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Sample records for diplopoda polydesmida pyrgodesmidae

  1. A replacement name for Dalodesmus  sakalava (de Saussure Zehntner, 1901) (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Dalodesmidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesibov, Robert; Wesener, Thomas; Hollier, John

    2018-04-23

    Polydesmus (Pterodesmus) voeltzkowi nom. nov. is proposed as a replacement name for Polydesmus (Pterodesmus) sakalava de Saussure Zehntner, 1901, now Dalodesmus sakalava (de Saussure Zehntner, 1901), a junior primary homonym of Polydesmus sakalava de Saussure Zehntner, 1897.

  2. The ”endemic” paradoxosomatids (Diplopoda, Polydesmida) of the Fiji Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeekel, C.A.W.

    1972-01-01

    The Paradoxosomatidae of the Fiji Islands are discussed. As a result of the reexamination of the type material the taxonomic position of Orthomorpha lampra Chamberlin and Prionopeltis dasys Chamberlin is cleared. O. lampra is a senior synonym of Gyrodrepanum bimontanum (Carl), P. dasys a junior

  3. A new species of the genus Canacophilus Carl, 1926, from New Caledonia (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Sphaerotrichopodidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeekel, C.A.W.

    1964-01-01

    Canacophilus chordeumopygus nov. spec. New Caledonia, Mt. Mou, 2000 ft. under stones, 8-14 March 1914 (coll. P. D. Montague, New Caledonia Expedition), 1 ♂ (holotype), 2 ♀ ♀. Colour. — Head rather dark brownish gray. Antennae of the same colour, though slightly paler. Body segments similarly

  4. The Australian millipede Dicranogonus pix Jeekel, 1982 (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae): a species with and without paranota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesibov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dicranogonus pix Jeekel, 1982 occurs in Victoria and Tasmania, Australia, including the islands in eastern Bass Strait between the two States. There is only slight gonopod variation across this range, but Dicranogonus pix populations with and without paranota are separated in Bass Strait by the ca 50 km-wide gap between the Kent and Furneaux Groups of islands. PMID:25493065

  5. A new genus and species of native exotic millipede in Australia (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesibov, Robert; Car, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Taxidiotisoma portabile gen. n., sp. n. is described from scattered populations in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, Australia. Populations of Taxidiotisoma portabile in Victoria, Tasmania and parts of New South Wales occur in urban, suburban and agricultural areas, with no collections of the species in natural habitats in the same district. Taxidiotisoma portabile is likely to be a native exotic species whose home range is in eastern New South Wales. PMID:25931961

  6. New species of Asphalidesmus Silvestri, 1910 from Australia (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Dalodesmidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesibov, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Asphalidesmus allynensis sp. n. and Asphalidesmus dorrigensis sp. n. are described from New South Wales, Asphalidesmus otwayensis sp. n. from Victoria, and Asphalidesmus bellendenkerensis sp. n., Asphalidesmus carbinensis sp. n., Asphalidesmus magnus sp. n. and Asphalidesmus minor sp. n. from Queensland. The previously endemic Tasmanian genus Asphalidesmus Silvestri, 1910 is now known from 16°S to 43°S in eastern Australia, a north-south range of ca 3000 km. Asphalidesmus spp. throughout this range are very similar in overall appearance. Three of the new species are able to coil in a tight spiral. PMID:21594078

  7. A new genus and species of native exotic millipede in Australia (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae

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    Robert Mesibov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Taxidiotisoma portabile gen. n., sp. n. is described from scattered populations in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, Australia. Populations of T. portabile in Victoria, Tasmania and parts of New South Wales occur in urban, suburban and agricultural areas, with no collections of the species in natural habitats in the same district. Taxidiotisoma portabile is likely to be a native exotic species whose home range is in eastern New South Wales.

  8. Vertical and time distribution of Diplopoda (Arthropoda: Myriapoda in a monodominant forest in Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil

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    Leandro D. Battirola

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study different sampling techniques for Diplopoda in soil, tree trunks and canopies were applied in an integrated way in the northern region of the Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil. This was done in order to assess the relationship within the fauna in each forest strata, as well as its richness and temporal distribution. In all these habitats there were a total of 1,354 diplopods, distributed in four taxonomic orders, with Polyxenida being predominant over Polydesmida, Spirostreptida and Spirobolida. The largest representation was found on the trunks of the Vochysia divergens (721 ind., intercepted by tree photoecletors, whereas in the canopies sampling reached only 65 specimens. In the edaphic stratum 568 diplopods were captured, most with the use of the Winkler extractor, followed by pitfall traps and soil photoecletors. In spite of being an important group in these environments, both in terms of richness and diversity, this was less than has been observed in other Neotropical areas. However, due to seasonal changes in the Pantanal the existence of a relationship between the soil and the tree fauna was found as well as different survival strategies observed during the flood period. Regarding vertical distribution, the greatest richness and variety of taxonomic groups was found in the forest's edaphic environment demonstrating its association mainly with this forest stratum.

  9. Revision of the Southeast Asian millipede genus Orthomorpha Bollman, 1893, with the proposal of a new genus (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae

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    Natdanai Likhitrakarn

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The large genus Orthomorpha is rediagnosed and is shown to currently comprise 51 identifiable species ranging from northern Myanmar and Thailand in the Northwest to Lombok Island, Indonesia in the Southeast. Of them, 20 species have been revised and/or abundantly illustrated, based on a restudy of mostly type material; further 12 species are described as new: O. atypica sp. n., O. communis sp. n., O. isarankurai sp. n., O. picturata sp. n., O. similanensis sp. n., O. suberecta sp. n., O. tuberculifera sp. n., O. subtuberculifera sp. n. and O. latiterga sp. n., all from Thailand, as well as O. elevata sp. n., O. spiniformis sp. n. and O. subelevata sp. n., from northern Malaysia. The type-species O. beaumontii (Le Guillou, 1841 is redescribed in due detail from male material as well, actually being a senior subjective synonym of O. spinala (Attems, 1932, syn. n. Two additional new synonymies are proposed: O. rotundicollis (Attems, 1937 = O. tuberculata (Attems, 1937, syn. n., and O. butteli Carl, 1922 = O. consocius Chamberlin, 1945, syn. n., the valid names to the left. All species have been keyed and all new and some especially widespread species have been mapped. Further six species, including two revised from type material, are still to be considered dubious, mostly because their paraterga appear to be too narrow to represent Orthomorpha species. A new genus, Orthomorphoides gen. n., diagnosed versus Orthomorpha through only moderately well developed paraterga, coupled with a poorly bi- or trifid gonopod tip, with at least some of its apical prongs being short spines, is erected for two species: O. setosus (Attems, 1937, the type-species, which is also revised from type material, and O. exaratus (Attems, 1953, both comb. n. ex Orthomorpha.

  10. A revision of the Sumatran Paradoxosomatidae (Diplopoda, Polydesmida) in the Museo Civico din Storia Naturale at Genoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeekel, C.A.W.

    1979-01-01

    Redescriptions are given of the Sumatran Paradoxosomatidae described by Silvestri, 1895, and previously referred to the genus Strongylosoma Brandt, 1833. S. inerme Silv. is referred to the genus Dajakina Jeekel, 1963 (Orthomorphini). S. filum Silv. is made the type-species of the new genus

  11. A revision of dragon millipedes I: genus Desmoxytes Chamberlin, 1923, with the description of eight new species (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae

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    Ruttapon Srisonchai

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The dragon millipede genus Desmoxytes s.l. is split into five genera, based on morphological characters and preliminary molecular phylogenetic analyses. The present article includes a review of Desmoxytes s.s., while future articles will deal with Hylomus Cook and Loomis, 1924 and three new genera which preliminarily are referred to as the ‘acantherpestes’, ‘gigas’, and ‘spiny’ groups. Diagnostic morphological characters of each group are discussed. Hylomus is resurrected as a valid genus and the following 33 species are assigned to it: H. asper (Attems, 1937, comb. n., H. cattienensis (Nguyen, Golovatch & Anichkin, 2005, comb. n., H. cervarius (Attems, 1953, comb. n., H. cornutus (Zhang & Li, 1982, comb. n., H. draco Cook & Loomis, 1924, stat. rev., H. enghoffi (Nguyen, Golovatch & Anichkin, 2005, comb. n., H. eupterygotus (Golovatch, Li, Liu & Geoffroy, 2012, comb. n., H. getuhensis (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2014, comb. n., H. grandis (Golovatch, VandenSpiegel & Semenyuk, 2016, comb. n., H. hostilis (Golovatch & Enghoff, 1994, comb. n., H. jeekeli (Golovatch & Enghoff, 1994, comb. n., H. lingulatus (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2014, comb. n., H. laticollis (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2016, comb. n., H. longispinus (Loksa, 1960, comb. n., H. lui (Golovatch, Li, Liu & Geoffroy, 2012, comb. n., H. minutuberculus (Zhang, 1986, comb. n., H. nodulosus (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2014, comb. n., H. parvulus (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2014, comb. n., H. phasmoides (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2016, comb. n., H. pilosus (Attems, 1937, comb. n., H. proximus (Nguyen, Golovatch & Anichkin, 2005, comb. n., H. rhinoceros (Likhitrakarn, Golovatch & Panha, 2015, comb. n., H. rhinoparvus (Likhitrakarn, Golovatch & Panha, 2015, comb. n., H. scolopendroides (Golovatch, Geoffroy & Mauriès, 2010, comb. n., H. scutigeroides (Golovatch, Geoffroy & Mauriès, 2010, comb. n., H. similis (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2016, comb. n., H. simplex (Golovatch, VandenSpiegel & Semenyuk, 2016, comb. n., H. simplipodus (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2016, comb. n., H. specialis (Nguyen, Golovatch & Anichkin, 2005, comb. n., H. spectabilis (Attems, 1937, comb. n., H. spinitergus (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2016, comb. n., H. spinissimus (Golovatch, Li, Liu & Geoffroy, 2012, comb. n. and H. variabilis (Liu, Golovatch & Tian, 2016, comb. n. Desmoxytes s.s. includes the following species: D. breviverpa Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, 2016; D. cervina (Pocock,1895; D. delfae (Jeekel, 1964; D. des Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, 2016; D. pinnasquali Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, 2016; D. planata (Pocock, 1895; D. purpurosea Enghoff, Sutcharit & Panha, 2007; D. takensis Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, 2016; D. taurina (Pocock, 1895; D. terae (Jeekel, 1964, all of which are re-described based mainly on type material. Two new synonyms are proposed: Desmoxytes pterygota Golovatch & Enghoff, 1994, syn. n. (= Desmoxytes cervina (Pocock, 1895, Desmoxytes rubra Golovatch & Enghoff, 1994, syn. n. (= Desmoxytes delfae (Jeekel, 1964. Six new species are described from Thailand: D. aurata Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, sp. n., D. corythosaurus Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, sp. n., D. euros Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, sp. n., D. flabella Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, sp. n., D. golovatchi Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, sp. n., D. octoconigera Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, sp. n., as well as one from Malaysia: D. perakensis Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, sp. n., and one from Myanmar: D. waepyanensis Srisonchai, Enghoff & Panha, sp. n. The species can mostly be easily distinguished by gonopod structure in combination with other external characters; some cases of particularly similar congeners are discussed. All species of Desmoxytes s.s. seem to be endemic to continental Southeast Asia (except the ‘tramp’ species D. planata. Some biological observations (relationship with mites, moulting are recorded for the first time. Complete illustrations of external morphological characters, an identification key, and distribution maps of all species are provided.

  12. The millipede genus Caucasodesmus Golovatch, 1985, with the description of a new species from the Crimea, Ukraine (Polydesmida, Diplopoda, Trichopolydesmidae

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    Sergei Golovatch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The hitherto monotypic genus Caucasodesmus is new to the Ukrainian list due to the discovery of C. tauricus sp. n. in a cave in the Crimea. The new species is easily distinguished from C. inexpectatus Golovatch, 1985, the type, and only other, known species of this genus, in the abundantly setose collum and following metaterga, and more elaborate gonopods. The status of Caucasodesmus, which shows in the superfamily Trichopolydesmoidea where it definitely belongs such evident generic-level apomorphies as the absence of bacilliform sensilla on antennomeres 5 and 7, of a cannula on the gonocoxite, and of a seminal groove on a biramous gononod telopodite (apparently, both latter characters are functionally correlated to each other, is refined by formally reassigning it to the family Trichopolydesmidae.

  13. The millipede genus Caucasodesmus Golovatch, 1985, with the description of a new species from the Crimea, Ukraine (Polydesmida, Diplopoda, Trichopolydesmidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovatch, Sergei I

    2011-04-29

    The hitherto monotypic genus Caucasodesmus is new to the Ukrainian list due to the discovery of Caucasodesmus tauricussp. n. in a cave in the Crimea. The new species is easily distinguished from Caucasodesmus inexpectatus Golovatch, 1985, the type, and only other, known species of this genus, in the abundantly setose collum and following metaterga, and more elaborate gonopods. The status of Caucasodesmus, which shows in the superfamily Trichopolydesmoidea where it definitely belongs such evident generic-level apomorphies as the absence of bacilliform sensilla on antennomeres 5 and 7, of a cannula on the gonocoxite, and of a seminal groove on a biramous gononod telopodite (apparently, both latter characters are functionally correlated to each other), is refined by formally reassigning it to the family Trichopolydesmidae.

  14. The millipede genus Solaenodolichopus Verhoeff, 1924 (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae. 1. New genus diagnosis and redescriptions of named species

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    Robert Mesibov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Solaenodolichopus Verhoeff, 1924 is redefined to include S. pruvoti (Brolemann, 1931, S. rubriventris Verhoeff, 1928, S. sulcatus (Verhoeff, 1928, S. teres (Verhoeff, 1924, S. vittatus (Verhoeff, 1924 and S. walesius Verhoeff, 1928, each of which is redescribed. Lectotypes are designated for S. sulcatus, S. teres, S. vittatus and S. walesius. Parwalesoma Verhoeff, 1937 is synonymised with Solaenodolichopus and S. vittatus dorsalis (Verhoeff, 1924 with S. vittatus vittatus (Verhoeff, 1924.

  15. Four colorful new species of dragon millipedes, genus Desmoxytes Chamberlin, 1923, from northern Thailand (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Paradoxosomatidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srisonchai, Ruttapon; Enghoff, Henrik; Likhitrakarn, Natdanai

    2016-01-01

    Four new dragon millipede species of the genus Desmoxytes from northern Thailand are described and illustrated: D. des sp. n. from Chiang Mai Province, D. breviverpa sp. n. from Phrae Province, D. takensis sp. n. from Tak Province and D. pinnasquali sp. n. from Phitsanulok Province. The new species...

  16. Cyrtodesmus baerti, n. sp., a cryptic millipede from the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Cyrtodesmidae).

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    Shear, William A; Peck, Stewart B

    2018-03-04

    Cyrtodesmus baerti, n. sp., previously reported from the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador, as Cyrtodesmus sp., is described, together with notes on the systematics, natural history and morphology of cyrotdesmid millipedes.

  17. Koponenius gen. nov., a new genus of the millipede family Haplodesmidae from the Himalayas of India and Nepal (Diplopoda: Polydesmida).

