K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17 V.

  15. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Northwood, Derek O. [Department of Mechanical, Auto and Materials Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor (Canada N9B 3P4); Macdonald, Charles L.B. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Windsor, Windsor (Canada N9B 3P4); Gyenge, Elod L. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada V6T 1Z4)

    2006-07-14

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bonneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH{sub 4}{sup -}, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH{sub 4}{sup -} oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5mgcm{sup -2} colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47V at 100mAcm{sup -2} and 333K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17V. (author)

  16. Evaluation of colloidal Ag and Ag-alloys as anode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Northwood, Derek O. [Mechanical, Auto, and Materials Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor, N9B 3P4 (Canada); Gyenge, Elod L. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Colombia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2007-10-15

    In this study, colloidal silver and silver-alloys (Ag-Pt, Ag-Au, Ag-Ir, and Ag-Pd) prepared by the Boenneman technique were evaluated as anode catalysts for sodium borohydride oxidation using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), chronopotentiometry (CP) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry. The CV results show that the colloidal Ag-alloys were electrochemically active towards borohydride oxidation with oxidation potentials ranging between -0.7 and 0.4 V vs. Hg/HgO (MOE). The most negative oxidation potential was recorded on Ag-Pt. CA results show that the steady state current density was highest on Ag-Pt, followed by Ag-Ir, Ag-Au, and Ag-Pd. The lowest overpotential was recorded on Ag-Ir for a current step change of 10mAcm{sup -2}. A significant temperature effect and a small rotation speed effect were found in the rotating disc voltammetry for all the investigated colloids. The highest peak current was recorded on Ag-Au, while the most negative peak potential was recorded on Ag-Ir. (author)

  17. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  18. Experimental advances and preliminary mathematical modeling of the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant direct borohydride fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W.; Gyenge, Előd L.

    2014-11-01

    The Swiss-roll single-cell mixed reactant (SR-MRFC) borohydride - oxygen fuel cell equipped with Pt/carbon cloth 3D anode and either MnO2 or Ag gas-diffusion cathodes is investigated by a combination of experimental studies and preliminary mathematical modeling of the polarization curve. We investigate the effects of four variables: cathode side metallic mesh fluid distributor, separator type (Nafion 112® vs. Viledon®), cathode catalyst (MnO2 vs. Ag), and the hydrophilic pore volume fraction of the gas-diffusion cathode. Using a two-phase feed of alkaline borohydride solution (1 M NaBH4 - 2 M NaOH) and O2 gas in an SR-MRFC equipped with Pt/C 3D anode, MnO2 gas diffusion cathode, Viledon® porous diaphragm, expanded mesh cathode-side fluid distributor, the maximum superficial power density is 2230 W m-2 at 323 K and 105 kPa(abs). The latter superficial power density is almost 3.5 times higher than our previously reported superficial power density for the same catalyst combinations. Furthermore, with a Pt anode and Ag cathode catalyst combination, a superficial power density of 2500 W m-2 is achieved with superior performance durability compared to the MnO2 cathode. The fuel cell results are substantiated by impedance spectroscopy analysis and preliminary mathematical model predictions based on mixed potential theory.

  19. Investigation of the Performance of Aucore-Pdshell/C as the Anode Catalyst of Direct Borohydride-Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon-supported bimetallic Au-Pd catalyst with core-shell structure is prepared by successive reduction method. The core-shell structure, surface morphology, and electrochemical performances of the catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrometry, linear sweep voltammetry, and chronopotentiometry. The results show that the Au-Pd/C catalyst with core-shell structure exhibits much higher catalytic activity for the direct oxidation of NaBH4 than pure Au/C catalyst. A direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell, in which the Au-Pd/C with core-shell structure is used as the anode catalyst and the Au/C as the cathode catalyst, shows as high as 68.215 mW cm−2 power density.

  20. Improvement of energy conversion efficiency and power generation in direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell: The effect of Ni-M core-shell nanoparticles (M = Pt, Pd, Ru)/Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M. G.; Mahmoodi, R.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, core@shell nanoparticles with Ni as a core material and Pt, Pd and Ru as shell materials are synthesized on multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as catalyst support using the sequence reduction method. The influence of Ni@Pt, Ni@Pd and Ni@Ru core@shell nanoparticles on MWCNT toward borohydride oxidation in alkaline solution is investigated by various three-electrode electrochemical techniques. Also, the impact of these anodic electrocatalysts on the performance of direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell (DBHPFC) is evaluated. The structural and morphological properties of electrocatalysts are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of three electrode investigations show that Ni@Pd/MWCNT has excellent catalytic activity since borohydride oxidation current density on Ni@Pd/MWCNT (34773.27 A g-1) is 1.37 and 9.19 times higher than those of Ni@Pt/MWCNT (25347.27 A g-1) and Ni@Ru/MWCNT (3782.83 A g-1), respectively. Also, the energy conversion efficiency and power density of DBHPFC with Ni@Pd/MWCNT (246.82 mW cm-2) increase to 34.27% and 51.53% respect to Ni@Pt/MWCNT (162.24 mW cm-2) and Ni@Ru/MWCNT (119.62 mW cm-2), respectively. This study reveals that Ni@Pd/MWCNT has highest activity toward borohydride oxidation and stability in fuel cell.

  1. Kinetics of sodium borohydride direct oxidation and oxygen reduction in sodium hydroxide electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatenet, Marian; Micoud, Fabrice; Roche, Ivan; Chainet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The direct oxidation of sodium borohydride in concentrated sodium hydroxide medium has been studied by cyclic and linear voltammetry, chronoamperometry and chronopotentiometry for silver and gold electrocatalysts, either bulk and polycrystalline or nanodispersed over high area carbon blacks. Gold and silver yield rather complete utilisation of the reducer: around 7.5 electrons are delivered on these materials, versus 4 at the most for platinum as a result of the BH 4 - non-negligible hydrolysis taking place on this latter material. The kinetic parameters for the direct borohydride oxidation are better for gold than for silver. A strong influence of the ratio of sodium hydroxide versus sodium borohydride is found: whereas the theoretical stoichiometry does forecast that eight hydroxide ions are needed for each borohydride ion, our experimental results prove that a larger excess hydroxide ion is necessary in quasi-steady state conditions. When the above-mentioned ratio is unity (1 M NaOH and 1 M NaBH 4 ), the tetrahydroborate ions direct oxidation is limited by the hydroxide concentration, and their hydrolysis is no longer negligible. The hydrolysis products are probably BH 3 OH - ions, for which gold displays a rather good oxidation activity. Additionally, silver, which is a weak BH 4 - oxidation electrocatalyst, exhibits the best activity of all the studied materials towards the BH 3 OH - direct oxidation. Finally, carbon-supported gold nanoparticles seem promising as anode material to be used in direct borohydride fuel cells

  2. Direct rotating ring-disk measurement of the sodium borohydride diffusion coefficient in sodium hydroxide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatenet, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 rue de la piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)], E-mail: Marian.Chatenet@phelma.grenoble-inp.fr; Molina-Concha, M.B. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 rue de la piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); El-Kissi, N. [Laboratoire de Rheologie, UMR 5520 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1301 rue de la piscine, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Parrour, G.; Diard, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 rue de la piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)

    2009-07-15

    This paper presents the experimental determination of the diffusion coefficient of borohydride anion and solution kinematic viscosity for a large panel of NaOH + NaBH{sub 4} electrolytic solutions relevant for use as anolyte in Direct Borohydride Fuel Cells (DBFC). The diffusion coefficients have been measured by the transit-time technique on gold rotating ring-disk electrodes, and verified using other classical techniques reported in the literature, namely the Levich method and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy on a gold RDE, or chronoamperometry at a gold microdisk. The agreement between these methods is generally good. The diffusion coefficients measured from the RRDE technique are however ca. twice larger than those previously reported in the literature (e.g. ca. 3 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} in 1 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaBH{sub 4} at 25 deg. C in the present study vs. ca. 1.6 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} in 1 M NaOH + 0.02 M NaBH{sub 4} at 30 deg. C in the literature, as measured by chronoamperometry at a gold microsphere), which is thoroughly discussed. Our measurements using chronoamperometry at a gold microdisk showed that such technique can yield diffusion coefficient values below what expected. The origin of such finding is explained in the frame of the formation of both a film of boron-oxide(s) at the surface of the (static) gold microdisk and the generation of H{sub 2} bubbles at the electrode surface (as a result of the heterogeneous hydrolysis at Au), which alter the access to the electrode surface and thus prevents efficient measurements. Such film formation and H{sub 2} bubbles generation is not so much of an issue for rotating electrodes thanks to the convection of electrolyte which sweeps the electrode surface. In addition, should such film be present, the transit-time determination technique on a RRDE displays the advantage of not being very sensible to its presence: the parameter measured is the time taken by a perturbation generated the

  3. Direct rotating ring-disk measurement of the sodium borohydride diffusion coefficient in sodium hydroxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatenet, M.; Molina-Concha, M.B.; El-Kissi, N.; Parrour, G.; Diard, J.-P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental determination of the diffusion coefficient of borohydride anion and solution kinematic viscosity for a large panel of NaOH + NaBH 4 electrolytic solutions relevant for use as anolyte in Direct Borohydride Fuel Cells (DBFC). The diffusion coefficients have been measured by the transit-time technique on gold rotating ring-disk electrodes, and verified using other classical techniques reported in the literature, namely the Levich method and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy on a gold RDE, or chronoamperometry at a gold microdisk. The agreement between these methods is generally good. The diffusion coefficients measured from the RRDE technique are however ca. twice larger than those previously reported in the literature (e.g. ca. 3 x 10 -5 cm 2 s -1 in 1 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaBH 4 at 25 deg. C in the present study vs. ca. 1.6 x 10 -5 cm 2 s -1 in 1 M NaOH + 0.02 M NaBH 4 at 30 deg. C in the literature, as measured by chronoamperometry at a gold microsphere), which is thoroughly discussed. Our measurements using chronoamperometry at a gold microdisk showed that such technique can yield diffusion coefficient values below what expected. The origin of such finding is explained in the frame of the formation of both a film of boron-oxide(s) at the surface of the (static) gold microdisk and the generation of H 2 bubbles at the electrode surface (as a result of the heterogeneous hydrolysis at Au), which alter the access to the electrode surface and thus prevents efficient measurements. Such film formation and H 2 bubbles generation is not so much of an issue for rotating electrodes thanks to the convection of electrolyte which sweeps the electrode surface. In addition, should such film be present, the transit-time determination technique on a RRDE displays the advantage of not being very sensible to its presence: the parameter measured is the time taken by a perturbation generated the disk to reach the ring trough a distance several orders

  4. Hydrogen storage using borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard BONNETOT; Laetitia LAVERSENNE

    2006-01-01

    The possibilities of hydrogen storage using borohydrides are presented and discussed specially in regard of the recoverable hydrogen amount and related to the recovering conditions. A rapid analysis of storage possibilities is proposed taking in account the two main ways for hydrogen evolution: the dehydrogenation obtained through thermal decomposition or the hydrolysis of solids or solutions. The recoverable hydrogen is related to the dehydrogenation conditions and the real hydrogen useful percentage is determined for each case of use. The high temperature required for dehydrogenation even when using catalyzed compounds lead to poor outlooks for this storage way. The hydrolysis conditions direct the chemical yield of the water consuming, and this must be related to the experimental conditions which rule the storage capacity of the 'fuel' derived from the borohydride. (authors)

  5. Preparation and characterization of PtRu/C, PtBi/C, PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts for direct electro-oxidation of ethanol in PEM fuels cells using the method of reduction by sodium borohydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandalise, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Pt/C, PtBi/C, PtRu/C and PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts were prepared by a borohydride reduction methodology and tested for ethanol oxidation. This methodology consists in mix a solution with sodium hydroxide and sodium borohydride to a mixture containing water/isopropyl alcohol, metallic precursors and the Vulcan XC 72 carbon support. It was studied the addition method of borohydride (drop by drop addition or rapid addition). The obtained electrocatalysts were characterized by energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The ethanol electro-oxidation was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry using the thin porous coating technique. The electrocatalysts were tested in real conditions of operation by unit cell tests. The stability of PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry using the ultra-thin porous coating technique and ring-disk electrode. The PtRuBi/C electro catalyst apparently presented a good performance for ethanol electro-oxidation but experimental evidences showed accentuated bismuth dissolution. (author)

  6. Effect of sodium borohydride synthesis on NaBH4-H2 system economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabakoglu, F. oeznur; Kurtulus, Guelbahar

    2007-01-01

    The hazards and negative impacts of fossil fuel usage on environment and the prospect of fossil fuel depletion in near future have urged scientists to search for and use clean energy sources and alternative fuels. Hydrogen is the best fuel among others, which can minimize the effects of global warming. Although it is currently more expensive than other fuels, it will be cheaper following further developments in hydrogen technologies from production till end-use. Hydrogen storage is a critical issue in terms of safety and economics of hydrogen energy system. Chemical hydrides are an attractive hydrogen storage method due to their potential of achieving high volumetric and gravimetric storage densities. Among chemical hydrides, sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ) is given a big attention, due to its 10.8% theoretical hydrogen storage capacity. Hydrogen, which can be released by sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction on-site, can be used in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at anode. on the other hand, sodium borohydride solution can be used directly in a borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) at anode. Like the other chemical hydrides, sodium borohydride has been an expensive material up to now, constituting a major obstacle to commercialization of sodium borohydride as a hydrogen storage method. This paper aims to give an approximate estimation process cost of the NaBH 4 -H 2 system by taking into account both the energy and raw material costs, starting with sodium borohydride production till recycling of it. Two different methods to synthesize sodium borohydride are analyzed and their effects on total cost are compared. It was found that the usage of Bayer process to synthesize sodium borohydride makes the overall sodium borohydride - hydrogen system cost higher than the total cost of the alternative process which starts with the production of sodium borohydride from borax decahydrate. (authors)

  7. Capacity enhancement of aqueous borohydride fuels for hydrogen storage in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, David; Neiner, Doinita [U.S. Borax Inc., Rio Tinto, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Bowden, Mark [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Whittemore, Sean; Holladay, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Zhenguo [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Autrey, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Adjusting ratio of Q = Na/B will maximize H{sub 2} storage capacity of liquid carrier. • Mixtures of hydrolysis products are desirable to maximize solubility. • 6.5 wt.% hydrogen and remains liquid from beginning to end. - Abstract: In this work we demonstrate enhanced hydrogen storage capacities through increased solubility of sodium borate product species in aqueous media achieved by adjusting the sodium (NaOH) to boron (B(OH){sub 3}) ratio, i.e., M/B, to obtain a distribution of polyborate anions. For a 1:1 mol ratio of NaOH to B(OH){sub 3}, M/B = 1, the ratio of the hydrolysis product formed from NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis, the sole borate species formed and observed by {sup 11}B NMR is sodium metaborate, NaB(OH){sub 4}. When the ratio is 1:3 NaOH to B(OH){sub 3}, M/B = 0.33, a mixture of borate anions is formed and observed as a broad peak in the {sup 11}B NMR spectrum. The complex polyborate mixture yields a metastable solution that is difficult to crystallize. Given the enhanced solubility of the polyborate mixture formed when M/B = 0.33 it should follow that the hydrolysis of sodium octahydrotriborate, NaB{sub 3}H{sub 8}, can provide a greater storage capacity of hydrogen for fuel cell applications compared to sodium borohydride while maintaining a single phase. Accordingly, the hydrolysis of a 23 wt.% NaB{sub 3}H{sub 8} solution in water yields a solution having the same complex polyborate mixture as formed by mixing a 1:3 M ratio of NaOH and B(OH){sub 3} and releases >8 eq of H{sub 2}. By optimizing the M/B ratio a complex mixture of soluble products, including B{sub 3}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 5}{sup 2−}, B{sub 4}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}{sup 2−}, B{sub 3}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}{sup −}, B{sub 5}O{sub 6}(OH){sub 4}{sup −} and B(OH){sub 3}, can be maintained as a single liquid phase throughout the hydrogen release process. Consequently, hydrolysis of NaB{sub 3}H{sub 8} can provide a 40% increase in H{sub 2} storage density compared to the hydrolysis

  8. Capacity enhancement of aqueous borohydride fuels for hydrogen storage in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, David; Neiner, Doinita; Bowden, Mark; Whittemore, Sean; Holladay, Jamie; Huang, Zhenguo; Autrey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adjusting ratio of Q = Na/B will maximize H 2 storage capacity of liquid carrier. • Mixtures of hydrolysis products are desirable to maximize solubility. • 6.5 wt.% hydrogen and remains liquid from beginning to end. - Abstract: In this work we demonstrate enhanced hydrogen storage capacities through increased solubility of sodium borate product species in aqueous media achieved by adjusting the sodium (NaOH) to boron (B(OH) 3 ) ratio, i.e., M/B, to obtain a distribution of polyborate anions. For a 1:1 mol ratio of NaOH to B(OH) 3 , M/B = 1, the ratio of the hydrolysis product formed from NaBH 4 hydrolysis, the sole borate species formed and observed by 11 B NMR is sodium metaborate, NaB(OH) 4 . When the ratio is 1:3 NaOH to B(OH) 3 , M/B = 0.33, a mixture of borate anions is formed and observed as a broad peak in the 11 B NMR spectrum. The complex polyborate mixture yields a metastable solution that is difficult to crystallize. Given the enhanced solubility of the polyborate mixture formed when M/B = 0.33 it should follow that the hydrolysis of sodium octahydrotriborate, NaB 3 H 8 , can provide a greater storage capacity of hydrogen for fuel cell applications compared to sodium borohydride while maintaining a single phase. Accordingly, the hydrolysis of a 23 wt.% NaB 3 H 8 solution in water yields a solution having the same complex polyborate mixture as formed by mixing a 1:3 M ratio of NaOH and B(OH) 3 and releases >8 eq of H 2 . By optimizing the M/B ratio a complex mixture of soluble products, including B 3 O 3 (OH) 5 2− , B 4 O 5 (OH) 4 2− , B 3 O 3 (OH) 4 − , B 5 O 6 (OH) 4 − and B(OH) 3 , can be maintained as a single liquid phase throughout the hydrogen release process. Consequently, hydrolysis of NaB 3 H 8 can provide a 40% increase in H 2 storage density compared to the hydrolysis of NaBH 4 given the decreased solubility of sodium metaborate

  9. Capacity enhancement of aqueous borohydride fuels for hydrogen storage in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, David [U.S. Borax Inc., Rio Tinto, CO (United States); Neiner, Doinita [U.S. Borax Inc., Rio Tinto, CO (United States); Bowden, Mark [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whittemore, Sean [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Zhenguo [Univ. of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Autrey, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate enhanced hydrogen storage capacities through increased solubility of sodium borate product species in aqueous media achieved by adjusting the sodium (NaOH) to boron (B(OH)3) ratio, i.e., M/B, to obtain a distribution of polyborate anions. For a 1:1 mole ratio of NaOH to B(OH)3, M/B = 1, the ratio of the hydrolysis product formed from NaBH4 hydrolysis, the sole borate species formed and observed by 11B NMR is sodium metaborate, NaB(OH)4. When the ratio is 1:3 NaOH to B(OH)3, M/B = 0.33, a mixture of borate anions is formed and observed as a broad peak in the 11B NMR spectrum. The complex polyborate mixture yields a metastable solution that is difficult to crystallize. Given the enhanced solubility of the polyborate mixture formed when M/B = 0.33 it should follow that the hydrolysis of sodium octahydrotriborate, NaB3H8, can provide a greater storage capacity of hydrogen for fuel cell applications compared to sodium borohydride while maintaining a single phase. Accordingly, the hydrolysis of a 23 wt% NaB3H8 solution in water yields a solution having the same complex polyborate mixture as formed by mixing a 1:3 molar ratio of NaOH and B(OH)3 and releases >8 eq of H2. By optimizing the M/B ratio a complex mixture of soluble products, including B3O3(OH)52-, B4O5(OH)42-, B3O3(OH)4-, B5O6(OH)4- and B(OH)3, can be maintained as a single liquid phase throughout the hydrogen release process. Consequently, hydrolysis of NaB3H8 can provide a 40% increase in H2 storage density compared to the hydrolysis of NaBH4 given the decreased solubility of sodium metaborate. The authors would like to thank Jim Sisco and Paul Osenar of

  10. Electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation: a review of density functional theory approach combined with experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison Escaño, Mary Clare; Lacdao Arevalo, Ryan; Gyenge, Elod; Kasai, Hideaki

    2014-09-01

    The electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation is a complex, up-to-eight-electron transfer process, which is essential for development of efficient direct borohydride fuel cells. Here we review the progress achieved by density functional theory (DFT) calculations in explaining the adsorption of BH4- on various catalyst surfaces, with implications for electrocatalyst screening and selection. Wherever possible, we correlate the theoretical predictions with experimental findings, in order to validate the proposed models and to identify potential directions for further advancements.

  11. New double-cation borohydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Inge; Domenech Ferrer, Roger; Schultz, Ludwig; Gutfleisch, Oliver [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270016, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Swiss-Norwegian Beam Lines at ESRF, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Hagemann, Hans; Cerny, Radovan [Department of Physical Chemistry and Crystallography, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Complex hydrides are under consideration for on-board hydrogen storage due to their high hydrogen density. However, up to now conventional borohydrides are either too stable or unstable for applications as in PEM fuel cells (60-120 C). Recently, double-cation borohydride systems have attracted great interest. The desorption temperature of the borohydrides decreases with increasing electronegativity of the cation. Consequently, it is possible to tailor a feasible on-board hydrogen storage material by the combination of appropriate cations. The stability was found to be intermediate between the single-cation borohydride systems. Two combinations were sucessfully synthesised by metathesis reaction via high energy ball milling. Al-Li-borohydride shows desorption at about 70 C combined with a very high hydrogen density (17.2 wt.%) and the Na-Al-borohydride (14.2 wt.%) decomposes around 90 C. Both desorption temperatures are in the target range for applications. The decomposition pathways were observed by in-situ-Raman spectroscopy, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), TG (Thermogravimetry) and thermal desorption measurements.

  12. Sodium borohydride hydrogen generator using Co–P/Ni foam catalysts for 200 W proton exchange membrane fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Taek Hyun; Gang, Byeong Gyu; Kim, Hyuntak; Kwon, Sejin

    2015-01-01

    The response characteristics of electroless-deposited Co–P/Ni foam catalysts for sodium borohydride hydrolysis were investigated. The effect of nickel foam geometry on the properties of the catalysts was evaluated. As the PPI (pores per inch) of the nickel foam increased, the hydrogen generation rate per gram of the deposited catalyst increased due to an increase in surface area. The response characteristics of various catalysts were compared under real operating conditions. When a thin nickel foam with high PPI was used, the response characteristics of the catalyst improved due to an increase in the amount of the deposited catalyst and surface area. Finally, a 200 W PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) system using electroless-deposited Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst was investigated. The response time to reach a hydrogen generation rate sufficient for a 200 W PEMFC was 71 s, and the energy density of a 200 W fuel cell system for producing 600 Wh was 252.1 Wh/kg. A fuel cell system using Co–P/Ni foam catalysts can be widely used as a power source for mobile applications due to fast response characteristics and high energy density. - Highlights: • Response characteristics of Co–P/Ni foam catalysts are investigated. • Catalytic activity is improved with increase in PPI (pores per inch) of Ni foam. • Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst has improved response characteristics. • The energy density of a 200 W PEMFC system for producing 600 Wh is 252.1 Wh/kg. • Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst is suitable for fuel cell system.

  13. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  14. Metal borohydrides and derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paskevicius, Mark; Haarh Jepsen, Lars; Schouwink, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    major classes of metal borohydride derivatives have also been discovered: anion-substituted compounds where the complex borohydride anion, BH4 -, is replaced by another anion, i.e. a halide or amide ion; and metal borohydrides modified with neutral molecules, such as NH3, NH3BH3, N2H4, etc. Here, we...

  15. The metal borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2004-01-01

    Publications on borohydrides of metals are systematized in the monograph. Special attention is paid to investigation in the field of synthesis and properties of borohydrides of rare-earth metals, which were carried out under author's supervision. The monograph reviews the basic types of chemical reactions, which are inherent to borohydrides of metals, and structural principles account for their molecular and crystal structures

  16. Cold-starting portable microenergy system. Autonomous fuel cell system using sodium borohydride as an energy source; Kaltstartfaehiges portables Mikroenergiesystem. Autarkes BZ-System mit Natriumborhydrid als Energietraeger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groos, Ulf; Koch, Wolfgang [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    A project consortium led by Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme ISE developed an autonomous micro energy system (AMES) with an output of 100 W{sub el} as a charging station for applications in emergency medicine. The system is designed for a wide temperature range of -15 to +50 degC during startup, operation, and shutoff. The cold starting fuel cell system is in accordance with current standards and is suited for serial production. It can be operated with common hydrogen stores, e.g. gas flasks or metal hydrides, or else with a specially developed hydrogen generator based on sodium borohydride. (orig.)

  17. Electro-oxidation of borohydride on colloidal Os and Os-alloys (Os-Sn, Os-Mo and Os-V)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, M.H.; Northwood, D.O. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering; Gyenge, E.L. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2005-10-15

    Preliminary experimental studies have demonstrated the possibility of using sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) oxidation catalysis by osmium (Os) in 2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the presence of thiourea as an inhibitor to hydrogen (H{sub 2}) evolution. The usefulness of this information for low-temperature direct fuel cells involving the anodic oxidation of fuels such as methanol, ethanol and sodium borohydride was discussed with reference to the challenge of high anode surface overpotential affecting the power output of direct fuel cells. This study examined the cyclic voltammetry features of supported colloidal Os and Os alloys with molybdenum, vanadium and tin, in the presence of NaBH{sub 4}. It also examined the potential for electrocatalysis in direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFC). Colloidal Os and Os alloys were tested for their use as electrocatalysts for oxidation of borohydride. The features of an Os cyclic voltammogram in alkaline media with and without BH{sub 4} were discussed along with the redox mediated oxidation of BH{sub 4}. Cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry tests showed that colloidal Os 20 per cent weight supported on Vulcan XC-72R possessed electrocatalytic activity toward borohydride oxidation while the investigated Os-alloys were catalytically inactive. Chronopotentiometry experiments also showed that the 20 per cent weight Os gave the lowest anodic potential, and is therefore recommended as the anode electrocatalyst in direct borohydride fuel cells. 29 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  18. Electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation: a review of density functional theory approach combined with experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sison Escaño, Mary Clare; Arevalo, Ryan Lacdao; Kasai, Hideaki; Gyenge, Elod

    2014-01-01

    The electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation is a complex, up-to-eight-electron transfer process, which is essential for development of efficient direct borohydride fuel cells. Here we review the progress achieved by density functional theory (DFT) calculations in explaining the adsorption of BH 4 − on various catalyst surfaces, with implications for electrocatalyst screening and selection. Wherever possible, we correlate the theoretical predictions with experimental findings, in order to validate the proposed models and to identify potential directions for further advancements. (topical review)

  19. Comparison of sodium borohydride hydrolysis kinetics on Co-based nanocomposite catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Georgi; Chorbadzhiyska, Elitsa; Mitov, Mario; Rashkov, Rashko; Hubenova, Yolina

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we compared the results, obtained with several Co-based nanocomposites (CoMnB, CoNiMnB and CoNiMoW) produced by electrodeposition on Ni-foam, as catalysts for the sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction. Based on the comparative analyses, we propose CoNiMnB electrodeposits as most suitable catalysts for development of Hydrogen-on-Demand (HOD) system, while CoNiMoW ones as potential anodes for Direct Borohydride Fuel Cells (DBFCs). Keywords: Hydrogen-on-Demand (HOD), Nanocomposites, Hydrolysis, Catalyst, Kinetic

  20. Hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of sodium borohydride using Ru(0) nanoclusters as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkar, S.; Zahmakiran, M.

    2005-01-01

    Sodium borohydride is stable in aqueous alkaline solution, however, it hydrolyses in water to hydrogen gas in the presence of suitable catalyst. By this way hydrogen can be generated safely for the fuel cells. Generating H 2 catalytically from NaBH 4 solutions has many advantages: NaBH 4 solutions are nonflammable, reaction products are environmentally benign, rate of H 2 generation is easily controlled, the reaction product NaBO 2 can be recycled, H 2 can be generated even at low temperatures. All of the catalysts that has been used in hydrolysis of sodium borohydride are bulk metals and they act as heterogeneous catalysts. The limited surface area of the heterogeneous catalysts causes lower catalytic activity as the activity of catalyst is directly related to its surface area. Thus, the use of metal nanoparticles with large surface area provides potential route to increase the catalytic activity. Here, we report, for the first time, the use of ruthenium(0) nanoclusters as catalyst in the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride liberating hydrogen gas. The ruthenium nanoparticles are generated from the reduction of ruthenium(III) chloride by sodium borohydride in water and stabilized by specific ligand. The ruthenium(0) nanoclusters are found to be highly active catalyst for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride

  1. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefore, direct methanol fuel cell is proper to use for the energy source of small electrical devices and vehicles etc.

  2. NaBH4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator with a volume-exchange fuel tank for small unmanned aerial vehicles powered by a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyu

    2014-01-01

    A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system integrated with a NaBH 4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator was developed for small UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles). The hydrogen generator was composed of a catalytic reactor, liquid pump and volume-exchange fuel tank, where the fuel and spent fuel exchange the volume within a single fuel tank. Co–B catalyst supported on a porous ceramic material was used to generate hydrogen from the NaBH 4 solution. Considering the power consumption according to the mission profile of a UAV, the power output of the fuel cell and auxiliary battery was distributed passively as an electrical load. A blended wing-body was selected considering the fuel efficiency and carrying capability of fuel cell components. First, the fuel cell stack and hydrogen generator were evaluated under the operating conditions, and integrated into the airframe. The ground test of the complete fuel cell UAV was performed under a range of load conditions. Finally, the fuel cell powered flight test was made for 1 h. The volume-exchange fuel tank minimized the fuel sloshing and the change in center of gravity due to fuel consumption during the flight, so that much stable operation of the fuel cell system was validated at different flight modes. - Highlights: • PEMFC system with a NaBH 4 hydrogen source was developed for small UAVs. • Volume-exchange fuel tank was used to reduce the size of the fuel cell system. • Passive power management was used for a stable power output during the flight. • BWB UAV was selected by taking the fuel cell integration into consideration. • Stable operation of the fuel cell system was verified from the flight test

  3. Novel Ammonium Metal Borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Jepsen, Lars Haahr; Cerny, Radovan

    Ammonium borohydride, NH4BH4, has a very high gravimetric (ρm = 24.5 wt% H2) and volumetric (157.3 g·H2/L) hydrogen content and releases 18.4 wt% H2 below 170 °C. However, NH4BH4 is metastable at RT and ambient pressure, with a half-life of ~6 h. The decomposition is strongly exothermic; therefore......, it cannot store hydrogen reversibly. Recently, the first ammonium metal borohydride, NH4Ca(BH4)3 was published, which may be considered as substitution of K+ by NH4+ in KCa(BH4)3, due to the similar sizes of NH4+ and K+[1]. This compound successfully stabilizes NH4BH4. In the present work, a series of novel...... halide-free ammonium metal borohydrides is presented, which have the chemical compositions (NH4)xM(BH4)n+x. The ammonium metal borohydrides are synthesized by cryomilling of NH4BH4 – M(BH4)n (M = Li, Na, K, Mg, Sr, Y, Mn, La, Gd) in different ratios. A new range of ammonium metal borohydrides is formed...

  4. Novel Ammonium Metal Borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Jepsen, Lars Haahr; Cerny, Radovan

    , it cannot store hydrogen reversibly. Recently, the first ammonium metal borohydride, NH4Ca(BH4)3 was published, which may be considered as substitution of K+ by NH4+ in KCa(BH4)3, due to the similar sizes of NH4+ and K+[1]. This compound successfully stabilizes NH4BH4. In the present work, a series of novel...... halide-free ammonium metal borohydrides is presented, which have the chemical compositions (NH4)xM(BH4)n+x. The ammonium metal borohydrides are synthesized by cryomilling of NH4BH4 – M(BH4)n (M = Li, Na, K, Mg, Sr, Y, Mn, La, Gd) in different ratios. A new range of ammonium metal borohydrides is formed......, and the crystal structures and thermal decompositions are investigated. Mixtures of NH4BH4 - NaBH4 do not react, while solid solutions, K1-x(NH4)xBH4, are formed for NH4BH4 - KBH4. For the other composites, novel ammonium metal borohydrides are formed. Several of these structures have been solved from high...

  5. Influence of the concentration of borohydride towards hydrogen production and escape for borohydride oxidation reaction on Pt and Au electrodes - experimental and modelling insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olu, Pierre-Yves; Bonnefont, Antoine; Braesch, Guillaume; Martin, Vincent; Savinova, Elena R.; Chatenet, Marian

    2018-01-01

    The Borohydride Oxidation Reaction (BOR), the anode reaction in a Direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), is complex and still poorly understood, which impedes the development and deployment of the DBFC technology. In particular, no practical electrocatalyst is capable to prevent gaseous hydrogen generation and escape from its anode upon operation, which lowers the fuel-efficiency of the DBFC and raises safety issues in operation. The nature of the anode electrocatalysts strongly influences the hydrogen escape characteristics of the DBFC, which demonstrates how important it is to isolate the BOR mechanism in conditions relevant to DBFC operation. In this paper, from a selected literature review and BOR experiments performed in differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) in a wide range of NaBH4 concentration (5-500 mM), a microkinetic model of the BOR for both Pt and Au surfaces is proposed; this model takes into account the hydrogen generation and escape.

  6. Deposition of nano-size particles on reticulated vitreous carbon using colloidal precursors : three-dimensional anodes for borohydride fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.; Gyenge, E.L. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2006-07-01

    In addition to their inherently larger specific surface area, mesoscopic materials also possess a higher density of surface constrained sites, which could serve as active sites in catalysis as well as facilitate the surface diffusion of small molecules and ions relevant to various catalytic steps. This study investigated the organosol method for the deposition of platinum (Pt), iridium (Ir), gold (Au) and nickel (Ni) nano-particles on reticulated vitreous carbon to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity for BH{sub 4} oxidation by both fundamental electrochemical studies and fuel cell experiments. The application of the organosol nanometal preparation technique was based on the quaternary ammonium compound N(C{sub 8}H{sub 17}){sub 4}B(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3}H acting as both reductant and colloid stabilizer. A current assisted variant was also studied where the reticulated vitreous carbon substrate served as the cathode operating at superficial current densities between 1.0 and 2.5 mA per cm{sup 2}. The organosol method produced a low catalyst load on reticulated vitreous carbons between 0.01 and 0.12 mg per cm{sup 2}. The electrodes were evaluated for catalytic activity toward the electro-oxidation of BH{sub 4} by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. Borohydride fuel cells with liquid electrolyte (2 M NaOH) were assembled using a 3-dimensional anode, a cation exchange membrane and a commercial oxygen cathode. Results showed that the anode catalyst mass activity was higher for the 3-D design compared to the case when a gas diffusion electrode served as the anode. It was concluded that the extended reaction zone of the three-dimensional anode with liquid electrolyte improved the catalyst utilization efficiency by allowing the reduction of the catalyst load. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Chemometric study of the effects of PtRu:BH4-molar ratio and solvent used in the preparation of PtRu/C electrocatalysts for for direct methanol fuel cell anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polanco, N.S.O.; Neto, A.O.; Spinace, E.V. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tusi, M.M. [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Missoes (URI), Santiago, RS (Brazil); Brandalise, M. [Instituto Federal Fluminense (IFF), Campos dos Goyracazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    PtRu/C electrocatalysts were prepared by borohydride reduction method and a chemometric study was performed to evaluate the influence of the solvent (water and isopropyl alcohol) and amount of reducing agent (PtRu:BH4- molar ratios of 5 and 15) in maximum power density. In borohydride reduction method, a solution containing sodium hydroxide and sodium borohydride (NaBH4) is added to a mixture containing water, isopropyl alcohol, metallic precursors and the carbon support Vulcan XC72. The obtained materials were characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEA's) were produced and tests in single direct methanol fuel cells were performed. The amount of sodium borohydride used in the reduction showed more influence on the maximum power density than the change of solvent of the reaction. (author)

  8. Attempts to cathodically reduce boron oxides to borohydride in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLafferty, J.; Colominas, S.; Macdonald, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    Sodium borohydride is being considered as a chemical hydrogen storage material (hydrogen being released through hydrolysis) and as an anodic fuel for fuel cells. However, the current cost of sodium borohydride is prohibitively high for automotive applications. Thus, there is interest in recycling the by-product of the hydrolysis or oxidation reaction, sodium metaborate. Numerous patents claim that this reaction is feasible in aqueous solution. Here, we report extensive experiments based upon methods outlined in the patents (particularly, the so-called direct reduction using high overpotential cathode materials). We also attempt to address concerns not discussed in the patents. In particular, to the authors' knowledge, previous reports have not addressed electrostatic repulsion of metaborate anion from the cathode. We further report several methods that were designed to overcome this problem: (1) use of a cathode material having a very negative potential of zero charge, (2) modification of the electrical double layer by using specifically adsorbing tetraalkylammonium hydroxides, (3) use of a rectangular wave pulse, and (4) use of chemically modified cathodes. None of these methods produced measurable quantities of borohydride. We then speculate as to why this reaction is not feasible, at least in aqueous solutions.

  9. On the purity assessment of solid sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botasini, Santiago; Méndez, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Since sodium borohydride has become extensively used as chemical hydrogen storage material in fuel cells, many techniques have been proposed to assess the purity of this substance. However, all of them are developed in aqueous media, where the reagent is unstable. In addition, its hygroscopic nature was difficults in any attempt to make precise quantifications. The present work compares three different methods, namely, voltammetric, titrimetric, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to assess the purity of sodium borohydride, using an expired and a new sodium borohydride samples as references. Our results show that only the FTIR measurements provide a simple and semi-quantitative means to assess the purity of sodium borohydride due to the fact that it is the only one that measures the sample in the solid state. A comparison between the experimental data and theoretical calculation reveals the identification of the absorption bands at 1437 cm-1 of sodium metaborate and 2291 cm-1 of sodium borohydride which represent a good fingerprint for the qualitative assessment of the sample quality.

  10. Oscillatory instabilities in the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Eduardo G.; Varela, Hamilton, E-mail: varela@iqsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-03-15

    The borohydride ion has been pointed as a promising alternative fuel. Most of the investigation on its electrochemistry is devoted to the electrocatalytic aspects of its electrooxidation on platinum and gold surfaces. Besides the known kinetic limitations and intricate mechanism, our Group has recently found the occurrence of two regions of bi-stability and autocatalysis in the electrode potential during the open circuit interaction of borohydride and oxidized platinum surfaces. Following this previous contribution, the occurrence of more complicated phenomena is here presented: namely the presence of electrochemical oscillations during the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum in alkaline media. Current oscillations were found to be associated to two distinct instability windows and characterized in the resistance-potential parameter plane. The dynamic features of such oscillations suggest the existence of distinct mechanisms according to the potential region. Previously published results obtained under non-oscillatory regime were used to give some hints on the surface chemistry behind the observed dynamics. (author)

  11. Economical Aspects of Sodium Borohydride for Hydrogen Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ture, I. Engin; Tabakoglu, F. Oznur; Kurtulus, Gulbahar

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is the best fuel among others, which can minimize the cause to global warming. Turkey has an important location with respect to hydrogen energy applications. Moreover, Turkey has 72.2% of the world's total boron reserves. Sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ) which can be produced from borax has high hydrogen storage capacity. Hence, it is important for Turkey to lead studies about sodium borohydride to make it one of the most feasible hydrogen storage methods. In this paper an approximate process cost analysis of a NaBH 4 -H 2 system is given, starting with NaBH 4 production till recycling of it. It is found that, the usage of NaBH 4 as hydrogen storage material is relatively an expensive method but after improving reactions and by-product removal in the system and reducing the energy and reactant costs, sodium borohydride is one of the best candidates among hydrogen storage technologies. (authors)

  12. Methanol electro-oxidation and direct methanol fuel cell using Pt/Rh and Pt/Ru/Rh alloy catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyung-Won; Park, In-Su; Nam, Woo-Hyun; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2004-01-01

    Pt-based binary or ternary catalysts containing Rh for use as anodes in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) were synthesized by borohydride reduction method combined with freeze-drying. The resulting catalysts had a specific surface area of approximately 65-75 m 2 /g. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that the catalysts were well alloyed and the average size of alloy catalysts was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Pt/Rh (2:1) and Pt/Ru/Rh (5:4:1) alloy catalysts showed better catalytic activities for methanol electro-oxidation than Pt or Pt/Ru (1:1), respectively

  13. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I [Champaign, IL; Zhu, Yimin [Urbana, IL; Kahn, Zakia [Palatine, IL; Man, Malcolm [Vancouver, CA

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  14. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Ming [Augusta, GA

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  15. Water co-adsorption and electric field effects on borohydride structures on Os(1 1 1) by first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escaño, Mary Clare Sison, E-mail: mcescano@u-fukui.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Arevalo, Ryan Lacdao [Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Gyenge, Elod [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Kasai, Hideaki [Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: ► Difference in Pt, Os electronic structures lead to different borohydride structures. ► Promotion of B–H bond breaking on Os due to water effects. ► Control of borohydride structure on Os catalyst using electric field. -- Abstract: Periodic density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the nature of the BH{sub 4ad} and its interaction with H{sub 2}O{sub ad} in the presence of homogenous electric field. We observed a significant charge polarity of BH{sub 4ad} on Os(1 1 1) and such property could explain the electrostatic interaction with water monomer (H{sub ad}) with its HOH plane parallel to the surface. This interaction changes the BH{sub ad} molecular structure to BH{sub 3ad} + H{sub ad}. In the presence of homogenous electric field, the water co-adsorption effect is reduced due to the stabilization of H{sub 2}O{sub ad} on the surface and the deviation of the O–H bond from the plane, decreasing the electrostatic interaction between BH{sub 4ad} and H{sub 2}O{sub ad}. These fundamental findings imply accessible control of borohydride structures on an electrode surface, which could be relevant for direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) and reversible hydrogen storage/release applications.

  16. Water co-adsorption and electric field effects on borohydride structures on Os(1 1 1) by first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaño, Mary Clare Sison; Arevalo, Ryan Lacdao; Gyenge, Elod; Kasai, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Difference in Pt, Os electronic structures lead to different borohydride structures. ► Promotion of B–H bond breaking on Os due to water effects. ► Control of borohydride structure on Os catalyst using electric field. -- Abstract: Periodic density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the nature of the BH 4ad and its interaction with H 2 O ad in the presence of homogenous electric field. We observed a significant charge polarity of BH 4ad on Os(1 1 1) and such property could explain the electrostatic interaction with water monomer (H ad ) with its HOH plane parallel to the surface. This interaction changes the BH ad molecular structure to BH 3ad + H ad . In the presence of homogenous electric field, the water co-adsorption effect is reduced due to the stabilization of H 2 O ad on the surface and the deviation of the O–H bond from the plane, decreasing the electrostatic interaction between BH 4ad and H 2 O ad . These fundamental findings imply accessible control of borohydride structures on an electrode surface, which could be relevant for direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) and reversible hydrogen storage/release applications

  17. PtRu/C and PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts prepared by two different methodologies of borohydride reduction process for ethanol electro-oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandalise, Michele; Tusi, Marcelo Marques; Piasentin, Ricardo Marcelo; Correa, Olandir Vercino; Linardi, Marcelo; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir, E-mail: brandalise@usp.br, E-mail: mmtusi@usp.br, E-mail: rmpiasen@ipen.br, E-mail: ovcorrea@ipen.br, E-mail: mlinardi@ipen.br, E-mail: espinace@ipen.br, E-mail: aolivei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    PtRu/C (50:50) and PtRuBi/C (50:40:10) electrocatalysts were prepared by borohydride reduction using H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6.6}H{sub 2}O, RuCl{sub 3.x}H{sub 2}O and Bi(NO{sub 3}){sub 3.5}H{sub 2}O as metals sources and Vulcan XC72 as support. The borohydride solution was added in two different ways: drop by drop and rapid addition of all the solution. The obtained electrocatalysts were characterized by EDX, XRD and cyclic voltammetry. The electro-oxidation of ethanol was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry at room temperature and on a single cell of a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at 100 deg C. PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts showed superior performance for ethanol electro-oxidation than PtRu/C electrocatalysts prepared in a similar way. However, PtRuBi/C electrocatalyst prepared by rapid addition of the borohydride solution showed superior performance for ethanol electro oxidation at room temperature, while PtRuBi/C electrocatalyst prepared by addition drop by drop of borohydride solution showed superior performance on DEFC at 100 deg C. (author)

  18. PtRu/C and PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts prepared by two different methodologies of borohydride reduction process for ethanol electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandalise, Michele; Tusi, Marcelo Marques; Piasentin, Ricardo Marcelo; Correa, Olandir Vercino; Linardi, Marcelo; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir

    2009-01-01

    PtRu/C (50:50) and PtRuBi/C (50:40:10) electrocatalysts were prepared by borohydride reduction using H 2 PtCl 6.6 H 2 O, RuCl 3.x H 2 O and Bi(NO 3 ) 3.5 H 2 O as metals sources and Vulcan XC72 as support. The borohydride solution was added in two different ways: drop by drop and rapid addition of all the solution. The obtained electrocatalysts were characterized by EDX, XRD and cyclic voltammetry. The electro-oxidation of ethanol was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry at room temperature and on a single cell of a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at 100 deg C. PtRuBi/C electrocatalysts showed superior performance for ethanol electro-oxidation than PtRu/C electrocatalysts prepared in a similar way. However, PtRuBi/C electrocatalyst prepared by rapid addition of the borohydride solution showed superior performance for ethanol electro oxidation at room temperature, while PtRuBi/C electrocatalyst prepared by addition drop by drop of borohydride solution showed superior performance on DEFC at 100 deg C. (author)

  19. Response of a direct methanol fuel cell to fuel change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leo, T.J. [Dpto de Sistemas Oceanicos y Navales- ETSI Navales, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Avda Arco de la Victoria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Raso, M.A.; de la Blanca, E. Sanchez [Dpto de Quimica Fisica I- Fac. CC. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Navarro, E.; Villanueva, M. [Dpto de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Pza Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Moreno, B. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Kelsen 5, Campus de la UAM, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Methanol and ethanol have recently received much attention as liquid fuels particularly as alternative 'energy-vectors' for the future. In this sense, to find a direct alcohol fuel cell that able to interchange the fuel without losing performances in an appreciable way would represent an evident advantage in the field of portable applications. In this work, the response of a in-house direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) to the change of fuel from methanol to ethanol and its behaviour at different ambient temperature values have been investigated. A corrosion study on materials suitable to fabricate the bipolar plates has been carried out and either 316- or 2205-duplex stainless steels have proved to be adequate for using in direct alcohol fuel cells. Polarization curves have been measured at different ambient temperature values, controlled by an experimental setup devised for this purpose. Data have been fitted to a model taking into account the temperature effect. For both fuels, methanol and ethanol, a linear dependence of adjustable parameters with temperature is obtained. Fuel cell performance comparison in terms of open circuit voltage, kinetic and resistance is established. (author)

  20. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  1. Direct electrical heating of irradiated metal fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.; Johanson, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept proposed by Argonne National Laboratory utilizes a metal fuel core. Reactor safety analysis requires information on the potential for fuel axial expansion during severe thermal transients. In addition to a comparatively large thermal expansion coefficient, metallic fuel has a unique potential for enhanced pre-failure expansion driven by retained fission gas and ingested bond sodium. In this paper, the authors present preliminary results from three direct electrical heating (DEH) experiments performed on irradiated metal fuel to investigate axial expansion behavior. The test samples were from Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) driver fuel ML-11 irradiated to 8 at.% burnup. Preliminary analysis of the results suggest that enhanced expansion driven by trapped fission gas can occur

  2. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  3. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  4. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  5. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  6. Silicon Based Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent

    The purpose of this project has been to investigate and fabricate small scale Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for Zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries...... such as lithium-ion batteries have insufficiently low energy density. Methanol is a promising fuel for such devices due to the high energy density and ease of refueling compared to charging batteries, making μDMFC a suitable replacement energy source. In this Ph.D. dissertation, silicon micro fabrication...... techniques where utilized to build μDMFCs with the purpose of engineering the structures, both on the micro and nano scales in order to realize a high level of control over the membrane and catalyst components. The work presents four different monolithic fuel cell designs. The primary design is based...

  7. Understanding oscillatory phenomena in molecular hydrogen generation via sodium borohydride hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budroni, M A; Biosa, E; Garroni, S; Mulas, G R C; Marchettini, N; Culeddu, N; Rustici, M

    2013-11-14

    The hydrolysis of borohydride salts represents one of the most promising processes for the generation of high purity molecular hydrogen under mild conditions. In this work we show that the sodium borohydride hydrolysis exhibits a fingerprinting periodic oscillatory transient in the hydrogen flow over a wide range of experimental conditions. We disproved the possibility that flow oscillations are driven by supersaturation phenomena of gaseous bubbles in the reactive mixture or by a nonlinear thermal feedback according to a thermokinetic model. Our experimental results indicate that the NaBH4 hydrolysis is a spontaneous inorganic oscillator, in which the hydrogen flow oscillations are coupled to an "oscillophor" in the reactive solution. The discovery of this original oscillator paves the way for a new class of chemical oscillators, with fundamental implications not only for testing the general theory on oscillations, but also with a view to chemical control of borohydride systems used as a source of hydrogen based green fuel.

  8. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply

  9. Mass-produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, In Young; Park, Ki Chul; Jung, Yong Chae; Lee, Sun Hyung; Song, Sung Moo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yong Jung; Endo, Morinobu

    2011-01-01

    Commercially mass-produced multi-walled carbon nanotubes, i.e., VGNF (Showa Denko Co.), were applied to support materials for platinum-ruthenium (PtRu) nanoparticles as anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells. The original VGNFs are composed of high-crystalline graphitic shells, which hinder the favorable surface deposition of the PtRu nanoparticles that are formed via borohydride reduction. The chemical treatment of VGNFs with potassium hydroxide (KOH), however, enables highly dispersed and dense deposition of PtRu nanoparticles on the VGNF surface. This capability becomes more remarkable depending on the KOH amount. The electrochemical evaluation of the PtRu-deposited VGNF catalysts showed enhanced active surface areas and methanol oxidation, due to the high dispersion and dense deposition of the PtRu nanoparticles. The improvement of the surface deposition states of the PtRu nanoparticles was significantly due to the high surface area and mesorporous surface structure of the KOH-activated VGNFs.

  10. Carbon-Supported Pd and PdFe Alloy Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Rivera Gavidia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs are electrochemical devices that efficiently produce electricity and are characterized by a large flexibility for portable applications and high energy density. Methanol crossover is one of the main obstacles for DMFC commercialization, forcing the search for highly electro-active and methanol tolerant cathodes. In the present work, carbon-supported Pd and PdFe catalysts were synthesized using a sodium borohydride reduction method and physico-chemically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX. The catalysts were investigated as DMFC cathodes operating at different methanol concentrations (up to 10 M and temperatures (60 °C and 90 °C. The cell based on PdFe/C cathode presented the best performance, achieving a maximum power density of 37.5 mW·cm−2 at 90 °C with 10 M methanol, higher than supported Pd and Pt commercial catalysts, demonstrating that Fe addition yields structural changes to Pd crystal lattice that reduce the crossover effects in DMFC operation.

  11. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2

  12. Development of new membrane materials for direct methanol fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Development of new membrane materials for direct methanol fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can convert the chemical energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy with high efficiency and low emission of pollutants. DMFCs can be used as the power sources to portable electronic devices

  13. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  14. Stability of aqueous-alkaline sodium borohydride formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkina, V.G.; Shabunya, S.I.; Kalinin, V.I.; Martynenko, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Stability of sodium borohydride in the form of concentrated solutions and suspensions and solids corresponding to a crystal hydrate in composition was studied. The effects of temperature, concentrations of sodium borohydride and alkali, and nature of alkali metal cation on the rate of sodium borohydride hydrolysis were studied [ru

  15. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  16. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino S. Aricò

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK, new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2. This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115.

