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Sample records for dioxygenase cmccd4a contributes

  1. Cloning and functional characterization of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fong-Chin; Molnár, Péter; Schwab, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Although a number of plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) genes have been functionally characterized in different plant species, little is known about the biochemical role and enzymatic activities of members of the subclass 4 (CCD4). To gain insight into their biological function, CCD4 genes were isolated from apple (Malus x domestica, MdCCD4), chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum x morifolium, CmCCD4a), rose (Rosa x damascena, RdCCD4), and osmanthus (Osmanthus fragrans, OfCCD4), and were expressed, together with AtCCD4, in Escherichia coli. In vivo assays showed that CmCCD4a and MdCCD4 cleaved beta-carotene well to yield beta-ionone, while OfCCD4, RdCCD4, and AtCCD4 were almost inactive towards this substrate. No cleavage products were found for any of the five CCD4 genes when they were co-expressed in E. coli strains that accumulated cis-zeta-carotene and lycopene. In vitro assays, however, demonstrated the breakdown of 8'-apo-beta-caroten-8'-al by AtCCD4 and RdCCD4 to beta-ionone, while this apocarotenal was almost not degraded by OfCCD4, CmCCD4a, and MdCCD4. Sequence analysis of genomic clones of CCD4 genes revealed that RdCCD4, like AtCCD4, contains no intron, while MdCCD, OfCCD4, and CmCCD4a contain introns. These results indicate that plants produce at least two different forms of CCD4 proteins. Although CCD4 enzymes cleave their substrates at the same position (9,10 and 9',10'), they might have different biochemical functions as they accept different (apo)-carotenoid substrates, show various expression patterns, and are genomically differently organized.

  2. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-dependent tryptophan metabolites contribute to tolerance induction during allergen immunotherapy in a mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taher, Yousef A.; Piavaux, Benoit J. A.; Gras, Renee; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; Hofman, Gerard A.; Bloksma, Nanne; Henricks, Paul A. J.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    Background: The tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been implicated in immune suppression and tolerance induction. Objective: We examined (1) whether IDO activity is required during tolerance induction by allergen immunotherapy or for the subsequent suppressive

  3. Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 make separate, tissue-specific contributions to basal and inflammation-induced kynurenine pathway metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Paul B; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J

    2016-11-01

    In mammals, the majority of the essential amino acid tryptophan is degraded via the kynurenine pathway (KP). Several KP metabolites play distinct physiological roles, often linked to immune system functions, and may also be causally involved in human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, schizophrenia and cancer. Pharmacological manipulation of the KP has therefore become an active area of drug development. To target the pathway effectively, it is important to understand how specific KP enzymes control levels of the bioactive metabolites in vivo. Here, we conducted a comprehensive biochemical characterization of mice with a targeted deletion of either tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) or indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the two initial rate-limiting enzymes of the KP. These enzymes catalyze the same reaction, but differ in biochemical characteristics and expression patterns. We measured KP metabolite levels and enzyme activities and expression in several tissues in basal and immune-stimulated conditions. Although our study revealed several unexpected downstream effects on KP metabolism in both knockout mice, the results were essentially consistent with TDO-mediated control of basal KP metabolism and a role of IDO in phenomena involving stimulation of the immune system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced enzymatic degradation of tryptophan by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase contributes to the tryptophan-deficient state seen after major trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Katharina; Neurauter, Gabriele; Wirleitner, Barbara; Fleming, Arthur W; Peterson, Verlyn M; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2005-03-01

    Decreased lymphocyte proliferation, lymphopenia, immunodepression, and opportunistic infections are common after major trauma. Early alimentation in these patients corrects lymphopenia, enhances immunity, and reduces the incidence of infections, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Tryptophan is essential for the production and function of rapidly proliferating cells such as lymphocytes. Tryptophan is enzymatically degraded by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), whose activity is solely dependent on expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Because increased expression of IFN-gamma has been reported in trauma patients, we investigated whether enhanced IDO-mediated tryptophan degradation is associated with lymphopenia and poor outcomes after major trauma. The incidence of bacteremic sepsis (BS), adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiple organ dysfunction/failure syndromes (MODS/MOF), and death was prospectively documented in 22 trauma patients with a mean ISS of 24.9 +/- 2.2. Sequential blood samples were obtained from admission through postinjury day 10. Five patients developed BS, three of whom developed ARDS; two of the three ARDS patients developed MOF and died on day 10. Trauma patients had significantly lower tryptophan levels (days 1-10), higher kynurenine:tryptophan ratios (days 1-2), and fewer lymphocytes (days 1-4) than healthy volunteers (P < 0.05). Although patients with poor outcomes (i.e., BS, ARDS, MOF, and death) had significantly lower tryptophan levels and greater lymphopenia on several days after injury, the sample size was too small to draw any definitive conclusions. These data indicate that decreased plasma tryptophan levels and lymphopenia typically occur after major trauma. A concomitant increase in kynurenine suggests that the observed tryptophan deficiency is caused, in part, by IDO-mediated tryptophan degradation.

  5. Tuning biphenyl dioxygenase for extended substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruehlmann, F.; Chen, W. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    1999-06-05

    Highly substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known to be very resistant to aerobic biodegradation, particularly the initial attack by biphenyl dioxygenase. Functional evolution of the substrate specificity of biphenyl dioxygenase was demonstrated by DNA shuffling and staggered extension process (StEP) of the bphA gene coding for the large subunit of biphenyl dioxygenase. Several variants with an extended substrate range for PCBs were selected. In contrast to the parental biphenyl dioxygenases from Burkholderia cepacia LB400 and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707, which preferentially recognize either ortho-(LB400) or para-(KF707) substituted PCBs, several variants degraded both congeners to about the same extent. These variants also exhibited superior degradation capabilities toward several tetra- and pentachlorinated PCBs as well as commercial PCB mixtures, such as Aroclor 1242 or Aroclor 1254. Sequence analysis confirmed that most variants contained at least four to six template switches. All desired variants contained the Thr335Ala and Phe336lle substitutions confirming the importance of this critical region in substrate specificity. These results suggest that the block-exchange nature of gene shuffling between a diverse class of dioxygenases may be the most useful approach for breeding novel dioxygenases for PCB degradation in the desired direction.

  6. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunoregulatory enzyme. Remarkably, we discovered IDO-specific T cells that can influence adaptive immune reactions in patients with cancer. Further, a recent phase I clinical trial demonstrated long-lasting disease stabilization without toxicity in patien...... with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were vaccinated with an IDO-derived HLA-A2-restricted epitope....

  7. Biochemical analysis of Phytolacca DOPA dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kana; Yoshida, Kazuko; Yura, Kei; Ashihara, Hiroshi; Sakuta, Masaaki

    2015-05-01

    The biochemical analysis of Phytolacca americana DOPA dioxygenases (PaDOD1 and PaDOD2) was carried out. The recombinant protein of PaDOD1 catalyzed the conversion of DOPA to betalamic acid, whereas DOD activity was not detected in PaDOD2 in vitro. While the reported motif conserved in DODs from betalain-producing plants was found in PaDOD1, a single amino acid residue alteration was detected in PaDOD2. A mutated PaDOD1 protein with a change of 177 Asn to Gly showed reduced specific activity compared with PaDOD1, while DOPA dioxygenase activity was not observed for a mutated PaDOD2 protein which had its conserved motif replaced with that of PaDOD. A three-dimensional (3D) structural model of PaDOD1 and PaDOD2 showed that the conserved motif in DODs was located in the N-terminal side of a loop, which was found close to the putative active site. The difference in stability of the loop may affect the enzymatic activity of PaDOD2.

  8. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (IDO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Marina; Wenzel, Joerg; Tüting, Thomas; Takikawa, Osamu; Bieber, Thomas; von Bubnoff, Dagmar

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that a type I interferon (IFN)-driven immune response might play an important role in the pathogenesis of lichen planus (LP), an inflammatory disorder of the skin of unclear etiology. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in affected skin from LP have been proposed to produce IFN-α/β locally, which leads to the expression of IFN-inducible chemokines such as IP10/CXCL10 in the epidermis. This chemokine recruits chemokine receptor CXCR3-expressing T-lymphocytes into the skin via CXCR3/IP10 interactions. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which degrades tryptophan and suppresses T-cell proliferation, is induced by IFNs and other inflammatory cytokines. We show that type I IFN-mediated skin disorders, such as LP, strongly express IDO in lesional skin. This expression closely correlates to the expression of the highly specific type I IFN marker MxA. We further demonstrate that the IDO+ cells in LP are large myeloid CD11c+S100+CD68− dendritic cells. Accordingly, CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells significantly up-regulate IDO gene expression and intracellular IDO protein expression after stimulation with IFN-α in vitro. These findings reveal that both proinflammatory and counterregulatory mechanisms are operative in cutaneous lesions of LP. We propose that the balance of these mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:18055547

  9. Exploring the mechanism of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Sarah J.; Mowat, Christopher G.; Chapman, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    The haem proteins TDO (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase) and IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase) are specific and powerful oxidation catalysts that insert one molecule of dioxygen into L-tryptophan in the first and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Recent crystallographic and biochemical analyses of TDO and IDO have greatly aided our understanding of the mechanisms employed by these enzymes in the binding and activation of dioxygen and tryptophan. In the present paper, we briefly discuss the function, structure and possible catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. PMID:19021508

  10. Isolation of recombinant cysteine dioxygenase protein from Trichophyton mentagrophytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašperová, A.; Kunert, J.; Horynová, M.; Weigl, E.; Sebela, M.; Lenobel, René; Raška, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2011), E456-E462 ISSN 0933-7407 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cysteine dioxygenase * dermatophytes * recombinant protein * keratinolytic fungi * cDNA Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2011

  11. Detection of meta - and ortho -cleavage dioxygenases in bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In contrast, isolates S-5, Sea-8, W-6, W-15 and Pla-1 showed activity with the enzyme catalyzing the second step in the phenol degradation meta-cleavage pathway, catechol-2,3-dioxygenase. On the basis of our previous and present analysis, the investigated isolates are considered to have a good potential for application ...

  12. Different Mechanisms of Catalytic Complex Formation in Two L-Tryptophan Processing Dioxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Nienhaus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The human heme enzymes tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (hTDO and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (hIDO catalyze the initial step in L-tryptophan (L-Trp catabolism, the insertion of dioxygen into L-Trp. Overexpression of these enzymes causes depletion of L-Trp and accumulation of metabolic products, and thereby contributes to tumor immune tolerance and immune dysregulation in a variety of disease pathologies. Understanding the assembly of the catalytically active, ternary enzyme-substrate-ligand complexes is not yet fully resolved, but an essential prerequisite for designing efficient and selective de novo inhibitors. Evidence is mounting that the ternary complex forms by sequential binding of ligand and substrate in a specific order. In hTDO, the apolar L-Trp binds first, decreasing active-site solvation and, as a result, reducing non-productive oxidation of the heme iron by the dioxygen ligand, which may leave the substrate bound to a ferric heme iron. In hIDO, by contrast, dioxygen must first coordinate to the heme iron because a bound substrate would occlude ligand access to the heme iron, so the ternary complex can no longer form. Consequently, faster association of L-Trp at high concentrations results in substrate inhibition. Here, we summarize our present knowledge of ternary complex formation in hTDO and hIDO and relate these findings to structural peculiarities of their active sites.

  13. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  14. Molecular mechanism of strict substrate specificity of an extradiol dioxygenase, DesB, derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

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    Keisuke Sugimoto

    Full Text Available DesB, which is derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6, is a type II extradiol dioxygenase that catalyzes a ring opening reaction of gallate. While typical extradiol dioxygenases show broad substrate specificity, DesB has strict substrate specificity for gallate. The substrate specificity of DesB seems to be required for the efficient growth of S. sp. SYK-6 using lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Since direct coordination of hydroxyl groups of the substrate to the non-heme iron in the active site is a critical step for the catalytic reaction of the extradiol dioxygenases, the mechanism of the substrate recognition and coordination of DesB was analyzed by biochemical and crystallographic methods. Our study demonstrated that the direct coordination between the non-heme iron and hydroxyl groups of the substrate requires a large shift of the Fe (II ion in the active site. Mutational analysis revealed that His124 and His192 in the active site are essential to the catalytic reaction of DesB. His124, which interacts with OH (4 of the bound gallate, seems to contribute to proper positioning of the substrate in the active site. His192, which is located close to OH (3 of the gallate, is likely to serve as the catalytic base. Glu377' interacts with OH (5 of the gallate and seems to play a critical role in the substrate specificity. Our biochemical and structural study showed the substrate recognition and catalytic mechanisms of DesB.

  15. INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE (IDO AND IMMUNE TOLERANCE

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    Coma-del-Corral MJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is an intracellular and extrahepatic enzyme predominantly found in many cells, especially macrophages. Tryptophan degradation generates kynurenine, and this pathway of tryptophan metabolism is an effective mechanism for modulating the immune response. The IDO facilitates immune tolerance and is one of the main actors involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, including activated T cells. IDO induces production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO radicals. Several pathways involved in the regulation of immune response are regulated by redox mechanisms. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS-RNS and other redox active molecules play key roles in immunity.

  16. 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitors: From Chemical Biology to Agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndikuryayo, Ferdinand; Moosavi, Behrooz; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2017-10-04

    The development of new herbicides is receiving considerable attention to control weed biotypes resistant to current herbicides. Consequently, new enzymes are always desired as targets for herbicide discovery. 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD, EC 1.13.11.27) is an enzyme engaged in photosynthetic activity and catalyzes the transformation of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid (HPPA) into homogentisic acid (HGA). HPPD inhibitors constitute a promising area of discovery and development of innovative herbicides with some advantages, including excellent crop selectivity, low application rates, and broad-spectrum weed control. HPPD inhibitors have been investigated for agrochemical interests, and some of them have already been commercialized as herbicides. In this review, we mainly focus on the chemical biology of HPPD, discovery of new potential inhibitors, and strategies for engineering transgenic crops resistant to current HPPD-inhibiting herbicides. The conclusion raises some relevant gaps for future research directions.

  17. INHIBITION OF INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE DOES NOT IMPEDE ORAL TOLERANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme, regulates immune tolerance through inhibition of T-cell proliferation. Pharmacologic inhibition of IDO, which causes fetal rejection and increased tumor resistance in mice, may prove useful in cancer...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Shun-ichiro [Biometal Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori Ako, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Sugimoto, Hiroshi, E-mail: sugimoto@spring8.or.jp [Biometal Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Yoshida, Tadashi [Department of Biochemistry, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Shiro, Yoshitsugu [Biometal Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori Ako, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2006-03-01

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, a haem-containing dioxygenase, was crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a haem-containing dioxygenase that catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of the pyrrole ring of indoleamines by the insertion of molecular oxygen. This reaction is the first and the rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway, the major Trp catabolic pathway in mammals. Recombinant human IDO was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique. The addition of 4-phenylimidazole as a haem ligand was essential for crystallization. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 86.1, b = 98.0, c = 131.0 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution.

  19. Cysteine dioxygenase type 1 promotes adipogenesis via interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Peng; Chen, Yi; Ji, Ning; Lin, Yunfeng; Yuan, Quan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Qianming, E-mail: qmchen@scu.edu.cn

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian cysteine dioxygenase type 1 (CDO1) is an essential enzyme for taurine biosynthesis and the biodegradation of toxic cysteine. As previously suggested, Cdo1 may be a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation, but the role of Cdo1 in adipogenesis has yet been reported. In this study, we found that the expression of Cdo1 is dramatically elevated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs). Conversely, knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 cells and mBMSCs. Mechanistically, we found Cdo1 interacted with Pparγ in response to adipogenic stimulus. Further, depletion of Cdo1 reduced the recruitment of Pparγ to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4. Collectively, our finding indicates that Cdo1 may be a co-activator of Pparγ in adipogenesis, and may contribute to the development of disease associated with excessive adipose tissue. - Highlights: • Cdo1expression is highly up-regulated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 and mBMSCs. • Depletion of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation. • Cdo1interacts with Pparγ during adipogenesis. • Knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited Pparγ binding to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4.

  20. Cloning and Expression of the Benzoate Dioxygenase Genes from Rhodococcus sp. Strain 19070

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Sandra; Eby, D. Matthew; Neidle, Ellen L.

    2001-01-01

    The bopXYZ genes from the gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain 19070 encode a broad-substrate-specific benzoate dioxygenase. Expression of the BopXY terminal oxygenase enabled Escherichia coli to convert benzoate or anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) to a nonaromatic cis-diol or catechol, respectively. This expression system also rapidly transformed m-toluate (3-methylbenzoate) to an unidentified product. In contrast, 2-chlorobenzoate was not a good substrate. The BopXYZ dioxygenase was homologous to the chromosomally encoded benzoate dioxygenase (BenABC) and the plasmid-encoded toluate dioxygenase (XylXYZ) of gram-negative acinetobacters and pseudomonads. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis failed to identify any plasmid in Rhodococcus sp. strain 19070. Catechol 1,2- and 2,3-dioxygenase activity indicated that strain 19070 possesses both meta- and ortho-cleavage degradative pathways, which are associated in pseudomonads with the xyl and ben genes, respectively. Open reading frames downstream of bopXYZ, designated bopL and bopK, resembled genes encoding cis-diol dehydrogenases and benzoate transporters, respectively. The bop genes were in the same order as the chromosomal ben genes of P. putida PRS2000. The deduced sequences of BopXY were 50 to 60% identical to the corresponding proteins of benzoate and toluate dioxygenases. The reductase components of these latter dioxygenases, BenC and XylZ, are 201 residues shorter than the deduced BopZ sequence. As predicted from the sequence, expression of BopZ in E. coli yielded an approximately 60-kDa protein whose presence corresponded to increased cytochrome c reductase activity. While the N-terminal region of BopZ was approximately 50% identical in sequence to the entire BenC or XylZ reductases, the C terminus was unlike other known protein sequences. PMID:11375157

  1. Conversion of 3-chlorocatechol by various catechol 2,3-dioxygenases and sequence analysis of the chlorocatechol dioxygenase region of Pseudomonas putida GJ31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, Astrid E.; Kingma, Jaap; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Reineke, Walter; Janssen, Dick B.

    Pseudomonas putida GJ31 contains an unusual catechol 2,3-dioxygenase that converts 3-chlorocatechol and 3-methylcatechol, which enables the organism to use both chloroaromatics and methylaromatics for growth, A 3.1-kb region of genomic DNA of strain GJ31 containing the gene for this chlorocatechol

  2. Kinetic analysis of human homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Alphonso A; Brzezinski, Kotanee T; Farrington, Natasha; Moran, Graham R

    2004-01-01

    Homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) is a mononuclear Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase that catalyzes the third step in the pathway for the catabolism of tyrosine, the conversion of homogentisate (HG) to maleylacetoacetate (MAA). We have heterologously expressed and purified native human HGD in the apo form. Steady-state analysis varying the concentration of both HG and molecular oxygen shows that the purified enzyme has a turnover number of 16 s(-1). Our data suggest that HG binds to the apo-enzyme and that the apo-HGD.HG complex does not bind Fe(II) and dissociates slowly at approximately 0.028 s(-1). The rate constant for the dissociation of Fe(II) from the holo-enzyme as measured under anaerobic conditions is 0.00004 s(-1) and indicates that this process is not relevant in steady-state turnover. The addition of HG and molecular oxygen to the holo-enzyme is formally random as the holo-enzyme reduces molecular oxygen at a rate of 1.35x10(3) M(-1) s(-1) at 4 degrees C. The term ordered with respect to the addition of substrates is most descriptive as the rate of reduction of molecular oxygen must increase in the presence of HG to sustain the observed turnover number.

  3. Engineering Non-Heme Mono- and Dioxygenases for Biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Dror

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxygenases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the introduction of one or two oxygen atoms to unreactive chemical compounds. They require reduction equivalents from NADH or NADPH and comprise metal ions, metal ion complexes, or coenzymes in their active site. Thus, for industrial purposes, oxygenases are most commonly employed using whole cell catalysis, to alleviate the need for co-factor regeneration. Biotechnological applications include bioremediation, chiral synthesis, biosensors, fine chemicals, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, food ingredients and polymers. Controlling activity and selectivity of oxygenases is therefore of great importance and of growing interest to the scientific community. This review focuses on protein engineering of non-heme monooxygenases and dioxygenases for generating improved or novel functionalities. Rational mutagenesis based on x-ray structures and sequence alignment, as well as random methods such as directed evolution, have been utilized. It is concluded that knowledge-based protein engineering accompanied with targeted libraries, is most efficient for the design and tuning of biocatalysts towards novel substrates and enhanced catalytic activity while minimizing the screening efforts.

  4. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G., E-mail: C.G.Mowat@ed.ac.uk

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •∼2800 National Cancer Institute USA compounds have been screened as potential inhibitors of TDO and/or IDO. •Seven compounds with anti-tumour properties have been identified as potent inhibitors. •NSC 36398 (taxifolin, dihydroquercetin) is selective for TDO with a K{sub i} of 16 M. •This may help further our understanding of the role of TDO in cancer. -- Abstract: The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ∼2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ∼16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported.

  5. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  6. Degradation of chloroanilines by toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida T57.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitisakulkan, Tisana; Oku, Shota; Kudo, Daizo; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Vangnai, Alisa S; Kato, Junichi

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the ability of Pseudomonas putida toluene dioxygenase to oxidize chloroanilines. Toluene-induced P. putida T57 cells degraded 4-chloroaniline (4CA) more rapidly than toluene-non-induced cells, suggesting that toluene dioxygenase pathway was involved in 4CA degradation. Escherichia coli harboring P. putida T57 genes encoding toluene dioxygenase complex (todC1C2BA) showed 4CA degradation activity, demonstrating that toluene dioxygenase oxidizes 4CA. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses identified 4-chlorocatechol and 2-amino-5-chlorophenol as reaction products, suggesting that toluene dioxygenase catalyzes both 1,2- and 2,3-dioxygenation of 4CA. A plasmid containing the entire tod operon (todC1C2BADE) was introduced to P. putida T57 to enhance its ability to degrade 4CA. Resulting P. putida T57 (pHK-C1C2BADE) showed 250-fold higher 4CA degradation activity than P. putida T57 parental strain. P. putida T57 (pHK-C1C2BADE) degraded 2-chloroaniline (2CA), 3-chloroaniline (3CA), and 3,4-dichloroaniline (34DCA) as well as 4CA, but not 3,5-dichloroaniline (35DCA). The order of the degradation rate was: 4CA > 3CA > 2CA > 34DCA. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. EPR characterization of the mononuclear Cu-containing Aspergillus japonicus quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase reveals dramatic changes upon anaerobic binding of substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooter, Ingeborg M.; Steiner, Roberto A.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Noort, Paula I. van; Egmond, Maarten R.; Huber, Martina

    Quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (2,3QD) is a copper-containing dioxygenase that catalyses the oxidation of the flavonol quercetin to 2-protocatechuoylphloroglucinol carboxylic acid with concomitant production of carbon monoxide. In contrast to iron dioxygenases, very little is known about copper

  8. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase protects corneal endothelial cells from UV mediated damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbecic, Nermin; Beutelspacher, Sven Christoph

    2006-03-01

    Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an intracellular enzyme present in dendritic cells and macrophages. It is a known modulator of T-cell response and contributes to the UV protection of the lens. There yet is no information on IDO activity in the corneal endothelium, protecting the endothelial cells from light mediated damage. We exposed murine corneal endothelial cells (MCEC) with different doses of UV-B light 280-320 nm, probed for IDO mRNA (real-time PCR) and assessed apoptosis rate (flow cytometry) and caspase-3-activity in the cells. The metabolites of the IDO catalysed reaction, l-kynurenine, was also measured. Malondialdehyde was detected for quantification of UV-B-induced oxidative stress. To investigate specificity, IDO effects were blocked by 1-methyl-tryptophan. The effects of IDO overexpression in the MCEC were assessed by transfection of an expression vector. MCEC consistently express IDO at low levels. Exposure to UV-B light led to a dose-responding upregulation of IDO; IDO was found competent converting l-tryptophan into l-kynurenine. Irradiation led to increased apoptosis and caspase-3-activity of MCEC. Supplementation of l-kynurenine or overexpression of IDO in the MCEC could reduce apoptosis significantly following UV-B irradiation. Inhibition of IDO by 1-MT was potent to reverse this effect. IDO and its metabolite l-kynurenine can protect corneal endothelial cells from UV-B-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. It may be an active protection mechanism against corneal endothelial damage.

  9. An iron-oxygen intermediate formed during the catalytic cycle of cysteine dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokov, E P; Faponle, A S; Davies, C G; Quesne, M G; Turner, R; Fellner, M; Souness, R J; Wilbanks, S M; de Visser, S P; Jameson, G N L

    2016-07-07

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a key enzyme in the breakdown of cysteine, but its mechanism remains controversial. A combination of spectroscopic and computational studies provides the first evidence of a short-lived intermediate in the catalytic cycle. The intermediate decays within 20 ms and has absorption maxima at 500 and 640 nm.

  10. Benzoate degradation by Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after dormancy: Characterization of dioxygenases involved in the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyanikova, Inna P; Emelyanova, Elena V; Borzova, Oksana V; Golovleva, Ludmila A

    2016-01-01

    The process of benzoate degradation by strain Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after a five-year dormancy was investigated and its peculiarities were revealed. The strain was shown to be capable of growth on benzoate at a concentration of up to 10 g L(-1). The substrate specificity of benzoate dioxygenase (BDO) during the culture growth on a medium with a low (200-250 mg L(-1)) and high (4 g L(-1)) concentration of benzoate was assessed. BDO of R. opacus 1CP was shown to be an extremely narrow specificity enzyme. Out of 31 substituted benzoates, only with one, 3-chlorobenzoate, its activity was higher than 9% of that of benzoate. Two dioxygenases, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (Cat 1,2-DO) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCA 3,4-DO), were identified in a cell-free extract, purified and characterized. The substrate specificity of Cat 1,2-DO isolated from cells of strain 1CP after the dormancy was found to differ significantly from that of Cat 1,2-DO isolated earlier from cells of this strain grown on benzoate. By its substrate specificity, the described Cat 1,2-DO was close to the Cat 1,2-DO from strain 1CP grown on 4-methylbenzoate. Neither activity nor inhibition by protocatechuate was observed during the reaction of Cat 1,2-DO with catechol, and catechol had no inhibitory effect on the reaction of PCA 3,4-DO with protocatechuate.

  11. A biological pathway linking inflammation and depression: activation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christmas DM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available David M Christmas, JP Potokar, Simon JC DaviesAcademic Unit of Psychiatry, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK A presentation relating to this manuscript was made by Dr David Christmas at the 9th International Meeting on Clinical Pharmacology in Psychiatry (9th IMCPP in Copenhagen, Denmark in September 2010Abstract: This article highlights the evidence linking depression to increased inflammatory drive and explores putative mechanisms for the association by reviewing both preclinical and clinical literature. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is induced by proinflammatory cytokines and may form a link between immune functioning and altered neurotransmission, which results in depression. Increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity may cause both tryptophan depletion and increased neurotoxic metabolites of the kynurenine pathway, two alterations which have been hypothesized to cause depression. The tryptophan-kynurenine pathway is comprehensively described with a focus on the evidence linking metabolite alterations to depression. The use of immune-activated groups at high risk of depression have been used to explore these hypotheses; we focus on the studies involving chronic hepatitis C patients receiving interferon-alpha, an immune activating cytokine. Findings from this work have led to novel strategies for the future development of antidepressants including inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, moderating the cytokines which activate it, or addressing other targets in the kynurenine pathway.Keywords: depression, inflammation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, kynurenine, serotonin, tryptophan

  12. Diversity of 16S rRNA and dioxygenase genes detected in coal-tar-contaminated site undergoing active bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M; Khanna, S

    2010-04-01

    In order to develop effective bioremediation strategies for polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation, the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities need to be better understood, especially in highly PAH contaminated sites in which little information on the cultivation-independent communities is available. Coal-tar-contaminated soil was collected, which consisted of 122.5 mg g(-1) total extractable PAH compounds. Biodegradation studies with this soil indicated the presence of microbial community that is capable of degrading the model PAH compounds viz naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene at 50 ppm each. PCR clone libraries were established from the DNA of the coal-tar-contaminated soil, targeting the 16S rRNA to characterize (i) the microbial communities, (ii) partial gene fragment encoding the Rieske iron sulfur center (alpha-subunit) common to all PAH dioxygenase enzymes and (iii) beta-subunit of dioxygenase. Phylotypes related to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria), Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococci were detected in 16S rRNA derived clone libraries. Many of the gene fragment sequences of alpha-subunit and beta-subunit of dioxygenase obtained from the respective clone libraries fell into clades that are distinct from the reference dioxygenase gene sequences. Presence of consensus sequence of the Rieske type [2Fe-2S] cluster binding site suggested that these gene fragments encode for alpha-subunit of dioxygenase gene. Sequencing of the cloned libraries representing alpha-subunit gene fragments (Rf1) and beta-subunit of dioxygenase showed the presence of hitherto unidentified dioxygenase in coal-tar-contaminated soil. The combination of the Rieske primers and bacterial community profiling represents a powerful tool for both assessing bioremediation potential and the exploration of novel dioxygenase genes in a contaminated environment.