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    Golovatch, Sergei I; Vandenspiegel, Didier

    2014-12-11

    The first, apparently westernmost indigenous representatives of Haplodesmidae are reported, from the Himalayas of Nepal and India. Both new species belong to a new genus, Koponenius gen. nov., with K. unicornis sp. nov., the type species from Darjeeling District, NE India, and K. biramus sp. nov., from Nepal. The new genus is superficially very similar to Prosopodesmus Silvestri, 1910, most species of which seem to be native to tropical Australia, partly also to southern Japan. However, Koponenius gen. nov. is easily distinguished in showing only 19 body segments, a special ozopore formula (5, 7-18), 4 transverse rows of setigerous isostictic tubercles per postcollum metatergum, and a clearly helicoid, twisted prefemoral portion of the gonopod so that the seminal groove runs mostly laterally, not mesally. 

  18. Three new species of the millipede genus Tylopus Jeekel, 1968 from Thailand, with additional notes on the species described by Attems (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae

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    Natdanai Likhitrakarn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tylopus currently comprises 55 species, including three new from Thailand: T. corrugatus sp. n., T. trigonum sp. n. and T. parahilaroides sp. n. A new distribution map and an updated key to all 29 species of Tylopus presently known to occur in Thailand are given. Illustrated redescriptions of all four Indochinese Tylopus species described by Carl Attems are also provided, based on type material.

  19. Millipedes (Diplopoda of twelve caves in Western Mecsek, Southwest Hungary

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    Angyal, D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Twelve caves of Western Mecsek, Southwest Hungary were examined between September 2010 and April 2013from the millipede (Diplopoda faunistical point of view. Ten species were found in eight caves, which consistedeutroglophile and troglobiont elements as well. The cave with the most diverse fauna was the Törökpince Sinkhole, while thetwo previously also investigated caves, the Abaligeti Cave and the Mánfai-kőlyuk Cave provided less species, which couldbe related to their advanced touristic and industrial utilization.

  20. Millipedes and centipedes in German greenhouses (Myriapoda: Diplopoda, Chilopoda

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    Peter Decker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A review is given of all the literature records of millipedes and centipedes that have been found in German greenhouses together with additional records for 29 such sites. Species lists are given for 46 greenhouses investigated throughout Germany. Thirty-five diplopod and 18 chilopod species were found to occur in greenhouses, of which 15 (3 Chilopoda, 12 Diplopoda are restricted to this type of habitat. First records for Germany include Anadenobolus monilicornis (Porat, 1876, Epinannolene cf. trinidadensis Chamberlin, 1918, Epinannolene sp., Mesoiulus gridellii Strasser, 1934, Leptogoniulus sorornus (Butler, 1876, Rhinotus purpureus (Pocock, 1894, Cryptops doriae Pocock, 1891, Lamyctes coeculus (Brölemann, 1889 and Tygarrup javanicus (Attems, 1907. The millipedes Oxidus gracilis (C. L. Koch, 1847 and Amphitomeus attemsi (Schubart, 1934 and the centipedes Lithobius forficatus (Linnaeus, 1758 and Cryptops hortensis (Donovan, 1810 are the species most frequently found in greenhouses.

  1. New species of millipedes occurring in the Czech Republic: species discovered in the period 2003-2017

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocourek, P.; Tajovský, Karel; Dolejší, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, December (2017), s. 27-30 ISSN 1861-0366 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Chordeumatida * Diplopoda * distribution * faunistics * Glomerida * Polydesmida * threatened species Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology

  2. Mnohonožky (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) CHKO a BR Křivoklátsko

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocourek, P.; Tajovský, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, - (2011), s. 285-300 ISSN 0231-5807 R&D Projects: GA ČR(IO) GA526/06/1348; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/93/0276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Millipedes * Diplopoda * Křivoklátsko Protected Landscape Area and Biosphere Reserve Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  3. Trophic priorities of millipedes (Diplopoda) in process of rehabilitation of the territories disturbed by mining industry

    OpenAIRE

    Y. L. Kulbachko; О. O. Didur

    2012-01-01

    The food selectivity of millipedes (Diplopoda) was studied in different variants of mine spoils and chernozem fillings applied as topsoil. It was found that the ordinary chernozem fillings determines the formation of food priorities increasingly in comparison with the mine spoil. There are shown statistically significant differences between millipeds food priorities depending on the proposed feed: litter leaves of trees (Acer platanoides, Robinia pseudoacacia, Juniperus virginiana) used in fo...

  4. Trophic priorities of millipedes (Diplopoda in process of rehabilitation of the territories disturbed by mining industry

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    Y. L. Kulbachko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The food selectivity of millipedes (Diplopoda was studied in different variants of mine spoils and chernozem fillings applied as topsoil. It was found that the ordinary chernozem fillings determines the formation of food priorities increasingly in comparison with the mine spoil. There are shown statistically significant differences between millipeds food priorities depending on the proposed feed: litter leaves of trees (Acer platanoides, Robinia pseudoacacia, Juniperus virginiana used in forest revegetation of mining lands.

  5. Invertebrate fauna (Coleoptera, Collembola, Diplopoda, Isopoda collected in the karst areas of the Aninei - Locvei Mountains

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    Andrei Giurginca

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors identified 132 species of invertebrates (14 Oniscidea, 25 Diplopoda,31 Collembola and 62 Coleoptera recently sampled (2001–2006 from the soil and subterranean (MSS and caves environments from the Banat Mountains. Some new,rare and endemic species are discussed. The seasonal changes of the species diversity in the superficial subterranean environments at 0.5 to 1 m in depth are for the first time presented for the Reşiţa – Moldova Nouă synclinorium. The characteristic and preferential species for the mesovoid shallow substratum (MSS, belonging to the analyzed taxa, are identified.

  6. An annotated checklist of the Chilopoda and Diplopoda (Myriapoda) of the Abrau Peninsula, northwestern Caucasus, Russia

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    Semenyuk, Irina I.; Tuf, Ivan H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The Abrau Peninsula is located in northwestern Caucasus between the cities of Novorossiysk and Anapa, Krasnodar Province, Russia. This paper contains an annotated checklist of the Chilopoda and Diplopoda inhabiting the Abrau Peninsula. New information The fauna of the Abrau Peninsula comprises 17 centipede (4 orders) and 16 millipede (6 orders) species. Henia taurica, hitherto known only from the Crimea, has now been reported from several localities in the studied region. The study also reveals two possibly new millipede species. Statistical analyses showed that habitat preferences of myriapod species within the Abrau Peninsula are caused by species geographic distribution pattern and microbiotope preferences. PMID:27346949

  7. The millipede family Paradoxosomatidae in the Philippines, with a description of Eustrongylosoma penevi sp.n., and notes on Anoplodesmus anthracinus Pocock, 1895, recorded in Malaysia and Sri Lanka for the first time (Diplopoda, Polydesmida

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    Sergei Golovatch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Philippine fauna of the family Paradoxosomatidae is reviewed and shown to comprise only 12 certain species (+ one dubious, definitely only a fraction of the real diversity to be expected from such a large tropical archipelago. Two new combinations are proposed: Euphyodesmus philippina (Nguyen Duc & Sierwald, 2010, comb. n. ex Desmoxytes Chamberlin, 1923, and Luzonomorpha polilloensis (San Juan & Lit, 2010, comb. n. ex Prionopeltis Pocock, 1895. The first representative of the large, basically Papuan genus Eustrongylosoma Silvestri, 1896 is described from Luzon, Philippines: E. penevi sp. n. It differs from the other congeners in certain details of gonopod structure, as well as by the particularly long legs. Based on a restudy of the types of Strongylosoma luzoniense Peters, 1864, from Luzon, the species is shown to be a new senior subjective synonym of Helicorthomorpha orthogona (Silvestri, 1898, syn. n. This formally results also in Helicorthomorpha luzoniensis (Peters, 1864, comb. n. Anoplodesmus anthracinus Pocock, 1895 is illustrated and briefly redescribed, based on material from State Pulau Penang, Malaysia, which represents the first formal record of the species in that country. This species is also new to the fauna of Sri Lanka. A review of the Anoplodesmus species reported from Sri Lanka, nearly all of them dubious, is presented.

  8. The millipede family Paradoxosomatidae in the Philippines, with a description of Eustrongylosomapenevi sp.n., and notes on Anoplodesmusanthracinus Pocock, 1895, recorded in Malaysia and Sri Lanka for the first time (Diplopoda, Polydesmida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovatch, Sergei; Stoev, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The Philippine fauna of the family Paradoxosomatidae is reviewed and shown to comprise only 12 certain species (+ one dubious), definitely only a fraction of the real diversity to be expected from such a large tropical archipelago. Two new combinations are proposed: Euphyodesmusphilippina (Nguyen Duc & Sierwald, 2010), comb. n. ex Desmoxytes Chamberlin, 1923, and Luzonomorphapolilloensis (San Juan & Lit, 2010), comb. n. ex Prionopeltis Pocock, 1895. The first representative of the large, basically Papuan genus Eustrongylosoma Silvestri, 1896 is described from Luzon, Philippines: Eustrongylosomapenevi sp. n. It differs from the other congeners in certain details of gonopod structure, as well as by the particularly long legs. Based on a restudy of the types of Strongylosomaluzoniense Peters, 1864, from Luzon, the species is shown to be a new senior subjective synonym of Helicorthomorphaorthogona (Silvestri, 1898), syn. n. This formally results also in Helicorthomorphaluzoniensis (Peters, 1864), comb. n. Anoplodesmusanthracinus Pocock, 1895 is illustrated and briefly redescribed, based on material from State Pulau Penang, Malaysia, which represents the first formal record of the species in that country. This species is also new to the fauna of Sri Lanka. A review of the Anoplodesmus species reported from Sri Lanka, nearly all of them dubious, is presented.

  9. Diplopoda: Spirostreptidae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1992-10-12

    Oct 12, 1992 ... spirostreptid millipede collected from five separate localities in Zimbabwe. Mating behaviour and ... body size correlates with competitive ability and males compete for ... Species and generic names used in the present study are after Auems ..... duration in populations showing a mating advantage to large.

  10. A checklist of the millipedes (Diplopoda) of Myanmar, with an updated list of Leonardo Fea's collecting localities.

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    Likhitrakarn, Natdanai; Jirapatrasilp, Parin; Golovatch, Sergei I; Panha, Somsak

    2017-11-16

    At present, the millipede fauna of Myanmar comprises 92 species from 34 genera, 13 families and 8 orders, mostly described in 1889-1896. All literature records are cited with updates on species identities, as well as numerous taxonomic problems which make the number of species and even genera still imprecise. The Myanmar millipede fauna contains 70 endemic and five widespread synanthropic species. One species is found to have erroneously been recorded from Myanmar, and is ejected from the list of Myanmar millipedes also because of its uncertain taxonomic status. A complete bibliography on the millipedes of Myanmar, an updated list of the collecting localities and a map of the journeys of Leonardo Fea, the principal collector of Diplopoda in Burma, are also presented.

  11. Fine structure of the midgut epithelium in the millipede Telodeinopus aoutii (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) with special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M; Marchewka, A; Poprawa, I

    2018-01-01

    The midgut of millipedes is composed of a simple epithelium that rests on a basal lamina, which is surrounded by visceral muscles and hepatic cells. As the material for our studies, we chose Telodeinopus aoutii (Demange, 1971) (Kenyan millipede) (Diplopoda, Spirostreptida), which lives in the rain forests of Central Africa. This commonly reared species is easy to obtain from local breeders and easy to culture in the laboratory. During our studies, we used transmission and scanning electron microscopes and light and fluorescent microscopes. The midgut epithelium of the species examined here shares similarities to the structure of the millipedes analyzed to date. The midgut epithelium is composed of three types of cells-digestive, secretory, and regenerative cells. Evidence of three types of secretion have been observed in the midgut epithelium: merocrine, apocrine, and microapocrine secretion. The regenerative cells of the midgut epithelium in millipedes fulfill the role of midgut stem cells because of their main functions: self-renewal (the ability to divide mitotically and to maintain in an undifferentiated state) and potency (ability to differentiate into digestive cells). We also confirmed that spot desmosomes are common intercellular junctions between the regenerative and digestive cells in millipedes.

  12. Two flat-backed polydesmidan millipedes from the Miocene Chiapas-amber Lagerstätte, Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Riquelme

    Full Text Available Two species of fossil polydesmidan millipedes (Diplopoda: Polydesmida embedded in amber are described from Miocene strata near Simojovel, in the Chiapas Highlands, Mexico. Maatidesmus paachtun gen. et sp. nov., placed into Chelodesmidae Cook, 1895, and Anbarrhacus adamantis gen. et sp. nov., assigned in the family Platyrhacidae Pocock, 1895. Morphological data from fossil specimens have been recovered using 3D X-ray micro-computed tomography and regular to infrared-reflected microscopy. Both fossil species are recognizable as new primarily but not exclusively, by collum margin modification and remarkable paranotal and metatergite dorsal sculpture.

  13. Two Flat-Backed Polydesmidan Millipedes from the Miocene Chiapas-Amber Lagerstätte, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Francisco; Hernández-Patricio, Miguel; Martínez-Dávalos, Arnulfo; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Montejo-Cruz, Maira; Alvarado-Ortega, Jesús; Ruvalcaba-Sil, José L.; Zúñiga-Mijangos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Two species of fossil polydesmidan millipedes (Diplopoda: Polydesmida) embedded in amber are described from Miocene strata near Simojovel, in the Chiapas Highlands, Mexico. Maatidesmus paachtun gen. et sp. nov., placed into Chelodesmidae Cook, 1895, and Anbarrhacus adamantis gen. et sp. nov., assigned in the family Platyrhacidae Pocock, 1895. Morphological data from fossil specimens have been recovered using 3D X-ray micro-computed tomography and regular to infrared-reflected microscopy. Both fossil species are recognizable as new primarily but not exclusively, by collum margin modification and remarkable paranotal and metatergite dorsal sculpture. PMID:25162220

  14. Millipedes of Cyprus (Myriapoda: Diplopoda)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagalinski, Boyan; Golovatch, Sergei; Simaiakis, Stylianos Michail

    2014-01-01

    , but are not formally described, and the status of another three is yet to be clarified. Pachyiulus cyprius Brölemann, 1896 and Strongylosoma (Tetrarthrosoma) cyprium Verhoeff, 1902 are established as junior subjective synonyms of Amblyiulus barroisi (Porat, 1893) and T. syriacum (Humbert & DeSaussure, 1869...

  15. Millipedes (Diplopoda) in birds' nests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tajovský, Karel; Mock, A.; Krumpál, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 37, - (2001), s. 321-323 ISSN 1164-5563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : bird s nest s * microsites * millipedes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.317, year: 2001

  16. Sampling strategies for millipedes (Diplopoda), centipedes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At present considerable effort is being made to document and describe invertebrate diversity as part of numerous biodiversity conservation research projects. In order to determine diversity, rapid and effective sampling and estimation procedures are required and these need to be standardized for a particular group of ...

  17. Millipedes (Diplopoda) from caves of Portugal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia; Enghoff, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    in caves of the mainland and the island of Madeira has provided new data about the distribution and diversity of millipedes. A review of millipedes from caves of Portugal is presented, listing fourteen species belonging to eight families, among which six species are considered troglobionts...