  17. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  18. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  19. Ballmilling of metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    of the renewable energy sources [2]. Borohydrides have received great attention as energy carrier due to their high gravimetric content of hydrogen, though unfortunately they are currently not applicable for industrial use due to high thermal stability and poor recycling. The purpose of the investigation...

  20. Direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Magnus; Blum, Zoltan; Shleev, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    In this mini-review we briefly describe some historical developments made in the field of enzymatic fuel cells (FCs), discussing important design considerations taken when constructing mediator-, cofactor-, and membrane-less biological FCs (BFCs). Since the topic is rather extensive, only BFCs utilizing direct electron transfer (DET) reactions on both the anodic and cathodic sides are considered. Moreover, the performance of mostly glucose/oxygen biodevices is analyzed and compared. We also present some unpublished results on mediator-, cofactor-, and membrane-less glucose/oxygen BFCs recently designed in our group and tested in different human physiological fluids, such as blood, plasma, saliva, and tears. Finally, further perspectives for BFC applications are highlighted.

  1. The Direct Methanol Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    Until the early 1990's the idea of a practical direct methanol fuel cell from transportation and other applications was just that, an idea. Several types of fuel cells that operate under near ambient conditions were under development.

  2. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  3. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  4. Extending EV Range with Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Steckmann, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Electric cars are the vehicles of the future, and there is a proven hybrid system for extending their mileage. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) provide safe, lightweight, onboard battery charging that can free car owners from worry about running out of power. The hybrid system includes a DMFC fuel cell, fuel cell cartridge and electric vehicle batteries. The fuel cell operates almost silently with virtually no exhaust, it is immune to extreme weather and the convenient fuel cartridges featu...

  5. New borohydride anion B6H7-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, I.Yu.; Vinitskij, D.M.; Solntsev, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The [Ni(Bipy) 3 ] (B 6 H 7 ) 2 , (Ph 4 P)B 6 H 7 , [Ni(Phen) 3 ](B 6 H 7 ) 2 crystals (where Bipy = bipyridine, Phen = phenathroline, Ph = phenyl) are obtained via the exchange reaction with a subsequent recrystallization from aqua-acetonic and acetonic solutions. The structure is studied of a new borohydride anion B 6 H 7 - possessing a four-valence bond unique for polyhedral borohydride anions. A triangular face of boride skeleton coordinating a hydrogen atom is considerably larger than other faces, and the electron density on this hydrogen atom is evidently much higher than at the end hydride hydrogen atoms. The trend of B 6 H 7 - anion to form statistically disordered structurs testifies to a rather slight effect of the seventh hydrogen atom position on the structure pattern of the ionic crystal lattice

  6. Electrochemical oxidation of ethanol using PtRh/C electrocatalysts in alkaline medium and synthesized by sodium borohydride and alcohol reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Eric Hossein

    2017-01-01

    PtRh/C were prepared by the following atomic proportions: (100,0), (0,100), (90,10), (70,30) and (50,50). The methods employed in the synthesis of these materials were reduction by sodium borohydride and reduction by alcohol. The metal salts used were H 2 PtCl 6 3•6H 2 0 and (RhNO 3 ) 3 , the support used was Carbon black XC72 and the bulk metal composition was 20% and 80% of support. The electrocatalysts were characterized by Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. The ethanol electrochemical oxidation mechanism was investigated by in situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy couple to an Attenuated Total Reflection technique. The electrocatalytic activity were evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry, Linear Sweep Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry techniques. The Fuel Cells tests were made in a single direct alcohol fuel cell with alkaline membrane. The working electrodes were prepared by a thin porous coating technique. X-ray diffraction allowed to verify metallic alloys, segregate phases and to calculate the percentage of metallic alloys. It was else possible to identify crystallographic phases. Infrared Spectroscopy allowed to verify that the electrochemical oxidation of ethanol was carried out by an incomplete mechanism. PtRh(70:30)/C prepared by sodium borohydride produced large amounts of carbon dioxide and acetaldehyde. Rh/C showed electrocatalytic activity when compared with other materials studied.

  7. Bleaching of Wool with Sodium Borohydride

    OpenAIRE

    Duygu Yilmazer, MSc.; Mehmet Kanik, Ph.D.

    2009-01-01

    An untreated wool fabric was bleached both with sodium borohydride (SBH) in the presence of sodium bisulphite (SBS) solution and with a commercial H2O2 bleaching method. The concentration effects of SBH and SBS, bleaching time, pH and temperature on SBH bleaching process were investigated. Whiteness, yellowness and alkali solubility results were assessed for both bleaching methods. The results showed that whiteness degrees obtained with SBH bleaching was comparable with that of H2O2 bleaching...

  8. Modified Borohydrides for Reversible Hydrogen Storage (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Au

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results in the effort to destabilize lithium borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage. A number of metals, metal hydrides, metal chlorides and complex hydrides were selected and evaluated as the destabilization agents for reducing de-hydriding temperature and generating de-hydriding-re-hydriding reversibility. It is found that some additives are effective. The Raman spectroscopic analysis shows the change of B-H binding nature. (authors)

  9. Solid Aluminum Borohydrides for Prospective Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgaliuk, Iurii; Safin, Damir A; Tumanov, Nikolay A; Morelle, Fabrice; Moulai, Adel; Černý, Radovan; Łodziana, Zbigniew; Devillers, Michel; Filinchuk, Yaroslav

    2017-12-08

    Metal borohydrides are intensively researched as high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. Aluminum is a cheap, light, and abundant element and Al 3+ can serve as a template for reversible dehydrogenation. However, Al(BH 4 ) 3 , containing 16.9 wt % of hydrogen, has a low boiling point, is explosive on air and has poor storage stability. A new family of mixed-cation borohydrides M[Al(BH 4 ) 4 ], which are all solid under ambient conditions, show diverse thermal decomposition behaviors: Al(BH 4 ) 3 is released for M=Li + or Na + , whereas heavier derivatives evolve hydrogen and diborane. NH 4 [Al(BH 4 ) 4 ], containing both protic and hydridic hydrogen, has the lowest decomposition temperature of 35 °C and yields Al(BH 4 ) 3 ⋅NHBH and hydrogen. The decomposition temperatures, correlated with the cations' ionic potential, show that M[Al(BH 4 ) 4 ] species are in the most practical stability window. This family of solids, with convenient and versatile properties, puts aluminum borohydride chemistry in the mainstream of hydrogen storage research, for example, for the development of reactive hydride composites with increased hydrogen content. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Fuel coolant interaction experiment by direct electrical heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tsuneo; Hirano, Kenmei

    1979-01-01

    In the PCM (Power Cooling Mismatch) experiments, the FCI (Fuel Coolant Interaction) test is one of necessary tests in order to predict various phenomena that occur during PCM in the core. A direct electrical heating method is used for the FCI tests for fuel pellet temperature of over 1000 0 C. Therefore, preheating is required before initiating the direct electrical heating. The fuel pin used in the FCI tests is typical LWR fuel element, which is surrounded by coolant water. It is undersirable to heat up the coolant water during preheating of the fuel pin. Therefore, a zirconia (ZrO 2 ) pellet which is similar to a UO 2 pellet in physical and chemical properties is used. Electric property (electric conductivity) of ZrO 2 is particularly suitable for direct electrical heating as in the case of UO 2 . In this experiment, ZrO 2 pellet (melting point 2500 0 C) melting was achieved by use of both preheating and direct electrical heating. Temperature changes of coolant and fuel surface, as well as the pressure change of coolant water, were measured. The molten fuel interacted with the coolant and generated shock waves. A portion of this molten fuel fragmented into small particles during this interaction. The peak pressure of the observed shock wave was about 35 bars. The damaged fuel pin was photographed after disassembly. This report shows the measured coolant pressure changes and the coolant temperature changes, as well as photographs of damaged fuel pin and fuel fragments. (author)

  11. Recent Advances in High-Performance Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T. I.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Frank, H.; Surumpudi, S.; Halpert, G.; Kosek, J.; Cropley, C.; La Conti, A. B.; hide

    1996-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed, direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant.

  12. Platinum- and membrane-free swiss-roll mixed-reactant alkaline fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W; Gyenge, Előd L

    2013-05-01

    Eliminating the expensive and failure-prone proton exchange membrane (PEM) together with the platinum-based anode and cathode catalysts would significantly reduce the high capital and operating costs of low-temperature (<373 K) fuel cells. We recently introduced the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant fuel cell (SR-MRFC) concept for borohydride-oxygen alkaline fuel cells. We now present advances in anode electrocatalysis for borohydride electrooxidation through the development of osmium nanoparticulate catalysts supported on porous monolithic carbon fiber materials (referred to as an osmium 3D anode). The borohydride-oxygen SR-MRFC operates at 323 K and near atmospheric pressure, generating a peak power density of 1880 W m(-2) in a single-cell configuration by using an osmium-based anode (with an osmium loading of 0.32 mg cm(-2)) and a manganese dioxide gas-diffusion cathode. To the best of our knowledge, 1880 W m(-2) is the highest power density ever reported for a mixed-reactant fuel cell operating under similar conditions. Furthermore, the performance matches the highest reported power densities for conventional dual chamber PEM direct borohydride fuel cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Kathyayani

    2011-10-04

    Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

  14. Synthesis of Halide- and Solvent free metal borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Møller, Kasper Trans; Jensen, Torben René

    chloride or LiBH4 is present in the sample. The synthesis pathway has been shown to work for most of the already known metal borohydrides, M = Na, Ca, Sr, Ba, Y, La, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb, but also new borohydrides are formed, M = Pr, Nd and Lu. Besides new compounds, new polymorphs...

  15. Chemical nickel plating in tartrate solutions with borohydride reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plokhov, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate the influence of various factors on the rate of chemical nickel plating in strongly alkaline tartrate solutions with a borohydride reducing agent. After 30 min of the process of nickel plating, the final concentration of sodium borohydride decreases to 0.26 g/liter, leading to stoppage of the process. The nickel plating process can be intensified by increasing the concentration of sodium hydroxide in the solution, suppressing hydrolysis of borohydride, and also by introducing additives which suppress hydrolysis of borohydride. For chemical deposition of nickel-boron coatings from tartrate solutions the authors recommend the following composition (g/liter): nickel chloride 15-25, Rochelle salt 450-550, sodium hydroxide 140-160, sodium borohydride 0.8-1.0, thallium nitrate 0.003-0.008. The process temperature is 92-95 C, and the deposition rate is 4-6 um/h

  16. The JPL Direct Methanol Liquid-feed PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, G.; Surampudi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, there has been a breakthrough in fuel cell technology in the Energy Storage Systems Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with the develpment of a direct methanol, liquid-feed, solid polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell... The methanol liquid-feed, solid polymer electrolyte (PEM) design has numerous system level advantages over the gas-feed design. These include:...

  17. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfield, S.

    1996-04-01

    Research on direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is discussed. Systems considered for transportation applications are addressed. The use of platinum/ruthenium anode electrocatalysts and platinum cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in significant performance enhancements.

  18. Direct Fuel Injector Power Drive System Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    solenoid coil to create magnetic field in the stator. Then, the stator pulls the pintle to open the injector nozzle . This pintle movement occurs when the...that typically deal with power strategies to the injector solenoid coil. Numerical simulation codes for diesel injection systems were developed by...Laboratory) for providing the JP-8 test fuel. REFERENCES 1. Digesu, P. and Laforgia D., “ Diesel electro- injector : A numerical simulation code”. Journal of

  19. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s......Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon......-carbonate slurry or anode layer. The nature of the coal affects both open circuit voltage and power output. Highest OCV and power densities were observed for bituminous coal and by adding manganese oxide or praseodymium-doped ceria to the carbon/carbonate mixture. Comparing the carbon black fueled performance...... bituminous coal (73 mW/cm2). © 2015 ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  20. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s......Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon......-carbonate slurry or anode layer. The nature of the coal affects both open circuit voltage and power output. Highest OCV and power densities were observed for bituminous coal and by adding manganese oxide or praseodymium-doped ceria to the carbon/carbonate mixture. Comparing the carbon black fueled performance...... bituminous coal (73 mW/cm2)....

  1. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, J.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K. [Fuel Cell Engineering, Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  2. Direct hydrogen fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Wang, X.

    Hybridizing a fuel cell system with an energy storage system offers an opportunity to improve the fuel economy of the vehicle through regenerative braking and possibly to increase the specific power and decrease the cost of the combined energy conversion and storage systems. Even in a hybrid configuration it is advantageous to operate the fuel cell system in a load-following mode and use the power from the energy storage system when the fuel cell alone cannot meet the power demand. This paper discusses an approach for designing load-following fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles and illustrates it by applying it to pressurized, direct hydrogen, polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for a mid-size family sedan. The vehicle level requirements relative to traction power, response time, start-up time and energy conversion efficiency are used to select the important parameters for the PEFC stack, air management system, heat rejection system and the water management system.

  3. Cathode-supported hybrid direct carbon fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Gurauskis, Jonas; Deleebeeck, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The direct conversion of coal to heat and electricity by a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC) is a highly efficient and cleaner technology than the conventional combustion power plants. HDCFC is defined as a combination of solid oxide fuel cell and molten carbonate fuel cell. This work...... investigates cathode-supported cells as an alternative configuration for HDCFC, with better catalytic activity and performance. This study aims to define the best processing route to manufacture highly efficient cathode-supported cells based on La0.75Sr0.25MnO3/yttria-stabilized zirconia infiltrated backbones...

  4. Modeling and Simulation of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohr, M.; Narayanan, S. R.; Halpert, G.

    1996-01-01

    From intro.: The direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell uses aqueous solutions of methanol as fuel and oxygen or air as the oxidant and uses an ionically conducting polymer membrane such as Nafion(sup r)117 and the electrolyte. This type of direct oxidation cell is fuel versatile and offers significant advantages in terms of simplicity of design and operation...The present study focuses on the results of a phenomenological model based on current understanding of the various processed operating in these cells.

  5. INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE ''BURNING'' AND DIRECT DISPOSAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodney C. Ewing; Lumin Wang

    2002-01-01

    Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241 Am, 244 Cm and 237 Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burnup of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-cycle of burn-up. Direct disposal can considerably reduce cost, processing requirements, and radiation exposure to workers

  6. A Direct DME High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been identified as an alternative to methanol for use in direct fuel cells. It combines the advantages of hydrogen in terms of pumpless fuel delivery and high energy density like methanol, but without the toxicity of the latter. The performance of a direct dimethyl ether...... fuel cell suffers greatly from the very low DME-water miscibility. To cope with the problem polybenzimidazole (PBI) based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) have been made and tested in a vapor fed system. PtRu on carbon has been used as anode catalyst and air at ambient pressure was used as oxidant...

  7. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian

    An increasing need for energy efficiency and high energy density has sparked a growing interest in direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications. This type of fuel cell directly generates electricity from a fuel mixture consisting of methanol and water. Although this technology...... surpasses batteries in important areas, fundamental research is still required to improve durability and performance. Particularly the transport of methanol and water within the cell structure is difficult to study in-situ. A demand therefore exist for the fundamental development of mathematical models...... for studying their transport. In this PhD dissertation the macroscopic transport phenomena governing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled using the two-fluid approach in the computational fluid dynamics framework of CFX 14. The overall objective of this work is to extend...

  8. High utilization platinum deposition on single-walled carbon nanotubes as catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.J.; Yin, G.P.; Zhang, J.; Wang, Z.B.; Gao, Y.Z.

    2007-01-01

    This research aims to enhance the activity of Pt catalysts, thus to lower the loading of Pt metal in fuel cell. Highly dispersed platinum supported on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as catalyst was prepared by ion exchange method. The homemade Pt/SWNTs underwent a repetition of ion exchange and reduction process in order to achieve an increase of the metal loading. For comparison, the similar loading of Pt catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes was prepared by borohydride reduction method. The catalysts were characterized by using energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX), transmission electron micrograph (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). Compared with the Pt/SWNTs catalyst prepared by borohydride method, higher Pt utilization was achieved on the SWNTs by ion exchange method. Furthermore, in comparison to the E-TEK 20 wt.% Pt/C catalyst with the support of carbon black, the results from electrochemical measurement indicated that the Pt/SWNTs prepared by ion exchange method displayed a higher catalytic activity for methanol oxidation and higher Pt utilization, while no significant increasing in the catalytic activity of the Pt/SWNTs catalyst obtained by borohydride method

  9. High performance direct methanol fuel cell with thin electrolyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Nianfang

    2017-06-01

    A high performance direct methanol fuel cell is achieved with thin electrolyte membrane. 320 mW cm-2 of peak power density and over 260 mW cm-2 at 0.4 V are obtained when working at 90 °C with normal pressure air supply. It is revealed that the increased anode half-cell performance with temperature contributes primarily to the enhanced performance at elevated temperature. From the comparison of iR-compensated cathode potential of methanol/air with that of H2/air fuel cell, the impact of methanol crossover on cathode performance decreases with current density and becomes negligible at high current density. Current density is found to influence fuel efficiency and methanol crossover significantly from the measurement of fuel efficiency at different current density. At high current density, high fuel efficiency can be achieved even at high temperature, indicating decreased methanol crossover.

  10. Novel materials for fuel cells operating on liquid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. C. Sequeira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Towards commercialization of fuel cell products in the coming years, the fuel cell systems are being redefined by means of lowering costs of basic elements, such as electrolytes and membranes, electrode and catalyst materials, as well as of increasing power density and long-term stability. Among different kinds of fuel cells, low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are of major importance, but their problems related to hydrogen storage and distribution are forcing the development of liquid fuels such as methanol, ethanol, sodium borohydride and ammonia. In respect to hydrogen, methanol is cheaper, easier to handle, transport and store, and has a high theoretical energy density. The second most studied liquid fuel is ethanol, but it is necessary to note that the highest theoretically energy conversion efficiency should be reached in a cell operating on sodium borohydride alkaline solution. It is clear that proper solutions need to be developed, by using novel catalysts, namely nanostructured single phase and composite materials, oxidant enrichment technologies and catalytic activity increasing. In this paper these main directions will be considered.

  11. Micropump Fuel Mix Control for Novel Miniature Direct Methanol Fuel Cells, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Energies and Power Densities of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs) are limited by the size and weight associated with the liquid pump, which must circulate the...

  12. Comparative exergy analysis of direct alcohol fuel cells using fuel mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Leo Mena, Teresa de Jesus; Raso García, Miguel Ángel; Navarro Arevalo, Emilio; Sánchez de la Blanca, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Within the last years there has been increasing interest in direct liquid fuel cells as power sources for portable devices and, in the future, power plants for electric vehicles and other transport media as ships will join those applications. Methanol is considerably more convenient and easy to use than gaseous hydrogen and a considerable work is devoted to the development of direct methanol fuel cells. But ethanol has much lower toxicity and from an ecological viewpoint ethanol is exceptiona...

  13. Tuning of platinum nano-particles by Au usage in their binary alloy for direct ethanol fuel cell: Controlled synthesis, electrode kinetics and mechanistic interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Abhijit; Mondal, Achintya; Datta, Jayati

    2015-06-01

    Understanding of the electrode-kinetics and mechanism of ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) is of considerable interest for optimizing electro-catalysis in direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). This work attempts to design Pt based electro-catalyst on carbon support, tuned with gold nano-particles (NPs), for their use in DEFC operating in alkaline medium. The platinum-gold alloyed NPs are synthesized at desired compositions and size (2-10 nm) by controlled borohydride reduction method and successfully characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS and XPS techniques. The kinetic parameters along with the activation energies for the EOR are evaluated over the temperature range 20-80 °C and the oxidation reaction products estimated through ion chromatographic analysis. Compared to single Pt/C catalyst, the over potential of EOR is reduced by ca. 500 mV, at the onset during the reaction, for PtAu/C alloy with only 23% Pt content demonstrating the ability of Au and/or its surface oxides providing oxygen species at much lower potentials compared to Pt. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the peak power density (>191%) is observed in an in-house fabricated direct ethanol anion exchange membrane fuel cell, DE(AEM)FC using the best performing Au covered Pt electrode (23% Pt) compared to the monometallic Pt catalyst.

  14. Borohydride, micellar, and exciplex-enhanced dechlorination of chlorobiphenyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epling, G.A.; Florio, E.M.; Bourque, A.J.; Qian, H.H.; Stuart, J.D.

    1988-08-01

    The photodechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) has been studied in the presence of sodium borohydride, detergents, and exciplex-forming additives. In a family of 13 representative PCB's these variations generally led to a dramatically increased rate of photodegradation. Further, the products of photoreaction in the presence of sodium borohydride are more cleanly the simple dechlorinated aromatics, with fewer side reactions than observed with ordinary photolysis.

  15. Manufacturing technologies for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluesen, Andreas; Mueller, Martin; Kimiaie, Nicola; Konradi, Irene; Mergel, Juergen; Stolten, Detlef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Energy Research - IEF-3: Fuel Cells

    2010-07-01

    Fuel cell research is focussing on increasing power density and lifetime and reducing costs of the whole fuel cell system. In order to reach these aims, it is necessary to develop appropriately designed components outgoing from high quality materials, a suitable manufacturing process and a well balanced system. To make use of the advantages that can be obtained by developing production technology, we are mainly improving the coating and assembling techniques for polymer electrolyte fuel cells, especially Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs). Coating is used for making fuel cell electrodes as well as highly conductive contacts. Assembling is used to join larger components like membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and bipolar units consisting of flow fields and the separator plate, as well as entire stacks. On the one hand a reproducible manufacturing process is required to study fine differences in fuel cell performance affected by new materials or new designs. On the other hand a change in each parameter of the manufacturing process itself can change product properties and therefore affect fuel cell performance. As a result, gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) are now produced automatically in square-meter batches, the hot-pressing of MEAs is a fully automated process and by pre-assembling the number of parts that have to be assembled in a stack was reduced by a factor of 10. These achievements make DMFC manufacturing more reproducible and less error-prone. All these and further developments of manufacturing technology are necessary to make DMFCs ready for the market. (orig.)

  16. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurau, Bogdan [Nuvant Systems Inc., Crown Point, IN (United States)

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  17. Autonomous Voltage Oscillations in a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Jéssica A.; Peña Arias, Ivonne K.; Hanke-Rauschenbach, Richard; Vidakovic-Koch, Tanja; Varela, Hamilton; Sundmacher, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells fed with H_2/CO mixtures at the anode have a considerably lower performance than fuel cells fed with pure hydrogen. However, when operated in an autonomous oscillatory regime, the overall voltage loss decreases due to a self-cleaning mechanism. Another molecule, also widely used as feed in the fuel cell and susceptible to kinetic instabilities, is methanol. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on autonomous voltage oscillations in the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The purpose of this work was to explore if such instabilities also occur in the DMFC system. Initially, half-cell experiments with a gas diffusion electrode were performed. Then, a DMFC was operated under current control and studied by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The half-cell measurements revealed that the induction period for oscillations depends on the mass transfer conditions, where on stagnant electrode the induction time was shorter than in the case of forced convection. The DMFC showed also autonomous voltage oscillations above a certain threshold current. The results obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy give evidence of a negative differential resistance in the fuel cell, hitherto not described in the literature, which can be related to the appearance of oscillations during galvanostatic methanol electro-oxidation. These results open the possibility to evaluate the performance of low-temperature fuel cells fed with carbon-containing fuels under oscillatory operating conditions.

  18. Pt -based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Bibian; Sanchez, Carlos; Gonzalez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is studied the electro-catalytic behavior of pure platinum and platinum-based alloys with Ru, Sn, Ir, and Os supported on carbon to the ethanol electro-oxidation in aims to develop anodic catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells, additionally, porous electrodes and membrane electrode assemblies were built for proton exchange membrane fuel cells in which the electrodes were tested. Catalysts characterization was made by cyclic voltammetry whereas the fuel cells behavior tests were made by current-potential polarization curves. in general, all alloys show a lower on-set reaction potential and a higher catalytic activity than pure platinum. However, in the high over potential zone, pure platinum has higher catalytic activity than the alloys. In agreement with these results, the alloys studied here could be useful in fuel cells operating on moderated and low current

  19. Rotating disk electrode study of borohydride oxidation in a molten eutectic electrolyte and advancements in the intermediate temperature borohydride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Gyenge, Előd L.

    2017-08-01

    The electrode kinetics of the NaBH4 oxidation reaction (BOR) in a molten NaOH-KOH eutectic mixture is investigated by rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry on electrochemically oxidized Ni at temperatures between 458 K and 503 K. The BH4- diffusion coefficient in the molten alkali eutectic together with the BOR activation energy, exchange current density, transfer coefficient and number of electrons exchanged, are determined. Electrochemically oxidized Ni shows excellent BOR electrocatalytic activity with a maximum of seven electrons exchanged and a transfer coefficient up to one. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the formation of NiO as the catalytically active species. The high faradaic efficiency and BOR rate on oxidized Ni anode in the molten electrolyte compared to aqueous alkaline electrolytes is advantageous for power sources. A novel molten electrolyte battery design is investigated using dissolved NaBH4 at the anode and immobilized KIO4 at the cathode. This battery produces a stable open-circuit cell potential of 1.04 V, and a peak power density of 130 mW cm-2 corresponding to a superficial current density of 160 mA cm-2 at 458 K. With further improvements and scale-up borohydride molten electrolyte batteries and fuel cells could be integrated with thermal energy storage systems.

  20. Tetra-n-butylammonium borohydride semiclathrate: a hybrid material for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyuchul; Kim, Yongkwan; Strobel, Timothy A; Prasad, P S R; Sugahara, Takeshi; Lee, Huen; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-06-11

    In this study, we demonstrate that tetra-n-butylammonium borohydride [(n-C(4)H(9))(4)NBH(4)] can be used to form a hybrid hydrogen storage material. Powder X-ray diffraction measurements verify the formation of tetra-n-butylammonium borohydride semiclathrate, while Raman spectroscopic and direct gas release measurements confirm the storage of molecular hydrogen within the vacant cavities. Subsequent to clathrate decomposition and the release of physically bound H(2), additional hydrogen was produced from the hybrid system via a hydrolysis reaction between the water host molecules and the incorporated BH(4)(-) anions. The additional hydrogen produced from the hydrolysis reaction resulted in a 170% increase in the gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity, or 27% greater storage than fully occupied THF + H(2) hydrate. The decomposition temperature of tetra-n-butylammonium borohydride semiclathrate was measured at 5.7 degrees C, which is higher than that for pure THF hydrate (4.4 degrees C). The present results reveal that the BH(4)(-) anion is capable of stabilizing tetraalkylammonium hydrates.

  1. Recent progresses in materials for the direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, C; Leger, J M [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 86 - Poitiers (France)

    1998-12-31

    Research programs are being conducted worldwide to develop a clean, zero emissions electric vehicle. However, even with the most advanced batteries, such as nickel/metal hydride, or lithium ion batteries, the driving range is limited and the recharging time is long. Only fuel cells which can convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy can compete with internal combustion engines. This paper reviewed the recent progress made in the development of a direct methanol fuel cell using the concept developed for the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). It was noted that the electrode materials, at the methanol anode and oxygen cathode need to be improved by using multifunctional electrocatalysts. The development of new temperature resistant proton exchange membranes with good ionic conductivity and low methanol cross-over, which resulted from the need to increase operating temperatures above 100 degrees C was also reviewed. 35 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  2. Direct dimethyl ether high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    and suffers from low DME solubility in water. When the DME - water mixture is fed as vapour miscibility is no longer a problem. The increased temperature is more beneficial for the kinetics of the direct oxidation of DME than of methanol. The Open Circuit Voltage (OCV) with DME operation was 50 to 100 m......A high temperature polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer fuel cell was fed with dimethyl ether (DME) and water vapour mixture on the anode at ambient pressure with air as oxidant. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was achieved at 200°C. A conventional polymer based direct DME fuel cell is liquid fed......V higher than that of methanol, indicating less fuel crossover....

  3. Matlab Source Code for Species Transport through Nafion Membranes in Direct Ethanol, Direct Methanol, and Direct Glucose Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    JH, Summerfield; MW, Manley

    2016-01-01

    A simple simulation of chemical species movement is presented. The species traverse a Nafion membrane in a fuel cell. Three cells are examined: direct methanol, direct ethanol, and direct glucose. The species are tracked using excess proton concentration, electric field strength, and voltage. The Matlab computer code is provided.

  4. DIAGNOSTICS OF GASOLINE FUEL SYSTEMS WITH DIRECT INJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bulgakov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A method of diagnosing fuel systems with direct injection by means of producing a pressure oscillation in a hydraulic accumulator is presented. Having obtained a signal from pressure sensor it is possible to register a pressure drop at the moment of injection. If the system has a malfunction, then the pressure drop will be higher.

  5. The Pore Structure of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Peter Brilner

    2005-01-01

    The pore structure and morphology of direct methanol fuel cell electrodes are characterized using mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the pore size distributions of printed primer and catalyst layers are largely dictated by the powders used to make...

  6. Increasing Fuel Efficiency of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems with Feedforward Control of the Operating Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngseung Na

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the R&D on fuel cells for portable applications concentrates on increasing efficiencies and energy densities to compete with other energy storage devices, especially batteries. To improve the efficiency of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC systems, several modifications to system layouts and operating strategies are considered in this paper, rather than modifications to the fuel cell itself. Two modified DMFC systems are presented, one with an additional inline mixer and a further modification of it with a separate tank to recover condensed water. The set point for methanol concentration control in the solution is determined by fuel efficiency and varies with the current and other process variables. Feedforward concentration control enables variable concentration for dynamic loads. Simulation results were validated experimentally with fuel cell systems.

  7. Porous silicon-based direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhafarov, T D; Yuksel, S Aydin

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the use of Au/porous silicon/Silicon Schottky type structure, as a direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell is demonstrated. The porous silicon filled with hydrochlorid acid was developed as a proton conduction membrane. The Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon cells were fabricated by first creating the porous silicon layer in single-crystalline Si using the anodic etching under illumination and then deposition Au catalyst layer onto the porous silicon. Using 80 mM H2S solution as fuel the open circuit voltage of 0.4 V was obtained and maximum power density of 30 W/m2 at room temperature was achieved. These results demonstrate that the Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell which uses H2S:dH2O solution as fuel and operates at room temperature can be considered as the most promising type of low cost fuel cell for small power-supply units.

  8. A novel direct carbon fuel cell by approach of tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Renzhu; Zhao, Chunhua; Li, Junliang; Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Shaorong; Wen, Tinglian; Wen, Zhaoyin [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Inorganic Energy Materials and Power Source Engineering Center, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS), 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2010-01-15

    A direct carbon fuel cell based on a conventional anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cell, which consisted of a NiO-YSZ anode support tube, a NiO-ScSZ anode functional layer, a ScSZ electrolyte film, and a LSM-ScSZ cathode, has been successfully achieved. It used the carbon black as fuel and oxygen as the oxidant, and a preliminary examination of the DCFC has been carried out. The cell generated an acceptable performance with the maximum power densities of 104, 75, and 47 mW cm{sup -2} at 850, 800, and 750 C, respectively. These results demonstrate the feasibility for carbon directly converting to electricity in tubular solid oxide fuel cells. (author)

  9. Valveless piezoelectric micropump for fuel delivery in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Qing-Ming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PA 15261 (United States)

    2005-01-10

    Fuel cells are being considered as an important technology that can be used for various power applications. For portable electronic devices such as laptops, digital cameras, cell phone, etc., the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a very promising candidate as a power source. Compared with conventional batteries, DMFC can provide a higher power density with a long-lasting life and recharging which is almost instant. However, many issues related to the design, fabrication and operation of miniaturized DMFC power systems still remain unsolved. Fuel delivery is one of the key issues that will determine the performance of the DMFC. To maintain a desired performance, an efficient fuel delivery system is required to provide an adequate amount of fuel for consumption and remove carbon dioxide generated from fuel cell devices at the same time. In this paper, a novel fuel delivery system combined with a miniaturized DMFC is presented. The core component of this system is a piezoelectric valveless micropump that can convert the reciprocating movement of a diaphragm activated by a piezoelectric actuator into a pumping effect. Nozzle/diffuser elements are used to direct the flow from inlet to outlet. As for DMFC devices, the micropump system needs to meet some specific requirements: low energy consumption but a sufficient fuel flow rate. Based on theoretical analysis, the effect of piezoelectric materials properties, driving voltage, driving frequency, nozzle/diffuser dimension, and other factors on the performance of the whole fuel cell system will be discussed. As a result, a viable design of a micropump system for fuel delivery can be achieved and some simulation results will be presented as well. (author)

  10. Process for production of a borohydride compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-19

    A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

  11. Membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, Z.; Kamarudin, S.K.; Timmiati, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • DEFCs have emerged as alternative energy source. • But many issue need to be addressed. • This paper describes current problem and advancement of membrane in DEFC. - Abstract: Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) are attractive as a power source options because ethanol is a nontoxic, leading to ease of handling and a high energy density fuel, leading to high system energy density. However, to provide practical DEFCs power source there are several issues that still must be addressed including low power density, effect of ethanol crossover on efficiency of fuel utilization, electrical, mechanical and thermal stability and water uptake of the DEFCs electrolyte membrane. This paper describes the proton exchange membrane and alkaline exchange membrane for DEFCs, focusing on current problems and advancements in DEFC membranes. It also presents the specifications and performances of the membranes used in DEFC.

  12. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Principles and Materials Aspects of Direct Alkaline Alcohol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Hao Yu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct alkaline alcohol fuel cells (DAAFCs have attracted increasing interest over the past decade because of their favourable reaction kinetics in alkaline media, higher energy densities achievable and the easy handling of the liquid fuels. In this review, principles and mechanisms of DAAFCs in alcohol oxidation and oxygen reduction are discussed. Despite the high energy densities available during the oxidation of polycarbon alcohols they are difficult to oxidise. Apart from methanol, the complete oxidation of other polycarbon alcohols to CO2 has not been achieved with current catalysts. Different types of catalysts, from conventional precious metal catalyst of Pt and Pt alloys to other lower cost Pd, Au and Ag metal catalysts are compared. Non precious metal catalysts, and lanthanum, strontium oxides and perovskite-type oxides are also discussed. Membranes like the ones used as polymer electrolytes and developed for DAAFCs are reviewed. Unlike conventional proton exchange membrane fuel cells, anion exchange membranes are used in present DAAFCs. Fuel cell performance with DAAFCs using different alcohols, catalysts and membranes, as well as operating parameters are summarised. In order to improve the power output of the DAAFCs, further developments in catalysts, membrane materials and fuel cell systems are essential.

  14. Direct methanol feed fuel cell with reduced catalyst loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Improvements to direct feed methanol fuel cells include new protocols for component formation. Catalyst-water repellent material is applied in formation of electrodes and sintered before application of ionomer. A membrane used in formation of an electrode assembly is specially pre-treated to improve bonding between catalyst and membrane. The improved electrode and the pre-treated membrane are assembled into a membrane electrode assembly.

  15. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  16. Direct dimethyl ether fueling of a high temperature polymer fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Vassiliev, Anton; Olsen, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Direct dimethyl ether (DME) fuel cells suffer from poor DME–water miscibility and so far peak powers of only 20–40 mW cm−2 have been reported. Based on available literature on solubility of dimethyl ether (DME) in water at ambient pressure it was estimated that the maximum concentration of DME at...

  17. Direct fuel cell - A high proficiency power generator for biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, P.S.; Steinfeld, G.; Baker, B.S.

    1994-01-01

    Conversion of renewable bio-based resources into energy offers significant benefits for our environment and domestic economic activity. It also improves national security by displacing fossil fuels. However, in the current economic environment, it is difficult for biofuel systems to compete with other fossil fuels. The biomass-fired power plants are typically smaller than 50 MW, lower in electrical efficiencies (<25%) and experience greater costs for handling and transporting the biomass. When combined with fuel cells such as the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC), biofuels can produce power more efficiently with negligible environmental impact. Agricultural and other waste biomass can be converted to ethanol or methane-rich biofuels for power generation use in the DFC. These DFC power plants are modular and factory assembled. Due to their electrochemical (non-combustion) conversion process, these plants are environmentally friendly, highly efficient and potentially cost effective, even in sizes as small as a few meagawatts. They can be sited closer to the source of the biomass to minimize handling and transportation costs. The high-grade waste heat available from DFC power plants makes them attractive in cogeneration applications for farming and rural communities. The DFC potentially opens up new markets for biofuels derived from wood, grains and other biomass waste products

  18. Experimental investigation two phase flow in direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat, M. D.; Kaplan, Y.; Celik, S.; Oeztural, A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) have received many attentions specifically for portable electronic applications since it utilize methanol which is in liquid form in atmospheric condition and high energy density of the methanol. Thus it eliminates the storage problem of hydrogen. It also eliminates humidification requirement of polymeric membrane which is a problem in PEM fuel cells. Some electronic companies introduced DMFC prototypes for portable electronic applications. Presence of carbon dioxide gases due to electrochemical reactions in anode makes the problem a two phase problem. A two phase flow may occur at cathode specifically at high current densities due to the excess water. Presence of gas phase in anode region and liquid phase in cathode region prevents diffusion of fuel and oxygen to the reaction sites thus reduces the performance of the system. Uncontrolled pressure buildup in anode region increases methanol crossover through membrane and adversely effect the performance. Two phase flow in both anode and cathode region is very effective in the performance of DMYC system and a detailed understanding of two phase flow for high performance DMFC systems. Although there are many theoretical and experimental studies available on the DMFC systems in the literature, only few studies consider problem as a two-phase flow problem. In this study, an experimental set up is developed and species distributions on system are measured with a gas chromatograph. System performance characteristics (V-I curves) is measured depending on the process parameters (temperature, fuel ad oxidant flow rates, methanol concentration etc)

  19. Synthesis of halide- and solvent free metal borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Møller, Kasper Trans; Richter, Bo

    have challenges due to their high desorption kinetics and limited reversibility at moderate conditions.[2],[3],[4] In this work, we present a new approach to synthesize halide- and solvent free metal borohydrides starting from the respective metal hydride. The synthetic strategy ensures that no metal...... to the metal. Hence, the powdered M(BH4)3∙DMS is heated to 140 °C for 4 hours to obtain pure M(BH4)3. The rare-earth metal borohydrides have been investigated by infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis (TGA-DSC-MS). Furthermore, the structural trends are investigated by synchrotron radiation powder X...

  20. Performance evaluation of direct methanol fuel cells for portable applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, R.; Dincer, I.; Naterer, G.F. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Berg, P. [Faculty of Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    This study examines the feasibility of powering a range of portable devices with a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The analysis includes a comparison between a Li-ion battery and DMFC to supply the power for a laptop, camcorder and a cell phone. A parametric study of the systems for an operational period of 4 years is performed. Under the assumptions made for both the Li-ion battery and DMFC system, the battery cost is lower than the DMFC during the first year of operation. However, by the end of 4 years of operational time, the DMFC system would cost less. The weight and cost comparisons show that the fuel cell system occupies less space than the battery to store a higher amount of energy. The weight of both systems is almost identical. Finally, the CO{sub 2} emissions can be decreased by a higher exergetic efficiency of the DMFC, which leads to improved sustainability. (author)

  1. Advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W.; Stringer, J. (eds.)

    1979-12-01

    The first conference on advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines was held at the Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, Maine. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy) and the Electric Power Research Institute, (Division of Fossil Fuel and Advanced Systems). Forty-four papers from the proceedings have been entered into EDB and ERA and one also into EAPA; three had been entered previously from other sources. The papers are concerned with US DOE research programs in this area, coal gasification, coal liquefaction, gas turbines, fluidized-bed combustion and the materials used in these processes or equipments. The materials papers involve alloys, ceramics, coatings, cladding, etc., and the fabrication and materials listing of such materials and studies involving corrosion, erosion, deposition, etc. (LTN)

  2. Reactivity descriptors for direct methanol fuel cell anode catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrin, Peter; Nilekar, Anand Udaykumar; Greeley, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    oxidation to CO2 are investigated: an indirect mechanism that goes through a CO intermediate and a direct mechanism where methanol is oxidized to CO2 without the formation of a CO intermediate. For the direct mechanism, we find that, because of CO poisoning, only a small current will result on all non......We have investigated the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells using a database of adsorption free energies for 16 intermediates on 12 close-packed transition metal surfaces calculated with periodic, self-consistent, density functional theory (DFT-GGA). This database, combined with a simple...... electrokinetic model of the methanol electrooxidation reaction, yields mechanistic insights that are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies on Pt, and extends these insights to a broad spectrum of other transition metals. In addition, by using linear scaling relations between...

  3. Facile solvothermal synthesis of highly active and robust Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn electrocatalyst towards direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Rajkumar; Dhiman, Shikha; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2016-08-01

    Ordered intermetallic Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn ternary electrocatalyst has been synthesized by sodium borohydride reduction of precursor salts Pd(acac)2, CuCl2.2H2O and SnCl2 using one-pot solvothermal synthesis method at 220 °C with a reaction time of 24 h. To the best of our knowledge, here for the first time we report surfactant free synthesis of a novel ordered intermetallic ternary Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn nanoparticles. The ordered structure of the catalyst has been confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Composition and morphology of the nanoparticles have been confirmed through field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry and TEM. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the ternary electrocatalyst towards ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. The catalyst is proved to be highly efficient and stable upto 500th cycle and even better than commercially available Pd/C (20 wt%) electrocatalysts. The specific and mass activity of the as synthesized ternary catalyst are found to be ∼4.76 and ∼2.9 times better than that of commercial Pd/C. The enhanced activity and stability of the ordered ternary Pd1.87Cu0.11Sn catalyst can make it as a promising candidate for the alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell application.

  4. Direct fabrication of 238PuO2 fuel forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burney, G.A.; Congdon, J.W.

    1982-07-01

    The current process for the fabrication of 238 PuO 2 heat sources includes precipitation of small particle plutonium oxalate crystals (4 to 6 μm diameter), a calcination to PuO 2 , ball milling, cold pressing, granulation (60 to 125 μm), and granule sintering prior to hot pressing the fuel pellet. A new two-step direct-strike Pu(III) oxalate precipitation method which yields mainly large well-developed rosettes (50 to 100 μm diameter) has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in the plant. These large rosettes are formed by agglomeration of small (2 to 4 μm) crystals, and after calcining and sintering, were directly hot pressed into fuel forms, thus eliminating several of the powder conditioning steps. Conditions for direct hot pressing of the large heat-treated rosettes were determined and a full-scale General Purpose Heat Source pellet was fabricated. The pellet had the desired granule-type microstructure to provide dimensional stability at high temperature. 27 figures

  5. Direct ethanol fuel cells with catalysed metal mesh anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, Raghuram; Scott, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Platinum based binary and ternary catalysts prepared by thermal decomposition on titanium mesh were characterised and compared in terms of the electrochemical activity for ethanol oxidation. An enhancement in the catalytic activity was observed for the binary catalyst containing tin and ruthenium in their compositions with platinum. The catalysts were tested in single direct ethanol fuel cells and the result obtained with PtRu and PtSn showed that the mesh based electrodes show competitive performance in comparison to the conventional carbon based anodes

  6. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, Stephen [Arkema Inc.; Mountz, David [Arkema Inc.; He, Wensheng [Arkema Inc.; Zhang, Tao [Arkema Inc.

    2013-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cell membranes were developed using blends of different polyelectrolytes with PVDF. The membranes showed complex relationships between polyelectrolyte chemistry, morphology, and processing. Although the PVDF grade was found to have little effect on the membrane permselectivity, it does impact membrane conductivity and methanol permeation values. Other factors, such as varying the polyelectrolyte polarity, using varying crosslinking agents, and adjusting the equivalent weight of the membranes impacted methanol permeation, permselectivity, and areal resistance. We now understand, within the scope of the project work completed, how these inter-related performance properties can be tailored to achieve a balance of performance.

  7. Integration of direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells for highly efficient power generation from hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Choi, Pyoungho; Smith, Franklyn; Bokerman, Gary [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In view of impending depletion of hydrocarbon fuel resources and their negative environmental impact, it is imperative to significantly increase the energy conversion efficiency of hydrocarbon-based power generation systems. The combination of a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor with a direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells (FC) as a means for a significant increase in chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency is discussed in this paper. The data on development and operation of a thermocatalytic hydrocarbon decomposition reactor and its coupling with a proton exchange membrane FC are presented. The analysis of the integrated power generating system including a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor, direct carbon and hydrogen FC using natural gas and propane as fuels is conducted. It was estimated that overall chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of the integrated system varied in the range of 49.4-82.5%, depending on the type of fuel and FC used, and CO{sub 2} emission per kW{sub el}h produced is less than half of that from conventional power generation sources. (author)

  8. Magnesium Borohydride: From Hydrogen Storage to Magnesium Battery**

    OpenAIRE

    Mohtadi, Rana; Matsui, Masaki; Arthur, Timothy S; Hwang, Son-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Beyond hydrogen storage: The first example of reversible magnesium deposition/stripping onto/from an inorganic salt was seen for a magnesium borohydride electrolyte. High coulombic efficiency of up to 94 % was achieved in dimethoxyethane solvent. This Mg(BH_4)_2 electrolyte was utilized in a rechargeable magnesium battery.

  9. Metal Borohydrides synthesized from metal borides and metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    Aarhus C, Denmark email: gallafogh@hotmail.com / sanna-sommer@hotmail.com Magnesium boride, MgB2, ball milled with MH (M = Li, Na, Ca) followed by hydrogenation under high hydrogen pressure, readily forms the corresponding metal borohydrides, M(BH4)x (M = Li, Na, Ca) and MgH2 according to reaction scheme...

  10. Passive direct methanol fuel cells for portable electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad, F.; Kamarudin, S.K.; Daud, W.R.W.; Majlan, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing demand for electricity, clean, renewable energy resources must be developed. Thus, the objective of the present study was to develop a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) for portable electronic devices. The power output of six dual DMFCs connected in series with an active area of 4 cm 2 was approximately 600 mW, and the power density of the DMFCs was 25 mW cm -2 . The DMFCs were evaluated as a power source for mobile phone chargers and media players. The results indicated that the open circuit voltage of the DMFC was between 6.0 V and 6.5 V, and the voltage under operating conditions was 4.0 V. The fuel cell was tested on a variety of cell phone chargers, media players and PDAs. The cost of energy consumption by the proposed DMFC was estimated to be USD 20 W -1 , and the cost of methanol is USD 4 kW h. Alternatively, the local conventional electricity tariff is USD 2 kW h. However, for the large-scale production of electronic devices, the cost of methanol will be significantly lower. Moreover, the electricity tariff is expected to increase due to the constraints of fossil fuel resources and pollution. As a result, DMFCs will become competitive with conventional power sources.

  11. A gradient activation method for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Guicheng; Yang, Zhaoyi; Halim, Martin; Li, Xinyang; Wang, Manxiang; Kim, Ji Young; Mei, Qiwen; Wang, Xindong; Lee, Joong Kee

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A gradient activation method was reported firstly for direct methanol fuel cells. • The activity recovery of Pt-based catalyst was introduced into the novel activation process. • The new activation method led to prominent enhancement of DMFC performance. • DMFC performance was improved with the novel activation step by step within 7.5 h. - Abstract: To realize gradient activation effect and recover catalytic activity of catalyst in a short time, a gradient activation method has firstly been proposed for enhancing discharge performance and perfecting activation mechanism of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). This method includes four steps, i.e. proton activation, activity recovery activation, H_2-O_2 mode activation and forced discharging activation. The results prove that the proposed method has gradually realized replenishment of water and protons, recovery of catalytic activity of catalyst, establishment of transfer channels for electrons, protons, and oxygen, and optimization of anode catalyst layer for methanol transfer in turn. Along with the novel activation process going on, the DMFC discharge performance has been improved, step by step, to more than 1.9 times higher than that of the original one within 7.5 h. This method provides a practicable activation way for the real application of single DMFCs and stacks.

  12. Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology is one of the most attractive candidates for transportation applications due to its inherently high efficiency and high power density. However, the fuel cell system efficiency can suffer because of the need for forced air supply and water-cooling systems. Hence the operating strategy of the fuel cell system can have a significant impact on the fuel cell system efficiency and thus vehicle fuel economy. The key issues are how the fuel cell b...

  13. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  14. Long Term Performance Study of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Fed with Alcohol Blends

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa J. Leo; Miguel A. Raso; Emilio Navarro; Eleuterio Mora

    2013-01-01

    The use of alcohol blends in direct alcohol fuel cells may be a more environmentally friendly and less toxic alternative to the use of methanol alone in direct methanol fuel cells. This paper assesses the behaviour of a direct methanol fuel cell fed with aqueous methanol, aqueous ethanol and aqueous methanol/ethanol blends in a long term experimental study followed by modelling of polarization curves. Fuel cell performance is seen to decrease as the ethanol content rises, and subsequent opera...

  15. Pt based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weijiang; Zhou, Zhenhua; Song, Shuqin; Li, Wenzhen; Sun, Gongquan; Xin, Qin [Direct Alcohol Fuel Cell Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 110, Dalian 116023 (China); Tsiakaras, Panagiotis [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Thessalia, Pedion Areos, GR 38334 Volos (Greece) 7

    2003-11-10

    In the present work several Pt-based anode catalysts supported on carbon XC-72R were prepared with a novel method and characterized by means of XRD, TEM and XPS analysis. It was found that all these catalysts are consisted of uniform nanosized particles with sharp distribution and Pt lattice parameter decreases with the addition of Ru or Pd and increases with the addition of Sn or W. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements and single direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) tests jointly showed that the presence of Sn, Ru and W enhances the activity of Pt towards ethanol electro-oxidation in the following order: Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}W{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}Pd{sub 1}/C>Pt/C. Moreover, Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C further modified by W and Mo showed improved ethanol electro-oxidation activity, but its DEFC performance was found to be inferior to that measured for Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C. Under this respect, several PtSn/C catalysts with different Pt/Sn atomic ratio were also identically prepared and characterized and their direct ethanol fuel cell performances were evaluated. It was found that the single direct ethanol fuel cell having Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C or Pt{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}/C or Pt{sub 2}Sn{sub 1}/C as anode catalyst showed better performances than those with Pt{sub 3}Sn{sub 1}/C or Pt{sub 4}Sn{sub 1}/C. It was also found that the latter two cells exhibited higher performances than the single cell using Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C, which is exclusively used in PEMFC as anode catalyst for both methanol electro-oxidation and CO-tolerance. This distinct difference in DEFC performance between the catalysts examined here would be attributed to the so-called bifunctional mechanism and to the electronic interaction between Pt and additives. It is thought that an amount of -OH{sub ads}, an amount of surface Pt active sites and the conductivity effect of PtSn/C catalysts would determine the activity of PtSn/C with different Pt/Sn ratios. At lower temperature values or at low

  16. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

  17. Mixtures of methanol and 2-propanol as a potential fuel for direct alcohol fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. LJ. GOJKOVIC

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of methanol, 2-propanol, and their mixtures was investigated on a Pt/C thin film electrode in acid solution. It was confirmed that the oxidation of 2-propanol commences at less positive potentials than that of methanol and exhibits significantly higher oxidation current densities at low potentials. When both methanol and 2-propanol were present in the solution, the onset of the oxidation current was the same as for the oxidation of pure 2-propanol. Although both alcohols inhibit the oxidation reaction of each other to a certain extent, steady-state polarization measurements showed that their mixture provides higher current densities than single alcohols over the entire potential region from the hydrogen region to oxide formation on the Pt surface. This implies that the addition of 2-propanol into the fuel may extend the operational range of direct methanol fuel cells.