  13. Purification and Characterization of Carbazole 1,9a-Dioxygenase, a Three-Component Dioxygenase System of Pseudomonas resinovorans Strain CA10

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Jeong-Won; Nojiri, Hideaki; Noguchi, Haruko; Uchimura, Hiromasa; Yoshida, Takako; Habe, Hiroshi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Omori, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO) system of Pseudomonas resinovorans strain CA10 consists of terminal oxygenase (CarAa), ferredoxin (CarAc), and ferredoxin reductase (CarAd). Each component of CARDO was expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) as a native form (CarAa) or a His-tagged form (CarAc and CarAd) and was purified to apparent homogeneity. CarAa was found to be trimeric and to have one Rieske type [2Fe-2S] cluster and one mononuclear iron center in each monomer. Both His-ta...

  14. Understanding human thiol dioxygenase enzymes: structure to function, and biology to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Bibekananda; Kulharia, Mahesh; Mantha, Anil K

    2017-04-01

    Amino acid metabolism is a significant metabolic activity in humans, especially of sulphur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine (Cys). Cys is cytotoxic and neurotoxic in nature; hence, mammalian cells maintain a constant intracellular level of Cys. Metabolism of Cys is mainly regulated by two thiol dioxygenases: cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and 2-aminoethanethiol dioxygenase (ADO). CDO and ADO are the only human thiol dioxygenases reported with a role in Cys metabolism and localized to mitochondria. This metabolic pathway is important in various human disorders, as it is responsible for the synthesis of antioxidant glutathione and is also for the synthesis of hypotaurine and taurine. CDO is the most extensively studied protein, whose high-resolution crystallographic structures have been solved. As compared to CDO, ADO is less studied, even though it has a key role in cysteamine metabolism. To further understand ADO's structure and function, the three-dimensional structures have been predicted from I-TASSER and SWISS-MODEL servers and validated with PROCHECK software. Structural superimposition approach using iPBA web server further confirmed near-identical structures (including active sites) for the predicted protein models of ADO as compared to CDO. In addition, protein-protein interaction and their association in patho-physiology are crucial in understanding protein functions. Both ADO and CDO interacting partner profiles have been presented using STRING database. In this study, we have predicted a 3D model structure for ADO and summarized the biological roles and the pathological consequences which are associated with the altered expression and functioning of ADO and CDO in case of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2017 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  15. Novel carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase catalyzes the first dedicated step in saffron crocin biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Frusciante, Sarah

    2014-08-05

    Crocus sativus stigmas are the source of the saffron spice and accumulate the apocarotenoids crocetin, crocins, picrocrocin, and safranal, responsible for its color, taste, and aroma. Through deep transcriptome sequencing, we identified a novel dioxygenase, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2 (CCD2), expressed early during stigma development and closely related to, but distinct from, the CCD1 dioxygenase family. CCD2 is the only identified member of a novel CCD clade, presents the structural features of a bona fide CCD, and is able to cleave zeaxanthin, the presumed precursor of saffron apocarotenoids, both in Escherichia coli and in maize endosperm. The cleavage products, identified through high-resolution mass spectrometry and comigration with authentic standards, are crocetin dialdehyde and crocetin, respectively. In vitro assays show that CCD2 cleaves sequentially the 7,8 and 7′,8′ double bonds adjacent to a 3-OH-β-ionone ring and that the conversion of zeaxanthin to crocetin dialdehyde proceeds via the C30 intermediate 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal. In contrast, zeaxanthin cleavage dioxygenase (ZCD), an enzyme previously claimed to mediate crocetin formation, did not cleave zeaxanthin or 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal in the test systems used. Sequence comparison and structure prediction suggest that ZCD is an N-truncated CCD4 form, lacking one blade of the β-propeller structure conserved in all CCDs. These results constitute strong evidence that CCD2 catalyzes the first dedicated step in crocin biosynthesis. Similar to CCD1, CCD2 has a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that it may cleave carotenoids localized in the chromoplast outer envelope.

  16. An isoelectronic NO dioxygenase reaction using a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex and nitrosonium ion†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Atsutoshi; Han, Jung Eun; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-01-01

    Reaction of a nonheme iron(III)-peroxo complex, [FeIII(14-TMC)(O2)]+, with NO+, a transformation which is essentially isoelectronic with that for nitric oxide dioxygenases [Fe(III)(O2•−) + NO], affords an iron(IV)-oxo complex, [FeIV(14-TMC)(O)]2+, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), followed by conversion to an iron(III)-nitrato complex, [FeIII(14-TMC)(NO3)(F)]+. PMID:24394960

  17. Identification of metabolites from phenanthrene oxidation by phenoloxidases and dioxygenases of Polyporus sp. S133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadibarata, Tony; Tachibana, Sanro; Askari, Muhamad

    2011-03-01

    Phenanthrene degradation by Polyporus sp. S133, a new phenanthrene-degrading strain, was investigated in this work. The analysis of degradation was performed by calculation of the remaining phenanthrene by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. When cells were grown in phenanthrene culture after 92 h, all but 200 and 250 mg/l of the phenanthrene had been degraded. New metabolic pathways of phenanthrene and a better understanding of the phenoloxidases and dioxygenase mechanism involved in degradation of phenanthrene were explored in this research. The mechanism of degradation was determined through identification of the several metabolites; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 2,2'-diphenic acid, salicylic acid, and catechol. 9,10-Oxidation and ring cleavage to give 9,10-phenanthrenequinone is the major fate of phenanthrene in ligninolytic Polyporus sp. S133. The identification of 2,2'-diphenic acid in culture extracts indicates that phenanthrene was initially attacked through dioxigenation at C9 and C10 to give cis-9,10-dihydrodiol. Dehydrogenation of phenanthrene-cis-9,10-dihydrodiol to produce the corresponding diol, followed by ortho-cleavage of the oxygenated ring, produced 2,2'-diphenic acid. Several enzymes (manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, laccase, 1,2-dioxygenase, and 2,3-dioxygenase) produced by Polyporus sp. S133 was detected during the incubation. The highest level of activity was shown at 92 h of culture.

  18. Direct Ring Fission of Salicylate by a Salicylate 1,2-Dioxygenase Activity from Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintner, Jan-Peter; Lechner, Christa; Riegert, Ulrich; Kuhm, Andrea Elisabeth; Storm, Thomas; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Stolz, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    In cell extracts of Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans strain BN12, an enzymatic activity was detected which converted salicylate in an oxygen-dependent but NAD(P)H-independent reaction to a product with an absorbance maximum at 283 nm. This metabolite was isolated, purified, and identified by mass spectrometry and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as 2-oxohepta-3,5-dienedioic acid. This metabolite could be formed only by direct ring fission of salicylate by a 1,2-dioxygenase reaction. Cell extracts from P. salicylatoxidans also oxidized 5-aminosalicylate, 3-, 4-, and 5-chlorosalicylate, 3-, 4-, and 5-methylsalicylate, 3- and 5-hydroxysalicylate (gentisate), and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate. The dioxygenase was purified and shown to consist of four identical subunits with a molecular weight of about 45,000. The purified enzyme showed higher catalytic constants with gentisate or 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate than with salicylate. It was therefore concluded that P. salicylatoxidans synthesized a gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase with an extraordinary substrate range, which also allowed the oxidation of salicylate. PMID:11698383

  19. Characterization of oxylipins and dioxygenase genes in the asexual fungus Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalkhove Stefanie IC

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus niger is an ascomycetous fungus that is known to reproduce through asexual spores, only. Interestingly, recent genome analysis of A. niger has revealed the presence of a full complement of functional genes related to sexual reproduction 1. An example of such genes are the dioxygenase genes which in Aspergillus nidulans, have been shown to be connected to oxylipin production and regulation of both sexual and asexual sporulation 234. Nevertheless, the presence of sex related genes alone does not confirm sexual sporulation in A. niger. Results The current study shows experimentally that A. niger produces the oxylipins 8,11-dihydroxy octadecadienoic acid (8,11-diHOD, 5,8-dihydroxy octadecadienoic acid (5,8-diHOD, lactonized 5,8-diHOD, 8-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid (8-HOD, 10-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid (10-HOD, small amounts of 8-hydroxy octadecamonoenoic acid (8-HOM, 9-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HOD and 13-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid (13-HOD. Importantly, this study shows that the A. niger genome contains three putative dioxygenase genes, ppoA, ppoC and ppoD. Expression analysis confirmed that all three genes are indeed expressed under the conditions tested. Conclusion A. niger produces the same oxylipins and has similar dioxygenase genes as A. nidulans. Their presence could point towards the existence of sexual reproduction in A. niger or a broader role for the gene products in physiology, than just sexual development.

  20. Characterization of dioxygenases and biosurfactants produced by crude oil degrading soil bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhakumar Muthukamalam

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Role of microbes in bioremediation of oil spills has become inevitable owing to their eco friendly nature. This study focused on the isolation and characterization of bacterial strains with superior oil degrading potential from crude-oil contaminated soil. Three such bacterial strains were selected and subsequently identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as Corynebacterium aurimucosum, Acinetobacter baumannii and Microbacterium hydrocarbonoxydans respectively. The specific activity of catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12O and catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23O was determined in these three strains wherein the activity of C12O was more than that of C23O. Among the three strains, Microbacterium hydrocarbonoxydans exhibited superior crude oil degrading ability as evidenced by its superior growth rate in crude oil enriched medium and enhanced activity of dioxygenases. Also degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH in crude oil was higher with Microbacterium hydrocarbonoxydans. The three strains also produced biosurfactants of glycolipid nature as indicated d by biochemical, FTIR and GCMS analysis. These findings emphasize that such bacterial strains with superior oil degrading capacity may find their potential application in bioremediation of oil spills and conservation of marine and soil ecosystem.

  1. Function of different amino acid residues in the reaction mechanism of gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases deduced from the analysis of mutants of the salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Erik; Ferraroni, Marta; Bürger, Sibylle; Steimer, Lenz; Peng, Grace; Briganti, Fabrizio; Stolz, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The genome of the α-proteobacterium Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans codes for a ferrous iron containing ring-fission dioxygenase which catalyzes the 1,2-cleavage of (substituted) salicylate(s), gentisate (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate), and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate. Sequence alignments suggested that the "salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase" (SDO) from this strain is homologous to gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases found in bacteria, archaea and fungi. In the present study the catalytic mechanism of the SDO and gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases in general was analyzed based on sequence alignments, mutational and previously performed crystallographic studies and mechanistic comparisons with "extradiol- dioxygenases" which cleave aromatic nuclei in the 2,3-position. Different highly conserved amino acid residues that were supposed to take part in binding and activation of the organic substrates were modified in the SDO by site-specific mutagenesis and the enzyme variants subsequently analyzed for the conversion of salicylate, gentisate and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate. The analysis of enzyme variants which carried exchanges in the positions Arg83, Trp104, Gly106, Gln108, Arg127, His162 and Asp174 demonstrated that Arg83 and Arg127 were indispensable for enzymatic activity. In contrast, residual activities were found for variants carrying mutations in the residues Trp104, Gly106, Gln108, His162, and Asp174 and some of these mutants still could oxidize gentisate, but lost the ability to convert salicylate. The results were used to suggest a general reaction mechanism for gentisate-1,2-dioxygenases and to assign to certain amino acid residues in the active site specific functions in the cleavage of (substituted) salicylate(s). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Degradation of chloroaromatics : Purification and characterization of a novel type of chlorocatechol 2,3-dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida GJ31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Kasberg, Thomas; Müller, Dagmar; Mars, Astrid E.; Janssen, Dick B.; Reineke, Walter

    A purification procedure for a new kind of extradiol dioxygenase, termed chlorocatechol 2,3-dioxygenase, that converts 3-chlorocatechol productively was developed. Structural and kinetic properties of the enzyme, which is part of the degradative pathway used for growth of Pseudomonas putida GJ31

  3. 3-Sulphocatechol 2,3-dioxygenase and other dioxygenases (EC 1.13.11.2 and EC 1.14.12.-) in the degradative pathways of 2-aminobenzenesulphonic, benzenesulphonic and 4-toluenesulphonic acids in Alcaligenes sp. strain O-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, F; Leisinger, T; Cook, A M

    1994-07-01

    Alcaligenes sp. strain O-1 utilizes three sulphonated aromatic compounds as sole sources of carbon and energy for growth in minimal salts medium-benzenesulphonate (BS), 4-toluenesulphonate (TS) and 2-aminobenzenesulphonate (2AS). The degradative pathway(s) in 2AS-grown cells are initiated with membrane transport, NADH-dependent dioxygenation and meta ring cleavage. The specific activity of the NADH-dependent dioxygenation(s) varied with the growth phase and was maximal near the end of exponential growth for each growth substrate. Cells were harvested at this point from BS-, TS- and 2AS-salts medium. Cells grown with each sulphonated substrate could oxygenate all three compounds, but only 2AS-grown cells consumed 2 mol O2 per mol 2AS or BS or TS. BS- and TS-grown cells consumed 2 mol O2 per mol BS or TS but failed to oxygenate the product of oxygenation of 2AS, 3-sulphocatechol (3SC). These observations were repeated with cell extracts and we concluded that there were two sets of desulphonative pathways in the organism, one for 2AS and one for BS and TS. We confirmed this hypothesis by separating the degradative enzymes from 2AS-, BS- or TS-grown cells. A 2AS dioxygenase system and a 3SC-2,3-dioxygenase (3SC23O) were detected in 2AS-grown cells only. In both BS- and TS-grown cells a dioxygenase system for BS and TS was observed as well as a principal catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O-III), neither of which was present in 2AS-grown cells. The 3SC23O was purified to near homogeneity, found to be monomeric (M(r) 42,000), and to catalyse 2,3-dioxygenation to a product that decayed spontaneously to sulphite and 2-hydroxymuconate. The 2AS dioxygenase system could cause not only deamination of 2AS but also desulphonation of BS and TS. The BS dioxygenase could desulphonate BS and apparently either desulphonate or deaminate 2AS. Strain O-1 thus seems to contain two putative, independently regulated operons involving oxygenation and spontaneous desulphonation(s). One operon

  4. Structure of the 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, R; Lebedev, A; Erskine, P; Guo, J; Wood, S P; Hopper, D J; Rigby, S E J; Cooper, J B

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C-C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in the predominantly hydrophobic active-site pocket where it undergoes peroxide radical-mediated heterolysis.

  5. Broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes and the bioremediation of hazardous aromatic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonus, P.A.; Nies, L.

    1996-01-01

    The release of aromatic compounds to the environment is a major source of global pollution. In particular, the contamination of soil and groundwater with benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) is the most ubiquitous form of aromatic pollution. The major source of BTX contamination is the release of gasoline and other petroleum products. This research focused on the improvement of bioremediation of BTX through a better understanding of broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes produced by soil and sediment bacteria. The investigation utilized pure bacterial strains isolated on biphenyl, naphthalene, or toluene. These isolated aerobic bacteria were then used to investigate the specificity of the initial enzymatic attack on aromatic compounds including BTX and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The enzymatic specificity and competency of the five isolates selected for study were determined through the use of growth tests and two rapid assay techniques. The growth tests were conducted on mineral agar plates or in liquid cultures, and they were used to determine substrate specificity. In addition, rapid assays for both BTX and PCBs were carried out using various growth substrates. These assays allowed further clarification of the specificity of the dioxygenase enzymes involved in aromatic degradation. Preliminary results of the PCB assay show that biphenyl and naphthalene isolated organisms grown on biphenyl, benzoate, naphthalene, and succinate maintain production of broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes able to degrade PCBs. Likewise, the BTX assay confirms that biphenyl and naphthalene selected organisms grown on their respective selection substrates completely degrade BTX including all three xylene isomers. In comparison, the toluene selected organism that was studied was unable to degrade PCBs, but it was able to degrade all BTX constituents

  6. A novel l-isoleucine-4?-dioxygenase and l-isoleucine dihydroxylation cascade in Pantoea ananatis

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnov, Sergey V; Sokolov, Pavel M; Kotlyarova, Veronika A; Samsonova, Natalya N; Kodera, Tomohiro; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Torii, Takayoshi; Hibi, Makoto; Shimizu, Sakayu; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Ogawa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    A unique operon structure has been identified in the genomes of several plant- and insect-associated bacteria. The distinguishing feature of this operon is the presence of tandem hilA and hilB genes encoding dioxygenases belonging to the PF13640 and PF10014 (BsmA) Pfam families, respectively. The genes encoding HilA and HilB from Pantoea ananatis AJ13355 were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The culturing of E. coli cells expressing hilA (E. coli-HilA) or both hilA and hilB (E. coli-...

  7. Spontaneous cytotoxic T-Cell reactivity against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Køllgaard, Tania; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    2011-01-01

    Several lines of data have suggested a possible link between the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-like protein IDO2 and cancer. First, IDO2 expression has been described in human tumors, including renal, gastric, colon, and pancreatic tumors. Second, the apparent selective inhibition of IDO2...... in mouse models of cancer in a nontoxic fashion. Here, we describe the immunogenicity of IDO2 by showing the presence of spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO2 in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and cancer patients. Furthermore, we show that these IDO2-specific T cells are cytotoxic...

  8. 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors in combination with safeners: solutions for modern and sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Hartmut; Lange, Gudrun; Müller, Thomas; Rosinger, Chris; Willms, Lothar; van Almsick, Andreas

    2013-09-02

    Inhibitors of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) prevent plant carotenoid pigment formation, which in turn leads to chlorophyll degradation. This "bleaching" herbicide mode of action provides weed-control products for various crops, such as rice, corn, and cereals. Combinations with suitable safeners allow the full exploitation of the potential of this compound class to selectively control major weed problems, including rapidly increasing cases of resistance against other important herbicide classes. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Nitroaromatic Contaminant Transformations by Nitroarene Dioxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sarah G.; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.; Hofstetter, Thomas B.

    2014-05-01

    Dioxygenation is an important biochemical reaction that often initiates the mineralization of recalcitrant organic contaminants such as nitroaromatic explosives, chlorinated benzenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. However, to assess the extent of dioxygenation in contaminated environments is difficult because of competing transformation processes and further reactions of the dioxygenation products. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers a new approach to reliably quantify biodegradation initiated by dioxygenation based on changes in stable isotope ratios of the pollutant. For CSIA it is essential to know the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) pertinent to the dioxygenation mechanism of organic contaminants. Unfortunately, the range of KIEs of such reactions is poorly constrained although many dioxygenase enzymes with a broad substrate specificity have been reported. Dioxygenase enzymes usually exhibit complex reaction kinetics involving multiple substrates and substrate-specific binding modes which makes the determination of KIEs challenging. The goal of this study was to explore the magnitude and variability of 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-KIEs for the dioxygenation of one contaminant class, that is nitroaromatic contaminants (NACs). To this end, we investigated the C, H, and N isotope fractionation during the dioxygenation of nitrobenzene (NB), 2-nitrotoluene (2-NT), and 3-nitrotoluene (3-NT) by pure cultures, E. coli clones, cell extracts, and purified enzymes. From isotope fractionations measured in the substrates and reaction products, we determined dioxygenation KIEs for different combinations of the three substrates with nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) and 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase (2NTDO). The 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-KIEs for the dioxygenation of NB by NBDO were consistent for all experimental systems considered (i.e., Comamonas sp. Strain JS765, E. coli clones, cell extracts of E. coli clones, and purified NBDO). This observation suggests that the isotope

  10. Catalytic Mechanism of Salicylate Dioxygenase: QM/MM Simulations Reveal the Origin of Unexpected Regioselectivity of the Ring Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhendu; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-07-03

    Salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase (SDO) was the first enzyme discovered, in the family of iron dioxygenases, to catalyze the ring cleavage of a monohydroxylated aromatic compound, salicylate, without a proton donor. Salicylate is not electron-rich like the familiar dihydroxy or aromatic substrates with an electron-donating group that are utilized in the well-known dioxygenases. SDO carries out the intramolecular C-C bond cleavage in salicylate bearing the OH and COOH groups with high regioselectivity in comparison with the extradiol and intradiol dioxygenases. The catalytic cleavage of a nonactivated substrate like salicylate that lacks an electron-donating group, also in the absence of a proton source, raises many puzzling questions about the oxy intermediates in the reaction pathway of dioxygenase enzymes in general. To answer these fundamental queries, we have investigated the full catalytic mechanism of SDO by a combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. Herein, our QM/MM study has several unexpected and interesting implications for the mechanistic pathway of SDO in comparison to the experimental observations. Importantly, it unravels the basis for the unexpected "intra"-cleavage regioselectivity in SDO. Ostensibly a similar alkylperoxo intermediate is formed in SDO much like in the extradiol and intradiol dioxygenases. In stark contrast to the two diol enzymes, the O-O bond breaking leads to an unprotonated gem-hydroxy carboxylate intermediate, a paradigm analogue of the elusive gem diol intermediate. This unprotonated gem-hydroxy carboxylate intermediate exclusively dictates the C-C cleavage regiospecificity in SDO, which is unprecedented in the family of dioxygenases. It forms a seven-membered lactone species, which eventually forms the ring-cleavage final product by incorporation of two oxygen atoms in the salicylate. Thus, our computational study unravels a detailed reaction pathway of the oxidative cleavage of salicylate

  11. Genetic Analysis of Dioxin Dioxygenase of Sphingomonas sp. Strain RW1: Catabolic Genes Dispersed on the Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Armengaud, Jean; Happe, Birgitta; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    1998-01-01

    The dioxin dioxygenase of Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 activates dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran for further metabolism by introducing two atoms of oxygen at a pair of vicinal carbon atoms, one of which is involved in one of the bridges between the two aromatic rings, i.e., an angular dioxygenation. The dxnA1 and dxnA2 cistrons encoding this dioxygenase have been cloned and shown to be located just upstream of a hydrolase gene which specifies an enzyme involved in the subsequent step of the ...

  12. Synergistic Substrate and Oxygen Activation in Salicylate Dioxygenase Revealed by QM/MM Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhendu; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-01-18

    Salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase (SDO) is the first enzyme to be discovered to catalyze the oxidative cleavage of a monohydroxylated aromatic compound, namely salicylate, instead of the well-known electron-rich substrates. We have investigated the mechanism of dioxygen activation in SDO by QM/MM calculations. Our study reveals that the non-heme Fe(II) center in SDO activates salicylate and O2 synergistically through a strong covalent interaction to facilitate the reductive cleavage of O2. A covalent salicylate-Fe(II) -O2 complex is the reactive oxygen species in this case, and its electronic structure is best described as being between the two limiting cases, Fe(II)-O2 and Fe(II)-O2˙(-), with partial electron transfer from the activated salicylate to O2 via the Fe center. Thus SDO employs a synergistic strategy of substrate and oxygen activation to carry out the catalytic reaction, which is unprecedented in the family of iron dioxygenases. Moreover, O2 activation in SDO happens without the assistance of a proton source. Our study essentially shows a new mechanistic possibility for O2 activation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 activity correlates with immune system abnormalities in multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonanno Giuseppina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple myeloma (MM is a plasma cell malignancy with a multifaceted immune dysfunction. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 degrades tryptophan into kynurenine (KYN, which inhibits effector T cells and promote regulatory T-cell (Treg differentiation. It is presently unknown whether MM cells express IDO1 and whether IDO1 activity correlates with immune system impairment. Methods We investigated IDO1 expression in 25 consecutive patients with symptomatic MM and in 7 patients with either monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS; n=3 or smoldering MM (SMM; n=4. IDO1-driven tryptophan breakdown was correlated with the release of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and with the frequency of Treg cells and NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells. Results KYN was increased in 75% of patients with symptomatic MM and correlated with the expansion of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells and the contraction of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells. In vitro, primary MM cells promoted the differentiation of allogeneic CD4+ T cells into bona fide CD4+CD25hiFoxP3hi Treg cells and suppressed IFN-γ/IL-2 secretion, while preserving IL-4 and IL-10 production. Both Treg expansion and inhibition of Th1 differentiation by MM cells were reverted, at least in part, by d,l-1-methyl-tryptophan, a chemical inhibitor of IDO. Notably, HGF levels were higher within the BM microenvironment of patients with IDO+ myeloma disease compared with patients having IDO- MM. Mechanistically, the antagonism of MET receptor for HGF with SU11274, a MET inhibitor, prevented HGF-induced AKT phosphorylation in MM cells and translated into reduced IDO protein levels and functional activity. Conclusions These data suggest that IDO1 expression may contribute to immune suppression in patients with MM and possibly other HGF-producing cancers.

  14. Effect of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Expressed in HTR-8/SVneo Cells on Decidual NK Cell Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yanli; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Fen; Dong, Baihua; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-05-01

    To study the effect of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expressed in HTR-8/SVneo cells on NKG2D and NKp46 expression and cytotoxicity of decidual NK (dNK) and peripheral NK (pNK) cells. CD56(+) dNK and pNK cells purified were cultured with HTR-8/SVneo cell conditioned medium (CM), 1-MT+HTR-8/SVneo cell CM, and complete RPMI 1640 medium (negative control) in vitro. The mRNA and protein expression of NKG2D and NKp46 in NK cells were then assessed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Their cytotoxicity was evaluated with LDH assays, and TNF-α secretion was analyzed by ELISA. For dNK cells, the mRNA and protein expression of NKp46 as well as NKG2D did not differ significantly among the three groups (P > 0.05), whereas for pNK cells, the expression level was significantly decreased in HTR-8/SVneo cell CM group than the other two groups (P cytotoxicity and TNF-α secretion than the other two groups (P 0.05). IDO expressed by HTR-8/SVneo cells can down-regulate NKp46 and NKG2D expression and reduce cytotoxicity in pNK cells, and may contribute to keep dNK cytotoxicity at a low level, suggesting an important role for IDO in the maintenance of normal pregnancy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Purification and partial characterization of the extradiol dioxygenase, 2'-carboxy-2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase, in the fluorene degradation pathway from Rhodococcus sp. strain DFA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Tatsuro; Matsuzawa, Jun; Suzuki-Minakuchi, Chiho; Okada, Kazunori; Nojiri, Hideaki; Iwata, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Type II extradiol dioxygenase, 2'-carboxy-2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase (FlnD1D2) involved in the fluorene degradation pathway of Rhodococcus sp. DFA3 was purified to homogeneity from a heterologously expressing Escherichia coli. Gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE suggested that FlnD1D2 is an α4β4 heterooctamer and that the molecular masses of these subunits are 30 and 9.9 kDa, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity were 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively. Assessment of metal ion effects suggested that exogenously supplied Fe(2+) increases enzyme activity 3.2-fold. FlnD1D2 catalyzed meta-cleavage of 2'-carboxy-2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl homologous compounds, but not single-ring catecholic compounds. The Km and kcat/Km values of FlnD1D2 for 2,3-dihidroxybiphenyl were 97.2 μM and 1.5 × 10(-2) μM(-1)sec(-1), and for 2,2',3-trihydroxybiphenyl, they were 168.0 μM and 0.5 × 10(-2) μM(-1)sec(-1), respectively. A phylogenetic tree of the large and small subunits of type II extradiol dioxygenases suggested that FlnD1D2 constitutes a novel subgroup among heterooligomeric type II extradiol dioxygenases.

  16. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and survivin peptide vaccine combined with temozolomide in metastatic melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nitschke, Nikolaj Juul; Bjoern, Jon; Iversen, Trine Zeeberg

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and survivin have been identified as potential targets for cancer vaccination. In this phase II study a vaccine using the peptides Sur1M2 and IDO5 was combined with the chemotherapy temozolomide (TMZ) for treatment of metastatic melanoma patients....... The aim was to simultaneously target several immune inhibiting mechanisms and the highly malignant cells expressing survivin. METHODS: HLA-A2 positive patients with advanced malignant melanoma were treated biweekly with 150 mg/m2 TMZ daily for 7 days followed by subcutaneous vaccination with 250 µg...... of each peptide in 500 µL Montanide solution at day 8. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was used as an adjuvant and topical imiquimod was applied prior to vaccination. Treatment was continued until disease progression. Clinical response was evaluated by PET-CT and immunological outcome...