  18. CHECKLIST OF THE MILLIPEDES (DIPLOPODA) OF TANZANIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, these many-legged animals are not insects (which have three .... Simon Stuart, who was carrying out studies on birds, contributed many specimens ... Diversity Project of November 1994 provided a series of millipede specimens. ... Tanzania records: Morogoro Region, Morogoro Rural Distr., Uluguru Mts, Lupanga.

  19. A new genus of Odontopygid Millipeds from Tanzania (Diplopoda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The new generic taxon Calyptomastix is proposed to accommodate the type species Odontopyge kakandae Kraus, 1958, and, tentatively, Odontopyge dorsalis Carl, 1909, Haplothysanus leviceps Attems, 1909, and Spirostreptus pardalis Gerstäcker, 1873, all from Tanzania. This genus is defined by the broad basal ...

  20. “Open access” growth histories in millipedes (Diplopoda)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik; Jensen, L. M.; Mikhaljova, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    A unique pattern of missing defence glands on certain body rings is described for two species of the millipede family Mongoliulidae, order Julida: Ussuriiulus pilifer Golovatch, 1980, and Koiulus interruptus Enghoff et al., 2017. Based on the patterns of missing glands observed in recently collec...

  1. The ultrastructure of the midgut epithelium in millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosinka, A.; Rost-Roszkowska, M.M.; Vilímová, J.; Tajovský, Karel; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M.; Chajec, Ł.; Sonakowska, L.; Kamińska, K.; Hyra, M.; Poprawa, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2014), s. 477-492 ISSN 1467-8039 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : digestive cells * midgut epithelium * millipedes * regenerative cells * secretory cells * ultrastructure Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.650, year: 2014

  2. A revision and phylogenetic analysis of the millipede genus Oxidus Cook, 1911 (Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh D. Nguyen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Oxidus Cook, 1911 is revised to contain five species, O. avia (Verhoeff, 1937, O. gigas (Attems, 1953, O. gracilis (C.L. Koch, 1847, O. riukiaria (Verhoeff, 1940, and “species inquirenda” O. obtusus (Takakuwa, 1942. A cosmopolitan species, O. gracilis, is widely found in temperate and sub-tropical regions over the world, but other species have limited distribution in restricted regions, e.g., O. gigas in northern Vietnam, O. riukiaria and O. avia in the Ryukyu Islands (Japan. Four species, O. gracilis, O. riukiaria, O. avia and O. gigas, are confirmed as different from each other in gonopod characters, coloration and body size. The status of the last species, O. obtusus, is still doubtful and requires examination of further fresh material. The phylogenetic relationships among species of Oxidus is analyzed using two fragments of the mitochondrial genes COI (Cytochrome c Oxidase subunit I and 16S rRNA. Three species of Oxidus are clearly separated from each other; O. gigas and O. gracilis form a monophyletic sister group with O. riukiaria. The genus Oxidus is also monophyletic and more closely related to the genus Tylopus Jeekel, 1968 than to the genera Sellanucheza Enghoff, Golovatch & Nguyen, 2004 or Kronopolites Attems, 1914. In addition, an identification key to species of Oxidus is provided.

  3. Developmental patterns in two populations of the millipede Archispirostreptus syriacus (De Saussure) in Israel (Diplopoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercovitz, Klara; Warburg, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison between two populations of the spirostreptid millipede Archispirostreptus syriacus reveals that there are no significant differences in the pattern of development between the xeric population (in Brosh) and the mesic one (in Megiddo). However, there is a difference in the duration of

  4. COLD HARDINESS AND RANGE OF THE MYRIAPOD Angarozonium amurense (POLYZONIIDAE, DIPLOPODA, ARTHROPODA) IN PERMAFROST ENVIRONMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, D I; Meshcheryakova, E N; Mikhaljova, E V

    2015-01-01

    Angarozonium amurense (Gerstfeldt, 1859) is the only one out of more than a hundred diplopod species described in Siberia and the Far East that inhabits regions with solid permafrost. To evaluate the cold hardiness of A. amurense that allows this species to inhabit permafrost regions. The survival temperature thresholds and supercooling points (SCP) were measured. The temperature thresholds for adult animal survival are -8.5 C in summer and -27 C in winter. Average SCP decreases from -7.7 in summer to -16.9 in winter. Water content decreases from 55.7% in summer to 49.4% in winter. The cold hardiness of A. amurense sets the record in this class of animals. It allows it to overwinter in the upper 15 centimeters layer of soil in most biotopes of the coldest permafrost regions in North Asia.

  5. Methane Production and Methanogenic Archaea in the Digestive Tracts of Millipedes (Diplopoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens’ diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE). The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia. PMID:25028969

  6. New records of Lophoproctuscoecus Pocock, 1894 (Diplopoda, Polyxenida, Lophoproctidae) extend the range of the genus Lophoproctus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The geographic distribution of the genus Lophoproctus Pocock, 1894 has greatly expanded with new records of the species Lophoproctuscoecus Pocock, 1894, together with the reassignment of a number of millipedes formerly identified as Lophoproctuslucidus (Chalande, 1888). Lophoproctuscoecus was found to be the sole representative of the family Lophoproctidae in collections examined from Crimea and the Caucasian region. The species was also identified from Iran and Kyrgyzstan. Lophoproctus specimens collected in Italy by Verhoeff were reassigned as Lophoproctuscoecus with the exception of one specimen of Lophoproctusjeanneli (Brölemann, 1910) from Capri. These data were combined with all available information from the literature to look at the pattern of distribution of the four species in the genus. The range of the genus Lophoproctus extends from Portugal to Central Asia. Lophoproctuscoecus is widespread from Italy eastward, while the morphologically very similar species Lophoproctuslucidus is confined to France and northern Africa. The two species have a narrow overlap in the Alpes Maritimes region of France. Lophoproctusjeanneli has a scattered coastal distribution around the Mediterranean Sea. The troglobitic species Lophoproctuspagesi (Condé, 1982) has only been recorded from a cave on Majorca, Spain.

  7. Thelastoma gueyei sp. n. (Nematoda: Thelastomatidae) from the Senegal diplopod Archispirostreptus tumuliporus (Diplopoda: Spirostreptidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koubková, B.; Baruš, Vlastimil; Matějusová, I.; Hodová, I.; Koubek, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2006), s. 739-747 ISSN 1388-5545 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6093403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : DNA barcoding * Senegal * long-tailed thelastomatids Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.722, year: 2006

  8. Sex ratios, mating frequencies and relative abundance of sympatric millipedes in the genus Chersastus (Diplopoda: Pachybolidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ian Cooper

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Three hypotheses exist for explaining climbing behavior in millipedes: 1 waterlogging, 2 detritus limiting, and 3 mate avoidance. Data of sex ratios, mating frequency and relative abundance are provided to suggest an alternative explanation for the pattern in sympatric forest millipedes. Sex ratio differences - from equality - were tested using a G-test comparing millipedes on and above ground. Mating frequencies were calculated based on the percentage of paired individuals. Relative abundance may correlate with male-biases in the sex ratios. All three factors suggest Chersastus inscriptus has a higher reproductive potential than C. anulatus. This is evidence for mating hotspots.

  9. Seasonal population dynamics of Brachyiulus jawlowskii (Diplopoda, Julidae in the Dnieper river arena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Gudym

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We have researched the population dynamics of Brachyiulus jawlowskii Lohmander, 1928 in the arena of the Dnepr river (within the "Dnieper-Orilsky” Nature Reserve and also present a full picture of the habitat distribution of Julidae within the researched area. The tested models were basic types of arena biogeocenosis: sand steppe, black maple forests, artificial pine plantations, deciduous forest, meadow and swamp. Variation in population density of B. jawlowskii is determined by biotopical features. The swamp and meadow habitats can be characterized by the highest level of population dynamics. B. jawlowskii plays the greatest role in the herpetobiont grouping in swamp and oak forest habitats (6.7% and 4.6% respectively. In other types of habitat this species composes 0.1–3.5% of the total abundance of this group. The highest abundance dynamic was reached by the Julidae cenopopulations which inhabit the swamp, oak forest and meadow habitats. B. jawlowskii occupies a relatively significant share in the herpetobiont communities of these habitats. Thus, the indicators of absolute number of this species and its relative participation in the herpertobiont grouping indicate the preference of this species for marsh, oak forest and meadow habitats. These habitats can be characterized by an excessive or moderate level of edaphotopic humidification. The ecosystem of the steppe zone of Ukraine is subject to significant human impact. In nature reserves, this effect is minimized, which permits research to be conducted on regimes of natural population dynamics. We established that B. jawlowskii inhabits all habitats investigated within the arena zone of the Dnepr river. This indicates that this is an environmentally flexible Julidae species. The population dynamics of B. jawlowskii can be characterized by three distinct periods: spring-summer, summer and autumn. Each of these periods is characterized by a distinct population dynamic, but throughout the study period the metapopulation of B. jawlowskii remained stable. This is due to the redistribution of representatives of the biotopical metapopulation over a wide range. The conservation regime within the "Dnieper-Orilsky" Nature Reserve had a positively effect on the state of the B. jawlowskii population. Within the reserve on the territory of the arena of the Dnepr river B. jawlowskii uses a wide variety of types of habitats.

  10. Insular species swarm goes underground: two new troglobiont Cylindroiulus millipedes from Madeira (Diplopoda: Julidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboleira, Ana Sofia P S; Enghoff, Henrik

    2014-04-04

    Two new species of the genus Cylindroiulus Verhoeff, 1894, C. julesvernei and C. oromii, are described from the subterranean ecosystem of Madeira Island, Portugal. Species are illustrated with photographs and diagrammatic drawings. The new species belong to the Cylindroiulus madeirae-group, an insular species swarm distributed in the archipelagos of Madeira and the Canary Islands. We discuss the differences between the new species and their relatives and present information on the subterranean environment of Madeira. An updated overview of the subterranean biodiversity of millipedes in Macaronesia is also provided.

  11. The origins of the giant pill-millipedes from Madagascar (Diplopoda: Sphaerotheriida: Arthrosphaeridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesener, Thomas; Raupach, Michael J; Sierwald, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Giant pill-millipedes (order Sphaerotheriida) are large-bodied millipedes without poison glands which can roll-up into a complete ball. Their disconnected area of distribution spanning South Africa, Madagascar, India, SE Asia, Australia and New Zealand makes them interesting model organisms for biogeographic studies. The here presented phylogeny is based on a molecular dataset covering all areas of distribution with a special focus on Madagascar, where some species of giant pill-millipedes show island gigantism, reaching the size of a baseball. For our study, two mitochondrial genes (partial 16S rRNA and COI) as well as the complete nuclear 18S rDNA were sequenced. While many recent vertebrate studies hint that the ancestors of the recent Malagasy fauna crossed the >350 km wide Mozambique Channel several times, no such crossing was discovered in the Sphaerotheriida. For the first time in a molecular phylogenetic study of soil arthropods, a Madagascar-India group, the family Arthrosphaeridae, is recovered, hinting to a Gondwanan origin of the Sphaerotheriida. The Malagasy-Indian family Arthrosphaeridae forms a monophyletic, statistically well-supported group in all obtained trees. The giant pill-millipedes from Madagascar are paraphyletic because the Malagasy genus Sphaeromimus is the sister-taxon of the Indian Arthrosphaera. In Sphaeromimus, an ecotone shift occurred only once: the spiny forest species Sphaeromimus musicus forms the sister-clade to the species collected in rainforests and littoral rainforests. The two species of the Malagasy genus Zoosphaerium which express island gigantism form a monophyletic group in some trees, but these trees lack good statistical support. Deeper nodes inside the Sphaerotheriida, like the position of the Australian genera Procyliosoma and Epicyliosoma, the Southeast Asian family Zephroniidae and the South African genus Sphaerotherium could not be resolved. This study is the first genetic study inside the order Sphaerotheriida and provides a proper basis for future molecular biogeographic studies in millipedes and soil organisms from Madagascar. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 7 (2014), e102659 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/1570 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : methane production * methanogenic Archaea * digestive tracts of millipedes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  13. Chemical Ecology of Cave-Dwelling Millipedes: Defensive Secretions of the Typhloiulini (Diplopoda, Julida, Julidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Slobodan E; Bodner, Michaela; Reineke, Doris; Vujisić, Ljubodrag V; Todosijević, Marina M; Antić, Dragan Ž; Vagalinski, Boyan; Lučić, Luka R; Mitić, Bojan M; Mitov, Plamen; Anđelković, Boban D; Lucić, Sofija Pavković; Vajs, Vlatka; Tomić, Vladimir T; Raspotnig, Günther

    2017-04-01

    Cave animals live under highly constant ecological conditions and in permanent darkness, and many evolutionary adaptations of cave-dwellers have been triggered by their specific environment. A similar "cave effect" leading to pronounced chemical interactions under such conditions may be assumed, but the chemoecology of troglobionts is mostly unknown. We investigated the defensive chemistry of a largely cave-dwelling julid group, the controversial tribe "Typhloiulini", and we included some cave-dwelling and some endogean representatives. While chemical defense in juliform diplopods is known to be highly uniform, and mainly based on methyl- and methoxy-substituted benzoquinones, the defensive secretions of typhloiulines contained ethyl-benzoquinones and related compounds. Interestingly, ethyl-benzoquinones were found in some, but not all cave-dwelling typhloiulines, and some non-cave dwellers also contained these compounds. On the other hand, ethyl-benzoquinones were not detected in troglobiont nor in endogean typhloiuline outgroups. In order to explain the taxonomic pattern of ethyl-benzoquinone occurrence, and to unravel whether a cave-effect triggered ethyl-benzoquinone evolution, we classed the "Typhloiulini" investigated here within a phylogenetic framework of julid taxa, and traced the evolutionary history of ethyl-benzoquinones in typhloiulines in relation to cave-dwelling. The results indicated a cave-independent evolution of ethyl-substituted benzoquinones, indicating the absence of a "cave effect" on the secretions of troglobiont Typhloiulini. Ethyl-benzoquinones probably evolved early in an epi- or endogean ancestor of a clade including several, but not all Typhloiulus (basically comprising a taxonomic entity known as "Typhloiulus sensu stricto") and Serboiulus. Ethyl-benzoquinones are proposed as novel and valuable chemical characters for julid systematics.

  14. Трофические предпочтения двупарноногих многоножек (Diplopoda) при восстановлении территорий, нарушенных горнодобывающей промышленностью

    OpenAIRE

    Кульбачко, Ю.; Дидур, О.

    2012-01-01

    Изучалась пищевая избирательность представителей кивсяков (Diplopoda) на различных вариантах шахтной породы и насыпке гумусированного слоя чернозема обыкновенного, используемого в качестве почво-грунта. Насыпка гумусированного слоя чернозема обыкновенного в большей степени обуславливает формирование пищевых предпочтений по сравнению с шахтной породой. Существуют статистически достоверные отличия в питании кивсяков, зависящем от предлагаемого животным корма – листового опада древесных пород (к...