  18. Characteristics of a direct methanol fuel cell system with the time shared fuel supplying approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Youngseung; Kwon, Jungmin; Kim, Hyun; Cho, Hyejung; Song, Inseob

    2013-01-01

    DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell) systems usually employ two pumps for supplying the methanol solution. The conventional system configuration, however, may bring about free flow from the methanol reservoir and malfunctions in the self-priming of the pumps. When instruments such as check valves and pressure regulators are applied, they result in excessive weight and control system malfunctions. In this paper, a light and robust DMFC system is proposed. By using the time sharing approach to supply fuel with a 3-way valve, free flow does not occur because only one inlet is opened at one time which means that both the circulation flow from gas liquid separator and the fuel flow from the methanol cartridge are not allowed to be opened at same time. As a result, back flow and self-priming problems do not occur. This makes the system stable and robust due to the removal of both the check valves and the fluctuation from unstable back pressure. Stabilized system doesn't need excessive battery buffering and recycling water any more, which are responsible for the heavy system. The proposed system performs the same level of power and efficiency with the conventional system. Adaptability is also carried out in various environmental temperature conditions. - Highlights: ►A light and robust DMFC system is proposed. ► The circulation pump is able to self-prime by itself after long term storage. ► The time sharing approach to supply fuel enables to control the methanol concentration precisely. ► The methanol concentration is controlled without free flow and the back flow from the fuel feeding pump. ► The excessive buffer of the batteries and the recycling water level are reduced

  19. New ETFE-based membrane for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarinen, V.; Kallio, T.; Paronen, M.; Tikkanen, P.; Rauhala, E.; Kontturi, K.

    2005-01-01

    The investigated membranes are based on 35-bar μ m thick commercial poly(ethylene-alt-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) films. The films were made proton conductive by means of irradiation treatment followed by sulfonation. These membranes have exceptionally low water uptake and excellent dimensional stability. The new membranes are investigated widely in a laboratory-scale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The temperature range used in the fuel cell tests was 30-85-bar o C and the measurement results were compared to those of the Nafion ( R)115 membrane. Also methanol permeability through the ETFE-based membrane was measured as a function of temperature, resulting in values less than 10% of the corresponding values for Nafion ( R)115, which was considerably thicker than the experimental membrane. Methanol crossover was reported to decrease when the thickness of the membrane increases, so the ETFE-based membrane compares favourably to Nafion ( R) membranes. The maximum power densities achieved with the experimental ETFE-based membrane were about 40-65% lower than the corresponding values of the Nafion ( R)115 membrane, because of the lower conductivity and noticeably higher IR-losses. Chemical and mechanical stability of the ETFE-based membrane appeared to be promising since it was tested over 2000-bar h in the DMFC without any performance loss

  20. Performance of a passive direct ethanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. P.; Falcão, D. S.; Oliveira, V. B.; Pinto, A. M. F. R.

    2014-06-01

    Ethanol emerges as an attractive fuel since it is less toxic and has higher energy density than methanol and can be produced from biomass. Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) appear as a good choice for producing sustainable energy for portable applications. However, they are still far from attaining acceptable levels of power output, since their performance is affected by the slow electrochemical ethanol oxidation and water and ethanol crossover. In the present work, an experimental study on the performance of a passive DEFC is described. Tailored MEAs (membrane electrode assembly) with different catalyst loadings, anode diffusion layers and membranes were tested in order to select optimal working conditions at high ethanol concentrations and low ethanol crossover. The performance increased with an increase of membrane and anode diffusion layer thicknesses and anode catalyst loading. A maximum power density of 1.33 mW cm-2, was obtained using a Nafion 117 membrane, 4 mg cm-2 of Pt-Ru and 2 mg cm-2 of Pt on the anode and cathode catalyst layers, ELAT as anode diffusion layer, carbon cloth as cathode diffusion layer and an ethanol concentration of 2 M. As far as the authors are aware this is the first work reporting an experimental optimization of passive DEFCs.

  1. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  2. Update on status of direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeve, R.W.

    2002-07-01

    This report reviews the progress in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology since 1995 and examines the opportunities for this technology in various market sectors. The report is divided into two parts. Part A describes the state-of-the-art of DMFC technology, developments in electrocatalysis relevant to DMFCs, single cell and stack performance, and polymer electrolyte membranes. Part B discusses the viability of current DMFCs for portable and automotive applications, and examines some niche markets, eg for remote power applications. Market opportunities, technical issues, applications and competing technologies are summarised. The report draws attention to the outstanding technical issues and recommends further development in a number of areas (eg inexpensive membranes with lower rates of methanol crossover, membranes with lower rates of water permeation, improved power density and methods to ensure solutions do not freeze in cold climates).

  3. Development of an electrode for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzia, A. M. S.; Iqbal, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the efficient use of platinum catalyst ruthenium with in the anode of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). This is achieved by depositing platinum and ruthenium nano-particles on the pre-refluxed multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (MWCNT): MWCNTs were synthesized using the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) with floating catalyst technique. The synthesized carbon nano tubes (CNT) were refluxed in 12M nitric acid to produce anchoring sites on the surface of the CNT. The platinum and ruthenium nano-particles were in a ratio of (3.1). These particles are deposited on the surface of the CNT at 60 wt % by reduction in ethylene glycol. Transmission micrograph (TEM) and scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images show the success of the deposition method. (author)

  4. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  5. A novel membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qingfeng; Chen, Qinghua; Yang, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-less fuel cell possesses such advantages as simplified design and lower cost. In this paper, a membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell is constructed by using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) supported Pd and ternary PdSnNi composites as the anode catalysts and Fe/C-PANI composite, produced by direct pyrolysis of Fe-doped polyaniline precursor, as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The alcohols investigated in the present study are methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, iso-propanol, n-butanol, iso-butanol and sec-butanol. The cathode catalyst Fe/C-PANI is electrochemically inactive to oxidation of the alcohols. The performance of the cell with various alcohols in 1 mol L-1 NaOH solution on either Pd/MWCNT or PdSnNi/MWCNT catalyst has been evaluated. In any case, the performance of the cell using the anode catalyst PdSnNi/MWCNT is considerably better than Pd/MWCNT. For the PdSnNi/MWCNT, the maximum power densities of the cell using methanol (0.5 mol L-1), ethanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), iso-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-butanol (0.2 mol L-1), iso-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) and sec-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) are 0.34, 1.03, 1.07, 0.44, 0.50, 0.31 and 0.15 mW cm-2, respectively.

  6. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  7. Discussion paper: direction for Canada's alternate fuels program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    There is a growing need to accelerate the consideration of alternate fuels for use in Canadian vehicle transportation. At the present time various governments and corporations are initiating alternate fuel programs involving ethanol, methanol, CNG, propane, etc. There is a bewildering array of perspectives as to which fuel or fuels will best serve Canada's needs in the future. In response to the 'Discussion Paper on Liquid Fuels Options, 1980', by the Federal Dept. of Energy, Mines and Resources, Ford of Canada has prepared this perspective on each of the alternate fuels from the company's vantage point as a vehicle manufacturer.

  8. New Transition metal assisted complex borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesha Srinivasan; Elias Lee Stefanakos; Yogi Goswami

    2006-01-01

    High capacity hydrogen storage systems are indeed essential for the on-board vehicular application that leads to the pollution free environment. Apart from the various hydrogen storage systems explored in the past, complex hydrides involving light weight alkali/alkaline metals exhibits promising hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation characteristics. New transition metal assisted complex borohydrides [Zn(BH 4 ) 2 ] have been successfully synthesized by an inexpensive mechano-chemical process. These complex hydrides possesses gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity of ∼8.4 wt.% at around 120 C. We have determined the volumetric hydrogen absorption and desorption of these materials for a number of cycles. Another complex borohydride mixture LiBH 4 /MgH 2 catalyzed with ZnCl 2 has been synthesized and characterized using various analytical techniques. (authors)

  9. Electrochemical oxidation of ethanol using PtRh/C electrocatalysts in alkaline medium and synthesized by sodium borohydride and alcohol reduction; Oxidação eletroquímica do etanol utilizando eletrocatalisadores PtRh/C em meio alcalino e sintetizados via borohidreto de sódio e redução por álcool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Eric Hossein

    2017-07-01

    PtRh/C were prepared by the following atomic proportions: (100,0), (0,100), (90,10), (70,30) and (50,50). The methods employed in the synthesis of these materials were reduction by sodium borohydride and reduction by alcohol. The metal salts used were H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}3•6H{sub 2}0 and (RhNO{sub 3}){sub 3}, the support used was Carbon black XC72 and the bulk metal composition was 20% and 80% of support. The electrocatalysts were characterized by Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. The ethanol electrochemical oxidation mechanism was investigated by in situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy couple to an Attenuated Total Reflection technique. The electrocatalytic activity were evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry, Linear Sweep Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry techniques. The Fuel Cells tests were made in a single direct alcohol fuel cell with alkaline membrane. The working electrodes were prepared by a thin porous coating technique. X-ray diffraction allowed to verify metallic alloys, segregate phases and to calculate the percentage of metallic alloys. It was else possible to identify crystallographic phases. Infrared Spectroscopy allowed to verify that the electrochemical oxidation of ethanol was carried out by an incomplete mechanism. PtRh(70:30)/C prepared by sodium borohydride produced large amounts of carbon dioxide and acetaldehyde. Rh/C showed electrocatalytic activity when compared with other materials studied.

  10. Magnesium borohydride: from hydrogen storage to magnesium battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana; Matsui, Masaki; Arthur, Timothy S; Hwang, Son-Jong

    2012-09-24

    Beyond hydrogen storage: The first example of reversible magnesium deposition/stripping onto/from an inorganic salt was seen for a magnesium borohydride electrolyte. High coulombic efficiency of up to 94 % was achieved in dimethoxyethane solvent. This Mg(BH(4))(2) electrolyte was utilized in a rechargeable magnesium battery. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. CERDEC Fuel Cell Team: Military Transitions for Soldier Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-27

    Fuel Cell (DMFC) (PEO Soldier) Samsung: 20W DMFC (CRADA) General Atomics & Jadoo: 50W Ammonia Borane Fueled PEMFC Current Fuel Cell Team Efforts...Continued Ardica: 20W Wearable PEMFC operating on Chemical Hydrides Spectrum Brands w/ Rayovac: Hydrogen Generators and Alkaline Fuel Cells for AA...100W Ammonia Borane fueled PEMFC Ultralife: 150W sodium borohydride fueled PEMFC Protonex: 250W RMFC and Power Manager (ARO) NanoDynamics: 250W SOFC

  12. Direct sorbitol proton exchange membrane fuel cell using moderate catalyst loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyarce, Alejandro; Gonzalez, Carlos; Lima, Raquel Bohn; Lindström, Rakel Wreland; Lagergren, Carina; Lindbergh, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •The performance of a direct sorbitol fuel cell was evaluated at different temperatures. •The performance was compared to the performance of a direct glucose fuel cell. •The mass specific peak power density of the direct sorbitol fuel cell was 3.6 mW mg −1 totalcatalystloading at 80 °C. •Both sorbitol and glucose fuel cell suffer from deactivation. -- Abstract: Recent progress in biomass hydrolysis has made it interesting to study the use of sorbitol for electricity generation. In this study, sorbitol and glucose are used as fuels in proton exchange membrane fuel cells having 0.9 mg cm −2 PtRu/C at the anode and 0.3 mg cm −2 Pt/C at the cathode. The sorbitol oxidation was found to have slower kinetics than glucose oxidation. However, at low temperatures the direct sorbitol fuel cell shows higher performance than the direct glucose fuel cell, attributed to a lower degree of catalyst poisoning. The performance of both fuel cells is considerably improved at higher temperatures. High temperatures lower the poisoning, allowing the direct glucose fuel cell to reach a higher performance than the direct sorbitol fuel cell. The mass specific peak power densities of the direct sorbitol and direct glucose fuel cells at 65 °C was 3.2 mW mg −1 catalyst and 3.5 mW mg −1 catalyst , respectively. Both of these values are one order of magnitude larger than mass specific peak power densities of earlier reported direct glucose fuel cells using proton exchange membranes. Furthermore, both the fuel cells showed a considerably decrease in performance with time, which is partially attributed to sorbitol and glucose crossover poisoning the Pt/C cathode

  13. Determination of kinetic parameters for borohydride oxidation on a rotating Au disk electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Scott, K.

    2006-01-01

    Borohydride oxidation has been investigated using a rotating disk electrode technique. The parameters, such as apparent rate constant, Tafel slope, Levich slope, number of electrons exchanged and reaction order, have been determined. The borohydride ion is oxidised on the gold electrode with an electrochemical rate constant of around 1 cm s -1 at intermediate potentials where side reactions had less effect. Influences of temperature, concentrations of borohydride and supporting electrolyte (NaOH) on the parameters were evaluated

  14. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  15. Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-09-24

    A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  16. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  17. Anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells utilizing directly solar light illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Daobao; Wang, Shuxi; Zheng, Peng; Wang, Jian; Zha, Longwu; Hou, Yuanyuan; He, Jianguo; Xiao, Ying; Lin, Huashui; Tian, Zhaowu

    2009-01-01

    Shine a light: A PtNiRu/TiO(2) anode catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells shows photocatalytic activity. The peak current density for ethanol oxidation under solar light illumination is 2-3 times greater than that in the absence of solar light. Ethanol is oxidized by light-generated holes, and the electrons are collected by the TiO(2) support to generate the oxidation current.Novel PtNiRu/TiO(2) anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) were prepared from PtNiRu nanoparticles (1:1:1 atomic ratios) and a nanoporous TiO(2) film by a sol-gel and electrodeposition method. The performances of the catalysts for ethanol oxidation were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results indicate a remarkable enhancement of activity for ethanol oxidation under solar light illumination. Under solar light illumination, the generated oxidation peak current density is 24.6 mA cm(-2), which is about 2.5 times higher than that observed without solar light (9.9 mA cm(-2)). The high catalytic activity of the PtNiRu/TiO(2) complex catalyst for the electrooxidation of ethanol may be attributed to the modified metal/nanoporous TiO(2) film, and the enhanced electrooxidation of ethanol under solar light may be due to the photogeneration of holes in the modified nanoporous TiO(2) film.

  18. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- sr¡pported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  19. Modified SPEEK membranes for direct ethanol fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Maab, Husnul

    2010-07-01

    Membranes with low ethanol crossover were prepared aiming their application for direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). They were based on (1) sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) coated with carbon molecular sieves (CMS) and (2) on SPEEK/PI homogeneous blends. The membranes were characterized concerning their water and ethanol solution uptake, water and ethanol permeability in pervaporation experiments and their performance in DEFC tests. The ethanol permeabilities for the CMS-coated (180 nm and 400 nm thick layers) SPEEK were 8.5 and 3.1 x 10(-10) kg m s(-1) m(-2) and for the homogeneous SPEEK/PI blends membranes with 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of PI were 4.4, 1.0 and 0.4 x 10(-10) kg m s(-1) m(-2) respectively, which is 2- to 50-fold lower than that for plain SPEEK (19 x 10(-10) kg m s(-1) m(-2)). Particularly the SPEEK/PI membranes had substantially better performance than Nafion 117 membranes in DEFC tests at 60 degrees C and 90 degrees C. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni and iron (Fe. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR. The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2–5 nm PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g−1 catalyst.

  1. Novel anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, S; Kamarudin, S K; Daud, W R W; Yaakob, Z; Kadhum, A A H

    2014-01-01

    PtRu catalyst is a promising anodic catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) but the slow reaction kinetics reduce the performance of DMFCs. Therefore, this study attempts to improve the performance of PtRu catalysts by adding nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe). Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are used to increase the active area of the catalyst and to improve the catalyst performance. Electrochemical analysis techniques, such as energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), are used to characterize the kinetic parameters of the hybrid catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is used to investigate the effects of adding Fe and Ni to the catalyst on the reaction kinetics. Additionally, chronoamperometry (CA) tests were conducted to study the long-term performance of the catalyst for catalyzing the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The binding energies of the reactants and products are compared to determine the kinetics and potential surface energy for methanol oxidation. The FESEM analysis results indicate that well-dispersed nanoscale (2-5 nm) PtRu particles are formed on the MWCNTs. Finally, PtRuFeNi/MWCNT improves the reaction kinetics of anode catalysts for DMFCs and obtains a mass current of 31 A g(-1) catalyst.

  2. Characterization of polymer blends PES/SPSf and PES/SPEEK for direct methanol fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manea, G.C.; Mulder, M.H.V.

    2002-01-01

    Existing polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) applied for hydrogen fuel cells are frequently not suitable for direct methanol fuel cells due to the high methanol permeability. Therefore, new materials are required and in order to avoid laborious fuel cell experiments with a so-called

  3. Review of direct electrical heating experiments on irradiated mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Bandyopadhyay, G.

    1982-01-01

    Results of approximately 50 out-of-reactor experiments that simulated various stages of a loss-of-flow event with irradiated fuel are presented. The tests, which utilized the direct electrical heating technique to simulate nuclear heating, were performed either on fuel segments with their original cladding intact or on fuel segments that were extruded into quartz tubes. The test results demonstrated that the macro- and microscopic fuel behavior was dependent on a number of variables including fuel heating rate, thermal history prior to a transient, the number of heating cycles, type of cladding (quartz vs stainless steel), and fuel burnup

  4. Method of operating a direct dme fuel cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of operating a fuel cell system comprising one or more fuel cells with a proton exchange membrane, wherein the membrane is composed of a polymeric material comprising acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI). The method comprises adjusting the operating...

  5. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) based membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roelofs, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels and the increasing impact of greenhouse gases on the environment lead to an extensive development of more efficient or renewable energy sources. The direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC) as a portable energy source is a promising and fast growing technology which meets these demands. Up to now, methanol is mostly studied as a fuel for these devices, however, applying ethanol has some evident advantages over methanol. The major challenges in direct ethanol...

  6. Nafion®/H-ZSM-5 composite membranes with superior performance for direct methanol fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, M.H.; Curos, Anna Roca; Motuzas, Julius; Motuzas, J.; Julbe, Anne; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Solution cast composite direct methanol fuel cell membranes (DEZ) based on DE2020 Nafion® dispersion and in-house prepared H-ZSM-5 zeolites with different Si/Al ratios were prepared and thoroughly characterized for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. All composite membranes have indeed

  7. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  8. Development of an on-board H2 storage and recovery system based on lithium borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Alkali metal borohydrides based on sodium and lithium, NaBH4 and LiBH4, have been evaluated as a potential hydrogen storage and recovery system for on-board vehicle use. The borohydride salts could be dissolved in water, followed by a hydrolytic reac...

  9. Study of catalysis for solid oxide fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xirong

    Fuel cells offer the enticing promise of cleaner electricity with lower environmental impact than traditional energy conversion technologies. Driven by the interest in power sources for portable electronics, and distributed generation and automotive propulsion markets, active development efforts in the technologies of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices have achieved significant progress. However, current catalysts for fuel cells are either of low catalytic activity or extremely expensive, presenting a key barrier toward the widespread commercialization of fuel cell devices. In this thesis work, atomic layer deposition (ALD), a novel thin film deposition technique, was employed to apply catalytic Pt to SOFC, and investigate both Pt skin catalysts and Pt-Ru catalysts for methanol oxidation, a very important reaction for DMFC, to increase the activity and utilization levels of the catalysts while simultaneously reducing the catalyst loading. For SOFCs, we explored the use of ALD for the fabrication of electrode components, including an ultra-thin Pt film for use as the electrocatalyst, and a Pt mesh structure for a current collector for SOFCs, aiming for precise control over the catalyst loading and catalyst geometry, and enhancement in the current collect efficiency. We choose Pt since it has high chemical stability and excellent catalytic activity for the O2 reduction reaction and the H2 oxidation reaction even at low operating temperatures. Working SOFC fuel cells were fabricated with ALD-deposited Pt thin films as an electrode/catalyst layer. The measured fuel cell performance reveals that comparable peak power densities were achieved for ALD-deposited Pt anodes with only one-fifth of the Pt loading relative to a DC-sputtered counterpart. In addition to the continuous electrocatalyst layer, a micro-patterned Pt structure was developed via the technique of area selective ALD. By coating yttria-stabilized zirconia, a

  10. Investigation of chemical and electrochemical reactions mechanisms in a direct carbon fuel cell using olive wood charcoal as sustainable fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuch, Amal; Halouani, Kamel; Li, Yongdan

    2015-05-01

    Direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) is a high temperature fuel cell using solid carbon as fuel. The use of environmentally friendly carbon material constitutes a promising option for the DCFC future. In this context, this paper focuses on the use of biomass-derived charcoal renewable fuel. A practical investigation of Tunisian olive wood charcoal (OW-C) in planar DCFCs is conducted and good power density (105 mW cm-2) and higher current density (550 mA cm-2) are obtained at 700 °C. Analytical and predictive techniques are performed to explore the relationships between fuel properties and DCFC chemical and electrochemical mechanisms. High carbon content, carbon-oxygen groups and disordered structure, are the key parameters allowing the achieved good performance. Relatively complex chain reactions are predicted to explain the gas evolution within the anode. CO, H2 and CH4 participation in the anodic reaction is proved.

  11. Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Ko, Won Il; Yang, Myung Seung

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC (∼49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC

  12. Facts and issues of direct disposal of spent fuel; Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, P.B.

    1993-10-01

    This report reviews those facts and issues that affect the direct disposal of spent reactor fuels. It is intended as a resource document for those impacted by the current Department of Energy (DOE) guidance that calls for the cessation of fuel reprocessing. It is not intended as a study of the specific impacts (schedules and costs) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) alone. Commercial fuels, other low enriched fuels, highly enriched defense-production, research, and naval reactor fuels are included in this survey, except as prevented by rules on classification.

  13. Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells and their reaction mechanisms - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    with carbon capture and storage (CCS) due to the high purity of CO2 emitted in the exhaust gas. Direct carbon (or coal) fuel cells (DCFCs) are directly fed with solid carbon to the anode chamber. The fuel cell converts the carbon at the anode and the oxygen at the cathode into electricity, heat and reaction......As coal is expected to continue to dominate power generation demands worldwide, it is advisable to pursue the development of more efficient coal power generation technologies. Fuel cells show a much higher fuel utilization efficiency, emit fewer pollutants (NOx, SOx), and are more easily combined...

  14. Biobutanol as fuel for direct alcohol fuel cells - Investigation of Sn-modified Pt catalyst for butanol electro-oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Puthiyapura, Vinod Kumar; Dan J. L. Brett,; Andrea E. Russell,; Wen-Feng Lin,; Hardacre, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) mostly use low molecular weight alcohols such as methanol and ethanol as fuels. However, short-chain alcohol molecules have a relative high membrane crossover rate in DAFCs and a low energy density. Long chain alcohols such as butanol have a higher energy density, as well as a lower membrane crossover rate compared to methanol and ethanol. Although a significant number of studies have been dedicated to low molecular weight alcohols in DAFCs, very few studies ...

  15. Status of work on the final repository concept concerning direct disposal of spent fuel rods in fuel rod casks (BSK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbert, W.; Wehrmann, J.; Bollingerfehr, W.; Graf, R.; Fopp, S.

    2008-01-01

    The reference concept in Germany on direct final storage of spent fuel rods is the burial of POLLUX containers in the final repository salt dome. The POLLUX container is self-shielded. The final storage concept also includes un-shielded borehole storage of high-level waste and packages of compacted waste. GNS has developed a spent fuel container (BSK-3) for unshielded borehole storage with a mass of 5.2 tons that can carry the fuel rods of three PWR reactors of 9 BWR reactors. The advantages of BSK storage include space saving, faster storage processes, less requirements concerning technical barriers, cost savings for self-shielded casks.

  16. Analysis of fuel using the Direct LSC method determination of bio-originated fuel in the presence of quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, Charles G.; Wright, Cherylyn W.; Morley, Shannon M.; Wright, Bob W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a modified version of the Direct LSC method to correct for quenching effect was investigated for the determination of bio-originated fuel content in fuel samples produced from multiple biological starting materials. The modified method was found to be accurate in determining the percent bio-originated fuel to within 5% of the actual value for samples with quenching effects ≤43%. Finally, analysis of highly quenched samples was possible when diluted with the exception of one sample with a 100% quenching effect.

  17. Isotopic Exchange in Porous and Dense Magnesium Borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavorotynska, Olena; Deledda, Stefano; Li, Guanqiao; Matsuo, Motoaki; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Hauback, Bjørn C

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH4)2) is one of the most promising complex hydrides presently studied for energy-related applications. Many of its properties depend on the stability of the BH4(-) anion. The BH4(-) stability was investigated with respect to H→D exchange. In situ Raman measurements on high-surface-area porous Mg(BH4 )2 in 0.3 MPa D2 have shown that the isotopic exchange at appreciable rates occurs already at 373 K. This is the lowest exchange temperature observed in stable borohydrides. Gas-solid isotopic exchange follows the BH4(-) +D˙ →BH3D(-) +H˙ mechanism at least at the initial reaction steps. Ex situ deuteration of porous Mg(BH4)2 and its dense-phase polymorph indicates that the intrinsic porosity of the hydride is the key behind the high isotopic exchange rates. It implies that the solid-state H(D) diffusion is considerably slower than the gas-solid H→D exchange reaction at the surface and it is a rate-limiting steps for hydrogen desorption and absorption in Mg(BH4)2. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle

  19. Hydrogen Gas as a Fuel in Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, Chinnathambi; Mohankumar, Gabriael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problem caused by the greenhouse gases, for protecting environment and saving conventional fuels. In this study, a dual fuel engine of hydrogen and diesel was investigated. Hydrogen was conceded through the intake port, and simultaneously air and diesel was pervaded into the cylinder. Using electronic gas injector and electronic control unit, the injection timing and duration varied. In this investigation, a single cylinder, KIRLOSKAR AV1, DI Diesel engine was used. Hydrogen injection timing was fixed at TDC and injection duration was timed for 30°, 60°, and 90° crank angles. The injection timing of diesel was fixed at 23° BTDC. When hydrogen is mixed with inlet air, emanation of HC, CO and CO2 decreased without any emission (exhaustion) of smoke while increasing the brake thermal efficiency.

  20. Recent advances on Zeolite modification for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-03-01

    The increase of energy demand and global warming issues has driven studies of alternative energy sources. The polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) can be an alternative energy source by (partially) replacing the use of fossil fuel which is in line with the green technology concept. However, the usage of hydrogen as a fuel has several disadvantages mainly transportation and storage related to its safety aspects. Recently, alcohol has gained attention as an energy source for fuel cell application, namely direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC). Among alcohols, high-mass energy density methanol and ethanol are widely used as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC), respectively. Currently, the performance of DMFC is still rudimentary. Furthermore, the use of ethanol gives some additional privileges such as non-toxic property, renewable, ease of production in great quantity by the fermentation of sugar-containing raw materials. Direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC) still has weakness in the low proton conductivity and high alcohol crossover. Therefore, to increase the performance of DAFC, modification using zeolite has been performed to improve proton conductivity and decrease alcohol crossover. Zeolite also has high thermal resistance properties, thereby increasing DAFC performance. This paper will discuss briefly about modification of catalyst and membrane for DAFC using zeolite. Zeolite modification effect on fuel cell performance especially proton conductivity and alcohol crossover will be presented in detail.

  1. Forest fuel characterization using direct sampling in forest plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva Reyna Esmeralda Díaz García; Marco Aurelio González Tagle; Javier Jiménez Pérez; Eduardo JavierTreviño Garza; Diana Yemilet Ávila Flores

    2013-01-01

    One of the essential elements for a fire to occur is the flammable material. This is defined as the total biomass that has the ability to ignite and burn when exposed to a heat source. Fuel characterization in Mexican forest ecosystems is very scarce. However, this information is very important for estimating flammability and forest fire risk, fire behavior,...

  2. Transport phenomena in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells for sustainable energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in ethanol directly into electricity, are one of the most promising energy-conversion devices for portable, mobile and stationary power applications, primarily because this type of fuel cell runs on a carbon-neutral, sustainable fuel and the electrocatalytic and membrane materials that constitute the cell are relatively inexpensive. As a result, the alkaline DEFC technology has undergone a rapid progress over the last decade. This article provides a comprehensive review of transport phenomena of various species in this fuel cell system. The past investigations into how the design and structural parameters of membrane electrode assemblies and the operating parameters affect the fuel cell performance are discussed. In addition, future perspectives and challenges with regard to transport phenomena in this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  3. On the Use of Potential Denaturing Agents for Ethanol in Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Domnik Bayer; Florina Jung; Birgit Kintzel; Martin Joos; Carsten Cremers; Dierk Martin; Jörg Bernard; Jens Tübke

    2011-01-01

    Acidic or alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) can be a sustainable alternative for power generation if they are fuelled with bio-ethanol. However, in order to keep the fuel cheap, ethanol has to be exempted from tax on spirits by denaturing. In this investigation the potential denaturing agents fusel oil, tert-butyl ethyl ether, and Bitrex were tested with regard to their compatibility with fuel cells. Experiments were carried out both in sulphuric acid and potassium hydroxide solution...

  4. Experimental study on fuel economies and emissions of direct-injection premixed combustion engine fueled with gasoline/diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Jiakun; Sun, Wanchen; Guo, Liang; Xiao, Senlin; Tan, Manzhi; Li, Guoliang; Fan, Luyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A compound combustion concept was proposed and investigated. • Premixed combustion near the top dead center was investigated using blended fuels. • Increasing gasoline blend ratio was found to enhance the mixture preparation. • Too much addition of gasoline decreases indicated thermal efficiency. • Gasoline/diesel blends may be a promising alternative for premixed combustion. - Abstract: The effects of gasoline/diesel blended fuel composed of diesel fuel with gasoline as additives in volume basis, on combustion, fuel economies and exhaust emissions were experimentally investigated. Tests were carried out based on a turbocharged Common-rail Direct Injection engine at a constant engine speed of 1800 r/min and different loads of 3.2 bar, 5.1 bar Indicated Mean Effective Pressure. Additionally, the effect of combustion phasing and Exhaust Gas Recirculation were evaluated experimentally for various fuels. The results indicated that with the fraction of gasoline increasing in blends, the ignition delay was prolonged and the combustion phasing was retarded with the common injection timing. This led to a significant increase of premixed burning phase, which was in favor of smoke reduction; although, too much gasoline might be adverse to fuel consumption. An optimum combustion phasing was identified, leading to a higher thermal efficiency and better premixed combustion with blended fuels. A combined application of Exhaust Gas Recirculation and blended fuel with a high gasoline fraction was confirmed effective in reducing the oxides of nitrogen and smoke emissions simultaneously at the optimum combustion phasing without giving significant penalty of fuel consumption. A compound combustion mode with its emission lower than the conventional Compression Ignition engines, and efficiency higher than the typical Spark Ignition engines, could be achieved with a cooperative control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation and combustion phasing of the gasoline

  5. Long Term Performance Study of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Fed with Alcohol Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleuterio Mora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of alcohol blends in direct alcohol fuel cells may be a more environmentally friendly and less toxic alternative to the use of methanol alone in direct methanol fuel cells. This paper assesses the behaviour of a direct methanol fuel cell fed with aqueous methanol, aqueous ethanol and aqueous methanol/ethanol blends in a long term experimental study followed by modelling of polarization curves. Fuel cell performance is seen to decrease as the ethanol content rises, and subsequent operation with aqueous methanol only partly reverts this loss of performance. It seems that the difference in the oxidation rate of these alcohols may not be the only factor affecting fuel cell performance.

  6. Review of the direct thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass for liquid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchun JIANG,Junming XU,Zhanqian SONG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased demand for liquid transportation fuels, environmental concerns and depletion of petroleum resources requires the development of efficient conversion technologies for production of second-generation biofuels from non-food resources. Thermochemical approaches hold great potential for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels. Direct thermochemical processes convert biomass into liquid fuels in one step using heat and catalysts and have many advantages over indirect and biological processes, such as greater feedstock flexibility, integrated conversion of whole biomass, and lower operation costs. Several direct thermochemical processes are employed in the production of liquid biofuels depending on the nature of the feedstock properties: such as fast pyrolysis/liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass for bio-oil, including upgrading methods, such as catalytic cracking and hydrogenation. Owing to the substantial amount of liquid fuels consumed by vehicular transport, converting biomass into drop-in liquid fuels may reduce the dependence of the fuel market on petroleum-based fuel products. In this review, we also summarize recent progress in technologies for large-scale equipment for direct thermochemical conversion. We focus on the technical aspects critical to commercialization of the technologies for production of liquid fuels from biomass, including feedstock type, cracking catalysts, catalytic cracking mechanisms, catalytic reactors, and biofuel properties. We also discuss future prospects for direct thermochemical conversion in biorefineries for the production of high grade biofuels.

  7. MONITORING REACTIONS IN ALKALINE DIRECT ETHANOL FUEL CELLS ASSEMBLED WITH NON-PT-CATALYST

    OpenAIRE

    Gülzow, Erich; Beyer, Monique; Friedrich, K. Andreas; Pengel, Stefanie; Fischer, Peter; Bettermann, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This contribution shows how Raman spectroscopy can be used to pursue chemical reactions within fuel cells. For this, the oxidation of ethanol occurring in an alkaline direct ethanolic fuel cell was investigated. The analysis of a sequence of Raman spectra recorded during the reaction shows that ethanol was solely oxidized to acetate in a unique reaction.

  8. Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2014-08-26

    Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

  9. Development of nanosized electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamedi, M. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Varennes, PQ (Canada). Centre de l' Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications

    2008-07-01

    Fuel cells have been touted as a promising power supply for automotive, portable or stationary use. Although methanol is a strong contender as an alternative fuel, the extensive use of this toxic compound is not practical due to environmental hazards. Ethanol is a good substitute because it has a very positive environmental, health, and safety footprint with no major uncertainties or hazards. Ethanol is a hydrogen-rich liquid which has more energy density than methanol. The C-C bond has a determining effect on fuel cell efficiency and the theoretical energy yield. Therefore, a good electrocatalyst towards the complete oxidation of ethanol must activate the C-C bond breaking while avoiding the poisoning of the catalytic surface by carbon monoxide species that occurs with methanol oxidation. The objective of this study was to develop new catalyst nanoparticles of well-controlled shape, size, and composition with excellent stability and better electrocatalytic activity. This paper described the recent achievements regarding the development of a series of PtxSn100-x catalysts prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). It reported on the effect of several deposition parameters on the structure and properties of the deposited catalysts. It also described how these deposition conditions affect the electrocatalytic response of the resulting materials toward ethanol oxidation. Some interesting periodic oscillations were observed at some catalysts during ethanol electrooxidation. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  10. A high selectivity quaternized polysulfone membrane for alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abuin, GC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available polysulfone membrane for alkaline direct methanol fuel cells Graciela C. Abuina, Esteban A. Franceschinib, Patrick Nonjolac, Mkhulu K. Mathec, Mmalewane Modibedic, Horacio R. Cortib,* aCentro de Procesos Superficiales, Instituto Nacional de Tecnología...

  11. A quasi-direct methanol fuel cell system based on blend polymer membrane electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Hasiotis, C.

    2002-01-01

    , compared to less than 100 ppm CO for the Nafion-based technology at 80degrees C. The high CO tolerance makes it possible to use the reformed hydrogen directly from a simple methanol reformer without further CO removal. That both the fuel cell and the methanol reformer operate at temperatures around 200......On the basis of blend polymer electrolytes of polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polysulfone, a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell was developed with an operational temperature up to 200degrees C. Due to the high operational temperature, the fuel cell can tolerate 1.0-3.0 vol % CO in the fuel...

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell in combined heat and power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, F.; Dincer, I.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive steady state modelling and thermodynamic analysis of Direct Urea Solid Oxide Fuel Cell integrated with Gas Turbine power cycle (DU-SOFC/GT). The use of urea as direct fuel mitigates public health and safety risks associated with the use of hydrogen and ammonia. The integration scheme in this study covers both oxygen ion-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-O) and hydrogen proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC-H). Parametric case studies are carried out to investigate the effects of design and operating parameters on the overall performance of the system. The results reveal that the fuel cell exhibited the highest level of exergy destruction among other system components. Furthermore, the SOFC-O based system offers better overall performance than that with the SOFC-H option mainly due to the detrimental reverse water-gas shift reaction at the SOFC anode as well as the unique configuration of the system.

  13. Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Performance with Anode Current Collector Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2015-01-01

    collectors were studied: Au, Ni, Ag, and Pt. It was shown that the performance of the direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) is dependent on the current collector materials, Ni and Pt giving the best performance, due to their catalytic activity. Gold is suggested to be the best material as an inert current collector......The influence of the current collector on the performance of a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC), consisting of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a molten carbonate-carbon slurry in contact with the anode, has been investigated using current-voltage curves. Four different anode current...

  14. Experimental analysis of methanol cross-over in a direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalegno, Andrea [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: andrea.casalegno@polimi.it; Grassini, Paolo [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: PGrassini@seal.it; Marchesi, Renzo [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: renzo.marchesi@polimi.it

    2007-03-15

    Methanol cross-over through the polymeric membrane is one of the main causes limiting direct methanol fuel cell performances. It causes fuel wasting and enhances cathode overpotential. A repeatable and reproducible measurement system, that assures the traceability of the measurement to international reference standards, is necessary to compare different fuel cell construction materials. In this work a method to evaluate methanol cross-over rate and operating condition influence is presented and qualified in term of measurement uncertainty. In the investigated range, the methanol cross-over rate results mainly due to diffusion through the membrane, in fact it is strongly affected by temperature. Moreover the cross-over influence on fuel utilization and fuel cell efficiency is investigated. The methanol cross-over rate appears linearly proportional to electrochemical fuel utilization and values, obtained by measurements at different anode flow rate but constant electrochemical fuel utilization, are roughly equal; methanol wasting, due to cross-over, is considerable and can still be higher than electrochemical utilization. The fuel recirculation effect on energy efficiency has been investigated and it was found that fuel recirculation gives more advantage at low temperature, but fuel cell energy efficiency results are in any event higher at high temperature.

  15. Experimental analysis of methanol cross-over in a direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalegno, Andrea; Grassini, Paolo; Marchesi, Renzo

    2007-01-01

    Methanol cross-over through the polymeric membrane is one of the main causes limiting direct methanol fuel cell performances. It causes fuel wasting and enhances cathode overpotential. A repeatable and reproducible measurement system, that assures the traceability of the measurement to international reference standards, is necessary to compare different fuel cell construction materials. In this work a method to evaluate methanol cross-over rate and operating condition influence is presented and qualified in term of measurement uncertainty. In the investigated range, the methanol cross-over rate results mainly due to diffusion through the membrane, in fact it is strongly affected by temperature. Moreover the cross-over influence on fuel utilization and fuel cell efficiency is investigated. The methanol cross-over rate appears linearly proportional to electrochemical fuel utilization and values, obtained by measurements at different anode flow rate but constant electrochemical fuel utilization, are roughly equal; methanol wasting, due to cross-over, is considerable and can still be higher than electrochemical utilization. The fuel recirculation effect on energy efficiency has been investigated and it was found that fuel recirculation gives more advantage at low temperature, but fuel cell energy efficiency results are in any event higher at high temperature

  16. Nanoconfinement in activated mesoporous carbon of calcium borohydride for improved reversible hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comănescu, Cezar; Capurso, Giovanni; Maddalena, Amedeo

    2012-09-28

    Mesoporous carbon frameworks were synthesized using the soft-template method. Ca(BH(4))(2) was incorporated into activated mesoporous carbon by the incipient wetness method. The activation of mesoporous carbon was necessary to optimize the surface area and pore size. Thermal programmed absorption measurements showed that the confinement of this borohydride into carbon nanoscaffolds improved its reversible capacity (relative to the reactive portion) and performance of hydrogen storage compared to unsupported borohydride. Hydrogen release from the supported hydride started at a temperature as low as 100 °C and the dehydrogenation rate was fast compared to the bulk borohydride. In addition, the hydrogen pressure necessary to regenerate the borohydride from the dehydrogenation products was reduced.

  17. Rapid evaluation of the electrooxidation of fuel compounds with a multiple-electrode setup for direct polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Naoko; Siroma, Zyun; Ioroi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Kazuaki [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2007-02-10

    Electrochemical oxidation of fuel compounds in acidic media was examined on eight electrodes (Pt, Ru, PtRu, Rh, Ir, Pd, Au, and glassy carbon) simultaneously by multiple cyclic voltammetry (CV) with an electrochemical cell equipped with an eight-electrode configuration. Direct-type polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), in which aqueous solutions of the fuel compounds are directly supplied to the anode, were also evaluated. The performances of direct PEFCs with various anode catalysts could be roughly estimated from the results obtained with multiple CV. This multiple evaluation may be useful for identifying novel fuels or electrocatalysts. Methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol, 2-propanol, and D-glucose were oxidized selectively on Pt or PtRu, as reported previously. However, several compounds that are often used as reducing agents show electrochemical oxidation with unique characteristics. Large current was obtained for the oxidation of formic acid, hypophosphorous acid, and phosphorous acid on a Pd electrode. L-Ascorbic acid and sulfurous acid were oxidized on all of the electrodes used in the present study. (author)

  18. Carbon-supported cobalt catalyst for hydrogen generation from alkaline sodium borohydride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Liu, Xinmin; Cao, Changqing; Guo, Qingjie [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Low cost transition metal catalysts with high performance are attractive for the development of on-board hydrogen generation systems by catalytic hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) in fuel cell fields. In this study, hydrogen production from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} via hydrolysis process over carbon-supported cobalt catalysts was studied. The catalytic activity of the supported cobalt catalyst was found to be highly dependent on the calcination temperatures. The hydrogen generation rate increases with calcination temperatures in the range of 200-400 C, but a high calcination temperature above 500 C led to markedly decreased activity. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the catalysts experience phase transition from amorphous Co-B to crystalline cobalt hydroxide with increase in calcination temperatures. The reaction performance is also dependent on the concentration of NaBH{sub 4}, and the hydrogen generation rate increases for lower NaBH{sub 4} concentrations and decreases after reaching a maximum at 10 wt.% of NaBH{sub 4}. (author)

  19. Electroless Nickel-Based Catalyst for Diffusion Limited Hydrogen Generation through Hydrolysis of Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon P. Anderson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts based on electroless nickel and bi-metallic nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles were synthesized for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation. The catalysts were synthesized by polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticle-catalyzation and activation of Al2O3 substrate and electroless Ni or Ni-Mo plating of the substrate for selected time lengths. Catalytic activity of the synthesized catalysts was tested for the hydrolyzation of alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for hydrogen generation. The effects of electroless plating time lengths, temperature and NaBH4 concentration on hydrogen generation rates were analyzed and discussed. Compositional analysis and surface morphology were carried out for nano-metallized Al2O3 using Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis (EDAX. The as-plated polymer-stabilized electroless nickel catalyst plated for 10 min and unstirred in the hydrolysis reaction exhibited appreciable catalytic activity for hydrolysis of NaBH4. For a zero-order reaction assumption, activation energy of hydrogen generation using the catalyst was estimated at 104.6 kJ/mol. Suggestions are provided for further work needed prior to using the catalyst for portable hydrogen generation from aqueous alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for fuel cells.

  20. A theoretical study of the structure and stability of borohydride on 3d transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Ryan Lacdao; Escaño, Mary Clare Sison; Gyenge, Elod; Kasai, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption of borohydride on 3d transition metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) was studied using first principles calculations within spin-polarized density functional theory. Magnetic effect on the stability of borohydride is noted. Molecular adsorption is favorable on Co, Ni and Cu, which is characterized by the strong s-dzz hybridization of the adsorbate-substrate states. Dissociated adsorption structure yielding one or two H adatom fragments on the surface is observed for Cr, Mn and Fe.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of direct internal reforming of methane and butane in proton and oxygen conducting fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Geerlings, J.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a thermodynamic analysis of direct internal reforming fuel cells, based on either a proton conducting fuel cell (FC-H+) or an oxygen ion conducting fuel cell (FC-O2-). We analyze the option of methane as fuel as well as butane. The model self-consistently combines all chemical

  2. Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, Ismail B. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This EPSCoR project had two primary goals: (i) to build infrastructure and work force at WVU to support long-term research in the area of fuel cells and related sciences; (ii) study effects of various impurities found in coal-syngas on performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). As detailed in this report the WVU research team has made significant accomplishments in both of these areas. What follows is a brief summary of these accomplishments: State-of-the-art test facilities and diagnostic tools have been built and put into use. These include cell manufacturing, half-cell and full-cell test benches, XPS, XRD, TEM, Raman, EDAX, SEM, EIS, and ESEM equipment, unique in-situ measurement techniques and test benches (Environmental EM, Transient Mass-Spectrometer-MS, and IR Optical Temperature measurements). In addition, computational capabilities have been developed culminating in a multi-scale multi-physics fuel cell simulation code, DREAM-SOFC, as well as a Beowulf cluster with 64 CPU units. We have trained 16 graduate students, 10 postdoctoral fellows, and recruited 4 new young faculty members who have actively participated in the EPSCoR project. All four of these faculty members have already been promoted to the tenured associate professor level. With the help of these faculty and students, we were able to secure 14 research awards/contracts amounting to a total of circa $5.0 Million external funding in closely related areas of research. Using the facilities mentioned above, the effects of PH3, HCl, Cl2, and H2S on cell performance have been studied in detail, mechanisms have been identified, and also remedies have been proposed and demonstrated in the laboratory. For example, it has been determined that PH3 reacts rapidly with Ni to from secondary compounds which may become softer or even melt at high temperature and then induce Ni migration to the surface of the cell changing the material and micro-structural properties of the cell drastically. It is found that

  3. Development of materials for use in solid oxid fuel cells anodes using renewable fuels in direct operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, D.B.P.L. de; Florio, D.Z. de; Bezerra, M.E.O.

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells produce electrical current from the electrochemical combustion of a gas or liquid (H2, CH4, C2H5OH, CH3OH, etc.) inserted into the anode cell. An important class of fuel cells is the SOFC (Solid Oxide Cell Fuel). It has a ceramic electrolyte that transports protons (H +) or O-2 ions and operating at high temperatures (500-1000 °C) and mixed conductive electrodes (ionic and electronic) ceramics or cermets. This work aims to develop anodes for fuel cells of solid oxide (SOFC) in order to direct operations with renewable fuels and strategic for the country (such as bioethanol and biogas). In this context, it becomes important to study in relation to the ceramic materials, especially those that must be used in high temperatures. Some types of double perovskites such as Sr2MgMoO6 (or simply SMMO) have been used as anodes in SOFC. In this study were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, analyzed and characterized different ceramic samples of families SMMO, doped with Nb, this is: Sr2 (MgMo)1-xNbxO6 with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2. The materials produced were characterized by various techniques such as, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and electrical properties determined by dc and ac measurements in a wide range of temperature, frequency and partial pressure of oxygen. The results of this work will contribute to a better understanding of advanced ceramic properties with mixed driving (electronic and ionic) and contribute to the advancement of SOFC technology operating directly with renewable fuels. (author)

  4. Study of the ultrafast polarization dynamics in lithium borohydride by means of femtosecond X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stingl, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the ultrafast electronic polarisation in the crystalline material lithium borohydride (LiBH 4 ) is examined. The material is excited by a femtosecond long optical pulse and scanned by a likewise short X-ray pulse. Using X-ray scattering the optically induced spatial rearrangement of electronic charge can be directly mapped with atomic spatial resolution. Copper K-alpha X-rays for the experiment are produced in a laboratory table-top laserplasma source with 1 kHz repetition rate. This radiation is then focused on a powdered sample. Debye-Scherrer rings produced from powder diffraction are collected on a large area detector and processed to yield intensity profiles. Using pump-probe technique the change in diffracted intensity, triggered by excitation with a femtosecond optical pulse is examined. The temporal resolution is given by the delay between pump and probe pulse. This way insight is gained into the dynamic electronic evolution of the system. Intensity changes can be correlated to changes in charge density in the relevant material to elucidate structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale. Lithium borohydride was chosen since it displays necessary characteristics for the exploration of ultrafast electronic polarisation. Up to date there has been no spatially resolved research in the femtosecond regime elucidating this electronic phenomenon. This work presents the ultrafast resonse in Lithiumborhydrid (LiBH 4 ) to strong electronic fields with optical frequencies, which leads to charge relocation accompanied by electronic polarisation.

  5. Implementation of direct LSC method for diesel samples on the fuel market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krištof, Romana; Hirsch, Marko; Kožar Logar, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    The European Union develops common EU policy and strategy on biofuels and sustainable bio-economy through several documents. The encouragement of biofuel's consumption is therefore the obligation of each EU member state. The situation in Slovenian fuel market is presented and compared with other EU countries in the frame of prescribed values from EU directives. Diesel is the most common fuel for transportation needs in Slovenia. The study was therefore performed on diesel. The sampling net was determined in accordance with the fuel consumption statistics of the country. 75 Sampling points were located on different types of roads. The quantity of bio-component in diesel samples was determined by direct LSC method through measurement of C-14 content. The measured values were in the range from 0 up to nearly 6 mass percentage of bio-component in fuel. The method has proved to be appropriate, suitable and effective for studies on the real fuel market. - Highlights: • The direct LSC method was tested and applied on real fuel samples from the Slovenian market. • The results of the study are comparable with the findings of official of EUROSTAT's report. • Comparison to other EU member states and EU directive prescription was performed

  6. Achieving high performance in intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cells with renewable carbon as a fuel source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Wenbin; He, Xiaojin; Mi, Yongli

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Bamboo fiber and waste paper were pyrolyzed to generate bamboo carbon and waste paper carbon as anode fuels of IT-DCFC. • Superior cell performance was achieved with the waste paper carbon. • The results suggested the high performance was due to the highest thermal reactivity and the catalytic inherent impurities. • Calcite and kaolinite as inherent impurities favored the thermal decomposition and the electrooxidation of carbon. - Abstract: Three kinds of carbon sources obtained from carbon black, bamboo fiber and waste paper were investigated as anode fuels in an intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cell. The carbon sources were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, etc. The results indicated that the waste paper carbon was more abundant in calcite and kaolinite, and showed higher thermal reactivity in the intermediate temperature range compared with the other two carbon sources. The cell performance was tested at 650 °C in a hybrid single cell, using Sm 0.20 Ce 0.80 O 2−x as the electrolyte. As a result, the cell fed with waste paper carbon showed the highest performance among the three carbon sources, with a peak power density of 225 mW cm −2 . The results indicated that its inherent impurities, such as calcite and kaolinite, might favor the thermal gasification of renewable carbon sources, which resulted in the enhanced performance of the intermediate temperature direct carbon fuel cell

  7. Characterisation of micro direct methanol fuel cells with silicon plate supported integrated ionomer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Kallesee, C.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the investigation and fabrication of Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries such as lithium......-ion batteries have insufficiently low energy density in the range 240 Wh/L to 300 Wh/L Methanol is a promising fuel for such devices due to the high energy density, with pure methanol having an energy density of 4400 Wh/L. Using a liquid fuel also allows refueling, which can be achieved much faster than battery...

  8. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  9. Preparation and spectroscopic properties of three new actinide (IV) borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, R.H.

    1979-12-01

    New tetrakis-borohydrides of Pa, Np, and Pu have been synthesized. The crystal structure of Pa(BH 4 ) 4 is isostructural to those of Th(BH 4 ) 4 and U(BH 4 ) 4 and is of the tetragonal space group P4 3 2 1 2, where a = 7.53 (3) A, c = 13.22 (5) A, and Z = 4. Its calculated density is 2.57 gm-cm -3 . Pa(BH 4 ) 4 is an orange, air-sensitive compound which is soluble in THF and sublimes at 55 0 in vacuum. Due to the thermal instabilities of Np(BH 4 ) 4 and Pu(BH 4 ) 4 , their reaction temperatures are maintained at 0 0 and the compounds must be stored at low temperature. Low temperature x-ray diffraction studies have shown that Np(BH 4 ) 4 and Pu(BH 4 ) 4 are isomorphous and exhibit a unique crystal structure which is very similar to that of Zr(BH 4 ) 4 . The details of this new structure were determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction methods at 130K for Np(BH 4 ) 4 . Neptunium borohydride is monomeric and crystallizes into the tetragonal space group P4 2 /nmc, where a = 8.559 (9) A, c = 6.017 (9) A, and Z = 2. The 12 coordinate Np atom is triply hydrogen-bridged bonded to four terminal BH 4 - groups disposed tetrahedrally around it giving Np-B distances of 2.46 (3) A. Solid-state, low temperature infrared (25-7400 cm -1 ) and Raman (100-2600 cm -1 ) spectra were taken for Np(BH 4 ) 4 and Np(BD 4 ) 4 . A normal coordinate analysis was carried out using the assigned fundamental frequencies obtained from the spectra and determined a reasonable set of force constants and calculated values for the frequencies of the unobserved T 1 modes. Based on results of the analysis, isotopic impurity, overtone, and combination bands were identified in the infrared spectra

  10. Study on the micro direct ethanol fuel cell (Micro-DEFC) performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisirirat, Penyarat; Joommanee, Bordindech

    2018-01-01

    The direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is selected for this research. DEFC uses ethanol in the fuel cell instead of the more toxic methanol. Ethanol is more attractive than methanol by many reasons. Ethanol is a hydrogen-rich liquid and it has a higher specific energy (8.0 kWh/kg) compared to that of methanol (6.1 kWh/kg). Ethanol can be obtained in great quantity from biomass through a fermentation process from renewable resources such as sugar cane, wheat, corn, and even straw. The use of ethanol would also overcome both the storage and infrastructure challenge of hydrogen for fuel cell applications. The experimental apparatus on the micro direct ethanol fuel cell for measuring the cell performance has been set for this research. The objective is to study the micro direct ethanol fuel cell performance for applying with the portable electronic devices. The cell performance is specified in the terms of cell voltage, cell current and power of the cell at room operating temperature and 1 atm for the pressure and also includes the ethanol fuel consumption. The effect of operating temperature change on the electrical production performance is also studied. The steady-state time for collecting each data value is about 5-10 minutes. The results show that with the increase of concentrations of ethanol by volume, the reactant concentration at the reaction sites increases so the electrochemical rate also increases but when it reaches the saturated point the performance gradually drops.