  17. Targeting the immunoregulatory indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase pathway in immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Burles A; Baban, Babak; Mellor, Andrew L

    2009-01-01

    Natural immune tolerance is a formidable barrier to successful immunotherapy to treat established cancers and chronic infections. Conversely, creating robust immune tolerance via immunotherapy is the major goal in treating autoimmune and allergic diseases, and enhancing survival of transplanted organs and tissues. In this review, we focus on a natural mechanism that creates local T-cell tolerance in many clinically relevant settings of chronic inflammation involving expression of the cytosolic enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by specialized subsets of dendritic cells. IDO-expressing dendritic cells suppress antigen-specific T-cell responses directly, and induce bystander suppression by activating regulatory T cells. Thus, manipulating IDO is a promising strategy to treat a range of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:20161103

  18. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase specific, cytotoxic T cells as immune regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Svane, Inge Marie

    2011-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunoregulatory enzyme that is implicated in suppressing T-cell immunity in normal and pathologic settings. Here, we describe that spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO exists not only in patients with cancer but also in healthy persons. We...... show that the presence of such IDO-specific CD8(+) T cells boosted T-cell immunity against viral or tumor-associated antigens by eliminating IDO+ suppressive cells. This had profound effects on the balance between interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing CD4(+) T cells and regulatory T cells. Furthermore....... We describe for the first time effector T cells with a general regulatory function that may play a vital role for the mounting or maintaining of an effective adaptive immune response. We suggest terming such effector T cells "supporter T cells." (Blood. 2011;117(7):2200-2210)...

  19. Degradation of benzotrifluoride via the dioxygenase pathway in Rhodococcus sp. 065240.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kenichi; Wachi, Masaaki; Tsuchida, Sakiko; Kitazume, Tomoya; Iwai, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    We previously isolated Rhodococcus sp. 065240, which catalyzes the defluorination of benzotrifluoride (BTF). In order to investigate the mechanism of this degradation of BTF, we performed proteomic analysis of cells grown with or without BTF. Three proteins, which resemble dioxygenase pathway enzymes responsible for isopropylbenzene degradation from Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2, were induced by BTF. Genomic PCR and DNA sequence analysis revealed that the Rhodococcus sp. 065240 carries the gene cluster, btf, which is highly homologous to the ipb gene cluster from R. erythropolis BD2. A mutant strain, which could not catalyze BTF defluorination, was isolated from 065240 strain by UV mutagenesis. The mutant strain had one mutation in the btfT gene, which encodes a response regulator of the two component system. The defluorinating ability of the mutant strain was recovered by complementation of btfT. These results suggest that the btf gene cluster is responsible for degradation of BTF.

  20. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase promotes peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer by inducing an immunosuppressive environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Yuko; Kobayashi, Aya; Toujima, Saori; Shiro, Michihisa; Mizoguchi, Mika; Mabuchi, Yasushi; Yagi, Shigetaka; Minami, Sawako; Takikawa, Osamu; Ino, Kazuhiko

    2014-08-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme that has immunoregulatory functions. Our prior study showed that tumoral IDO overexpression is involved in disease progression and impaired patient survival in human ovarian cancer, although its mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the role of IDO during the process of peritoneal dissemination of ovarian cancer. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase cDNA was transfected into the murine ovarian carcinoma cell line OV2944-HM-1, establishing stable clones of IDO-overexpressing cells (HM-1-IDO). Then HM-1-IDO or control vector-transfected cells (HM-1-mock) were i.p. transplanted into syngeneic immunocompetent mice. The HM-1-IDO-transplanted mice showed significantly shortened survival compared with HM-1-mock-transplanted (control) mice. On days 11 and 14 following transplantation, the tumor weight of peritoneal dissemination and ascites volume were significantly increased in HM-1-IDO-transplanted mice compared with those of control mice. This tumor-progressive effect was coincident with significantly reduced numbers of CD8(+) T cells and natural killer cells within tumors as well as increased levels of transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-10 in ascites. Finally, treatment with the IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-tryptophan significantly suppressed tumor dissemination and ascites with reduced transforming growth factor-β secretion. These findings showed that tumor-derived IDO promotes the peritoneal dissemination of ovarian cancer through suppression of tumor-infiltrating effector T cell and natural killer cell recruitment and reciprocal enhancement of immunosuppressive cytokines in ascites, creating an immunotolerogenic environment within the peritoneal cavity. Therefore, IDO may be a promising molecular target for the therapeutic strategy of ovarian cancer. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer

  1. Functional Metagenomics of a Biostimulated Petroleum-Contaminated Soil Reveals an Extraordinary Diversity of Extradiol Dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrón-González, Laura; Martín-Cabello, Guadalupe; Ferrer, Manuel; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    A metagenomic library of a petroleum-contaminated soil was constructed in a fosmid vector that allowed heterologous expression of metagenomic DNA. The library, consisting of 6.5 Gb of metagenomic DNA, was screened for extradiol dioxygenase (Edo) activity using catechol and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl as the substrates. Fifty-eight independent clones encoding extradiol dioxygenase activity were identified. Forty-one different Edo-encoding genes were identified. The population of Edo genes was not dominated by a particular gene or by highly similar genes; rather, the genes had an even distribution and high diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that most of the genes could not be ascribed to previously defined subfamilies of Edos. Rather, the Edo genes led to the definition of 10 new subfamilies of type I Edos. Phylogenetic analysis of type II enzymes defined 7 families, 2 of which harbored the type II Edos that were found in this work. Particularly striking was the diversity found in family I.3 Edos; 15 out of the 17 sequences assigned to this family belonged to 7 newly defined subfamilies. A strong bias was found that depended on the substrate used for the screening: catechol mainly led to the detection of Edos belonging to the I.2 family, while 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl led to the detection of most other Edos. Members of the I.2 family showed a clear substrate preference for monocyclic substrates, while those from the I.3 family showed a broader substrate range and high activity toward 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl. This metagenomic analysis has substantially increased our knowledge of the existing biodiversity of Edos. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene using genetically engineered dioxygenase producing Pseudomonas putida in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardani Gashtasb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation use to promote degradation and/or removal of contaminants into nonhazardous or less-hazardous substances from the environment using microbial metabolic ability. Pseudomonas spp. is one of saprotrophic soil bacterium and can be used for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs but this activity in most species is weak. Phenanthrene and pyrene could associate with a risk of human cancer development in exposed individuals. The aim of the present study was application of genetically engineered P. putida that produce dioxygenase for degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene in spiked soil using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method. The nahH gene that encoded catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O was cloned into pUC18 and pUC18-nahH recombinant vector was generated and transformed into wild P. putida, successfully. The genetically modified and wild types of P. putida were inoculated in soil and pilot plan was prepared. Finally, degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene by this bacterium in spiked soil were evaluated using HPLC measurement technique. The results were showed elimination of these PAH compounds in spiked soil by engineered P. putida comparing to dishes containing natural soil with normal microbial flora and inoculated autoclaved soil by wild type of P. putida were statistically significant (p0.05 but it was few impact on this process (more than 2%. Additional and verification tests including catalase, oxidase and PCR on isolated bacteria from spiked soil were indicated that engineered P. putida was alive and functional as well as it can affect on phenanthrene and pyrene degradation via nahH gene producing. These findings indicated that genetically engineered P. putida generated in this work via producing C23O enzyme can useful and practical for biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene as well as petroleum compounds in polluted environments.

  3. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing leukemic dendritic cells impair a leukemia-specific immune response by inducing potent T regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Antonio; Trabanelli, Sara; Onofri, Chiara; Aluigi, Michela; Salvestrini, Valentina; Ocadlikova, Darina; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Rutella, Sergio; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Baccarani, Michele; Lemoli, Roberto M

    2010-12-01

    The immunoregulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan into kynurenine, is expressed in a significant subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, resulting in the inhibition of T-cell proliferation and the induction of regulatory T cells. Acute myeloid leukemia cells can be differentiated into dendritic cells, which have increased immunogenicity and have been proposed as vaccines against leukemia. Leukemic dendritic cells were generated from acute myeloid leukemia cells and used as stimulators in functional assays, including the induction of regulatory T cells. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in leukemic dendritic cells was evaluated at molecular, protein and enzymatic levels. We demonstrate that, after differentiation into dendritic cells, both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-negative and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-positive acute myeloid leukemia samples show induction and up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase gene and protein, respectively. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-positive acute myeloid leukemia dendritic cells catabolize tryptophan into kynurenine metabolite and inhibit T-cell proliferation through an indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-dependent mechanism. Moreover, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-positive leukemic dendritic cells increase the number of allogeneic and autologous CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T cells and this effect is completely abrogated by the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-inhibitor, 1-methyl tryptophan. Purified CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells obtained from co-culture with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-positive leukemic dendritic cells act as regulatory T cells as they inhibit naive T-cell proliferation and impair the complete maturation of normal dendritic cells. Importantly, leukemic dendritic cell-induced regulatory T cells are capable of in vitro suppression of a leukemia-specific T cell-mediated immune response, directed against the leukemia-associated antigen, Wilms' tumor protein. These data identify

  4. Structure of the Dioxygenase AsqJ: Mechanistic Insights into a One-Pot Multistep Quinolone Antibiotic Biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Bräuer, Alois

    2015-11-10

    © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Multienzymatic cascades are responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products and represent a source of inspiration for synthetic chemists. The FeII/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase AsqJ from Aspergillus nidulans is outstanding because it stereoselectively catalyzes both a ferryl-induced desaturation reaction and epoxidation on a benzodiazepinedione. Interestingly, the enzymatically formed spiro epoxide spring-loads the 6,7-bicyclic skeleton for non-enzymatic rearrangement into the 6,6-bicyclic scaffold of the quinolone alkaloid 4′-methoxyviridicatin. Herein, we report different crystal structures of the protein in the absence and presence of synthesized substrates, surrogates, and intermediates that mimic the various stages of the reaction cycle of this exceptional dioxygenase.

  5. Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO)-reactive T cells differ in their functional characteristics in health and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortsø, Mads Duus; Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Kongsted, Per

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) physiologically regulates systemic tryptophan levels in the liver. However, numerous studies have linked cancer with activation of local and systemic tryptophan metabolism. Indeed, similar to other heme dioxygenases TDO is constitutively expressed in many cancers....... In the present study, we detected the presence of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell reactivity toward TDO in peripheral blood of patients with malignant melanoma (MM) or breast cancer (BC) as well as healthy subjects. However, TDO-reactive CD4(+) T cells constituted distinct functional phenotypes in health...... and disease. In healthy subjects these cells predominately comprised interferon (IFN)γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α producing Th1 cells, while in cancer patients TDO-reactive CD4(+) T-cells were more differentiated with release of not only IFNγ and TNFα, but also interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-10 in response...

  6. Modulating Tumor Immunology by Inhibiting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (IDO): Recent Developments and First Clinical Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davar, Diwakar; Bahary, Nathan

    2018-04-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) catalyze the first rate-limiting step in the oxidative metabolism of compounds containing indole rings, including the transformation of the essential amino acid L-tryptophan to N-formyl-L-kynurenine. Through direct and indirect means, IDO exerts both tolerogenic and pro-inflammatory effects and has a profound immunoregulatory role in the tumor microenvironment. Although the role of IDO in mediating peripheral acquired immunologic tolerance has been known for some time, its role in tumorigenesis and the subversion of anti-tumor immunity have only recently been appreciated. Small-molecule inhibitors of IDO1 and TDO are being evaluated as single agents and in combination with immune checkpoint blockade in a host of advanced cancers. In this review, we delineate the tolerogenic and pro-inflammatory effects of IDO as it relates to immune escape and discuss current clinical progress in this area.

  7. Atom Tunneling in the Hydroxylation Process of Taurine/α-Ketoglutarate Dioxygenase Identified by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    Taurine/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase is one of the most studied α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (αKGDs), involved in several biotechnological applications. We investigated the key step in the catalytic cycle of the αKGDs, the hydrogen transfer process, by a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (B3LYP/CHARMM22). Analysis of the charge and spin densities during the reaction demonstrates that a concerted mechanism takes place, where the H atom transfer happens simultaneously with the electron transfer from taurine to the Fe═O cofactor. We found the quantum tunneling of the hydrogen atom to increase the rate constant by a factor of 40 at 5 °C. As a consequence, a quite high kinetic isotope effect close to 60 is obtained, which is consistent with the experimental value.

  8. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity correlates with immune system abnormalities in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Bonanno Giuseppina; Mariotti Andrea; Procoli Annabella; Folgiero Valentina; Natale Daniela; De Rosa Luca; Majolino Ignazio; Novarese Linda; Rocci Alberto; Gambella Manuela; Ciciarello Marilena; Scambia Giovanni; Palumbo Antonio; Locatelli Franco; De Cristofaro Raimondo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy with a multifaceted immune dysfunction. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) degrades tryptophan into kynurenine (KYN), which inhibits effector T cells and promote regulatory T-cell (Treg) differentiation. It is presently unknown whether MM cells express IDO1 and whether IDO1 activity correlates with immune system impairment. Methods We investigated IDO1 expression in 25 consecutive patients with symptomatic MM and in 7 pat...

  9. Characterization of arene di-oxygenases involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation in Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1; Caracterisation d'arene dioxygenases impliquees dans la biodegradation des hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques chez Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuony, S.

    2005-06-15

    This thesis deals with the bacterial biodegradation of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The bacterium Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 was isolated from a polluted soil for its ability to use pyrene, a 4-ring PAH, as sole source of carbon and energy. To learn about the pyrene metabolic pathway, the identification of the enzymes involved in this process has been undertaken using a proteomic approach. This approach revealed the occurrence of two ring-hydroxylating di-oxygenases in strain 6PY1, which could catalyze the initial attack of pyrene. The goal of this study was to clone the genes encoding the di-oxygenases identified in Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1, over-express these genes in an heterologous system in order to facilitate the purification of the corresponding enzymes, and determine the biochemical and catalytic properties of these enzymes. The pdoA1B1 genes encoding the terminal component of a di-oxygenase were cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The catalytic properties of this enzyme, called Pdo1, were determined in vivo by measuring the oxidation products of 2- to 4-ring PAHs by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Analysis of the selectivity of the enzyme, as determined using GC-MS, showed that Pdo1 preferentially oxidized 3- or 4-ring PAHs, including phenanthrene and pyrene, but was inactive on di-aromatic compounds such as naphthalene and biphenyl. Pdo1 was unstable and was therefore purified in inactive form. The genes encoding a second di-oxygenase component were found in a locus containing two other catabolic genes. The pdoA2B2 genes encoded an enzyme called Pdo2 showing a narrow specificity towards 2- to 3-ring PAHs, and a high preference for phenanthrene. Pdo2 is an a3{beta}3 hexamer, containing [2Fe-2S] Rieske clusters which confer it a characteristic absorbance spectrum. A third set of genes possibly encoding another di-oxygenase was discovered in the genome of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1. This set is closely

  10. Tryptamine and dimethyltryptamine inhibit indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and increase the tumor-reactive effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourino, Melissa Cavalheiro; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; Bellé, Luziane Potrich; Knebel, Franciele Hinterholz; Albuquerque, Renata Chaves; Dörr, Felipe Augusto; Okada, Sabrina Sayori; Migliorini, Silene; Soares, Irene Silva; Campa, Ana

    2013-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced tryptophan-degrading enzyme, producing kynurenine (KYN) that participates in the mechanism of tumor immune tolerance. Thus, IDO inhibition has been considered a strategy for anticancer therapy. The aim of this study was to identify whether the metabolites originated from the competitive routes of tryptophan metabolism, such as the serotonergic or N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) pathways, have inhibitory effects on recombinant human IDO (rhIDO) activity. Serotonin and melatonin had no effect; on the other hand, tryptamine (TRY) and DMT modulated the activity of rhIDO as classical non-competitive inhibitors, with Ki values of 156 and 506 μM, respectively. This inhibitory effect was also observed on constitutively expressed or IFN-γ-induced IDO in the A172 human glioma cell line. TRY and DMT increased the cytotoxic activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in co-culture assays. We conclude that the IDO inhibition by TRY and DMT contributed to a more effective tumor-reactive response by the PBMCs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Analysis of phylogenetic and functional diverge in plant nine-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, R; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2015-07-01

    During different environmental stress conditions, plant growth is regulated by the hormone abscisic acid (an apocarotenoid). In the biosynthesis of abscisic acid, the oxidative cleavage of cis-epoxycarotenoid catalyzed by 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the crucial step. The NCED genes were isolated in numerous plant species and those genes were phylogenetically investigated to understand the evolution of NCED genes in various plant lineages comprising lycophyte, gymnosperm, dicot and monocot. A total of 93 genes were obtained from 48 plant species to statistically estimate their sequence conservation and functional divergence. Selaginella moellendorffii appeared to be evolutionarily distinct from those of the angiosperms, insisting the substantial influence of natural selection pressure on NCED genes. Further, using exon-intron structure analysis, the gene structures of NCED were found to be conserved across some species. In addition, the substitution rate ratio of non-synonymous (Ka) versus synonymous (Ks) mutations using the Bayesian inference approach, depicted the critical amino acid residues for functional divergence. A significant functional divergence was found between some subgroups through the co-efficient of type-I functional divergence. Our results suggest that the evolution of NCED genes occurred by duplication, diversification and exon intron loss events. The site-specific profile and functional diverge analysis revealed NCED genes might facilitate the tissue-specific functional divergence in NCED sub-families, that could combat different environmental stress conditions aiding plant survival.

  12. Synthesis and Herbicidal Activity of Triketone-Quinoline Hybrids as Novel 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Yan; Cao, Run-Jie; Chen, Tao; Wu, Feng-Xu; Hao, Ge-Fei; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-06-17

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.27, HPPD) is one of the most important targets for herbicide discovery. In the search for new HPPD inhibitors with novel scaffolds, triketone-quinoline hybrids were designed and subsequently optimized on the basis of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed potent inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana HPPD (AtHPPD), and some of them exhibited broad-spectrum and promising herbicidal activity at the rate of 150 g ai/ha by postemergence application. Most promisingly, compound III-l, 3-hydroxy-2-(2-methoxy-7-(methylthio)quinoline-3-carbonyl)cyclohex-2-enone (Ki = 0.009 μM, AtHPPD), had broader spectrum of weed control than mesotrione. Furthermore, compound III-l was much safer to maize at the rate of 150 g ai/ha than mesotrione, demonstrating its great potential as herbicide for weed control in maize fields. Therefore, triketone-quinoline hybrids may serve as new lead structures for novel herbicide discovery.

  13. Expression Profile of Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase Genes in Summer Squash (Cucurbita pepo L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Verdejo, Clara I; Obrero, Ángeles; Román, Belén; Gómez, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Carotenoids are important dietary components that can be found in vegetable crops. The accumulation of these compounds in fruit and vegetables is altered by the activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) enzymes that produce their degradation. The aim of this work was to study the possible implication of CCD genes in preventing carotenoid storage in the horticultural crop summer squash (Cucurbita pepo L.). The relationship between the presence of these compounds and gene expression for CCDs was studied in three varieties showing different peel and flesh colour. Expression analysis for the CCD genes CpNCED1, CpNCED2, CpNCED3, CpNCED9, CpCCD1, CpCCD4a, CpCCD4b and CpCCD8 was carried out on different organs and at several fruit developmental stages. The results showed that the CpCCD4a and CpCCD4b genes were highly expressed in the variety with lowest carotenoid content suggesting a putative role in carotenoid accumulation pattern in summer squash fruit.

  14. Zinc protoporphyrin IX stimulates tumor immunity by disrupting the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Richard; Duhadaway, James B; Rust, Sonja; Munn, David H; Muller, Alexander J; Mautino, Mario; Prendergast, George C

    2010-06-01

    The tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has emerged as an important driver of immune escape in a growing number of cancers and cancer-associated chronic infections. In this study, we define novel immunotherapeutic applications for the heme precursor compound zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) based on our discovery that it is a potent small-molecule inhibitor of IDO. Inhibitory activity was determined using in vitro and in-cell enzyme assays as well as a novel in vivo pharmacodynamic system. An irreversible mechanism of inhibition was documented, consistent with competition for heme binding in newly synthesized cellular protein. siRNA methodology and an IDO-deficient mouse strain were used to verify the specificity of ZnPP as an IDO inhibitor. In a preclinical model of melanoma, ZnPP displayed antitumor properties that relied on T-cell function and IDO integrity. ZnPP also phenocopied the known antitumor properties of IDO inhibitors in preclinical models of skin and breast carcinoma. Our results suggest clinical evaluation of ZnPP as an adjuvant immunochemotherapy in chronic infections and cancers in which there is emerging recognition of a pathophysiologic role for IDO dysregulation.

  15. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5 μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4 μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200 μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  16. Structural insights into substrate and inhibitor binding sites in human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Pham, Khoa N.; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Karkashon, Shay; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru (Einstein); (UCI)

    2017-11-22

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (hIDO1) is an attractive cancer immunotherapeutic target owing to its role in promoting tumoral immune escape. However, drug development has been hindered by limited structural information. Here, we report the crystal structures of hIDO1 in complex with its substrate, Trp, an inhibitor, epacadostat, and/or an effector, indole ethanol (IDE). The data reveal structural features of the active site (Sa) critical for substrate activation; in addition, they disclose a new inhibitor-binding mode and a distinct small molecule binding site (Si). Structure-guided mutation of a critical residue, F270, to glycine perturbs the Si site, allowing structural determination of an inhibitory complex, where both the Sa and Si sites are occupied by Trp. The Si site offers a novel target site for allosteric inhibitors and a molecular explanation for the previously baffling substrate-inhibition behavior of the enzyme. Taken together, the data open exciting new avenues for structure-based drug design.

  17. The aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase-12 (AAD-12) protein is not acutely toxic in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papineni, Sabitha; Golden, Rachel M; Thomas, Johnson

    2017-12-01

    Typically, when a protein is orally toxic, it acts via acute mechanisms, especially at high doses. Therefore, an acute oral toxicity study is considered appropriate for evaluating the safety of transgenic proteins. Soybean plants (events DAS-68416-4 and DAS-444Ø6-6) have been genetically modified to express the aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase-12 (AAD-12) protein. The AAD-12 protein provides tolerance to the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). This paper summarizes the study designs of two acute oral toxicity studies evaluating the AAD-12 protein and reports the results of these studies. No mortalities or adverse effects were observed in mice when AAD-12 was tested up to a limit dose of 5000 mg/kg body weight. Based on the results of these studies, it can be concluded that AAD-12 protein, as expressed in genetically modified DAS-68416-4 and DAS-444Ø6-6 soybeans, lacks acute toxicity via the oral route. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Detection of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylenes (BTEX) using toluene dioxygenase-peroxidase coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaohui; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a simple, whole-cell bioassay for the detection of bioavailable benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and similar compounds. A genetically engineered E. coli strain expressing toluene dioxygenase (TDO) and toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (TodD) was constructed, enabling the conversion of BTEX into their respective catechols, which were quickly converted into colored products by a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-coupled reaction. The intensity of the color formation was correlated to concentrations of the BTEX compounds. Under the optimized conditions, a detection limit (defined as three times the standard deviation of the response obtained from the blank) of 10, 10, 20, and 50 microM was observed for benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene, respectively. The bioassay was selective toward BTEX-related compounds with no interference observed with commonly used pesticides, herbicides, and organic solvent. The bioassay was very stable with little change in response over a 10-week period. The excellent stability suggests that the reported bioassay may be suitable for field monitoring of BTEX to identify and track contaminated water and follow the bioremediation progress.

  19. On the substrate- and stereospecificity of the plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 7

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Strigolactones are phytohormones synthesized from carotenoids via a stereospecific pathway involving the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 7 (CCD7) and 8. CCD7 cleaves 9-cis-β-carotene to form a supposedly 9-cis-configured β-apo-10′-carotenal. CCD8 converts this intermediate through a combination of yet undetermined reactions into the strigolactone-like compound carlactone. Here, we investigated the substrate and stereo-specificity of the Arabidopsis and pea CCD7 and determined the stereo-configuration of the β-apo-10′-carotenal intermediate by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Our data unequivocally demonstrate the 9-cis-configuration of the intermediate. Both CCD7s cleave different 9-cis-carotenoids, yielding hydroxylated 9-cis-apo-10′-carotenals that may lead to hydroxylated carlactones, but show highest affinity for 9-cis-β-carotene. © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in patients with allergic rhinitis: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luukkainen Annika

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is a tryptophan catalyzing enzyme. It has been suggested that it has a role in lower airway allergic inflammations, but its role in allergic rhinitis has not been investigated. Objective Our aim was to evaluate the expression of IDO in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients allergic to birch pollen during peak exposure to birch pollen allergen and compare it to non-atopic patients. Methods IDO expression was immunohistochemically evaluated from nasal specimens obtained in- and off-season from otherwise healthy non-smoking volunteers both allergic to birch pollen (having mild or moderate allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and non-allergic controls. Results: The IDO expression levels were low in healthy controls and remained low also in patients allergic to birch pollen. There were no differences in the expression of IDO in- and off-season in either healthy or allergic subjects. Conclusions There is a controversy in the role of IDO in upper and lower airways during allergic airway disease. It seems that IDO is associated to allergic inflammations of the lower airways, but does not have a local role in the nasal cavity at least in mild or moderate forms of allergic rhinitis.

  1. Isolation and Functional Characterization of Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase-1 from Laurus nobilis L. (Bay Laurel) Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyaa, Mosaab; Berim, Anna; Isaacson, Tal; Marzouk, Sally; Bar, Einat; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Ibdah, Mwafaq

    2015-09-23

    Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.) is an agriculturally important tree used in food, drugs, and the cosmetics industry. Many of the health beneficial properties of bay laurel are due to volatile terpene metabolites that they contain, including various norisoprenoids. Despite their importance, little is known about the norisoprenoid biosynthesis in Laurus nobilis fruits. We found that the volatile norisoprenoids 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, pseudoionone, and β-ionone accumulated in Laurus nobilis fruits in a pattern reflecting their carotenoid content. A full-length cDNA encoding a potential carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (LnCCD1) was isolated. The LnCCD1 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and recombinant protein was assayed for its cleavage activity with an array of carotenoid substrates. The LnCCD1 protein was able to cleave a variety of carotenoids at the 9,10 (9',10') and 5,6 (5',6') positions to produce 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, pseudoionone, β-ionone, and α-ionone. Our results suggest a role for LnCCD1 in Laurus nobilis fruit flavor biosynthesis.

  2. Identification and expression pattern of a new carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene member from Bixa orellana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ávila, N. L.; Narváez-Zapata, J. A.; Ramírez-Benítez, J. E.; Aguilar-Espinosa, M. L.; Rivera-Madrid, R.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a class of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of a broad diversity of secondary metabolites known as apocarotenoids. In plants, CCDs are part of a genetic family with members which cleave specific double bonds of carotenoid molecules. CCDs are involved in the production of diverse and important metabolites such as vitamin A and abscisic acid (ABA). Bixa orellana L. is the main source of the natural pigment annatto or bixin, an apocarotenoid accumulated in large quantities in its seeds. Bixin biosynthesis has been studied and the involvement of a CCD has been confirmed in vitro. However, the CCD genes involved in the biosynthesis of the wide variety of apocarotenoids found in this plant have not been well documented. In this study, a new CCD1 gene member (BoCCD1) was identified and its expression was charaterized in different plant tissues of B. orellana plantlets and adult plants. The BoCCD1 sequence showed high homology with plant CCD1s involved mainly in the cleavage of carotenoids in several sites to generate multiple apocarotenoid products. Here, the expression profiles of the BoCCD1 gene were analysed and discussed in relation to total carotenoids and other important apocarotenoids such as bixin. PMID:21813796

  3. Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase (IDO Expression and Activity in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Mancuso

    Full Text Available Interferon gamma (IFN-γ production induces the transcription of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO resulting in the reduction of T-cell activation and proliferation through the depletion of tryptophan and the elicitation of Treg lymphocytes. IDO was shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases; we investigated whether changes in IDO gene expression and activity could be indicative of onset of relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS patients.IDO and interferon-γ (IFN-γ gene expression, serum IDO activity (Kynurenine/Tryptophan ratio and serum neopterin concentration--a protein released by macrophages upon IFN-γ stimulation--were measured in 51 individuals: 36 relapsing remitting (RR-MS patients (21 in acute phase--AMS, 15 in stable phase--SMS and 15 healthy controls (HC. PBMCs samples in AMS patients were collected before (BT-AMS and during glucocorticoids-based therapy (DT-AMS.IDO expression was increased and IFN-γ was decreased (p<0.001 in BT-AMS compared to SMS patients. Glucocorticoids-induced disease remission resulted in a significant reduction of IDO and IFN-γ gene expression, IDO catalytic activity (p<0.001. Serum neopterin concentration followed the same trend as IDO expression and activity.Measurement of IDO gene expression and activity in blood could be a useful marker to monitor the clinical course of RR-MS. Therapeutic interventions modulating IDO activity may be beneficial in MS.