  15. Hungarosoma bokori Verhoeff, 1928 (Diplopoda: Chordeumatida): new insights into its taxonomy, systematics, molecular genetics, biogeography and ecology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mock, A.; Tajovský, Karel; Žurovcová, Martina; Jarošová, Andrea; Kocourek, P.; Gruber, J.; Angyal, D.; Spelda, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4178, č. 2 (2016), s. 234-256 ISSN 1175-5326 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hungarosomatidae * redescription * gonopods * distribution * cytochrome oxidase 1 gene * DNA barcoding Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.972, year: 2016

  16. Occurrence and assemblage composition of millipedes (Myriapoda, Diplopoda) and terrestrial isopods (Crustacea, Isopoda, Oniscidea) in urban areas of Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilisics, Ferenc; Bogyó, Dávid; Sattler, Thomas; Moretti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial isopods and millipedes, members of the invertebrate macro-decomposer guild, were collected through pitfall traps in three Swiss cities (Zurich, Lucerne, Lugano). A total of 7,198 individuals of 17 isopod species (7093 ind.), and 10 millipede species (105 ind.) were captured. Besides the Alpine endemic isopod (Trichoniscus alemannicus) and millipede (Cylindroiulus verhoeffi), urban assemblages were mainly composed of widespread, native European and even cosmopolitan species, which are frequent in anthropogenic areas. Overall species richness (isopods and millipedes combined) was similar in Zurich (17 species) and Lucerne (16), while only 13 species were sampled in Lugano. According to the Sørensen index of similarity, species composition of Zurich and Lucerne were more alike, while the one of Lugano was more distinct from the other two cities. This result can be explained by the spatial proximity of Zurich and Lucerne in the north of the Alps compared to Lugano, which is located more distantly and in the south of the Alps. Dominant isopods and millipedes in Zurich and Lucerne were found to be widespread synanthropic species in temperate Europe(Porcellio scaber, Trachelipus rathkii and Ophyiulus pilosus) while the dominant isopod in Lugano (Trachelipus razzautii) is a species with a north-eastern Mediterranean distribution. Our study reveals that the urban millipede and isopod fauna in Swiss cities mainly consists of widespread species, but species of narrower distribution (e.g. Trichoniscus alemannicus, Cylindroiulus verhoeffi) may also find suitable habitats in cities. Despite some signs of biotic homogenization, our study also found compositional differences of millipede and isopod assemblages between northern and southern cities that suggest geographical effects of the regional species pool.

  17. New records of Lophoproctus coecus Pocock, 1894 (Diplopoda, Polyxenida, Lophoproctidae extend the range of the genus Lophoproctus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Short

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The geographic distribution of the genus Lophoproctus Pocock, 1894 has greatly expanded with new records of the species Lophoproctus coecus Pocock, 1894, together with the reassignment of a number of millipedes formerly identified as Lophoproctus lucidus (Chalande, 1888. L. coecus was found to be the sole representative of the family Lophoproctidae in collections examined from Crimea and the Caucasian region. The species was also identified from Iran and Kyrgyzstan. Lophoproctus specimens collected in Italy by Verhoeff were reassigned as L. coecus with the exception of one specimen of L. jeanneli (Brölemann, 1910 from Capri. These data were combined with all available information from the literature to look at the pattern of distribution of the four species in the genus. The range of the genus Lophoproctus extends from Portugal to Central Asia. Lophoproctus coecus is widespread from Italy eastward, while the morphologically very similar species L. lucidus is confined to France and northern Africa. The two species have a narrow overlap in the Alpes Maritimes region of France. L. jeanneli has a scattered coastal distribution around the Mediterranean Sea. The troglobitic species L. pagesi (Condé, 1982 has only been recorded from a cave on Majorca, Spain.

  18. Seasonal activity of Leptoiulus trilineatus (C.L. Koch, 1847) and Megaphyllum trassylvanicum (Verhoeff, 1897) (Diplopoda: Julida: Julidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachvarova, Darina; Doichinov, Aleksandar; Abdulova, Rayme

    2018-03-01

    The article presents the results of a study of the soil surface seasonal activity of two species of julidae, widely spread in the Balkan Peninsula: Leptoiulus trilineatus (C.L. Koch, 1847) and Megaphyllum trassylvanicum (Verhoeff, 1897). The material was collected by means of pitfall traps between May 2007 and May 2009 in natural and urban habitats exposed to varying degrees of anthropogenic pressure. In the study period 1474 specimens of L. trilineatus and 618 specimens of M. transsylvanicum were collected. The impact of the soil and air temperature and humidity on the seasonal activity of both species was measured through statistical analysis. The statistical data processing was conducted using SPSS 9.0 and StatPlus 3.5.3 software packages. L. trilineatus and M. trassylvanicum are polytopic, mesophilic and mesotermic species with year-round activity in the studied area. There is no statistically significant correlation between the degree of anthropogenic impact and the activity of the two species. Leptoiulus trilineatus shows equal preference for both urban and natural habitats in the studied area. The species demonstrates the typical of all millipedes bimodal activity, which is the highest in spring and the beginning of winter - in the periods from March to May and from November to December. The coefficients of correlation dependence of L. trilineatus activity on the tested abiotic environmental factors are not statistically significant. The Pearson-Brave coefficient which measures the effect of soil humidity on species activity is 0.417, which shows a positive correlation. M. trassylvanicum has the highest frequency in urban biotops such as parks in the urban and suburban areas of Shumen and in the coniferous habitats on the Shumen Plateau. In this area the species demonstrates its highest activity in spring and summer (from February to July). The abiotic factors with statistically significant effect on the soil surface activity of M. trassylvanicum are the soil and air temperature - the values of the Pearson-Brave correlation coefficients are 0.708 and 0.586 respectively.

  19. The aberrant millipede genus Pteridoiulus and its position in a revised molecular phylogeny of the family Julidae (Diplopoda : Julida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole

    2013-01-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of 62 species (32 genera) of the Palaearctic millipede family Julidae, including the aberrant alpine genus Pteridoiulus Verhoeff, 1913, was made based on partial sequences of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA (16S) gene and the nuclear 28SrRNA(28S) gene, respectively. The two......MAFTTand run inTNT both with gaps treated as a fifth state, and as missing, and finally the alignments were used as input in a maximum likelihood (ML) analysis. The order Julida and the family Julidae were recovered as monophyletic under all weight sets in POY, as well as in the TNT andMLanalyses. Likewise...

  20. Revision of the genus Ommatoiulus Latzel, 1884 (Julida, Diplopoda in Portugal, with description of six new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrine Akkari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a revision of the genus Ommatoiulus Latzel, 1884 in Portugal. Based on recently collected material and older museum samples, including type specimens, we describe six new species to science, viz. Ommatoiulus alacygni sp. nov., O. camurus sp. nov., O. denticulatus sp. nov., O. litoralis sp. nov., O. staglae sp. nov. and O. stellaris sp. nov. The species O. alacygni sp. nov., O. denticulatus sp. nov. and O. staglae sp. nov. described from the Algarve are outstanding by their extremely reduced mesomerital process. The species O. porathi (Verhoeff, 1893 and O. andalusius (Attems, 1927 are recorded and redescribed for the first time after their original description. The finding of O. andalusius – originally described from Andalusia in Spain – constitutes a new record for Portugal together with two species, viz. O. fuentei (Brolemann, 1920 and O. martensi Mauriès, 1969. The taxonomic status of several species is revised. Thus Archiulus (Schistocoxitus cingulatus Attems, 1927 is here considered as a junior synonym of Ommatoiulus lusitanus (Verhoeff, 1895 while Schizophyllum cervinum Verhoeff, 1910 is synonymized with Ommatoiulus moreleti (Lucas, 1860. An identification key to all hitherto known Portuguese species of Ommatoiulus is presented as well as a distribution map illustrating the various species occurrences in the country.

  1. Stadial distributions of Ommatoiulus Moreleti at different altitudes in Madeira with reference to life history phenomena (Diplopoda; Julidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Read, Helen J.

    1985-01-01

    Ommatoiulus moreleti is a julid millipede native of Spain and Portugal. It has been introduced into Australia, where it has become a considerable pest, and also into Madeira, where it is now reported to be the commonest species of millipede. In April and August 1981 an expediton from the University

  2. Integrative description of two new species of Malagasy chirping giant pill-millipedes, genus Sphaeromimus (Diplopoda: Sphaerotheriida: Arthrosphaeridae

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    Leif Moritz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The species-rich giant pill-millipedes (Sphaerotheriida often represent a microendemic component of Madagascar’s mega-invertebrate fauna. Of the chirping genus Sphaeromimus de Saussure & Zehntner, 1902, ten species have been described. Here, we describe two new species of Sphaeromimus integratively, combining light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, DNA barcoding and micro-CT technology for the first time in a taxonomic description of a giant pill-millipede. S. kalambatritra sp. nov. and S. midongy sp. nov. are the first giant pill-millipedes collected and described from the mountainous rainforests of Kalambatritra and Midongy. Both species show island gigantism compared to their congeners. Our analysis of the mitochondrial COI gene shows that the two species are related to one another with a moderate genetic distance (9.4%, while they are more closely related to an undetermined specimen from the forest of Vevembe (6.3% and 8.4%. They stand in a basal position with S. ivohibe Wesener, 2014 and S. musicus (de Saussure & Zehntner, 1897. The four aforementioned species share a high number of stridulation ribs on the male harp. Our micro-CT analysis provides a look into the head of S. kalambatritra sp. nov. and shows that non-destructive CT methods are a useful tool for studying the inner morphology of giant pill-millipedes.

  3. Colonization of colliery spoil heaps by millipedes (Diplopoda) and terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea) in the Sokolov region, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tajovský, Karel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2001), s. 365-369 ISSN 1061-2971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : colliery spoil heaps * succession * rekultivation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.011, year: 2001

  4. The giant African millipede, .i.Archispirostreptus gigas./i. (Diplopoda: Spirostreptida), a model species for ecophysiological studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šustr, Vladimír; Tajovský, Karel; Semanová, Stanislava; Chroňáková, Alica; Šimek, Miloslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 2 (2013), s. 145-158 ISSN 1211-376X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/1570 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Spirostreptidae * giant millipedes * digestive enzymes * methane * gut microflora Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  5. Occurrence of cyclopropane fatty acids in females and eggs of the millipede Graphidostreptus tumuliporus (Karsch) (Myriapoda: Diplopoda), as contrasted with their absence in the males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, D.J. van der; Oudejans, R.C.H.M.; Zandee, D.I.

    1972-01-01

    1. 1. The distribution of cyclopropane fatty acids in the lipids of males, females and eggs of the millipede Graphidostreptus tumuliporus is investigated. 2. 2. Cyclopropane fatty acids account for 25 per cent of the total fatty acids in the female animals (without eggs), and for as much as 35

  6. Integrative revision of the giant pill-millipede genus Sphaeromimus from Madagascar, with the description of seven new species (Diplopoda, Sphaerotheriida, Arthrosphaeridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesener, Thomas; Le, Daniel Minh-Tu; Loria, Stephanie F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Malagasy giant pill-millipede genus Sphaeromimus de Saussure & Zehntner, 1902 is revised. Seven new species, S. titanus sp. n., S. vatovavy sp. n., S. lavasoa sp. n., S. andohahela sp. n., S. ivohibe sp. n., S. saintelucei sp. n., and S. andrahomana sp. n. were discovered, in one case with the help of sequence data, in the rainforests of southeastern Madagascar. The species are described using light- and scanning electron microscopy. A key to all 10 species of the genus is presented. All but one (S. andohahela) of the newly discovered species are microendemics each occurring in isolated forest fragments. The mitochondrial COI barcoding gene was amplified and sequenced for 18 Sphaeromimus specimens, and a dataset containing COI sequences of 28 specimens representing all Sphaeromimus species (except S. vatovavy) was analyzed. All species are genetically monophyletic. Interspecific uncorrected genetic distances were moderate (4–10%) to high (18–25%), whereas intraspecific variation is low (0–3.5%). Sequence data allowed the correct identification of three colour morphs of S. musicus, as well as the identity of a cave specimen, which although aberrant in its morphology and colouration, was genetically identical to the holotype of S. andrahoma. PMID:25009417

  7. A new species of Tarracoblaniulus Mauriès & Vicente, 1977: description, postembryonic development, life cycle, and spatial distribution (Diplopoda, Julida, Blaniulidae

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    Martínez, H.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tarracoblaniulus phantasmanus n. sp. is described from Tarragona province, Spain and compared with the only known other species known in the genus, T. lagari Mauriès & Vicente, 1977, from which it differs mainly in having only 5, instead of 15 or more, straight spines on the posterior gonopod. The female vulva (unknown in T. lagari is very different from all known blaniulid vulvae. Based on a large number of specimens, the postembryonic development (euanamorphosis from stadium II onward is described. This is highly variable, with three to six apodous body rings in stadium IV, which is the most variable number so far recorded in Blaniulidae. Accordingly, specimens beyond stadium VIII could not be assigned to a specific stadium. At least some males are morphologically distinguishable in stadium IV, morphologically mature males appear in stadium VIII, possibly already in stadium VII. The life cycle of the new species is tentatively suggested to involve at least three years. The monthly mean density of the total population was 28.82 ind/m2 across the whole soil profile. Statistically significant differences in density values between months and Spearman’s rank correlation analyses between the monthly mean values of density and temperature show that T. phantasmanus presents a maximum density in the coldest months and a minimum one in the summer. Significant differences between monthly mean densities of different soil levels and the Usher index values show that during the spring and summer T. phantasmanus is concentrated in the mineral horizon A. In autumn, during winter and up to early spring, the population shows a clear tendency to move up towards horizon H and horizon L/F. Concerning horizontal distribution, Morisita index monthly values for each of the horizons indicate that the species is distributed in patches.Se describe Tarracoblaniulus phantasmanus n. sp., especie encontrada en la provincia de Tarragona (España, y se compara con la única especie conocida del género, T. lagari Mauriès & Vicente, 1977, de la cual difiere principalmente por tener sólo 5 espinas, en lugar de 15 o más, en el gonópodo posterior. La vulva de la hembra (desconocida en T. lagari es muy distinta a todas las vulvas conocidas de blaniúlidos. En base a los numerosos ejemplares disponibles, se describe asimismo el desarrollo postembrionario (euanamorphosis a partir del estadio II. Este desarrollo se manifiesta muy variable, con tres a seis anillos ápodos en el tronco del estadio IV, número que con mucho es el más elevado encontrado en Blaniulidae. De acuerdo con estos resultados, los ejemplares pertenecientes a estadios posteriores al VII no pueden ser asignados a un estadio específico. Algunos machos son morfológicamente distinguibles en el estadio IV y los machos morfológicamente maduros aparecen en el estadio VIII y posiblemente ya lo sean en el estadio VII. El ciclo vital de la nueva especie parece sugerir una duración de al menos tres años. La densidad mensual media registrada para el total de la población es de 28.82 ind/m2 en el conjunto del perfil edáfico. Diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los valores de densidad mensuales y el análisis de correlación de rango de Spearman entre la densidad mensual media y la temperatura muestran que T. phantasmanus presenta una densidad máxima en los meses más fríos y un valor mínimo durante el verano. Diferencias siginificativas entre las densidades mensuales medias registradas en los distintos horizontes edáficos y los valores del índice de Usher, ponen de manifiesto que durante la primavera y el verano T. phantasmanus se situa principalmente en el horizonte mineral A. Durante el otoño, el invierno y hasta principios de la primavera, la población muestra una clara tendencia a ocupar los horizontes superiores H y L/F. En cuanto a la distribución horizontal, los valores mensuales del índice de Morisita obtenidos para cada uno de los horizontes indican que la especie tiene una distribución agregativa.