  11. Performance comparison of low-temperature direct alcohol fuel cells with different anode catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W. J.; Zhou, B.; Li, W. Z.; Zhou, Z. H.; Song, S. Q.; Sun, G. Q.; Xin, Q.; Douvartzides, S.; Goula, M.; Tsiakaras, P.

    Low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells directly fed by methanol and ethanol were investigated employing carbon supported Pt, PtSn and PtRu as anode catalysts, respectively. Employing Pt/C as anode catalyst, both direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) showed poor performances even in presence of high Pt loading on anode. It was found that the addition of Ru or Sn to the Pt dramatically enhances the electro-oxidation of both methanol and ethanol. It was also found that the single cell adopting PtRu/C as anode shows better DMFC performance, while PtSn/C catalyst shows better DEFC performance. The single fuel cell using PtSn/C as anode catalyst at 90 °C shows similar power densities whenever fueled by methanol or ethanol. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) and single fuel cell tests indicated that PtRu is more suitable for DMFC while PtSn is more suitable for DEFC.

  12. Hydroxide Self-Feeding High-Temperature Alkaline Direct Formate Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinshi; Sun, Xianda; Feng, Ying

    2017-05-22

    Conventionally, both the thermal degradation of the anion-exchange membrane and the requirement of additional hydroxide for fuel oxidation reaction hinder the development of the high-temperature alkaline direct liquid fuel cells. The present work addresses these two issues by reporting a polybenzimidazole-membrane-based direct formate fuel cell (DFFC). Theoretically, the cell voltage of the high-temperature alkaline DFFC can be as high as 1.45 V at 90 °C. It has been demonstrated that a proof-of-concept alkaline DFFC without adding additional hydroxide yields a peak power density of 20.9 mW cm -2 , an order of magnitude higher than both alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells and alkaline direct methanol fuel cells, mainly because the hydrolysis of formate provides enough OH - ions for formate oxidation reaction. It was also found that this hydroxide self-feeding high-temperature alkaline DFFC shows a stable 100 min constant-current discharge at 90 °C, proving the conceptual feasibility. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Fuel-pellet-fabrication experience using direct-denitration-recycle-PuO2-coprecipitated mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Schaus, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The fuel pellet fabrication experience described in this paper involved three different feed powders: coprecipitated PuO 2 -UO 2 which was flash calcined in a fluidized bed; co-direct denitrated PuO 2 -UO 2 ; and direct denitrated LWR recycle PuO 2 which was mechanically blended with natural UO 2 . The objectives of this paper are twofold; first, to demonstrate that acceptable quality fuel pellets were fabricated using feed powders manufactured by processes other than the conventional oxalate process; and second, to highlight some pellet fabrication difficulties experienced with the direct denitration LWR recycle PuO 2 feed material, which did not produce acceptable pellets. The direct denitration LWR recycle PuO 2 was available as a by-product and was not specifically produced for use in fuel pellet fabrication. Nevertheless, its characteristics and pellet fabrication behavior serve to re-emphasize the importance of continued process development involving both powder suppliers and fuel fabricators to close the fuel cycle in the future

  14. A One-compartment direct glucose alkaline fuel cell with methyl viologen as electron mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xianhua; Hao, Miaoqing; Feng, Mengnan; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Yong; Du, Xiwen; Wang, Guangyi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A glucose–air alkaline fuel cell without using noble metal catalysts has been developed. ► The rudimentary fuel cell generates a maximum power density of 0.62 mW m −2 . ► The high performance is attributed to the use of MV and nickel foam. ► Main oxidation products are small organic acids indicating deep oxidation of glucose. - Abstract: Glucose is abundant, renewable, non-toxic and convenient as a fuel for fuel cells, but current technologies are unavailable for us to directly oxidize it to obtain energy. Fuel cells using enzymes and micro-organisms as catalysts are limited by their extremely low power output and rather short durability. Fuel cells using precious metal catalyst are expensive for large-scale use. In this work, a one-compartment direct glucose alkaline fuel cell has been developed that use methyl viologen (MV) as electron mediator and nickel foam as the anode. The rudimentary fuel cell generates a maximum power density of 0.62 mW cm −2 , while the maximum current density is 5.03 mA cm −2 . Electro-catalytic activities of MV and the nickel foam in alkaline conditions were studied by cyclic voltammetry. It is indicated that the high performance of the fuel cell is attributed to the combined use of MV and nickel foam. 13 C-NMR and HPLC were used to analyze oxidation products of glucose. The result shows that the principal oxidation products are short-chain organic acids indicating deep oxidation of glucose is achieved

  15. Fluorinated cobalt for catalyzing hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akdim, O.; Demirci, U.B.; Brioude, A.; Miele, P. [Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, UMR 5615 CNRS Universite Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-07-15

    The present paper reports preliminary results relating to a search for durable cobalt-based catalyst intended to catalyze the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}). Fluorination of Co [Suda S, Sun YM, Liu BH, Zhou Y, Morimitsu S, Arai K, et al. Catalytic generation of hydrogen by applying fluorinated-metal hydrides as catalysts. Appl Phys A 2001; 72: 209-12.] has attracted our attention whereas the fluorination of Co boride has never been envisaged so far. Our first objective was to compare the reactivity of fluorinated Co with that of Co boride. We focused our attention on the formation of Co boride from fluorinated Co. Our second objective was to show the fluorination effect on the reactivity of Co. Our third objective was to find an efficient, durable Co catalyst. It was observed a limited stabilization of the Co surface by virtue of the fluorination, which made the formation of surface Co boride more difficult while the catalytic activity was unaltered. The fluorination did not affect the number of surface active sites. Nevertheless, it did not prevent the formation of Co boride. The fluorination of Co boride was inefficient. Hence, fluorination is a way to gain in stabilization of the catalytic surface but it is quite inefficient to hinder the boride formation. Accordingly, it did not permit to compare the reactivity of Co boride with that of Co. (author)

  16. Low-Pt-Content Anode Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Combinatorial experiments have led to the discovery that a nanophase alloy of Pt, Ru, Ni, and Zr is effective as an anode catalyst material for direct methanol fuel cells. This discovery has practical significance in that the electronic current densities achievable by use of this alloy are comparable or larger than those obtained by use of prior Pt/Ru catalyst alloys containing greater amounts of Pt. Heretofore, the high cost of Pt has impeded the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells. By making it possible to obtain a given level of performance at reduced Pt content (and, hence, lower cost), the discovery may lead to reduction of the economic impediment to commercialization.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of anode exhaust of direct methanol fuel cells without isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Young Seok; Hwang, Reo Yun; Han, Ochee

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert the chemical energy of fuels such as natural gas, gasoline, and methanol, into electricity. Fuel cells more efficiently use energy than internal combustion engines and do not produce undesirable pollutants, such as NO_x ,SO_x and particulates. Fuel cells can be distinguished from one another by their electrolytes. Among the various direct alcohol fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have been developed most. However, DMFCs have several practical problems such as methanol crossove r from an anode to a cathode and slow methanol oxidation reaction rates. Therefore, understanding the electrochemical reaction mechanisms of DMFCs may provide clues to solve these problems, and various analytical methods have been employed to examine these mechanisms. We demonstrated that "1H and "1"3C NMR spectroscopy can be used for analyzing anode exhausts of DMFCs operated with methanol without any isotope enrichment. However, the low sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy hindered our efforts to detect minor reaction intermediates. Therefore, sensitivity enhancement techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR methods and/or presaturation methods to increase the dynamic range of the proton spectra by pre-saturating large water signals, are expected to be useful to detect low-concentration species

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of anode exhaust of direct methanol fuel cells without isotope enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Young Seok; Hwang, Reo Yun; Han, Ochee [Western Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert the chemical energy of fuels such as natural gas, gasoline, and methanol, into electricity. Fuel cells more efficiently use energy than internal combustion engines and do not produce undesirable pollutants, such as NO{sub x} ,SO{sub x} and particulates. Fuel cells can be distinguished from one another by their electrolytes. Among the various direct alcohol fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have been developed most. However, DMFCs have several practical problems such as methanol crossove r from an anode to a cathode and slow methanol oxidation reaction rates. Therefore, understanding the electrochemical reaction mechanisms of DMFCs may provide clues to solve these problems, and various analytical methods have been employed to examine these mechanisms. We demonstrated that {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for analyzing anode exhausts of DMFCs operated with methanol without any isotope enrichment. However, the low sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy hindered our efforts to detect minor reaction intermediates. Therefore, sensitivity enhancement techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR methods and/or presaturation methods to increase the dynamic range of the proton spectra by pre-saturating large water signals, are expected to be useful to detect low-concentration species.

  19. Cost Analysis of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stacks for Mass Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Francesco Sgroi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells are very promising technologies for efficient electrical energy generation. The development of enhanced system components and new engineering solutions is fundamental for the large-scale deployment of these devices. Besides automotive and stationary applications, fuel cells can be widely used as auxiliary power units (APUs. The concept of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC is based on the direct feed of a methanol solution to the fuel cell anode, thus simplifying safety, delivery, and fuel distribution issues typical of conventional hydrogen-fed polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEMFCs. In order to evaluate the feasibility of concrete application of DMFC devices, a cost analysis study was carried out in the present work. A 200 W-prototype developed in the framework of a European Project (DURAMET was selected as the model system. The DMFC stack had a modular structure allowing for a detailed evaluation of cost characteristics related to the specific components. A scale-down approach, focusing on the model device and projected to a mass production, was used. The data used in this analysis were obtained both from research laboratories and industry suppliers specialising in the manufacturing/production of specific stack components. This study demonstrates that mass production can give a concrete perspective for the large-scale diffusion of DMFCs as APUs. The results show that the cost derived for the DMFC stack is relatively close to that of competing technologies and that the introduction of innovative approaches can result in further cost savings.

  20. The economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, M.; Holdren, J.P.; Fetter, S.; Zwaan, B. van der

    2007-01-01

    The economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel are assessed. The break-even uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is estimated for a wide range of reprocessing prices and other fuel cycle costs and parameters. The contribution of each fuel cycle option to the cost of electricity is also estimated. A similar analysis is performed for the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron reactors (FRs) would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of differences in capital cost between LWRs and FRs. Available information about reprocessing prices and various other fuel cycle costs and input parameters are reviewed, as well as the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide at a range of different possible future prices. It is concluded that the once-through fuel cycle is likely to remain significantly cheaper than reprocessing and recycling in either LWRs or FRs for at least the next 50 years. Finally, there is a discussion of how scarce and expensive repository space would have to become before separation and transmutation would be economically attractive. (author)

  1. Effects of dimethyl ether on the performance characteristics of a direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Sang Hern; Lee, Chang Sik

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Activation loss is significantly reduced in fuel cell with DME-methanol. • DME crossover through the membrane reduces. • The open circuit voltage of DME-methanol the fuel cell increases. • The overall efficiency of the mixed fuel cell is higher than that of DMFC. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dimethyl ether (DME) on the performance characteristics of a direct methanol fuel cell. Impedance and crossover experiments were performed in order to investigate the performance losses such as ohmic loss, activation loss and crossover loss accurately. The DME was pressurized to 5 bar to supply with liquid phase was and blended with an aqueous methanol solution. In this experiment, the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was composed of Nafion 115, anode catalyst loaded Pt–Ru and cathode catalyst loaded Pt-Black. Experimental results showed that fuel cells with DME-methanol enhanced performance when compared to fuel cells with methanol only. Such performance enhancement was due to a decrease in activation losses by DME oxidation reactions. As the DME crossover through the membrane was reduced, the open circuit voltage (OCV) of the fuel cell increased. Other output characteristics are also discussed

  2. Combinatorial approach toward high-throughput analysis of direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong; Rong, Charles; Chu, Deryn

    2005-01-01

    A 40-member array of direct methanol fuel cells (with stationary fuel and convective air supplies) was generated by electrically connecting the fuel cells in series. High-throughput analysis of these fuel cells was realized by fast screening of voltages between the two terminals of a fuel cell at constant current discharge. A large number of voltage-current curves (200) were obtained by screening the voltages through multiple small-current steps. Gaussian distribution was used to statistically analyze the large number of experimental data. The standard deviation (sigma) of voltages of these fuel cells increased linearly with discharge current. The voltage-current curves at various fuel concentrations were simulated with an empirical equation of voltage versus current and a linear equation of sigma versus current. The simulated voltage-current curves fitted the experimental data well. With increasing methanol concentration from 0.5 to 4.0 M, the Tafel slope of the voltage-current curves (at sigma=0.0), changed from 28 to 91 mV.dec-1, the cell resistance from 2.91 to 0.18 Omega, and the power output from 3 to 18 mW.cm-2.

  3. A comparative study of approaches to direct methanol fuel cells modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, V.B.; Falcao, D.S.; Pinto, A.M.F.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Eng. Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Rangel, C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Tecnologia e Inovacao, Paco do Lumiar, 22,1649-038 (Portugal)

    2007-03-15

    Fuel cell modelling has received much attention over the past decade in an attempt to better understand the phenomena occurring within the cell. Mathematical models and simulation are needed as tools for design optimization of fuel cells, stacks and fuel cell power systems. Analytical, semi-empirical and mechanistic models for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are reviewed. Effective models were until now developed describing the fundamental electrochemical and transport phenomena taking place in the cell. More research is required to develop models that can account for the two-phase flows occurring in the anode and cathode of the DMFC. The merits and demerits of the models are presented. Selected models of different categories are implemented and discussed. Finally, one of the selected simplified models is proposed as a computer-aided tool for real-time system level DMFC calculations. (author)

  4. Use of Pd-Pt loaded graphene aerogel on nickel foam in direct ethanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Chi Him A.; Leung, D. Y. C.

    2018-01-01

    A size customized binder-free bimetallic Pd-Pt loaded graphene aerogel deposited on nickel foam plate (Pd-Pt/GA/NFP) was prepared and used as an electrode for an alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) under room temperature. The effect of fuel concentration and metal composition on the output power density of the DEFC was systematically investigated. Under the optimum fuel concentration, the cell could achieve a value of 3.6 mW cm-2 at room temperature for the graphene electrode with Pd/Pt ratio approaching 1:1. Such results demonstrated the possibility of producing a size customized metal loaded GA/NFP electrode for fuel cell with high performance.

  5. On the Use of Potential Denaturing Agents for Ethanol in Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domnik Bayer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidic or alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs can be a sustainable alternative for power generation if they are fuelled with bio-ethanol. However, in order to keep the fuel cheap, ethanol has to be exempted from tax on spirits by denaturing. In this investigation the potential denaturing agents fusel oil, tert-butyl ethyl ether, and Bitrex were tested with regard to their compatibility with fuel cells. Experiments were carried out both in sulphuric acid and potassium hydroxide solution. Beside, basic electrochemical tests, differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS and fuel cell tests were conducted. It was found that fusel oil is not suitable as denaturing agent for DEFC. However, tert-butyl ethyl ether does not seem to hinder the ethanol conversion as much. Finally, a mixture of tert-butyl ethyl ether and Bitrex can be proposed as promising candidate as denaturing agent for use in acidic and alkaline DEFC.

  6. Investigating the dynamics of a direct parallel combination of supercapacitors and polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papra, M.; Buechi, F.N.; Koetz, R. [Electrochemistry Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Hydrogen fuelled vehicles with a fuel cell based powertrain are considered to contribute to sustainable mobility by reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from road transport. In such vehicles the fuel cell system is typically hybridised with an energy storage device such as a battery or a supercapacitor (SC) to allow for recovering braking energy and assist the fuel cell system for peak power. The direct parallel combination of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) and a SC without any control electronics is investigated in the present study. It is demonstrated that the combination enhances the dynamics of the PEFC significantly during load changes. However, due to the lack of a power electronic interface the SC cannot be utilised to its optimum capacity. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Effect of Fuel Composition on Particulate Matter Emissions from a Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Bryden Alexander

    The effects of fuel composition on reducing PM emissions were investigated using a Ford Focus wall-guided gasoline direct injection engine (GDI). Initial results with a 65% isooctane and 35% toluene blend showed significant reductions in PM emissions. Further experiments determined that this decrease was due to a lack of light-end components in that fuel blend. Tests with pentane content lower than 15% were found to have PN concentrations 96% lower than tests with 20% pentane content. This indicates that there is a shift in mode of soot production. Pentane significantly increases the vapour pressure of the fuel blend, potentially resulting in surface boiling, less homogeneous mixtures, or decreased fuel rebound from the piston. PM mass measurements and PN Index values both showed strong correlations with the PN concentration emissions. In the gaseous exhaust, THC, pentane, and 1,3 butadiene showed strong correlations with the PM emissions.

  8. Thermal decomposition behaviors of magnesium borohydride doped with metal fluoride additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.G.; Wang, H.; Liu, J.W.; Zhu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The decomposition proceeded through several distinct steps. • The mixed materials show a dramatically low initial hydrogen release temperature. • The additives react with the Mg–B–H compounds rather than acting as catalysts. • The reaction process was studied using an in situ TEM. - Abstract: The thermal decomposition behaviors of Magnesium borohydride [Mg(BH 4 ) 2 ] and metal fluoride doped mixtures were studied by temperature programmed desorption measurement/mass spectrometry (TPD/MS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. The decomposition and release of hydrogen proceeded through several distinct steps, including two polymorphic transitions, ionic Mg(BH 4 ) 2 melting with solid Mg–B–H amorphous phase formation and Mg–B–H decomposition. The addition of additives such as CaF 2 , ZnF 2 and TiF 3 resulted in a decrease in the hydrogen release temperature. ZnF 2 and TiF 3 reduced the initial hydrogen release temperature to ca. 50 °C. However, hydrogen release during the transformation from γ-Mg(BH 4 ) 2 to the amorphous Mg–B–H compounds at ca. 300 °C was only 4.5 wt.% in contrast to 9.8 wt.% for the direct decomposition of pure Mg(BH 4 ) 2 . TEM observations confirmed that ZnF 2 and TiF 3 reacted with amorphous Mg–B–H compounds rather than acting as catalysts

  9. Optical properties of humic substances and CDOM: effects of borohydride reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiahai; Del Vecchio, Rossana; Golanoski, Kelli S; Boyle, Erin S; Blough, Neil V

    2010-07-15

    Treatment of Suwanee River humic (SRHA) and fulvic (SRFA) acids, a commercial lignin (LAC), and a series of solid phase extracts (C18) from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB extracts) with sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)), a selective reductant of carbonyl-containing compounds including quinones and aromatic ketones, produces a preferential loss of visible absorption (> or = 50% for SRFA) and substantially enhanced, blue-shifted fluorescence emission (2- to 3-fold increase). Comparison of the results with those obtained from a series of model quinones and hydroquinones demonstrates that these spectral changes cannot be assigned directly to the absorption and emission of visible light by quinones/hydroquinones. Instead, these results are consistent with a charge transfer model in which the visible absorption is due primarily to charge transfer transitions arising among hydroxy- (methoxy-) aromatic donors and carbonyl-containing acceptors. Unlike most of the model hydroquinones, the changes in optical properties of the natural samples following NaBH(4) reduction were largely irreversible in the presence of air and following addition of a Cu(2+) catalyst, providing tentative evidence that aromatic ketones (or other similar carbonyl-containing structures) may play a more important role than quinones in the optical properties of these materials.

  10. Platinum and palladium nano-structured catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Thi, Cao Minh; Yong, Yang; Nogami, Masayuki; Ohtaki, Michitaka

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis and characterization of Pt, Pd, Pt based bimetallic and multi-metallic nanoparticles with mixture, alloy and core-shell structure for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, and fuel cells. Here, Pt and Pd nanoparticles with modified nanostructures can be controllably synthesized via chemistry and physics for their uses as electro-catalysts. The cheap base metal catalysts can be studied in the relationship of crystal structure, size, morphology, shape, and composition for new catalysts with low cost. Thus, Pt based alloy and core-shell catalysts can be prepared with the thin Pt and Pt-Pd shell, which are proposed in low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We also present the survey of the preparation of Pt and Pd based catalysts for the better catalytic activity, high durability, and stability. The structural transformations, quantum-size effects, and characterization of Pt and Pd based catalysts in the size ranges of 30 nm (1-30 nm) are presented in electro-catalysis. In the size range of 10 nm (1-10 nm), the pure Pt catalyst shows very large surface area for electro-catalysis. To achieve homogeneous size distribution, the shaped synthesis of the polyhedral Pt nanoparticles is presented. The new concept of shaping specific shapes and morphologies in the entire nano-scale from nano to micro, such as polyhedral, cube, octahedra, tetrahedra, bar, rod, and others of the nanoparticles is proposed, especially for noble and cheap metals. The uniform Pt based nanosystems of surface structure, internal structure, shape, and morphology in the nanosized ranges are very crucial to next fuel cells. Finally, the modifications of Pt and Pd based catalysts of alloy, core-shell, and mixture structures lead to find high catalytic activity, durability, and stability for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, fuel cells, especially the next large-scale commercialization of next

  11. THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs. DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, Matthew; Fetter, Steve; Holdren, John P.; Zwaan, Bob van der

    2003-01-01

    This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices

  12. Degradation Mechanism in a Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Operated with Demineralised Brown Coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rady, Adam C.; Giddey, Sarbjit; Kulkarni, Aniruddha; Badwal, Sukhvinder P.S.; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Degradation mechanism studied for demineralised coal in a direct carbon fuel cell. • Diffusion limited processes dominate the electrode polarisation losses in pure N 2 . • Major fuel cell performance loss occurred due to loss of carbon/anode contacts. • The anode retained its phase structure with minor other phases formed in operation. - Abstract: The performance of a demineralised and devolatilised coal from the Morwell mine in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, has been investigated in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) operated at 850 °C. The focus of the investigation has been on understanding degradation issues as a function of time involving a sequence of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltage-current characteristic. Diffusion limited processes dominate the electrode polarisation losses in pure N 2 atmosphere, however, these decrease substantially in the presence of CO 2 as the anode chamber purge gas, due to in situ generation of fuel species by the reaction of CO 2 with carbon. Post-mortem analysis of anode by SEM and XRD revealed only a minor degradation due to its reduction, particle agglomeration as well as the formation of small quantity of new phases. However, major fuel cell performance degradation (increase of ohmic resistive and electrode polarisation losses) occurred due to loss of carbon/anode contacts and a reduction in the electron-conducting pathways as the fuel was consumed. The investigations revealed that the demineralised coal char can be used as a viable fuel for DCFC, however, further developments on anode materials and fuel feed mechanism would be required to achieve long-term sustained performance

  13. Effects of direct injection timing and blending ratio on RCCI combustion with different low reactivity fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; Molina, Santiago; García, Antonio; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • E85 requires notable lower premixed energy ratios to achieve a stable combustion. • E10-95 leads to shorter and advanced combustion with higher maximum RoHR peaks. • E20-95, E10-98 and E10-95 reach EURO VI NOx and soot levels for all the engine loads. • E10-95 allows a significant reduction in HC and CO emissions. - Abstract: This work investigates the effects of the direct injection timing and blending ratio on RCCI performance and engine-out emissions at different engine loads using four low reactivity fuels: E10-95, E10-98, E20-95 and E85 (port fuel injected) and keeping constant the same high reactivity fuel: diesel B7 (direct injected). The experiments were conducted using a heavy-duty single-cylinder research diesel engine adapted for dual-fuel operation. All the tests were carried out at 1200 rpm. To assess the blending ratio effect, the total energy delivered to the cylinder coming from the low reactivity fuel was kept constant for the different fuel blends investigated by adjusting the low reactivity fuel mass as required in each case. In addition, a detailed analysis of the air/fuel mixing process has been developed by means of a 1-D in-house developed spray model. Results suggest that notable higher diesel amount is required to achieve a stable combustion using E85. This fact leads to higher NOx levels and unacceptable ringing intensity. By contrast, EURO VI NOx and soot levels are fulfilled with E20-95, E10-98 and E10-95. Finally, the higher reactivity of E10-95 results in a significant reduction in CO and HC emissions, mainly at low load

  14. Design of a PWR for long cycle and direct recycling of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Nader M.A., E-mail: mnader73@yahoo.com

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Single-batch loading PWR with a new fuel assembly for 36 calendar months cycle was designed. • The new fuel assembly is constructed from a number of CANDU fuel bundles. • This design enables to recycle the spent fuel directly in CANDU reactors for high burnup. • Around 56 MWd/kgU burnup is achieved from fuel that has average enrichment of 4.8 w/o U-235 using this strategy. • Safety parameters such as the power distribution and CANDU coolant void reactivity were considered. - Abstract: In a previous work, a new design was proposed for the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly for direct use of the PWR spent fuel without processing. The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of 61-element CANDU fuel bundles (8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. The space between the tubes contains 44 lower enriched UO{sub 2} fuel rods and 12 guide tubes. In this paper, this assembly is used to build a single batch loading 36-month PWR and the spent CANDU bundles are recycled in the on power refueling CANDU reactors. The Advanced PWR (APWR) is considered as a reference design. The average enrichment in the core is 4.76%w U-235. IFBA and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as burnable poisons are used for controlling the excess reactivity and to flatten the power distribution. The calculations using MCNPX showed that the PWR will discharge the fuel with average burnup of 31.8 MWd/kgU after 1000 effective full power days. Assuming a 95 days plant outage, 36 calendar months can be achieved with a capacity factor of 91.3%. Good power distribution in the core is obtained during the cycle and the required critical boron concentration is less than 1750 ppm. Recycling of the discharged CANDU fuel bundles that represents 85% of the fuel in the assembly, in CANDU-6 or in 700 MWe Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR-700), an additional burnup of about 31 or 26 MWd/kgU burnup can be achieved, respectively. Averaging the fuel burnup on the all fuel in the PWR

  15. Fruit bats (Pteropodidae) fuel their metabolism rapidly and directly with exogenous sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, O; Holtze, S; Barkan, S; Amichai, E; Korine, C; Pinshow, B; Voigt, C C

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies reported that fed bats and birds mostly use recently acquired exogenous nutrients as fuel for flight, rather than endogenous fuels, such as lipids or glycogen. However, this pattern of fuel use may be a simple size-related phenomenon because, to date, only small birds and bats have been studied with respect to the origin of metabolized fuel, and because small animals carry relatively small energy reserves, considering their high mass-specific metabolic rate. We hypothesized that approximately 150 g Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus Pteropodidae), which are more than an order of magnitude heavier than previously studied bats, also catabolize dietary sugars directly and exclusively to fuel both rest and flight metabolism. We based our expectation on the observation that these animals rapidly transport ingested dietary sugars, which are absorbed via passive paracellular pathways in the intestine, to organs of high energy demand. We used the stable carbon isotope ratio in exhaled CO(2) (delta(13)C(breath)) to assess the origin of metabolized substrates in 16 Egyptian fruit bats that were maintained on a diet of C3 plants before experiments. First, we predicted that in resting bats delta(13)C(breath) remains constant when bats ingest C3 sucrose, but increases and converges on the dietary isotopic signature when C4 sucrose and C4 glucose are ingested. Second, if flying fruit bats use exogenous nutrients exclusively to fuel flight, we predicted that delta(13)C(breath) of flying bats would converge on the isotopic signature of the C4 sucrose they were fed. Both resting and flying Egyptian fruit bats, indeed, directly fuelled their metabolism with freshly ingested exogenous substrates. The rate at which the fruit bats oxidized dietary sugars was as fast as in 10 g nectar-feeding bats and 5 g hummingbirds. Our results support the notion that flying bats, irrespective of their size, catabolize dietary sugars directly, and possibly exclusively, to

  16. Magnox fuel dry storage and direct disposal assessment of CEGB/SSEB reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This report assesses the Boards' presented work in response to Recommendations 17 and 18 of the Environment Committee's First Report (Jan 86). The Boards have made an extensive study of the dry store design and also considered direct disposal. Their basic conclusion that the financial advantage is with continued reprocessing is accepted with the comment that their storage and disposal costs may be on the high side. The Boards statements on drying wet-stored fuel and on improvement of the fuel's chemical stability are accepted. The Boards coverage of fuel after disposal is considered to be too brief; the assessment expresses a more pessimistic view than the Boards' of the acceptability of direct disposal. (author)

  17. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  18. Direct Coupling of Thermo- and Photocatalysis for Conversion of CO2 -H2 O into Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Kong, Guoguo; Meng, Yaping; Tian, Jinshu; Zhang, Lijie; Wan, Shaolong; Lin, Jingdong; Wang, Yong

    2017-12-08

    Photocatalytic CO 2 reduction into renewable hydrocarbon solar fuels is considered as a promising strategy to simultaneously address global energy and environmental issues. This study focused on the direct coupling of photocatalytic water splitting and thermocatalytic hydrogenation of CO 2 in the conversion of CO 2 -H 2 O into fuels. Specifically, it was found that direct coupling of thermo- and photocatalysis over Au-Ru/TiO 2 leads to activity 15 times higher (T=358 K; ca. 99 % CH 4 selectivity) in the conversion of CO 2 -H 2 O into fuels than that of photocatalytic water splitting. This is ascribed to the promoting effect of thermocatalytic hydrogenation of CO 2 by hydrogen atoms generated in situ by photocatalytic water splitting. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The current status of technology January 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheelton, I.S.; Kelly, B.R.; Wood, E.

    1987-02-01

    The Study assesses the degree and status of research and development worldwide on Direct Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel. It is limited to technological, radiological and waste management aspects appertaining to Light Water and AGR Reactor Systems and reviews the 'State of the Art' in terms of applicability to the United Kingdom. The report concludes that much technology exists both at National and International level which the UK can apply to the subject of Direct Disposal. (author)

  20. Micro-patterned Nafion membranes for direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, M.H.; te Braake, J.; Aran, H.C.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we report the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance of micro-patterned (μp) Nafion® 117 (N117) membranes prepared by hot embossing and compare them with that of normal N117 and heat and pressure treated (hp) N117 non-patterned (smooth) membranes. Our results suggest that the

  1. Bifunctional catalysts for the direct production of liquid fuels from syngas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartipi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Design and development of catalyst formulations that maximize the direct production of liquid fuels by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), hydrocarbon cracking, and isomerization into one single catalyst particle (bifunctional FTS catalyst) have been investigated in this thesis. To achieve

  2. New polymeric electrolyte membranes based on proton donor proton acceptor properties for direct methanol fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manea, G.C.; Mulder, M.H.V.

    2002-01-01

    In order to reduce the high methanol permeability of membranes in a direct methanol fuel cell application new and better materials are still required. In this paper membranes made from polybenzimidazole/sulfonated polysulfone are given and compared with homopolymer membranes made from sulfonated

  3. Challenges in Design of an Orientation free Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (µDMFC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omidvarnia, Farzaneh; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Hales, Jan Harry

    2014-01-01

    the challenges in design and manufacturing of a micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) as the power generator in hearing aid devices is investigated. Among the different challenges in design for μDMFC, the CO2 bubble management and orientation independency of the cell are addressed by proposing a spring loaded...

  4. Novel crosslinked membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanqin; Zieren, Shelley; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2011-07-14

    Novel covalently crosslinked membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and carboxylated polysulfone exhibit much lower methanol crossover and better performance in direct methanol fuel cells at 65 °C in 1 and 2 M methanol solutions compared to Nafion 115 membranes.

  5. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  6. Direct synthesis of Pt-free catalyst on gas diffusion layer of fuel cell and usage of high boiling point fuels for efficient utilization of waste heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandan, Ravi; Goswami, Gopal Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Direct-grown boron-doped carbon nanotubes on gas-diffusion layer as efficient Pt-free cathode catalyst for alcohol fuel cells, high boiling point fuels used to obtain hot fuels for the enhancement of cell performance that paves the way for the utilization of waste heat. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •One-step direct synthesis of boron-doped carbon nanotubes (BCNTs) on gas diffusion layer (GDL). •Home built fuel-cell testing using BCNTs on GDL as Pt-free cathode catalyst. •BCNTs exhibit concentration dependent oxygen reduction reaction and the cell performance. •Effective utilization of waste heat to raise the fuel temperature. •Fuel selectivity to raise the fuel temperature and the overall performance of the fuel cells. -- Abstract: Gas diffusion layers (GDL) and electrocatalysts are integral parts of fuel cells. It is, however, a challenging task to grow Pt-free robust electrocatalyst directly on GDL for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) – a key reaction in fuel cells. Here, we demonstrate that boron-doped carbon nanotubes (BCNTs) grown directly on gas-diffusion layer (which avoid the need of ionomer solution used for catalyst loading) can be used as efficient Pt-free catalyst in alcohol fuel cells. Increase in boron concentration improves the electrochemical ORR activity in terms of onset and ORR peak positions, half-wave potentials and diffusion-limited current density that ensure the optimization of the device performance. The preferential 4e − pathway, excellent cell performance, superior tolerance to fuel crossover and long-term stability makes directly grown BCNTs as an efficient Pt-free cathode catalyst for cost-effective fuel cells. The maximum power density of the fuel cell is found to increase monotonically with boron concentration. In addition to the application of BCNTs in fuel cell, we have introduced the concept of hot fuels so that waste heat can effectively be used and external power sources can be avoided. The fuel

  7. Alkali free hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.J.F.; Pinto, A.M.F.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Gales, L. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto and Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas Abel Salazar, Largo Prof. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, V.R.; Rangel, C.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia - LNEG, Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit Estrada do Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is related with the production of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}), at elevated pressures and with high gravimetric storage density, to supply a PEM fuel cell on-demand. To achieve this goal, solid sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) was mixed with a proper amount of a powder reused nickel-ruthenium based catalyst (Ni-Ru based/NaBH{sub 4}: 0.2 and 0.4 g/g; {approx}150 times reused) inside the bottom of a batch reactor. Then, a stoichiometric amount of pure liquid water (H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4}: 2-8 mol/mol) was added and the catalyzed NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis evolved, in the absence of an alkali inhibitor. In this way, this research work is designated alkali free hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} for H{sub 2} generation. This type of hydrolysis is excellent from an environmental point of view because it does not involve strongly caustic solutions. Experiments were performed in three batch reactors with internal volumes 646, 369 and 229 cm{sup 3}, and having different bottom geometries (flat and conical shapes). The H{sub 2} generated was a function of the added water and completion was achieved with H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4} = 8 mol/mol. The results show that hydrogen yields and rates increase remarkably increasing both system temperature and pressure. Reactor bottom shape influences deeply H{sub 2} generation: the conical bottom shape greatly enhances the rate and practically eliminates the reaction induction time. Our system of compressed hydrogen generation up to 1.26 MPa shows 6.3 wt% and 70 kg m{sup -3}, respectively, for gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities (materials-only basis) and therefore is a viable hydrogen storage candidate for portable applications. (author)

  8. Toyota's innovative concept for a SI direct fuel injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, E.; Kanda, M.; Hattori, F. [Toyota Motor Corporation, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    To reduce environmental footprint of vehicle, demands have been intensifying for gasoline engines with lower fuel consumption, improved power performance, and lower emissions. The adoption of direct injection technology is rapidly expanding because it is an efficient way to achieve these targets. Originally, gasoline direct injection engines were designed to allow stratified lean combustion, which has a significant fuel consumption reduction effect. However, as exhaust gas emission regulations have become more stringent, the combustion strategy of most gasoline direct injection engines was changed to homogeneous stoichiometric combustion. Stratified lean combustion can nevertheless be used during catalyst heat up phase to fasten it and reduce pollutant emissions. In addition, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), widely used in Diesel combustion, can also be used in gasoline engine to further reduce fuel consumption by reducing fuel requirement to maintain stoichiometric combustion. Regulations covering the emission of particulate matter (PM), which is an issue of direct injection, have also been strengthened, such as by the introduction of particle number restrictions in Europe. Based on this background, this article introduces the new Toyota direct injection (D-4S) concept that was developed to respond to such requirements. In this concept, combustion speed and air-fuel mixture homogeneity were improved by active usage of spray jets to strengthen the in-cylinder flow. The PM number and oil dilution were significantly reduced by usage of a thin fan-shaped spray formed by a slit nozzle. In addition, this developed slit nozzle has high potential to avoid deposit build-up. Moreover, fast catalyst warming up performance was secured to achieve a low level of emissions compatible with the super ultra low emission vehicle (SULEV) standards in North America. (orig.)

  9. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  10. Implementation of direct LSC method for diesel samples on the fuel market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krištof, Romana; Hirsch, Marko; Kožar Logar, Jasmina

    2014-11-01

    The European Union develops common EU policy and strategy on biofuels and sustainable bio-economy through several documents. The encouragement of biofuel's consumption is therefore the obligation of each EU member state. The situation in Slovenian fuel market is presented and compared with other EU countries in the frame of prescribed values from EU directives. Diesel is the most common fuel for transportation needs in Slovenia. The study was therefore performed on diesel. The sampling net was determined in accordance with the fuel consumption statistics of the country. 75 Sampling points were located on different types of roads. The quantity of bio-component in diesel samples was determined by direct LSC method through measurement of C-14 content. The measured values were in the range from 0 up to nearly 6 mass percentage of bio-component in fuel. The method has proved to be appropriate, suitable and effective for studies on the real fuel market. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bis(phenolate)amine-supported lanthanide borohydride complexes for styrene and trans-1,4-isoprene (co-)polymerisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnet, Fanny; Dyer, Hellen E.; El Kinani, Yassine; Dietz, Carin; Roussel, Pascal; Bria, Marc; Visseaux, Marc; Zinck, Philippe; Mountford, Philip

    2015-01-01

    New bis(phenolate)amine-supported neodymium borohydride complexes and their previously reported samarium analogues were tested as catalysts for the polymerisation of styrene and isoprene. Reaction of Na2O2NL (L = py, OMe, NMe2) with Nd(BH4)3(THF)3 afforded the borohydride complexes

  12. A microfluidic-structured flow field for passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with highly concentrated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q X; Zhao, T S; Chen, R; Yang, W W

    2010-01-01

    Conventional direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have to operate with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and its detrimental consequences. Operation with such diluted methanol solutions not only results in a significant penalty in the specific energy of the power pack, limiting the runtime of this type of fuel cell, but also lowers the cell performance and operating stability. In this paper, a microfluidic-structured anode flow field for passive DMFCs with neither liquid pumps nor gas compressors/blowers is developed. This flow field consists of plural micro flow passages. Taking advantage of the liquid methanol and gas CO 2 two-phase counter flow, the unique fluidic structure enables the formation of a liquid–gas meniscus in each flow passage. The evaporation from the small meniscus in each flow passage can lead to an extremely large interfacial mass-transfer resistance, creating a bottleneck of methanol delivery to the anode CL. The fuel cell tests show that the innovative flow field allows passive DMFCs to achieve good cell performance with a methanol concentration as high as 18.0 M, increasing the specific energy of the DMFC system by about five times compared with conventional designs.

  13. Anion- or Cation-Exchange Membranes for NaBH4/H2O2 Fuel Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sljukić, Biljana; Morais, Ana L; Santos, Diogo M F; Sequeira, César A C

    2012-07-19

    Direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFC), which operate on sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as the fuel, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the oxidant, are receiving increasing attention. This is due to their promising use as power sources for space and underwater applications, where air is not available and gas storage poses obvious problems. One key factor to improve the performance of DBFCs concerns the type of separator used. Both anion- and cation-exchange membranes may be considered as potential separators for DBFC. In the present paper, the effect of the membrane type on the performance of laboratory NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells using Pt electrodes is studied at room temperature. Two commercial ion-exchange membranes from Membranes International Inc., an anion-exchange membrane (AMI-7001S) and a cation-exchange membrane (CMI-7000S), are tested as ionic separators for the DBFC. The membranes are compared directly by the observation and analysis of the corresponding DBFC's performance. Cell polarization, power density, stability, and durability tests are used in the membranes' evaluation. Energy densities and specific capacities are estimated. Most tests conducted, clearly indicate a superior performance of the cation-exchange membranes over the anion-exchange membrane. The two membranes are also compared with several other previously tested commercial membranes. For long term cell operation, these membranes seem to outperform the stability of the benchmark Nafion membranes but further studies are still required to improve their instantaneous power load.

  14. Back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. A comparison of the direct disposal and reprocessing options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.

    1997-01-01

    Based on the need to address public concerns, the need to ensure long-term safety and an ethical concern for future generations, many countries are developing technology to dispose of nuclear fuel waste. The waste substances in used fuel can be disposed of either by directly disposing of the used fuel assemblies themselves, or by disposing of the long-lived waste from fuel reprocessing. The basic thesis of this paper is that the direct disposal of either used fuel or of the long-lived heat-generating and non-heat generating waste that arise from reprocessing is technically and economically feasible and that both options will meet the fundamental objectives of protecting human health and the environment. Decisions about whether, or when, to reprocess used fuel, or about whether to dispose of used fuel directly, are not fundamentally waste management issues. (author)

  15. Direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cell operating in gradual internal reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, S. D.; Galesco, M. V.; Girona, K.; de Florio, D. Z.; Steil, M. C.; Georges, S.; Fonseca, F. C.

    2012-09-01

    An electrolyte supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using standard electrodes, doped-lanthanum manganite cathode and Ni-cermet anode, was operated with direct (anhydrous) ethanol for more than 100 h, delivering essentially the same power output as running on hydrogen. A ceria-based layer provides the catalytic activity for the gradual internal reforming, which uses the steam formed by the electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen for the decomposition of ethanol. Such a concept opens up the way for multi-fuel SOFCs using standard components and a catalytic layer.

  16. A micro alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with platinum-free catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verjulio, R. W.; Alcaide, F.; Álvarez, G.; Sabaté, N.; Torres-Herrero, N.; Esquivel, J. P.; Santander, J.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a micro alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell. The device has been conceived as a feasibility demonstrator, using microtechnologies for the fabrication of the current collectors and traditional techniques for the membrane electrode assembly production. The fuel cell works in passive mode, as expected for the simplicity required for micro power systems. Non-noble catalysts have been used in order to implement the main advantage of alkaline systems, showing the feasibility of such a device as a potential very-low-cost power device at mini- and micro scales.

  17. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Jae Sul; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes the second year progress of phase II of DUPIC program which aims to verify experimentally the feasibility of direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The project is to provide the experimental facilities and technologies that are required to perform the DUPIC experiment. As an early part of the project, engineering analysis of those facilities and construction of mock-up facility are described. Another scope of the project is to assess the DUPIC fuel cycle system and facilitate international cooperation. The progresses in this scope of work made during the fiscal year are also summarized in the report. 38 figs, 44 tabs, 8 refs. (Author).

  18. A micro alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with platinum-free catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verjulio, R W; Sabaté, N; Torres-Herrero, N; Esquivel, J P; Santander, J; Alcaide, F; Álvarez, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a micro alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell. The device has been conceived as a feasibility demonstrator, using microtechnologies for the fabrication of the current collectors and traditional techniques for the membrane electrode assembly production. The fuel cell works in passive mode, as expected for the simplicity required for micro power systems. Non-noble catalysts have been used in order to implement the main advantage of alkaline systems, showing the feasibility of such a device as a potential very-low-cost power device at mini- and micro scales. (paper)

  19. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  20. Design of an optimal micro direct methanol fuel cell for portable applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.M.; Kamarudin, S.K.; Daud, W.R.W

    2010-01-01

    The main constraint for the commercialization of micro Direct Methanol Fuel cell (μDMFC) for small power generation is the performance of the fuel cell. In this study, a high-power μDMFC with a power output of 14.10 mW on an active area of 4 cm 2 and catalyst loading of 0.5 mg cm -2 cathode was successfully developed. The optimal parameters for methanol concentration and catalyst loading were determined. Besides that, testing of performance, long term and open circuit voltage (OCV) was also performed. (author)

  1. Demonstration study on direct use of waste vegetable oil as car fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remoto, Yasuyuki; Zeeren, Nyamgerel; Ushiyama, Izumi

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Various kinds of vegetable oil and waste cooking oil are in fact used as car fuel all over the world. In general, 'bio-diesel' i.e. fatty acid methyl ester extracted from such oil is utilized as fuel for vehicles. However bio-diesel has some problems such as byproduct and waste materials created during transesterification. An alternative method is the direct use of vegetable oil as car fuel through installation of a heater unit in the car to decrease vegetable oil viscosity. However little data has been reported concerning this method. The authors of this study carried out performance tests on the direct use of waste cooking oil using a car with a heater unit and found its high potential. Moreover, the authors compared the environmental load of direct use with biodiesel and light oil by carrying out life cycle inventory to clarify the superiority of direct use. First, the authors made a car to test waste cooking oil as fuel by equipping a heater unit, filter and sub tank for light oil to a used Toyota Estima Diesel KD-CXR10G. The car can be driven on road using only waste cooking oil, although a little light oil is necessary for starting the engine. The authors, then, carried out chassis dynamo tests and on-road tests using the car. The car showed similar performance and could be driven on road for over half a year without any problems in both cases using either waste cooking oil or light oil as fuel. Next, authors carried out life cycle inventory and compared the environmental loads of direct use of waste cooking oil with biodiesel from waste cooking oil and light oil. The data for life cycle inventory were obtained from tests on direct use, from a factory in Japan for bio-diesel and from the Life Cycle Assessment Society of Japan database for light oil, respectively. The CO 2 emission rates were 73.9, 12.7 and 7.06 [kg-CO 2 / GJ] for light oil, bio-diesel from waste cooking oil and the direct use of waste cooking oil, respectively. The superiority of

  2. Optimisation of polypyrrole/Nafion composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jun; Sattler, Rita R.; Garsuch, Arnd; Yepez, Omar; Pickup, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Acidic and neutral Nafion[reg] 115 perfluorosulphonate membranes have been modified by in situ polymerization of pyrrole using Fe(III) and H 2 O 2 as oxidizing agents, in order to decrease methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cells. Improved selectivities for proton over methanol transport and improved fuel cell performances were only obtained with membranes that were modified while in the acid form. Use of Fe(III) as the oxidizing agent can produce a large decrease in methanol crossover, but causes polypyrrole deposition on the surface of the membrane. This increases the resistance of the membrane, and leads to poor fuel cell performances due to poor bonding with the electrodes. Surface polypyrrole deposition can be minimized, and surface polypyrrole can be removed, by using H 2 O 2 . The use of Nafion in its tetrabutylammonium form leads to very low methanol permeabilities, and appears to offer potential for manipulating the location of polypyrrole within the Nafion structure

  3. Utilization of corn cob biochar in a direct carbon fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinshuai; Zhao, Yicheng; Li, Yongdan

    2014-12-01

    Biochar obtained from the pyrolysis of corn cob is used as the fuel of a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) employing a composite electrolyte composed of a samarium doped ceria (SDC) and a eutectic carbonate phase. An anode layer made of NiO and SDC is utilized to suppress the cathode corrosion by the molten carbonate and improves the whole cell stability. The anode off-gas of the fuel cell is analyzed with a gas chromatograph. The effect of working temperature on the cell resistance and power output is examined. The maximum power output achieves 185 mW cm-2 at a current density of 340 mA cm-2 and 750 °C. An anode reaction scheme including the Boudouard reaction is proposed.

  4. Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gray, D. [Mitre Corp, McLean, VA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    For the foreseeable future, liquid hydrocarbon fuels will play a significant role in the transportation sector of both the United States and the world. Factors favoring these fuels include convenience, high energy density, and the vast existing infrastructure for their production and use. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports from countries with developing economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be allieviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. One option is direct coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology will results in improved technical readiness that can significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically in a time frame to address the shortfall.

  5. Mid-Term Direction of JAEA Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, H.; Sugiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Takeda, S.; Nomura, S.

    2009-01-01

    1. Introduction Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has sufficient experience and ability through its 50 year operation to establish the next generation closed cycle. It strives to become a world-class Center Of Excellence. 2. Current activity in NCL: 1) - Recycling of MOX fuel: The Tokai Reprocessing Plant has reprocessed 29 tons of MOX fuel from the ATR Fugenh as a part of 1140 tons of cumulative spent fuel reprocessed. JAEA has supported the pre-operation of the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. An innovative MOX pellet fabrication process has been developed in the Plutonium Fuel Development Center, and a part of products obtained by the development are used as a fuel for core confirmation test for re-startup of the FBR Monjuh. Characterization of MOX containing Am and Np has been studied and a new data such as melting point and thermal conductivity were reported. In the Chemical Processing Facility, a hot lab., an advanced aqueous reprocessing technology has been tested for TRU recovery, economical improvement, etc., using irradiated MOX fuel from the FR Joyoh. 2) - Supporting Activity: JAEA has improved the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safeguards activities. The Integrated Safeguards approach for all facilities in NCL has been implemented since August, 2008, as a pioneer and a good example in the world. To reduce anxiety among local residents, NCL has explained its operation plans and exchanged information and opinions with them concerning potential risks to health and environment. Recently, stake-holder participation in the management of NCL was started from the view point of Corporate Social Responsibility. In April, 2008, the agreement was signed with Idaho National Laboratory for cooperation of personnel training in fuel cycle area. 3. Mid-Term Direction: In Japan, feasibility and direction of the transition period from the LWR era to the FBR era should be discussed for the next several years. Study

  6. Mid-Term Direction of JAEA Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, H.; Sugiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Takeda, S.; Nomura, S. [Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1194 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    1. Introduction Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has sufficient experience and ability through its 50 year operation to establish the next generation closed cycle. It strives to become a world-class Center Of Excellence. 2. Current activity in NCL: 1) - Recycling of MOX fuel: The Tokai Reprocessing Plant has reprocessed 29 tons of MOX fuel from the ATR Fugenh as a part of 1140 tons of cumulative spent fuel reprocessed. JAEA has supported the pre-operation of the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. An innovative MOX pellet fabrication process has been developed in the Plutonium Fuel Development Center, and a part of products obtained by the development are used as a fuel for core confirmation test for re-startup of the FBR Monjuh. Characterization of MOX containing Am and Np has been studied and a new data such as melting point and thermal conductivity were reported. In the Chemical Processing Facility, a hot lab., an advanced aqueous reprocessing technology has been tested for TRU recovery, economical improvement, etc., using irradiated MOX fuel from the FR Joyoh. 2) - Supporting Activity: JAEA has improved the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safeguards activities. The Integrated Safeguards approach for all facilities in NCL has been implemented since August, 2008, as a pioneer and a good example in the world. To reduce anxiety among local residents, NCL has explained its operation plans and exchanged information and opinions with them concerning potential risks to health and environment. Recently, stake-holder participation in the management of NCL was started from the view point of Corporate Social Responsibility. In April, 2008, the agreement was signed with Idaho National Laboratory for cooperation of personnel training in fuel cycle area. 3. Mid-Term Direction: In Japan, feasibility and direction of the transition period from the LWR era to the FBR era should be discussed for the next several years. Study

  7. Direct-injection strategies for a hydrogen-fueled engine : an optical and numerical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, S.; Salazar, V. [Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scarcelli, R.; Wallner, T. [Argonne National Lab, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Vehicles with hydrogen-fueled engines are competitive with systems based on fuel cells. There is a lack of fundamental knowledge about in-cylinder processes in hydrogen direct injection engines. This presentation discussed a study that used a variety of injector configurations to establish a broad database. A light-load conditions that can profit from stratification was investigated. Several results were presented, including the 5-hole nozzle produced an asymmetric jet pattern which may be good for late injection. Very lean regions in the wake of the transient jets were found to be similar to those found in diesel injection. The 13-hole nozzle demonstrated complete jet collapse, consistent with Schlieren imaging by Petersen. Stratification made efficiency sensitive to the targeting of the single-hole injector. Computational fluid dynamics with a commercially available code aimed to improve the process of design optimization. The simulation predicted less fuel dispersion than was experimentally measured. Details of the fuel penetration were captured. It was concluded that for the single-hole nozzle, the pre-spark fuel distribution is consistent with results from the fired engine. tabs., figs.