  4. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO): the antagonist of type I interferon-driven skin inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Marina; Wenzel, Joerg; Tüting, Thomas; Takikawa, Osamu; Bieber, Thomas; von Bubnoff, Dagmar

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that a type I interferon (IFN)-driven immune response might play an important role in the pathogenesis of lichen planus (LP), an inflammatory disorder of the skin of unclear etiology. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in affected skin from LP have been proposed to produce IFN-alpha/beta locally, which leads to the expression of IFN-inducible chemokines such as IP10/CXCL10 in the epidermis. This chemokine recruits chemokine receptor CXCR3-expressing T-lymphocytes into the skin via CXCR3/IP10 interactions. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which degrades tryptophan and suppresses T-cell proliferation, is induced by IFNs and other inflammatory cytokines. We show that type I IFN-mediated skin disorders, such as LP, strongly express IDO in lesional skin. This expression closely correlates to the expression of the highly specific type I IFN marker MxA. We further demonstrate that the IDO+ cells in LP are large myeloid CD11c+S100+CD68(-) dendritic cells. Accordingly, CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells significantly up-regulate IDO gene expression and intracellular IDO protein expression after stimulation with IFN-alpha in vitro. These findings reveal that both proinflammatory and counterregulatory mechanisms are operative in cutaneous lesions of LP. We propose that the balance of these mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  5. Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenase DpgC+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding,E.; Widboom, P.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenases not dependent on accessory cofactors for activity. DpgC is in the biosynthetic pathway for the nonproteinogenic amino acid 3, 5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in actinomycetes bacteria responsible for the production of the vancomycin/teicoplanin family of antibiotic natural products. The X-ray structure of DpgC confirmed the absence of cofactors and defined a novel hydrophobic dioxygen binding pocket adjacent to a bound substrate analogue. In this paper, the role specific amino acids play in substrate recognition and catalysis is examined through biochemical and structural characterization of site-specific enzyme mutations and alternate substrates. The results establish the importance of three amino acids, Arg254, Glu299, and Glu189, in the chemistry of DpgC. Arg254 and Glu189 join to form a specific contact with one of the phenolic hydroxyls of the substrate, and this interaction plays a key role in both substrate recognition and catalysis. The X-ray crystal structure of Arg254Lys was determined to address the role this residue plays in the chemistry. In addition, characterization of alternate substrate analogues demonstrates the presence and position of phenol groups are necessary for both enzyme recognition and downstream oxidation chemistry. Overall, this work defines the mechanism of substrate recognition and specificity by the cofactor-independent dioxygenase DpgC.

  6. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Baek Sørensen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO exerts an well established immunosuppressive function in cancer. IDO is expressed within the tumor itself as well as in antigen-presenting cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, where it promotes the establishment of peripheral immune tolerance to tumor antigens. In the present study, we tested the notion whether IDO itself may be subject to immune responses.The presence of naturally occurring IDO-specific CD8 T cells in cancer patients was determined by MHC/peptide stainings as well as ELISPOT. Antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL from the peripheral blood of cancer patients were cloned and expanded. The functional capacity of the established CTL clones was examined by chrome release assays. The study unveiled spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO in peripheral blood as well as in the tumor microenvironment of different cancer patients. We demonstrate that these IDO reactive T cells are indeed peptide specific, cytotoxic effector cells. Hence, IDO reactive T cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells including directly isolated AML blasts as well as IDO-expressing dendritic cells, i.e. one of the major immune suppressive cell populations.IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals, IDO-based immunotherapy holds the promise to boost anti-cancer immunotherapy in general.

  7. 1,2,3-Triazoles as inhibitors of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrig, Ute F; Majjigapu, Somi Reddy; Caldelari, Daniela; Dilek, Nahzli; Reichenbach, Patrick; Ascencao, Kelly; Irving, Melita; Coukos, George; Vogel, Pierre; Zoete, Vincent; Michielin, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2) is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases that involve immune escape such as cancer. In contrast to IDO1, only a very limited number of inhibitors have been described for IDO2 due to inherent difficulties in expressing and purifying a functionally active, soluble form of the enzyme. Starting from our previously discovered highly efficient 4-aryl-1,2,3-triazole IDO1 inhibitor scaffold, we used computational structure-based methods to design inhibitors of IDO2 which we then tested in cellular assays. Our approach yielded low molecular weight inhibitors of IDO2, the most active displaying an IC50 value of 51μM for mIDO2, and twofold selectivity over hIDO1. These compounds could be useful as molecular probes to investigate the biological role of IDO2, and could inspire the design of new IDO2 inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional expression of a valencene dioxygenase from Pleurotus sapidus in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelena, Kateryna; Krings, Ulrich; Berger, Ralf G

    2012-03-01

    Valencene dioxygenase (ValOx) from the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus converted the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene to the valuable grapefruit flavour (+)-nootkatone and to nootkatols through intermediate hydroperoxides. Expression of the enzyme was carried out in the cytosol and periplasm of Escherichia coli. The heterologous production led to high yields of inclusion bodies. The poor yield of soluble recombinant protein was improved by various strategies including cold shock expression, chaperone co-expression, and employment of mutant E. coli strains. Up to 60 mg of the biologically active, soluble ValOx was produced by cold shock under control of the cspA promoter at 8 °C in the BL21(DE3)Star strain and co-expression of the E. coli trigger factor. The recombinant enzyme, purified using the N-terminal His tag, showed the catalytic properties of the wild-type enzyme, as was confirmed by the LC-MS analysis of hydroperoxide intermediates and GC-MS analysis of the volatile products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and other meta-cleavage catabolic pathway genes in the 'anaerobic' termite gut spirochete Treponema primitia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Kaitlyn S; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms have evolved a spectacular diversity of metabolisms, some of which allow them to overcome environmental constraints, utilize abundant but inaccessible resources and drive nutrient cycling in various ecosystems. The termite hindgut microbial community is optimized to metabolize wood, and in recent years, the in situ physiological and ecological functions of community members have been researched. Spirochetes are abundant in the termite gut, and herein, putative aromatic meta-cleavage pathway genes typical of aerobic pseudomonads were located in genomes of homoacetogenic termite hindgut 'anaerobes', Treponema primitia str. ZAS-1 and ZAS-2. Phylogenetic analyses suggest the T. primitia catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and several other essential meta-pathway genes were acquired from an α-proteobacterium in the distant past to augment several genes T. primitia acquired from anaerobic firmicutes that do not directly catabolize aromatics but can contribute to the final pathway steps. Further, transcripts for each meta-pathway gene were expressed in strictly anaerobic cultures of T. primitia str. ZAS-2 indicative of constitutive pathway expression. Also, the addition of catechol + O(2) to T. primitia liquid cultures resulted in the transient accumulation of trace amounts of the yellow ring cleavage product, hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. This is the first evidence of aromatic ring cleavage in the phylum (division) Spirochetes. Results also support a possible role for T. primitia in termite hindgut O(2) /lignin aromatic monomer metabolism. Potential O(2) -dependent yet nonrespiratory microbial metabolisms have heretofore been overlooked and warrant further investigation. These metabolisms could describe the degradation of plant-derived and other aromatics in microoxic environments and contribute significantly to carbon turnover. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Remarkable ability of Pandoraea pnomenusa B356 biphenyl dioxygenase to metabolize simple flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thi Thanh My; Tu, Youbin; Sylvestre, Michel

    2012-05-01

    Many investigations have provided evidence that plant secondary metabolites, especially flavonoids, may serve as signal molecules to trigger the abilities of bacteria to degrade chlorobiphenyls in soil. However, the bases for this interaction are largely unknown. In this work, we found that BphAE(B356), the biphenyl/chlorobiphenyl dioxygenase from Pandoraea pnomenusa B356, is significantly better fitted to metabolize flavone, isoflavone, and flavanone than BphAE(LB400) from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400. Unlike those of BphAE(LB400), the kinetic parameters of BphAE(B356) toward these flavonoids were in the same range as for biphenyl. In addition, remarkably, the biphenyl catabolic pathway of strain B356 was strongly induced by isoflavone, whereas none of the three flavonoids induced the catabolic pathway of strain LB400. Docking experiments that replaced biphenyl in the biphenyl-bound form of the enzymes with flavone, isoflavone, or flavanone showed that the superior ability of BphAE(B356) over BphAE(LB400) is principally attributable to the replacement of Phe336 of BphAE(LB400) by Ile334 and of Thr335 of BphAE(LB400) by Gly333 of BphAE(B356). However, biochemical and structural comparison of BphAE(B356) with BphAE(p4), a mutant of BphAE(LB400) which was obtained in a previous work by the double substitution Phe336Met Thr335Ala of BphAE(LB400), provided evidence that other residues or structural features of BphAE(B356) whose precise identification the docking experiment did not allow are also responsible for the superior catalytic abilities of BphAE(B356). Together, these data provide supporting evidence that the biphenyl catabolic pathways have evolved divergently among proteobacteria, where some of them may serve ecological functions related to the metabolism of plant secondary metabolites in soil.

  11. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Iman; Zayed, Rania A; Said, Fadwa; Latif, Lamyaa Abdel

    2016-09-01

    The microenvironment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized to play a role in helping leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are essential contributors in immunomodulation of the microenvironment as they can promote differentiation of Tregs via the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) pathway. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of IDO in bone marrow derived MSCs and to study its correlation to percentage of Tregs. Thirty-seven adult bone marrow samples were cultured in appropriate culture medium to isolate MSCs. Successful harvest of MSCs was determined by plastic adherence, morphology, and positive expression of CD271 and CD105; negative expression of CD34 and CD45 using flowcytometry. MSCs were examined for IDO expression by immunocytochemistry using anti-IDO monoclonal antibody. CD4+ CD25+ cells (Tregs) were measured in bone marrow samples by flowcytometry. MSCs were successfully isolated from 20 of the 37 bone marrow samples cultured. MSCs showed higher expression of IDO and Tregs percentage was higher in AML patients compared to control subjects (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). A positive correlation was found between IDO expression and Tregs percentage (P value = 0.012, r = 0.5). In this study, we revealed an association between high IDO expression in MSCs and elevated levels of Tregs which could have an important role in the pathogenesis of AML, providing immunosuppressive microenvironment.

  12. Glial and tissue-specific regulation of Kynurenine Pathway dioxygenases by acute stress of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Dostal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stressors activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and immune system eliciting changes in cognitive function, mood and anxiety. An important link between stress and altered behavior is stimulation of the Kynurenine Pathway which generates neuroactive and immunomodulatory kynurenines. Tryptophan entry into this pathway is controlled by rate-limiting indoleamine/tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenases (DOs: Ido1, Ido2, Tdo2. Although implicated as mediating changes in behavior, detecting stress-induced DO expression has proven inconsistent. Thus, C57BL/6J mice were used to characterize DO expression in brain-regions, astrocytes and microglia to characterize restraint-stress-induced DO expression. Stress increased kynurenine in brain and plasma, demonstrating increased DO activity. Of three Ido1 transcripts, only Ido1-v1 expression was increased by stress and within astrocytes, not microglia, indicating transcript- and glial-specificity. Stress increased Ido1-v1 only in frontal cortex and hypothalamus, indicating brain-region specificity. Of eight Ido2 transcripts, Ido2-v3 expression was increased by stress, again only within astrocytes. Likewise, stress increased Tdo2-FL expression in astrocytes, not microglia. Interestingly, Ido2 and Tdo2 transcripts were not correspondingly induced in Ido1-knockout (Ido1KO mice, suggesting that Ido1 is necessary for the central DO response to acute stress. Unlike acute inflammatory models resulting in DO induction within microglia, only astrocyte DO expression was increased by acute restraint-stress, defining their unique role during stress-dependent activation of the Kynurenine Pathway. Keywords: Stress, Ido, Tdo, Kynurenine, Astrocyte, Liver

  13. Evolutionarily distinct carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases are responsible for crocetin production in Buddleja davidii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Diretto, Gianfranco; Argandoña, Javier; Rubio-Moraga, Ángela; Julve, José Manuel; Orzáez, Diego; Granell, Antonio; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2017-07-20

    Crocetin, one of the few colored apocarotenoids known in nature, is present in flowers and fruits and has long been used medicinally and as a colorant. Saffron is the main source of crocetin, although a few other plants produce lower amounts of this apocarotenoid. Notably, Buddleja davidii accumulates crocetin in its flowers. Recently, a carotenoid dioxygenase cleavage enzyme, CCD2, has been characterized as responsible for crocetin production in Crocus species. We searched for CCD2 homologues in B. davidii and identified several CCD enzymes from the CCD1 and CCD4 subfamilies. Unexpectedly, two out of the three CCD4 enzymes, namely BdCCD4.1 and BdCCD4.3, showed 7,8;7',8' activity in vitro and in vivo over zeaxanthin. In silico analyses of these enzymes and CCD2 allowed the determination of key residues for this activity. Both BdCCD4 genes are highly expressed during flower development and transcripts levels parallel the accumulation of crocins in the petals. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BdCCD4.2 grouped with almost all the characterized CCD4 enzymes, while BdCCD4.1 and BdCCD4.3 form a new sub-cluster together with CCD4 enzymes from certain Lamiales species. The present study indicates that convergent evolution led to the acquisition of 7,8;7',8' apocarotenoid cleavage activity in two separate CCD enzyme families. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Resonance Raman study on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: Control of reactivity by substrate-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Hara, Masayuki [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu [Biometal Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Koto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ogura, Takashi, E-mail: ogura@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: • Indoleamine 2,3-dioygenase has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. • Trp-binding to the enzyme induces high frequency shift of the Fe–His stretching mode. • Increased imidazolate character of histidine promotes the O–O bond cleavage step. • A fine-tuning of the reactivity of the O–O bond cleavage reaction is identified. • The results are consistent with the sequential oxygen-atom-transfer mechanism. - Abstract: Resonance Raman spectra of ligand-bound complexes including the 4-phenylimidazole complex and of free and L-Trp-bound forms of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in the ferric state were examined. Effects on the vinyl and propionate substituent groups of the heme were detected in a ligand-dependent fashion. The effects of phenyl group of 4-phenylimidazole on the vinyl and propionate Raman bands were evident when compared with the case of imidazole ligand. Substrate binding to the ferrous protein caused an upshift of the iron–histidine stretching mode by 3 cm{sup −1}, indicating an increase in negativity of the imidazole ring, which favors the O–O bond cleavage. The substrate binding event is likely to be communicated from the heme distal side to the iron–histidine bond through heme substituent groups and the hydrogen-bond network which includes water molecules, as identified in an X-ray structure of a 4-phenylimidazole complex. The results provide evidence for fine-tuning of the reactivity of O–O bond cleavage by the oxygenated heme upon binding of L-Trp.

  15. Swapping metals in Fe- and Mn-dependent dioxygenases: Evidence for oxygen activation without a change in metal redox state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Joseph P.; Kovaleva, Elena G.; Farquhar, Erik R.; Lipscomb, John D.; Que, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Biological O2 activation often occurs after binding to a reduced metal [e.g., M(II)] in an enzyme active site. Subsequent M(II)-to-O2 electron transfer results in a reactive M(III)-superoxo species. For the extradiol aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenases, we have proposed a different model where an electron is transferred from substrate to O2 via the M(II) center to which they are both bound, thereby obviating the need for an integral change in metal redox state. This model is tested by using homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenases from Brevibacterium fuscum (Fe-HPCD) and Arthrobacter globiformis (Mn-MndD) that share high sequence identity and very similar structures. Despite these similarities, Fe-HPCD binds Fe(II) whereas Mn-MndD incorporates Mn(II). Methods are described to incorporate the nonphysiological metal into each enzyme (Mn-HPCD and Fe-MndD). The x-ray crystal structure of Mn-HPCD at 1.7 Å is found to be indistinguishable from that of Fe-HPCD, while EPR studies show that the Mn(II) sites of Mn-MndD and Mn-HPCD, and the Fe(II) sites of the NO complexes of Fe-HPCD and Fe-MndD, are very similar. The uniform metal site structures of these enzymes suggest that extradiol dioxygenases cannot differentially compensate for the 0.7-V gap in the redox potentials of free iron and manganese. Nonetheless, all four enzymes exhibit nearly the same KM and Vmax values. These enzymes constitute an unusual pair of metallo-oxygenases that remain fully active after a metal swap, implicating a different way by which metals are used to promote oxygen activation without an integral change in metal redox state. PMID:18492808

  16. Swapping metals in Fe- and Mn-dependent dioxygenases: Evidence for oxygen activation without a change in metal redox state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Joseph P.; Kovaleva, Elena G.; Farquhar, Erik R.; Lipscomb, John D.; Oue, Jr., Lawrence (UMM)

    2008-07-21

    Biological O{sub 2} activation often occurs after binding to a reduced metal [e.g., M(II)] in an enzyme active site. Subsequent M(II)-to-O{sub 2} electron transfer results in a reactive M(III)-superoxo species. For the extradiol aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenases, we have proposed a different model where an electron is transferred from substrate to O{sub 2} via the M(II) center to which they are both bound, thereby obviating the need for an integral change in metal redox state. This model is tested by using homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenases from Brevibacterium fuscum (Fe-HPCD) and Arthrobacter globiformis (Mn-MndD) that share high sequence identity and very similar structures. Despite these similarities, Fe-HPCD binds Fe(II) whereas Mn-MndD incorporates Mn(II). Methods are described to incorporate the nonphysiological metal into each enzyme (Mn-HPCD and Fe-MndD). The x-ray crystal structure of Mn-HPCD at 1.7 {angstrom} is found to be indistinguishable from that of Fe-HPCD, while EPR studies show that the Mn(II) sites of Mn-MndD and Mn-HPCD, and the Fe(II) sites of the NO complexes of Fe-HPCD and Fe-MndD, are very similar. The uniform metal site structures of these enzymes suggest that extradiol dioxygenases cannot differentially compensate for the 0.7-V gap in the redox potentials of free iron and manganese. Nonetheless, all four enzymes exhibit nearly the same K{sub M} and V{sub max} values. These enzymes constitute an unusual pair of metallo-oxygenases that remain fully active after a metal swap, implicating a different way by which metals are used to promote oxygen activation without an integral change in metal redox state.

  17. Stepwise O-Atom Transfer in Heme-Based Tryptophan Dioxygenase: Role of Substrate Ammonium in Epoxide Ring Opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Inchul; Ambler, Brett R; Wherritt, Daniel; Griffith, Wendell P; Maldonado, Amanda C; Altman, Ryan A; Liu, Aimin

    2018-03-28

    Heme-based tryptophan dioxygenases are established immunosuppressive metalloproteins with significant biomedical interest. Here, we synthesized two mechanistic probes to specifically test if the α-amino group of the substrate directly participates in a critical step of the O atom transfer during catalysis in human tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Substitution of the nitrogen atom of the substrate to a carbon (probe 1) or oxygen (probe 2) slowed the catalytic step following the first O atom transfer such that transferring the second O atom becomes less likely to occur, although the dioxygenated products were observed with both probes. A monooxygenated product was also produced from probe 2 in a significant quantity. Analysis of this new product by HPLC coupled UV-vis spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectrometry, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, HSQC, HMBC, and infrared (IR) spectroscopies concluded that this monooxygenated product is a furoindoline compound derived from an unstable epoxyindole intermediate. These results prove that small molecules can manipulate the stepwise O atom transfer reaction of TDO and provide a showcase for a tunable mechanism by synthetic compounds. The product analysis results corroborate the presence of a substrate-based epoxyindole intermediate during catalysis and provide the first substantial experimental evidence for the involvement of the substrate α-amino group in the epoxide ring-opening step during catalysis. This combined synthetic, biochemical, and biophysical study establishes the catalytic role of the α-amino group of the substrate during the O atom transfer reactions and thus represents a substantial advance to the mechanistic comprehension of the heme-based tryptophan dioxygenases.

  18. Zinc protoporphyrin-IX stimulates tumor immunity by disrupting the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    Metz, Richard; DuHadaway, James B.; Rust, Sonja; Munn, David H.; Muller, Alexander J.; Mautino, Mario; Prendergast, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has emerged as an important driver of immune escape in a growing number of cancers and cancer-associated chronic infections. In this study, we define novel immunotherapeutic applications for the heme precursor compound zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) based on our discovery that it is a potent small molecule inhibitor of IDO. Inhibitory activity was determined using in vitro and in-cell enzyme assays as well as a novel in vivo pha...

  19. Purification and properties of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase from Chaetomium piluliferum induced with p-hydroxybenzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtaś-Wasilewska, M; Trojanowski, J

    1980-01-01

    1. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (protocatechuate : oxygen 3,4-oxidoreductase, EC 1.13.11.3) was isolated from mycelium of Chaetomium piluliferum induced with p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The enzyme was purified about 80-fold by ammonium sulphate fractionation and DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-200 chromatography, and was homogeneous on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. 2. The enzyme showed high substrate specificity; its pH optimum was 7.5-8.0, and molecula weight about 76 000 as determined by filtration on Sephadex G-200. The Michaelis constant for protocatechuic acid was 11.1 microM.

  20. Dioxygenases of Chlorobiphenyl-Degrading Species Rhodococcus wratislaviensis G10 and Chlorophenol-Degrading Species Rhodococcus opacus 1CP Induced in Benzoate-Grown Cells and Genes Potentially Involved in These Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyanikova, I P; Borzova, O V; Emelyanova, E V; Shumkova, E S; Prisyazhnaya, N V; Plotnikova, E G; Golovleva, L A

    2016-09-01

    Dioxygenases induced during benzoate degradation by the actinobacterium Rhodococcus wratislaviensis G10 strain degrading haloaromatic compounds were studied. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis G10 completely degraded 2 g/liter benzoate during 30 h and 10 g/liter during 200 h. Washed cells grown on benzoate retained respiration activity for more than 90 days, and a high activity of benzoate dioxygenase was recorded for 10 days. Compared to the enzyme activities with benzoate, the activity of benzoate dioxygenases was 10-30% with 13 of 35 substituted benzoate analogs. Two dioxygenases capable of cleaving the aromatic ring were isolated and characterized: protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. Catechol inhibited the activity of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Protocatechuate did not affect the activity of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. A high degree of identity was shown by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for protein peaks of the R. wratislaviensis G10 and Rhodococcus opacus 1CP cells grown on benzoate or LB. DNA from the R. wratislaviensis G10 strain was specifically amplified using specific primers to variable regions of genes coding α- and β-subunits of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase and to two genes of the R. opacus 1CP coding catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. The products were 99% identical with the corresponding regions of the R. opacus 1CP genes. This high identity (99%) between the genes coding degradation of aromatic compounds in the R. wratislaviensis G10 and R. opacus 1CP strains isolated from sites of remote location (1400 km) and at different time (20-year difference) indicates a common origin of biodegradation genes of these strains and a wide distribution of these genes among rhodococci.

  1. Molecular detection and diversity of novel diterpenoid dioxygenase DitA1 genes from proteobacterial strains and soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzig, Robert; Aly, Hamdy A H; Strömpl, Carsten; Wray, Victor; Junca, Howard; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2007-05-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic diterpenoids naturally synthesized by trees that are released from wood during pulping processes. Using a newly designed primer set, genes similar to that encoding the DitA1 catalytic alpha-subunit of the diterpenoid dioxygenase, a key enzyme in abietane resin acid degradation by Pseudomonas abietaniphila BKME-9, could be amplified from different Pseudomonas strains, whereas ditA1 gene sequence types representing distinct branches in the evolutionary tree were amplified from Burkholderia and Cupriavidus isolates. All isolates harbouring a ditA1-homologue were capable of growth on dehydroabietic acid as the sole source of carbon and energy and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in three strains confirmed that ditA1 was expressed constitutively or in response to DhA, demonstrating its involvement in DhA-degradation. Evolutionary analyses indicate that gyrB (as a phylogenetic marker) and ditA1 genes have coevolved under purifying selection from their ancestral variants present in the most recent common ancestor of the genera Pseudomonas, Cupriavidus and Burkholderia. A polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation poylmorphism fingerprinting method was established to monitor the diversity of ditA1 genes in environmental samples. The molecular fingerprints indicated the presence ofa broad, previously unrecognized diversity of diterpenoid dioxygenase genes in soils, and suggest that other bacterial phyla may also harbour the genetic potential for DhA-degradation.

  2. Overexpression of the rice carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 gene in Golden Rice endosperm suggests apocarotenoids as substrates in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Andrea; Yu, Qiuju; Schaub, Patrick; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2010-08-01

    Carotenoids are converted by carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases that catalyze oxidative cleavage reactions leading to apocarotenoids. However, apocarotenoids can also be further truncated by some members of this enzyme family. The plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 (CCD1) subfamily is known to degrade both carotenoids and apocarotenoids in vitro, leading to different volatile compounds. In this study, we investigated the impact of the rice CCD1 (OsCCD1) on the pigmentation of Golden Rice 2 (GR2), a genetically modified rice variety accumulating carotenoids in the endosperm. For this purpose, the corresponding cDNA was introduced into the rice genome under the control of an endosperm-specific promoter in sense and anti-sense orientations. Despite high expression levels of OsCCD1 in sense plants, pigment analysis revealed carotenoid levels and patterns comparable to those of GR2, pleading against carotenoids as substrates in rice endosperm. In support, similar carotenoid contents were determined in anti-sense plants. To check whether OsCCD1 overexpressed in GR2 endosperm is active, in vitro assays were performed with apocarotenoid substrates. HPLC analysis confirmed the cleavage activity of introduced OsCCD1. Our data indicate that apocarotenoids rather than carotenoids are the substrates of OsCCD1 in planta.