  8. Hydrocarbons in the millipede Graphidostreptus tumuliporus (Karsch) (Myriapoda: Diplopoda)—I. In vivo incorporation of 14C-labelled precursors into the hydrocarbon fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudejans, R.C.H.M.

    1972-01-01

    1. 1. Biosynthesis of hydrocarbons in male and female specimens of the millipede Graphidostreptus tumuliporus was investigated after injection of the following precursors: 1-14C-acetate, 16-14C- and 1-14C-palmitic acid, isoleucine-14C(U), valine-14C(U) and mevalonic-2-14C acid. 2. 2. Both sexes

  9. Arthropod phylogenetics in light of three novel millipede (myriapoda: diplopoda) mitochondrial genomes with comments on the appropriateness of mitochondrial genome sequence data for inferring deep level relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Michael S; Swafford, Lynn; Spruill, Chad L; Bond, Jason E

    2013-01-01

    Arthropods are the most diverse group of eukaryotic organisms, but their phylogenetic relationships are poorly understood. Herein, we describe three mitochondrial genomes representing orders of millipedes for which complete genomes had not been characterized. Newly sequenced genomes are combined with existing data to characterize the protein coding regions of myriapods and to attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships within the Myriapoda and Arthropoda. The newly sequenced genomes are similar to previously characterized millipede sequences in terms of synteny and length. Unique translocations occurred within the newly sequenced taxa, including one half of the Appalachioria falcifera genome, which is inverted with respect to other millipede genomes. Across myriapods, amino acid conservation levels are highly dependent on the gene region. Additionally, individual loci varied in the level of amino acid conservation. Overall, most gene regions showed low levels of conservation at many sites. Attempts to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships suffered from questionable relationships and low support values. Analyses of phylogenetic informativeness show the lack of signal deep in the trees (i.e., genes evolve too quickly). As a result, the myriapod tree resembles previously published results but lacks convincing support, and, within the arthropod tree, well established groups were recovered as polyphyletic. The novel genome sequences described herein provide useful genomic information concerning millipede groups that had not been investigated. Taken together with existing sequences, the variety of compositions and evolution of myriapod mitochondrial genomes are shown to be more complex than previously thought. Unfortunately, the use of mitochondrial protein-coding regions in deep arthropod phylogenetics appears problematic, a result consistent with previously published studies. Lack of phylogenetic signal renders the resulting tree topologies as suspect. As such, these data are likely inappropriate for investigating such ancient relationships.

  10. Arthropod phylogenetics in light of three novel millipede (myriapoda: diplopoda mitochondrial genomes with comments on the appropriateness of mitochondrial genome sequence data for inferring deep level relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Brewer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropods are the most diverse group of eukaryotic organisms, but their phylogenetic relationships are poorly understood. Herein, we describe three mitochondrial genomes representing orders of millipedes for which complete genomes had not been characterized. Newly sequenced genomes are combined with existing data to characterize the protein coding regions of myriapods and to attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships within the Myriapoda and Arthropoda. RESULTS: The newly sequenced genomes are similar to previously characterized millipede sequences in terms of synteny and length. Unique translocations occurred within the newly sequenced taxa, including one half of the Appalachioria falcifera genome, which is inverted with respect to other millipede genomes. Across myriapods, amino acid conservation levels are highly dependent on the gene region. Additionally, individual loci varied in the level of amino acid conservation. Overall, most gene regions showed low levels of conservation at many sites. Attempts to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships suffered from questionable relationships and low support values. Analyses of phylogenetic informativeness show the lack of signal deep in the trees (i.e., genes evolve too quickly. As a result, the myriapod tree resembles previously published results but lacks convincing support, and, within the arthropod tree, well established groups were recovered as polyphyletic. CONCLUSIONS: The novel genome sequences described herein provide useful genomic information concerning millipede groups that had not been investigated. Taken together with existing sequences, the variety of compositions and evolution of myriapod mitochondrial genomes are shown to be more complex than previously thought. Unfortunately, the use of mitochondrial protein-coding regions in deep arthropod phylogenetics appears problematic, a result consistent with previously published studies. Lack of phylogenetic signal renders the resulting tree topologies as suspect. As such, these data are likely inappropriate for investigating such ancient relationships.

  11. An apparently non-swinging tentorium in the Diplopoda (Myriapoda: comparative morphology of the tentorial complex in giant pill-millipedes (Sphaerotheriida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Moritz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a swinging tentorium is a key apomorphy of Myriapoda, but this character has been studied in detail in only few species. Here the tentorium, i.e., the peristomatic skeleton of the preoral chamber, is comparatively studied in three species of the millipede order Sphaerotheriida Brandt, 1833. Since dissections of the fragile tentorial components proved to be difficult, despite the large head size, they were analysed mainly in situ via micro-computed tomography. Our results confirm previous observations of large differences in the tentorial construction in the giant pill-millipedes compared to chilognathan diplopods. The tentorium of Sphaerotheriida consists of a curved, plate-like epipharyngeal bar with distal projections, an elongate and thin hypopharyngeal bar, and a plate-like triangular posterior process; a transverse bar is absent. Only seven muscles attach at the tentorium in giant pill-millipedes, including two antennal muscles and two muscles of the gnathochilarium. Within the order Sphaerotheriida, the composition of the tentorium and its muscular equipment seems to be conserved, except for some variability in the shape of the epipharyngeal bar. As the transverse bar has been considered essential for the mobility of the tentorium in myriapods, its absence in Sphaerotheriida may indicate that their tentorium is not capable of performing a swing. Loss of tentorial mobility may also pertain to the order Glomerida Brandt, 1833, inferred here from the absence of a posterior process. An apparently immobile tentorium in Glomerida and Sphaerotheriida can straightforwardly be correlated with transformations of the head related to their ability of volvation. The different transformations of the tentorium, here hypothesised to cause immobility, may support current assumptions that the ability of volvation evolved convergently in Glomerida and Sphaerotheriida. This conclusion, however, still requires more detailed studies of the head anatomy in Glomerida and Glomeridesmida Cook, 1895.

  12. Two new giant pill-millipede species of the genus Zoosphaerium endemic to the Bemanevika area in northern Madagascar (Diplopoda, Sphaerotheriida, Arthrosphaeridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagorny, Christina; Wesener, Thomas

    2017-05-09

    Madagascar is one of the world's most important hotspots of biodiversity and a center for localized endemism. Among the highly endemic faunal elements are the giant pill-millipedes, order Sphaerotheriida, which are severely understudied in Madagascar. Here we provide descriptions of two new species of endemic giant-pill millipedes of the genus Zoosphaerium Pocock, 1895: Zoosphaerium bemanevika n. sp. and Zoosphaerium minutus n. sp.. Zoosphaerium bemanevika n. sp. belongs to the Z. coquerelianum species-group, while Z. minutus n. sp. is not assignable to a species-group. An updated key to the 19 species of the Z. coquerelianum group is provided. Zoosphaerium minutus n. sp. has a body length of Madagascar, an only recently protected area that represents a Malagasy center of endemism.

  13. Highly disjunct and highly infected millipedes – a new cave-dwelling species of Chiraziulus (Diplopoda: Spirostreptida: Cambalidae) from Iran and notes on Laboulbeniales ectoparasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia; Malek Hosseini, M.J.; Sadeghi, S.

    2015-01-01

    face of the anterior gonopod coxites first point distad instead of basad or basad-posteriad as in most other flagelliferous Cambalidea (and Julida), then traverse a groove on the mesal surface of the anterior gonopod coxites, making a full (360°) loop. The same feature is also illustrated for the first...

  14. Highly disjunct and highly infected millipedes – a new cave-dwelling species of Chiraziulus (Diplopoda: Spirostreptida: Cambalidae from Iran and notes on Laboulbeniales ectoparasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sofia P.S. Reboleira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiraziulus is a highly disjunct, hitherto monotypic genus of cambalid millipedes, geographically isolated in Iran by more than 7000 km from its presumed closest relatives in East Asia and North America. Recent fieldwork in caves of Iran has provided several specimens of this genus, allowing the description of Chiraziulus troglopersicus sp. nov. The intraspecific variability of the type species, C. kaiseri Mauriès, 1983, is illustrated with scanning electron micrographs. Chiraziulus is characterized by exceedingly long microtrichose gonopod flagella which from their insertion points on the posterior face of the anterior gonopod coxites first point distad instead of basad or basad-posteriad as in most other flagelliferous Cambalidea (and Julida, then traverse a groove on the mesal surface of the anterior gonopod coxites, making a full (360° loop. The same feature is also illustrated for the first time in the genus Cambala. The patterns and prevalence of the infection with a species of ectoparasitic fungus of the genus Rickia (order Laboulbeniales in the type material of C. kaiseri is described. An updated review of the cave-adapted fauna of Iran is given.

  15. Infectious intimacy and contaminated caves—three new species of ectoparasitic fungi (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniales) from blaniulid millipedes (Diplopoda: Julida) and inferences about their transmittal mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik; Santamaria, S.

    2015-01-01

    Laboulbeniales is an order of more than 2000 species of small ascomycete fungi which are ectoparasites of insects, millipedes and mites. They are often highly hostspecific and often are also highly specific with regard to which body parts they infect. Laboulbeniales from millipedes are particular...

  16. Hay-bait traps are a useful tool for sampling of soil dwelling millipedes and centipedes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tuf, I. H.; Chmelík, V.; Dobroruka, I.; Habová, L.; Hudcová, P.; Šipoš, Jan; Stašiov, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, č. 510 (2015), s. 197-207 ISSN 1313-2989 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : chilopoda * populations * diplopoda * Diplopoda * Chilopoda * soil sampling * agroecosystem * soil fauna Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.938, year: 2015

  17. Půdní fauna (Oribatida, Lumbricidae, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Oniscidea) NPR Kaňon Labe a PR Libouchecké rybníčky (CHKO Labské pískovce)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pižl, Václav; Starý, Josef; Tajovský, Karel

    -, 35/36 (2013), s. 9-18 ISSN 1214-2573 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : soil fauna * Kaňon Labe NNR * Libouchecké rybníčky NR * Northern Bohemia Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  18. Morphological and mitochondrial DNA data reshuffle the taxonomy of the genera em>Atopochetus> Attems, Litostrophus Chamberlin and em>Tonkinbolus> Verhoeff (Diplopoda: Spirobolida: Pachybolidae), with descriptions of nine new species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimvichai, Piyatida; Enghoff, Henrik; Panha, Somsak

    2018-01-01

    Species-level taxonomy and phylogeny of two genera of South-East (SE) Asian pachybolid millipedes are analysed with a combination of morphological characters and DNA sequences (two mitochondrial gene fragments: COI and 16S rRNA). Strong support is found for the genera Litostrophus Chamberlin, 192...

  19. Daily activities of the giant pill-millipede Zephronia cf. viridescens Attems, 1936 (Diplopoda: Sphaerotheriida: Zephroniidae) in a deciduous forest in Northern Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wongthamwanich, Nattarin; Panha, Somsak; Sitthicharoenchai, Duangkhae

    2012-01-01

    of millipedes fed throughout the day under the leaf litter. Walking activity was significantly higher in males than females throughout the day. Compared to males, females rested more during the night and fed more during the day. Average daily distances moved were significantly higher in males than females...... periods of 1 d each, 16 males and 23 females were marked with acrylic paint on the anal shield, and each was optically observed in its natural habitat every 30 min for 24 h. Key visually discernible activities of each individual, such as feeding, walking, mating, and resting, were recorded. The majority....... It was concluded that females tend to accumulate energy throughout the day, probably for reproduction, while males tend to spend more time walking, probably for the purpose of finding mates. http://zoolstud.sinica.edu.tw/Journals/51.7/913.pdf...

  20. Concentración natural de compuestos antimaláricos en artrópodos tropicales (in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misael Chinchilla-Carmona

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Extractos alcohólicos, hexánicos y diclorometánicos de 751 muestras de artrópodos fueron estudiados por la presencia de actividad antimalárica. En este trabajo se empleó un modelo murino usando el Plasmodium berghei, modelo que es biológicamente similar a la malaria humana. El estudio fue realizado determinando el efecto del extracto sobre el parásito por la inclusión o no del colorante azul de cresil brillante. Estimando como positivos aquellos extractos cuya actividad antimalárica se mostró en concentraciones no mayores de 50 mg, se encontró que los órdenes más promisorios fueron Lepidoptera (24.1%, Polydesmida (81.3%, Blattodea (25% y Opiliones, entre otros. Las formas inmaduras de Lepidoptera fueron las más positivas, por lo que se analizaron las plantas hospederos de donde se alimentaban dichos organismos. Las familias de estas plantas eran Malvaceae, Acanthaceae, Rutaceae, Myrtaceae, Solanaceae, Fabaceae, Urticaceae, Anacardiaceae, Rosaceae, Asteraceae, Rubiaceae, Lauraceae y Caprifoliaceae. Especies de casi todas estas familias han sido reportadas con actividad antimalárica. En el caso de los órdenes Polydesmida, Opiliones y Blattodea, cuyas formas adultas presentaron alguna actividad contra P. berghei, encontramos que todos esos grupos se alimentan también de plantas. En el caso de Opiliones sus especies son predadores de lepidópteros, coleópteros, hemípteros fitófagos y otros artrópodos, además de que producen sustancias de defensas tales como alcoholes, cetonas y quinonas, entre otros, todo lo cual podría explicar la actividad encontrada. Algunas especies del Orden Polydesmida, también secretan ciertas sustancias químicas, las cuales podrían tener un efecto antiparasitario. Así, a través de este trabajo en artrópodos hemos llegado a identificar fuentes vegetales potenciales para componentes antimaláricos.Natural concentration of antimalaric components in Tropical arthropods (in vitro. Alcohol, hexane and

  1. Food sources of selected terrestrial cave arthropods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smrž, J.; Kováč, L.; Mikeš, J.; Šustr, Vladimír; Lukešová, Alena; Tajovský, Karel; Nováková, Alena; Režňáková, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2015), s. 37-46 ISSN 1768-1448 Grant - others:Vega(SK) 1/0139/09 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * caves * Collembola * Diplopoda * feeding habits * Isopoda Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  2. A revision of the Thyropygus allevatus group. Part V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimvichai, Piyatida; Enghoff, Henrik; Panha, Somsak

    2016-01-01

    The Thyropygus opinatus subgroup (Diplopoda: Harpagophoridae) of the T. allevatus group in Thailand is revised. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequence data, it is merged with the T. bifurcus subgroup to form an extended T. opinatus subgroup. Nine new species are described: Thyropygus ...

  3. Methane release from millipedes and other soil invertebrates in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šustr, Vladimír; Šimek, Miloslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 8 (2009), s. 1684-1688 ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : invertebrates * diplopoda * methane production Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.978, year: 2009

  4. Litter-dwelling arthropod abundance peaks near coarse woody debris in loblolly pine forest of the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; J.L. Hanula

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that many litter-dwelling arthropod and other invertebrate taxa (e.g., Isopoda, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Araneae, Pseudo scorpionida, Coleoptera, and Gastropoda) are more numerous near dead wood than away from it in the broad-leaved forests of Europe (Jabin et al. 2004; Topp et al. 2006a, 2006b; Kappes et...