  8. Direct alcohol fuel cells: Increasing platinum performance by modification with sp-group metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Marta C.; Sorsa, Olli; Doan, Nguyet; Pohjalainen, Elina; Hildebrand, Helga; Schmuki, Patrik; Wilson, Benjamin P.; Kallio, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    By using sp group metals as modifiers, the catalytic properties of Pt can be improved toward alcohols oxidation. In this work we report the performance increase of direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) fuelled with ethanol or 2-propanol with platinum based anode electrodes modified with Bi and Sb adatoms. For example, by simply adding Sb to the Pt/C based anode ink during membrane electrode assembly fabrication of a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) its performance is improved three-fold, with more than 100 mV increase in the open circuit potential. For the fuel cell fuelled with 2-propanol high power densities are obtained at very high potentials with these catalyst materials suggesting a great improvement for practical applications. Particularly in the case of Pt/C-Bi, the improvement is such that within 0.6 V (from 0.7 to 0.1 V) the power densities are between 7 and 9 mW/cm2. The results obtained with these catalysts are in the same range as those obtained with other bimetallic catalysts comprising of PtRu and PtSn, which are currently considered to be the best for these type of fuel cells and that are obtained by more complicated (and consequently more expensive) methods.

  9. The Direct Internal Recycling concept to simplify the fuel cycle of a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Christian; Giegerich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The fusion fuel cycle is presented and its functions are discussed. • Tritium inventories are estimated for an early DEMO configuration. • The Direct Internal Recycling concept to reduce tritium inventories is described. • Concepts for its technical implementation are developed. -- Abstract: A new concept, the Direct Internal Recycling (DIR) concept, is proposed, which minimizes fuel cycle inventory by adding an additional short-cut between the pumped torus exhaust gas and the fuelling systems. The paper highlights quantitative modelling results derived from a simple fuel cycle spreadsheet which underline the potential benefits that can be achieved by implementation of the DIR concept into a fusion power plant. DIR requires a novel set-up of the torus exhaust pumping system, which replaces the batch-wise and cyclic operated cryogenic pumps by a continuous pumping solution and which offers at the same time an additional integral gas separation function. By that, hydrogen can be removed close to the divertor from all other gases and the main load to the fuel clean-up systems is a smaller, helium-rich gas stream. Candidate DIR relevant pump technology based on liquid metals (vapour diffusion and liquid ring pumps) and metal foils is discussed

  10. Performance of an Active Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Using Reduced Catalyst Loading MEAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Falcão

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The micro direct methanol fuel cell (MicroDMFC is an emergent technology due to its special interest for portable applications. This work presents the results of a set of experiments conducted at room temperature using an active metallic MicroDMFC with an active area of 2.25 cm2. The MicroDMFC uses available commercial materials with low platinum content in order to reduce the overall fuel cell cost. The main goal of this work is to provide useful information to easily design an active MicroDMFC with a good performance recurring to cheaper commercial Membrane Electrode Assemblies MEAs. A performance/cost analysis for each MEA tested is provided. The maximum power output obtained was 18.1 mW/cm2 for a hot-pressed MEA with materials purchased from Quintech with very low catalyst loading (3 mg/cm2 Pt–Ru at anode side and 0.5 mg/cm2 PtB at the cathode side costing around 15 euros. Similar power values are reported in literature for the same type of micro fuel cells working at higher operating temperatures and substantially higher cathode catalyst loadings. Experimental studies using metallic active micro direct methanol fuel cells operating at room temperature are very scarce. The results presented in this work are, therefore, very useful for the scientific community.

  11. Performance of PEM Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol-Air Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at near atmospheric pressure, low-flow rate air, and at temperatures close to 60oC would tremendously enlarge the scope of potential applications. While earlier studies have reported performance with oxygen, the present study focuses on characterizing the performance of a PEM liquid feed direct methanol-air cell consisting of components developed in house. These cells employ Pt-Ru catalyst in the anode, Pt at the cathode and Nafion 117 as the PEM. The effect of pressure, flow rate of air and temperature on cell performance has been studied. With air, the performance level is as high as 0.437 V at 300 mA/cm2 (90oC, 20 psig, and excess air flow) has been attained. Even more significant is the performance level at 60oC, 1 atm and low flow rates of air (3-5 times stoichiometric), which is 0.4 V at 150 mA/cm2. Individual electrode potentials for the methanol and air electrode have been separated and analyzed. Fuel crossover rates and the impact of fuel crossover on the performance of the air electrode have also been measured. The study identifies issues specific to the methanol-air fuel cell and provides a basis for improvement strategies.

  12. Integrated anode structure for passive direct methanol fuel cells with neat methanol operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Peng; Guo, Jing; Yuan, Ting; Zheng, Junwei; Yang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    A microporous titanium plate based integrated anode structure (Ti-IAS) suitable for passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) fueled with neat methanol is reported. This anode structure incorporates a porous titanium plate as a methanol mass transfer barrier and current collector, pervaporation film for passively vaporizing methanol, vaporous methanol cavity for evenly distributing fuel, and channels for carbon dioxide venting. With the effective control of methanol delivery rate, the Ti-IAS based DMFC allows the direct use of neat methanol as the fuel source. In the meantime, the required water for methanol-oxidation reaction at the anode can also be fully recovered from the cathode with the help of the highly hydrophobic microporous layer in the cathode. DMFCs incorporating this new anode structure exhibit a power density as high as 40 mW cm-2 and a high volumetric energy density of 489 Wh L-1 operating with neat methanol and at 25 °C. Importantly, no obvious performance degradation of the passive DMFC system is observed after more than 90 h of continuous operation. The experimental results reveal that the compact DMFC based on the Ti-IAS exhibits a substantial potential as power sources for portable applications.

  13. Direct Utilization of Liquid Fuels in SOFC for Portable Applications: Challenges for the Selection of Alternative Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Cimenti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC have the advantage of being able to operate with fuels other than hydrogen. In particular, liquid fuels are especially attractive for powering portable applications such as small power generators or auxiliary power units, in which case the direct utilization of the fuel would be convenient. Although liquid fuels are easier to handle and transport than hydrogen, their direct use in SOFC can lead to anode deactivation due to carbon formation, especially on traditional nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni/YSZ anodes. Significant advances have been made in anodic materials that are resistant to carbon formation but often these materials are less electrochemically active than Ni/YSZ. In this review the challenges of using liquid fuels directly in SOFC, in terms of gas-phase and catalytic reactions within the anode chamber, will be discussed and the alternative anode materials so far investigated will be compared.

  14. Sinusoidal potential cycling operation of a direct ethanol fuel cell to improving carbon dioxide yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2014-12-01

    A direct ethanol fuel cell has been operated under sinusoidal (AC) potential cycling conditions in order to increase the yield of carbon dioxide and thereby increase cell efficiency relative to operation at a fixed potential. At 80 °C, faradaic yields of CO2 as high as 25% have been achieved with a PtRu anode catalyst, while the maximum CO2 production at constant potential was 13%. The increased yields under cycling conditions have been attributed to periodic oxidative stripping of adsorbed CO. These results will be important in the optimization of operating conditions for direct ethanol fuel cells, where the benefits of potential cycling are projected to increase as catalysts that produce CO2 more efficiently are implemented.

  15. Characterization and fuel cell performance analysis of polyvinylalcohol-mordenite mixed-matrix membranes for direct methanol fuel cell use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uctug, Fehmi Goerkem, E-mail: gorkem.uctug@bahcesehir.edu.t [University of Manchester, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Holmes, Stuart M. [University of Manchester, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > We investigated the availability of PVA-mordenite membranes for DMFC use. > We measured the methanol permeability of PVA-mordenite membranes via pervaporation. > We did the fuel cell testing of these membranes, which had not been done before. > We showed that PVA-mordenite membranes have poorer DMFC performance than Nafion. > Membrane performance can be improved by increasing the proton conductivity of PVA. - Abstract: Polyvinylalcohol-mordenite (PVA-MOR) mixed matrix membranes were synthesized for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) use. For the structural and the morphological characterization, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis methods were used. Zeolite distribution within the polymer matrix was found to be homogeneous. An impedance spectroscope was used to measure the proton conductivity. In order to obtain information about methanol permeation characteristics, swelling tests and a series of pervaporation experiments were carried out. 60-40 wt% PVA-MOR membranes were found to give the optimum transport properties. Proton conductivity of these membranes was found to be slightly lower than that of Nafion117{sup TM} whereas their methanol permeability was at least two orders of magnitude lower than Nafion117{sup TM}. DMFC performance of the PVA-MOR membranes was also measured. The inferior DMFC performance of PVA-MOR membranes was linked to drying in the fuel cell medium and the consequent proton conductivity loss. Their performance was improved by adding a dilute solution of sulfuric acid into the feed methanol solution. Future studies on the improvement of the proton conductivity of PVA-MOR membranes, especially via sulfonation of the polymer matrix, can overcome the low-performance problem associated with insufficient proton conductivity.

  16. Characterization and fuel cell performance analysis of polyvinylalcohol-mordenite mixed-matrix membranes for direct methanol fuel cell use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uctug, Fehmi Goerkem; Holmes, Stuart M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigated the availability of PVA-mordenite membranes for DMFC use. → We measured the methanol permeability of PVA-mordenite membranes via pervaporation. → We did the fuel cell testing of these membranes, which had not been done before. → We showed that PVA-mordenite membranes have poorer DMFC performance than Nafion. → Membrane performance can be improved by increasing the proton conductivity of PVA. - Abstract: Polyvinylalcohol-mordenite (PVA-MOR) mixed matrix membranes were synthesized for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) use. For the structural and the morphological characterization, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis methods were used. Zeolite distribution within the polymer matrix was found to be homogeneous. An impedance spectroscope was used to measure the proton conductivity. In order to obtain information about methanol permeation characteristics, swelling tests and a series of pervaporation experiments were carried out. 60-40 wt% PVA-MOR membranes were found to give the optimum transport properties. Proton conductivity of these membranes was found to be slightly lower than that of Nafion117 TM whereas their methanol permeability was at least two orders of magnitude lower than Nafion117 TM . DMFC performance of the PVA-MOR membranes was also measured. The inferior DMFC performance of PVA-MOR membranes was linked to drying in the fuel cell medium and the consequent proton conductivity loss. Their performance was improved by adding a dilute solution of sulfuric acid into the feed methanol solution. Future studies on the improvement of the proton conductivity of PVA-MOR membranes, especially via sulfonation of the polymer matrix, can overcome the low-performance problem associated with insufficient proton conductivity.

  17. Relating Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance to Measurements in a Liquid Half Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov; Tynelius, Oskar; Lund-Olesen, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) could act as a replacement for batteries in low power electronics. For instance, micro—DMFC’s could be used to power hearing instruments[1]. The power output of a DMFC is limited by the sluggish kinetics of both the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on the anode ...... Cells Bull. 2012 (2012) 12–16. doi:10.1016/S1464-2859(12)70367-X....

  18. Highly ordered Pd nanowire arrays as effective electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in direct alcohol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, C.W. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, H. [Departement of Applied Chemistry, Dongguan University of Technology, Dongguan 523106 (China); Shen, P.K. [School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yet-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Jiang, S.P.

    2007-12-03

    Pd nanowire arrays (NWAs) with high electrochemically active surface area are successfully fabricated using anodized aluminum oxide electrodeposition. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pd NWAs for ethanol electrooxidation are not only significantly higher that of conventional Pd film electrodes, but also higher than that of well-established commercial PtRu/C electrocatalysts. The Pd NWAs show great potential as electrocatalysts for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline media in direct ethanol fuel cells. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. High-performance alkaline direct methanol fuel cell using a nitrogen-postdoped anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joghee, Prabhuram; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Wood, Kevin; Bender, Guido; O'Hayre, Ryan

    2014-07-01

    A commercial PtRu/C catalyst postdoped with nitrogen demonstrates a significantly higher performance (~10-20% improvement) in the anode of an alkaline direct methanol fuel cell than an unmodified commercial PtRu/C catalyst control. The enhanced performance shown herein is attributed at least partially to the increased electrochemical surface area of the PtRu/C after postdoping with nitrogen. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Elementary kinetic modelling applied to solid oxide fuel cell pattern anodes and a direct flame fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogler, Marcel

    2009-05-27

    In the course of this thesis a model for the prediction of polarisation characteristics of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was developed. The model is based on an elementary kinetic description of electrochemical reactions and the fundamental conservation principles of mass and energy. The model allows to predict the current-voltage relation of an SOFC and offers ideal possibilities for model validation. The aim of this thesis is the identification of rate-limiting processes and the determination of the elementary pathway during charge transfer. The numerical simulation of experiments with model anodes allowed to identify a hydrogen transfer to be the most probable charge-transfer reaction and revealed the influence of diffusive transport. Applying the hydrogen oxidation kinetics to the direct flame fuel cell system (DFFC) showed that electrochemical oxidation of CO is possible based on the same mechanism. Based on the quantification of loss processes in the DFFC system, improvements on cell design, predicting 80% increase of efficiency, were proposed. (orig.)

  1. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Direct hydrothermal growth of GDC nanorods for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soonwook; Lee, Dohaeng; Yang, Hwichul; Kim, Young-Beom

    2018-06-01

    We report a novel synthesis technique of gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) nano-rod (NRs) via direct hydrothermal process to enhance performance of low temperature solid oxide fuel cell by increasing active reaction area and ionic conductivity at interface between cathode and electrolyte. The cerium nitrate hexahydrate, gadolinium nitrate hexahydrate and urea were used to synthesis GDC NRs for growth on diverse substrate. The directly grown GDC NRs on substrate had a width from 819 to 490 nm and height about 2200 nm with a varied urea concentration. Under the optimized urea concentration of 40 mMol, we confirmed that GDC NRs able to fully cover the substrate by enlarging active reaction area. To maximize ionic conductivity of GDC NRs, we synthesis varied GDC NRs with different ratio of gadolinium and cerium precursor. Electrochemical analysis revealed a significant enhanced performance of fuel cells applying synthesized GDC NRs with a ratio of 2:8 gadolinium and cerium precursor by reducing polarization resistance, which was chiefly attributed to the enlarged active reaction area and enhanced ionic conductivity of GDC NRs. This method of direct hydrothermal growth of GDC NRs enhancing fuel cell performance was considered to apply other types of catalyzing application using nano-structure such as gas sensing and electrolysis fields.

  3. Volcano Plot for Bimetallic Catalysts in Hydrogen Generation by Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Anais; Toshikj, Nikola; Hoett, Sandra; Bernaud, Laurent; Demirci, Umit B.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of "hydrogen energy", sodium borohydride (NaBH[subscript 4]) is a potential hydrogen carrier able to release H[subscript 2] by hydrolysis in the presence of a metal catalyst. Our laboratory experiment focuses on this. It is intended for thirdyear undergraduate students in order to have hands-on laboratory experience through…

  4. An improved synthesis of 14C labelled glycerol using sodium borohydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, H.; Ramamurthy, T.V.; Viswanathan, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    [1- 14 C]Glyceric acid has been reduced to [1(3)- 14 C]glycerol in high yields via the methyl ester of [1- 14 C]glyceric acid by sodium borohydride in the presence of t-butyl alcohol and methanol. The importance of the procedure is highlighted in relation to other procedures involving lithium aluminium hydride reduction. (author)

  5. Li-Al-borohydride as a potential candidate for on-board hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Inge; Domenech Ferrer, Roger; Dunsch, Lothar; Schultz, Ludwig; Gutfleisch, Oliver [IFW Dresden, PO Box 270016, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Swiss-Norwegian Beam Lines at ESRF, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Hagemann, Hans; Cerny, Radovan [University of Geneva, Crystallography and Physical Chemistry Department, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    Recently, double-cation borohydride systems have attracted great interest. It was found that the desorption temperature of the borohydrides decreases with increasing electronegativity of the cation. Consequently, it is possible to tailor a feasible on-board hydrogen storage material by combination of appropriate cations. Li-Al-borohydride shows a desorption temperature suitable for applications ({approx} 70 C) combined with an high hydrogen density (17.2 wt.%). It was synthesised via high energy ball milling of AlCl{sub 3} and LiBH{sub 4}. The structure of the compound was obtained from high-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction and shows a unique complex structure within the borohydrides. The material was characterized by means of in-situ-Raman, DSC, TG and thermal desorption measurements to study its decomposition pathway. The desorption at {approx} 70 C results in the formation of LiBH{sub 4} while the high mass loss of about 20% points to the release of not only hydrogen but also diborane. This is right now the main drawback for applications because it hinders reversibility.

  6. Results of the German alternative fuel cycle evaluation and further efforts geared toward demonstration of direct disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, R.; Closs, K.D.

    1986-01-01

    In a comparative study initiated by the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology which was carried out by Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in the period from 1981 to 1985, direct disposal of spent fuel was contrasted to the traditional fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycle. The results of the study did not exhibit decisive advantages of direct disposal over fuel reprocessing. Due to this face and legal requirements of the German Atomic Energy Act, the cabinet concluded to continue to adhere to fuel reprocessing as the preferred version of ''Entsorgung''. But the door was left ajar for the direct disposal alternative that, under present atomic law, is permissible for fuel for which reprocessing is neither technically feasible nor economically justified. An ambitious program has been launched in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), geared to bring direct disposal to a point of technical maturity

  7. Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-05

    This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

  8. Influence of fuel injection pressures on Calophyllum inophyllum methyl ester fuelled direct injection diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanthagopal, K.; Ashok, B.; Karuppa Raj, R. Thundil

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of injection pressure of Calophyllum inophyllum biodiesel is investigated. • Engine characteristics of 100% Calophyllum inophyllum biodiesel has been performed. • Calophyllum inophyllum is a non-edible source for biodiesel production. • Increase in injection pressure of biodiesel, improves the fuel economy. • Incylinder pressure characteristics of biodiesel follows similar trend as of diesel. - Abstract: The trend of using biodiesels in compression ignition engines have been the focus in recent decades due to the promising environmental factors and depletion of fossil fuel reserves. This work presents the effect of Calophyllum inophyllum methyl ester on diesel engine performance, emission and combustion characteristics at different injection pressures. Experimental investigations with varying injection pressures of 200 bar, 220 bar and 240 bar have been carried out to analyse the parameters like brake thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, heat release rate and engine emissions of direct injection diesel engine fuelled with 100% biodiesel and compared with neat diesel. The experimental results revealed that brake specific fuel consumption of C. inophyllum methyl ester fuelled engine has been reduced to a great extent with higher injection pressure. Significant reduction in emissions of unburnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and smoke opacity have been observed during fuel injection of biodiesel at 220 bar compared to other fuel injection pressures. However oxides of nitrogen increased with increase in injection pressures of C. inophyllum methyl ester and are always higher than that of neat diesel. In addition the combustion characteristics of biodiesel at all injection pressures followed a similar trend to that of conventional diesel.

  9. Performance of direct alcohol fuel cells fed with mixed methanol/ethanol solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongyao, N. [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Rd., Bang Mod, Thung Khru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Therdthianwong, A., E-mail: apichai.the@kmutt.ac.t [Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Research and Engineering Center, Clean Energy System Group, PDTI, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Rd., Bang Mod, Thung Khru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Therdthianwong, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Rd., Bang Mod, Thung Khru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} We examined the performance of direct alcohol fuel cells fed with mixed alcohol. {yields} PtRu-PtSn/C and PtRu/C as catalysts for mixed alcohol electrooxidation reaction. {yields} Misplace adsorption of ethanol on PtRu/C caused the cell performance drop. {yields} PtRu/C showed higher performance than PtRu-PtSn/C for mixed alcohol fuel. -- Abstract: In combining the advantages of both methanol and ethanol, direct alcohol fuel cells fed with mixed alcohol solutions (1 M methanol and 1 M ethanol in varying volume ratios) were tested for performance. Employing a PtRu-PtSn/C catalyst as anode, cell performance was found to diminish rapidly even at 2.5% by volume ethanol mixture. Further increase of ethanol exceeded 10%, the cell performance gradually decreased and finally approached that of direct ethanol fuel cells. The causes of the decrease in the cell performance were the slow electro-oxidation of ethanol and the misplaced adsorption of ethanol on PtRu/C. By comparing the PtRu-PtSn/C cell with the PtRu/C cell operated with mixed alcohol solutions, the cell using PtRu/C as an anode catalyst provided higher power density since more PtRu/C surface was available for methanol oxidation reaction and less ohmic resistance of PtRu/C than that of PtRu-PtSn/C. In order to reach optimization of DAFC performance fed with mixed alcohol, the electrocatalyst used for the anode must selectively adsorb an alcohol, especially ethanol.

  10. Ethanol tolerant precious metal free cathode catalyst for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmer, Ilena; Zorn, Paul; Weinberger, Stephan; Grimmer, Christoph; Pichler, Birgit; Cermenek, Bernd; Gebetsroither, Florian; Schenk, Alexander; Mautner, Franz-Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Selective ORR catalysts are presented for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells. • Perovskite based cathode catalysts show high tolerance toward ethanol. • A membrane-free alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell is presented. - Abstract: La 0.7 Sr 0.3 (Fe 0.2 Co 0.8 )O 3 and La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 −based cathode catalysts are synthesized by the sol-gel method. These perovskite cathode catalysts are tested in half cell configuration and compared to MnO 2 as reference material in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (ADEFCs). The best performing cathode is tested in single cell setup using a standard carbon supported Pt 0.4 Ru 0.2 based anode. A backside Luggin capillary is used in order to register the anode potential during all measurements. Characteristic processes of the electrodes are investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Physical characterizations of the perovskite based cathode catalysts are performed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and by X-ray diffraction showing phase pure materials. In half cell setup, La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 shows the highest tolerance toward ethanol with a performance of 614 mA cm −2 at 0.65 V vs. RHE in 6 M KOH and 1 M EtOH at RT. This catalyst outperforms the state-of-the-art precious metal-free MnO 2 catalyst in presence of ethanol. In fuel cell setup, the peak power density is 27.6 mW cm −2 at a cell voltage of 0.345 V and a cathode potential of 0.873 V vs. RHE.

  11. Performance of direct alcohol fuel cells fed with mixed methanol/ethanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongyao, N.; Therdthianwong, A.; Therdthianwong, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We examined the performance of direct alcohol fuel cells fed with mixed alcohol. → PtRu-PtSn/C and PtRu/C as catalysts for mixed alcohol electrooxidation reaction. → Misplace adsorption of ethanol on PtRu/C caused the cell performance drop. → PtRu/C showed higher performance than PtRu-PtSn/C for mixed alcohol fuel. -- Abstract: In combining the advantages of both methanol and ethanol, direct alcohol fuel cells fed with mixed alcohol solutions (1 M methanol and 1 M ethanol in varying volume ratios) were tested for performance. Employing a PtRu-PtSn/C catalyst as anode, cell performance was found to diminish rapidly even at 2.5% by volume ethanol mixture. Further increase of ethanol exceeded 10%, the cell performance gradually decreased and finally approached that of direct ethanol fuel cells. The causes of the decrease in the cell performance were the slow electro-oxidation of ethanol and the misplaced adsorption of ethanol on PtRu/C. By comparing the PtRu-PtSn/C cell with the PtRu/C cell operated with mixed alcohol solutions, the cell using PtRu/C as an anode catalyst provided higher power density since more PtRu/C surface was available for methanol oxidation reaction and less ohmic resistance of PtRu/C than that of PtRu-PtSn/C. In order to reach optimization of DAFC performance fed with mixed alcohol, the electrocatalyst used for the anode must selectively adsorb an alcohol, especially ethanol.

  12. Porous carbon as electrode material in direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) synthesized by the direct carbonization of MOF-5

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Inayatali

    2014-01-12

    Porous carbon (PC-900) was prepared by direct carbonization of porous metal-organic framework (MOF)-5 (Zn4O(bdc)3, bdc=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) at 900 °C. The carbon material was deposited with PtM (M=Fe, Ni, Co, and Cu (20 %) metal loading) nanoparticles using the polyol reduction method, and catalysts PtM/PC-900 were designed for direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs). However, herein, we are reporting PtFe/PC-900 catalyst combination which has exhibited superior performance among other options. This catalyst was characterized by powder XRD, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) technique. The electrocatalytic capability of the catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation was investigated using cyclic voltammetry and direct ethanol single cell testing. The results were compared with those of PtFe and Pt supported on Vulcan XC72 carbon catalysts (PFe/CX-72 and Pt/XC-72) prepared via the same method. It has been observed that the catalyst PtFe/PC-900 developed in this work showed an outstanding normalized activity per gram of Pt (6.8 mA/g Pt) and superior power density (121 mW/cm2 at 90 °C) compared to commercially available carbon-supported catalysts. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014.

  13. Porous carbon as electrode material in direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) synthesized by the direct carbonization of MOF-5

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Inayatali; Badshah, Amin; Haider, Naghma; Ullah, Shafiq; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif

    2014-01-01

    Porous carbon (PC-900) was prepared by direct carbonization of porous metal-organic framework (MOF)-5 (Zn4O(bdc)3, bdc=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) at 900 °C. The carbon material was deposited with PtM (M=Fe, Ni, Co, and Cu (20 %) metal loading) nanoparticles using the polyol reduction method, and catalysts PtM/PC-900 were designed for direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs). However, herein, we are reporting PtFe/PC-900 catalyst combination which has exhibited superior performance among other options. This catalyst was characterized by powder XRD, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) technique. The electrocatalytic capability of the catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation was investigated using cyclic voltammetry and direct ethanol single cell testing. The results were compared with those of PtFe and Pt supported on Vulcan XC72 carbon catalysts (PFe/CX-72 and Pt/XC-72) prepared via the same method. It has been observed that the catalyst PtFe/PC-900 developed in this work showed an outstanding normalized activity per gram of Pt (6.8 mA/g Pt) and superior power density (121 mW/cm2 at 90 °C) compared to commercially available carbon-supported catalysts. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014.

  14. Carbon supported Pd-Ni and Pd-Ru-Ni nanocatalysts for the alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, MK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon supported Pd-Ni and Pd-Ru-Ni nanocatalysts were prepared by the chemical reduction method, using sodium borohydride and ethylene glycol mixture as the reducing agent. The catalytic activity towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium...

  15. Review on utilization of the pervaporation membrane for passive vapor feed direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauzi, N F I; Hasran, U A; Kamarudin, S K

    2013-01-01

    The Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) is a promising portable power source for mobile electronic devices because of its advantages including easy fuel storage, high energy density, low temperature operation and compact structure. In DMFC, methanol is used as a fuel source where it can be fed in liquid or vapor phase. However, the vapor feed DMFC has an advantage over the liquid feed system as it has the potential to have a higher operating temperature to increase the reaction rates and power outputs, to enhance the mass transfers, to reduce methanol crossover, reliable for high methanol concentration and it can increase the fuel cell performance. Methanol vapor can be delivered to the anode by using a pervaporation membrane, heating the liquid methanol or another method that compatible. Therefore, this paper is a review on vapor feed DMFC as a better energy source than liquid feed DMFC, the pervaporation membrane used to vaporize methanol feed from the reservoir and its applications in vapor feed DMFC

  16. Integration of a molten carbonate fuel cell with a direct exhaust absorption chiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Pere; Samuelsen, Scott

    A high market value exists for an integrated high-temperature fuel cell-absorption chiller product throughout the world. While high-temperature, molten carbonate fuel cells are being commercially deployed with combined heat and power (CHP) and absorption chillers are being commercially deployed with heat engines, the energy efficiency and environmental attributes of an integrated high-temperature fuel cell-absorption chiller product are singularly attractive for the emerging distributed generation (DG) combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) market. This study addresses the potential of cooling production by recovering and porting the thermal energy from the exhaust gas of a high-temperature fuel cell (HTFC) to a thermally activated absorption chiller. To assess the practical opportunity of serving an early DG-CCHP market, a commercially available direct fired double-effect absorption chiller is selected that closely matches the exhaust flow and temperature of a commercially available HTFC. Both components are individually modeled, and the models are then coupled to evaluate the potential of a DG-CCHP system. Simulation results show that a commercial molten carbonate fuel cell generating 300 kW of electricity can be effectively coupled with a commercial 40 refrigeration ton (RT) absorption chiller. While the match between the two "off the shelf" units is close and the simulation results are encouraging, the match is not ideal. In particular, the fuel cell exhaust gas temperature is higher than the inlet temperature specified for the chiller and the exhaust flow rate is not sufficient to achieve the potential heat recovery within the chiller heat exchanger. To address these challenges, the study evaluates two strategies: (1) blending the fuel cell exhaust gas with ambient air, and (2) mixing the fuel cell exhaust gases with a fraction of the chiller exhaust gas. Both cases are shown to be viable and result in a temperature drop and flow rate increase of the

  17. Integration of a molten carbonate fuel cell with a direct exhaust absorption chiller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margalef, Pere; Samuelsen, Scott [National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC), University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3550 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    A high market value exists for an integrated high-temperature fuel cell-absorption chiller product throughout the world. While high-temperature, molten carbonate fuel cells are being commercially deployed with combined heat and power (CHP) and absorption chillers are being commercially deployed with heat engines, the energy efficiency and environmental attributes of an integrated high-temperature fuel cell-absorption chiller product are singularly attractive for the emerging distributed generation (DG) combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) market. This study addresses the potential of cooling production by recovering and porting the thermal energy from the exhaust gas of a high-temperature fuel cell (HTFC) to a thermally activated absorption chiller. To assess the practical opportunity of serving an early DG-CCHP market, a commercially available direct fired double-effect absorption chiller is selected that closely matches the exhaust flow and temperature of a commercially available HTFC. Both components are individually modeled, and the models are then coupled to evaluate the potential of a DG-CCHP system. Simulation results show that a commercial molten carbonate fuel cell generating 300 kW of electricity can be effectively coupled with a commercial 40 refrigeration ton (RT) absorption chiller. While the match between the two ''off the shelf'' units is close and the simulation results are encouraging, the match is not ideal. In particular, the fuel cell exhaust gas temperature is higher than the inlet temperature specified for the chiller and the exhaust flow rate is not sufficient to achieve the potential heat recovery within the chiller heat exchanger. To address these challenges, the study evaluates two strategies: (1) blending the fuel cell exhaust gas with ambient air, and (2) mixing the fuel cell exhaust gases with a fraction of the chiller exhaust gas. Both cases are shown to be viable and result in a temperature drop and flow

  18. Nanoporous palladium anode for direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cells with nanoscale proton-conducting ceramic electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Wong, Lai Mun; Xie, Hanlin; Wang, Shijie; Su, Pei-Chen

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the operation of micro-solid oxide fuel cells (μ-SOFCs) with nanoscale proton-conducting Y-BaZrO3 (BZY) electrolyte to avoid the fuel crossover problem for direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs). The μ-SOFCs are operated with the direct utilisation of ethanol vapour as a fuel and Pd as anode at the temperature range of 300-400 °C. The nanoporous Pd anode is achieved by DC sputtering at high Ar pressure of 80 mTorr. The Pd-anode/BYZ-electrolyte/Pt-cathode cell show peak power densities of 72.4 mW/cm2 using hydrogen and 15.3 mW/cm2 using ethanol at 400 °C. No obvious carbon deposition is seen from XPS analysis after fuel cell test with ethanol fuel.

  19. Characterization of an anionic-exchange membranes for direct methanol alkaline fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuin, Graciela C. [Centro de Procesos Superficiales, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Industrial (INTI), Av. Gral. Paz 5445, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Nonjola, Patrick; Mathe, Mkhulu K. [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Material Science and Manufacturing, PO Box 395, Brumeria, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Franceschini, Esteban A.; Izraelevitch, Federico H.; Corti, Horacio R. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    Ammonium quaternized polymers such as poly (arylene ether sulfones) are being developed and studied as candidates of ionomeric materials for application in alkaline fuel cells, due to their low cost and promising electrochemical properties. In this work, a quaternary ammonium polymer was synthesized by chloromethylation of a commercial polysulfone followed by amination process. Quaternized polysulfone membrane properties such us water and water-methanol uptake, electrical conductivity and Young's modulus were evaluated and compared to Nafion 117, commonly employed in direct methanol fuel cells. The anionic polysulfone membrane sorbs more water than Nafion all over the whole range of water activities, but it uptakes much less methanol as compared to Nafion. The specific conductivity of the fully hydrated polysulfone membrane equilibrated with KOH solutions at ambient temperature increases with the KOH concentration, reaching a maximum of 0.083 S cm{sup -1} for 2 M KOH, slightly less conductive than Nafion 117. The elastic modulus of the polysulfone membranes inmersed in water is similar to that reported for Nafion membranes under the same conditions. We concluded that quaternized polysulfone membrane are good candidates as electrolytes in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells. (author)

  20. Electrode design for direct-methane micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (MT-SOFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabuni, Mohamad Fairus; Li, Tao; Punmeechao, Puvich; Li, Kang

    2018-04-01

    Herein, a micro-structured electrode design has been developed via a modified phase-inversion method. A thin electrolyte integrated with a highly porous anode scaffold has been fabricated in a single-step process and developed into a complete fuel cell for direct methane (CH4) utilisation. A continuous and well-dispersed layer of copper-ceria (Cu-CeO2) was incorporated inside the micro-channels of the anode scaffold. A complete cell was investigated for direct CH4 utilisation. The well-organised micro-channels and nano-structured Cu-CeO2 anode contributed to an increase in electrochemical reaction sites that promoted charge-transfer as well as facilitating gaseous fuel distribution, resulting in outstanding performances. Excellent electrochemical performances have been achieved in both hydrogen (H2) and CH4 operation. The power density of 0.16 Wcm-2 at 750 °C with dry CH4 as fuel is one of the highest ever reported values for similar anode materials.

  1. Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - IV: DUPIC Fuel Cycle Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Yang, Myung Seung

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the economics of the DUPIC fuel cycle using unit costs of fuel cycle components estimated based on conceptual designs. The fuel cycle cost (FCC) was calculated by a deterministic method in which reference values of fuel cycle components are used. The FCC was then analyzed by a Monte Carlo simulation to get the uncertainty of the FCC associated with the unit costs of the fuel cycle components. From the deterministic analysis on the equilibrium fuel cycle model, the DUPIC FCC was estimated to be 6.21 to 6.34 mills/kW.h for DUPIC fuel options, which is a little smaller than that of the once-through FCC by 0.07 to 0.27 mills/kW.h. Considering the uncertainty (0.40 to 0.44 mills/kW.h) of the FCC estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method, the cost difference between the DUPIC and once-through fuel cycle is negligible. On the other hand, the material balance calculation has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle can save natural uranium resources by ∼20% and reduce the spent fuel arising by ∼65% compared with the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion, the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable with the once-through fuel cycle from the viewpoint of FCC. In the future, it should be important to consider factors such as the environmental benefit owing to natural uranium savings, the capability of reusing spent pressurized water reactor fuel, and the safeguardability of the fuel cycle when deciding on an advanced nuclear fuel cycle option

  2. Mixed phase Pt-Ru catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell anode by flame aerosol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Debasish; Bischoff, H.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2005-01-01

    A spray-flame aerosol catalyzation technique was studied for producing Pt-Ru anode electrodes for the direct methanol fuel cell. Catalysts were produced as aerosol nanoparticles in a spray-flame reactor and deposited directly as a thin layer on the gas diffusion layer. The as-prepared catalyst wa......Ru1/Vulcan carbon. The kinetics of methanol oxidation on the mixed phase catalyst was also explored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. (c) 2005 The Electrochemical Society.......A spray-flame aerosol catalyzation technique was studied for producing Pt-Ru anode electrodes for the direct methanol fuel cell. Catalysts were produced as aerosol nanoparticles in a spray-flame reactor and deposited directly as a thin layer on the gas diffusion layer. The as-prepared catalyst...... was found to be a mixture of nanocrystalline, mostly unalloyed Pt and an amorphous phase mostly of Ru and to a lesser extent of Pt oxides on top of the crystalline phase. The flame-produced Pt1Ru1 demonstrated similar onset potential but similar to 60% higher activity compared to commercially available Pt1...

  3. Direct internal steam reforming of ethanol in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) - A thermodynamic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima da Silva, Aline; De Fraga Malfatti, Celia; Heck, Nestor Cesar; Melo Halmenschlager, Cibele

    2003-01-01

    Among the various types of fuel cells, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has attracted considerable interest due to the possibility for operation with an internal reformer and higher system efficiency. In SOFC, high operative temperature allows the direct conversion of ethanol into H 2 and CO to take place in the electrochemical cell. Ethanol is considered to be an attractive fuel because it is a renewable energy source and presents some advantages over other green fuels such as safety in storage and handling. Direct internal reforming of ethanol, however, can produce undesirable products that diminish system efficiency and, in the case of carbon deposition over the anode, promote the growth of carbon filaments attached to the anode crystallites which generate massive forces within the electrode structure leading to its rapid breakdown. In this context, a thermodynamic analysis is fundamental to predict the product distribution as well as the conditions favorable for carbon to precipitate inside the cell. Despite of such importance, there are few works in literature dealing with thermodynamic analysis of the direct internal steam reforming of ethanol in fuel cell systems. Hence, the aim of this work is to find appropriate ranges for operating conditions where carbon deposition in SOFC with direct internal reforming operation is not feasible, in temperature range of 500- 1200K. The calculation here is more complicated than that for a reformer because the disappearance of hydrogen and the generation of H 2 O from electrochemical reaction must be taken into account. In the present study, the effects of hydrogen consumption on anode components and on carbon formation are investigated. Equilibrium determinations are performed by the Gibbs energy minimization method, considering the following species: H 2 , H 2 O, CH 4 , CO, CO 2 and C gr . (graphite). The effect of the type of solid electrolyte (oxygen-conducting and hydrogen-conducting) on carbon formation is also

  4. Thermoelectric characterization of an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell system directly fed by dry biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lorenzo, G.; Corigliano, O.; Lo Faro, M.; Frontera, P.; Antonucci, P.; Zignani, S.C.; Trocino, S.; Mirandola, F.A.; Aricò, A.S.; Fragiacomo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical Model (NM) of SOFC Cogenerative System (SCS) fed by dry biogas is set up. • NM simulates new Ni-Fe/CGO protective layer for direct CH_4 consumption at the anode. • NM simulates the anode carbonation phenomenon and is experimentally validated. • The performance parameters trends of SCS fed by three types of dry biogas are shown. • SEM images after 40 h of operation show that there is no anode carbon deposition. - Abstract: A properly manufactured intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) can be directly fed by dry biogas, considering also the electrochemical partial and total oxidation reactions of methane in the biogas at the anode. In this way the methane in the biogas is electrochemically consumed directly at the fuel cell without the need to mix the biogas with any reforming gas (steam, oxygen or carbon dioxide). In this article, a numerical model of an SOFC system with Ni-Fe/CGO electrocatalyst anode protective layer directly fed by dry biogas, in cogenerative arrangement and with anode exhaust gas recirculation is formulated. The influences of biogas composition, of fuel cell operating current density and of percentage of recirculated anode exhaust gas on the SOFC system performances were evaluated by calculation code. An SOFC test bench was set up to validate the calculation code results experimentally. Furthermore, the numerical model also considers the anode carbonation and evaluates the amount of carbon that can be formed in the anode at chemical equilibrium and quasi-equilibrium conditions associated with the specific anode protective layer used.

  5. Three-dimensional anode engineering for the direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Oloman, C. W.; Gyenge, E. L.

    Catalyzed graphite felt three-dimensional anodes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operated with sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. With a conventional serpentine channel flow field the preferred anode thickness was 100 μm, while a novel flow-by anode showed the best performance with a thickness of 200-300 μm. The effects of altering the methanol concentration, anolyte flow rate and operating temperature on the fuel cell superficial power density were studied by full (2 3 + 1) factorial experiments on a cell with anode area of 5 cm 2 and excess oxidant O 2 at 200 kPa(abs). For operation in the flow-by mode with 2 M methanol at 2 cm 3 min -1 and 353 K the peak power density was 2380 W m -2 with a PtRuMo anode catalyst, while a PtRu catalyst yielded 2240 W m -2 under the same conditions.

  6. Investigation of Novel Electrolytes for Use in Lithium-Ion Batteries and Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilar, Kartik

    Energy storage and conversion plays a critical role in the efficient use of available energy and is crucial for the utilization of renewable energy sources. To achieve maximum efficiency of renewable energy sources, improvements to energy storage materials must be developed. In this work, novel electrolytes for secondary batteries and fuel cells have been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance and high pressure x-ray scattering techniques to form a better understanding of dynamic and structural properties of these materials. Ionic liquids have been studied due to their potential as a safer alternative to organic solvent-based electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries and composite sulfonated polyetheretherketone (sPEEK) membranes have been investigated for their potential use as a proton exchange membrane electrolyte in direct methanol fuel cells. The characterization of these novel electrolytes is a step towards the development of the next generation of improved energy storage and energy conversion devices.

  7. Enhancing hybrid direct carbon fuel cell anode performance using Ag2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Ippolito, Davide; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid-direct carbon fuel cell (HDCFC), consisting of a molten slurry of solid carbon black and (Li-K)2CO3 added to the anode chamber of a solid oxide fuel cell, was characterized using current-potential-power density curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Two...... types of experimental setups were employed in this study, an anode-supported full cell configuration (two electrodes, two atmospheres setup) and a 3-electrode electrolyte-supported half-cell setup (single atmosphere). Anode processes with and without catalysts were investigated as a function...... of temperature (700-800 °C) and anode sweep gas (N2, 4-100% CO2 in N2-CO2). It was shown that the addition of silver based catalysts (Ag, Ag2O, Ag2CO3) into the carbon-carbonate slurry enhanced the performance of the HDCFC....

  8. Performance of a direct glycerol fuel cell using KOH doped polybenzimidazole as electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Ana P.; Linares, Jose J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of the operating variables (glycerol concentration, temperature and feed rate) for a direct glycerol fuel cell fed with glycerol using polybenzimidazole (PBI) impregnated with KOH as electrolyte and Pt/C as catalyst. Temperature displays a beneficial effect up to 75 °C due to the enhanced conductivity and kinetics of the electrochemical reactions. The optimum cell feed corresponds to 1 mol L -1 glycerol and 4 mol L -1 KOH, supplying sufficient quantities of fuel and electrolyte without massive crossover nor mass transfer limitations. The feed rate increases the performance up to a limit of 2 mL min -1 , high enough to guarantee the access of the glycerol and the exit of the products. Finally, the use of binary catalysts (PtRu/C and Pt 3 Sn/C) is beneficial for increasing the cell performance. (author)

  9. Performance of single cylinder, direct injection Diesel engine using water fuel emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Zaid, M.

    2004-01-01

    A single cylinder Diesel engine study of water-in-Diesel emulsions was conducted to investigate the effect of water emulsification on the engine performance and gases exhaust temperature. Emulsified Diesel fuels of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 water/Diesel ratios by volume, were used in a single cylinder, direct injection Diesel engine, operating at 1200-3300 rpm. The results indicate that the addition of water in the form of emulsion improves combustion efficiency. The engine torque, power and brake thermal efficiency increase as the water percentage in the emulsion increases. The average increase in the brake thermal efficiency for 20% water emulsion is approximately 3.5% over the use of Diesel for the engine speed range studied. The proper brake specific fuel consumption and gases exhaust temperature decrease as the percentage of water in the emulsion increases

  10. A direct methanol fuel cell system to power a humanoid robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Han-Ik; Ha, Tae Jung; Hwang, Sang Youp; Kim, Jong-Ho; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Jae Hyung; Prabhuram, Joghee; Kim, Soo-Kil; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Cho, Baek-Kyu; Oh, Jun-Ho; Moon, Sang Heup; Ha, Heung Yong

    In this study, a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) system, which is the first of its kind, has been developed to power a humanoid robot. The DMFC system consists of a stack, a balance of plant (BOP), a power management unit (PMU), and a back-up battery. The stack has 42 unit cells and is able to produce about 400 W at 19.3 V. The robot is 125 cm tall, weighs 56 kg, and consumes 210 W during normal operation. The robot is integrated with the DMFC system that powers the robot in a stable manner for more than 2 h. The power consumption by the robot during various motions is studied, and load sharing between the fuel cell and the back-up battery is also observed. The loss of methanol feed due to crossover and evaporation amounts to 32.0% and the efficiency of the DMFC system in terms of net electric power is 22.0%.

  11. A small mono-polar direct methanol fuel cell stack with passive operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y. H.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Xu, C.

    A passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) stack that consists of six unit cells was designed, fabricated, and tested. The stack was tested with different methanol concentrations under ambient conditions. It was found that the stack performance increased when the methanol concentration inside the fuel tank was increased from 2.0 to 6.0 M. The improved performance is primarily due to the increased cell temperature as a result of the exothermic reaction between the permeated methanol and oxygen on the cathode. Moreover, the increased cell temperature enhanced the water evaporation rate on the air-breathing cathode, which significantly reduced water flooding on the cathode and further improved the stack performance. This passive DMFC stack, providing 350 mW at 1.8 V, was successfully applied to power a seagull display kit. The seagull display kit can continuously run for about 4 h on a single charge of 25 cm 3 4.0-M methanol solution.

  12. Micro direct methanol fuel cell with perforated silicon-plate integrated ionomer membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and characterization of a silicon based micro direct methanol fuel cell using a Nafion ionomer membrane integrated into a perforated silicon plate. The focus of this work is to provide a platform for micro- and nanostructuring of a combined current collector...... at a perforation ratio of 40.3%. The presented fuel cells also show a high volumetric peak power density of 2 mW cm−3 in light of the small system volume of 480 μL, while being fully self contained and passively feed....... and catalytic electrode. AC impedance spectroscopy is utilized alongside IV characterization to determine the influence of the plate perforation geometries on the cell performance. It is found that higher ratios of perforation increases peak power density, with the highest achieved being 2.5 mW cm−2...

  13. Selective electrocatalysts toward a prototype of the membraneless direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Yang, Jinhua; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-22

    Mastery over the structure of nanomaterials enables control of their properties to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design and fabrication of Pt-based nanomaterials with enhanced catalytic activity and superior selectivity toward the reactions in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) upon the deep understanding of the mechanisms of these electrochemical reactions. In particular, the ternary Au@Ag2S-Pt nanocomposites display superior methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) selectivity due to the electronic coupling effect among different domains of the nanocomposites, while the cage-bell structured Pt-Ru nanoparticles exhibit excellent methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode because of the differential diffusion of methanol and oxygen in the porous Ru shell of the cage-bell nanoparticles. The good catalytic selectivity of these Pt-based nanomaterials via structural construction enables a DMFC to be built without a proton exchange membrane between the fuel electrode and the oxygen electrode.

  14. Performance of a direct glycerol fuel cell using KOH doped polybenzimidazole as electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Ana P.; Linares, Jose J., E-mail: joselinares@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-03-15

    This paper studies the influence of the operating variables (glycerol concentration, temperature and feed rate) for a direct glycerol fuel cell fed with glycerol using polybenzimidazole (PBI) impregnated with KOH as electrolyte and Pt/C as catalyst. Temperature displays a beneficial effect up to 75 °C due to the enhanced conductivity and kinetics of the electrochemical reactions. The optimum cell feed corresponds to 1 mol L{sup -1} glycerol and 4 mol L{sup -1} KOH, supplying sufficient quantities of fuel and electrolyte without massive crossover nor mass transfer limitations. The feed rate increases the performance up to a limit of 2 mL min{sup -1}, high enough to guarantee the access of the glycerol and the exit of the products. Finally, the use of binary catalysts (PtRu/C and Pt{sub 3}Sn/C) is beneficial for increasing the cell performance. (author)

  15. Environmental impact and risk analysis of direct disposal of spent fuel as compared to reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.; Peltonen, E.; Vira, J.

    1984-01-01

    It is important to put the estimated environmental impacts and radiation exposures of alternatives considered into perspective with each other as well as with similar man-made or natural exposures taking into account all the stages of the pertinent fuel cycles and all relevant impact factors. The likely differences in safety between the reprocessing case and the direct disposal case are not very significant taking into account the uncertainties involved in the analyses and the problems of value judgement in the comparison of different types of impacts. Furthermore the difference of costs of measures to achieve a desired level of safety in each case should be considered in view of the other cost impacts arising from the choice of the fuel cycle

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of carbon formation in solid oxide fuel cells with a direct internal reformer fueled by ethanol, methanol, and methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laosiripojana, N.; Assabumrungrat, S.; Pavarajarn, V.; Sangtongkitcharoen, W.; Tangjitmatee, A.; Praserthdam, P.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' This paper concerns a detailed thermodynamic analysis of carbon formation for a Direct Internal Reformer (DIR) Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). The modeling of DIR-SOFC fueled by ethanol, methanol, and methane were compared. Two types of fuel cell electrolytes, i.e. oxygen-conducting and hydrogen-conducting, are considered. Equilibrium calculations were performed to find the ranges of inlet steam/fuel ratio where carbon formation is thermodynamically unfavorable in the temperature range of 500-1200 K. It was found that the key parameters determining the boundary of carbon formation are temperature, type of solid electrolyte and extent of the electrochemical reaction of hydrogen. The minimum requirements of H2O/fuel ratio for each type of fuel in which the carbon formation is thermodynamically unfavored were compared. At the same operating conditions, DIR-SOFC fueled by ethanol required the lowest inlet H2O/fuel ratio in which the carbon formation is thermodynamically unfavored. The requirement decreased with increasing temperature for all three fuels. Comparison between two types of the electrolytes reveals that the hydrogen-conducting electrolyte is impractical for use, regarding to the tendency of carbon formation. This is due mainly to the water formed by the electrochemical reaction at the electrodes. (author)

  17. Autonomous electrochemical biosensors: A new vision to direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, M Goreti F; Brandão, Lúcia

    2017-12-15

    A new approach to biosensing devices is demonstrated aiming an easier and simpler application in routine health care systems. Our methodology considered a new concept for the biosensor transducing event that allows to obtain, simultaneously, an equipment-free, user-friendly, cheap electrical biosensor. The use of the anode triple-phase boundary (TPB) layer of a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) as biosensor transducer is herein proposed. For that, the ionomer present in the anode catalytic layer of the DMFC is partially replaced by an ionomer with molecular recognition capability working as the biorecognition element of the biosensor. In this approach, fuel cell anode catalysts are modified with a molecularly imprinted polymer (plastic antibody) capable of protein recognition (ferritin is used as model protein), inserted in a suitable membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and tested, as initial proof-of-concept, in a non-passive fuel cell operation environment. The anchoring of the ionomer-based plastic antibody on the catalyst surface follows a simple one-step grafting from approach through radical polymerization. Such modification increases fuel cell performance due to the proton conductivity and macroporosity characteristics of the polymer on the TPB. Finally, the response and selectivity of the bioreceptor inside the fuel cell showed a clear and selective signal from the biosensor. Moreover, such pioneering transducing approach allowed amplification of the electrochemical response and increased biosensor sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude when compared to a 3-electrodes configuration system. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Behavior of strontium- and magnesium-doped gallate electrolyte in direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Xiao, Jie; Xie, Yongmin; Tang, Yubao; Liu, Jiang; Liu, Meilin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • La 0.9 Sr 0.1 Ga 0.8 Mg 0.2 O 3−δ (LSGM) can be used as electrolyte of direct carbon SOFCs. • DC-SOFC with LSGM electrolyte gives higher performance than that with YSZ. • LSGM-electrolyte DC-SOFC gives maximum power density of 383 mW cm −2 at 850 °C. • Operation of LSGM-DC-SOFC at 210 mA cm −2 lasts 72 min, with fuel utilization of 60%. - Abstract: Perovskite-type La 0.9 Sr 0.1 Ga 0.8 Mg 0.2 O 3−δ (LSGM) is synthesized by conventional solid state reaction. Its phase composition, microstructure, relative density, and oxygen-ionic conductivity are investigated. Tubular electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are prepared with the LSGM as electrolyte and gadolinia doped ceria (GDC) mixed with silver as anode. The SOFCs are operated with Fe-loaded activated carbon as fuel and ambient air as oxidant. A typical single cell gives a maximum power density of 383 mW cm −2 at 850 °C, which is nearly 1.3 times higher than that of the similar cell with YSZ as electrolyte. A stability test of 72 min is carried out at a constant current density of 210 mA cm −2 , with a fuel utilization of 60%, indicating that LaGaO 3 -based electrolyte is promising to be applied in direct carbon SOFCs (DC-SOFCs)

  19. Behavior of strontium- and magnesium-doped gallate electrolyte in direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; Xiao, Jie; Xie, Yongmin [The Key Laboratory of Fuel Cell Technology of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Tang, Yubao [Key Laboratory of Sensor Analysis of Tumor Marker Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao o 266042 (China); Liu, Jiang, E-mail: jiangliu@scut.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Fuel Cell Technology of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); New Energy Research Institute, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Meilin [New Energy Research Institute, College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3−δ} (LSGM) can be used as electrolyte of direct carbon SOFCs. • DC-SOFC with LSGM electrolyte gives higher performance than that with YSZ. • LSGM-electrolyte DC-SOFC gives maximum power density of 383 mW cm{sup −2} at 850 °C. • Operation of LSGM-DC-SOFC at 210 mA cm{sup −2} lasts 72 min, with fuel utilization of 60%. - Abstract: Perovskite-type La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3−δ} (LSGM) is synthesized by conventional solid state reaction. Its phase composition, microstructure, relative density, and oxygen-ionic conductivity are investigated. Tubular electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are prepared with the LSGM as electrolyte and gadolinia doped ceria (GDC) mixed with silver as anode. The SOFCs are operated with Fe-loaded activated carbon as fuel and ambient air as oxidant. A typical single cell gives a maximum power density of 383 mW cm{sup −2} at 850 °C, which is nearly 1.3 times higher than that of the similar cell with YSZ as electrolyte. A stability test of 72 min is carried out at a constant current density of 210 mA cm{sup −2}, with a fuel utilization of 60%, indicating that LaGaO{sub 3}-based electrolyte is promising to be applied in direct carbon SOFCs (DC-SOFCs)

  20. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T C Mike

    2015-12-04

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young's modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ 3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO₂• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  1. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kyu Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES proton exchange membranes (PEMs for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young’s modulus >1400 MPa and low water swelling (λ < 15 even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO2• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  2. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications. 2009 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian D. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States); Kalinoski, Jeffrey A. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States); Baum, Kevin N. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems suitable for powering light duty automobiles.