  3. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of Recombinant Chlorocatechol 1 2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas Putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Rustiguel; M Pinheiro; A Araujo; M Nonato

    2011-12-31

    Chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida (Pp 1,2-CCD) is considered to be an important biotechnological tool owing to its ability to process a broad spectrum of organic pollutants. In the current work, the crystallization, crystallographic characterization and phasing of the recombinant Pp 1,2-CCD enzyme are described. Reddish-brown crystals were obtained in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium acetate by utilizing the vapor-diffusion technique in sitting drops. Crystal dehydration was the key step in obtaining data sets, which were collected on the D03B-MX2 beamline at the CNPEM/MCT - LNLS using a MAR CCD detector. Pp 1,2-CCD crystals belonged to space group P6{sub 1}22 and the crystallographic structure of Pp 1,2-CCD has been solved by the MR-SAD technique using Fe atoms as scattering centres and the coordinates of 3-chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Rhodococcus opacus (PDB entry 2boy) as the search model. The initial model, which contains three molecules in the asymmetric unit, has been refined to 3.4 {angstrom} resolution.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide-induced brain activation of the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and depressive-like behavior are impaired in a mouse model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinel, Anne-Laure; André, Caroline; Aubert, Agnès; Ferreira, Guillaume; Layé, Sophie; Castanon, Nathalie

    2014-02-01

    Although peripheral low-grade inflammation has been associated with a high incidence of mood symptoms in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), much less is known about the potential involvement of brain activation of cytokines in that context. Recently we showed in a mouse model of MetS, namely the db/db mice, an enhanced hippocampal inflammation associated with increased anxiety-like behavior (Dinel et al., 2011). However, depressive-like behavior was not affected in db/db mice. Based on the strong association between depressive-like behavior and cytokine-induced brain activation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the enzyme that metabolizes tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway, these results may suggest an impairment of brain IDO activation in db/db mice. To test this hypothesis, we measured the ability of db/db mice and their healthy db/+ littermates to enhance brain IDO activity and depressive-like behavior after a systemic immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we show that LPS (5 μg/mouse) significantly increased depressive-like behavior (increased immobility time in a forced-swim test, FST) 24h after treatment in db/+ mice, but not in db/db mice. Interestingly, db/db mice also displayed after LPS treatment blunted increase of brain kynurenine/tryptophan ratio compared to their db/+ counterparts, despite enhanced induction of hippocampal cytokine expression (interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α). Moreover, this was associated with an impaired effect of LPS on hippocampal expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that contributes to mood regulation, including under inflammatory conditions. Collectively, these data indicate that the rise in brain tryptophan catabolism and depressive-like behavior induced by innate immune system activation is impaired in db/db mice. These findings could have relevance in improving the management and treatment of inflammation-related complications in MetS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  5. Inhibition of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Activity by Levo-1-Methyl Tryptophan Blocks Gamma Interferon-Induced Chlamydia trachomatis Persistence in Human Epithelial Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibana, Joyce A.; Belland, Robert J.; Zea, Arnold H.; Schust, Danny J.; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; AbdelRahman, Yasser M.; Tate, David J.; Beatty, Wandy L.; Aiyar, Ashok A.; Quayle, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induces expression of the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in human epithelial cells, the permissive cells for the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. IDO1 depletes tryptophan by catabolizing it to kynurenine with consequences for C. trachomatis, which is a tryptophan auxotroph. In vitro studies reveal that tryptophan depletion can result in the formation of persistent (viable but noncultivable) chlamydial forms. Here, we tested the effects of the IDO1 inhibitor, levo-1-methyl-tryptophan (L-1MT), on IFN-γ-induced C. trachomatis persistence. We found that addition of 0.2 mM L-1MT to IFN-γ-exposed infected HeLa cell cultures restricted IDO1 activity at the mid-stage (20 h postinfection [hpi]) of the chlamydial developmental cycle. This delayed tryptophan depletion until the late stage (38 hpi) of the cycle. Parallel morphological and gene expression studies indicated a consequence of the delay was a block in the induction of C. trachomatis persistence by IFN-γ. Furthermore, L-1MT addition allowed C. trachomatis to undergo secondary differentiation, albeit with limited productive multiplication of the bacterium. IFN-γ-induced persistent infections in epithelial cells have been previously reported to be more resistant to doxycycline than normal productive infections in vitro. Pertinent to this observation, we found that L-1MT significantly improved the efficacy of doxycycline in clearing persistent C. trachomatis forms. It has been postulated that persistent forms of C. trachomatis may contribute to chronic chlamydial disease. Our findings suggest that IDO1 inhibitors such as L-1MT might provide a novel means to investigate, and potentially target, persistent chlamydial forms, particularly in conjunction with conventional therapeutics. PMID:21911470

  6. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase mediates inhibition of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation by human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jian; Hueckelhoven, Angela; Wang, Lei; Schmitt, Anita; Wuchter, Patrick; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek; Kleist, Christian; Bieback, Karen; Ho, Anthony D; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) exert broad immunomodulatory functions. We recently demonstrated a strong suppressive effect of MSCs on virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell proliferation. Here, we further explored the underlying mechanism. The role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in inhibition of virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell proliferation by human MSCs was investigated using a mixed lymphocyte peptide culture assay, IDO intracellular staining and IDO inhibition through 1-methyl-DL-tryptophan (1-MT). Moreover, the influence of the number of passages and the seeding density of MSCs on their IDO expression and immunosuppressive ability were investigated. MSCs with low IDO expression exhibited a reduced suppressive effect on both allo-antigen- and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8(+) T-cell proliferation. 1-MT could partially abrogate the suppressive effect. MSCs inhibited CMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell proliferation regardless of the number of passages and the seeding density. IDO expression of MSCs was not significantly affected by the number of passages or the seeding density. In addition, the interferon (IFN)-γ level in the culture system was crucial for MSCs to inhibit the proliferation of CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. MSCs inhibit virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell proliferation through IFN-γ-induced IDO activity, resolving current conflicting reports on this issue and indicating the potential need for prophylaxis and surveillance of virus infection in patients treated with MSCs. In addition, our study makes a contribution to the development of MSC potency assay for clinical use. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Immuno-regulatory function of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase through modulation of innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe-Sadat Poormasjedi-Meibod

    Full Text Available Successful long-term treatment of type-1 diabetes mainly relies on replacement of β-cells via islet transplantation. Donor shortage is one of the main obstacles preventing transplantation from becoming the treatment of choice. Although animal organs could be an alternative source for transplantation, common immunosuppressive treatments demonstrate low efficacy in preventing xenorejection. Immunoprotective effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO on T-cell mediated allorejection has been extensively studied. Our studies revealed that IDO expression by fibroblasts, induced apoptosis in T-cells while not affecting non-immune cell survival/function. Since macrophages play a pivotal role in xenograft rejection, herein we investigated the effect of IDO-induced tryptophan deficiency/kynurenine accumulation on macrophage function/survival. Moreover, we evaluated the local immunosuppressive effect of IDO on islet-xenograft protection. Our results indicated that IDO expression by bystander fibroblasts significantly reduced the viability of primary macrophages via apoptosis induction. Treatment of peritoneal macrophages by IDO-expressing fibroblast conditioned medium significantly reduced their proinflammatory activity through inhibition of iNOS expression. To determine whether IDO-induced tryptophan starvation or kynurenine accumulation is responsible for macrophage apoptosis and inhibition of their proinflammatory activity, Raw264.7 cell viability and proinflammatory responses were evaluated in tryptophan deficient medium or in the presence of kynurenine. Tryptophan deficiency, but not kynurenine accumulation, reduced Raw264.7 cell viability and suppressed their proinflammatory activity. Next a three-dimensional islet-xenograft was engineered by embedding rat islets within either control or IDO-expressing fibroblast-populated collagen matrix. Islets morphology and immune cell infiltration were then studied in the xenografts transplanted into the C57

  8. The effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Scaramal da Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthracene is a highly toxic organic compound capable of contaminating water and soils, and biodegradation is an important tool for remediating polluted environments. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on the activity of the protocatechol 3,4-dioxygenase (P3,4O enzyme produced by the isolate Leifsonia sp. in cell-free and immobilized extracts. The isolate was grown in Luria Bertani broth medium (LB amended with 250 mg L-1 of phenanthrene. Various levels of pH (4.0-9.0, temperature (5-80 °C, time (0-90 min, trace elements (Cu2+, Hg2+ and Fe3+, and cations (Mg2+, Mn2+, K+ and NH4+ were tested to determine which conditions optimized enzyme activity. In general, the immobilized extract exhibited higher enzyme activity than the cell-free extract in the presence of trace elements and cations. Adding iron yielded the highest relative activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 16 and 99 %, respectively. Copper also increased enzyme activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 8 and 44 %, respectively. Enzyme activity in the phosphate buffer was high across a wide range of pH, reaching 80 % in the pH range between 6.5 and 8.0. The optimum temperatures for enzyme activity differed for cell-free and immobilized extracts, with maximum enzyme activity observed at 35 ºC for the cell-free extract and at 55 ºC for the immobilized extract. The cell-free extract of the P3,4O enzyme exhibited high activity only during the first 3 min of incubation, when it showed 50 % relative activity, and dropped to 0 % after 60 min of incubation. By contrast, activity in the immobilized extract was maintained during 90 min of incubation. This isolate has important characteristics for phenanthrene biodegradation, producing high quantities of the P3,4O enzyme that forms part of the most important pathway for PAH biodegradation.

  9. The Relationships among Tryptophan, Kynurenine, Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase, Depression, and Neuropsychological Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut A. Hestad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the metabolic enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is a biological mediator of inflammation related to the psychopathology of depression, with a Kynurenine (KYN increase in the Tryptophan (TRP metabolic pathway, resulting in reduced Serotonin. In this study, we examined KYN, TRP, and the ratio of KYN to TRP concentrations × 103 (KT Ratio in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in (a a group of depressed patients and (b a control group of patients referred to a neurologic outpatient clinic for whom no specific diagnosis could be established. The KT Ratio is considered an index that represents IDO. The participants were examined with the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II, the Montgomery Aasberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS, and a neuropsychological test battery. We found no significant differences between the two study groups with respect to TRP, KYN, or KT Ratio in serum or CSF. Differences in neuropsychological performance between the two patient groups could be seen in the following tests: Animal Fluency, Digit Symbol, the DKEFS Color-Interference Test (Naming Part, Trail Making Test A and B, and the Grooved Pegboard Non-dominant Hand. KYN in serum correlated highly with KYN in CSF. KYN in serum correlated significantly with both age and gender. When analyzing males and females separately, we found that women had a lower level of TRP in both serum (Mann–Whitney U-test: TRP in Serum; p = 0.001 and CSF (Mann–Whitney U-test: TRP in CSF; p = 0.003. Women had a lower level of KYN in serum (p = 0.029 than men did. Age was positively associated with KYN. KYN in CSF correlated only with age, however; there were no gender differences. No significant relationship was seen between BDI-II and MADRS on the one hand, and KYN and TRP on the other. KYN in CSF as the KT Ratio in both serum and CSF was associated with neuropsychological performance. Thus, we suggest that KYN and KT Ratio are related more strongly to

  10. Characterization of Metal Binding in the Active Sites of acireductone dioxygenase Isoforms from Klebsiella ATCC 8724

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Chai; T Ju; M Dang; R Goldsmith; M Maroney; T Pochapsky

    2011-12-31

    The two acireductone dioxygenase (ARD) isozymes from the methionine salvage pathway of Klebsiella ATCC 8724 present an unusual case in which two enzymes with different structures and distinct activities toward their common substrates (1,2-dihydroxy-3-oxo-5-(methylthio)pent-1-ene and dioxygen) are derived from the same polypeptide chain. Structural and functional differences between the two isozymes are determined by the type of M{sup 2+} metal ion bound in the active site. The Ni{sup 2+}-bound NiARD catalyzes an off-pathway shunt from the methionine salvage pathway leading to the production of formate, methylthiopropionate, and carbon monoxide, while the Fe{sup 2+}-bound FeARD catalyzes the on-pathway formation of methionine precursor 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyrate and formate. Four potential protein-based metal ligands were identified by sequence homology and structural considerations. Based on the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and isothermal calorimetry measurements, it is concluded that the same four residues, His96, His98, Glu102 and His140, provide the protein-based ligands for the metal in both the Ni- and Fe-containing forms of the enzyme, and subtle differences in the local backbone conformations trigger the observed structural and functional differences between the FeARD and NiARD isozymes. Furthermore, both forms of the enzyme bind their respective metals with pseudo-octahedral geometry, and both may lose a histidine ligand upon binding of substrate under anaerobic conditions. However, mutations at two conserved nonligand acidic residues, Glu95 and Glu100, result in low metal contents for the mutant proteins as isolated, suggesting that some of the conserved charged residues may aid in transfer of metal from in vivo sources or prevent the loss of metal to stronger chelators. The Glu100 mutant reconstitutes readily but has low activity. Mutation of Asp101 results in an active enzyme that incorporates

  11. NRVS Studies of the Peroxide Shunt Intermediate in a Rieske Dioxygenase and Its Relation to the Native FesupII/supOinf2/infReaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sutherlin, K. D.; Rivard, B. S.; Böttger, L. H.; Liu, L. V.; Rogers, M. S.; Srnec, Martin; Park, K.; Yoda, Y.; Kitao, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Saito, M.; Seto, M.; Hu, M.; Zhao, J.; Lipscomb, J. D.; Solomon, E. I.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 16 (2018), s. 5544-5559 ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : NRVS studies * Rieske dioxygenase * mononuclear nonheme iron enzymes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  12. Long-lasting Disease Stabilization in the Absence of Toxicity in Metastatic Lung Cancer Patients Vaccinated with an Epitope Derived from Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Trine Zeeberg; Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Ellebaek, Eva

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate targeting of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme using a synthetic peptide vaccine administered to patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In a clinical phase I study, we treated 15 HLA-A2-positive patients with stage III-IV N...

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the three components of the toluene 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung; Friemann, Rosmarie; Parales, Juan V.; Gibson, David T.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2005-01-01

    All three components of the toluene dioxygenase system have been expressed, purified and crystallized. Pseudomonas putida F1 can grow with toluene as its sole source of carbon and energy. The initial reaction of the degradation of toluene is catalyzed by a three-component toluene dioxygenase enzyme system consisting of a reductase (Reductase TOL ), a ferredoxin (Ferredoxin TOL ) and a Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenase (Oxygenase TOL ). The three components and the apoenzyme of the dioxygenase (apo-Oxygenase TOL ) were overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Reductase TOL diffracts to 1.8 Å and belongs to space group P4 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 77.1, c = 156.3 Å. Ferredoxin TOL diffracts to 1.2 Å and belongs to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 30.5, b = 52.0, c = 30.95 Å, β = 113.7°. Apo-Oxygenase TOL and Oxygenase TOL diffract to 3.2 Å and belong to space group P4 3 32, with unit-cell parameters a = 235.9 Å and a = 234.5 Å, respectively

  14. NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCING AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL MAPPING OF THE GENES ENCODING BIPHENYL DIOXYGENASE, A MULTICOM- PONENT POLYCHLORINATED-BIPHENYL-DEGRADING ENZYME IN PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DNA region encoding biphenyl dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the biphenyl-polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway of Pseudomonas species strain LB400, was sequenced. Six open reading frames were identified, four of which are homologous to the components of toluene dioxy...

  15. Characterization and Functional Identification of a Novel Plant 4,5-Extradiol Dioxygenase Involved in Betalain Pigment Biosynthesis in Portulaca grandiflora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christinet, Laurent; Burdet, Frédéric X.; Zaiko, Maïa; Hinz, Ursula; Zrÿd, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Betalains are pigments that replace anthocyanins in the majority of families of the plant order Caryophyllales. Betalamic acid is the common chromophore of betalains. The key enzyme of the betalain biosynthetic pathway is an extradiol dioxygenase that opens the cyclic ring of dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) between carbons 4 and 5, thus producing an unstable seco-DOPA that rearranges nonenzymatically to betalamic acid. A gene for a 4,5-DOPA-dioxygenase has already been isolated from the fungus Amanita muscaria, but no homolog was ever found in plants. To identify the plant gene, we constructed subtractive libraries between different colored phenotypes of isogenic lines of Portulaca grandiflora (Portulacaceae) and between different stages of flower bud formation. Using in silico analysis of differentially expressed cDNAs, we identified a candidate showing strong homology at the level of translated protein with the LigB domain present in several bacterial extradiol 4,5-dioxygenases. The gene was expressed only in colored flower petals. The function of this gene in the betalain biosynthetic pathway was confirmed by biolistic genetic complementation in white petals of P. grandiflora genotypes lacking the gene for color formation. This gene named DODA is the first characterized member of a novel family of plant dioxygenases phylogenetically distinct from Amanita sp. DOPA-dioxygenase. Homologs of DODA are present not only in betalain-producing plants but also, albeit with some changes near the catalytic site, in other angiosperms and in the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. These homologs are part of a novel conserved plant gene family probably involved in aromatic compound metabolism. PMID:14730069

  16. Spectroscopic and computational studies of reversible O2binding by a cobalt complex of relevance to cysteine dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anne A; Lindeman, Sergey V; Fiedler, Adam T

    2017-10-10

    The substitution of non-native metal ions into metalloenzyme active sites is a common strategy for gaining insights into enzymatic structure and function. For some nonheme iron dioxygenases, replacement of the Fe(ii) center with a redox-active, divalent transition metal (e.g., Mn, Co, Ni, Cu) gives rise to an enzyme with equal or greater activity than the wild-type enzyme. In this manuscript, we apply this metal-substitution approach to synthetic models of the enzyme cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). CDO is a nonheme iron dioxygenase that initiates the catabolism of l-cysteine by converting this amino acid to the corresponding sulfinic acid. Two mononuclear Co(ii) complexes (3 and 4) have been prepared with the general formula [Co 2+ (Tp R2 )(CysOEt)] (R = Ph (3) or Me (4); Tp R2 = hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl)borate substituted with R-groups at the 3- and 5-positions, and CysOEt is the anion of l-cysteine ethyl ester). These Co(ii) complexes mimic the active-site structure of substrate-bound CDO and are analogous to functional iron-based CDO models previously reported in the literature. Characterization with X-ray crystallography and/or 1 H NMR spectroscopy revealed that 3 and 4 possess five-coordinate structures featuring facially-coordinating Tp R2 and S,N-bidentate CysOEt ligands. The electronic properties of these high-spin (S = 3/2) complexes were interrogated with UV-visible absorption and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The air-stable nature of complex 3 replicates the inactivity of cobalt-substituted CDO. In contrast, complex 4 reversibly binds O 2 at reduced temperatures to yield an orange chromophore (4-O 2 ). Spectroscopic (EPR, resonance Raman) and computational (density functional theory, DFT) analyses indicate that 4-O 2 is a S = 1/2 species featuring a low-spin Co(iii) center bound to an end-on (η 1 ) superoxo ligand. DFT calculations were used to evaluate the energetics of key steps in the reaction mechanism. Collectively, these

  17. The salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase as a model for a conventional gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase: crystal structures of the G106A mutant and its adducts with gentisate and salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraroni, Marta; Matera, Irene; Bürger, Sibylle; Reichert, Sabrina; Steimer, Lenz; Scozzafava, Andrea; Stolz, Andreas; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase (SDO) from the bacterium Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans BN12 is a versatile gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (GDO) that converts both gentisate (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate) and various monohydroxylated substrates. Several variants of this enzyme were rationally designed based on the previously determined enzyme structure and sequence differences between the SDO and the 'conventional' GDO from Corynebacterium glutamicum. This was undertaken in order to define the structural elements that give the SDO its unique ability to dioxygenolytically cleave (substituted) salicylates. SDO variants M103L, G106A, G111A, R113G, S147R and F159Y were constructed and it was found that G106A oxidized only gentisate; 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate and salicylate were not converted. This indicated that this enzyme variant behaves like previously known 'conventional' GDOs. Crystals of the G106A SDO variant and its complexes with salicylate and gentisate were obtained under anaerobic conditions, and the structures were solved and analyzed. The amino acid residue Gly106 is located inside the SDO active site cavity but does not directly interact with the substrates. Crystal structures of G106A SDO complexes with gentisate and salicylate showed a different binding mode for salicylate when compared with the wild-type enzyme. Thus, salicylate coordinated in the G106A variant with the catalytically active Fe(II) ion in an unusual and unproductive manner because of the inability of salicylate to displace a hydrogen bond that was formed between Trp104 and Asp174 in the G106A variant. It is proposed that this type of unproductive substrate binding might generally limit the substrate spectrum of 'conventional' GDOs. Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank databases under the accession numbers 3NST, 3NWA, 3NVC. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  18. The AlkB Family of Fe(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenases: Repairing Nucleic Acid Alkylation Damage and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Singh, Vipender; Delaney, James C; Li, Deyu; Essigmann, John M

    2015-08-21

    The AlkB family of Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases is a class of ubiquitous direct reversal DNA repair enzymes that remove alkyl adducts from nucleobases by oxidative dealkylation. The prototypical and homonymous family member is an Escherichia coli "adaptive response" protein that protects the bacterial genome against alkylation damage. AlkB has a wide variety of substrates, including monoalkyl and exocyclic bridged adducts. Nine mammalian AlkB homologs exist (ALKBH1-8, FTO), but only a subset functions as DNA/RNA repair enzymes. This minireview presents an overview of the AlkB proteins including recent data on homologs, structural features, substrate specificities, and experimental strategies for studying DNA repair by AlkB family proteins. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Properties of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase in the cell free extract and immobilized extract of Mycobacterium fortuitum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A.S.; Jacques, R.J.S.; Andreazza, R.; Bento, F.M.; Roesch, L.F.W.; Camargo, F.A.O.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are carcinogenic compounds which contaminate water and soil, and the enzymes can be used for bioremediation of these environments. This study aimed to evaluate some environmental conditions that affect the production and activity of the catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12O) by Mycobacterium fortuitum in the cell free and immobilized extract in sodium alginate. The bacterium was grown in mineral medium and LB broth containing 250 mg L−1 of anthracene (PAH). The optimum conditions of pH (4.0–9.0), temperature (5–70 °C), reaction time (10–90 min) and the effect of ions in the enzyme activity were determined. The Mycobacterium cultivated in LB shown higher growth and the C12O activity was two-fold higher to that in the mineral medium. To both extracts the highest enzyme activity was at pH 8.0, however, the immobilized extract promoted the increase in the C12O activity in a pH range between 4.0 and 8.5. The immobilized extract increased the enzymatic activity time and showed the highest C12O activity at 45 °C, 20 °C higher than the greatest temperature in the cell free extract. The enzyme activity in both extracts was stimulated by Fe3+, Hg2+ and Mn2+ and inhibited by NH4+ and Cu2+, but the immobilization protected the enzyme against the deleterious effects of K+ and Mg2+ in tested concentrations. The catechol 1,2-dioxygenase of Mycobacterium fortuitum in the immobilized extract has greater stability to the variations of pH, temperature and reaction time, and show higher activity in presence of ions, comparing to the cell free extract. PMID:24159319

  20. Structure and mechanism leading to formation of the cysteine sulfinate product complex of a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmann, Madleen; Kumar, Suresh; Chernev, Petko; Nehrkorn, Joscha; Schnegg, Alexander; Kumar, Devesh; Dau, Holger; Limberg, Christian; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-05-11

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a unique nonheme iron enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of cysteine in the body. It contains an iron active site with an unusual 3-His ligation to the protein, which contrasts with the structural features of common nonheme iron dioxygenases. Recently, some of us reported a truly biomimetic model for this enzyme, namely a trispyrazolylborato iron(II) cysteinato complex, which not only has a structure very similar to the enzyme-substrate complex but also represents a functional model: Treatment of the model with dioxygen leads to cysteine dioxygenation, as shown by isolating the cysteine part of the product in the course of the work-up. However, little is known on the conversion mechanism and, so far, not even the structure of the actual product complex had been characterised, which is also unknown in case of the enzyme. In a multidisciplinary approach including density functional theory calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have now determined the structure of the actual sulfinato complex for the first time. The Cys-SO2 (-) functional group was found to be bound in an η(2) -O,O-coordination mode, which, based on the excellent resemblance between model and enzyme, also provides the first support for a corresponding binding mode within the enzymatic product complex. Indeed, this is again confirmed by theory, which had predicted a η(2) -O,O-binding mode for synthetic as well as the natural enzyme. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. In situ, real-time catabolic gene expression: Extraction and characterization of naphthalene dioxygenase mRNA transcripts from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.S.; Bakermans, C.; Madsen, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    The authors developed procedures for isolating and characterizing in situ-transcribed mRNA from groundwater microorganisms catabolizing naphthalene at a coal tar waste-contaminated site. Groundwater was pumped through 0.22-microm-pore-size filters, which were then frozen to dry ice-ethanol. RNA was extracted from the frozen filters by boiling sodium dodecyl sulfate lysis and acidic phenol-chloroform extraction. Transcript characterization was performed with a series of PCR primers designed to amplify nahAc homologs. Several primer pairs were found to amplify nahAc homologs representing the entire diversity of the naphthalene-degrading genes. The environmental RNA extract was reverse transcribed, and the resultant mixture of cDNAs was amplified by PCR. A digoxigenin-labeled probe mixture was produced by PCR amplification of groundwater cDNA. This probe mixture hybridized under stringent conditions with the corresponding PCR products from naphthalene-degrading bacteria carrying a variety of nahAc homologs, indicating that diverse dioxygenase transcripts had been retrieved from groundwater. Diluted and undiluted cDNA preparations were independently amplified, and 28 of the resulting PCR products were cloned and sequenced. Sequence comparisons revealed two major groups related to the dioxygenase genes ndoB and dntAc, previously cloned from Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4 and Burkholderia sp. strain DNT, respectively. A distinctive subgroup of sequences was found only in experiments performed with the undiluted cDNA preparation. To the authors' knowledge, these results are the first to directly document in situ transcription of genes encoding naphthalene catabolism at a contaminated site by indigenous microorganisms. The retrieved sequences represent greater diversity than has been detected at the study site by culture-based approaches

  2. Enzyme Specificity of 2-Nitrotoluene 2,3-Dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain JS42 Is Determined by the C-Terminal Region of the α Subunit of the Oxygenase Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parales, Juanito V.; Parales, Rebecca E.; Resnick, Sol M.; Gibson, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Biotransformations with recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the genes encoding 2-nitrotoluene 2,3-dioxygenase (2NTDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42 demonstrated that 2NTDO catalyzes the dihydroxylation and/or monohydroxylation of a wide range of aromatic compounds. Extremely high nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence identity exists between the components from 2NTDO and the corresponding components from 2,4-dinitrotoluene dioxygenase (2,4-DNTDO) from Burkholderia sp. strain DNT (formerly Pseudomonas sp. strain DNT). However, comparisons of the substrates oxidized by these dioxygenases show that they differ in substrate specificity, regiospecificity, and the enantiomeric composition of their oxidation products. Hybrid dioxygenases were constructed with the genes encoding 2NTDO and 2,4-DNTDO. Biotransformation experiments with these hybrid dioxygenases showed that the C-terminal region of the large subunit of the oxygenase component (ISPα) was responsible for the enzyme specificity differences observed between 2NTDO and 2,4-DNTDO. The small subunit of the terminal oxygenase component (ISPβ) was shown to play no role in determining the specificities of these dioxygenases. PMID:9495758

  3. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing leukemic dendritic cells impair a leukemia-specific immune response by inducing potent T regulatory cells

    OpenAIRE

    Curti, A; Trabanelli, S; Onofri, C; Aluigi, M; Salvestrini, V; Ocadlikova, D; Evangelisti, C; Rutella, S; De Cristofaro, R; Ottaviani, E; Baccarani, M; Lemoli, RM

    2010-01-01

    Background: The immunoregulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan into kynurenine, is expressed in a significant subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, resulting in the inhibition of T-cell proliferation and the induction of regulatory T cells. Acute myeloid leukemia cells can be differentiated into dendritic cells, which have increased immunogenicity and have been proposed as vaccines against leukemia.\\ud Design and Methods: Leukemic d...

  4. Ability of bacterial biphenyl dioxygenases from Burkholderia sp. LB400 and Comamonas testosteroni B-356 to catalyse oxygenation of ortho-hydroxychlorobiphenyls formed from PCBs by plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Francová, K.; Macková, M.; Macek, Tomáš; Sylvestre, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 127, - (2004), s. 41-48 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/01/1292 Grant - others:Natural Science and Engineering Research(CA) RGPIN39579-02; NATO Collaborative linkage(XE) SA(EST.GLC.977477)5941SA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : PCB degradation * biphenyl dioxygenases * enzyme specificity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.205, year: 2004

  5. Remarkable Role of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Tryptophan Metabolites in Infectious Diseases: Potential Role in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Yuki; Hoshi, Masato; Imamura, Yukio; Arioka, Yuko; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Saito, Kuniaki

    2013-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), the L-tryptophan-degrading enzyme, plays a key role in the immunomodulatory effects on several types of immune cells. Originally known for its regulatory function during pregnancy and chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis, the activity of IDO1 seems to modify the inflammatory state of infectious diseases. The pathophysiologic activity of L-tryptophan metabolites, kynurenines, is well recognized. Therefore, an understanding of the regulation of IDO1 and th...

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of maganese(II)-dependent 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase from Bacillus sp. JF8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Miki; Hatta, Takashi; Kimbara, Kazuhide; Senda, Toshiya

    2010-01-01

    A thermostable manganese(II)-dependent 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase derived from Bacillus sp. JF8 was crystallized in two forms using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Both crystals diffracted to approximately 1.3 Å resolution. A thermostable manganese(II)-dependent 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase derived from Bacillus sp. JF8 was crystallized. The initial screening for crystallization was performed by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using a crystallization robot, resulting in the growth of two crystal forms. The first crystal belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.7, b = 71.4, c = 93.6 Å, α = 71.2, β = 81.0, γ = 64.0°, and diffracted to 1.3 Å resolution. The second crystal belonged to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.2, b = 90.8, c = 104.3 Å, and diffracted to 1.3 Å resolution. Molecular-replacement trials using homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase from Arthrobacter globiformis (28% amino-acid sequence identity) as a search model provided a satisfactory solution for both crystal forms

  7. Characterization of DitA3, the [Fe3S4] ferredoxin of an aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase from a diterpenoid-degrading microorganism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Manon M-J; Martin, Vincent J J; Mohn, William W; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2006-09-01

    DitA3, a small soluble ferredoxin, is a component of a ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase involved in the microbial degradation of the diterpenoid, dehydroabietic acid. The anaerobic purification of a heterologously expressed his-tagged DitA3 yielded 20 mg of apparently homogeneous recombinant protein, rcDitA3, per liter of cell culture. Each mole of purified rcDitA3 contained 2.9 equivalents of iron and 4.2 equivalents of sulfur, indicating the presence of a single [Fe(3)S(4)] cluster. This conclusion was corroborated by UV-Visible absorption (epsilon(412)=13.4 mM(-1) cm(-1)) and EPR (g(x,y)=2.00 and g(z)=2.02) spectroscopies. The reduction potential of rcDitA3, determined using a highly oriented parallel graphite (HOPG) electrode, was -177.0+/-0.5 mV vs. the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) (20 mM MOPS, 80 mM KCl, pH 7.0, 22 degrees C). This potential is similar to those of small, soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin components of aromatic-ring dihydroxylating dioxygenases. In contrast to these Rieske-type ferredoxins, DitA3 appears to exist as a dimer in solution. The dimeric ferredoxin may be more stable or may increase the catalytic efficiency of the dioxygenase by delivering the two reducing equivalents required for turnover of the oxygenase.