  5. Litter-dwelling arthropod abundance peaks near coarse woody debris in loblolly pine forests of the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; James L. Hanula

    2009-01-01

    litter-dwelling arthropod and other invertebrate taxa (e.g., Isopoda, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Araneae, Pseudoscorpionida, Coleoptera, and Gastropoda) are more numerous near dead wood than away from it in the broad-leaved forests of Europe(Jabin et al. 2004; Topp et al. 2006a, 2006b; Kappes et al. 2006; Kappes 2006; Jabin et al. 2007) and...

  6. Diversity of macro-detritivores in dead wood is influenced by tree species, decay stage and environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuo, Juan; Fonck, Myrthe; van Hal, Jurgen; Cornelissen, J. Hans C.; Berg, Matty P.

    Diplopoda (millipedes) and Isopoda (woodlice) are among the most abundant macro-detritivores in temperate forests. These key regulators of plant litter decomposition are influenced by habitat and substrate quality, including that of dead wood. Dead wood provides shelter and resources to

  7. Diversity of macro-detritivores in dead wood is influenced by tree species, decay stage and environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuo, J.; Fonck, M.; van Hal, J.R.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Berg, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopoda (millipedes) and Isopoda (woodlice) are among the most abundant macro-detritivores in temperate forests. These key regulators of plant litter decomposition are influenced by habitat and substrate quality, including that of dead wood. Dead wood provides shelter and resources to

  8. Factors affecting invertebrate assemblages in bryophytes of the Litovelské Luhy National Nature Reserve, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Božanić, B.; Hradílek, Z.; Machač, O.; Pižl, Václav; Šťáhlavský, F.; Tufová, J.; Véle, A.; Tuf, I.H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2013), s. 197-206 ISSN 0324-0770 Grant - others:GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D3/155/08; GA MŽP(CZ) IGA PrF/2010/001 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Chilopoda * Diplopoda * Oniscidea * Araneae * Pseudoscorpiones * Opiliones * Formicidae * Lumbricidae * Litovelské Pomoraví Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.357, year: 2013

  9. Venomous and poisonous arthropods: identification, clinical manifestations of envenomation, and treatments used in human injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Haddad Junior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review presents the main species of venomous and poisonous arthropods, with commentary on the clinical manifestations provoked by the toxins and therapeutic measures used to treat human envenomations. The groups of arthopods discussed include the class Arachnida (spiders and scorpions, which are responsible for many injuries reported worldwide, including Brazil; the subphylum Myriapoda, with the classes Chilopoda and Diplopoda (centipedes and millipedes; and the subphylum Hexapoda, with the class Insecta and the orders Coleoptera (beetles, Hemiptera (stink bugs, giant water bugs, and cicadas, Hymenoptera (ants, wasps, and bees, and Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths.

  10. Hábito alimentar do tatu-canastra (Xenarthra, Dasypodidae em uma área de cerrado do Brasil Central Food habits of the giant armadillo (Xenarthra, Dasypodidae in an area of grassland of central Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina S. Anacleto

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The diel of the giant armadillo - Priodontes maximus (Kerr,1792 - was studied in the field at Fazenda São Miguel, Unaí, Minas Gerais, Brazil, through 82 samples collected at foraging excavations and 25 fecal samples. In both types of sample the most common item was insects (Isoptera e Hymenoptera and, in less quantity, plant fragments and orhers invertebrates (Aranae, Blattaria, Coleoptera, Diplopoda, Scorpiones. These data suggest the giant armadillo is a specialist on insects with an opportunistic foraging strategy.

  11. Millipedes as food for humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik; Manno, Nicola; Tchibozo, Sévérin

    2014-01-01

    The first record of millipedes (Diplopoda) being regularly used for food by humans (the Bobo people of Burkina Faso) is given, including information on how the millipedes are prepared. The species in question are Tymbodesmus falcatus (Karsch, 1881) and Sphenodesmus sheribongensis (Schiøtz, 1966...... for the spread of millipedes as an everyday food source. On the other hand, the possibility that benzoquinones may act as insect-repellents, as known from studies on nonhuman primates, and that sublethal cyanide ingestionmay enhance human innate resistance tomalaria, suggests promising ethnomedical perspectives...

  12. Exploring Phylogenetic Relationships within Myriapoda and the Effects of Matrix Composition and Occupancy on Phylogenomic Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rosa; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    Myriapods, including the diverse and familiar centipedes and millipedes, are one of the dominant terrestrial arthropod groups. Although molecular evidence has shown that Myriapoda is monophyletic, its internal phylogeny remains contentious and understudied, especially when compared to those of Chelicerata and Hexapoda. Until now, efforts have focused on taxon sampling (e.g., by including a handful of genes from many species) or on maximizing matrix size (e.g., by including hundreds or thousands of genes in just a few species), but a phylogeny maximizing sampling at both levels remains elusive. In this study, we analyzed 40 Illumina transcriptomes representing 3 of the 4 myriapod classes (Diplopoda, Chilopoda, and Symphyla); 25 transcriptomes were newly sequenced to maximize representation at the ordinal level in Diplopoda and at the family level in Chilopoda. Ten supermatrices were constructed to explore the effect of several potential phylogenetic biases (e.g., rate of evolution, heterotachy) at 3 levels of gene occupancy per taxon (50%, 75%, and 90%). Analyses based on maximum likelihood and Bayesian mixture models retrieved monophyly of each myriapod class, and resulted in 2 alternative phylogenetic positions for Symphyla, as sister group to Diplopoda + Chilopoda, or closer to Diplopoda, the latter hypothesis having been traditionally supported by morphology. Within centipedes, all orders were well supported, but 2 deep nodes remained in conflict in the different analyses despite dense taxon sampling at the family level. Relationships among centipede orders in all analyses conducted with the most complete matrix (90% occupancy) are at odds not only with the sparser but more gene-rich supermatrices (75% and 50% supermatrices) and with the matrices optimizing phylogenetic informativeness or most conserved genes, but also with previous hypotheses based on morphology, development, or other molecular data sets. Our results indicate that a high percentage of ribosomal

  13. Non-omnia moriantur-toxicity of mancozeb on dead wood microarthropod fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, Zbigniew; Bloszyk, Jerzy; Bruin, Jan; Ziemnicki, Kazimierz

    2007-01-01

    The effect of Dithane M-45 (dithiocarbamate fungicide; active substance: mancozeb) was studied on microarthropod fauna inhabiting dead wood. Although the exposure was almost never 100% lethal for the majority of observed taxa, almost all (Mesostigmata, Oribatida, some Uropodina, Actinedida, Collembola and Diplopoda) showed very high correlation between concentration of the fungicide and mortality (r > 0.86). Only Stigmaeidae showed low correlation (r = 0.293). For the majority of taxa LC(50 )values were close to the concentrations used during agrochemical activities in woods. Only Trachytes aegrota showed full susceptibility to the fungicide within the range of recommended field concentrations used in forestry (characterised by the low LC(95 )value). Tolerance of mesostigmatid and oribatid mites was found to differ between juveniles and adults, but not consistently. Related Uropodina species varied in susceptibility to the fungicide.

  14. Occurrence and characterization of entomogen galls in plants from natural vegetation areas in Delfinópolis, MG, Brazil Ocorrência e caracterização de galhas entomógenas em plantas de áreas de vegetação natural em Delfinópolis, MG, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Urso-Guimarães

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we aimed to register the occurrence of galls, inductors, inquilines, and parasitoids in plants of three natural vegetation areas in Delfinópolis, MG, Brazil. Results obtained showed 22 types of galls collected from leaf, vein leaf, petioles, stem, and inflorescence of nineteen species belonging to fifteen distinct families. Concerning gall morphology, the following were collected: globoid, conicle, discoidal, fusiform, shell-shape, indefinite, and one substituition of an ovary by an immature. As principal inducers were found insects of the families Cecidomyiidae (Diptera, Psyllidae, and Diaspididae (Sternorrhyncha/Hemiptera. As parasitoids the most common are of the Chalcidoidea superfamily (Hymenoptera and, as occasional inquilines, Polyxenidae (Diplopoda and Psocodea (Psocoptera. The results of this study contribute to existing of knowledge host-plant diversity and gall-associated insects in rocky fields, cerrado, and gallery forests.Neste trabalho registramos a ocorrência de galhas, galhadores, inquilinos e parasitóides em plantas de três áreas de vegetação natural em Delfinópolis, MG, Brasil. Como resultado foram obtidas galhas coletadas em folhas, nervuras de folhas, pecíolos, ramos e inflorescências de quinze famílias distintas. Quanto à morfologia, foram coletadas galhas globóides, cônicas, discóides e fusiformes, em forma de concha, uma sem formato definido e uma substituição do ovário pelo imaturo. Como principais indutores foram obtidos insetos das famílias Cecidomyiidae (Diptera, Psyllidae e Diaspididae (Sternorrhyncha/Hemiptera. Os parasitóides são da superfamília Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera e, como inquilinos ocasionais, Polyxenidae (Diplopoda e Psocodea (Psocoptera. Os resultados deste trabalho contribuem para aumento do conhecimento sobre a diversidade de plantas hospedeiras e insetos galhadores associados à vegetação de campo rupestre, cerrado e mata de galeria.

  15. Influência da aplicação de calcário na população da meso e macrofauna do solo sob sistema plantio direto Influence of lime application on meso and macrofauna of the soil under no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecila Maria Nunes Giracca

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo avaliou-se o efeito de diferentes doses e modos de aplicação de calcário em plantio direto em campo nativo sobre a fauna edáfica, após cinco anos da aplicação. Organismos da fauna epiedáfica foram coletados com armadilhas tipo Provid e macrorganismos euedáficos utilizando monolitos de solos em duas épocas de amostragem: inverno e verão. Os organismos foram identificados ao nível de classe e ordem. Foram identificados 17 grupos taxonômicos, com ocorrência de cinco classes: Arachnida, Diplopoda, Crustacea, Oligochaeta e Insecta. A abundância de organismos apresentou maior variação em função das diferentes épocas de coleta e não sofreu influência das diferentes doses e modos de aplicação de calcário avaliados.In the present study one evaluated the effect of different methods and levels of lime application on soil under no-tillage system on edaphic fauna, after five years of the application. Organisms of epiedaphic fauna were sampled with "Provid" traps and euedaphics macrorganisms using soil monoliths in two sampling time: winter and summer. The organisms under study were identified in laboratory at class and order levels. One identified 17 taxonomics groups, with five classes: Arachnida, Diplopoda, Crustacea, Oligochaeta and Insecta. The abundance of organisms showed higher variation in function of different sampling time than the levels and methods of lime application.

  16. The Robin, Erithacus Rubecula (Passeriformes, Turdidae, As a Component of Autotrophic Consortia of Forest Cenoses, Northeast Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaplygina A. B.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the robin, Erithacus rubecula Linnaeus, 1758 as a consort of autotrophic consortia is considered. It has been found that representatives of 9 higher taxa of animals (Mammalia, Aves, Gastropoda, Insecta, Arachnida, Acarina, Malacostraca, Diplopoda, Clitellata have trophic and topical links with the robin. At the same time, the robin is a consort of determinants of autotrophic consortia, which core is represented mostly by dominating species of deciduous trees (Quercus robur Linnaeus, 1753 (24.6 %, Tilia cordata Miller, 1768 (17.5 %, Acer platanoides Linnaeus, 1753 (22.8 %, Acer campestre Linnaeus, 1753, and also by sedges (Carex sp. and grasses (Poaceae. The robin also belongs to the concentre of the second and higher orders as a component of forest biogeocenoses and forms a complex trophic system. In the diet of its nestlings, there have been found 717 objects from 32 invertebrate taxa, belonging to the phylums Arthropoda (99.2 %, 31 species and Annelida (0.8 %, 1 species. The phylum Arthropoda was represented by the most numerous class Insecta (76.9 %, in which 10 orders (Lepidoptera (46.8 % dominates and 20 families were recorded, and also by the classes Arachnida (15.0 %, Malacostraca (5.3 % and Diplopoda (1.9 %. The invertebrate species composition was dominated by representatives of a trophic group of zoophages (14 species; 43.8 %; the portion of phytophages (7 species; 21.9 %, saprophages (18.7 %, and necrophages (15.6 % was the less. The highest number of food items was represented by phytophages (N = 717; 51 %, followed by zoophages (34 %, saprophages (12 %, and necrophages (3 %. The difference among study areas according to the number of food items and the number of species in the robin nestling diet is shown. In NNP “HF”, the highest number of food items was represented by phytophages - 47 % (N = 443, whereas zoophages were the most species-rich group (43.3 %, 13 species. In NNP “H”, phytophages also prevailed in

  17. New records and detailed distribution and abundance of selected arthropod species collected between 1999 and 2011 in Azorean native forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Clara; Crespo, Luís Carlos Fonseca; Rigal, François; Cardoso, Pedro; Pereira, Fernando; Rego, Carla; Amorim, Isabel R.; Melo, Catarina; Aguiar, Carlos; André, Genage; Mendonça, Enésima P.; Ribeiro, Sérvio; Hortal, Joaquín; Santos, Ana M.C.; Barcelos, Luís; Enghoff, Henrik; Mahnert, Volker; Pita, Margarida T.; Ribes, Jordi; Baz, Arturo; Sousa, António B.; Vieira, Virgílio; Wunderlich, Jörg; Parmakelis, Aristeidis; Whittaker, Robert J.; Quartau, José Alberto; Serrano, Artur R.M.; Triantis, Kostas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In this contribution we present detailed distribution and abundance data for arthropod species identified during the BALA – Biodiversity of Arthropods from the Laurisilva of the Azores (1999-2004) and BALA2 projects (2010-2011) from 18 native forest fragments in seven of the nine Azorean islands (all excluding Graciosa and Corvo islands, which have no native forest left). New information Of the total 286 species identified, 81% were captured between 1999 and 2000, a period during which only 39% of all the samples were collected. On average, arthropod richness for each island increased by 10% during the time frame of these projects. The classes Arachnida, Chilopoda and Diplopoda represent the most remarkable cases of new island records, with more than 30% of the records being novelties. This study stresses the need to expand the approaches applied in these projects to other habitats in the Azores, and more importantly to other less surveyed taxonomic groups (e.g. Diptera and Hymenoptera). These steps are fundamental for getting a more accurate assessment of biodiversity in the archipelago. PMID:28174509

  18. Invasion patterns of ground-dwelling arthropods in Canarian laurel forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Erik; Perner, Jörg

    2008-09-01

    Patterns of invasive species in four different functional groups of ground-dwelling arthropods (Carnivorous ground dwelling beetles; Chilopoda; Diplopoda; Oniscoidea) were examined in laurel forests of the Canary Islands. The following hypotheses were tested: (A) increasing species richness is connected with decreasing invasibility as predicted by the Diversity-invasibility hypothesis (DIH); (B) disturbed or anthropogenically influenced habitats are more sensitive for invasions than natural and undisturbed habitats; and (C) climatic differences between laurel forest sites do not affect the rate of invasibility. A large proportion of invasives (species and abundances) was observed in most of the studied arthropod groups. However, we did not find any support for the DIH based on the examined arthropod groups. Regarding the impact of the extrinsic factors 'disturbance' and 'climate' on invasion patterns, we found considerable differences between the studied functional groups. Whereas the 'disturbance parameters' played a minor role and only affected the relative abundances of invasive centipedes (positively) and millipedes (negatively), the 'climate parameters' were significantly linked with the pattern of invasive detritivores. Interactions between native and invading species have not been observed thus far, but cannot completely be excluded.