  3. Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications. 2010 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian D. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States); Kalinoski, Jeffrey A. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States); Baum, Kevin N. [Directed Technologies, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2010-09-30

    This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct-hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems suitable for powering light-duty automobiles.

  4. Quantitative characterization of near-field fuel sprays by multi-orifice direct injection using ultrafast x-tomography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Im, K.S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Hung, D.L.S.; Winkelman, J.R.; Tate, M.W.; Ercan, A.; Koerner, L.J.; Caswell, T.; Chamberlain, D.; Schuette, D.R.; Philipp, H.; Smilgies, D.M.; Gruner, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    A low-pressure direct injection fuel system for spark ignition direct injection engines has been developed, in which a high-turbulence nozzle technology was employed to achieve fine fuel droplet size at a low injection pressure around 2 MPa. It is particularly important to study spray characteristics in the near-nozzle region due to the immediate liquid breakup at the nozzle exit. By using an ultrafast x-ray area detector and intense synchrotron x-ray beams, the interior structure and dynamics of the direct injection gasoline sprays from a multi-orifice turbulence-assisted nozzle were elucidated for the first time in a highly quantitative manner with μs-temporal resolution. Revealed by a newly developed, ultrafast computed x-microtomography technique, many detailed features associated with the transient liquid flows are readily observable in the reconstructed spray. Furthermore, an accurate 3-dimensional fuel density distribution, in the form of fuel volume fraction, was obtained by the time-resolved computed tomography. The time-dependent fuel density distribution revealed that the fuel jet is well broken up immediately at the nozzle exits. These results not only reveal the near-field characteristics of the partial atomized fuel sprays with unprecedented detail, but also facilitate the development of an advanced multi-orifice direct injector. This ultrafast tomography capability also will facilitate the realistic computational fluid dynamic simulations in highly transient and multiphase fuel spray systems.

  5. CFD analysis of rewetting of a single sector AHWR fuel cluster with changing jet directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debbarma, Ajoy, E-mail: ajoy@debbarma.me; Pandey, Krishna Murari, E-mail: kmpandey2001@yahoo.com

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • CFD analysis of three modes of jet impingement in AHWR fuel cluster is analyzed. • Single sector (9 rod bundle) of AHWR has been analyzed with ANSYS 14.0-CFX. • It is observed that the wetting delay gets reduced significantly by proposed jet models. - Abstract: The transient numerical analysis of the rewetting of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) fuel assembly with jet impingement has been conducted. The present study is concerned with three different types of jet impingement directions, Model: M is the existing design of AHWR and other two Model: X and X2 was introduced in the study and compared with an existing model of AHWR. The present investigation aims to study thermo-rewetting behavior with respect to the coolant jet impingement directions. The computational results are validated with available experimental data. It is observed that the wetting delay has been reduced significantly with the proposed jet models and the jet direction has been an effective parameter in increasing the rewetting performance.

  6. The study of interaction of lanthanum-, cerium- and neodymium chlorides with sodium borohydride in pyridine- and tetrahydrofuran medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Rotenberg, T.G.; Dymova, T.N.

    1976-01-01

    Bis-tetrahydrofurans of lanthanum and neodymium borohydrides and bis-pyridinates of lanthanum, cerium and neodymium borohydrides were obtained by interacting sodium borohydride with lanthanum-, cerium and neodymium chlorides in pyridine and tetrahydrofuran media. All operations involving reagent combination, sampling and phase separation are performed in inert atmosphere using argonvacuum equipment. The reaction in pyridine was virtually instantaneous and accompanied by flocculanet precipitation. The interaction of lanthanum chloride and neodymium chloride with sodium borohydride in tetrahydrofuran (THF) was a slow (23-30 hr) heterophase process. The interaction rate was affected by size reduction of the intial substances, temperature, reagent proportion and mixing rate. The reaction time was twice reduced with boiling tetrahydrofuran

  7. Construction of a Direct Water-Injected Two-Stroke Engine for Phased Direct Fuel Injection-High Pressure Charging Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somsel, James P.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a water injected Orbital Combustion Process (OCP) engine was conducted to assess the viability of using the powerplant for high altitude NASA aircraft and General Aviation (GA) applications. An OCP direct fuel injected, 1.2 liter, three cylinder, two-stroke engine has been enhanced to independently inject water directly into the combustion chamber. The engine currently demonstrates low brake specific fuel consumption capability and an excellent power to weight ratio. With direct water injection, significant improvements can be made to engine power, to knock limits/ignition advance timing, and to engine NO(x) emissions. The principal aim of the testing was to validate a cyclic model developed by the Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Ames Research Center. The work is a continuation of Ames' investigations into a Phased Direct Fuel Injection Engine with High Pressure Charging (PDFI-ITPC).

  8. Study of PtNi/C catalyst for direct ethanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, L.P.R. de; Silva, E.L. da; Amico, S.C.; Malfatti, C.F.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, PtNi binary catalyst and pure platin catalyst were synthesized by the impregnation-reduction method, using Vulcan XC72R as support, for direct ethanol fuel cells. The composition and structure of the catalysts were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, the electrochemical behavior was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and morphology of the catalysts was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the addition of Ni to Pt led to the contraction of the crystal lattice, increased the catalytic activity compared to pure Pt and initiated the electrooxidation of ethanol at lower potential. (author)

  9. Performance enhancement of direct ethanol fuel cell using Nafion composites with high volume fraction of titania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, B. R.; Isidoro, R. A.; Santiago, E. I.; Fonseca, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    The present study reports on the performance enhancement of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at 130 °C with Nafion-titania composite electrolytes prepared by sol-gel technique and containing high volume fractions of the ceramic phase. It is found that for high volume fractions of titania (>10 vol%) the ethanol uptake of composites is largely reduced while the proton conductivity at high-temperatures is weakly dependent on the titania content. Such tradeoff between alcohol uptake and conductivity resulted in a boost of DEFC performance at high temperatures using Nafion-titania composites with high fraction of the inorganic phase.

  10. Nanostructured Polyelectrolytes Based on SPEEK/TiO2 for Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells (DEFCs)

    OpenAIRE

    Dutra Filho, José Carlos; Santos, Tamirys Rodrigues dos; Gomes, Aílton de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Proton-conducting hybrid membranes consisting of poly(ether ether ketone) sulfonated (SPEEK) and titanium oxide (TiO2) were prepared using the sol-gel technique for application in direct ethanol fuel cells. The effect from TiO2 incorporation on membrane properties such as ethanol uptake, pervaporation and proton conductivity was investigated. The uptake and permeated flux decreased with increasing content of TiO2. The ethanol permeability was about one order of magnitude smaller than Nafion® ...

  11. Industrial feasibility study of a spent nuclear fuel package for direct deep disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Lous, K.; Loubrieu, J.; Chupeau, J.; Serpantie, J.P.; Becle, D.; Aubry, S.

    2001-01-01

    EDF has undertaken to study the industrial feasibility of a spent nuclear fuel package meeting direct disposal requirements. In this context, a disposal concept has been defined in which packages are cooled in place until the module is finally sealed. Indeed, one of the objectives of that disposal concept is to reduce the underground area occupied by the repository. A functional analysis has been performed within the framework of that ventilated disposal concept, taking into account the phases of the package lifetime from its conditioning until the disposal post-closure phase. An industrial feasibility study is in progress, which takes into account the functional specifications and some preliminary studies. (author)

  12. Development and characterisation of a portable direct methanol fuel cell stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oedegaard, A.

    2005-11-21

    This thesis deals with the development and characterisation of a portable direct methanol fuel cell stack. In addition, calculations of the transport of methanol and water in the membrane are compared with experimentally determined values. It also includes investigations of the behaviour of single-cells and some of its components, as the anode gas diffusion layer and the anode flow-field. For the addition of methanol to the anode feed loop, a passive concept based on a permeable tube was developed and verified by both experiments and simulations. (orig.)

  13. Apollo-L2, an advanced fuel tokamak reactor utilizing direct conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Blanchard, J.P.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Witt, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A scoping study of a tokamak reactor fueled by a D- 3 He plasma is presented. The Apollo D- 3 He tokamak capitalizes on recent advances in high field magnets (20 T) and utilizes rectennas to convert the synchrotron radiation directly to electricity. The low neutron wall loading (0.1 MW/m 2 ) permits a first wall lasting the life of the plant and enables the reactor to be classified as inherently safe. The cost of electricity is less than that from a similar power level DT reactor. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  14. In situ synthesis of nanocomposite membranes: comprehensive improvement strategy for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Siyuan; Xiu, Ruijie; Si, Jiangju; Lu, Shanfu; Yang, Meng; Xiang, Yan

    2014-03-01

    In situ synthesis is a powerful approach to control nanoparticle formation and consequently confers extraordinary properties upon composite membranes relative to conventional doping methods. Herein, uniform nanoparticles of cesium hydrogen salts of phosphotungstic acid (CsPW) are controllably synthesized in situ in Nafion to form CsPW–Nafion nanocomposite membranes with both improved proton conductivity and methanol-crossover suppression. A 101.3% increase of maximum power density has been achieved relative to pristine Nafion in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), indicating a potential pathway for large-scale fabrication of DMFC alternative membranes.

  15. Effects of dissolved iron and chromium on the performance of direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Weimin; Xin, Qin; Sun, Gongquan; Yang, Shaohua; Zhou, Zhenhua; Mao, Qing; Sun, Pichang

    2007-01-01

    Effects of Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ ions on the performance of direct methanol fuel cell were investigated. The results show that the cell performance decreased remarkably when the concentration of Fe 3+ or Cr 3+ exceeded 1 x 10 -4 mol L -1 . Fe 3+ displayed a strong negative effect on the catalytic oxidation of methanol, while Cr 3+ affected the cell performance primarily by exchanging with protons of the membrane/ionomer and resulted in ionic conductivity losses. Complete recovery of the cell performance was not obtained after flushing the cell with deionized water

  16. Safety of direct disposal of spent fuel and of disposal of reprocessing waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besnus, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    In 2005, the French Agency for Radioactive waste management (ANDRA) established a report on the feasibility of the geological disposal of high level and intermediate level long lived radioactive waste, in a clay formation. The hypothesis of spent fuel direct disposal was also considered. By the end of 2005, IRSN performed a complete technical review of ANDRA's report, aiming at highlighting the salient safety issues that were to be addressed within a process that may possibly lead to the creation of a disposal facility for these wastes. The following publication presents the main conclusions of this technical review. (author)

  17. Mould Design and Material selection for Film Insert Moulding of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wöhner, Timo; Senkbeil, S.; Olesen, T. L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the mould design for an injection moulding (IM) process for the production of a methanol container for the use in small, passive Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) systems, which are intended to be used in behind-the-ear hearing aid systems. One of the crucial properties...... for the production of containers with different venting area and location of the venting holes and the use of different membrane thicknesses by using the same mould. Mould design and material selection are presented....

  18. Safety of direct disposal of spent fuel and of disposal of reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnus, F.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the French Agency for Radioactive waste management (ANDRA) established a report on the feasibility of the geological disposal of high level and intermediate level long lived radioactive waste, in a clay formation. The hypothesis of spent fuel direct disposal was also considered. By the end of 2005, IRSN performed a complete technical review of ANDRA's report, aiming at highlighting the salient safety issues that were to be addressed within a process that may possibly lead to the creation of a disposal facility for these wastes. The following publication presents the main conclusions of this technical review. (author)

  19. Lube-oil dilution of gasoline direct-injection engines with ethanol fuels; Schmieroelverduennung von direkteinspritzenden Ottomotoren unter Kaltstartrandbedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuepper, Carsten; Pischinger, Stefan [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen (VKA); Artmann, Chrsitina; Rabl, Hans-Peter [Hochschule Regensburg (Germany). Labor fuer Verbrennungsmotoren und Abgasnachbehandlung

    2013-09-15

    Ethanol fuel mixtures account for the majority of biofuels used worldwide. However, their properties make these fuels more difficult to use in cold conditions and especially when starting a cold engine. As part of the FVV research project 'Lubricant Dilution with Ethanol Fuels under Cold Start Conditions', the Institute for Combustion Engines (VKA) at RWTH Aachen University and the Combustion Engines and Emission Control Laboratory at Regensburg University of Applied Sciences have investigated the influence of the ethanol content in fuels on the dilution of the lubricating oil in modern direct-injection gasoline engines. (orig.)

  20. Experimental characterization of cooled EGR in a gasoline direct injection engine for reducing fuel consumption and nitrogen oxide emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ki; Lee, Jungkoo; Kim, Kyungcheol; Park, Seongho; Kim, Hyung-Man

    2015-11-01

    The emphasis on increasing fuel economy and reducing emissions is increasing. Attention has turned to how the performance of a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine can be improved to achieve lower fuel consumption and NOx emission. Therefore, positive effects can reduce fuel consumption and NOx emission as well as knock suppression. The cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) ranges within the characteristic map are characterized from the experimental results at various speeds and brake mean effective pressures in a GDI engine. The results show that the application of cooled EGR system brought in 3.63 % reduction as for the fuel consumption and 4.34 % as for NOx emission.

  1. Direct microscopic image and measurement of the atomization process of a port fuel injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmail, Mohamed; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Eiji; Sumida, Mamoru

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to observe and investigate the phenomena of atomization, i.e. the fuel break-up process very close to the nozzle exit of a practical port fuel injector (PFI). In order to achieve this objective, direct microscopic images of the atomization process were obtained using an ultra-high-speed video camera that could record 102 frames at rates of up to 1 Mfps, coupled with a long-distance microscope and Barlow lens. The experiments were carried out using a PFI in a closed chamber at atmospheric pressure. Time-series images of the spray behaviour were obtained with a high temporal resolution using backlighting. The direct microscopic images of a liquid column break-up were compared with experimental results from laser-induced exciplex fluorescence (LIEF), and the wavelength obtained from the experimental results compared with that predicated from the Kelvin–Helmholtz break-up model. The droplet size diameters from a ligament break-up were compared with results predicated from Weber's analysis. Furthermore, experimental results of the mean droplet diameter from a direct microscopic image were compared with the results obtained from phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) experimental results. Three conclusions were obtained from this study. The atomization processes and detailed characterizations of the break-up of a liquid column were identified; the direct microscopic image results were in good agreement with the results obtained from LIEF, experimental results of the wavelength were in good agreement with those from the Kelvin–Helmholtz break-up model. The break-up process of liquid ligaments into droplets was investigated, and Weber's analysis of the predicated droplet diameter from ligament break-up was found to be applicable only at larger wavelengths. Finally, the direct microscopic image method and PDA method give qualitatively similar trends for droplet size distribution and quantitatively similar values of Sauter mean diameter

  2. Direct microscopic image and measurement of the atomization process of a port fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmail, Mohamed; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Eiji; Sumida, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to observe and investigate the phenomena of atomization, i.e. the fuel break-up process very close to the nozzle exit of a practical port fuel injector (PFI). In order to achieve this objective, direct microscopic images of the atomization process were obtained using an ultra-high-speed video camera that could record 102 frames at rates of up to 1 Mfps, coupled with a long-distance microscope and Barlow lens. The experiments were carried out using a PFI in a closed chamber at atmospheric pressure. Time-series images of the spray behaviour were obtained with a high temporal resolution using backlighting. The direct microscopic images of a liquid column break-up were compared with experimental results from laser-induced exciplex fluorescence (LIEF), and the wavelength obtained from the experimental results compared with that predicated from the Kelvin-Helmholtz break-up model. The droplet size diameters from a ligament break-up were compared with results predicated from Weber's analysis. Furthermore, experimental results of the mean droplet diameter from a direct microscopic image were compared with the results obtained from phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) experimental results. Three conclusions were obtained from this study. The atomization processes and detailed characterizations of the break-up of a liquid column were identified; the direct microscopic image results were in good agreement with the results obtained from LIEF, experimental results of the wavelength were in good agreement with those from the Kelvin-Helmholtz break-up model. The break-up process of liquid ligaments into droplets was investigated, and Weber's analysis of the predicated droplet diameter from ligament break-up was found to be applicable only at larger wavelengths. Finally, the direct microscopic image method and PDA method give qualitatively similar trends for droplet size distribution and quantitatively similar values of Sauter mean diameter.

  3. A Review on the Fabrication of Electro spun Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junoh, H.; Jaafar, J.; Norddin, M.N.A.M.; Ismail, A.F.; Othman, M.H.D.; Rahman, M.A.; Yusof, N.; Salleh, W.N.W.; Junoh, H.; Jaafar, J.; Norddin, M.N.A.M.; Ismail, A.F.; Othman, M.H.D.; Rahman, M.A.; Yusof, N.; Salleh, W.N.W.; Hamid Ilbeygi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) is an electrolyte which behaves as important indicator for fuel cell’s performance. Research and development (R and D) on fabrication of desirable PEM have burgeoned year by year, especially for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). However, most of the R and Ds only focus on the parent polymer electrolyte rather than polymer inorganic composites. This might be due to the difficulties faced in producing good dispersion of inorganic filler within the polymer matrix, which would consequently reduce the DMFC’s performance. Electro spinning is a promising technique to cater for this arising problem owing to its more widespread dispersion of inorganic filler within the polymer matrix, which can reduce the size of the filler up to nano scale. There has been a huge development on fabricating electrolyte nano composite membrane, regardless of the effect of electro spun nano composite membrane on the fuel cell’s performance. In this present paper, issues regarding the R and D on electro spun sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK)/inorganic nano composite fiber are addressed.

  4. Improved coking resistance of direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cells with a Ni-Sx anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Luo, Jing-Li; Chuang, Karl T.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the coking resistance of anode supported direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-Sx anode was investigated comparatively with the conventional cell using pure Ni catalyst. The surface catalytic properties of Ni were manipulated via depositing a layer of S atoms. It was confirmed that on the surface of Ni, a combination of S monolayer and elemental S was formed without producing Ni3S2 phase. The developed Ni-Sx cell exhibited a significantly improved coke resistivity in ethanol feed while maintaining an adequately high performance. The S species on Ni enabled the suppression of the coke formation as well as the alleviation of the metal dusting effect of the anode structure. After operating in ethanol fuel for identical period of time at 850 °C, a maximum power density of 400 mW cm-2 was sustained whereas the conventional cell performance decreased to less than 40 mW cm-2 from the original 704 mW cm-2. In an optimized stability test, the Ni-Sx cell operated at 750 °C for more than 22 h until the fuel drained without any degradation.

  5. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B.; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M.; Stobinski, L.; Ciecierska, E.; Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  6. Mechanism of enhanced performance on a hybrid direct carbon fuel cell using sawdust biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangbin; Jiang, Cairong; Liu, Juan; Tao, Haoliang; Meng, Xie; Connor, Paul; Hui, Jianing; Wang, Shaorong; Ma, Jianjun; Irvine, John T. S.

    2018-04-01

    Biomass is expected to play a significant role in power generation in the near future. With the uprising of carbon fuel cells, hybrid direct carbon fuel cells (HDCFCs) show its intrinsic and incomparable advantages in the generation of clean energy with higher efficiency. In this study, two types of biomass treated by physical sieve and pyrolysis from raw sawdust are investigated on an anode-supported HDCFC. The structure and thermal analysis indicate that raw sawdust has well-formed cellulose I phase with very low ash. Electrochemical performance behaviors for sieved and pyrolyzed sawdust combined with various weight ratios of carbonate are compared in N2 and CO2 purge gas. The results show that the power output of sieved sawdust with 789 mWcm-2 is superior to that of pyrolyzed sawdust in CO2 flowing, as well as in N2 flowing. The anode reaction mechanism for the discrepancy of two fuels is explained and the emphasis is also placed on the modified oxygen-reduction cycle mechanism of catalytic effects of Li2CO3 and K2CO3 salts in promoting cell performance.

  7. In-field direct combustion fuel property changes of switchgrass harvested from summer to fall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, C.A.; Ileleji, K.E. [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Johnson, K.D. [Department of Agronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Wang, Q. [State Key Laboratory for Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Switchgrass, a perennial warm-season grass and potential energy crop, is usually harvested during the time between full maturity in the fall to the following spring. During this wide harvest window, the changes in fuel properties that could occur are important for making appropriate decisions with respect to the optimum harvest time for maximum fuel quality. A field plot study was carried out to investigate the quantitative fuel properties (proximate, ultimate and mineral analyses) of switchgrass over a harvest period from crop maturity in July through November. Harvest moisture decreased from July to November and moisture was uniformly distributed in the switchgrass plant at all times in the harvest period. There were significant differences in ash, volatiles, fixed carbon and nitrogen among months of harvest. Nitrogen, ash and fixed carbon contents decreased while oxygen and volatiles increased through the harvest period. Also, there were significant differences in oxides of silicon, calcium, potassium, phosphorus and sulfur among harvest times. The concentration of oxides of potassium and sulfur decreased at the end of the harvesting period. Fouling and slagging indices decreased as harvest was delayed but remained low throughout harvest. However, the decreases are small and might not dramatically impact fouling and slagging. Overall, the results appear to favor a later harvest for switchgrass used for direct combustion. This study will benefit feedstock producers as well as biomass feedstock facility operators by providing a better understanding of how the properties of switchgrass vary over a typical harvest period and their potential effect on boiler equipment. (author)

  8. Effect of the ethanol concentration in the anode on the direct ethanol fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchor, Pablo Martins; Loeser, Neiva; Forte, Maria Madalena de Camargo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carpenter, Deyse [Fundacao Universidade Regional de Blumenau (FURB), Blumenau, SC (Brazil)], Email: rafarstv@hotmail.com

    2010-07-01

    Changes in the climate, sources and development of renewable energy are issues that have gain greater importance, and fuel cells have been investigated as an alternative source to produce energy through electrochemical reactions. Among the fuel cells types the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEMFC), fed with pure hydrogen at the anode and oxygen at the cathode, seen be the more promising ones as an electrolyte for portable, mobile and stationary applications due to its low emissions, low operating temperature, high power density and quick configuration. To avoid inconvenience of storage and transportation of pure hydrogen a PEMFC fed with alcohols has been developed, named Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells (DAFC). One way to increase the performance of DAFC is added water in the alcohol inserted into the anode, because the water keeps the membrane hydrated. In this work, the performance of a DAFC was evaluated by following the loss in the polarization curve and cell power by varying the ethanol/water ratio. The aim of this study was determine the optimal water/ethanol ratio to be feed in a DEFC prototype mounted in the lab. By the results it was possible to point that the best concentration of ethanol aqueous solution for the DEFC tested was around 1 mol.L-1. (author)

  9. A selective electrocatalyst-based direct methanol fuel cell operated at high concentrations of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Owing to the serious crossover of methanol from the anode to the cathode through the polymer electrolyte membrane, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) usually use dilute methanol solutions as fuel. However, the use of high-concentration methanol is highly demanded to improve the energy density of a DMFC system. Instead of the conventional strategies (for example, improving the fuel-feed system, membrane development, modification of electrode, and water management), we demonstrate the use of selective electrocatalysts to run a DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. In particular, at an operating temperature of 80°C, the as-fabricated DMFC with core-shell-shell Au@Ag 2 S@Pt nanocomposites at the anode and core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles at the cathode produces a maximum power density of 89.7 mW cm -2 at a methanol feed concentration of 10 M and maintains good performance at a methanol concentration of up to 15 M. The high selectivity of the electrocatalysts achieved through structural construction accounts for the successful operation of the DMFC at high concentrations of methanol.

  10. A selective electrocatalyst–based direct methanol fuel cell operated at high concentrations of methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the serious crossover of methanol from the anode to the cathode through the polymer electrolyte membrane, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) usually use dilute methanol solutions as fuel. However, the use of high-concentration methanol is highly demanded to improve the energy density of a DMFC system. Instead of the conventional strategies (for example, improving the fuel-feed system, membrane development, modification of electrode, and water management), we demonstrate the use of selective electrocatalysts to run a DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. In particular, at an operating temperature of 80°C, the as-fabricated DMFC with core-shell-shell Au@Ag2S@Pt nanocomposites at the anode and core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles at the cathode produces a maximum power density of 89.7 mW cm−2 at a methanol feed concentration of 10 M and maintains good performance at a methanol concentration of up to 15 M. The high selectivity of the electrocatalysts achieved through structural construction accounts for the successful operation of the DMFC at high concentrations of methanol. PMID:28695199

  11. Development of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell with Lightweight Disc Type Current Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yean-Der Kuan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC adopts methanol solution as a fuel suitable for low power portable applications. A miniature, lightweight, passive air-breathing design is therefore desired. This paper presents a novel planar disc-type DMFC with multiple cells containing a novel developed lightweight current collector at both the anode and cathode sides. The present lightweight current collector adopts FR4 Glass/Epoxy as the substrate with the current collecting areas located at the corresponding membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA areas. The current collecting areas are fabricated by sequentially coating a corrosion resistant layer and electrical conduction layer via the thermal evaporation technique. The anode current collector has carved flow channels for fuel transport and production. The cathode current collector has drilled holes for passive air breathing. In order to ensure feasibility in the present concept a 3-cell prototype DMFC module with lightweight disc type current collectors is designed and constructed. Experiments were conducted to measure the cell performance. The results show that the highest cell power output is 54.88 mW·cm−2 and successfully demonstrate the feasibility of this novel design.

  12. Effect of operating conditions on energy efficiency for a small passive direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Deryn; Jiang Rongzhong

    2006-01-01

    Energy conversion efficiency was studied in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) with an air-breathing cathode using Nafion 117 as electrolyte membrane. The effect of operating conditions, such as methanol concentration, discharge voltage and temperature, on Faradic and energy conversion efficiencies was analyzed under constant voltage discharge with quantitative amount of fuel. Both of Faradic and energy conversion efficiencies decrease significantly with increasing methanol concentration and environmental temperature. The Faradic conversion efficiency can be as high as 94.8%, and the energy conversion efficiency can be as high as 23.9% if the environmental temperature is low enough (10 deg. C) under constant voltage discharge at 0.6 V with 3 M methanol for a DMFC bi-cell. Although higher temperature and higher methanol concentration can achieve higher discharge power, it will result in considerable losses of Faradic and energy conversion efficiencies for using Nafion electrolyte membrane. Development of alternative highly conductive membranes with significantly lower methanol crossover is necessary to avoid loss of Faradic conversion efficiency with temperature and with fuel concentration

  13. Three-dimensional graphene as gas diffusion layer for micro direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingli; Zhang, Xiaojian; Li, Jianyu; Qi, Gary

    2018-05-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL), as an important structure of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), provides a support layer for the catalyst and the fuel and the product channel. Traditionally, the material of GDL is generally carbon paper (CP). In this paper, a new material, namely three-dimensional graphene (3DG) is used as GDL for micro DMFC. The experimental results reveal that the performance of the DMFC has been improved significantly by application of 3DG. The peak powers increase from 25 mW to 31.2 mW and 32 mW by using 3DG as the anode and cathode GDL instead of CP, respectively. The reason may be the decrease of charge and mass transfer resistance of the cell. This means that the unique 3D porous architecture of the 3DG can provide lower contact resistance and sufficient fuel diffusion paths. The output performance of the cell will be further improved when porous metal current collectors is used.

  14. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  15. A Review on the Fabrication of Electrospun Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazlina Junoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane (PEM is an electrolyte which behaves as important indicator for fuel cell’s performance. Research and development (R&D on fabrication of desirable PEM have burgeoned year by year, especially for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. However, most of the R&Ds only focus on the parent polymer electrolyte rather than polymer inorganic composites. This might be due to the difficulties faced in producing good dispersion of inorganic filler within the polymer matrix, which would consequently reduce the DMFC’s performance. Electrospinning is a promising technique to cater for this arising problem owing to its more widespread dispersion of inorganic filler within the polymer matrix, which can reduce the size of the filler up to nanoscale. There has been a huge development on fabricating electrolyte nanocomposite membrane, regardless of the effect of electrospun nanocomposite membrane on the fuel cell’s performance. In this present paper, issues regarding the R&D on electrospun sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone (SPEEK/inorganic nanocomposite fiber are addressed.

  16. Investigation of an alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with non Pt-catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, M.; Guelzow, E.; Uhm, S. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik

    2010-07-01

    This paper focuses on the characterisation of an alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC). Ethanol and for comparison also methanol was fed to the anode in a caustic potash solution at different concentrations and temperatures. An anion exchange membrane (Tokuyama) sandwiched between two Hypermec electrodes (Acta SpA.) was investigated in a single cell. Current-voltage-measurements (U(I) characteristics), short term operation under load, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and pH recording were carried out to characterize fuel cell performance. The long term objective is to investigate the mechanism of ethanol electro oxidation reaction (EOR). 18 mW/cm{sup 2} was reached at room temperature with a technically oriented 50 cm{sup 2} cell with ethanol. However, poor long term stability under load of the fuel cell is observed. Furthermore in the U(I) characteristics a negative hysteresis is present in the forward and backward scan at room temperature which indicates poisoning intermediates of electrode reactions. A pH decline appears during operation indicating a development of either acetic acid or acetates or acetaldehyde as main products of the ethanol oxidation, which may be responsible for rate decrease of ethanol oxidation with time. EIS measurement shows an increased membrane resistance. (orig.)

  17. Electrocatalysis and kinetics of the direct alcohol fuel cells. DEMS and ac voltammetry studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman Mostafa, Ehab Mostafa

    2013-01-11

    For the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) operating at low temperature, the main problem that arises at the anode is its poisoning (deactivation) due to the accumulation of the fuel adsorption product (CO{sub ad}) which can only be oxidized at high potentials (> 0.7 V). For low temperature direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs), the main problem that arises at the anode, beside its poisoning by ethanol adsorption products (CO{sub ad} and CH{sub x,ad}), is the incomplete ethanol oxidation due to the difficulty of (C-C) bond breaking. In the previous types of fuel cells, a sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) kinetics was observed at the cathode which results in a large voltage drop. Such behavior is due to strong inhibition of the cathodic ORR, resulting in high overpotentials and therefore, significant deterioration in the energy conversion efficiency of the cell. The slow kinetic behavior stems from the difficulty of (O=O) bond breaking. In order to model the conditions of continuous oxidation/reduction in a fuel cell, the continuous mass transfer to the electrode surface is necessary. Therefore, mass spectrometry and AC voltammetry measurements presented here were done using the thin layer flow through cell. This thesis aims at a determination of the rate constant of single reaction steps during the oxidation of CO, methanol and ethanol at different platinum surfaces. Towards that aim, I investigated the electrocatalytic oxidation and adsorption rate of methanol (chapter 3) and the electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol (chapter 4) at different Pt surfaces, using DEMS. In chapter 5, the potential dependence of the bulk and adsorbed methanol oxidation reaction rate (presented by the apparent transfer coefficient, {alpha}') and the corresponding Tafel slope of the reaction have been determined under convection conditions using a potential modulation ac voltammetry technique. Finally, as an application of the method presented in chapter 5, my work in chapter 6

  18. Nanoconfined Alkali-metal borohydrides for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen has been identified as a promising energy carrier. Its combustion is not associated with pollution when generated from renewable energy sources like solar and wind. The large-scale use of hydrogen for intermittent energy storage and as a fuel for cars can contribute to the realization of a

  19. Borohydride electro-oxidation by Ag-doped lanthanum chromites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    complex and the as-synthesized powder are calcined at 900 ... conducting solid oxide fuel cells (PC-SOFC),3 as cata- lysts for the ... Nanoparticles of Au and Ag supported on carbon19 ... cipitates of La(OH)3, Cr(OH)3 and AgOH were filtered.

  20. Startup, testing, and operation of the Santa Clara 2MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skok, A.J.; Leo, A.J. [Fuel Cell Engineering Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); O`Shea, T.P. [Santa Clara Demonstration Project, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is a collaboration between several utility organizations, Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE), and the U.S. Dept. Of Energy aimed at the demonstration of Energy Research Corporation`s (ERC) direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology. ERC has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade, and this project is an integral part of the ERC commercialization effort. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project is to provide the first full, commercial scale demonstration of this technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere. An aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing interaction with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: the Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its production facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant. FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer subcontractor for the design and construction of the plant and provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

  1. Electrocatalytic activity of carbon-supported catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Varela, F.J. [CINVESTAV-Unidad Saltillo, Coahuila, (Mexico). Grupo de Investigacion en Energia; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie

    2008-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) can be fueled with hydrogen, alcohols, hydrocarbons and acetals. Ethanol is an important fuel candidate because it can be electro-oxidized to carbon dioxide on platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalysts in a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) at relatively low temperatures. This study investigated the electrocatalytic activity of some carbon-supported electrocatalysts towards the ethanol oxidation (EOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the presence of ethanol. Compared to other anode catalysts such as Pt, PtRu and Pt oxide, anodes based on PtSn alloys have a higher catalytic activity for the EOR. When tested in a DEFC, the current density at 0.4V and 90 degrees C based on a PtSn/C anode and a Pt/C cathode was 2 times higher than that of a cell based on a PtRu/C-Pt/C membrane electrode assembly (MEA) configuration. In addition, cathode catalysts based on Ru/C had good catalytic activity for the ORR and exhibited high selectivity for this reaction in the presence of ethanol. The results showed that in the presence of 0.125, 0.25 or 0.5 M ethanol concentrations, a decrease in onset potential of about 60, 62 and 68 mV emerged, respectively. These values were about 10 times lower than those measured for some Pt-based cathode catalysts tested in this study in the presence of 0.125 M EtOH. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  2. A battery-fuel cell hybrid auxiliary power unit for trucks: Analysis of direct and indirect hybrid configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsun, Remzi Can; Krupp, Carsten; Baltzer, Sidney; Gnörich, Bruno; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A battery-fuel cell hybrid auxiliary power unit for heavy duty vehicles is reported. • Comparison of direct and indirect hybrids using representative load profiles. • Evaluation based on validated fuel cell system and battery models. • Indirect hybrid with constant fuel cell load yields 29.3% hybrid system efficiency. • Fuel cell should be pre-heated using waste heat from the diesel engine during drive. - Abstract: The idling operation of engines in heavy duty vehicles to cover electricity demand during layovers entails significant fuel consumption and corresponding emissions. Indeed, this mode of operation is highly inefficient and a noteworthy contributor to the transportation sector’s aggregate carbon dioxide emissions. Here, a potential solution to this wasteful practice is outlined in the form of a hybrid battery-fuel cell system for application as an auxiliary power unit for trucks. Drawing on experimentally-validated fuel cell and battery models, several possible hybrid concepts are evaluated and direct and indirect hybrid configurations analyzed using a representative load profile. The results indicate that a direct hybrid configuration is only applicable if the load demand profile does not deviate strongly from the assumed profile. Operation of an indirect hybrid with a constant fuel cell load yields the greatest hybrid system efficiency, at 29.3%, while battery size could be reduced by 87% if the fuel cell is operated at the highest dynamics. Maximum efficiency in truck applications can be achieved by pre-heating the system prior to operation using exhaust heat from the motor, which increased system efficiency from 25.3% to 28.1%, including start-up. These findings confirm that hybrid systems could offer enormous fuel savings and constitute a sizeable step on the path toward energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly heavy duty vehicles that does not necessitate a fuel switch.

  3. A Graphite Oxide Paper Polymer Electrolyte for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A flow directed assembly of graphite oxide solution was used in the formation of free-standing graphene oxide paper of approximate thickness of 100 μm. The GO papers were characterised by XRD and SEM. Electrochemical characterization of the GO paper membrane electrode assembly revealed proton conductivities of 4.1 × 10−2 S cm−1 to 8.2 × 10−2 S cm−1 at temperatures of 25–90°C. A direct methanol fuel cell, at 60°C, gave a peak power density of 8 mW cm−2 at a current density of 35 mA cm−2.

  4. Structure optimization of cathode microporous layer for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Guicheng; Ding, Xianan; Zhou, Hongwei; Chen, Ming; Wang, Manxiang; Zhao, Zhenxuan; Yin, Zhuang; Wang, Xindong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pore-forming technology was introduced to optimize microporous layer microstructure. • The water removal and gas mass transfer property of diffusion layer were improved. • The optimum DMFC performance reached 292 mW cm −2 at 80 °C. - Abstract: To obtain the cathode microporous layer (CML) with high mass transfer performance and high electronic conductivity, a pore-forming technology was introduced to optimize CML microstructure for direct methanol fuel cells. In this paper, the effects of carbon material type, carbon material loading and pore-forming agent loading in CML on fuel cell performance were discussed systematically. The results indicated that the optimized CML consisted of carbon nanotubes and ammonium oxalate with the loading of 1.5 and 3.5 mg cm −2 respectively. The fuel cell performance was improved by 30.3%, from 224 to 292 mW cm −2 at 80 °C under 0.3 MPa O 2 . Carbon nanotube was found to be the most suitable carbon material for the CML due to its great specific surface area and small particle size, resulting in increasing the number of the hydrophobic sites and the contact area between the support and the catalyst layer. The carbon material and pore-forming agent loading directly influenced the pore distribution and the contact resistance of membrane electrode assembly. The water removal capacity and the gas mass transfer property of diffusion layer were improved by optimizing the amount of micropore and macropore structures

  5. Proton conductive montmorillonite-Nafion composite membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiu-Wen; Wu, Nan; Shi, Chun-Qing; Zheng, Zhi-Yuan; Qi, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ya-Fang

    2016-12-01

    The preparation of Nafion membranes modified with montmorillonites is less studied, and most relative works mainly applied in direct methanol fuel cells, less in direct ethanol fuel cells. Organic/inorganic composite membranes are prepared with different montmorillonites (Ca-montmorillonite, Na-montmorillonite, K-montmorillonite, Mg-montmorillonite, and H-montmorillonite) and Nafion solution via casting method at 293 K in air, and with balance of their proton conductivity and ethanol permeability. The ethanol permeability and proton conductivity of the membranes are comparatively studied. The montmorillonites can well decrease the ethanol permeability of the membranes via inserted them in the membranes, while less decrease the proton conductivities of the membranes depending on the inserted amount and type of montmorillonites. The proton conductivities of the membranes are between 36.0 mS/cm and 38.5 mS/cm. The ethanol permeability of the membranes is between 0.69 × 10-6 cm2/s and 2.67 × 10-6 cm2/s.

  6. Proton conductive montmorillonite-Nafion composite membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiu-Wen; Wu, Nan; Shi, Chun-Qing; Zheng, Zhi-Yuan; Qi, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ya-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Composite membranes are prepared with different montmorillonites and nafion solution. • Proton conductivities of the composite membranes are between 36.0 mS/cm and 38.5 mS/cm. • Ethanol permeability is between 0.69 × 10"−"6 cm"2/s and 2.67 × 10"−"6 cm"2/s. • Water uptake is approximately 24.30 mass%. - Abstract: The preparation of Nafion membranes modified with montmorillonites is less studied, and most relative works mainly applied in direct methanol fuel cells, less in direct ethanol fuel cells. Organic/inorganic composite membranes are prepared with different montmorillonites (Ca-montmorillonite, Na-montmorillonite, K-montmorillonite, Mg-montmorillonite, and H-montmorillonite) and Nafion solution via casting method at 293 K in air, and with balance of their proton conductivity and ethanol permeability. The ethanol permeability and proton conductivity of the membranes are comparatively studied. The montmorillonites can well decrease the ethanol permeability of the membranes via inserted them in the membranes, while less decrease the proton conductivities of the membranes depending on the inserted amount and type of montmorillonites. The proton conductivities of the membranes are between 36.0 mS/cm and 38.5 mS/cm. The ethanol permeability of the membranes is between 0.69 × 10"−"6 cm"2/s and 2.67 × 10"−"6 cm"2/s.

  7. Development of cesium phosphotungstate salt and chitosan composite membrane for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanxin; Xiang, Yan; Xiu, Ruijie; Lu, Shanfu

    2013-10-15

    A novel composite membrane has been developed by doping cesium phosphotungstate salt (CsxH3-xPW12O40 (0≤x≤3), Csx-PTA) into chitosan (CTS/Csx-PTA) for application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Uniform distribution of Csx-PTA nanoparticles has been achieved in the chitosan matrix. The proton conductivity of the composite membrane is significantly affected by the Csx-PTA content in the composite membrane as well as the Cs substitution in PTA. The highest proton conductivity for the CTS/Csx-PTA membranes was obtained with x=2 and Cs2-PTA content of 5 wt%. The value is 6×10(-3) S cm(-1) and 1.75×10(-2) S cm(-1) at 298 K and 353 K, respectively. The methanol permeability of CTS/Cs2-PTA membrane is about 5.6×10(-7), 90% lower than that of Nafion-212 membrane. The highest selectivity factor (φ) was obtained on CTS/Cs2-PTA-5 wt% composite membrane, 1.1×10(4)/Scm(-3)s. The present study indicates the promising potential of CTS/Csx-PTA composite membrane as alternative proton exchange membranes in direct methanol fuel cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Proton exchange membrane materials for the advancement of direct methanol fuel-cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Christopher J [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-04-04

    A new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, and methods of synthesis, that can be used as a proton exchange membrane in a direct methanol fuel cell. In contrast with Nafion.RTM. PEM materials, which have random sulfonation, the new class of materials have ordered sulfonation achieved through self-assembly of alternating polyimide segments of different molecular weights comprising, for example, highly sulfonated hydrophilic PDA-DASA polyimide segment alternating with an unsulfonated hydrophobic 6FDA-DAS polyimide segment. An inorganic phase, e.g., 0.5 5 wt % TEOS, can be incorporated in the sulfonated polyimide copolymer to further improve its properties. The new materials exhibit reduced swelling when exposed to water, increased thermal stability, and decreased O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 gas permeability, while retaining proton conductivities similar to Nafion.RTM.. These improved properties may allow direct methanol fuel cells to operate at higher temperatures and with higher efficiencies due to reduced methanol crossover.

  9. Direct Coal -to-Liquids (CTL) for Jet Fuel Using Biomass-Derived Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Satya P. [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Garbark, Daniel B. [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Taha, Rachid [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Peterson, Rick [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Battelle has demonstrated a novel and potentially breakthrough technology for a direct coal-to-liquids (CTL) process for producing jet fuel using biomass-derived coal solvents (bio-solvents). The Battelle process offers a significant reduction in capital and operating costs and a substantial reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, without requiring carbon capture and storage (CCS). The results of the project are the advancement of three steps of the hybrid coal/biomass-to-jet fuel process to the technology readiness level (TRL) of 5. The project objectives were achieved over two phases. In Phase 1, all three major process steps were explored and refined at bench-scale, including: (1) biomass conversion to high hydrogen-donor bio-solvent; (2) coal dissolution in biomass-derived bio-solvent, without requiring molecular H2, to produce a synthetic crude (syncrude); and (3) two-stage catalytic hydrotreating/hydrogenation of syncrude to jet fuel and other distillates. In Phase 2, all three subsystems of the CTL process were scaled up to a pre-pilot scale, and an economic analysis was carried out. A total of over 40 bio-solvents were identified and prepared. The most unique attribute of Battelle’s bio-solvents is their ability to provide much-needed hydrogen to liquefy coal and thus increase its hydrogen content so much that the resulting syncrude is liquid at room temperature. Based on the laboratory-scale testing with bituminous coals from Ohio and West Virginia, a total of 12 novel bio-solvent met the goal of greater than 80% coal solubility, with 8 bio-solvents being as good as or better than a well-known but expensive hydrogen-donor solvent, tetralin. The Battelle CTL process was then scaled up to 1 ton/day (1TPD) at a pre-pilot facility operated in Morgantown, WV. These tests were conducted, in part, to produce enough material for syncrude-upgrading testing. To convert the Battelle-CTL syncrude into a form suitable as a blending stock for jet

  10. 1 kWe sodium borohydride hydrogen generation system Part II: Reactor modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinsong; Zheng, Yuan; Gore, Jay P; Mudawar, Issam; Fisher, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) hydrogen storage systems offer many advantages for hydrogen storage applications. The physical processes inside a NaBH4 packed bed reactor involve multi-component and multi-phase flow and multi-mode heat and mass transfer. These processes are also coupled with reaction kinetics. To guide reactor design and optimization, a reactor model involving all of these processes is desired. A onedimensional numerical model in conjunction with the assumption of homogeneous cata...

  11. By-Product Carrying Humidified Hydrogen: An Underestimated Issue in the Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Eddy; Miele, Philippe; Demirci, Umit B

    2016-07-21

    Catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride generates up to four molecules of hydrogen, but contrary to what has been reported so far, the humidified evolved gas is not pure hydrogen. Elemental and spectroscopic analyses show, for the first time, that borate by-products pollute the stream as well as the vessel. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Tailoring the properties of ammine metal borohydrides for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Lars H; Ley, Morten B; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-04-24

    A series of halide-free ammine manganese borohydrides, Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅nNH3 , n=1, 2, 3, and 6, a new bimetallic compound Li2 Mn(BH4 )4 ⋅6NH3 , and the first ammine metal borohydride solid solution Mg1-x Mnx (BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 are presented. Four new crystal structures have been determined by synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction and the thermal decomposition is systematically investigated for all the new compounds. The solid-gas reaction between Mn(BH4 )2 and NH3 provides Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 . The number of NH3 per Mn has been varied by mechanochemical treatment of Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 -Mn(BH4 )2 mixtures giving rise to increased hydrogen purity for n/m≤1 for M(BH4 )m ⋅nNH3 . The structures of Mg(BH4 )2 ⋅3NH3 and Li2 Mg(BH4 )4 ⋅6NH3 have been revisited and new structural models are presented. Finally, we demonstrate that ammonia destabilizes metal borohydrides with low electronegativity of the metal (χp ∼1.6) are generally stabilized. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis and thermal decomposition behaviors of magnesium borohydride ammoniates with controllable composition as hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjing; Liu, Yongfeng; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2013-02-01

    An ammonia-redistribution strategy for synthesizing metal borohydride ammoniates with controllable coordination number of NH(3) was proposed, and a series of magnesium borohydride ammoniates were easily synthesized by a mechanochemical reaction between Mg(BH(4))(2) and its hexaammoniate. A strong dependence of the dehydrogenation temperature and purity of the released hydrogen upon heating on the coordination number of NH(3) was elaborated for Mg(BH(4))(2)·xNH(3) owing to the change in the molar ratio of H(δ+) and H(δ-), the charge distribution on H(δ+) and H(δ-), and the strength of the coordinate bond N:→Mg(2+). The monoammoniate of magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH(4))(2)·NH(3)) was obtained for the first time. It can release 6.5% pure hydrogen within 50 minutes at 180 °C. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Simulating the synthesis and thermodynamic characteristics of the desolvation of lanthanide borohydride tris-Tetrahydrofuranates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, B. A.; Mirsaidov, I. U.; Nasrulloeva, D. Kh.; Badalov, A.

    2013-10-01

    Lanthanide borohydride tris-tetrahydrofuranates (Ln(BH4) · 3THF, where THF is tetrahydrofuran and Ln is La, Nd, Sm, Gd, Er, Yb, and Lu) is synthesized via the exchange reaction of lanthanide(III) chloride and sodium borohydride in THF. It is found that synthesis proceeds according to a stepwise mechanism and the product of the reaction (lanthanide borohydride) initiates the process. The two-step character of the desolvation of Ln(BH4)3 · 3THF under steady-state conditions in the temperature range of 300 to 400 K is determined through X-ray phase and chemical analyses, tensiometry, and gas volumetry. It is established that one mole and then two moles of THF are removed from the initial sample at the first and second steps, respectively. Equations for barograms are obtained and the thermodynamic characteristics of desolvation of Ln(BH4)3 · 3THF under study are calculated. Gibbs energy values of the stages of process are determined semi-empirically. The law of its change for the entire series of Ln(BH4)3 · 3THF is determined with the emergence of the tetrad effect.

  15. Directly connected series coupled HTPEM fuel cell stacks to a Li-ion battery DC bus for a fuel cell electrical vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Ashworth, Leanne; Remón, Ian Natanael

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in this paper examines the use of pure hydrogen fuelled high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell stacks in an electrical car, charging a Li-ion battery pack. The car is equipped with two branches of two series coupled 1 kW fuel cell stacks which...... are connected directly parallel to the battery pack during operation. This enables efficient charging of the batteries for increased driving range. With no power electronics used, the fuel cell stacks follow the battery pack voltage, and charge the batteries passively. This saves the electrical and economical...... losses related to these components and their added system complexity. The new car battery pack consists of 23 Li-ion battery cells and the charging and discharging are monitored by a battery management system (BMS) which ensures safe operating conditions for the batteries. The direct connection...