  8. The indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-D-tryptophan upregulates IDO1 in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane A Opitz

    Full Text Available 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-D-MT is currently being used in clinical trials in patients with relapsed or refractory solid tumors with the aim of inhibiting indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-mediated tumor immune escape. IDO is expressed in tumors and tumor-draining lymph nodes and degrades tryptophan (trp to create an immunsuppressive micromilieu both by depleting trp and by accumulating immunosuppressive metabolites of the kynurenine (kyn pathway. Here we show that proliferation of alloreactive T-cells cocultured with IDO1-positive human cancer cells paradoxically was inhibited by 1-D-MT. Surprisingly incubation with 1-D-MT increased kyn production of human cancer cells. Cell-free assays revealed that 1-D-MT did not alter IDO1 enzymatic activity. Instead, 1-D-MT induced IDO1 mRNA and protein expression through pathways involving p38 MAPK and JNK signalling. Treatment of cancer patients with 1-D-MT has transcriptional effects that may promote rather than suppress anti-tumor immune escape by increasing IDO1 in the cancer cells. These off-target effects should be carefully analyzed in the ongoing clinical trials with 1-D-MT.

  9. Ethylnaphthoquinone derivatives as inhibitors of indoleamine-2, 3-dioxygenase from the mangrove endophytic fungus Neofusicoccum austral SYSU-SKS024.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hui; Zhang, Hongao; Liu, Yena; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun; Huang, Xishan; She, Zhigang

    2018-03-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane extract of the fungus Neofusicoccum austral SYSU-SKS024 led to the isolation of three new ethylnaphthoquinone derivatives, neofusnaphthoquinone A (1), 6-(1-methoxylethy1)-2,7-dimethoxyjuglone (2), (3R,4R)-3-methoxyl-botryosphaerone D (6), together with six known analogs (3-5 and 7-9). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Neofusnaphthoquinone A (1) is the third example of the unsymmetrical naphthoquinone dimer, which is rarely found in natural source. All of the isolates were evaluated for their indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitory activity, compounds 1-6 showed in vitro inhibitory effects against IDO with IC 50 values ranging from 0.11 to 10.92μM. This is the first time naphthoquinone dimer (1), as a novel carbon skeleton possessing IDO inhibitory activity, was reported. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Zinc protoporphyrin-IX stimulates tumor immunity by disrupting the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Richard; DuHadaway, James B.; Rust, Sonja; Munn, David H.; Muller, Alexander J.; Mautino, Mario; Prendergast, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has emerged as an important driver of immune escape in a growing number of cancers and cancer-associated chronic infections. In this study, we define novel immunotherapeutic applications for the heme precursor compound zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) based on our discovery that it is a potent small molecule inhibitor of IDO. Inhibitory activity was determined using in vitro and in-cell enzyme assays as well as a novel in vivo pharmacodynamic system. An irreversible mechanism of inhibition was documented consistent with competition for heme binding in newly synthesized cellular protein. siRNA methodology and an IDO-deficient mouse strain were used to verify specificity as an IDO inhibitor. In a preclinical model of melanoma, ZnPP displayed antitumor properties that relied upon T cell function and IDO integrity. ZnPP also phenocopied the known antitumor properties of IDO inhibitors in preclinical models of skin and breast carcinoma. Our results suggest clinical evaluation of ZnPP as an adjuvant immunochemotherapy in chronic infections and cancers where there is emerging recognition of a pathophysiological role for IDO dysregulation. PMID:20530717

  11. INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE INDUCES EXPRESSION OF A NOVEL TRYPTOPHAN TRANSPORTER IN MOUSE AND HUMAN TUMOR CELLS1

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    Silk, Jonathan D.; Lakhal, Samira; Laynes, Robert; Vallius, Laura; Karydis, Ioannis; Marcea, Cornelius; Boyd, C. A. Richard; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, catabolizing tryptophan to kynurenine. Tryptophan depletion by IDO expressing tumors is a common mechanism of immune evasion inducing regulatory T cells and inhibiting effector T cells. As mammalian cells cannot synthesize tryptophan, it remains unclear how IDO positive tumor cells overcome the detrimental effects of local tryptophan depletion. We demonstrate that IDO positive tumor cells express a novel amino acid transporter, which accounts for approximately 50% of the tryptophan uptake. The induced transporter is biochemically distinguished from the constitutively expressed tryptophan transporter System L by increased resistance to inhibitors of System L, resistance to inhibition by high concentrations of most amino acids tested, and high substrate specificity for tryptophan. Under conditions of low extracellular tryptophan, expression of this novel transporter significantly increases tryptophan entry into IDO positive tumors relative to tryptophan uptake through the low affinity System L alone, and further decreases tryptophan levels in the microenvironment. Targeting this additional tryptophan transporter could be a way of pharmacological inhibition of IDO mediated tumor escape. These findings highlight the ability of IDO-expressing tumor cells to thrive in a tryptophan depleted microenvironment by expressing a novel, highly tryptophan-specific transporter, which is resistant to inhibition by most other amino acids. The additional transporter allows tumor cells to strike the ideal balance between supply of tryptophan essential for their own proliferation and survival, and depleting the extracellular milieu of tryptophan to inhibit T cell proliferation. PMID:21742973

  12. Activation of ethylene-responsive p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase leads to increased tocopherol levels during ripening in mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh K.; Ali, Sharique A.; Nath, Pravendra; Sane, Vidhu A.

    2011-01-01

    Mango is characterized by high tocopherol and carotenoid content during ripening. From a cDNA screen of differentially expressing genes during mango ripening, a full-length p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (MiHPPD) gene homologue was isolated that encodes a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of tocopherols. The gene encoded a 432-amino-acid protein. Transcript analysis during different stages of ripening revealed that the gene is ripening related and rapidly induced by ethylene. The increase in MiHPPD transcript accumulation was followed by an increase in tocopherol levels during ripening. The ripening-related increase in MiHPPD expression was also seen in response to abscisic acid and to alesser extent to indole-3-acetic acid. The expression of MiHPPD was not restricted to fruits but was also seen in other tissues such as leaves particularly during senescence. The strong ethylene induction of MiHPPD was also seen in young leaves indicating that ethylene induction of MiHPPD is tissue independent. Promoter analysis of MiHPPD gene in tomato discs and leaves of stable transgenic lines of Arabidopsis showed that the cis elements for ripening-related, ethylene-responsive, and senescence-related expression resided within the 1590 nt region upstream of the ATG codon. Functionality of the gene was demonstrated by the ability of the expressed protein in bacteria to convert p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate to homogentisate. These results provide the first evidence for HPPD expression during ripening of a climacteric fruit. PMID:21430290

  13. Expression of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in mature granule cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus

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    Ohira, Koji

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract New granule cells are continuously generated in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus. During granule cell maturation, the mechanisms that differentiate new cells not only describe the degree of cell differentiation, but also crucially regulate the progression of cell differentiation. Here, we describe a gene, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO, whose expression distinguishes stem cells from more differentiated cells among the granule cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus. The use of markers for proliferation, neural progenitors, and immature and mature granule cells indicated that TDO was expressed in mature cells and in some immature cells. In mice heterozygous for the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, in which dentate gyrus granule cells fail to mature normally, TDO immunoreactivity was substantially downregulated in the dentate gyrus granule cells. Moreover, a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling experiment revealed that new neurons began to express TDO between 2 and 4 wk after the neurons were generated, when the axons and dendrites of the granule cells developed and synaptogenesis occurred. These findings indicate that TDO might be required at a late-stage of granule cell development, such as during axonal and dendritic growth, synaptogenesis and its maturation.

  14. Disruption of a CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 4 gene converts flower colour from white to yellow in Brassica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao; Liu, Chao; Wang, Yaqin; Yao, Xuan; Wang, Fang; Wu, Jiangsheng; King, Graham J; Liu, Kede

    2015-06-01

    In Brassica napus, yellow petals had a much higher content of carotenoids than white petals present in a small number of lines, with violaxanthin identified as the major carotenoid compound in yellow petals of rapeseed lines. Using positional cloning we identified a carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 gene, BnaC3.CCD4, responsible for the formation of flower colour, with preferential expression in petals of white-flowered B. napus lines. Insertion of a CACTA-like transposable element 1 (TE1) into the coding region of BnaC3.CCD4 had disrupted its expression in yellow-flowered rapeseed lines. α-Ionone was identified as the major volatile apocarotenoid released from white petals but not from yellow petals. We speculate that BnaC3.CCD4 may use δ- and/or α-carotene as substrates. Four variations, including two CACTA-like TEs (alleles M1 and M4) and two insertion/deletions (INDELs, alleles M2 and M3), were identified in yellow-flowered Brassica oleracea lines. The two CACTA-like TEs were also identified in the coding region of BcaC3.CCD4 in Brassica carinata. However, the two INDELs were not detected in B. napus and B. carinata. We demonstrate that the insertions of TEs in BolC3.CCD4 predated the formation of the two allotetraploids. © 2015 The Authors New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 Inhibition Constrains Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 Activity in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Cells

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    Sergio Rutella

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 metabolizes L-tryptophan to kynurenines (KYN, inducing T-cell suppression either directly or by altering antigen-presenting-cell function. Cyclooxygenase (COX-2, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of prostaglandins, is over-expressed by several tumours. We aimed at determining whether COX-2 inhibitors down-regulate the IFN-g-induced expression of IDO1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML cells. IFN-γ at 100 ng/mL up-regulated COX-2 and IDO1 in HL-60 AML cells, both at mRNA and protein level. The increased COX-2 and IDO1 expression correlated with heightened production of prostaglandin (PGE2 and kynurenines, respectively. Nimesulide, a preferential COX-2 inhibitor, down-regulated IDO1 mRNA/protein and attenuated kynurenine synthesis, suggesting that overall IDO inhibition resulted both from reduced IDO1 gene transcription and from inhibited IDO1 catalytic activity. From a functional standpoint, IFN-g-challenged HL-60 cells promoted the in vitro conversion of allogeneic CD4+CD25− T cells into bona fide CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, an effect that was significantly reduced by treatment of IFN-γ-activated HL-60 cells with nimesulide. Overall, these data point to COX-2 inhibition as a potential strategy to be pursued with the aim at circumventing leukaemia-induced, IDO-mediated immune dysfunction.

  16. Dioxygenases Catalyze O-Demethylation and O,O-Demethylenation with Widespread Roles in Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Metabolism in Opium Poppy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Scott C.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    In opium poppy, the antepenultimate and final steps in morphine biosynthesis are catalyzed by the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases, thebaine 6-O-demethylase (T6ODM) and codeine O-demethylase (CODM). Further investigation into the biochemical functions of CODM and T6ODM revealed extensive and unexpected roles for such enzymes in the metabolism of protopine, benzo[c]phenanthridine, and rhoeadine alkaloids. When assayed with a wide range of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, CODM, T6ODM, and the functionally unassigned paralog DIOX2, renamed protopine O-dealkylase, showed novel and efficient dealkylation activities, including regio- and substrate-specific O-demethylation and O,O-demethylenation. Enzymes catalyzing O,O-demethylenation, which cleave a methylenedioxy bridge leaving two hydroxyl groups, have previously not been reported in plants. Similar cleavage of methylenedioxy bridges on substituted amphetamines is catalyzed by heme-dependent cytochromes P450 in mammals. Preferred substrates for O,O-demethylenation by CODM and protopine O-dealkylase were protopine alkaloids that serve as intermediates in the biosynthesis of benzo[c]phenanthridine and rhoeadine derivatives. Virus-induced gene silencing used to suppress the abundance of CODM and/or T6ODM transcripts indicated a direct physiological role for these enzymes in the metabolism of protopine alkaloids, and they revealed their indirect involvement in the formation of the antimicrobial benzo[c]phenanthridine sanguinarine and certain rhoeadine alkaloids in opium poppy. PMID:23928311

  17. Dioxygenases catalyze O-demethylation and O,O-demethylenation with widespread roles in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Scott C; Facchini, Peter J

    2013-10-04

    In opium poppy, the antepenultimate and final steps in morphine biosynthesis are catalyzed by the 2-oxoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenases, thebaine 6-O-demethylase (T6ODM) and codeine O-demethylase (CODM). Further investigation into the biochemical functions of CODM and T6ODM revealed extensive and unexpected roles for such enzymes in the metabolism of protopine, benzo[c]phenanthridine, and rhoeadine alkaloids. When assayed with a wide range of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, CODM, T6ODM, and the functionally unassigned paralog DIOX2, renamed protopine O-dealkylase, showed novel and efficient dealkylation activities, including regio- and substrate-specific O-demethylation and O,O-demethylenation. Enzymes catalyzing O,O-demethylenation, which cleave a methylenedioxy bridge leaving two hydroxyl groups, have previously not been reported in plants. Similar cleavage of methylenedioxy bridges on substituted amphetamines is catalyzed by heme-dependent cytochromes P450 in mammals. Preferred substrates for O,O-demethylenation by CODM and protopine O-dealkylase were protopine alkaloids that serve as intermediates in the biosynthesis of benzo[c]phenanthridine and rhoeadine derivatives. Virus-induced gene silencing used to suppress the abundance of CODM and/or T6ODM transcripts indicated a direct physiological role for these enzymes in the metabolism of protopine alkaloids, and they revealed their indirect involvement in the formation of the antimicrobial benzo[c]phenanthridine sanguinarine and certain rhoeadine alkaloids in opium poppy.

  18. Eosinophil Granulocytes Account for Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Mediated Immune Escape in Human Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Simonetta Astigiano

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, a catabolizing enzyme of tryptophan, is supposed to play a role in tumor immune escape. Its expression in solid tumors has not yet been well elucidated: IDO can be expressed by the tumor cells themselves, or by ill-defined infiltrating cells, possibly depending on tumor type. We have investigated IDO expression in 25 cases of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, we found that IDO was expressed not by tumor cells, but by normal cells infiltrating the peritumoral stroma. These cells were neither macrophages nor dendritic cells, and were identified as eosinophil granulocytes. The amount of IDO-positive eosinophils varied in different cases, ranging from a few cells to more than 50 per field at x200 magnification. IDO protein in NSCLC was enzymatically active. Therefore, at least in NSCLC cases displaying a large amount of these cells in the inflammatory infiltrate, IDO-positive eosinophils could exert an effective immunosuppressive action. On analyzing the 17 patients with adequate follow-up, a significant relationship was found between the amount of IDO-positive infiltrate and overall survival. This finding suggests that the degree of IDO-positive infiltrate could be a prognostic marker in NSCLC.

  19. P-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE from Medicago sativa is involved in vitamin E biosynthesis and abscisic acid-mediated seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jishan; Chen, Zhihong; Ban, Liping; Wu, Yudi; Huang, Jianping; Chu, Jinfang; Fang, Shuang; Wang, Zan; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin

    2017-01-01

    P-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE (HPPD) is the first committed enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of vitamin E, and is characterized by catalyzing the conversion of p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate (HPP) to homogentisic acid (HGA). Here, an HPPD gene was cloned from Medicago sativa L. and designated MsHPPD, which was expressed at high levels in alfalfa leaves. PEG 6000 (polyethylene glycol), NaCl, abscisic acid and salicylic acid were shown to significantly induce MsHPPD expression, especially in the cotyledons and root tissues. Overexpression of MsHPPD was found to significantly increase the level of β-tocotrienol and the total vitamin E content in Arabidopsis seeds. Furthermore, these transgenic Arabidopsis seeds exhibited an accelerated germination time, compared with wild-type seeds under normal conditions, as well as under NaCl and ABA treatments. Meanwhile, the expression level of several genes associated with ABA biosynthesis (NCED3, NCED5 and NCED9) and the ABA signaling pathway (RAB18, ABI3 and ABI5) were significantly down-regulated in MsHPPD-overexpressing transgenic lines, as well as the total free ABA content. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MsHPPD functions not only in the vitamin E biosynthetic pathway, but also plays a critical role in seed germination via affecting ABA biosynthesis and signaling. PMID:28084442

  20. P-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE from Medicago sativa is involved in vitamin E biosynthesis and abscisic acid-mediated seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jishan; Chen, Zhihong; Ban, Liping; Wu, Yudi; Huang, Jianping; Chu, Jinfang; Fang, Shuang; Wang, Zan; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin

    2017-01-13

    P-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE (HPPD) is the first committed enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of vitamin E, and is characterized by catalyzing the conversion of p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate (HPP) to homogentisic acid (HGA). Here, an HPPD gene was cloned from Medicago sativa L. and designated MsHPPD, which was expressed at high levels in alfalfa leaves. PEG 6000 (polyethylene glycol), NaCl, abscisic acid and salicylic acid were shown to significantly induce MsHPPD expression, especially in the cotyledons and root tissues. Overexpression of MsHPPD was found to significantly increase the level of β-tocotrienol and the total vitamin E content in Arabidopsis seeds. Furthermore, these transgenic Arabidopsis seeds exhibited an accelerated germination time, compared with wild-type seeds under normal conditions, as well as under NaCl and ABA treatments. Meanwhile, the expression level of several genes associated with ABA biosynthesis (NCED3, NCED5 and NCED9) and the ABA signaling pathway (RAB18, ABI3 and ABI5) were significantly down-regulated in MsHPPD-overexpressing transgenic lines, as well as the total free ABA content. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MsHPPD functions not only in the vitamin E biosynthetic pathway, but also plays a critical role in seed germination via affecting ABA biosynthesis and signaling.

  1. 4-Bromophenylhydrazinyl benzenesulfonylphenylureas as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase inhibitors with in vivo target inhibition and anti-tumor efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Yu; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Song, Jen-Shin; Hung, Ming-Shiu; Cheng, Ming-Fu; Liao, Fang-Yu; Li, An-Shiou; Cheng, Shu-Ying; Lin, Li-Mei; Chiu, Chun-Hsien; Wu, Mine-Hsine; Lin, Yi-Jyun; Hsiao, Wenchi; Sun, Manwu; Wang, Yi-Hsin; Huang, Chin-Hsiang; Tang, Ya-Chu; Chang, Hsin-Huei; Huang, Zih-Ting; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Shih, Chuan; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Wu, Su-Ying; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Ueng, Shau-Hua

    2018-02-12

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is a heme-containing enzyme implicated in the down regulation of the anti-tumor immune response, and considered a promising anti-cancer drug target. Several pharmaceutical companies, including Pfizer, Merck, and Bristol-Myers Squibb, are known to be in pursuit of IDO inhibitors, and Incyte recently reported good results in the phase II clinical trial of the IDO inhibitor Epacadostat. In previous work, we developed a series of IDO inhibitors based on a sulfonylhydrazide core structure, and explored how they could serve as potent IDO inhibitors with good drug profiles. Herein, we disclose the development of the 4-bromophenylhydrazinyl benzenesulfonylphenylurea 5k, a potent IDO inhibitor which demonstrated 25% tumor growth inhibition in a murine CT26 syngeneic model on day 18 with 100 mg/kg oral administration twice daily, and a 30% reduction in tumor weight. Pharmacodynamic testing of 5k found it to cause a 25% and 21% reduction in kyn/trp ratio at the plasma and tumor, respectively. In the CT26 tumor model, 5k was found to slightly increase the percentage of CD3 + T cells and lymphocyte responsiveness, indicating that 5k may have potential in modulating anti-tumor immunity. These data suggest 5k to be worthy of further investigation in the development of anti-tumor drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. One enzyme, many reactions: structural basis for the various reactions catalyzed by naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase

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    Daniel J. Ferraro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rieske nonheme iron oxygenases (ROs are a well studied class of enzymes. Naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase (NDO is used as a model to study ROs. Previous work has shown how side-on binding of oxygen to the mononuclear iron provides this enzyme with the ability to catalyze stereospecific and regiospecific cis-dihydroxylation reactions. It has been well documented that ROs catalyze a variety of other reactions, including mono-oxygenation, desaturation, O- and N-dealkylation, sulfoxidation etc. NDO itself catalyzes a variety of these reactions. Structures of NDO in complex with a number of different substrates show that the orientation of the substrate in the active site controls not only the regiospecificity and stereospecificity, but also the type of reaction catalyzed. It is proposed that the mononuclear iron-activated dioxygen attacks the atoms of the substrate that are most proximal to it. The promiscuity of delivering two products (apparently by two different reactions from the same substrate can be explained by the possible binding of the substrate in slightly different orientations aided by the observed flexibility of residues in the binding pocket.

  3. Eucalyptus ESTs involved in the production of 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, a regulatory enzyme of abscisic acid production

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    Iraê A. Guerrini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA regulates stress responses in plants, and genomic tools can help us to understand the mechanisms involved in that process. FAPESP, a Brazilian research foundation, in association with four private forestry companies, has established the FORESTs database (https://forests.esalq.usp.br. A search was carried out in the Eucalyptus expressed sequence tag database to find ESTs involved with 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED, the regulatory enzyme for ABA biosynthesis, using the basic local BLAST alignment tool. We found four clusters (EGEZLV2206B11.g, EGJMWD2252H08.g, EGBFRT3107F10.g, and EGEQFB1200H10.g, which represent similar sequences of the gene that produces NCED. Data showed that the EGBFRT3107F10.g cluster was similar to the maize (Zea mays NCED enzyme, while EGEZLV2206B11.g and EGJMWD2252H08.g clusters were similar to the avocado (Persea americana NCED enzyme. All Eucalyptus clusters were expressed in several tissues, especially in flower buds, where ABA has a special participation during the floral development process.

  4. Putative mitochondrial α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase Fmp12 controls utilization of proline as an energy source in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Ikuhisa Nishida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid proline functions as a nitrogen source and as a stress protectant in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, utilization of proline as a carbon source in S. cerevisiae cells has not been studied yet. In the process of study on the physiological roles of the found-in-mitochondrial-proteome (FMP genes in proline metabolism, we found that Δfmp12 cells could grow better than wild-type cells on agar plate medium containing proline as the sole nitrogen and carbon sources. In contrast, overexpression of FMP12 negatively affected cell growth under the same condition. The Fmp12 protein was localized in the mitochondria and was constitutively expressed. Deletion of the genes that encode mitochondrial enzymes, such as proline dehydrogenase (PUT1, Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (PUT2, alanine transaminase (ALT1, and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase subunit (KGD1, abolished the enhanced cell growth in Δfmp12. These results provided the first evidence that proline can be utilized as a carbon source via the mitochondrial proline metabolic pathway and the subsequent tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle in S. cerevisiae. The function of Fmp12, which has a similarity with α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases of the yeast Candida species and human, might inhibit cell growth by skipping the ATP production step of the TCA cycle.

  5. New Insight into the Cleavage Reaction of Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120 Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase in Natural and Nonnatural Carotenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jinsol; Kim, Se Hyeuk

    2013-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at a specific double bond to generate apocarotenoids. In this study, we investigated the activity and substrate preferences of NSC3, a CCD of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, in vivo and in vitro using natural and nonnatural carotenoid structures. NSC3 cleaved β-apo-8′-carotenal at 3 positions, C-13C-14, C-15C-15′, and C-13′C-14′, revealing a unique cleavage pattern. NSC3 cleaves the natural structure of carotenoids 4,4′-diaponeurosporene, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-al, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-oic acid, 4,4′-diapotorulene, and 4,4′-diapotorulen-4′-al to generate novel cleavage products (apo-14′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-13′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-10′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-14′-diapotorulenal, and apo-10′-diapotorulenal, respectively). The study of carotenoids with natural or nonnatural structures produced by using synthetic modules could provide information valuable for understanding the cleavage reactions or substrate preferences of other CCDs in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23524669

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase in bitter melon (Momordica charantia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Park, Sang Un

    2013-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a family of enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at various chain positions to form a broad spectrum of apocarotenoids, including aromatic substances, pigments and phytohormones. Using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR method, we isolated three cDNA-encoding CCDs (McCCD1, McCCD4, and McNCED) from Momordica charantia. Amino acid sequence alignments showed that they share high sequence identity with other orthologous genes. Quantitative real-time RT PCR (reverse transcriptase PCR) analysis revealed that the expression of McCCD1 and McCCD4 was highest in flowers, and lowest in roots and old leaves (O-leaves). During fruit maturation, the two genes displayed differential expression, with McCCD1 peaking at mid-stage maturation while McCCD4 showed the lowest expression at that stage. The mRNA expression level of McNCED, a key enzyme involved in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, was high during fruit maturation and further increased at the beginning of seed germination. When first-leaf stage plants of M. charantia were exposed to dehydration stress, McNCED mRNA expression was induced primarily in the leaves and, to a lesser extend, in roots and stems. McNCED expression was also induced by high temperature and salinity, while treatment with exogenous ABA led to a decrease. These results should be helpful in determining the substrates and cleavage sites catalyzed by CCD genes in M. charantia, and also in defining the roles of CCDs in growth and development, and in the plant's response to environmental stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of 9-lipoxygenase and α-dioxygenase oxylipin pathways as modulators of local and systemic defense.

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    Vicente, Jorge; Cascón, Tomás; Vicedo, Begonya; García-Agustín, Pilar; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Plant 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOX) and α-dioxygenases (α-DOX) initiate the synthesis of oxylipins after bacterial infection. Here, the role of these enzymes in plants' defense was investigated using individual Arabidopsis thaliana lox1 and dox1 mutants and a double lox1 dox1 mutant. Studies with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) revealed the enhanced susceptibility of lox1 to the virulent strain Pst DC3000 and the partial impairment of lox1 and dox1 mutants to activate systemic acquired resistance. Notably, both defects were enhanced in the lox1 dox1 plants as compared with individual mutants. We found that pre-treatment with 9-LOX- and α-DOX-generated oxylipins protected plant tissues against bacterial infection. The strongest effect in this respect was exerted by 9-ketooctadecatrienoic acid (9-KOT), which is produced from linolenic acid by 9-LOX. Quantification of 9-KOT revealed its accumulation after bacterial infection. The levels were reduced in lox1 and lox1 dox1 plants but strongly increased in the dox1 mutant due to metabolic interaction of the two pathways. Transcriptional analyses indicated that 9-KOT pre-treatment modifies hormone homeostasis during bacterial infection. The nature of the changes detected suggested that 9-KOT interferes with the hormonal changes caused by bacterial effectors. This notion was substantiated by the finding that 9-KOT failed to reduce the growth of PstDC3000hrpA, a mutant compromised in effector secretion, and of the avirulent strain Pst DC3000 avrRpm1. Further support for the action of the 9-LOX- and α-DOX-oxylipin pathways as modulators of hormone homeostasis was the observation that lox1 dox1 seedlings are hypersensitive to the growth-inhibitory effect of ABA and showed enhanced activation of ABA-inducible marker genes as compared with wild-type plants.

  8. Tryptophan degradation in irritable bowel syndrome: evidence of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation in a male cohort

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    Cryan John F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common disorder that affects 10–15% of the population. Although characterised by a lack of reliable biological markers, the disease state is increasingly viewed as a disorder of the brain-gut axis. In particular, accumulating evidence points to the involvement of both the central and peripheral serotonergic systems in disease symptomatology. Furthermore, altered tryptophan metabolism and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO activity are hallmarks of many stress-related disorders. The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation may serve to link these findings to the low level immune activation recently described in IBS. In this study, we investigated tryptophan degradation in a male IBS cohort (n = 10 and control subjects (n = 26. Methods Plasma samples were obtained from patients and healthy controls. Tryptophan and its metabolites were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and neopterin, a sensitive marker of immune activation, was measured using a commercially available ELISA assay. Results Both kynurenine levels and the kynurenine:tryptophan ratio were significantly increased in the IBS cohort compared with healthy controls. Neopterin was also increased in the IBS subjects and the concentration of the neuroprotective metabolite kynurenic acid was decreased, as was the kynurenic acid:kynurenine ratio. Conclusion These findings suggest that the activity of IDO, the immunoresponsive enzyme which is responsible for the degradation of tryptophan along this pathway, is enhanced in IBS patients relative to controls. This study provides novel evidence for an immune-mediated degradation of tryptophan in a male IBS population and identifies the kynurenine pathway as a potential source of biomarkers in this debilitating condition.