  19. Trophic structure and feeding rates of forest soil invertebrate populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBrayer, J F; Reichle, D E

    1971-01-01

    Trophic level relationships of a soil invertebrate community were determined using the transient behavior of cesium-137 in experimental soil microcosms. Feeding rates were estimated from radionuclide mass balance equations using radiocesium uptake coefficients, equilibrium concentrations of /sup 137/Cs in consumers, and /sup 137/Cs composition of food bases. The fungivore trophic level included Scatopsidae larvae (Diptera), Enchytraeida (Annelida), Entomobryidae and Onychiuridae (Collembola), Rhodacaridae (Mesostigmata), and Oribatulidae, Camasiidae, Carabodidae, and Cymbaeremaeidae (Oribatei). Approximately 60% of the total faunal biomass occurred in the fungivore trophic level. Fungivores averaged 7.0 +/- 2.4% dry body weight ingested per day. Cecidomyiidae larvae (Diptera), Diplopoda, Isotomidae (Collembola), Uropodina, and Phthiracaridae (Oribatei) were determined to be surface-feeding saprophages. Subsurface-feeding saprophages included Symphyla, Cillibidae (Uropidina), and Palaeacaridae and Epilohmannidae (Oribatei). Surface-feeding saprophages averaged 1.0 +/- 0.4% dry body weight ingested per day. Feeding rates were not calculated for saprophages feeding within the mineral soil horizon. Predators included Dolichopodidae larvae (Diptera), gamasine mites, and the Scutacaridae and other prostigmatid mites. Predators averaged 2.5 +/- 1.0% dry body weight ingested per day. 15 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Terrestrial invertebrates in the Rhynie chert ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Jason A; Garwood, Russell J

    2018-02-05

    The Early Devonian Rhynie and Windyfield cherts remain a key locality for understanding early life and ecology on land. They host the oldest unequivocal nematode worm (Nematoda), which may also offer the earliest evidence for herbivory via plant parasitism. The trigonotarbids (Arachnida: Trigonotarbida) preserve the oldest book lungs and were probably predators that practiced liquid feeding. The oldest mites (Arachnida: Acariformes) are represented by taxa which include mycophages and predators on nematodes today. The earliest harvestman (Arachnida: Opiliones) includes the first preserved tracheae, and male and female genitalia. Myriapods are represented by a scutigeromorph centipede (Chilopoda: Scutigeromorpha), probably a cursorial predator on the substrate, and a putative millipede (Diplopoda). The oldest springtails (Hexapoda: Collembola) were probably mycophages, and another hexapod of uncertain affinities preserves a gut infill of phytodebris. The first true insects (Hexapoda: Insecta) are represented by a species known from chewing (non-carnivorous?) mandibles. Coprolites also provide insights into diet, and we challenge previous assumptions that several taxa were spore-feeders. Rhynie appears to preserve a largely intact community of terrestrial animals, although some expected groups are absent. The known fossils are (ecologically) consistent with at least part of the fauna found around modern Icelandic hot springs.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The Rhynie cherts: our earliest terrestrial ecosystem revisited'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Entomologic perception by teachers and students in the municipality of Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Maia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to identify and interpret the entomologic perception of students and teachers living in the Santa Cruz do Xingu, Médio Araguaia region. Semistructured interviews were carried out in December 2006 with students and teachers of the basic and intermediate levels, as well as in Youth and Adult Education, in the municipality of Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso. Of the living beings perceived as “insects” by all the interviewees, 82.75% belonged to the Insecta Class, but the rest belonged either to the Fungi Kingdom or to Classes of Animalia (Amphibia, Arachnida, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Gastropoda, Mammalia and Reptilia. The “insects” were defined by the interviewees as small bugs, which were disgusting and dangerous. When in contact with the “insects”, 76% of the interviewees admitted that they killed them, and the greatest reason given for this was the psychological damage caused by the presence of these animals (65%. To 78% of those interviewed, the “insects” were beings without positive importance. Due to the scarce knowledge about their positive aspects, the perception of the “insects” by the students and teachers living in the Santa Cruz do Xingu region is mainly related to their belief in the negative qualities of these animals, causing aggressive reactions against them as soon as they are perceived in the environment.

  2. Oculogryphus chenghoiyanae sp. n. (Coleoptera, Lampyridae: a new ototretine firefly from Hong Kong with descriptions of its bioluminescent behavior and ultraviolet-induced fluorescence in females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vor Yiu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The first Oculogryphus species with associated males and female was found in Hong Kong and is described as new: O. chenghoiyanae sp. n. Adults of both sexes were collected live in the field and their bioluminescent behavior is reported for the first time in the genus. The captive males emit weak and continuous light from a pair of light spots on abdominal ventrite 6 or do so when disturbed. The larviform (highly paedomorphic females can glow brightly from a pair of light-emitting organs on the abdomen. The females of Oculogryphus and Stenocladius are to date the only documented representatives of paedomorphism in ototretine fireflies. The finding is consistent with the evidence from male morphology and bioluminescent behavior, supporting the close relationship between the two genera. A key to the Oculogryphus species is provided. The Oculogryphus females can fluoresce with a blue-green light through the whole body under ultraviolet illumination, a phenomenon reported in the Lampyridae for the first time. The co-occurrence of bioluminescence and fluorescence is rare in terrestrial ecosystems, previously known only in some millipedes (Diplopoda. The fluorescence and bioluminescence abilities of Oculogryphus females are functionally independent: abdominal light-emitting organs producing bright yellowish green light while the body wall fluoresces with blue-green light. In contrast, fluorescence and bioluminescence in millipedes are biochemically linked, like in some jellyfish (Cnidaria: Medusozoa.

  3. [Effects of mulching management of Phyllostachys heterocycla forests on the characteristics of soil infiltration and biometrics in southwest Zhejiang Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi Kun; Jin, Ai Wu; Fang, Sheng Zuo

    2017-05-18

    Soil infiltration, soil physical and chemical properties, root length density and soil fauna diversity were studied in Phyllostachys heterocycla forests with different mulching times in southwest Zhejiang Province, China. Significant differences of soil infiltration capability were found among the forests with different mulching times and among soil layers. Soil infiltration capability generally declined in the deeper soil layers. With mulching management, soil infiltration capability increased under the first mulching, and then declined with the increase of mulching times. The Kostiakov model was suitable for simulating soil infiltration process. With the extending of mulching times (4 to 6 years), soil pH and total/non-capillary porosity decreased, while soil bulk density, soil orga-nic matter and total nitrogen contents increased significantly. Soil initial, steady, and average infiltration rates as well as the cumulative infiltration amount correlated closely with the length density of roots with diameter from 0.5 mm to 5.0 mm, showing a decreasing tendency with the decrease in root length density. Soil fauna density was highest in the forest under the first mulching, and was lowest after third mulching. The decreased numbers of large and meso-arthropods, including Symphyla, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Hymenoptera and pseudoscorpions, and the micro-arthropods, including Oribatida, Mesostigmata, Onychiuridae, Neanuridae, Cyphoderidae, and Entomobryidae, showed negative effects on soil infiltration. In conclusion, long-term mulching changed soil physical and chemical properties, decreased soil infiltration capability, and suppressed the development of soil fauna, which might cause the decline ofP. heterocycla forests.

  4. A Comparison of the Pitfall Trap, Winkler Extractor and Berlese Funnel for Sampling Ground-Dwelling Arthropods in Tropical Montane Cloud Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabu, Thomas K.; Shiju, Raj T.; Vinod, KV.; Nithya, S.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the ground-dwelling arthropod diversity in tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF). Due to unique habitat conditions in TMCFs with continuously wet substrates and a waterlogged forest floor along with the innate biases of the pitfall trap, Berlese funnel and Winkler extractor are certain to make it difficult to choose the most appropriate method to sample the ground-dwelling arthropods in TMCFs. Among the three methods, the Winkler extractor was the most efficient method for quantitative data and pitfall trapping for qualitative data for most groups. Inclusion of floatation method as a complementary method along with the Winkler extractor would enable a comprehensive quantitative survey of ground-dwelling arthropods. Pitfall trapping is essential for both quantitative and qualitative sampling of Diplopoda, Opiliones, Orthoptera, and Diptera. The Winkler extractor was the best quantitative method for Psocoptera, Araneae, Isopoda, and Formicidae; and the Berlese funnel was best for Collembola and Chilopoda. For larval forms of different insect orders and the Acari, all the three methods were equally effective. PMID:21529148

  5. Colémbolos (Hexapoda como bioindicadores de la calidad de suelos contaminados con hidrocarburos en el sureste de México Collembola (Hexapoda as quality bioindicators of the hydrocarburans polluted soils in Southestern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Uribe-Hernández

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron invertebrados del suelo, en particular los colémbolos, como bioindicadores de la calidad de suelos contaminados con hidrocarburos en el sureste de México. Se realizaron 2 muestreos en verano-otoño del 2004, en 4 parcelas de 2 hectáreas, denominadas zona 1, 2, 3 y control. De cada unidad se tomaron 8 muestras que fueron procesadas por medio del embudo de Berlese-Tullgren y 4 por el método de flotación. Para colémbolos se determinaron los siguientes índices ecológicos: abundancia, riqueza, índice de Shannon (H', dominancia (λ, equidad(J' e índice de similitud (S. Se realizaron análisis fisicoquímicos del suelo: hidrocarburos totales del petróleo (HTP e hidrocarburos aromáticos policíclicos (HAP, porosidad, pH, CE, MO, N, P, K, CIC y textura. Los HTP, en las zonas contaminadas, sobrepasan los límites de las normas mexicanas ambientales. En todas las zonas de estudio se observaron colémbolos, ácaros y larvas de dípteros, por lo que su abundancia y diversidad pueden ser utilizadas como bioindicadores del grado de contaminación y calidad del suelo. En las zonas contaminadas se registraron abundancias muy bajas de Crustacea, Formicidae, Araneae, Diptera, Pseudoscorpionida, y Diplopoda. Las familias de los colémbolos más ampliamente distribuidas fueron Sminthurididae e Isotomidae. De acuerdo con el análisis de correlación, su diversidad de colémbolos es afectada por la presencia de HAP (flouranteno, naftaleno, pireno, criseno y fenantrenoWe evaluated invertebrates, with an emphasis on Collembola, as bioindicators of soil quality in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in southeastern Mexico. We carried out 2 sampling periods in summer-fall of 2004 in 4 parcels of 2 hectares each. From each parcel we processed 8 samples using the Berlese-Tullgren funnel technique and 4 using the flotation method. For Collembola we calculated the following ecological indices: abundance, richness, the Shannon index (H', dominance (

  6. Soil macrofauna under integrated crop-livestock systems in a Brazilian Cerrado Ferralsol Macrofauna edáfica em sistemas de integração lavoura-pecuária num Latossolo Vermelho do Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robélio Leandro Marchão

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the effects of integrated crop-livestock systems, associated with two tillage and two fertilization regimes, on the abundance and diversity of the soil macrofauna. Four different management systems were studied: continuous pasture (mixed grass; continuous crop; two crop-livestock rotations (crop/pasture and pasture/crop; and native Cerrado as a control. Macrofauna was sampled using a modified Tropical Soil Biology and Fertility method, and all individuals were counted and identified at the morphospecies level for each plot. A total of 194 morphospecies were found, distributed among 30 groups, and the most representative in decreasing order of density were: Isoptera, Coleoptera larvae, Formicidae, Oligochaeta, Coleoptera adult, Diplopoda, Hemiptera, Diptera larvae, Arachnida, Chilopoda, Lepidoptera, Gasteropoda, Blattodea and Orthoptera. Soil management systems and tillage regimes affected the structure of soil macrofauna, and integrated crop-livestock systems, associated with no-tillage, especially with grass/legume species associations, had more favorable conditions for the development of "soil engineers" compared with continuous pasture or arable crops. Soil macrofauna density and diversity, assessed at morphospecies level, are effective data to measure the impact of land use in Cerrado soils.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos de sistemas de integração lavoura-pecuária, associados a dois tipos de preparo e de fertilização do solo, sobre a abundância e a diversidade da macrofauna edáfica. Quatro sistemas de manejo foram estudados: pastagem contínua de gramíneas; lavoura contínua de culturas anuais; dois sistemas integrados lavoura-pecuária (lavoura/pastagem e pastagem/lavoura; e Cerrado nativo (controle. A macrofauna foi avaliada pelo método "Tropical Soil Biology and Fertility" modificado e todos os indivíduos coletados nas parcelas foram contados e identificados ao nível de

  7. Percepção entomológica por docentes e discentes do município de Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brasil

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    Anna Frida Hatsue Modro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2009v22n2p153 Este trabalho objetivou identificar e interpretar a percepção entomológica de alunos e professores residentes em Santa Cruz do Xingu, região do Médio Araguaia. Entrevistas semi-estruturadas foram realizadas em dezembro de 2006 com alunos e professores dos ensinos fundamental, médio e Educação de Jovens e Adultos em dezembro de 2006, no Município de Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso. Dos seres vivos percebidos como “insetos” por todos os entrevistados, 82,75% pertenceram à Classe Insecta, as demais citações foram pertencentes ao Reino Fungi e a outras Classes do Reino Animalia (Amphibia, Arachnida, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Gastropoda, Mammalia e Reptilia. Os “insetos” foram definidos, como bichos pequenos, nojentos ou perigosos. Em contato com os “insetos”, 76% dos entrevistados admitiram matá-los e a maior razão para tal reação foi o dano psicológico causado pela presença destes animais (65%. Para 78% dos entrevistados, os “insetos” foram seres sem importância positiva. Devido ao pouco conhecimento sobre os seus aspectos positivos, a percepção dos “insetos” por alunos e professores residentes da região de Santa Cruz do Xingu está relacionada, principalmente, à atribuição de qualidades negativas a estes animais, provocando reações de agressividade contra os “insetos” assim que percebidos no ambiente.

  8. Decomposition of oak leaf litter and millipede faecal pellets in soil under temperate mixed oak forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav; Háněl, Ladislav; Šantrůčková, Hana; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The millipedes Glomeris hexasticha (Diplopoda, Glomerida) were maintained under laboratory conditions and fed on oak leaf litter collected from a mixed oak forest (Abieto-Quercetum) in South Bohemia, Czech Republic. Every fourth day litter was changed and produced faecal pellets were separated and afterwards analysed. Content of organic carbon and C:N ratio lowered in faecal pellets as compared with consumed litter. Changes in content of chemical elements (P, K, Ca, Mg, Na) were recognised as those characteristic for the first stage of degradation of plant material. Samples of faecal pellets and oak leaf litter were then exposed in mesh bags between the F and H layers of forest soil for up to one year, subsequently harvested and analysed. A higher rate of decomposition of exposed litter than that of faecal pellets was found during the first two weeks. After 1-year exposure, the weight of litter was reduced to 51%, while that of pellets to 58% only, although the observed activity of present biotic components (algae, protozoans, nematodes; CO2 production, nitrogenase activity) in faecal pellets was higher as compared with litter. Different micro-morphological changes were observed in exposed litter and in pellets although these materials originated from the same initial sources. Comparing to intact leaf litter, another structural and functional processes occurred in pellets due to the fragmentation of plant material by millipedes. Both laboratory and field experiments showed that the millipede faecal pellets are not only a focal point of biodegradation activity in upper soil layers, but also confirmed that millipede feces undergo a slower decomposition than original leaf litter.