  16. Modeling analysis of urea direct injection on the NOx emission reduction of biodiesel fueled diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, H.; Yang, W.M.; Li, J.; Zhou, D.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of urea direct injection on NO x emissions reduction was investigated. • Aqueous urea solution was proposed to be injected after the fuel injection process. • The optimized injection strategy achieved a reduction efficiency of 58%. • There were no severe impacts on the CO emissions and BSFC. - Abstract: In this paper, a numerical simulation study was conducted to explore the possibility of an alternative approach: direct aqueous urea solution injection on the reduction of NO x emissions of a biodiesel fueled diesel engine. Simulation studies were performed using the 3D CFD simulation software KIVA4 coupled with CHEMKIN II code for pure biodiesel combustion under realistic engine operating conditions of 2400 rpm and 100% load. The chemical behaviors of the NO x formation and urea/NO x interaction processes were modeled by a modified extended Zeldovich mechanism and urea/NO interaction sub-mechanism. To ensure an efficient NO x reduction process, various aqueous urea injection strategies in terms of post injection timing, injection angle, and injection rate and urea mass fraction were carefully examined. The simulation results revealed that among all the four post injection timings (10 °ATDC, 15 °ATDC, 20 °ATDC and 25 °ATDC) that were evaluated, 15 °ATDC post injection timing consistently demonstrated a lower NO emission level. The orientation of the aqueous urea injection was also shown to play a critical role in determining the NO x removal efficiency, and 50 degrees injection angle was determined to be the optimal injection orientation which gave the most NO x reduction. In addition, both the urea/water ratio and aqueous urea injection rate demonstrated important roles which affected the thermal decomposition of urea into ammonia and the subsequent NO x removal process, and it was suggested that 50% urea mass fraction and 40% injection rate presented the lowest NO emission levels. At last, with the optimized injection

  17. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A., E-mail: amikolajczuk@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Ciecierska, E. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Palladium catalyst used on the cathode DFAFC is comparable to commercial platinum catalyst. • The treatment of carbon supports in nitric acid(V) increases the electrochemically available metal surface area and the catalytic activity in oxygen reduction reaction of catalysts. - Abstract: One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  18. Pyro-electrochemical reprocessing of irradiated MOX fast reactor fuel, testing of the reprocessing process with direct MOX fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kormilitzyn, M.V.; Vavilov, S.K.; Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Chistyakov, V.M.; Tselichshev, I.V

    2000-07-01

    One of the advanced technologies for fast reactor fuel recycle is pyro-electrochemical molten salt technology. In 1998 we began to study the next phase of the irradiated oxide fuel reprocessing new process MOX {yields} MOX. This process involves the following steps: - Dissolution of irradiated fuel in molten alkaline metal chlorides, - Purification of melt from fission products that are co-deposited with uranium and plutonium oxides, - Electrochemical co-deposition of uranium and plutonium oxides under the controlled cathode potential, - Production of granulated MOX (crushing,salt separation and sizing), and - Purification of melt from fission products by phosphate precipitation. In 1998 a series of experiments were prepared and carried out in order to validate this process. It was shown that the proposed reprocessing flowsheet of irradiated MOX fuel verified the feasibility of its decontamination from most of its fission products (rare earths, cesium) and minor-actinides (americium, curium)

  19. Pyro-electrochemical reprocessing of irradiated MOX fast reactor fuel, testing of the reprocessing process with direct MOX fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormilitzyn, M.V.; Vavilov, S.K.; Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Chistyakov, V.M.; Tselichshev, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    One of the advanced technologies for fast reactor fuel recycle is pyro-electrochemical molten salt technology. In 1998 we began to study the next phase of the irradiated oxide fuel reprocessing new process MOX → MOX. This process involves the following steps: - Dissolution of irradiated fuel in molten alkaline metal chlorides, - Purification of melt from fission products that are co-deposited with uranium and plutonium oxides, - Electrochemical co-deposition of uranium and plutonium oxides under the controlled cathode potential, - Production of granulated MOX (crushing,salt separation and sizing), and - Purification of melt from fission products by phosphate precipitation. In 1998 a series of experiments were prepared and carried out in order to validate this process. It was shown that the proposed reprocessing flowsheet of irradiated MOX fuel verified the feasibility of its decontamination from most of its fission products (rare earths, cesium) and minor-actinides (americium, curium)

  20. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand and more accurately measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, our group has recently proposed to apply hot wire anemometry in the fuel cell's anode outlet. It was theoretically shown that the electrical signal obtained from the hot wire sensor...... can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work an ex-situ experimental investigation is performed to examine the effect of the wire diameter and the outlet pipe diameter on the voltage signal. For a laboratory fuel cell where the mass flow rate the anode outlet is small...... number Nu range between m = 0.137 and m = 0.246. In general, it is shown that applying hot wire anemometry yields in fact very clear voltage readings with high frequency, and it can be used as a diagnosis tool in various fuel cell applications....

  1. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Fuel management and safety analysis-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Boh Wook; Choi, Hang Bok; Lee, Yung Wook; Cho, Jae Sun; Huh, Chang Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The reference DUPIC fuel composition was determined based on the reactor safety, thermal-hydraulics, economics, and refabrication aspects. The center pin of the reference DUPIC fuel bundle is poisoned with natural dysprosium. The worst LOCA analysis has shown that the transient power and heat deposition of the reference DUPIC core are the same as those of natural uranium CANDU core. The intra-code comparison has shown that the accuracy of DUPIC physics code system is comparable to the current CANDU core design code system. The sensitivity studies were performed for the refuelling schemes of DUPIC core and the 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme was selected as the standard refuelling scheme of the DUPIC core. The application of 4-bundle shift refuelling scheme will be studied in parallel as the auto-refuelling method is improved and the reference core parameters of the heterogeneous DUPIC core are defined. The heterogeneity effect was analyzed in a preliminary fashion using 33 fuel types and the random loading strategy. The refuelling simulation has shown that the DUPIC core satisfies the current CANDU 6 operating limits of channel and bundle power regardless of the fuel composition heterogeneity. The 33 fuel types used in the heterogeneity analysis was determined based on the initial enrichment and discharge burnup of the PWR fuel. 90 figs, 62 tabs, 63 refs. (Author).

  2. Three-dimensional anode engineering for the direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, A.; Oloman, C.W.; Gyenge, E.L. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 2360 East Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-09-05

    Catalyzed graphite felt three-dimensional anodes were investigated in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) operated with sulfuric acid supporting electrolyte. With a conventional serpentine channel flow field the preferred anode thickness was 100 {mu}m, while a novel flow-by anode showed the best performance with a thickness of 200-300 {mu}m. The effects of altering the methanol concentration, anolyte flow rate and operating temperature on the fuel cell superficial power density were studied by full (2{sup 3} + 1) factorial experiments on a cell with anode area of 5 cm{sup 2} and excess oxidant O{sub 2} at 200 kPa(abs). For operation in the flow-by mode with 2 M methanol at 2 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1} and 353 K the peak power density was 2380 W m{sup -2} with a PtRuMo anode catalyst, while a PtRu catalyst yielded 2240 W m{sup -2} under the same conditions. (author)

  3. Developments for improved direct methanol fuel cell stacks for portable power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremers, C.; Stimming, U. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, ZAE Bayern, Abteilung 1, Walther-Meissner-Str. 6, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Physics E19, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Scholz, M.; Seliger, W. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, ZAE Bayern, Abteilung 1, Walther-Meissner-Str. 6, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Racz, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Physics E19, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Knechtel, W.; Rittmayr, J.; Grafwallner, F.; Peller, H. [ET EnergieTechnologie GmbH, Eugen-Saenger-Ring 4, D-85649 Brunnthal-Nord (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Different aspects of the improvement of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) systems for portable power generation are investigated, in a project funded by the Bavarian state. The materials research focuses on the development of improved catalysts, in particular for the oxygen reduction reaction. Some recent results on supported ruthenium selenium catalysts are reported. In parallel, tests on other fuel cell materials are performed using MEAs made from industrial unsupported catalysts as the reference. These standard MEAs have catalyst loadings of about 11 mg cm{sup -2} and, at high air flux, can deliver current densities of about 500 mA cm{sup -2} and 100 mA cm{sup -2} at 110 C and 50 C, respectively. At low air flux and 50 C, current densities between 60 and 80 mA cm{sup -2} are possible rate at 500 mV. Using these MEAs, different commercial gas diffusion materials are tested as the cathode backing. Thus, it is found that the Sigracet materials by SGL Carbon are the most suitable for operation at a low air flux. Finally, a demonstration stack, comprised of up to ten cells, is developed using graphite PVDF compound bipolar plates by SGL Carbon. As will be reported, this stack shows a high homogeneity of cell voltages and stable operation under relevant conditions, using standard MEAs. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. A study on the dissymmetrical microporous layer structure of a direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tongtao; Lin Caishun; Fang Yong; Ye Feng; Miao Ruiying; Wang Xindong

    2008-01-01

    The effect of carbon type, carbon loading and microporous layer structure in the microporous layer on the performance of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) at low temperature was investigated using electrochemical polarization techniques, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and other methods. Vulcan XC-72 carbon was found to be most suitable as a microporous layer for low temperature DMFC. Maximum fuel cell performance was obtained utilizing a microporous layer with carbon loading of 1.0 mg cm -2 when air was used as an oxidant. A membrane electrode assembly with 1.0 mg cm -2 Vulcan XC-72 carbon with 20 wt.% Teflon in the cathode and no microporous layer in the anode showed a maximum power density of 36.7 mW cm -2 at 35 deg. C under atmospheric pressure. The AC impedance study proved that a cell with a dissymmetrical microporous layer structure had lower internal resistance and mass transfer resistance, thus obtaining better performance

  5. A carbon in molten carbonate anode model for a direct carbon fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hongjiao; Liu Qinghua [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Catalysis Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Weijing Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory for Chemical Engineering (Tianjin University), School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Weijing Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Yongdan, E-mail: ydli@tju.edu.c [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Catalysis Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Weijing Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory for Chemical Engineering (Tianjin University), School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Weijing Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-02-15

    The electrochemical oxidation of carbon at the anode of a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) includes charge transfer steps and chemical steps. A microstructural model of carbon particle is built, in which perfect graphene stacks are taken as the basic building blocks of carbon. A modified mechanism taking account of the irreversibility of the process and supposing that the electrochemical oxidation of carbon takes place only at the edges of the graphene sheets is proposed. A Tafel type overall rate equation is deduced along with expressions of exchange current density (j{sub 0}) and activation polarization (eta{sub act}). The performance of carbon black and graphite as the fuel of DCFC is examined. It has been found that j{sub 0} is in the range of 0.10-6.12 mA cm{sup -2} at 923-1123 K and eta{sub act} is in the range of 0.024-0.28 V at 923-1123 K with current density in 10-120 mA cm{sup -2}. Analysis of the j{sub 0}, eta{sub act} values and the product composition reveals that the charge transfer steps as well as the oxygen ion absorption steps are both important for the reaction rate. The activity of the carbon material with respect to atom location is introduced to the open circuit potential difference (OCP) calculation with Nernst equation.

  6. Electricity generation by direct oxidation of glucose in mediatorless microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swades K; Lovley, Derek R

    2003-10-01

    Abundant energy, stored primarily in the form of carbohydrates, can be found in waste biomass from agricultural, municipal and industrial sources as well as in dedicated energy crops, such as corn and other grains. Potential strategies for deriving useful forms of energy from carbohydrates include production of ethanol and conversion to hydrogen, but these approaches face technical and economic hurdles. An alternative strategy is direct conversion of sugars to electrical power. Existing transition metal-catalyzed fuel cells cannot be used to generate electric power from carbohydrates. Alternatively, biofuel cells in which whole cells or isolated redox enzymes catalyze the oxidation of the sugar have been developed, but their applicability has been limited by several factors, including (i) the need to add electron-shuttling compounds that mediate electron transfer from the cell to the anode, (ii) incomplete oxidation of the sugars and (iii) lack of long-term stability of the fuel cells. Here we report on a novel microorganism, Rhodoferax ferrireducens, that can oxidize glucose to CO(2) and quantitatively transfer electrons to graphite electrodes without the need for an electron-shuttling mediator. Growth is supported by energy derived from the electron transfer process itself and results in stable, long-term power production.

  7. Performance and stability of Pd nanostructures in an alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera-Cerritos, R.; Fuentes-Ramírez, R.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    Pd nanopolyhedral, nanobar and nanorod particles were synthesised using the polyol process and evaluated as anodes in a direct ethanol fuel cell. The materials were physico-chemically characterised by high-resolution transmission electronic microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of the operation parameters (i.e., temperature and fuel ethanol concentration) on the maximum power density (MPD) and open circuit voltage (OCV) was investigated. In addition, a stability test was performed by applying three current density steps for fifty cycles. The OCV values increased as the temperature increased for all of the catalysts at low ethanol concentration. Although the MPD increased with temperature for all of the catalyst independent of the ethanol concentration, the effect of the temperature on the MPD for each Pd structure results in different slopes due to the different crystal faces. Finally, a loss of electro-catalytic activity after fifty cycles was observed in all of the catalysts evaluated, which may be in response to morphological changes in the nanostructures.

  8. On the actual cathode mixed potential in direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, M.; Bisello, A.; Baricci, A.; Rabissi, C.; Brightman, E.; Hinds, G.; Casalegno, A.

    2016-09-01

    Methanol crossover is one of the most critical issues hindering commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells since it leads to waste of fuel and significantly affects cathode potential, forming a so-called mixed potential. Unfortunately, due to the sluggish anode kinetics, it is not possible to obtain a reliable estimation of cathode potential by simply measuring the cell voltage. In this work we address this limitation, quantifying the mixed potential by means of innovative open circuit voltage (OCV) tests with a methanol-hydrogen mixture fed to the anode. Over a wide range of operating conditions, the resulting cathode overpotential is between 250 and 430 mV and is strongly influenced by methanol crossover. We show using combined experimental and modelling analysis of cathode impedance that the methanol oxidation at the cathode mainly follows an electrochemical pathway. Finally, reference electrode measurements at both cathode inlet and outlet provide a local measurement of cathode potential, confirming the reliability of the innovative OCV tests and permitting the evaluation of cathode potential up to typical operating current. At 0.25 A cm-2 the operating cathode potential is around 0.85 V and the Ohmic drop through the catalyst layer is almost 50 mV, which is comparable to that in the membrane.

  9. Radiation-grafted membranes based on polyethylene for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherazi, Tauqir A. [Department of Chemistry, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 (Canada); Guiver, Michael D.; Kingston, David; Xue, Xinzhong [Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 (Canada); Ahmad, Shujaat [PIEAS/PINSTECH, P O Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Kashmiri, M. Akram [Department of Chemistry, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Board of Intermediate and Secondary Education, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2010-01-01

    Styrene was grafted onto ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene powder (UHMWPE) by gamma irradiation using a {sup 60}Co source. Compression moulded films of selected pre-irradiated styrene-grafted ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE-g-PS) were post-sulfonated to the sulfonic acid derivative (UHMWPE-g-PSSA) for use as proton exchange membranes (PEMs). The sulfonation was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The melting and flow properties of UHMWPE and UHMWPE-g-PS are conducive to forming homogeneous pore-free membranes. Both the ion conductivity and methanol permeability coefficient increased with degree of grafting, but the grafted membranes showed comparable or higher ion conductivity and lower methanol permeability than Nafion {sup registered} 117 membrane. One UHMWPE-g-PS membrane was fabricated into a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) and tested as a single cell direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Low membrane cost and acceptable fuel cell performance indicate that UHMWPE-g-PSSA membranes could offer an alternative approach to perfluorosulfonic acid-type membranes for DMFC. (author)

  10. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based micro-scale direct methanol fuel cell development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, S.-C.; Tang Xudong; Hsieh, C.-C.; Alyousef, Yousef; Vladimer, Michael; Fedder, Gary K.; Amon, Cristina H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a high-power density, silicon-based micro-scale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), under development at Carnegie Mellon. Major issues in the DMFC design include the water management and energy-efficient micro fluidic sub-systems. The air flow and the methanol circulation are both at a natural draft, while a passive liquid-gas separator removes CO 2 from the methanol chamber. An effective approach for maximizing the DMFC energy density, pumping the excess water back to the anode, is illustrated. The proposed DMFC contains several unique features: a silicon wafer with arrays of etched holes selectively coated with a non-wetting agent for collecting water at the cathode; a silicon membrane micro pump for pumping the collected water back to the anode; and a passive liquid-gas separator for CO 2 removal. All of these silicon-based components are fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based processes on the same silicon wafer, so that interconnections are eliminated, and integration efforts as well as post-fabrication costs are both minimized. The resulting fuel cell has an overall size of one cubic inch, produces a net output of 10 mW, and has an energy density three to five times higher than that of current lithium-ion batteries

  11. Conversion of solar energy into electricity by using duckweed in Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the present study we demonstrate for the first time the possibility for conversion of solar energy into electricity on the principles of Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell (DPPFC) technology by using aquatic higher plants. Lemna minuta duckweed was grown autotrophically in specially constructed fuel cells under sunlight irradiation and laboratory lighting. Current and power density up to 1.62±0.10 A.m(-2) and 380±19 mW.m(-2), respectively, were achieved under sunlight conditions. The influence of the temperature, light intensity and day/night sequencing on the current generation was investigated. The importance of the light intensity was demonstrated by the higher values of generated current (at permanently connected resistance) during daytime than those through the nights, indicating the participation of light-dependent photosynthetic processes. The obtained DPPFC outputs in the night show the contribution of light-independent reactions (respiration). The electron transfer in the examined DPPFCs is associated with a production of endogenous mediator, secreted by the duckweed. The plants' adaptive response to the applied polarization is also connected with an enhanced metabolism resulting in an increase of the protein and carbohydrate intracellular content. Further investigations aiming at improvement of the DPPFC outputs and elucidation of the electron transfer mechanism are required for practical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel fluoropolymer anion exchange membranes for alkaline direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmei; Fang, Jun; Wu, Yongbin; Xu, Hankun; Chi, Xianjun; Li, Wei; Yang, Yixu; Yan, Ge; Zhuang, Yongze

    2012-09-01

    A series of novel fluoropolymer anion exchange membranes based on the copolymer of vinylbenzyl chloride, butyl methacrylate, and hexafluorobutyl methacrylate has been prepared. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis techniques are used to study the chemical structure and chemical composition of the membranes. The water uptake, ion-exchange capacity (IEC), conductivity, methanol permeability, and chemical stability of the membranes are also determined. The membranes exhibit high anionic conductivity in deionized water at 65 °C ranging from 3.86×10(-2) S cm(-1) to 4.36×10(-2) S cm(-1). The methanol permeability coefficients of the membranes are in the range of 4.21-5.80×10(-8) cm(2) s(-1) at 65 °C. The novel membranes also show good chemical and thermal stability. An open-circuit voltage of 0.7 V and a maximum power density of 53.2 mW cm(-2) of alkaline direct methanol fuel cell (ADMFC) with the membrane C, 1 M methanol, 1 M NaOH, and humidified oxygen are achieved at 65 °C. Therefore, these membranes have great potential for applications in fuel cell systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of Anodic Flux and Temperature Controlling System for Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M M; Liu, C; Liang, J S; Wu, C B; Xu, Z

    2006-01-01

    Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (μDMFC) is a kind of newly developed power sources, which effective apparatus for its performance evaluation is still in urgent need at present. In this study, a testing system was established for the purpose of testing the continuous working performance such as micro flux and temperature of μDMFC. In view of the temperature controlling for micro-flux liquid fuel, a heating block with labyrinth-like single pass channel inside for heating up the methanol solution was fabricated. A semiconductorrefrigerating chip was utilized to heat and cool the liquid flow during testing procedures. On the other hand, the two channels of a high accuracy double-channel syringe pump that can suck and pump in turn so as to transport methanol solution continuously was adopted. Based on the requirements of wide-ranged temperature and micro flux controlling, the solenoid valves and the correlative component were used. A hydraulic circuit, which can circulate the fed methanol cold to hot in turn, has also been constructed to test the fatigue life of the μDMFC. The automatic control was actualized by software module written with Visual C++. Experimental results show that the system is perfect in stability and it may provide an important and advanced evaluation apparatus to satisfy the needs for real time performance testing of μDMFC

  14. Computational Flame Diagnostics for Direct Numerical Simulations with Detailed Chemistry of Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Tianfeng [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2017-02-16

    The goal of the proposed research is to create computational flame diagnostics (CFLD) that are rigorous numerical algorithms for systematic detection of critical flame features, such as ignition, extinction, and premixed and non-premixed flamelets, and to understand the underlying physicochemical processes controlling limit flame phenomena, flame stabilization, turbulence-chemistry interactions and pollutant emissions etc. The goal has been accomplished through an integrated effort on mechanism reduction, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flames at engine conditions and a variety of turbulent flames with transport fuels, computational diagnostics, turbulence modeling, and DNS data mining and data reduction. The computational diagnostics are primarily based on the chemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) and a recently developed bifurcation analysis using datasets from first-principle simulations of 0-D reactors, 1-D laminar flames, and 2-D and 3-D DNS (collaboration with J.H. Chen and S. Som at Argonne, and C.S. Yoo at UNIST). Non-stiff reduced mechanisms for transportation fuels amenable for 3-D DNS are developed through graph-based methods and timescale analysis. The flame structures, stabilization mechanisms, local ignition and extinction etc., and the rate controlling chemical processes are unambiguously identified through CFLD. CEMA is further employed to segment complex turbulent flames based on the critical flame features, such as premixed reaction fronts, and to enable zone-adaptive turbulent combustion modeling.

  15. Scandium and vanadium borohydride ammoniates: Enhanced dehydrogenation behavior upon coordinative expansion and establishment of Hδ+⋯−δH interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Ziwei; Yuan, Feng; Gu, Qinfen; Tan, Yingbin; Chen, Xiaowei; Jensen, Craig M.; Yu, Xuebin

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Two novel metal borohydride ammoniates—ScLi(BH 4 ) 4 ·4NH 3 and V(BH 4 ) 3 ·3NH 3 are shown to exhibit superior dehydrogenation performances established upon intensive interactions and balanced stoichiometry of dihydrogen. -- Abstract: LiSc(BH 4 ) 4 ·4NH 3 and V(BH 4 ) 3 ·3NH 3 , two novel metal borohydride ammoniates (MBAs), have been successfully synthesized via ball-milling the mixtures of MCl 3 ·xNH 3 (M = Sc, V and x = 3, 4) with LiBH 4 . Structure analysis reveals that LiSc(BH 4 ) 4 ·4NH 3 crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure with lattice parameters of a = 7.4376(3) Å, b = 11.1538(5) Å and c = 14.5132(7) Å and space group of Pc2 1 n, in which the base octahedral units are composed of central metal and an equivalent number of BH 4 and NH 3 units, distinct from other reported MBAs. Base units with the above constitution are also observed in the crystal structure of V(BH 4 ) 3 ·3NH 3 , which is identified as a cubic structure with lattice parameters of a = 10.78060(25) Å and space group of F23. These two compounds exhibit a favorable dehydrogenation capability, releasing 15.1 and 14.3 wt.% high-purity hydrogen, respectively, below 300 °C. Isothermal measurements reveal that, at a constant temperature of 110 °C, which meets the operation requirement of fuel cells, >8 and >10 wt.% pure hydrogen is released from the two compounds with favorable kinetics, respectively. Moreover, by reacting with N 2 H 4 in liquid ammonia, the decomposed LiSc(BH 4 ) 4 ·4NH 3 can be partly hydrogenated and can possibly establish a system that will undergo reversible dehydrogenation. These favorable properties point to potential on-board application. The dehydrogenation capacity, purity and temperature of the two systems can be adjusted, by tuning the ratios of the starting reagents LiBH 4 and MCl 3 ·xNH 3 , to achieve expected stoichiometric proportions of BH 4 and NH 3 units, which provides a facile and viable strategy for the synthesis of

  16. Analysis of scenarios for the direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel disposal conditions as expected in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, P.; Mehling, O.; Mohn, R.; Wingender, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains an investigation of aspects of the waste management of spent light water reactor fuel by direct disposal in a deep geological formation on land. The areas covered are: interim dry storage of spent fuel with three options of pre-conditioning; conditioning of spent fuel for final disposal in a salt dome repository; disposal of spent fuel (heat-generating waste) in a salt dome repository; disposal of medium and low-level radioactive wastes in the Konrad mine. Dose commitments, effluent discharges and potential incidents were not found to vary significantly for the various conditioning options/salt dome repository types. Due to uncertainty in the cost estimates, in particular the disposal cost estimates, the variation between the three conditioning options examined is not considered as being significant. The specific total costs for the direct disposal strategy are estimated to lie in the range ECU 600 to 700 per kg hm (basis 1988)

  17. Status on Establishing the Feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy for Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Used Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Warren, Glen A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; O' Donnell, J. M.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Bonebrake, Eric; Imel, G. R.; Harris, Jason; Beller, Dennis; Hatchett, D.; Droessler, J.

    2012-08-30

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy. This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. This paper will present efforts on the development of time-spectral analysis algorithms, fast neutron detector advances, and validation and testing measurements.

  18. Near-frictionless carbon coatings for spark-ignited direct-injected fuel systems. Final report, January 2002.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, J.; Ozturk, O.; Ajayi, O. O.; Woodford, J. B.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes an investigation by the Tribology Section of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) into the use of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coatings for spark-ignited, direct-injected (SIDI) engine fuel systems. Direct injection is being pursued in order to improve fuel efficiency and enhance control over, and flexibility of, spark-ignited engines. SIDI technology is being investigated by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) as one route towards meeting both efficiency goals and more stringent emissions standards. Friction and wear of fuel injector and pump parts were identified as issues impeding adoption of SIDI by the OTT workshop on ''Research Needs Related to CIDI and SIDI Fuel Systems'' and the resulting report, Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Argonne's NFC coatings consistently reduced friction and wear in existing and reformulated gasolines. (2) Compared to three commercial DLC coatings, NFC provided the best friction reduction and protection from wear in gasoline and alternative fuels. (3) NFC was successfully deposited on production fuel injectors. (4) Customized wear tests were performed to simulate the operating environment of fuel injectors. (5) Industry standard lubricity test results were consistent with customized wear tests in showing the friction and wear reduction of NFC and the lubricity of fuels. (6) Failure of NFC coatings by tensile crack opening or spallation did not occur, and issues with adhesion to steel substrates were eliminated. (7) This work addressed several of the current research needs of the OAAT SIDI program, as defined by the OTT report Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines

  19. Electrocatalytic activity of ZnS nanoparticles in direct ethanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredol, Michael; Kaczmarek, Michał; Wiemhöfer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    Low temperature fuel cells consuming ethanol without reformation would be a major step toward the use of renewable energy sources from biomass. However, the necessary electrodes and electrocatalysts still are far from being perfect and suffer from various poisoning and deactivation processes. This work describes investigations on systems using carbon/ZnS-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in complete membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). MEAs were built on Nafion membranes with active masses prepared from ZnS nanoparticles and Vulcan carbon support. Under operation, acetic acid and acetaldehyde were identified and quantified as soluble oxidation products, whereas the amount of CO2 generated could not be quantified directly. Overall conversion efficiencies of up to 25% were estimated from cells operated over prolonged time. From polarization curves, interrupt experiments and analysis of reaction products, mass transport problems (concentration polarization) and breakthrough losses were found to be the main deficiencies of the ethanol oxidation electrodes fabricated so far.

  20. Modeling and simulation of a direct ethanol fuel cell: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, S.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Hasran, U. A.; Masdar, M. S.; Daud, W. R. W.

    2014-09-01

    The commercialization of Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells (DEFCs) is still hindered because of economic and technical reasons. Fundamental scientific research is required to more completely understanding the complex electrochemical behavior and engineering technology of DEFCs. To use the DEFC system in real-world applications, fast, reliable, and cost-effective methods are needed to explore this complex phenomenon and to predict the performance of different system designs. Thus, modeling and simulation play an important role in examining the DEFC system as well as in designing an optimized DEFC system. The current DEFC literature shows that modeling studies on DEFCs are still in their early stages and are not able to describe the DEFC system as a whole. Potential DEFC applications and their current status are also presented.

  1. Numerical simulation of direct methanol fuel cells using lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavar, Mojtaba Aghajani; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol, P.O. Box 484 (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    In this study Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) as an alternative of conventional computational fluid dynamics method is used to simulate Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). A two dimensional lattice Boltzmann model with 9 velocities, D2Q9, is used to solve the problem. The computational domain includes all seven parts of DMFC: anode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers, membrane and cathode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers. The model has been used to predict the flow pattern and concentration fields of different species in both clear and porous channels to investigate cell performance. The results have been compared well with results in literature for flow in porous and clear channels and cell polarization curves of the DMFC at different flow speeds and feed methanol concentrations. (author)

  2. Controlled disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) multiblock copolymers for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Chen, Yu; Rowlett, Jarrett R; McGrath, James E; Mack, Nathan H; Kim, Yu Seung

    2014-04-23

    Structure-property-performance relationships of disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) multiblock copolymer membranes were investigated for their use in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. Multiple series of reactive polysulfone, polyketone, and polynitrile hydrophobic block segments having different block lengths and molecular composition were synthesized and reacted with a disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) hydrophilic block segment by a coupling reaction. Large-scale morphological order of the multiblock copolymers evolved with the increase of block size that gave notable influence on mechanical toughness, water uptake, and proton/methanol transport. Chemical structural changes of the hydrophobic blocks through polar group, fluorination, and bisphenol type allowed further control of the specific properties. DMFC performance was analyzed to elicit the impact of structural variations of the multiblock copolymers. Finally, DMFC performances of selected multiblock copolymers were compared against that of the industrial standard Nafion in the DMFC system.

  3. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANO-CATALYSTS: TOWARD DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2010-06-16

    A series of bimetallic core-shell-alloy type Au-Pt nanomaterials with various morphologies, aspect ratios and compositions, were produced in a heterogenous epitaxial fashion. Gold nanoparticles with well-controlled particle size and shape, e.g. spheres, rods and cubes, were used as 'seeds' for platinum growth in the presence of a mild reducing agent, ascorbic acid and a cationic surfactant cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The reactions take place in air and water, and are quick, economical and amenable for scaling up. The synthesized nanocatalysts were characterized by electron microscopy techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Nafion membranes were embedded with the Au-Pt nanomaterials and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their potential in direct methanol fuel cells applications.

  4. Development of an air-breathing direct methanol fuel cell with the cathode shutter current collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Liu, Xiaowei [Key Laboratory of Micro-Systems and Micro-Structures Manufacturing, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150001 (China); MEMS Center, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Li, Jianmin; Deng, Huichao [MEMS Center, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-06-15

    An air-breathing direct methanol fuel cell with a novel cathode shutter current collector is fabricated to develop the power sources for consumer electronic devices. Compared with the conventional circular cathode current collector, the shutter one improves the oxygen consumption and mass transport. The anode and cathode current collectors are made of stainless steel using thermal stamping die process. Moreover, an encapsulation method using the tailor-made clamps is designed to assemble the current collectors and MEA for distributing the stress of the edges and inside uniformly. It is observed that the maximum power density of the air-breathing DMFC operating with 1 M methanol solution achieves 19.7 mW/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Based on the individual DMFCs, the air-breathing stack consisting of 36 DMFC units is achieved and applied to power a notebook computer. (author)

  5. Analysis of performance losses of direct ethanol fuel cells with the aid of a reference electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangchun; Pickup, Peter G.

    The performances of direct ethanol fuel cells with different anode catalysts, different ethanol concentrations, and at different operating temperatures have been studied. The performance losses of the cell have been separated into individual electrode performance losses with the aid of a reference electrode, ethanol crossover has been quantified, and CO 2 and acetic acid production have been measured by titration. It has been shown that the cell performance strongly depends on the anode catalyst, ethanol concentration, and operating temperature. It was found that the cathode and anode exhibit different dependences on ethanol concentration and operating temperature. The performance of the cathode is very sensitive to the rate of ethanol crossover. Product analysis provides insights into the mechanisms of electro-oxidation of ethanol.

  6. Analysis of performance losses of direct ethanol fuel cells with the aid of a reference electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guangchun; Pickup, Peter G. [Department of Chemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Elizabeth Avenue, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada A 1B 3X7)

    2006-10-20

    The performances of direct ethanol fuel cells with different anode catalysts, different ethanol concentrations, and at different operating temperatures have been studied. The performance losses of the cell have been separated into individual electrode performance losses with the aid of a reference electrode, ethanol crossover has been quantified, and CO{sub 2} and acetic acid production have been measured by titration. It has been shown that the cell performance strongly depends on the anode catalyst, ethanol concentration, and operating temperature. It was found that the cathode and anode exhibit different dependences on ethanol concentration and operating temperature. The performance of the cathode is very sensitive to the rate of ethanol crossover. Product analysis provides insights into the mechanisms of electro-oxidation of ethanol. (author)

  7. Experimental Investigation of a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell with Hilbert Fractal Current Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yi Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hilbert curve is a continuous type of fractal space-filling curve. This fractal curve visits every point in a square grid with a size of 2×2, 4×4, or any other power of two. This paper presents Hilbert fractal curve application to direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC current collectors. The current collectors are carved following first, second, and third order Hilbert fractal curves. These curves give the current collectors different free open ratios and opening perimeters. We conducted an experimental investigation into DMFC performance as a function of the free open ratio and opening perimeter on the bipolar plates. Nyquist plots of the bipolar plates are made and compared using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS experiments to understand the phenomena in depth. The results obtained in this paper could be a good reference for future current collector design.

  8. Three-dimensional two-phase mass transport model for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.W.; Zhao, T.S.; Xu, C.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) steady-state model for liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is presented in this paper. This 3D mass transport model is formed by integrating five sub-models, including a modified drift-flux model for the anode flow field, a two-phase mass transport model for the porous anode, a single-phase model for the polymer electrolyte membrane, a two-phase mass transport model for the porous cathode, and a homogeneous mist-flow model for the cathode flow field. The two-phase mass transport models take account the effect of non-equilibrium evaporation/ condensation at the gas-liquid interface. A 3D computer code is then developed based on the integrated model. After being validated against the experimental data reported in the literature, the code was used to investigate numerically transport behaviors at the DMFC anode and their effects on cell performance

  9. Nanostructured Polyelectrolytes Based on SPEEK/TiO2 for Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells (DEFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Dutra Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton-conducting hybrid membranes consisting of poly(ether ether ketone sulfonated (SPEEK and titanium oxide (TiO2 were prepared using the sol-gel technique for application in direct ethanol fuel cells. The effect from TiO2 incorporation on membrane properties such as ethanol uptake, pervaporation and proton conductivity was investigated. The uptake and permeated flux decreased with increasing content of TiO2. The ethanol permeability was about one order of magnitude smaller than Nafion® 117. FTIR spectra indicated that PEEK was sulfonated and the second degradation temperature of SPEEK58 samples confirmed the titanium oxide incorporation. The proton conductivity in ethanol solution was of the order of 10-3 S cm-1 when 4 or 8 wt% TiO2 were added, and generally increased with addition of TiO2.

  10. Catalyst inks and method of application for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Davey, John; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon; Thomas, Sharon C.

    2004-02-24

    Inks are formulated for forming anode and cathode catalyst layers and applied to anode and cathode sides of a membrane for a direct methanol fuel cell. The inks comprise a Pt catalyst for the cathode and a Pt--Ru catalyst for the anode, purified water in an amount 4 to 20 times that of the catalyst by weight, and a perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer in an amount effective to provide an ionomer content in the anode and cathode surfaces of 20% to 80% by volume. The inks are prepared in a two-step process while cooling and agitating the solutions. The final solution is placed in a cooler and continuously agitated while spraying the solution over the anode or cathode surface of the membrane as determined by the catalyst content.

  11. Characteristics of PVdF copolymer/Nafion blend membrane for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Ki-Yun; Eom, Ji-Yong; Jung, Ho-Young; Choi, Nam-Soon; Lee, Yong Min; Park, Jung-Ki; Choi, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyung-Won; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2004-01-01

    For direct methanol fuel cell, blends of vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene copolymer (P(VdF-co-HFP)) and Nafion were prepared the different equivalent weight of Nafion. The investigations of the blend morphology were performed by means of permeability test, uptake measurement, differential-scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy. In the blend membranes, many pores were created as the content of Nafion in blend increased. Then, the methanol uptake was sharply increased. But the methanol permeability was not sharply increased because the methanol permeation through blend membranes is diffusion-controlled process. The methanol permeability of N10 (low equivalent weight) series was similar to that of N11 series (high equivalent weight). The proton conductivity of N10 series was around one and a half times higher than that of N11 series. The cell performance of the blend was much enhanced when the equivalent weight of Nafion was 1000

  12. Combined local current distribution measurements and high resolution neutron radiography of operating direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alexander; Wippermann, Klaus [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy Research, IEF-3: Fuel Cells; Sanders, Tilman [RWTH Aachen (DE). Inst. for Power Electronics and Electrical Drives (ISEA); Arlt, Tobias [Helmholtz Centre Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials

    2010-07-01

    Neutron radiography allows the investigation of the local fluid distribution in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) under operating conditions. Spatial resolutions in the order of some tens of micrometers at the full test cell area are achieved. This offers the possibility to study practice-oriented, large stack cells with an active area of several hundred cm{sup 2} as well as specially designed, small test cells with an area of some cm{sup 2}. Combined studies of high resolution neutron radiography and segmented cell measurements are especially valuable, because they enable a correlation of local fluid distribution and local performance [1, 2]. The knowledge of this interdependency is essential to optimise the water management and performance respecting a homogeneous fluid, current and temperature distribution and to achieve high performance and durability of DMFCs. (orig.)

  13. Microbial fuel cells for direct electrical energy recovery from urban wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodaglio, A G; Molognoni, D; Dallago, E; Liberale, A; Cella, R; Longoni, P; Pantaleoni, L

    2013-01-01

    Application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to wastewater treatment for direct recovery of electric energy appears to provide a potentially attractive alternative to traditional treatment processes, in an optic of costs reduction, and tapping of sustainable energy sources that characterizes current trends in technology. This work focuses on a laboratory-scale, air-cathode, and single-chamber MFC, with internal volume of 6.9 L, operating in batch mode. The MFC was fed with different types of substrates. This study evaluates the MFC behaviour, in terms of organic matter removal efficiency, which reached 86% (on average) with a hydraulic retention time of 150 hours. The MFC produced an average power density of 13.2 mW/m(3), with a Coulombic efficiency ranging from 0.8 to 1.9%. The amount of data collected allowed an accurate analysis of the repeatability of MFC electrochemical behaviour, with regards to both COD removal kinetics and electric energy production.

  14. Structural Study of Reduced Graphene Oxide/ Polypyrrole Composite as Methanol Sensor in Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtazah Atiqah Hassan; Siti Kartom Kamarudin; Siti Kartom Kamarudin

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) computations were performed on the optimized geometric and electronic properties of reduced graphene oxide/polypyrole (rGO/ PPy) composite in comparison with pure graphene and graphene oxide structures. Incorporation of both reduced GO (rGO) and PPy will form a good composite which have advantages from both materials such as good mechanical strength and excellent electrical conductivity. These composite would be very suitable in fabrication of methanol sensor in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The HOMO-LUMO energy (eV) was also calculated. These computations provide a theoretical explanation for the good performance of rGO/ PPy composite as electrode materials in methanol sensor. (author)

  15. The performance analysis of direct methanol fuel cells with different hydrophobic anode channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hung-Chun; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Luo, Win-Jet; Jiang, Jia-You; Kuan, Yean-Der; Lin, Xin-Quan

    In order to enhance the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), the product of CO 2 bubble has to be efficiently removed from the anode channel during the electrochemical reaction. In this study, the materials of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) with hydrophilic property and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with hydrophobic property are used to form the anode cannel. The channel is fabricated through a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) manufacture process of the DMFCs. In addition, some particles with high hydrophobic properties are added into the PDMS materials in order to further reduce the hydro-resistance in the anode channel. The performance of the DMFCs is investigated under the influence of operation conditions, including operation temperature, flow rate, and methanol concentration. It is found that the performance of the DMFC, which is made of PDMS with high hydrophobic particles, can be greatly enhanced and the hydrophobic property of the particles can be unaffected by different operation conditions.

  16. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Calì, M.; Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P.

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H 2/CO 2 mixture instead of conventional CH 4/CO 2 anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H 2/CO 2 synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 °C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 °C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 °C, 0.35 W cm -2 with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm -2 with H 2) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and mercaptans up to 10 ppm). Therefore, it

  17. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Cali, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P. [BioEnergy Lab, Environment Park S.p.A., Via Livorno 60, 10144 Turin (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixture instead of conventional CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 C, 0.35 W cm{sup -2} with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm{sup -2} with H{sub 2}) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Polymer Electrolyte and Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Erik

    2004-02-01

    This thesis deals with modeling of two types of fuel cells: the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) and the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), for which we address four major issues: a) mass transport limitations; b) water management (PEFC); c) gas management (DMFC); d) thermal management. Four models have been derived and studied for the PEFC, focusing on the cathode. The first exploits the slenderness of the cathode for a two-dimensional geometry, leading to a reduced model, where several non dimensional parameters capture the behavior of the cathode. The model was extended to three dimensions, where four different flow distributors were studied for the cathode. A quantitative comparison shows that the interdigitated channels can sustain the highest current densities. These two models, comprising isothermal gas phase flow, limit the studies to (a). Returning to a two-dimensional geometry of the PEFC, the liquid phase was introduced via a separate flow model approach for the cathode. In addition to conservation of mass, momentum and species, the model was extended to consider simultaneous charge and heat transfer for the whole cell. Different thermal, flow fields, and hydrodynamic conditions were studied, addressing (a), (b) and (d). A scale analysis allowed for predictions of the cell performance prior to any computations. Good agreement between experiments with a segmented cell and the model was obtained. A liquid-phase model, comprising conservation of mass, momentum and species, was derived and analyzed for the anode of the DMFC. The impact of hydrodynamic, electrochemical and geometrical features on the fuel cell performance were studied, mainly focusing on (a). The slenderness of the anode allows the use of a narrow-gap approximation, leading to a reduced model, with benefits such as reduced computational cost and understanding of the physical trends prior to any numerical computations. Adding the gas-phase via a multiphase mixture approach, the gas

  19. Proton conductive montmorillonite-Nafion composite membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiu-Wen, E-mail: wuxw2008@163.com [School of Science, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Nan; Shi, Chun-Qing; Zheng, Zhi-Yuan; Qi, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ya-Fang [School of Science, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Composite membranes are prepared with different montmorillonites and nafion solution. • Proton conductivities of the composite membranes are between 36.0 mS/cm and 38.5 mS/cm. • Ethanol permeability is between 0.69 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/s and 2.67 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/s. • Water uptake is approximately 24.30 mass%. - Abstract: The preparation of Nafion membranes modified with montmorillonites is less studied, and most relative works mainly applied in direct methanol fuel cells, less in direct ethanol fuel cells. Organic/inorganic composite membranes are prepared with different montmorillonites (Ca-montmorillonite, Na-montmorillonite, K-montmorillonite, Mg-montmorillonite, and H-montmorillonite) and Nafion solution via casting method at 293 K in air, and with balance of their proton conductivity and ethanol permeability. The ethanol permeability and proton conductivity of the membranes are comparatively studied. The montmorillonites can well decrease the ethanol permeability of the membranes via inserted them in the membranes, while less decrease the proton conductivities of the membranes depending on the inserted amount and type of montmorillonites. The proton conductivities of the membranes are between 36.0 mS/cm and 38.5 mS/cm. The ethanol permeability of the membranes is between 0.69 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/s and 2.67 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2}/s.

  20. Palladium-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Leticia Poras Reis de; Amico, Sandro Campos; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga, E-mail: leticiamoraes@usp.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre (Brazil); Matos, Bruno R.; Santiago, Elisabete Inacio; Fonseca, Fabio Coral [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Direct ethanol fuel cells require adequate electrocatalysts to promote the carbon carbon cleavage of ethanol molecule. Typical electrocatalysts are based on platinum, which have shown improved activity in acidic media. However, Pt-based catalysts have high cost and are easily deactivated by CO poisoning. Therefore, novel catalysts have been developed, and among then, palladium-based materials have shown promising results for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media. The present study reports on the performance of alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC) by using carbon-supported Pd, PdSn, PdNi, and PdNiSn produced by impregnation-reduction of the metallic precursors. The effect of chemical functionalization by acid treatment of the carbon support (Vulcan) was investigated. The electrocatalysts were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-rays diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and ADEFC tests. TGA measurements of functionalized Vulcan evidenced the characteristic weight losses attributed to the presence of surface functional groups due to the acid treatment. A high degree of alloying between Pd and Sn was inferred from XRD data, whereas in both PdNi and PdNiSn, Ni occurs mostly segregated in the oxide form. TEM analyses indicated agglomeration of Pd and PdSn particles, whereas a more uniform particle distribution was observed for PdNi and PdNiSn samples. CV curves showed that the peak potential for the oxidation of ethanol shifts towards negative values for all samples supported on functionalized Vulcan indicating that ethanol oxidation is facilitated. Microstructural and electrochemical features were confirmed by ADEFC tests, which revealed that the highest open circuit voltage and maximum power density were achieved for PdNiSn electrocatalysts supported on functionalized Vulcan with uniform particle distribution and improved triple phase boundaries. (author)

  1. Palladium-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Leticia Poras Reis de; Amico, Sandro Campos; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga; Matos, Bruno R.; Santiago, Elisabete Inacio; Fonseca, Fabio Coral

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Direct ethanol fuel cells require adequate electrocatalysts to promote the carbon carbon cleavage of ethanol molecule. Typical electrocatalysts are based on platinum, which have shown improved activity in acidic media. However, Pt-based catalysts have high cost and are easily deactivated by CO poisoning. Therefore, novel catalysts have been developed, and among then, palladium-based materials have shown promising results for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media. The present study reports on the performance of alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC) by using carbon-supported Pd, PdSn, PdNi, and PdNiSn produced by impregnation-reduction of the metallic precursors. The effect of chemical functionalization by acid treatment of the carbon support (Vulcan) was investigated. The electrocatalysts were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-rays diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and ADEFC tests. TGA measurements of functionalized Vulcan evidenced the characteristic weight losses attributed to the presence of surface functional groups due to the acid treatment. A high degree of alloying between Pd and Sn was inferred from XRD data, whereas in both PdNi and PdNiSn, Ni occurs mostly segregated in the oxide form. TEM analyses indicated agglomeration of Pd and PdSn particles, whereas a more uniform particle distribution was observed for PdNi and PdNiSn samples. CV curves showed that the peak potential for the oxidation of ethanol shifts towards negative values for all samples supported on functionalized Vulcan indicating that ethanol oxidation is facilitated. Microstructural and electrochemical features were confirmed by ADEFC tests, which revealed that the highest open circuit voltage and maximum power density were achieved for PdNiSn electrocatalysts supported on functionalized Vulcan with uniform particle distribution and improved triple phase boundaries. (author)

  2. Performance of direct methanol fuel cell with a palladium–silica nanofibre/Nafion composite membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiam, H.S.; Daud, W.R.W.; Kamarudin, S.K.; Mohamad, A.B.; Kadhum, A.A.H.; Loh, K.S.; Majlan, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This study introduces Pd–SiO 2 Carbon Nano Fibre as an additive to Nafion membrane. • It investigates the effects of membrane annealing temperature and casting solvent. • Results show that Pd–SiO 2 fibre/Nafion performs lower methanol permeability. • This could effectively reduces methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell. - Abstract: Palladium–silica nanofibres (Pd–SiO 2 fibre) were adopted as an additive to Nafion recast membranes in order to reduce methanol crossover and improve the cell performance. The performance of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with fabricated composite membrane was evaluated through a passive air-breathing single cell direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The limiting crossover current density was measured to determine the methanol permeation in the DMFC. The effects of membrane annealing temperature and casting solvent of composite membrane on the cell performance were investigated and are discussed here. Compared to recast Nafion with the same thickness (150 μm), the Pd–SiO 2 fibre/Nafion composite membrane exhibited higher performance and lower methanol permeability. A maximum power density of 10.4 mW cm −2 was obtained with a 2 M methanol feed, outperforming the much thicker commercial Nafion 117 with a power density of 7.95 mW cm −2 under the same operating conditions. The experimental results showed that the Pd–SiO 2 fibre as inorganic fillers for Nafion could effectively reduce methanol crossover and improve the membrane performance in DMFC applications

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

    2006-01-01

    The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy and Environment (E and E) and Chemistry and Material Sciences (C and MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E and E and C and MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US

  4. Study of a device for the direct measurement of the fission gas pressure inside an in-pile fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavaud, B.; Uschanoff, S.

    1964-01-01

    The fission gas pressure inside a fuel element made of a refractory fuel constitutes an important limiting factor for the burn-up. Although it is possible to calculate approximately the volume of gas produced outside the fuel during its life-time; it is nevertheless very difficult to evaluate the pressure since the volume allowed to the fission gases, as well as their temperature are known only very approximately. This physical value, which is essential for the technologist, can only be known by direct in-pile measurement of the pressure. The report describes the equipment which has been developed for this test. (authors) [fr

  5. Final Report: Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications (2012-2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Huya-Kouadio, Jennie Moton [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Houchins, Cassidy [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel Allen [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes project activities for Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) Contract Number DE-EE0005236 to the U.S. Department of Energy titled “Transportation Fuel Cell System Cost Assessment”. The project defined and projected the mass production costs of direct hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell power systems for light-duty vehicles (automobiles) and 40-foot transit buses. In each year of the five-year contract, the fuel cell power system designs and cost projections were updated to reflect technology advances. System schematics, design assumptions, manufacturing assumptions, and cost results are presented.

  6. Investigation of the Impact of Fuel Properties on Particulate Number Emission of a Modern Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fioroni, Gina [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fatouraie, Mohammad [Robert Bosch LLC; Frommherz, Mario [Robert Bosch LLC; Mosburger, Michael [Robert Bosch LLC; Chapman, Elana [General Motors LLC; Li, Sharon [General Motors LLC

    2018-04-03

    Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) has become the preferred technology for spark-ignition engines resulting in greater specific power output and lower fuel consumption, and consequently reduction in CO2 emission. However, GDI engines face a substantial challenge in meeting new and future emission limits, especially the stringent particle number (PN) emissions recently introduced in Europe and China. Studies have shown that the fuel used by a vehicle has a significant impact on engine out emissions. In this study, nine fuels with varying chemical composition and physical properties were tested on a modern turbo-charged side-mounted GDI engine with design changes to reduce particulate emissions. The fuels tested included four fuels meeting US certification requirements; two fuels meeting European certification requirements; and one fuel meeting China 6 certification requirements being proposed at the time of this work. Two risk safeguard fuels (RSG), representing the properties of worst case market fuels in Europe and China, were also included. The particle number concentration of the solid particulates was measured in the engine-out exhaust flow at steady state engine operations with load and speed sweeps, and semi-transient load steps. The test results showed a factor of 6 PN emission difference among all certification fuels tested. Combined with detailed fuel analyses, this study evaluated important factors (such as oxygenates, carbon chain length and thermo-physical properties) that cause PN emissions which were not included in PMI index. A linear regression was performed to develop a PN predictive model which showed improved fitting quality than using PMI.

  7. Atomization and spray characteristics of bioethanol and bioethanol blended gasoline fuel injected through a direct injection gasoline injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Su Han; Kim, Hyung Jun; Suh, Hyun Kyu; Lee, Chang Sik

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the spray characteristics and atomization performance of gasoline fuel (G100), bioethanol fuel (E100), and bioethanol blended gasoline fuel (E85) in a direct injection gasoline injector in a gasoline engine. The overall spray and atomization characteristics such as an axial spray tip penetration, spray width, and overall SMD were measured experimentally and predicted by using KIVA-3V code. The development process and the appearance timing of the vortices in the test fuels were very similar. In addition, the numerical results accurately described the experimentally observed spray development pattern and shape, the beginning position of the vortex, and the spray breakup on the spray surface. Moreover, the increased injection pressure induced the occurrence of a clear circular shape in the downstream spray and a uniform mixture between the injected spray droplets and ambient air. The axial spray tip penetrations of the test fuels were similar, while the spray width and spray cone angle of E100 were slightly larger than the other fuels. In terms of atomization performance, the E100 fuel among the tested fuels had the largest droplet size because E100 has a high kinematic viscosity and surface tension.