  9. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase prevented cognitive impairment in adult Wistar rats subjected to pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Elias, Samuel G; Tashiro, Michael H; Dominguini, Diogo; Comim, Clarissa M; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of forms of bacterial meningitis that have a high mortality rate and cause long-term neurologic sequelae. We evaluated the effects of an indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitor on proinflammatory mediators and memory in Wistar rats subjected to pneumococcal meningitis. The animals were divided into 4 groups: sham, sham treated with IDO inhibitor, meningitis, and meningitis treated with IDO inhibitor. During the first experiment, the animals were killed 24 hours later, and the hippocampus was isolated for the analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CINC-1) levels. The survival rate was 56.296% in the meningitis group and 29.616% in the meningitis group with IDO inhibitor. In the control group, we found a mean of 14.29 white blood cells/mL cerebrospinal fluid, whereas the mean was 80.00 white blood cells/mL cerebrospinal fluid in the sham IDO inhibitor group, 1167.00 white blood cells/mL cerebrospinal fluid in the meningitis group, and 286.70 white blood cells/mL cerebrospinal fluid in the meningitis IDO inhibitor group. In the meningitis group with IDO inhibitor, the levels of TNF-α and CINC-1 were reduced. In the second experiment, animals were subjected to a behavioral task and cytokine analysis 10 days after meningitis induction. In the meningitis group, there was an impairment of aversive memory. However, in the meningitis group that received adjuvant treatment with the IDO inhibitor, animals demonstrated preservation of aversive memory. These findings showed dual effects of the IDO inhibitor on a pneumococcal meningitis animal model because the inhibitor impaired survival but also produced beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory activity and neuroprotection against the latter behavioral deficits. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Tryptophan Contained in 1-Methyl-Tryptophan on Antimicrobial and Immunoregulatory Functions of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Silvia K.; Siepmann, Stephan; Kuhlmann, Katja; Meyer, Helmut E.; Metzger, Sabine; Pudelko, Sabine; Leineweber, Margret; Däubener, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been identified as an important antimicrobial and immunoregulatory effector molecule essential for the establishment of tolerance by regulating local tryptophan (Trp) concentrations. On the other hand, the immunosuppressive capacity of IDO can have detrimental effects for the host as it can lead to deleterious alterations of the immune response by promoting tolerance to some types of tumors. To suppress this disadvantageous IDO effect, the competitive inhibitor 1-Methyl-Tryptophan (1-MT) is being tested in clinical trials. However, it remains inconclusive which stereoisomer of 1-MT is the more effective inhibitor of IDO-mediated immunosuppression. While IDO enzyme activity is more efficiently inhibited by 1-L-MT in cell-free or in vitro settings, 1-D-MT is superior to 1-L-MT in the enhancement of anti-tumor responses in vivo. Here, we present new data showing that commercially available 1-L-MT lots contain tryptophan in amounts sufficient to compensate for the IDO-mediated tryptophan depletion in vitro. The addition of 1-L-MT abrogated IDO-mediated antimicrobial effects and permitted the growth of the tryptophan-auxotroph microorganisms Staphylococcus aureus and Toxoplasma gondii. Consistent with this, the tryptophan within 1-L-MT lots was sufficient to antagonize IDO-mediated inhibition of T cell responses. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed not only tryptophan within 1-L-MT, but also the incorporation of this tryptophan in bacterial and human proteins that were generated in the presence of 1-L-MT in otherwise tryptophan-free conditions. In summary, these data reveal that tryptophan within 1-L-MT can affect the results of in vitro studies in an L-stereospecific and IDO-independent way. PMID:23028625

  11. Modulatory roles of interferon-γ through indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase induction in innate immune response of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegawa, Daisuke; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Hirao, Kouji; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Kanako; Matsuo, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    Marked infiltration of inflammatory cells such as activated T cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is observed in severe pulpitis. However, the roles of IFN-γ in the innate immune response of dental pulp have not been reported. Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a regulator of immune responses, and the IDO expression is induced by IFN-γ in many cells whose expression in dental pulp is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of IFN-γ in the immune response through microbial pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as Toll-like receptors or nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors on the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as CXCL10 and interleukin (IL)-6 and the expression of IDO in cultured human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). HDPCs were established from explant cultures of healthy pulp tissues. CXCL10 and IL-6 production was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Confirmation of IDO localization in dental pulp tissues was examined using immunohistochemistry. IDO expression in HDPCs was analyzed by immunoblot. IFN-γ significantly up-regulated CXCL10 and IL-6 production in the HDPCs stimulated with ligands for PRRs in a concentration-dependent manner. The expression of IDO was detected in inflamed pulp tissue. In addition, IFN-γ in combination with the PRR ligands enhanced IDO expression in HDPCs compared with IFN-γ alone. Moreover, CXCL10 production in IFN-γ-stimulated HDPCs was inhibited by an IDO inhibitor. This study showed the synergistic effects by IFN-γ on cytokine production and IDO expression in HDPCs, suggesting that IFN-γ may modulate the innate immune response of dental pulp. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. First report of a deletion encompassing an entire exon in the homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase gene causing alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouheir Habbal, Mohammad; Bou-Assi, Tarek; Zhu, Jun; Owen, Renius; Chehab, Farid F

    2014-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is often diagnosed clinically with episodes of dark urine, biochemically by the accumulation of peripheral homogentisic acid and molecularly by the presence of mutations in the homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase gene (HGD). Alkaptonuria is invariably associated with HGD mutations, which consist of single nucleotide variants and small insertions/deletions. Surprisingly, the presence of deletions beyond a few nucleotides among over 150 reported deleterious mutations has not been described, raising the suspicion that this gene might be protected against the detrimental mechanisms of gene rearrangements. The quest for an HGD mutation in a proband with AKU revealed with a SNP array five large regions of homozygosity (5-16 Mb), one of which includes the HGD gene. A homozygous deletion of 649 bp deletion that encompasses the 72 nucleotides of exon 2 and surrounding DNA sequences in flanking introns of the HGD gene was unveiled in a proband with AKU. The nature of this deletion suggests that this in-frame deletion could generate a protein without exon 2. Thus, we modeled the tertiary structure of the mutant protein structure to determine the effect of exon 2 deletion. While the two β-pleated sheets encoded by exon 2 were missing in the mutant structure, other β-pleated sheets are largely unaffected by the deletion. However, nine novel α-helical coils substituted the eight coils present in the native HGD crystal structure. Thus, this deletion results in a deleterious enzyme, which is consistent with the proband's phenotype. Screening for mutations in the HGD gene, particularly in the Middle East, ought to include this exon 2 deletion in order to determine its frequency and uncover its origin.

  13. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages in infectious and noninfectious cutaneous granulomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bubnoff, Dagmar; Scheler, Marina; Wilms, Helene; Wenzel, Jörg; von Bubnoff, Nikolas; Häcker, Georg; Schultze, Joachim; Popov, Alexey; Racz, Paul; Bieber, Thomas; Wickenhauser, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, and this degradation is an immunosuppressive mechanism that is mainly used by antigen-presenting cells. IDO-expressing dendritic cells and macrophages have previously been identified as components of lymph node granulomas after Listeria monocytogenes infection. In this study we undertook an analysis of IDO expression in granulomas of infectious and noninfectious origin in the human skin. Lesional skin biopsy specimens (n = 22) from different granulomatous skin disorders (lupus vulgaris, sarcoidosis, granuloma annulare, leprosy) were analyzed. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify and locate the enzyme IDO within the inflammatory granulomatous infiltrate (IDO, CD11c, CD68, S100, CD3, Foxp3). Two-color immunofluorescence of IDO in combination with multiple markers was applied to characterize the IDO-expressing cells. Cutaneous granulomas of different origin strongly express IDO, mainly in the center and in the ring wall of the granulomas. We demonstrate that in infectious, but also in noninfectious human cutaneous granulomas the large myeloid CD11c(+)S100(+)CD68(-) dendritic cells and the CD68(+) macrophages express IDO. This study was limited by the lack of details about the exact stage or maturity of granuloma formation in the specimens investigated. These findings reveal that IDO expression in myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages is part of an integrated response of granuloma formation, which may be a unifying feature of granulomatous reactions in the skin. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prognostic Significance of Promoter DNA Hypermethylation of cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1 Gene in Primary Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Minatani

    Full Text Available Using pharmacological unmasking microarray, we identified promoter DNA methylation of cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1 gene in human cancer. In this study, we assessed the clinicopathological significance of CDO1 methylation in primary breast cancer (BC with no prior chemotherapy. The CDO1 DNA methylation was quantified by TaqMan methylation specific PCR (Q-MSP in 7 BC cell lines and 172 primary BC patients with no prior chemotherapy. Promoter DNA of the CDO1 gene was hypermethylated in 6 BC cell lines except SK-BR3, and CDO1 gene expression was all silenced at mRNA level in the 7 BC cell lines. Quantification of CDO1 methylation was developed using Q-MSP, and assessed in primary BC. Among the clinicopathologic factors, CDO1 methylation level was not statistically significantly associated with any prognostic factors. The log-rank plot analysis elucidated that the higher methylation the tumors harbored, the poorer prognosis the patients exhibited. Using the median value of 58.0 as a cut-off one, disease specific survival in BC patients with CDO1 hypermethylation showed significantly poorer prognosis than those with hypomethylation (p = 0.004. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model identified that CDO1 hypermethylation was prognostic factor as well as Ki-67 and hormone receptor status. The most intriguingly, CDO1 hypermethylation was of robust prognostic relevance in triple negative BC (p = 0.007. Promoter DNA methylation of CDO1 gene was robust prognostic indicator in primary BC patients with no prior chemotherapy. Prognostic relevance of the CDO1 promoter DNA methylation is worthy of being paid attention in triple negative BC cancer.

  15. Single turnover of substrate-bound ferric cysteine dioxygenase with superoxide anion: enzymatic reactivation, product formation, and a transient intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Joshua A; Li, Wei; Pierce, Brad S

    2011-11-29

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a non-heme mononuclear iron enzyme that catalyzes the O(2)-dependent oxidation of L-cysteine (Cys) to produce cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA). In this study we demonstrate that the catalytic cycle of CDO can be "primed" by one electron through chemical oxidation to produce CDO with ferric iron in the active site (Fe(III)-CDO, termed 2). While catalytically inactive, the substrate-bound form of Fe(III)-CDO (2a) is more amenable to interrogation by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy than the 'as-isolated' Fe(II)-CDO enzyme (1). Chemical-rescue experiments were performed in which superoxide (O(2)(•-)) anions were introduced to 2a to explore the possibility that a Fe(III)-superoxide species represents the first intermediate within the catalytic pathway of CDO. In principle, O(2)(•-) can serve as a suitable acceptor for the remaining 3-electrons necessary for CSA formation and regeneration of the active Fe(II)-CDO enzyme (1). Indeed, addition of O(2)(•-) to 2a resulted in the rapid formation of a transient species (termed 3a) observable at 565 nm by UV-vis spectroscopy. The subsequent decay of 3a is kinetically matched to CSA formation. Moreover, a signal attributed to 3a was also identified using parallel mode X-band EPR spectroscopy (g ~ 11). Spectroscopic simulations, observed temperature dependence, and the microwave power saturation behavior of 3a are consistent with a ground state S = 3 from a ferromagnetically coupled (J ~ -8 cm(-1)) high-spin ferric iron (S(A) = 5/2) with a bound radical (S(B) = 1/2), presumably O(2)(•-). Following treatment with O(2)(•-), the specific activity of recovered CDO increased to ~60% relative to untreated enzyme.

  16. Structural Investigations of the Ferredoxin and Terminal Oxygenase Components of the biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase from Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro,D.; Brown, E.; Yu, C.; Parales, R.; Gibson, D.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2007-01-01

    The initial step involved in oxidative hydroxylation of monoaromatic and polyaromatic compounds by the microorganism Sphingobium yanoikuyae strain B1 (B1), previously known as Sphingomonas yanoikuyae strain B1 and Beijerinckia sp. strain B1, is performed by a set of multiple terminal Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases. These enzymes share a single electron donor system consisting of a reductase and a ferredoxin (BPDO-F{sub B1}). One of the terminal Rieske oxygenases, biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase (BPDO-O{sub B1}), is responsible for B1's ability to dihydroxylate large aromatic compounds, such as chrysene and benzo(a)pyrene. Results: In this study, crystal structures of BPDO-O{sub B1} in both native and biphenyl bound forms are described. Sequence and structural comparisons to other Rieske oxygenases show this enzyme to be most similar, with 43.5 % sequence identity, to naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4. While structurally similar to naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase, the active site entrance is significantly larger than the entrance for naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase. Differences in active site residues also allow the binding of large aromatic substrates. There are no major structural changes observed upon binding of the substrate. BPDO-F{sub B1} has large sequence identity to other bacterial Rieske ferredoxins whose structures are known and demonstrates a high structural homology; however, differences in side chain composition and conformation around the Rieske cluster binding site are noted. Conclusion: This is the first structure of a Rieske oxygenase that oxidizes substrates with five aromatic rings to be reported. This ability to catalyze the oxidation of larger substrates is a result of both a larger entrance to the active site as well as the ability of the active site to accommodate larger substrates. While the biphenyl ferredoxin is structurally similar to other Rieske ferredoxins, there are distinct changes in the amino acids near the

  17. Spontaneous release of fluoride during the dioxygenolytic cleavage of 5-fluorosalicylate by the salicylate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans BN12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Erik; Bürger, Sibylle; Stolz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-Proteobacterium Pseudaminobacter salicylatoxidans BN12 forms a peculiar gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (SDO) that oxidatively cleaves gentisate (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate) and additionally 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate, salicylate and various amino-, chloro-, fluoro-, hydroxy- and methylsalicylates. In the present study, the conversion of 5-fluorosalicylate by this enzyme was analysed using various analytical techniques. Spectrophotometric assays showed that the conversion of 5-fluorosalicylate by the purified enzyme resulted in the formation of a new unstable intermediate showing an absorbance maximum at λmax = 292 nm. The analysis of the enzymatic reaction by HPLC showed that two main products with absorbance maxima at λmax = 292-296 nm were formed from 5-fluorosalicylate. The same two products (although in different relative proportions) were also formed when the SDO transformed 5-chlorosalicylate or when a purified 5-nitrosalicylate 1,2-dioxygenase from Bradyrhizobium sp. JS329 oxidized 5-nitrosalicylate. A whole cell system with recombinant Escherichia coli cells overexpressing the SDO activity was established in order to produce larger amounts of the reaction products. The reaction products were subsequently identified by (1)H-NMR and mass spectrometry as stereoisomers of 2-oxo-3-(5-oxofuran-2-ylidine)propanoic acid. The release of fluoride in the course of the dioxygenolytic cleavage reaction was confirmed by ion-chromatography and (19)F-NMR. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Evidence that pcpA encodes 2,6-dichlorohydroquinone dioxygenase, the ring cleavage enzyme required for pentachlorophenol degradation in Sphingomonas chlorophenolica strain ATCC 39723.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L; Resing, K; Lawson, S L; Babbitt, P C; Copley, S D

    1999-06-15

    An enzyme that catalyzes an Fe2+-dependent reaction of 2, 6-dichlorohydroquinone with O2 has been isolated from Sphingomonas chlorophenolica sp. strain ATCC 39723, a soil microorganism capable of complete mineralization of pentachlorophenol. The product of the reaction is too unstable to allow spectroscopic characterization, but is apparently negatively charged and retains the two chlorine atoms of the substrate. The enzyme was partially sequenced using electrospray LC-MS, and one peptide was used to search the NCBInr database. This peptide matched a part of PcpA, a protein of unknown function that is induced in S. chlorophenolica in response to pentachlorophenol. Several other peptides could also be mapped onto the sequence of PcpA, suggesting that the enzyme is encoded by pcpA. PcpA has low but significant sequence similarity to an unusual class of extradiol dioxygenases. On the basis of the sequence analysis, the Fe2+ and O2 dependence of the enzyme, and the characteristics of the product, the enzyme is proposed to be a 2,6-dichlorohydroquinone dioxygenase. The position of ring cleavage has not yet been identified.

  19. Kinetics of interaction between substrates/substrate analogs and benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase from benzoate-degrading Rhodococcus opacus 1CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyanikova, Inna P; Borzova, Oksana V; Emelyanova, Elena V

    2017-07-01

    Benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase (BDO) of Rhodococcus opacus 1CP, which carried out the initial attack on benzoate, was earlier shown to be the enzyme with a narrow substrate specificity. A kinetics of interaction between benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase and substituted benzoates was assessed taking into account the enlarged list of the type of inhibition and using whole cells grown on benzoate. The type of inhibition was determined and the constants of a reaction of BDO with benzoate in the presence of 2-chlorobenzoate (2CBA), 3,5-dichlorobenzoate (3,5DCBA), and 3-methylbenzoate (3MBA) were calculated. For 2CBA and 3MBA, the types of inhibition were classified as biparametrically disсoordinated inhibition and transient inhibition (from activation towards inhibition), respectively. The process of not widely recognized pseudoinhibition of a BDO reaction with benzoate by 3,5DCBA was assessed by the vector method for the representation of enzymatic reactions. Ki value was determined for 2CBA, 3MBA, and 3,5DCBA as 337.5, 870.3, and 14.7 μM, respectively.

  20. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  1. Searching iron sensors in plants by exploring the link among 2’-OG-dependent dioxygenases, the iron deficiency response and metabolic adjustments occurring under iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIANPIERO eVIGANI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge accumulated on the regulation of iron (Fe homeostasis, its intracellular trafficking and transport across various cellular compartments and organs in plants; storage proteins, transporters and transcription factors involved in Fe metabolism have been analysed in detail in recent years. However, the key sensor(s of cellular plant Fe status triggering the long-distance shoot-root signalling and leading to the root Fe-deficiency responses is (are still unknown. Local Fe sensing is also a major task for roots, for adjusting the internal Fe requirements to external Fe availability: how such sensing is achieved and how it leads to metabolic adjustments in case of nutrient shortage, is mostly unknown. Two proteins belonging to the 2′-OG dependent dioxygenases family accumulate several folds in Fe-deficient Arabidopsis roots. Such proteins require Fe(II as enzymatic cofactor; one of their subgroups, the HIF-P4H (Hypoxia Inducible Factor- Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase, is an effective oxygen sensor in animal cells. We envisage here the possibility that some members of the 2′-OG dioxygenase family may be involved in the Fe-deficiency response and in the metabolic adjustments to Fe deficiency or even in sensing Fe, in plant cells.

  2. Ability of bacterial biphenyl dioxygenases from Burkholderia sp. LB400 and Comamonas testosteroni B-356 to catalyse oxygenation of ortho-hydroxychlorobiphenyls formed from PCBs by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francova, K.; Mackova, M.; Macek, T.; Sylvestre, M.

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial dioxygenases are useful in breakdown of PCB products associated with plants. - Capacity of enzymes of the biphenyl/chlorobiphenyl pathway, especially biphenyl dioxygenase (BPDO) of two polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) degrading bacteria, Burkholderia sp. LB400 and Comamonas testosteroni B-356, to metabolize ortho-substituted hydroxybiphenyls was tested.,These compounds found among plant products of PCB metabolism, are carrying chlorine atoms on the hydroxyl-substituted ring. The abilities of His-tagged purified LB400 and B-356 BPDOs to catalyze the oxygenation of 2-hydroxy-3-chlorobiphenyl, 2-hydroxy-5-chlorobiphenyl and 2-hydroxy-3,5-dichlorobiphenyl were compared. Both enzyme preparations catalyzed the hydroxylation of the three chloro-hydroxybiphenyls on the non-substituted ring. Neither LB400 BPDO nor B-356 BPDO oxygenated the substituted ring of the ortho-hydroxylated biphenyl. The fact that metabolites generated by both enzymes were identical for all three hydroxychlorobiphenyls tested; exclude any other mode of attack of these compounds by LB400 BPDOs than the ortho-meta oxygenation

  3. Purification of Biotransformation Products of Cis-Isoflavan-4-ol by Biphenyl Dioxygenase of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 Strain Expressed in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Ratna Sulistiyani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Isoflavone has multiple beneficial effects on human health, especially through its antioxidant and anticancer activities. The biotransformation of isoflavone using byphenyl dioxygenase could be performed to extend the diversity of flavonoids and to improve their biological and physiological properties. Biotransformation of two enantiomers (3R, 4R-cis-isoflavan-4-ol and (3S, 4S-cis-isoflavan-4-ol by E. coli JM109 (pJHF108 carrying a biphenyl dioxygenase gene from P. pseudoalcaligenesKF707 produced two products, designated as CM1 andCM2. The products had a retention time of 11.9 and 14.6 min, respectively, and the same absorption peaks at 204, 220, and 275 nm. CM1 and CM2 had [M-H2O+H]+ at m/z 225. Based on the molecular mass and hydrolysis products, we proposed that epoxidation occurred on cis-isoflavan-4-ol. Chloroform extraction instead of ethyl acetate extraction was performed to improve the stability of cismetabolites, CM1 and CM2.

  4. Contributions: SAGE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Contributions: SAGE. Space Alternating Generalized Expectation (SAGE) Maximization algorithm provides an iterative approach to parameter estimation when direct maximization of the likelihood function may be infeasible. Complexity is less in those applications ...

  5. Various Contributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Various Contributions. Developed an Off –Diagonal MIMO Canceller to mitigate Upstream Crosstalk in VDSL. Developed a low complexity, Expectation Maximization based iterative Crosstalk cancellation. Developed an optimal way of computational complexity ...

  6. Phenylpropanoid 2,3-dioxygenase involved in the cleavage of the ferulic acid side chain to form vanillin and glyoxylic acid in Vanilla planifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Osamu; Negishi, Yukiko

    2017-09-01

    Enzyme catalyzing the cleavage of the phenylpropanoid side chain was partially purified by ion exchange and gel filtration column chromatography after (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 precipitation. Enzyme activities were dependent on the concentration of dithiothreitol (DTT) or glutathione (GSH) and activated by addition of 0.5 mM Fe 2+ . Enzyme activity for ferulic acid was as high as for 4-coumaric acid in the presence of GSH, suggesting that GSH acts as an endogenous reductant in vanillin biosynthesis. Analyses of the enzymatic reaction products with quantitative NMR (qNMR) indicated that an amount of glyoxylic acid (GA) proportional to vanillin was released from ferulic acid by the enzymatic reaction. These results suggest that phenylpropanoid 2,3-dioxygenase is involved in the cleavage of the ferulic acid side chain to form vanillin and GA in Vanilla planifolia.

  7. Safety, immune and clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients vaccinated with a long peptide derived from indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in combination with ipilimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Jon; Iversen, Trine Zeeberg; Nitschke, Nikolaj Juul

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIM: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an emerging new target in cancer therapy that can be targeted with active immunotherapy (e.g. through peptide vaccination). Furthermore, IDO has been identified as a key mechanism underlying resistance to treatment with the checkpoint blocking...... antibody ipilimumab (ipi). METHODS: Ten patients with metastatic melanoma participated in a phase I first-in-human clinical study assessing safety of combining ipi with a 21-mer synthetic peptide vaccine from IDO denoted IDOlong. Secondary and tertiary end points included vaccine and clinical response....... RESULTS: Treatment was generally safe and well tolerated. Vaccine related adverse reactions included grade I and II erythema, oedema and pruritus at the vaccination site, which were manageable with mild topical corticosteroids. One patient developed presumed ipi-induced colitis. It initially responded...

  8. Interferon-γ regulates the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via activation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Croitoru-Lamoury

    Full Text Available The kynurenine pathway (KP of tryptophan metabolism is linked to antimicrobial activity and modulation of immune responses but its role in stem cell biology is unknown. We show that human and mouse mesenchymal and neural stem cells (MSCs and NSCs express the complete KP, including indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO and IDO2, that it is highly regulated by type I (IFN-β and II interferons (IFN-γ, and that its transcriptional modulation depends on the type of interferon, cell type and species. IFN-γ inhibited proliferation and altered human and mouse MSC neural, adipocytic and osteocytic differentiation via the activation of IDO. A functional KP present in MSCs, NSCs and perhaps other stem cell types offers novel therapeutic opportunities for optimisation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

  9. Remarkable Role of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Tryptophan Metabolites in Infectious Diseases: Potential Role in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Murakami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1, the L-tryptophan-degrading enzyme, plays a key role in the immunomodulatory effects on several types of immune cells. Originally known for its regulatory function during pregnancy and chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis, the activity of IDO1 seems to modify the inflammatory state of infectious diseases. The pathophysiologic activity of L-tryptophan metabolites, kynurenines, is well recognized. Therefore, an understanding of the regulation of IDO1 and the subsequent biochemical reactions is essential for the design of therapeutic strategies in certain immune diseases. In this paper, current knowledge about the role of IDO1 and its metabolites during various infectious diseases is presented. Particularly, the regulation of type I interferons (IFNs production via IDO1 in virus infection is discussed. This paper offers insights into new therapeutic strategies in the modulation of viral infection and several immune-related disorders.

  10. Expression of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and production of kynurenine pathway metabolites in triple transgenic mice and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

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    Wei Wu

    Full Text Available To assess the role of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD, the expression and localization of key components of the kynurenine pathway including the key regulatory enzyme tryptophan 2,3 dioxygenase (TDO, and the metabolites tryptophan, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, quinolinic acid and picolinic acid were assessed in different brain regions of triple transgenic AD mice. The expression and cell distribution of TDO and quinolinic acid, and their co-localization with neurofibrillary tangles and senile β amyloid deposition were also determined in hippocampal sections from human AD brains. The expression of TDO mRNA was significantly increased in the cerebellum of AD mouse brain. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the density of TDO immuno-positive cells was significantly higher in the AD mice. The production of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid strongly increased in the hippocampus in a progressive and age-dependent manner in AD mice. Significantly higher TDO and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 immunoreactivity was observed in the hippocampus of AD patients. Furthermore, TDO co-localizes with quinolinic acid, neurofibrillary tangles-tau and amyloid deposits in the hippocampus of AD. These results show that the kynurenine pathway is over-activated in AD mice. This is the first report demonstrating that TDO is highly expressed in the brains of AD mice and in AD patients, suggesting that TDO-mediated activation of the kynurenine pathway could be involved in neurofibrillary tangles formation and associated with senile plaque. Our study adds to the evidence that the kynurenine pathway may play important roles in the neurodegenerative processes of AD.

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Biosynthesis and Deactivation of Gibberellin-Dioxygenases Gene Family in Camellia sinensis (L. O. Kuntze

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    Cheng Pan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gibberellins (GAs, a class of diterpenoid phytohormones, play a key role in regulating diverse processes throughout the life cycle of plants. Bioactive GA levels are rapidly regulated by Gibberellin-dioxygenases (GAox, which are involved in the biosynthesis and deactivation of gibberellin. In this manuscript, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis was carried out to find all GAox in Camellia sinensis. For the first time in a tea plant, 14 CsGAox genes, containing two domains, DIOX_N (PF14226 and 2OG-FeII_Oxy, were identified (PF03171. These genes all belong to 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-ODD, including four CsGA20ox (EC: 1.14.11.12, three CsGA3ox (EC: 1.14.11.15, and seven CsGA2ox (EC: 1.14.11.13. According to the phylogenetic classification as in Arabidopsis, the CsGAox genes spanned five subgroups. Each CsGAox shows tissue-specific expression patterns, although these vary greatly. Some candidate genes, which may play an important role in response to external abiotic stresses, have been identified with regards to patterns, such as CsGA20ox2, CsGA3ox2, CsGA3ox3, CsGA2ox1, CsGA2ox2, and CsGA2ox4. The bioactive GA levels may be closely related to the GA20ox, GA3ox and GA2ox genes. In addition, the candidate genes could be used as marker genes for abiotic stress resistance breeding in tea plants.

  12. Enzymes Involved in the Aerobic Bacterial Degradation of N-Heteroaromatic Compounds: Molybdenum Hydroxylases and Ring-Opening 2,4-Dioxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, S.