  9. Omnivory of an Insular Lizard: Sources of Variation in the Diet of Podarcis lilfordi (Squamata, Lacertidae.

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    Ana Pérez-Cembranos

    Full Text Available Through 17 years and from a sample of 7,790 faecal pellets and 26,346 prey items, we studied the diet of the Balearic lizard Podarcis lilfordi in Aire Island (Menorca, Balearic Islands, Spain. We analysed the diet in terms of prey frequencies, as well as by their volume and biomass contributions. The diet of the Balearic lizard was extremely variable through the years, months and areas under study. The dominance of small clumped prey, particularly ants, was confirmed. However, the main contribution by volume corresponded to beetles, with a relevant role for Diplopoda and terrestrial Isopoda during some months and at particular areas of the island. Several prey items were probably captured at the base of shrubs, under stones or inside rock crevices. Therefore, our estimations of electivity would only be reliable for epigeal and flying prey. The capacity of the Balearic lizard to include marine subsidies in its diet, such as coastal crustaceans, is noteworthy. Also, its consumption of carrion from carcasses of gulls and rabbits and leftovers from human visitors is remarkable. Juvenile conspecifics can also be a sporadic food resource, especially during the second half of summer, whereas the consumption of vegetal matter is constant for each whole year. The shifts of vegetal exploitation among areas of the island and months take place according to availability of different plant species at each area or during a given period. Thus, lizards are able to conduct a thorough monitoring of plant phenology, exploiting a large variety of plant species. Omnivory does not imply the indiscriminate inclusion of any edible food in its diet. Rather, the inclusion of several food items means the adoption of a wide range of foraging behaviours adapted to the exploitation of each food resource.

  10. Omnivory of an Insular Lizard: Sources of Variation in the Diet of Podarcis lilfordi (Squamata, Lacertidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cembranos, Ana; León, Alicia; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Through 17 years and from a sample of 7,790 faecal pellets and 26,346 prey items, we studied the diet of the Balearic lizard Podarcis lilfordi in Aire Island (Menorca, Balearic Islands, Spain). We analysed the diet in terms of prey frequencies, as well as by their volume and biomass contributions. The diet of the Balearic lizard was extremely variable through the years, months and areas under study. The dominance of small clumped prey, particularly ants, was confirmed. However, the main contribution by volume corresponded to beetles, with a relevant role for Diplopoda and terrestrial Isopoda during some months and at particular areas of the island. Several prey items were probably captured at the base of shrubs, under stones or inside rock crevices. Therefore, our estimations of electivity would only be reliable for epigeal and flying prey. The capacity of the Balearic lizard to include marine subsidies in its diet, such as coastal crustaceans, is noteworthy. Also, its consumption of carrion from carcasses of gulls and rabbits and leftovers from human visitors is remarkable. Juvenile conspecifics can also be a sporadic food resource, especially during the second half of summer, whereas the consumption of vegetal matter is constant for each whole year. The shifts of vegetal exploitation among areas of the island and months take place according to availability of different plant species at each area or during a given period. Thus, lizards are able to conduct a thorough monitoring of plant phenology, exploiting a large variety of plant species. Omnivory does not imply the indiscriminate inclusion of any edible food in its diet. Rather, the inclusion of several food items means the adoption of a wide range of foraging behaviours adapted to the exploitation of each food resource.

  11. So many genes, so little time: A practical approach to divergence-time estimation in the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen A; Brown, Joseph W; Walker, Joseph F

    2018-01-01

    Phylogenomic datasets have been successfully used to address questions involving evolutionary relationships, patterns of genome structure, signatures of selection, and gene and genome duplications. However, despite the recent explosion in genomic and transcriptomic data, the utility of these data sources for efficient divergence-time inference remains unexamined. Phylogenomic datasets pose two distinct problems for divergence-time estimation: (i) the volume of data makes inference of the entire dataset intractable, and (ii) the extent of underlying topological and rate heterogeneity across genes makes model mis-specification a real concern. "Gene shopping", wherein a phylogenomic dataset is winnowed to a set of genes with desirable properties, represents an alternative approach that holds promise in alleviating these issues. We implemented an approach for phylogenomic datasets (available in SortaDate) that filters genes by three criteria: (i) clock-likeness, (ii) reasonable tree length (i.e., discernible information content), and (iii) least topological conflict with a focal species tree (presumed to have already been inferred). Such a winnowing procedure ensures that errors associated with model (both clock and topology) mis-specification are minimized, therefore reducing error in divergence-time estimation. We demonstrated the efficacy of this approach through simulation and applied it to published animal (Aves, Diplopoda, and Hymenoptera) and plant (carnivorous Caryophyllales, broad Caryophyllales, and Vitales) phylogenomic datasets. By quantifying rate heterogeneity across both genes and lineages we found that every empirical dataset examined included genes with clock-like, or nearly clock-like, behavior. Moreover, many datasets had genes that were clock-like, exhibited reasonable evolutionary rates, and were mostly compatible with the species tree. We identified overlap in age estimates when analyzing these filtered genes under strict clock and uncorrelated

  12. Why be red listed? Threatened Myriapoda species in Brazil with implications for their conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam-Gemael, Manoela; Izzo, Thiago Junqueira; Chagas, Amazonas

    2018-01-01

    The biodiversity crisis we live in, marked by high extinction rates, requires well-planned conservation efforts. To overcome this issue, red lists of threatened species are recognized as the main objective approach for evaluating the conservation status of species and therefore guiding conservation priorities. This work focuses on the Myriapoda (Chilopoda and Diplopoda) species listed in the Brazilian red list of fauna to enable discussion of the practical implications of red lists for conservation. Almost all myriapods assessed are endemic to Brazil (99 %) and 73 % are known from subterranean habitats only. Despite of 33 % being recorded from protected areas (PAs), downgrading, degazettement or downsizing of PAs and intense and unregulated ecotourism represent great threats. The PAs network in Brazil tends to fail in conserving myriapod species. The number of data deficient species (42 %) states the need of investing in ecological and taxonomic studies about the group, in order to fill in important knowledge gaps in species assessments nationally and globally. In this work we show that there is a lack of communication between national and global agencies concerning red lists, which results in a significant loss for science and for conservation. Despite investing in national and state red lists, individual countries must take the final step of submitting its data to IUCN global database, as significant international funding is available for IUCN red listed species conservation. Being one of the most diverse countries in the world, and facing the biggest cuts ever on national science funding, losing these important funding opportunities is a huge loss for Brazilian biodiversity conservation and for science. This study raises awareness on subterranean habitats conservation, due to its high endemism and fragility. Since the first edition of the Brazilian Red List in 1968, centipedes are now included for the first time, and millipedes for the second time. The presence

  13. Effects of chemical elements in the trophic levels of natural salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Piotr; Barczak, Tadeusz; Bennewicz, Janina; Jerzak, Leszek; Bogdzińska, Maria; Aleksandrowicz, Oleg; Koim-Puchowska, Beata; Szady-Grad, Małgorzata; Klawe, Jacek J; Woźniak, Alina

    2016-06-01

    The relationships between the bioaccumulation of Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, Cd, and Pb, acidity (pH), salinity (Ec), and organic matter content within trophic levels (water-soil-plants-invertebrates) were studied in saline environments in Poland. Environments included sodium manufactures, wastes utilization areas, dumping grounds, and agriculture cultivation, where disturbed Ca, Mg, and Fe exist and the impact of Cd and Pb is high. We found Zn, Cu, Mn, Co, and Cd accumulation in the leaves of plants and in invertebrates. Our aim was to determine the selectivity exhibited by soil for nutrients and heavy metals and to estimate whether it is important in elucidating how these metals are available for plant/animal uptake in addition to their mobility and stability within soils. We examined four ecological plant groups: trees, shrubs, minor green plants, and water macrophytes. Among invertebrates, we sampled breastplates Malacostraca, small arachnids Arachnida, diplopods Diplopoda, small insects Insecta, and snails Gastropoda. A higher level of chemical elements was found in saline polluted areas (sodium manufactures and anthropogenic sites). Soil acidity and salinity determined the bioaccumulation of free radicals in the trophic levels measured. A pH decrease caused Zn and Cd to increase in sodium manufactures and an increase in Ca, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb in the anthropogenic sites. pH increase also caused Na, Mg, and Fe to increase in sodium manufactures and an increase in Na, Fe, Mn, and Co in the anthropogenic sites. There was a significant correlation between these chemical elements and Ec in soils. We found significant relationships between pH and Ec, which were positive in saline areas of sodium manufactures and negative in the anthropogenic and control sites. These dependencies testify that the measurement of the selectivity of cations and their fluctuation in soils provide essential information on the affinity and binding strength in these environments. The

  14. THE COMPOST – A METHOD TO RESTORE THE ORGANIC WASTE PRODUCTS IN THE NATURAL CIRCUIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Nicoleta VIERU

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Half of the quantity of waste products produced by the households is made of foodremainders, vegetable and garden remainders and more of 50% of waste products are organicand they arrive in waste products storehouses, in cesspools or are burned, causing animportant pollution. As an alternative to those, we can transform the organic material througha set of microbial, biochemical, chemical and physical processes into a valuable material witha humus appearance, named compost. To obtain a quality compost we need to lead thecompost process, in accordance with the dimension, the humidity, the structure and thecomposition of residual materials, that these to be fast and efficient available to the microorganisms,making up an ideal substratum rich in nutrients for their development. Thedecomposition agents (bacterium, fungous, mites, Collembola, wooden lice, worms,diplopoda need the azote to build the cells and some food remainders, ripped grass and greenleaves. The chips of wood, the dry leaves and the sawdust are rich in carbon and theyconstitute another energy source for the decomposition agents. The azote sources aredesignated as the „green” elements, and the carbon sources are the „brown” ones. In a pile ofcompost is efficient to maintain a balance between the „brown” elements (carbon and the„green” ones (azote – in percent of 30:1 to offer the decomposition agents a balancednourishment and this thing can be acquired through the alternation of layers of brown andgreen elements. The production of compost in schools can be a way to determine the entireschool community to work together for helping the environment. This means the naturalrecirculation of resources, community education over the benefits of the compost, the changeof the cultural attitude over the garbage in a way that brings benefits to the society, thereduction of the alimentary remainders quantity from the school canteen, the implication ofthe students in extra

  15. Study of microarthropod communities to assess soil quality in different managed vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnarli, Elena; Vignozzi, Nadia; Valboa, Giuseppe; Bouneb, Mabrouk; Corino, Lorenzo; Goggioli, Donatella; Guidi, Silvia; Lottero, Mariarosa; Tarchi, Franca; Simoni, Sauro

    2014-05-01

    conventional/IPM management). The mites represented about 50% of the arthropodofauna recorded, collembolans 30%, and 20% other microarthropods (Blattaria, Chilopoda, Coleoptera, Diplopoda, Diplura, Diptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera, Isopoda, Homoptera, Pauropoda, Protura, Pseudoscopionida, Psocoptera, Symphyla, Thysanoptera). The mesofauna abundance was affected by the type of management (P=0.015) and soil texture (P=0.029). At the identification level considered, the biological indices calculated showed no substantial differences between different crop managements (H'=1.26, D=0.97 in organic vineyard, H'=1.30, D=0.89 in IPM vineyard). The analysis of microarthropod communities by QBSar, however, showed higher values in organic compared to IPM managed vineyards (QBSar 199 vs 98 in 2011 and 205 vs 188 in 2012, respectively) which are close to figures characteristic of preserved soils.

  16. Regional conditions and land-use alter the potential contribution of soil arthropods to ecosystem services in grasslands

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    Klaus eBirkhofer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of regional conditions and land-use intensity on eight selected arthropod taxa of Mesostigmata (Parasitidae, Oribatida (3 species, Collembola (1 species, Chilopoda (2 species and Diplopoda (1 species sampled in differently managed permanent grasslands of three German study regions. By jointly analyzing changes in abundance and trophic behavior (measured as natural variation in 15N/14N and 13C/12C ratios we intended to develop a framework for evaluating the impact of local and regional conditions on the ecosystem services delivered by soil animals (mainly decomposition- and predation-related services. The investigated taxa could be assorted to three major groups: (1 numerical response only, (2 numerical and trophic response and (3 trophic response only. Since the combination of taxa assembled in the individual groups does not correspond to any of the conventional soil ecological classification systems, this grouping offers a new approach for analyzing soil communities. The complementing consideration of both the direction of the numerical response and the type of the trophic response (change of the basal food source vs. trophic level shift vs. variations in isotopic niches provided a differential insight into the effect of management and geographic differences on soil arthropods. It could be shown that the effect of land-use on the abundance of detritivorous microarthropods varies among regions, but does not induce any changes in feeding behavior. Our findings on Parasitidae indicate that carnivorous microarthropods exert substantial predation pressure on soil mesofauna and may be quite resistant to environmental changes due to high trophic flexibility. If conditions are favorable, centipedes may reach comparatively high densities in permanent grasslands and could be very important for controlling belowground pests. Concerning millipedes, isotopic signatures suggest that some species could exert a substantial disservice

  17. The behaviour of radiocaesium in woodland ecosystems. Measurement and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toal, M.

    1999-02-01

    In order to better quantify risk to non-human biota from environmental radioactivity, our understanding of the behaviour of radionuclides in the biosphere needs to be increased. Hence the aims of the present study were threefold: 1) Review Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) methodologies, 2) Quantify radiocaesium distribution in woodland biota in the vicinity of BNFL Sellafield, 3) Use this information to develop radiocaesium food-chain and dosimetry models for terrestrial invertebrates and small-mammals. A review of ERA literature concluded that of the two main methodologies available (individual receptor and holistic ERA), individual receptor based analysis is the most credible method given in today's level of scientific understanding. lt was also concluded that the use of modelling techniques in ERA will increase in future years. Two study sites were sampled, a Picea sitchensis monoculture (Lady Wood) and a mixed deciduous site (Longrigg Wood). Mean levels of Cs-137 (all activities quoted in Bq/kg dry weight) in soils:leaf litter were 473:408 (Lady Wood) and 142:32 (Longrigg Wood). The activity of understorey vegetation varied with ranges of 17-508 and 4-48 Bq/kg in Lady Wood and Longrigg, respectively. No vegetation species had concentration ratios (CRs) > 1. The greatest range in Cs-137 activity (2-5242 Bq/kg DW, Lady Wood) was found in fungi, with Mycena galariculata and Hypholoma fasciculare attaining the highest biomagnifications (CRs = 2.6, 2.0 respectively). Due to radioanalytical constraints, only 'mixed invertebrate' samples were measured for Longrigg Wood (yearly average = 8.5 Bq/kg). No significant invertebrate body-burden differences were found between taxa or between seasons for each invertebrate group in Lady Wood. Mean yearly Cs-137 body-burdens (Bq/kg DW) were 94 (Diplopoda), 104 (Isopoda), 54 (Chilopoda), 120 (Araneae), 91 (Opilionidae) and 41 (Carabidae). No invertebrates had CRs > 1. Seasonal Cs-137 body-burdens were also measured for the