  8. Application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for the monitoring and direct usage of biohydrogen produced by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oncel, S.; Vardar-Sukan, F. [Department of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2011-01-01

    Photo-biologically produced hydrogen by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is integrated with a proton exchange (PEM) fuel cell for online electricity generation. To investigate the fuel cell efficiency, the effect of hydrogen production on the open circuit fuel cell voltage is monitored during 27 days of batch culture. Values of volumetric hydrogen production, monitored by the help of the calibrated water columns, are related with the open circuit voltage changes of the fuel cell. From the analysis of this relation a dead end configuration is selected to use the fuel cell in its best potential. After the open circuit experiments external loads are tested for their effects on the fuel cell voltage and current generation. According to the results two external loads are selected for the direct usage of the fuel cell incorporating with the photobioreactors (PBR). Experiments with the PEM fuel cell generate a current density of 1.81 mA cm{sup -2} for about 50 h with 10 {omega} load and 0.23 mA cm{sup -2} for about 80 h with 100 {omega} load. (author)

  9. Direct extraction of uranium and plutonium from oxide fuel using TBP-HNO3 complex for super-DIREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, S.; Kamiya, M.; Nomura, K.; Koyama, T.; Ogum, S.; Shimada, T.; Mori, Y.; Enokida, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Super-DIREX is a new reprocessing method which has high economical efficiency. Experimental study of this process was started on the direct extraction of U and Pu from irradiated MOX fuel by the supercritical carbon dioxide (SFCO 2 ) containing TBP-HNO 3 complex. This report describes direct extraction of U and Pu with TBP-HNO 3 complex at atmospheric pressure, as the first test for irradiated fuel, in order to investigate the applicability of SFCO 2 containing TBP-HNO 3 complex. In this test, dependency on dissolution temperature, Pu content, fuel/ TBP-HNO 3 complex ratio and effect of voloxidation were investigated. From these results, TBP-HNO 3 complex was found to be effective in the respect of the recovery of U and Pu. The number of the process step in dissolution and co-extraction is small, and amount of waste can be reduced. It is applicable to the direct extraction in Super-DIREX. (authors)

  10. Combinatorial investigation of Pt-Ru-Sn alloys as an anode electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Young Hwan [Department of New Energy.Resource Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Sangji University, 124, Sangjidae-gil, Wonju-si, Gangwon-Do 220-702 (Korea); Shul, Yong Gun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 134, Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea)

    2010-10-15

    Low-temperature direct alcohol fuel cells fed with different kinds of alcohol (methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol) have been investigated by employing ternary electrocatalysts (Pt-Ru-Sn) as anode catalysts. Combinatorial chemistry has been applied to screen the 66-PtRuSn-anode arrays at the same time to reduce cost, time, and effort when we select the optimum composition of electrocatalysts for DAFCs (Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells). PtRuSn (80:20:0) showed the lowest onset potential for methanol electro-oxidation, PtRuSn (50:0:50) for ethanol, and PtRuSn (20:70:10) for 2-propanol in CV results respectively, and single cell performance test indicated that Ru is more suitable for direct methanol fuel cell system, Sn for direct ethanol fuel cell system, and 2-propanol could be applied as fuel with low platinum composition anode electrocatalyst. The single cell performance results and electrochemical results (CV) were well matched with the combinatorial electrochemical results. As a result, we could verify the availability of combinatorial chemistry by comparing the results of each extreme electrocatalysts compositions as follows: PtRuSn (80:20:0) for methanol, PtRuSn (50:0:50) for ethanol and PtRuSn (20:70:10) for 2-propanol. (author)

  11. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

  12. Enhancement of Hybrid SPEEK Based Polymer–Cyclodextrin-Silica Inorganic Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2017-06-01

      Keywords: Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, Poly(ether ether ketone, cyclodextrin-silica, sulfonation, ionic conductivity. Article History: Received January 18th 2017; Received in revised form April 21st 2017; Accepted June 22nd 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Kusworo, T.D., Hakim, M.F. and Hadiyanto, H. (2017 Enhancement of Hybrid SPEEK Based Polymer–Cyclodextrin-Silica Inorganic Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Application. International Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 6(2, 165-170. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.6.2.165-170

  13. Pd and polyaniline nanocomposite on carbon fiber paper as an efficient direct formic acid fuel cell anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rakesh K.

    2018-03-01

    Direct formic acid fuel cells are advantageous as portable power generating devices. In the present work, an anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) is presented which has good catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation. The catalyst is composed of Pd and conducting polymer polyaniline (Pd-PANI) nanocomposite. The catalyst was prepared by using a single step galvanostatic electrochemical deposition method. The Pd-PANI catalyst was electrodeposited at different time durations and a comparison of the catalytic activity at each deposition time was carried out and optimized.

  14. Mass transport of direct methanol fuel cell species in sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, V.S.; Ruffmann, B.; Vetter, S.; Boaventura, M.; Mendes, A.M.; Madeira, L.M.; Nunes, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Homogeneous membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with different sulfonation degrees (SD) were prepared and characterized. In order to perform a critical analysis of the SD effect on the polymer barrier and mass transport properties towards direct methanol fuel cell species, proton conductivity, water/methanol pervaporation and nitrogen/oxygen/carbon dioxide pressure rise method experiments are proposed. This procedure allows the evaluation of the individual permeability coefficients in hydrated sPEEK membranes with different sulfonation degrees. Nafion[reg] 112 was used as reference material. DMFC tests were also performed at 50 deg. C. It was observed that the proton conductivity and the permeability towards water, methanol, oxygen and carbon dioxide increase with the sPEEK sulfonation degree. In contrast, the SD seems to not affect the nitrogen permeability coefficient. In terms of selectivity, it was observed that the carbon dioxide/oxygen selectivity increases with the sPEEK SD. In contrast, the nitrogen/oxygen selectivity decreases. In terms of barrier properties for preventing the DMFC reactants loss, the polymer electrolyte membrane based on the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) with SD lower or equal to 71%, although having slightly lower proton conductivity, presented much better characteristics for fuel cell applications compared with the well known Nafion[reg] 112. In terms of the DMFC tests of the studied membranes at low temperature, the sPEEK membrane with SD = 71% showed to have similar performance, or even better, as that of Nafion[reg] 112. However, the highest DMFC overall efficiency was achieved using sPEEK membrane with SD = 52%

  15. Comparative studies on the performance and emissions of a direct injection diesel engine fueled with neem oil and pumpkin seed oil biodiesel with and without fuel preheater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Muneeswaran; Rathinam, Thansekhar Maruthu; Viswanathan, Karthickeyan

    2018-02-01

    In the present experimental analysis, two non-edible oils namely neem oil and pumpkin seed oil were considered. They are converted into respective biodiesels namely neem oil methyl ester (B1) and pumpkin seed oil methyl ester (B2) through transesterification process and their physical and chemical properties were examined using ASTM standards. Diesel was used as a baseline fuel in Kirloskar TV1 model direct injection four stroke diesel engine. A fuel preheater was designed and fabricated to operate at various temperatures (60, 70, and 80 °C). Diesel showed higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) than biodiesel samples. Lower brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) was obtained with diesel than B1 sample. B1 exhibited lower BSFC than B2 sample without preheating process. High preheating temperature (80 °C) results in lower fuel consumption for B1 sample. The engine emission characteristics like carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC), and smoke were found lower with B1 sample than diesel and B2 except oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission. In preheating of fuel, B1 sample with high preheating temperature showed lower CO, HC, and smoke emission (except NOx) than B2 sample.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study on spray behaviors of modified bio-ethanol fuel employing direct injection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghahremani Amirreza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key solutions to improve engine performance and reduce exhaust emissions of internal combustion engines is direct injection of bio-fuels. A new modified bio-ethanol is produced to be substituted by fossil fuels in gasoline direct injection engines. The key advantages of modified bio-ethanol fuel as an alternative fuel are higher octane number and oxygen content, a long-chain hydro-carbon fuel, and lower emissions compared to fossil fuels. In the present study spray properties of a modified bio-ethanol and its atomization behaviors have been studied experimentally and theoretically. Based on atomization physics of droplets dimensional analysis has been performed to develop a new non-dimensional number namely atomization index. This number determines the atomization level of the spray. Applying quasi-steady jet theory, air entrainment and fuel-air mixing studies have been performed. The spray atomization behaviors such as atomization index number, Ohnesorge number, and Sauter mean diameter have been investigated employing atomization model. The influences of injection and ambient conditions on spray properties of different blends of modified bio-ethanol and gasoline fuels have been investigated performing high-speed visualization technique. Results indicate that decreasing the difference of injection and ambient pressures increases spray cone angle and projected area, and decreases spray tip penetration length. As expected, increasing injection pressure improves atomization behaviors of the spray. Increasing percentage of modified bio-ethanol in the blend, increases spray tip penetration and decreases the projected area as well.

  17. Application of infiltrated LSCM-GDC oxide anode in direct carbon/coal fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiangling; Arenillas, Ana; Irvine, John T S

    2016-08-15

    Hybrid direct carbon/coal fuel cells (HDCFCs) utilise an anode based upon a molten carbonate salt with an oxide conducting solid electrolyte for direct carbon/coal conversion. They can be fuelled by a wide range of carbon sources, and offer higher potential chemical to electrical energy conversion efficiency and have the potential to decrease CO2 emissions compared to coal-fired power plants. In this study, the application of (La, Sr)(Cr, Mn)O3 (LSCM) and (Gd, Ce)O2 (GDC) oxide anodes was explored in a HDCFC system running with two different carbon fuels, an organic xerogel and a raw bituminous coal. The electrochemical performance of the HDCFC based on a 1-2 mm thick 8 mol% yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and the GDC-LSCM anode fabricated by wet impregnation procedures was characterized and discussed. The infiltrated oxide anode showed a significantly higher performance than the conventional Ni-YSZ anode, without suffering from impurity formation under HDCFC operation conditions. Total polarisation resistance (Rp) reached 0.8-0.9 Ω cm(2) from DCFC with an oxide anode on xerogel and bituminous coal at 750 °C, with open circuit voltage (OCV) values in the range 1.1-1.2 V on both carbon forms. These indicated the potential application of LSCM-GDC oxide anode in HDCFCs. The chemical compatibility of LSCM/GDC with carbon/carbonate investigation revealed the emergence of an A2BO4 type oxide in place of an ABO3 perovskite structure in the LSCM in a reducing environment, due to Li attack as a result of intimate contact between the LSCM and Li2CO3, with GDC being stable under identical conditions. Such reaction between LSCM and Li2CO3 was not observed on a LSCM-YSZ pellet treated with Li-K carbonate in 5% H2/Ar at 700 °C, nor on a GDC-LSCM anode after HDCFC operation. The HDCFC durability tests of GDC-LSCM oxide on a xerogel and on raw bituminous coal were performed under potentiostatic operation at 0.7 V at 750 °C. The degradation mechanisms were

  18. Development of methanol evaporation plate to reduce methanol crossover in a direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiming

    This research focuses on methanol crossover reduction in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) through separating the methanol vapor from its liquid phase and feeding the vapor passively at low temperature range. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were fabricated by using commercial available membrane with different thickness at different anode catalyst loading levels, and tested under the operating conditions below 100°C in cell temperature and cathode exit open to ambient pressure. Liquid methanol transport from the anode through the membrane into cathode ("methanol crossover") is identified as one of the major efficiency losses in a DMFC. It is known that the methanol crossover rate in the vapor phase is much lower than in liquid phase. Vapor feed can be achieved by heating the liquid methanol to elevated temperatures (>100°C), but other issues limit the performance of the cell when operating above 100°C. High temperature membranes and much more active cathode catalyst structures are required, and a complex temperature control system must be employed. However, methanol vapor feed can also occur at a lower temperature range (evaporation through a porous body. The methanol crossover with this vapor feed mode is lower compared with the direct liquid methanol feed. A new method of using a methanol evaporation plate (MEP) to separate the vapor from its liquid phase to reduce the liquid methanol crossover at low temperature range is developed. A MEP plays the roles of liquid/vapor methanol phase separation and evaporation in a DMFC. The goal of this study is to develop a MEP with the proper properties to achieve high methanol phase separation efficiency and fast methanol evaporation rate over a wide range of temperature, i.e., from room temperature up to near boiling temperature (100°C). MEP materials were selected and characterized. MEPs made from three different types were tested extensively with different MEA and porous back layer configurations. The benefits of

  19. Alkali metal – yttrium borohydrides: The link between coordination of small and large rare-earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadikin, Yolanda; Stare, Katarina; Schouwink, Pascal; Brix Ley, Morten; Jensen, Torben R.; Meden, Anton; Černý, Radovan

    2015-01-01

    The system Li–A–Y–BH 4 (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five new compounds and four further ones known from previous work on the homoleptic borohydrides. Crystal structures have been solved and refined from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, thermal stability of new compounds have been investigated and ionic conductivity measured for selected samples. Significant coordination flexibility for Y 3+ is revealed, which allows the formation of both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions with the tetrahydroborate anion BH 4 both as a linker and terminal ligand. Bi- and trimetallic cubic double-perovskites c-A 3 Y(BH 4 ) 6 or c-A 2 LiY(BH 4 ) 6 (A=Rb, Cs) form in all the investigated systems, with the exception of the Li–K–Y system. The compounds with the stoichiometry AY(BH 4 ) 4 crystallize in all investigated systems with a great variety of structure types which find their analog amongst metal oxides. In-situ formation of a new borohydride – closo-borane is observed during decomposition of all double perovskites. - Graphical abstract: The system Li–A–Y–BH 4 (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five novel compounds and four further ones previously reported. Significant coordination flexibility of Y 3+ is revealed, which can be employed to form both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions, very different structural topologies. Versatility is also manifested in three different simultaneously occurring coordination modes of borohydrides for one metal cation, as proposed by DFT optimization of the monoclinic KY(BH 4 ) 4 structural model observed by powder diffraction. - Highlights: • The system Li-A-Y-BH 4 (A=K, Rb, Cs) contains nine compounds in total. • Y 3+ forms octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions. • Bi- and trimetallic double-perovskites crystallize in most systems. • Various AY(BH 4 ) 4 crystallize with structure types analogous to metal oxides. • Double-perovskites decompose and form a novel

  20. Alkali metal – yttrium borohydrides: The link between coordination of small and large rare-earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadikin, Yolanda [Department of Quantum Matter Physics, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Stare, Katarina [Department of Quantum Matter Physics, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerjeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Schouwink, Pascal [Department of Quantum Matter Physics, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Brix Ley, Morten; Jensen, Torben R. [Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), and Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Meden, Anton [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerjeva 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Černý, Radovan, E-mail: radovan.cerny@unige.ch [Department of Quantum Matter Physics, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Geneva, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    The system Li–A–Y–BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five new compounds and four further ones known from previous work on the homoleptic borohydrides. Crystal structures have been solved and refined from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, thermal stability of new compounds have been investigated and ionic conductivity measured for selected samples. Significant coordination flexibility for Y{sup 3+} is revealed, which allows the formation of both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions with the tetrahydroborate anion BH{sub 4} both as a linker and terminal ligand. Bi- and trimetallic cubic double-perovskites c-A{sub 3}Y(BH{sub 4}){sub 6} or c-A{sub 2}LiY(BH{sub 4}){sub 6} (A=Rb, Cs) form in all the investigated systems, with the exception of the Li–K–Y system. The compounds with the stoichiometry AY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} crystallize in all investigated systems with a great variety of structure types which find their analog amongst metal oxides. In-situ formation of a new borohydride – closo-borane is observed during decomposition of all double perovskites. - Graphical abstract: The system Li–A–Y–BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) is found to contain five novel compounds and four further ones previously reported. Significant coordination flexibility of Y{sup 3+} is revealed, which can be employed to form both octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions, very different structural topologies. Versatility is also manifested in three different simultaneously occurring coordination modes of borohydrides for one metal cation, as proposed by DFT optimization of the monoclinic KY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} structural model observed by powder diffraction. - Highlights: • The system Li-A-Y-BH{sub 4} (A=K, Rb, Cs) contains nine compounds in total. • Y{sup 3+} forms octahedral frameworks and tetrahedral complex anions. • Bi- and trimetallic double-perovskites crystallize in most systems. • Various AY(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} crystallize with

  1. Towards neat methanol operation of direct methanol fuel cells: a novel self-assembled proton exchange membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Liying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Chen, Zhangxian; Cheng, Hansong

    2015-04-18

    We report here a novel proton exchange membrane with remarkably high methanol-permeation resistivity and excellent proton conductivity enabled by carefully designed self-assembled ionic conductive channels. A direct methanol fuel cell utilizing the membrane performs well with a 20 M methanol solution, very close to the concentration of neat methanol.

  2. An experimental study of flame stability in a directly-fueled wall cavity with a supersonic free stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Chadwick Clifford

    An extensive study of flame stability in a cavity-based fuel injector/flameholder has been performed. Flames were stabilized in cavities with two different aft wall configurations and length to depth ratios of 3 and 4. Fuel was injected directly into the cavity using two injector configurations. Fuel injected from the aft wall of the cavity entered directly into the recirculation zone and provided desirable performance near the lean blowout limit. At high fuel flowrates, the cavity became flooded with fuel and rich blowout occurred. When fuel was injected from the floor of the cavity, excess fuel was directed out of the cavity which allowed for flame stabilization at extremely high fuel flowrates; however, this phenomenon also resulted in suboptimal performance near the lean limit where the blowout point was less predictable. Images of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of CH, OH, and formaldehyde give insight into the flameholding mechanisms. CH layers in the cavity are thin and continuous and show structure that is comparable to lifted jet flames, while broad CH zones are sometimes observed in the shear layer. OH PLIF images show that hot recirculated products are always present at the location of flame stabilization, whereas images of formaldehyde indicate that partial premixing takes place in the shear layer portion of the flame. Nonreacting measurements of the boundary layer and the free stream velocity profiles were obtained to provide necessary boundary conditions for computational modeling. Mean and instantaneous velocity profiles were determined for the nonreacting flow using particle image velocimetry (PIV). A correlation of the blowout points for a directly-fueled cavity in a supersonic flow was accomplished using a Damkohler number and an equivalence ratio based upon an effective air mass flowrate. The chemical time was formulated using a generic measure of the reaction rate, tauc ˜ alpha/ S2L , which was found to be adequate for correlating lean

  3. Direct Investigations of the Immobilization of Radionuclides in the Alteration Products of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Peter C.; Finch, Robert J.; Wronkiewicz, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Safe disposal of the nation's nuclear waste in a geological repository involves unique scientific and engineering challenges owing to the very long-lived radioactivity of the waste. The repository must retain a variety of radionuclides that have vastly different chemical characters for several thousand years. Most of the radioactivity that will be housed in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will be associated with spent nuclear fuel, much of which is derived from commercial reactors. DOE is custodian of approximately 8000 tons of spent nuclear fuel that is also intended for eventual disposal in a geological repository. Unlike the spent fuel from commercial reactors, the DOE fuel is diverse in composition with more than 250 varieties. Safe disposal of spent fuel requires a detailed knowledge of its long-term behavior under repository conditions, as well as the fate of radionuclides released from the spent fuel as waste containers are breached

  4. Direct synthesis of nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes on carbon paper for fuel cell electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wong Wai; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir Hassan; Majlan, Edy Herianto; Shyuan, Loh Kee

    2012-06-01

    Organic catalyst has recently been identified as the potential substitution for expensive platinum electrocatalyst for fuel cell application. Numerous studies have shown that the nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (N-CNT) can be synthesized through spray pyrolysis or floating chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique using various type of organometallic as precursors. This paper presents the method of synthesis and the initial findings of the growth of N-CNT directly on carbon paper using a modified CVD technique. In this research, nickel (II) phthalocyanines (Ni-Pc) as precursor was dissolved in ethanol solvent, stirred and sonicated to become homogenized. The solution was poured into a bubbler and heated up to allow the mixture to vaporize. Subsequently, the solution vapor was flowed into the tubical reactor maintained at 900°C. Carbon paper sputtered with nickel nanoparticles was used as the substrate. The synthesized sample was examined through Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). Long, entangled and compartmentalized nanotubes with tube diameter ranging 23-27 nm were found covered the carbon paper surface with approximate of 5.5-6.0 μm in thickness. EDX analysis has successfully showed the presence of nitrogen in the carbon nanotube. FTIR analysis showed the presence of the C-N bond on CNT.

  5. Quaternized poly(vinyl alcohol)/alumina composite polymer membranes for alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Chen; Chiu, Shwu-Jer; Chien, Wen-Chen; Chiu, Sheng-Shin

    The quaternized poly(vinyl alcohol)/alumina (designated as QPVA/Al 2O 3) nanocomposite polymer membrane was prepared by a solution casting method. The characteristic properties of the QPVA/Al 2O 3 nanocomposite polymer membranes were investigated using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and AC impedance method. Alkaline direct methanol fuel cell (ADMFC) comprised of the QPVA/Al 2O 3 nanocomposite polymer membrane were assembled and examined. Experimental results indicate that the DMFC employing a cheap non-perfluorinated (QPVA/Al 2O 3) nanocomposite polymer membrane shows excellent electrochemical performances. The peak power densities of the DMFC with 4 M KOH + 1 M CH 3OH, 2 M CH 3OH, and 4 M CH 3OH solutions are 28.33, 32.40, and 36.15 mW cm -2, respectively, at room temperature and in ambient air. The QPVA/Al 2O 3 nanocomposite polymer membranes constitute a viable candidate for applications on alkaline DMFC.

  6. Tuning of size and shape of Au–Pt nanocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunyadi Murph, Simona E.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Colon-Mercado, Hector R.; Torres, Ricardo D.; Heroux, Katie J.; Fox, Elise B.; Thompson, Lucas B.; Haasch, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report the precise control of the size, shape, and surface morphology of Au–Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons, and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold “seeds” of different aspect ratios (1–4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au–Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 °C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis, UV–Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was employed to evaluate the Au–Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au–Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au–Pt dogbones and Pt-black; however, its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  7. Preparation of supported PtRu/C electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Luhua; Sun Gongquan; Zhao Xinsheng; Zhou Zhenhua; Yan Shiyou; Tang Shuihua; Wang Guoxiong; Zhou Bing; Xin Qin

    2005-01-01

    In this work, high-surface supported PtRu/C were prepared with Ru(NO)(NO 3 ) 3 and [Pt(H 2 NCH 2 CH 2 NH 2 ) 2 ]Cl 2 as the precursors and hydrogen as a reducing agent. XRD and TEM analyses showed that the PtRu/C catalysts with different loadings possessed small and homogeneous metal particles. Even at high metal loading (40 wt.% Pt, 20 wt.% Ru) the mean metal particle size is less than 4 nm. Meanwhile, the calculated Pt crystalline lattice parameter and Pt (2 2 0) peak position indicated that the geometric structure of Pt was modified by Ru atoms. Among the prepared catalysts, the lattice parameter of 40-20 wt.% PtRu/C contract most. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), CO stripping and single direct methanol fuel cell tests jointly suggested that the 40-20 wt.% PtRu/C catalyst has the highest electrochemical activity for methanol oxidation

  8. Palladium-alloy catalysts as ethanol tolerant cathodes for direct alcohol fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie; Varela, F.J.R. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Coahuila (Mexico). Unidad Saltillo

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that electroactive palladium (Pd) and Pd-alloy catalysts prepared using a sputtering technique possess a similar degree of activity as platinum (Pt) electrodes. This study demonstrated that Pd and Pd-alloys show a high degree of tolerance to ethanol during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) processes. The onset potential of the ORR process in the presence of 0.5M of ethanol decreased by only 33 mV and 18 mV on Pd and Pd-cobalt (Co) catalysts. Linear sweep voltammetry experiments showed that no peak current density caused by the electro-oxidation of ethanol was observed in the Pd-based catalysts. The selective behaviour of the Pd and Pd-Co catalysts was attributed to a slow rate of adsorption of the ethanol as well as the presence of reaction intermediates on the catalytic surface. Results suggested that the Pd and Pd-Co catalysts are suitable candidates for direct alcohol fuel cell applications. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Economic analysis of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cells in three near-term markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, K.; Stone, H.; Judd, K.; Paul, D.

    2007-01-01

    Direct hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (H-PEMFCs) offer several near-term opportunities including backup power applications in state and local agencies of emergency response; forklifts in high throughput distribution centers; and, airport ground support equipment. This paper presented an analysis of the market requirements for introducing H-PEMFCs successfully, as well as an analysis of the lifecycle costs of H-PEMFCs and competing alternatives in three near-term markets. It also used three scenarios as examples of the potential for market penetration of H-PEMFCs. For each of the three potential opportunities, the paper presented the market requirements, a lifecycle cost analysis, and net present value of the lifecycle costs. A sensitivity analysis of the net present value of the lifecycle costs and of the average annual cost of owning and operating each of the H-PEMFC opportunities was also conducted. It was concluded that H-PEMFC-powered pallet trucks in high-productivity environments represented a promising early opportunity. However, the value of H-PEMFC-powered forklifts compared to existing alternatives was reduced for applications with lower hours of operation and declining labor rates. In addition, H-PEMFC-powered baggage tractors in airports were more expensive than battery-powered baggage tractors on a lifecycle cost basis. 9 tabs., 4 figs

  10. Recast Nafion{sup R}-based membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrova, Penka; Friedrich, Kaspar A.; Stimming, Ulrich; Vogt, Brunhilde [Department of Physics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-80333 Munich (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Commercially available Nafion{sup R} membranes at present do not meet the requirements for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications, amongst others factors because of their high methanol permeability. With the aim of improving this undesirable characteristic, a modification procedure has been applied to recast Nafion-based membranes. Membranes, containing different additives, are assessed with regard to their conductivity and methanol permeation rate. The preparation of the samples involves the introduction of a small amount of a high boiling point solvent to the as-received Nafion solution and then shaping the membranes by a recasting procedure (drying at room temperature and heating up to 150{sup o}C). An enhancement of the conductivity of the thermally treated membranes in comparison to the commercial Nafion 117 is found. The thickness-normalised methanol permeation rate of the samples, containing inorganic additives (Aerosil and molybdophosphoric acid) decreases compared to the pure recast and as-received Nafion membranes. The observed results are discussed in terms of the membrane structure and preparation. (author)

  11. Current status and future direction of INPRO (International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira; Moriwaki, Masanao; Sugimoto, Jun; Nakai, Ryodai

    2007-01-01

    INPRO is an international forum to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles so as to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to a sustainable development of the human, and IAEA becomes the secretariat for INPRO. The number of the members counts 28 by recent participation of Japan and U.S.A. now, and it is a unique forum to bring together both technology users and technology holders, that includes 5 countries which do not still have nuclear power generation. Until now it was phase I, and focused its activities to make clear the desired characteristics of nuclear energy system toward the future, and to develop methodology to evaluate various nuclear energy systems, but it shifted to phase II from July, 2006, and it planned three areas of activities such as improvement of evaluation methodology, institutional/infrastructure oriented activities and a collaborative project of technology development. Current status and future direction of INPRO was presented to encourage Japan in significant contributions of these three areas. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Carbon-Supported PtRuMo Electrocatalysts for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L.G. Fierro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The review article discusses the current status and recent findings of our investigations on the synthesis and characterization of carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells. In particular, the effect of the carbon support and the composition on the structure, stability and the activity of the PtRuMo nanoparticles for the electrooxidation of CO, methanol and ethanol have been studied. Different physicochemical techniques have been employed for the analysis of the catalysts structures: X-ray analytical methods (XRD, XPS, TXRF, thermogravimetry (TGA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, as well as a number of electrochemical techniques like CO adsorption studies, current-time curves and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Furthermore, spectroscopic methods adapted to the electrochemical systems for in situ studies, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS, have been used to evaluate the oxidation process of CO, methanol and ethanol over the carbon-supported PtRuMo electrocatalysts.

  13. Nanostructured Carbon Materials as Supports in the Preparation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Lázaro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Different advanced nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanocoils, carbon nanofibers, graphitized ordered mesoporous carbons and carbon xerogels, presenting interesting features such as high electrical conductivity and extensively developed porous structure were synthesized and used as supports in the preparation of electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. The main advantage of these supports is that their physical properties and surface chemistry can be tailored to adapt the carbonaceous material to the catalytic requirements. Moreover, all of them present a highly mesoporous structure, diminishing diffusion problems, and both graphitic character and surface area can be conveniently modified. In the present work, the influence of the particular features of each material on the catalytic activity and stability was analyzed. Results have been compared with those obtained for commercial catalysts supported on Vulcan XC-72R, Pt/C and PtRu/C (ETEK. Both a highly ordered graphitic and mesopore-enriched structure of these advanced nanostructured materials resulted in an improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the commercial catalysts assayed, both towards CO and alcohol oxidation.

  14. Model-based analysis of water management in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinzierl, C.; Krewer, U.

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical modelling is used to analyse water management in Alkaline Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (ADMFCs) with an anion exchange membrane as electrolyte. Cathodic water supply is identified as one of the main challenges and investigated at different operation conditions. Two extreme case scenarios are modelled to study the feasible conditions for sufficient water supply. Scenario 1 reveals that water supply by cathodic inlet is insufficient and, thus, water transport through membrane is essential for ADMFC operation. The second scenario is used to analyse requirements on water transport through the membrane for different operation conditions. These requirements are influenced by current density, evaporation rate, methanol cross-over and electro-osmotic drag of water. Simulations indicate that water supply is mainly challenging for high current densities and demands on high water diffusion are intensified by water drag. Thus, current density might be limited by water transport through membrane. The presented results help to identify important effects and processes in ADMFCs with a polymer electrolyte membrane and to understand these processes. Furthermore, the requirements identified by modelling show the importance of considering water transport through membrane besides conductivity and methanol cross-over especially for designing new membrane materials.

  15. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  16. Modeling of the anode side of a direct methanol fuel cell with analytical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosquera, Martin A.; Lizcano-Valbuena, William H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, analytical solutions were derived (for any methanol oxidation reaction order) for the profiles of methanol concentration and proton current density, by assuming diffusion mass transport mechanism, Tafel kinetics, and fast proton transport in the anodic catalyst layer of a direct methanol fuel cell. An expression for the Thiele modulus that allows to express the anodic overpotential as a function of the cell current and kinetic and mass transfer parameters was obtained. For high cell current densities, it was found that the Thiele modulus (φ 2 ) varies quadratically with cell current density; yielding a simple correlation between anodic overpotential and cell current density. Analytical solutions were derived for the profiles of both local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer and local anodic current density in the catalyst layer. Under the assumptions of the model presented here, in general, the local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer cannot be expressed as an explicit function of the position in the layer. In spite of this, the equations presented here for the anodic overpotential allow the derivation of new semi-empirical equations

  17. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  18. Single wall carbon nanotube supports for portable direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girishkumar, G; Hall, Timothy D; Vinodgopal, K; Kamat, Prashant V

    2006-01-12

    Single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes are employed as carbon supports in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The morphology and electrochemical activity of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes obtained from different sources have been examined to probe the influence of carbon support on the overall performance of DMFC. The improved activity of the Pt-Ru catalyst dispersed on carbon nanotubes toward methanol oxidation is reflected as a shift in the onset potential and a lower charge transfer resistance at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The evaluation of carbon supports in a passive air breathing DMFC indicates that the observed power density depends on the nature and source of carbon nanostructures. The intrinsic property of the nanotubes, dispersion of the electrocatalyst and the electrochemically active surface area collectively influence the performance of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). As compared to the commercial carbon black support, single wall carbon nanotubes when employed as the support for anchoring the electrocatalyst particles in the anode and cathode sides of MEA exhibited a approximately 30% enhancement in the power density of a single stack DMFC operating at 70 degrees C.

  19. Palladium-Based Catalysts as Electrodes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: A Last Ten Years Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Calderón Gómez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Platinum-based materials are accepted as the suitable electrocatalysts for anodes and cathodes in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. Nonetheless, the increased demand and scarce world reserves of Pt, as well as some technical problems associated with its use, have motivated a wide research focused to design Pd-based catalysts, considering the similar properties between this metal and Pt. In this review, we present the most recent advancements about Pd-based catalysts, considering Pd, Pd alloys with different transition metals and non-carbon supported nanoparticles, as possible electrodes in DMFCs. In the case of the anode, different reported works have highlighted the capacity of these new materials for overcoming the CO poisoning and promote the oxidation of other intermediates generated during the methanol oxidation. Regarding the cathode, the studies have showed more positive onset potentials, as fundamental parameter for determining the mechanism of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR and thus, making them able for achieving high efficiencies, with less production of hydrogen peroxide as collateral product. This revision suggests that it is possible to replace the conventional Pt catalysts by Pd-based materials, although several efforts must be made in order to improve their performance in DMFCs.

  20. Study on the water flooding in the cathode of direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hun Suk; Kim, Sang-Kyung; Lim, Seongyop; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Doohwan; Hong, Won Hi

    2011-07-01

    Water flooding phenomena in the cathode of direct methanol fuel cells were analyzed by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Two kinds of commercial gas diffusion layers with different PTFE contents of 5 wt% (GDL A5) and 20 wt% (GDL B20) were used to investigate the water flooding under various operating conditions. Water flooding was divided into two types: catalyst flooding and backing flooding. The cathode impedance spectra of each gas diffusion layer was obtained and compared under the same conditions. The diameter of the capacitive semicircle became larger with increasing current density for both, and this increase was greater for GDL B20 than GDL A5. Catalyst flooding is dominant and backing flooding is negligible when the air flow rate is high and current density is low. An equivalent model was suggested and fitted to the experimental data. Parameters for catalyst flooding and backing flooding were individually obtained. The capacitance of the catalyst layer decreases as the air flow rate decreases when the catalyst flooding is dominant.

  1. Design, fabrication and performance of a mixed-reactant membraneless micro direct methanol fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrego-Martínez, J. C.; Moreno-Zuria, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Arriaga, L. G.; Sun, Shuhui; Mohamedi, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, we report the design, fabrication and evaluation of a membraneless mixed-reactant and air-breathing microfluidic direct methanol fuel cell (ML-μDMFC) stack operated in passive mode. The operation under mixed-reactant conditions was achieved by using a highly methanol-tolerant Ag/Pt/CP cathode with ultra-low Pt loading in alkaline medium. Prior to the fabrication of the stack, a flow simulation was made in order to study the behavior of the reactants stream in the microchannel through the 2 cells. Subsequently, the device was tested in passive mode using a mixture of 5 M MeOH +0.5 M KOH. The results showed that by connecting the 2 cells in series, it is possible to effectively double the voltage of a single ML-μDMFC, as well as increasing the absolute power by 75% with practically no cost increase. The stack was capable of operate continuously for more than 2 h with a single charge of 40 μL, producing an OCV of 0.89 V and a maximum power density of 3.33 mW mgPt-1. Additionally, the device exhibited good stability throughout a 10 h test.

  2. High-Performance Direct Methanol Fuel Cells with Precious-Metal-Free Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wang, Tanyuan; Havas, Dana; Zhang, Hanguang; Xu, Ping; Han, Jiantao; Cho, Jaephil; Wu, Gang

    2016-11-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) hold great promise for applications ranging from portable power for electronics to transportation. However, apart from the high costs, current Pt-based cathodes in DMFCs suffer significantly from performance loss due to severe methanol crossover from anode to cathode. The migrated methanol in cathodes tends to contaminate Pt active sites through yielding a mixed potential region resulting from oxygen reduction reaction and methanol oxidation reaction. Therefore, highly methanol-tolerant cathodes must be developed before DMFC technologies become viable. The newly developed reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based Fe-N-C cathode exhibits high methanol tolerance and exceeds the performance of current Pt cathodes, as evidenced by both rotating disk electrode and DMFC tests. While the morphology of 2D rGO is largely preserved, the resulting Fe-N-rGO catalyst provides a more unique porous structure. DMFC tests with various methanol concentrations are systematically studied using the best performing Fe-N-rGO catalyst. At feed concentrations greater than 2.0 m, the obtained DMFC performance from the Fe-N-rGO cathode is found to start exceeding that of a Pt/C cathode. This work will open a new avenue to use nonprecious metal cathode for advanced DMFC technologies with increased performance and at significantly reduced cost.

  3. Highly Durable Direct Methanol Fuel Cell with Double-Layered Catalyst Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM is one of the key components in direct methanol fuel cells. However, the PEM usually gets attacked by reactive oxygen species during the operation period, resulting in the loss of membrane integrity and formation of defects. Herein, a double-layered catalyst cathode electrode consisting of Pt/CeO2-C as inner catalyst and Pt/C as outer catalyst is fabricated to extend the lifetime and minimize the performance loss of DMFC. Although the maximum power density of membrane electrode assembly (MEA with catalyst cathode is slightly lower than that of the traditional one, its durability is significantly improved. No obvious degradation is evident in the MEA with double-layered catalyst cathode within durability testing. These results indicated that Pt/CeO2-C as inner cathode catalyst layer greatly improved the stability of MEA. The significant reason for the improved stability of MEA is the ability of CeO2 to act as free-radical scavengers.

  4. A Nafion-Ceria Composite Membrane Electrolyte for Reduced Methanol Crossover in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban Velayutham

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An alternative Nafion composite membrane was prepared by incorporating various loadings of CeO2 nanoparticles into the Nafion matrix and evaluated its potential application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs. The effects of CeO2 in the Nafion matrix were systematically studied in terms of surface morphology, thermal and mechanical stability, proton conductivity and methanol permeability. The composite membrane with optimum filler content (1 wt. % CeO2 exhibits a proton conductivity of 176 mS·cm−1 at 70 °C, which is about 30% higher than that of the unmodified membrane. Moreover, all the composite membranes possess a much lower methanol crossover compared to pristine Nafion membrane. In a single cell DMFC test, MEA fabricated with the optimized composite membrane delivered a peak power density of 120 mW·cm−2 at 70 °C, which is about two times higher in comparison with the pristine Nafion membrane under identical operating conditions.

  5. Sensing methanol concentration in direct methanol fuel cell with total harmonic distortion: Theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Qing; Krewer, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear frequency response of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is studied by analyzing the total harmonic distortion (THD) spectra. The dependence of the THD spectra on methanol concentration and methanol oxidation kinetics is investigated by means of both simulation and experiment. Simulation using a continuous stirred tank reactor network model suggests that the methanol concentration profile in the anode has a strong impact on the THD spectra. The experimentally observed nonlinear behavior of the DMFC anode can be qualitatively reproduced with a model containing a three-step methanol oxidation mechanism with Kauranen–Frumkin/Temkin kinetics. Both experiment and simulation results show that THD value has a monotonic correlation with methanol concentration at certain frequencies and its sensitivity to concentration is improved with increased current amplitude. The monotonic relationship enables the THD to sense the methanol concentration level by the DMFC itself, which is of mayor interest for the portable application as an external sensor for the system can be omitted.

  6. Ion pair reinforced semi-interpenetrating polymer network for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chunliu; Julius, David; Tay, Siok Wei; Hong, Liang; Lee, Jim Yang

    2012-06-07

    This paper describes the synthesis of ion-pair-reinforced semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPNs) as proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Specifically, sulfonated poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (SPPO), a linear polymer proton source, was immobilized in a brominated PPO (BPPO) network covalently cross-linked by ethylenediamine (EDA). The immobilization of SPPO in the SIPN network was accomplished not only by the usual means of mechanical interlocking but also by ion pair formation between the sulfonic acid groups of SPPO and the amine moieties formed during the cross-linking reaction of BPPO with EDA. Through the ion pair interactions, the immobilization of SPPO polymer in the BPPO network was made more effective, resulting in a greater uniformity of sulfonic acid cluster distribution in the membrane. The hydrophilic amine-containing cross-links also compensated for some of the decrease in proton conductivity caused by ion pair formation. The SIPN membranes prepared as such showed good proton conductivity, low methanol permeability, good mechanical properties, and dimensional stability. Consequently, the PPO based SIPN membranes were able to deliver a higher maximum power density than Nafion, demonstrating the potential of the SIPN structure for PEM designs.

  7. Numerical simulation of internal and near-nozzle flow of a gasoline direct injection fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kaushik; Som, Sibendu; Battistoni, Michele; Li, Yanheng; Quan, Shaoping; Senecal, Peter Kelly

    2015-12-01

    A numerical study of two-phase flow inside the nozzle holes and the issuing spray jets for a multi-hole direct injection gasoline injector has been presented in this work. The injector geometry is representative of the Spray G nozzle, an eight-hole counterbore injector, from, the Engine Combustion Network (ECN). Simulations have been carried out for the fixed needle lift. Effects of turbulence, compressibility and, non-condensable gases have been considered in this work. Standard k—ɛ turbulence model has been used to model the turbulence. Homogeneous Relaxation Model (HRM) coupled with Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach has been utilized to capture the phase change phenomena inside and outside the injector nozzle. Three different boundary conditions for the outlet domain have been imposed to examine non-flashing and evaporative, non-flashing and non-evaporative, and flashing conditions. Inside the nozzle holes mild cavitation-like and in the near-nozzle region flash boiling phenomena have been predicted in this study when liquid fuel is subjected to superheated ambiance. Noticeable hole to hole variation has been also observed in terms of mass flow rates for all the holes under both flashing and non-flashing conditions.

  8. A three-dimensional non-isothermal model for a membraneless direct methanol redox fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Yuan, Xianxia; Jiang, Fangming

    2018-05-01

    In the membraneless direct methanol redox fuel cell (DMRFC), three-dimensional electrodes contribute to the reduction of methanol crossover and the open separator design lowers the system cost and extends its service life. In order to better understand the mechanisms of this configuration and further optimize its performance, the development of a three-dimensional numerical model is reported in this work. The governing equations of the multi-physics field are solved based on computational fluid dynamics methodology, and the influence of the CO2 gas is taken into consideration through the effective diffusivities. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data, and the deviation observed for cases of large current density may be related to the single-phase assumption made. The three-dimensional electrode is found to be effective in controlling methanol crossover in its multi-layer structure, while it also increases the flow resistance for the discharging products. It is found that the current density distribution is affected by both the electronic conductivity and the concentration of reactants, and the temperature rise can be primarily attributed to the current density distribution. The sensitivity and reliability of the model are analyzed through the investigation of the effects of cell parameters, including porosity values of gas diffusion layers and catalyst layers, methanol concentration and CO2 volume fraction, on the polarization characteristics.

  9. Energy Conversion Efficiency Potential for Forward-Deployed Generation Using Direct Carbon Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    fuel cells vs. DCFCs. PEMFC PAFC MCFC SOFC DCFC Electrolyte Polymer Phosphoric acid Molten car- bonate salt Ceramic Fused KNO3 Operating...air O2/air CO2/O2/air O2/air Humidified air Efficiency (Higher Heating Value [HHV]) 30–35% 40–50% 50–60% 45–55% 80% PEMFC : Proton Exchange... PEMFC proton-exchange membrane fuel cell SOFC solid oxide fuel cell SRI Statistical Research, Inc. TR technical report TRL technology readiness level

  10. Electrode Design for Low Temperature Direct-Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin (Inventor); Zhao, Fei (Inventor); Liu, Qiang (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  11. Electrode design for low temperature direct-hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanglin; Zhao, Fei; Liu, Qiang

    2015-10-06

    In certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The solid oxide fuel cell includes a hierarchically porous cathode support having an impregnated cobaltite cathode deposited thereon, an electrolyte, and an anode support. The anode support includes hydrocarbon oxidation catalyst deposited thereon, wherein the cathode support, electrolyte, and anode support are joined together and wherein the solid oxide fuel cell operates a temperature of 600.degree. C. or less.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of Pa(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, R.H.; Edelstein, N.M.

    1979-12-01

    The actinide borohydrides of Pa, Np, and Pu have been prepared and some of their physical and optical properties measured. X-ray powder diffraction photographs of Pa(BH 4 ) 4 have shown that it is isostructural to Th(BH 4 ) 4 and U(BH 4 ) 4 . Np(BH 4 ) 4 and Pu(BH 4 ) 4 are much more volatile than the borohydrides of Th, Pa, and U and are liquids at room temperature. Results from low-temperature single-crystal x-ray diffraction investigation of Np(BH 4 ) 4 show that its structure is very similar to Zr(BH 4 ) 4 . With the data from low-temperature infrared and Raman spectra, a normal coordinate analysis on Np(BH 4 ) 4 and Np(BD 4 ) 4 has been completed. EPR experiments on Np(BH 4 ) 4 /Zr(BH 4 ) 4 and Np(BD 4 ) 4 /Zr(BD 4 ) 4 have characterized the ground electronic state. 5 figures

  13. The Removal of Cu (II) from Aqueous Solution using Sodium Borohydride as a Reducing Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, N. T.; Ntuli, F.; Mashifana, T.

    2018-03-01

    The removal and recovery of metals from wastewater has been a subject of significant importance due the negative impact these toxic metals have on human health and the environment as a result of water and soil pollution. Increased use of the metals and chemicals in the process industries has resulted in generation of large quantity of effluents that contains high level of toxic metals and other pollutants. The objective of this work was to recover of Cu in its elemental form as metallic powder from aqueous solution using NaBH4 as a reducing agent. Reductive precipitation was achieved in a batch reactor at 65°C using Cu powder as a seeding material. This study also investigated the effect of concentration of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as a reducing agent. The amount of NaBH4 was varied based on mole ratios which are 1:1, 1:0.25 and 1:0.1 to recover Cu from synthetic wastewater. The results obtained showed that sodium borohydride is an effective reducing agent to recover Cu from wastewater. The optimum concentration of NaBH4 that gives the best results the 1:1 molar ratio with over 99% Cu removal.

  14. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Co-Ru Alloy Particle Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Sodium Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kurtinaitienė

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of μm and sub-μm-sized Co, Ru, and Co-Ru alloy species by hydrothermal approach in the aqueous alkaline solutions (pH ≥ 13 containing CoCl2 and/or RuCl3, sodium citrate, and hydrazine hydrate and a study of their catalytic properties for hydrogen generation by hydrolysis of sodium borohydride solution. This way provides a simple platform for fabrication of the ball-shaped Co-Ru alloy catalysts containing up to 12 wt% Ru. Note that bimetallic Co-Ru alloy bowls containing even 7 at.% Ru have demonstrated catalytic properties that are comparable with the ones of pure Ru particles fabricated by the same method. This result is of great importance in view of the preparation of cost-efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from borohydrides. The morphology and composition of fabricated catalyst particles have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  15. Optimizing energy management of fuel cell-direct storage-hybrid systems; Optimierendes Energiemanagement von Brennstoffzelle-Direktspeicher-Hybridsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocklisch, Thilo

    2010-03-29

    The dissertation presents a new optimizing energy management concept for fuel cell-direct storage-hybrid systems. Initially, the characteristics of specific energy time series are investigated on the basis of real measurement data. A new concept for the multi-scale analysis, modelling and prediction of fluctuating photovoltaic supply and electric load demand profiles is developed. The second part of the dissertation starts with a discussion of the benefits of and the basic coupling and control principles for fuel cell-direct storage-hybrid systems. The typical characteristics of a PEM-fuel cell, a metal hydride hydrogen storage, a lithium-ion battery and a supercap unit are presented. A new modular DC/DC-converter is described. Results from experimental and theoretical investigations of the individual components and the overall hybrid system are discussed. New practicable models for the voltage-current-curve, the state of charge behaviour and the conversion losses are presented. The third part of the dissertation explains the new energy management concept. The optimization of power flows is achieved by a control-oriented approach, employing a) the primary control of bus voltage and fuel cell current, b) the secondary control to limit fuel cell current gradient and operating range and to perform direct storage charge control, and c) the system control to optimally adjust secondary control parameters aiming for a reduction of dynamic fuel cell stress and hydrogen consumption. Results from simulations and experimental investigations demonstrate the benefits and high capabilities of the new optimizing energy management concept. Examples of stationary and portable applications conclude the dissertation. (orig.)

  16. Activity of platinum/carbon and palladium/carbon catalysts promoted by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Feng, Ligang; Chang, Jinfa; Wickman, Björn; Grönbeck, Henrik; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol is an alternative fuel for direct alcohol fuel cells, in which the electrode materials are commonly based on Pt or Pd. Owing to the excellent promotion effect of Ni2 P that was found in methanol oxidation, we extended the catalyst system of Pt or Pd modified by Ni2 P in direct ethanol fuel cells. The Ni2 P-promoted catalysts were compared to commercial catalysts as well as to reference catalysts promoted with only Ni or only P. Among the studied catalysts, Pt/C and Pd/C modified by Ni2 P (30 wt %) showed both the highest activity and stability. Upon integration into the anode of a homemade direct ethanol fuel cell, the Pt-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst showed a maximum power density of 21 mW cm(-2) , which is approximately two times higher than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The Pd-Ni2 P/C-30 % catalyst exhibited a maximum power density of 90 mW cm(-2) . This is approximately 1.5 times higher than that of a commercial Pd/C catalyst. The discharge stability on both two catalysts was also greatly improved over a 12 h discharge operation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Methyl phosphate formation as a major degradation mode of direct methanol fuel cells with phosphoric acid based electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid and phosphoric acid doped polymer membranes are widely used as electrolytes in hydrogen based fuel cells operating at elevated temperatures. Such electrolytes have been explored for direct oxidation of methanol to further increase the versatility of the systems, however......, with demonstrated lifetimes of only a few days to weeks. In this work the methyl phosphate formation from the acid and methanol is identified and proposed to be a major mechanism for the cell degradation. Proton conductivity and fuel cell durability tests validate the mechanism at high methanol contents....

  18. Motor fuels made by direct liquefaction of coal, peat and biomass. Drivmedel genom direktfoervaetskning av kol, torv och biomassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granath, L; Karlsson, G; Karlsson, G; Nilsson, T

    1981-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Technology at the Royal Institute of Technology has completed a system study concerning direct liquefaction of peat and biomass to produce transportation fuel. A comprehensive survey of coal liquefaction is included. Gasoline produced in Sweden from direct liquefaction of imported coal may compete with regular gasoline at the earliest around 1985. Biomass can become a competitive alternative to black coal at the beginning of the 21st century. Methanol can be produced from wood with a higher efficiency than the transportation fuels which are produced by direct liquefaction. The peat is not good source for liquefaction as wood chips. A continuously working liquefaction plant designed also for peat among other substances is under construction at the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.

  19. A review of low carbon fuel policies: Principles, program status and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Sonia; Witcover, Julie; Lade, Gabriel E.; Sperling, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) is a market-based policy that specifies declining standards for the average lifecycle fuel carbon intensity (AFCI) of transportation fuels sold in a region. This paper: (i) compares transportation fuel carbon policies in terms of their economic efficiency, fuel price impacts, greenhouse gas emission reductions, and incentives for innovation; (ii) discusses key regulatory design features of LCFS policies; and (iii) provides an update on the implementation status of LCFS policies in California, the European Union, British Columbia, and Oregon. The economics literature finds that an intensity standard implicitly taxes emissions and subsidizes output. The output subsidy results in an intensity standard being inferior to a carbon tax in a first-best world, although the inefficiency can be corrected with a properly designed consumption tax (or mitigated by a properly designed carbon tax or cap-and-trade program). In California, from 2011 to 2015 the share of alternative fuels in the regulated transportation fuels pool increased by 30%, and the reported AFCI of all alternative fuels declined 21%. LCFS credit prices have varied considerably, rising to above $100/credit in the first half of 2016. LCFS programs in other jurisdictions share many features with California's, but have distinct provisions as well. - Highlights: • LCFS is a market-based policy that sets standards for carbon intensity of fuels. • We compare efficiency, price impacts, GHG emissions, and innovation of C policies. • In California, reported carbon intensity of alternative fuels declined 21% 2011–2015. • LCFS credit prices have varied considerably, rising to above $100/credit in the first half of 2016. • Other LCFS programs share many features with CA's and have distinct provisions.

  20. Facile synthesis of Ni-decorated multi-layers graphene sheets as effective anode for direct urea fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Yousef

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of urea-containing wastewater is produced as a by-product in the fertilizer industry, requiring costly and complicated treatment strategies. Considering that urea can be exploited as fuel, this wastewater can be treated and simultaneously exploited as a renewable energy source in a direct urea fuel cell. In this study, multi-layers graphene/nickel nanocomposites were prepared by a one-step green method for use as an anode in the direct urea fuel cell. Typically, commercial sugar was mixed with nickel(II acetate tetrahydrate in distilled water and then calcined at 800 °C for 1 h. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were employed to characterize the final product. The results confirmed the formation of multi-layers graphene sheets decorated by nickel nanoparticles. To investigate the influence of metal nanoparticles content, samples were prepared using different amounts of the metal precursor; nickel acetate content was changed from 0 to 5 wt.%. Investigation of the electrochemical characterizations indicated that the sample prepared using the original solution with 3 wt.% nickel acetate had the best current density, 81.65 mA/cm2 in a 0.33 M urea solution (in 1 M KOH at an applied voltage 0.9 V vs Ag/AgCl. In a passive direct urea fuel cell based on the optimal composition, the observed maximum power density was 4.06 × 10−3 mW/cm2 with an open circuit voltage of 0.197 V at room temperature in an actual electric circuit. Overall, this study introduces a cheap and beneficial methodology to prepare effective anode materials for direct urea fuel cells.