    Many N-heteroaromatic compounds are utilized by micro-organisms as a source of carbon (and nitrogen) and energy. The aerobic bacterial degradation of these growth substrates frequently involves several hydroxylation steps and subsequent dioxygenolytic cleavage of (di)hydroxy-substituted heteroaromatic intermediates to aliphatic metabolites which finally are channeled into central metabolic pathways. As a rule, the initial bacterial hydroxylation of a N-heteroaromatic compound is catalyzed by a molybdenum hydroxylase, which uses a water molecule as source of the incorporated oxygen. The enzyme's redox-active centers - the active site molybdenum ion coordinated to a distinct pyranopterin cofactor, two different [2Fe2S] centers, and in most cases, flavin adenine dinucleotide - transfer electrons from the N-heterocyclic substrate to an electron acceptor, which for many molybdenum hydroxylases is still unknown. Ring-opening 2,4-dioxygenases involved in the bacterial degradation of quinaldine and 1H-4-oxoquinoline catalyze the cleavage of two carbon-carbon bonds with concomitant formation of carbon monoxide. Since they contain neither a metal center nor an organic cofactor, and since they do not show any sequence similarity to known oxygenases, these unique dioxygenases form a separate enzyme family. Quite surprisingly, however, they appear to be structurally and mechanistically related to enzymes of the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. Microbial enzymes are a great resource for biotechnological applications. Microbial strains or their enzymes may be used for degradative (bioremediation) or synthetic (biotransformation) purposes. Modern bioremediation or biotransformation strategies may even involve microbial catalysts or strains designed by protein engineering or pathway engineering. Prerequisite for developing such modern tools of biotechnology is a comprehensive understanding of microbial metabolic pathways, of the structure and function of enzymes, and of the

  13. Synthesis of 5-hydroxyectoine from ectoine: crystal structure of the non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase EctD.

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    Klaus Reuter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As a response to high osmolality, many microorganisms synthesize various types of compatible solutes. These organic osmolytes aid in offsetting the detrimental effects of low water activity on cell physiology. One of these compatible solutes is ectoine. A sub-group of the ectoine producer's enzymatically convert this tetrahydropyrimidine into a hydroxylated derivative, 5-hydroxyectoine. This compound also functions as an effective osmostress protectant and compatible solute but it possesses properties that differ in several aspects from those of ectoine. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD is a member of the non-heme iron(II-containing and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (EC 1.14.11. These enzymes couple the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate with the formation of a high-energy ferryl-oxo intermediate to catalyze the oxidation of the bound organic substrate. We report here the crystal structure of the ectoine hydroxylase EctD from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens in complex with Fe(3+ at a resolution of 1.85 A. Like other non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases, the core of the EctD structure consists of a double-stranded beta-helix forming the main portion of the active-site of the enzyme. The positioning of the iron ligand in the active-site of EctD is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. The side chains of the three residues forming this iron-binding site protrude into a deep cavity in the EctD structure that also harbours the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate-binding site. Database searches revealed a widespread occurrence of EctD-type proteins in members of the Bacteria but only in a single representative of the Archaea, the marine crenarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The EctD crystal structure reported here can serve as a template to guide further biochemical and structural studies of this biotechnologically interesting enzyme family.

  14. Metabolism and Residues of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid in DAS-40278-9 Maize (Zea mays) Transformed with Aryloxyalkanoate Dioxygenase-1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao; Rotondaro, Sandra L; Ma, Mingming; Rosser, Steve W; Olberding, Ed L; Wendelburg, Brian M; Adelfinskaya, Yelena A; Balcer, Jesse L; Blewett, T Craig; Clements, Bruce

    2016-10-12

    DAS-40278-9 maize, which is developed by Dow AgroSciences, has been genetically modified to express the aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase-1 (AAD-1) protein and is tolerant to phenoxy auxin herbicides, such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). To understand the metabolic route and residue distribution of 2,4-D in DAS-40278-9 maize, a metabolism study was conducted with 14 C-radiolabeled 2,4-D applied at the maximum seasonal rate. Plants were grown in boxes outdoors. Forage and mature grain, cobs, and stover were collected for analysis. The metabolism study showed that 2,4-D was metabolized to 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), which was then rapidly conjugated with glucose. Field-scale residue studies with 2,4-D applied at the maximum seasonal rate were conducted at 25 sites in the U.S. and Canada to measure the residues of 2,4-D and free and conjugated 2,4-DCP in mature forage, grain, and stover. Residues of 2,4-D were not detectable in the majority of the grain samples and averaged <1.0 and <1.5 μg/g in forage and stover, respectively. Free plus conjugated 2,4-DCP was not observed in grain and averaged <1.0 μg/g in forage and stover.

  15. Diversity of extradiol dioxygenases in aromatic-degrading microbial community explored using both culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Hikaru; Mizuta, Shiori; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2014-11-01

    Culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches were used for extensive retrieval of the extradiol dioxygenase (EDO) gene from the environment to investigate the relationship between the EDO genes from isolated bacteria and the metagenomic EDO genes from which they were isolated. In our previous study, we identified 91 fosmid clones showing EDO enzyme activity using a metagenomic approach. In the present study, we classified all these metagenome-derived EDOs and newly isolated 88 phenol-utilizing bacteria from the same sample and identified four EDO genes from them. Of these, two EDOs had amino acid sequences similar to those reported previously in aromatic-utilizing strains, and one EDO had a sequence almost identical to that of metagenomic EDOs identified in our previous study. Unexpectedly, one EDO showed no similarity to any class I EDOs and was categorized as class II, which has not been found in past metagenomic approaches. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated that the low-abundance class II EDO gene can be enriched by culturing approaches. We conclude that the combined use of the two approaches can explore the gene community more extensively than their individual use. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The potato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 catalyzes a single cleavage of β-ionone ring-containing carotenes and non-epoxidated xanthophylls

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Down-regulation of the potato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (StCCD4) transcript level led to tubers with altered morphology and sprouting activity, which also accumulated higher levels of violaxanthin and lutein leading to elevated carotenoid amounts. This phenotype indicates a role of this enzyme in tuber development, which may be exerted by a cleavage product. In this work, we investigated the enzymatic activity of StCCD4, by expressing the corresponding cDNA in carotenoid accumulating Escherichia coli strains and by performing in vitro assays with heterologously expressed enzyme. StCCD4 catalyzed the cleavage of all-. trans-β-carotene at the C9\\'-C10\\' double bond, leading to β-ionone and all-. trans-β-apo-10\\'-carotenal, both in vivo and in vitro. The enzyme also cleaved β,β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein either at the C9\\'-C10\\' or the C9-C10 double bond in vitro. In contrast, we did not observe any conversion of violaxanthin and only traces of activity with 9-. cis-β-carotene, which led to 9-. cis-β-apo-10\\'-carotenal. Our data indicate that all-. trans-β-carotene is the likely substrate of StCCD4 in planta, and that this carotene may be precursor of an unknown compound involved in tuber development.

  17. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  18. Kinetic and spectroscopic investigation of CoII, NiII, and N-oxalylglycine inhibition of the FeII/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase, TauD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalliri, Efthalia; Grzyska, Piotr K.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    Co II , Ni II , and N-oxalylglycine (NOG) are well-known inhibitors of Fe II /α-ketoglutarate (αKG)-dependent hydroxylases, but few studies describe their kinetics and no spectroscopic investigations have been reported. Using taurine/αKG dioxygenase (TauD) as a paradigm for this enzyme family, time-dependent inhibition assays showed that Co II and Ni II follow slow-binding inhibition kinetics. Whereas Ni II -substituted TauD was non-chromophoric, spectroscopic studies of the Co II -substituted enzyme revealed a six-coordinate site (protein alone or with αKG) that became five-coordinate upon taurine addition. The Co II spectrum was not perturbed by a series of anions or oxidants, suggesting the Co II is inaccessible and could be used to stabilize the protein. NOG competed weakly (K i ∼ 290 μM) with αKG for binding to TauD, with the increased electron density of NOG yielding electronic transitions for NOG-Fe II -TauD and taurine-NOG-Fe II -TauD at 380 nm (ε 38 90-105 M -1 cm -1 ). The spectra of the NOG-bound TauD species did not change significantly upon oxygen exposure, arguing against the formation of an oxygen-bound state mimicking an early intermediate in catalysis

  19. Brief Report: Proteasomal Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Degradation Reduces the Immunosuppressive Potential of Clinical Grade-Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Undergoing Replicative Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Séverine; Dulong, Joëlle; Ménard, Cédric; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Meziere, Nadine; Isabelle, Bezier; Latour, Maëlle; Bescher, Nadège; Pedeux, Rémy; Bertheuil, Nicolas; Flecher, Erwan; Sensebé, Luc; Tarte, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Owing to their immunosuppressive properties, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) obtained from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) or adipose tissue (ASCs) are considered a promising tool for cell therapy. However, important issues should be considered to ensure the reproducible production of efficient and safe clinical-grade MSCs. In particular, high expansion rate, associated with progressive senescence, was recently proposed as one of the parameters that could alter MSC functionality. In this study, we directly address the consequences of replicative senescence on BM-MSC and ASC immunomodulatory properties. We demonstrate that MSCs produced according to GMP procedures inhibit less efficiently T-cell, but not Natural Killer (NK)- and B-cell, proliferation after reaching senescence. Senescence-related loss-of-function is associated with a decreased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in response to inflammatory stimuli. In particular, although STAT-1-dependent IDO expression is transcriptionally induced at a similar level in senescent and nonsenescent MSCs, IDO protein is specifically degraded by the proteasome in senescent ASCs and BM-MSCs, a process that could be reversed by the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. These data encourage the use of appropriate quality controls focusing on immunosuppressive mechanisms before translating clinical-grade MSCs in the clinic. Stem Cells 2017;35:1431-1436. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Chemo-Immunotherapy: Role of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase in Defining Immunogenic Versus Tolerogenic Cell Death in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Theodore S; Mcgaha, Tracy; Munn, David H

    2017-01-01

    In certain settings, chemotherapy can trigger an immunogenic form of tumor cell death. More often, however, tumor cell death after chemotherapy is not immunogenic, and may be actively tolerizing. However, even in these settings the dying tumor cells may be much more immunogenic than previously recognized, if key suppressive immune checkpoints such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) can be blocked. This is an important question, because a robust immune response to dying tumor cells could potentially augment the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy, or enhance the strength and duration of response to other immunologic therapies. Recent findings using preclinical models of self-tolerance and autoimmunity suggest that IDO and related downstream pathways may play a fundamental role in the decision between tolerance versus immune activation in response to dying cells. Thus, in the period of tumor cell death following chemotherapy or immunotherapy, the presence of IDO may help dictate the choice between dominant immunosuppression versus inflammation, antigen cross-presentation, and epitope spreading. The IDO pathway thus differs from other checkpoint-blockade strategies, in that it affects early immune responses, at the level of inflammation, activation of antigen-presenting cells, and initial cross-presentation of tumor antigens. This "up-stream" position may make IDO a potent target for therapeutic inhibition.

  1. Enhanced tolerance and remediation to mixed contaminates of PCBs and 2,4-DCP by transgenic alfalfa plants expressing the 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Ren, Hejun; Pan, Hongyu; Liu, Jinliang; Zhang, Lanying

    2015-04-09

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) generally led to mixed contamination of soils as a result of commercial and agricultural activities. Their accumulation in the environment poses great risks to human and animal health. Therefore, the effective strategies for disposal of these pollutants are urgently needed. In this study, genetic engineering to enhance PCBs/2,4-DCP phytoremediation is a focus. We cloned the 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase (BphC.B) from a soil metagenomic library, which is the key enzyme of aerobic catabolism of a variety of aromatic compounds, and then it was expressed in alfalfa driven by CaMV 35S promoter using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transgenic line BB11 was selected out through PCR, Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Its disposal and tolerance to both PCBs and 2,4-DCP were examined. The tolerance capability of transgenic line BB11 towards complex contaminants of PCBs/2,4-DCP significantly increased compared with non-transgenic plants. Strong dissipation of PCBs and high removal efficiency of 2,4-DCP were exhibited in a short time. It was confirmed expressing BphC.B would be a feasible strategy to help achieving phytoremediation in mixed contaminated soils with PCBs and 2,4-DCP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of the Promoter Region of an Arabidopsis Gene for 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase Involved in Dehydration-Inducible Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Babak; Iuchi, Satoshi; Fujita, Miki; Fujita, Yasunari; Takasaki, Hironori; Osakabe, Yuriko; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Plants respond to dehydration stress and tolerate water-deficit status through complex physiological and cellular processes. Many genes are induced by water deficit. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in tolerance to dehydration stress by inducing many stress genes. ABA is synthesized de novo in response to dehydration. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis have been identified, and they are expressed mainly in leaf vascular tissues. Of the products of such genes, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis. One of the five NCED genes in Arabidopsis, AtNCED3, is significantly induced by dehydration. To understand the regulatory mechanism of the early stages of the dehydration stress response, it is important to analyse the transcriptional regulatory systems of AtNCED3. In the present study, we found that an overlapping G-box recognition sequence (5′-CACGTG-3′) at −2248 bp from the transcriptional start site of AtNCED3 is an important cis-acting element in the induction of the dehydration response. We discuss the possible transcriptional regulatory system of dehydration-responsive AtNCED3 expression, and how this may control the level of ABA under water-deficit conditions. PMID:23604098

  3. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    KAUST Repository

    Ilg, Andrea

    2014-06-25

    The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B), which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-. trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents. © 2014 The Authors.

  4. Increased activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in serum from acutely infected dengue patients linked to gamma interferon antiviral function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Aniuska; Warke, Rajas V.; Xhaja, Kris; Evans, Barbara; Evans, James; Martin, Katherine; de Bosch, Norma; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2009-01-01

    The depletion of l-tryptophan (L-Trp) has been associated with the inhibition of growth of micro-organisms and also has profound effects on T cell proliferation and immune tolerance. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyses the rate-limiting step in the catabolic pathway of L-Trp. Gene expression analysis has shown upregulation of genes involved in L-Trp catabolism in in vitro models of dengue virus (DENV) infection. To understand the role of IDO during DENV infection, we measured IDO activity in sera from control and DENV-infected patients. We found increased IDO activity, lower levels of L-Trp and higher levels of l-kynurenine in sera from DENV-infected patients during the febrile days of the disease compared with patients with other febrile illnesses and healthy donors. Furthermore, we confirmed upregulation of IDO mRNA expression in response to DENV infection in vitro, using a dendritic cell (DC) model of DENV infection. We found that the antiviral effect of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in DENV-infected DCs in vitro was partially dependent on IDO activity. Our results demonstrate that IDO plays an important role in the antiviral effect of IFN-γ against DENV infection in vitro and suggest that it has a role in the immune response to DENV infections in vivo. PMID:19264674

  5. Effects of Various Phytochemicals on Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase 1 Activity: Galanal Is a Novel, Competitive Inhibitor of the Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Rie; Yamamoto, Yasuko; Imai, Shinjiro; Fukutomi, Ryuta; Ozawa, Yoshio; Abe, Masako; Matuo, Yushi; Saito, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the degradation of L-tryptophan, has an important immunomodulatory function. The activity of IDO1 increases in various inflammatory diseases, including tumors, autoimmune diseases, and different kinds of inflammation. We evaluated the suppressive effect of plant extracts or phytochemicals on IDO1 induction and activity; sixteen kinds of plants extracts and fourteen kinds of phytochemicals were examined. As a result, the methanol extracts of Myoga flower buds, which are traditional Japanese foods, and labdane-type diterpene galanal derived from Myoga flowers significantly suppressed IDO1 activity. The Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis indicated that galanal is a competitive inhibitor. Galanal attenuated L-kynurenine formation with an IC50 value of 7.7 µM in the assay system using recombinant human IDO1, and an IC50 value of 45 nM in the cell-based assay. Further, mechanistic analysis revealed that galanal interfered with the transcriptional function of the nuclear factor-κB and the interferon-γ signaling pathway. These effects of galanal are important for immune response. Because the inhibitory effect of galanal on IDO1 activity was stronger than that of 1-methyl tryptophan, a tryptophan analog, galanal may have great potential as the novel drug for various immune-related diseases. PMID:24533148

  6. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is frequently expressed in stromal cells of Hodgkin lymphoma and is associated with adverse clinical features: a retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Ji-Young; Yun, Ji Yun; Jeon, Yoon Kyoung; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Gyeongsin; Huh, Joo Ryoung; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Ji Eun

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of tumor microenvironment is closely involved in the prognosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an enzyme acting as immune modulator through suppression of T-cell immunity. This study aims to investigate role of IDO in the microenvironment of HL. A total of 121 cases of HL were enrolled to do immunohistochemistry for IDO, CD163, CD68, CD4, CD8, and FoxP3. Positivity was evaluated from area fractions or numbers of positive cells using automated image analyzer. Correlations between IDO expression and various cellular infiltrates and clinicopathologic parameters were examined and survival analyses were performed. IDO was expressed in histiocytes, dendritic cells and some endothelial cells with variable degrees, but not in tumor cells. IDO positive cells were more frequently found in mixed cellularity type than other histologic types, and in cases with EBV+, high Ann Arbor stages, B symptoms, and high IPS (all p < 0.05). High IDO expression was associated with inferior survival (p < 0.001) and reflects an independent prognostic factor in nodular sclerosis HL. This is the first study suggesting that IDO is the principle immunomodulator and is involved to adverse clinical outcomes of HL

  7. A "White" Anthocyanin-less Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. Caused by an Insertion in the Coding Region of the Leucoanthocyanidin Dioxygenase (LDOX; ANS Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohar Ben-Simhon

    Full Text Available Color is an important determinant of pomegranate fruit quality and commercial value. To understand the genetic factors controlling color in pomegranate, chemical, molecular and genetic characterization of a "white" pomegranate was performed. This unique accession is lacking the typical pomegranate color rendered by anthocyanins in all tissues of the plant, including flowers, fruit (skin and arils and leaves. Steady-state gene-expression analysis indicated that none of the analyzed "white" pomegranate tissues are able to synthesize mRNA corresponding to the PgLDOX gene (leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, also called ANS, anthocyanidin synthase, which is one of the central structural genes in the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway. HPLC analysis revealed that none of the "white" pomegranate tissues accumulate anthocyanins, whereas other flavonoids, corresponding to biochemical reactions upstream of LDOX, were present. Molecular analysis of the "white" pomegranate revealed the presence of an insertion and an SNP within the coding region of PgLDOX. It was found that the SNP does not change amino acid sequence and is not fully linked with the "white" phenotype in all pomegranate accessions from the collection. On the other hand, genotyping of pomegranate accessions from the collection and segregating populations for the "white" phenotype demonstrated its complete linkage with the insertion, inherited as a recessive single-gene trait. Taken together, the results indicate that the insertion in PgLDOX is responsible for the "white" anthocyanin-less phenotype. These data provide the first direct molecular, genetic and chemical evidence for the effect of a natural modification in the LDOX gene on color accumulation in a fruit-bearing woody perennial deciduous tree. This modification can be further utilized to elucidate the physiological role of anthocyanins in protecting the tree organs from harmful environmental conditions, such as temperature and UV

  8. Long-lasting disease stabilization in the absence of toxicity in metastatic lung cancer patients vaccinated with an epitope derived from indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Trine Zeeberg; Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Rikke; Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Bjoern, Jon; Zeyher, Claus; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Thomsen, Birthe Moerk; Holm, Bente; Thor Straten, Per; Mellemgaard, Anders; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2014-01-01

    To investigate targeting of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme using a synthetic peptide vaccine administered to patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical phase I study, we treated 15 HLA-A2-positive patients with stage III-IV NSCLC in disease stabilization after standard chemotherapy. Patients were treated with imiquimod ointment and subcutaneous vaccinations (100 μg IDO5 peptide, sequence ALLEIASCL, formulated in 900 μL Montanide). Primary endpoint was toxicity. Clinical benefit and immunity were assessed as secondary endpoints. No severe toxicity was observed. One patient developed a partial response (PR) after one year of vaccine treatment, whereas long-lasting stable disease (SD) ≥ 8.5 months was demonstrated in another six patients. The median overall survival (OS) was 25.9 months. Patients demonstrated significant improved OS (P = 0.03) when compared with the group of patients excluded because of HLA-A2 negativity. IDO-specific CD8(+) T-cell immunity was demonstrated by IFN-γ Elispot and Tetramer staining. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses demonstrated a significant reduction of the Treg population (P = 0.03) after the sixth vaccine (2.5 months) compared with pretreatment levels. Furthermore, expression of IDO was detected in nine of ten tumor biopsies by immunohistochemistry. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of kynurenine/tryptophan (Kyn/Trp) ratio in sera were performed. In long-term analyses of two clinical responding patients, the ratio of Kyn/Trp remained stable. The vaccine was well tolerated with no severe toxicity occurring. A median OS of 25.9 months was demonstrated and long-lasting PR+SD was seen in 47% of the patients.

  9. Involvement of NpdA, a Putative 2-Nitropropane Dioxygenase, in the T3SS Expression and Full Virulence inRalstonia solanacearumOE1-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqi; Li, Jing; Tang, Yu; Chen, Kai; Shi, Xiaojun; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Zhang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we isolated several genes that potentially affected the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS) in Ralstonia solanacearum OE1-1. Here, we focused on the rsp0316 , which encodes a putative 2-nitropropane dioxygenase (hereafter designated NpdA). The deletion of npdA substantially reduced the T3SS expression and virulence in OE1-1, and the complementation with functional NpdA could completely restore its reduced T3SS expression and virulence to that of wild type. The NpdA was highly conserved among diverse R. solanacearum species and the NpdA-dependent expression of T3SS was not specific to OE1-1 strain, but not the virulence. The NpdA was important for the T3SS expression in planta , while it was not required for the bacterial growth in planta . Moreover, the NpdA was not required for the elicitation of hypersensitive response (HR) of R. solanacearum strains in tobacco leaves. The T3SS in R. solanacearum is directly controlled by the AraC-type transcriptional regulator HrpB and regulated by a complex regulation network. The NpdA affected the T3SS expression mediated with HrpB but through some novel pathway. All these results from genetic studies demonstrate that NpdA is a novel factor for the T3SS expression in diverse R. solanacearum species in medium, but specifically for the T3SS expression in strain OE1-1 in planta . And the NpdA-dependent expression of T3SS in planta plays an important role in pathogenicity of R. solanacearum OE1-1 in host plants.

  10. A "White" Anthocyanin-less Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Caused by an Insertion in the Coding Region of the Leucoanthocyanidin Dioxygenase (LDOX; ANS) Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Simhon, Zohar; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Trainin, Taly; Harel-Beja, Rotem; Bar-Ya'akov, Irit; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Holland, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Color is an important determinant of pomegranate fruit quality and commercial value. To understand the genetic factors controlling color in pomegranate, chemical, molecular and genetic characterization of a "white" pomegranate was performed. This unique accession is lacking the typical pomegranate color rendered by anthocyanins in all tissues of the plant, including flowers, fruit (skin and arils) and leaves. Steady-state gene-expression analysis indicated that none of the analyzed "white" pomegranate tissues are able to synthesize mRNA corresponding to the PgLDOX gene (leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, also called ANS, anthocyanidin synthase), which is one of the central structural genes in the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway. HPLC analysis revealed that none of the "white" pomegranate tissues accumulate anthocyanins, whereas other flavonoids, corresponding to biochemical reactions upstream of LDOX, were present. Molecular analysis of the "white" pomegranate revealed the presence of an insertion and an SNP within the coding region of PgLDOX. It was found that the SNP does not change amino acid sequence and is not fully linked with the "white" phenotype in all pomegranate accessions from the collection. On the other hand, genotyping of pomegranate accessions from the collection and segregating populations for the "white" phenotype demonstrated its complete linkage with the insertion, inherited as a recessive single-gene trait. Taken together, the results indicate that the insertion in PgLDOX is responsible for the "white" anthocyanin-less phenotype. These data provide the first direct molecular, genetic and chemical evidence for the effect of a natural modification in the LDOX gene on color accumulation in a fruit-bearing woody perennial deciduous tree. This modification can be further utilized to elucidate the physiological role of anthocyanins in protecting the tree organs from harmful environmental conditions, such as temperature and UV radiation.

  11. Implication of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase and its Novel Variants in the Hippocampus and Cerebellum During the Developing and Adult Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kanai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO is a first and rate-limiting enzyme for the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. Using Tdo-/-mice, we have recently shown that TDO plays a pivotal role in systemic tryptophan metabolism and brain serotonin synthesis as well as emotional status and adult neurogenesis. However, the expression of TDO in the brain has not yet been well characterized, in contrast to its predominant expression in the liver. To further examine the possible role of local TDO in the brain, we quantified the levels of tdo mRNA in various nervous tissues, using Northern blot and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Higher levels of tdo mRNA expression were detected in the cerebellum and hippocampus. We also identified two novel variants of the tdo gene, termed tdo variant1 and variant2, in the brain. Similar to the known TDO form (TDO full-form, tetramer formation and enzymatic activity were obtained when these variant forms were expressed in vitro. While quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that the tissue distribution of these variants was similar to that of tdo full-form, the expression patterns of these variants during early postnatal development in the hippocampus and cerebellum differed. Our findings indicate that in addition to hepatic TDO, TDO and its variants in the brain might function in the developing and adult nervous system. Given the previously reported associations of tdo gene polymorphisms in the patients with autism and Tourette syndrome, the expression of TDO in the brain suggests the possible influence of TDO on psychiatric status. Potential functions of TDOs in the cerebellum, hippocampus and cerebral cortex under physiological and pathological conditions are discussed.

  12. Homogentisate 1-2-Dioxygenase Downregulation in the Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian Epidemic Strain-1 in the CF Lung.

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    Christopher J Harmer

    Full Text Available Some Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains including Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1 or AUS-01 cause persistent chronic infection in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, with greater morbidity and mortality. Factors conferring persistence are largely unknown. Previously we analysed the transcriptomes of AES-1 grown in Luria broth, nematode growth medium for Caenorhabditis elegans assay (both aerobic and artificial sputum medium (mainly hypoxic. Transcriptional comparisons included chronic AES-1 strains against PAO1 and acute AES-1 (AES-1R against its chronic isogen (AES-1M, isolated 10.5 years apart from a CF patient and not eradicated in the meantime. Prominent amongst genes downregulated in AES-1M in all comparisons was homogentisate-1-2-dioxygenase (hmgA; an oxygen-dependent gene known to be mutationally deactivated in many chronic infection strains of P. aeruginosa. To investigate if hmgA downregulation and deactivation gave similar virulence persistence profiles, a hmgA mutant made in UCBPP-PA14 utilising RedS-recombinase and AES-1M were assessed in the C. elegans virulence assay, and the C57BL/6 mouse for pulmonary colonisation and TNF-α response. In C. elegans, hmgA deactivation resulted in significantly increased PA14 virulence while hmgA downregulation reduced AES-1M virulence. AES-1M was significantly more persistent in mouse lung and showed a significant increase in TNF-α (p<0.0001, sustained even with no detectable bacteria. PA14ΔhmgA did not show increased TNF-α. This study suggests that hmgA may have a role in P. aeruginosa persistence in chronic infection and the results provide a starting point for clarifying the role of hmgA in chronic AES-1.

  13. Knockout of the murine cysteine dioxygenase gene results in severe impairment in ability to synthesize taurine and an increased catabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B.; Valli, Alessandro; Fieselmann, Krista; Lam, Jimmy; Peters, Rachel; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine homeostasis is dependent on the regulation of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) in response to changes in sulfur amino acid intake. CDO oxidizes cysteine to cysteinesulfinate, which is further metabolized to either taurine or to pyruvate plus sulfate. To gain insight into the physiological function of CDO and the consequence of a loss of CDO activity, mice carrying a null CDO allele (CDO+/− mice) were crossed to generate CDO−/−, CDO+/−, and CDO+/+ mice. CDO−/− mice exhibited postnatal mortality, growth deficit, and connective tissue pathology. CDO−/− mice had extremely low taurine levels and somewhat elevated cysteine levels, consistent with the lack of flux through CDO-dependent catabolic pathways. However, plasma sulfate levels were slightly higher in CDO−/− mice than in CDO+/− or CDO+/+ mice, and tissue levels of acid-labile sulfide were elevated, indicating an increase in cysteine catabolism by cysteine desulfhydration pathways. Null mice had lower hepatic cytochrome c oxidase levels, suggesting impaired electron transport capacity. Supplementation of mice with taurine improved survival of male pups but otherwise had little effect on the phenotype of the CDO−/− mice. H2S has been identified as an important gaseous signaling molecule as well as a toxicant, and pathology may be due to dysregulation of H2S production. Control of cysteine levels by regulation of CDO may be necessary to maintain low H2S/sulfane sulfur levels and facilitate the use of H2S as a signaling molecule. PMID:21693692

  14. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase controls fungal loads and immunity in Paracoccidioidomicosis but is more important to susceptible than resistant hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Eliseu F; Loures, Flávio V; Bazan, Silvia B; Feriotti, Claudia; Pina, Adriana; Schanoski, Alessandra S; Costa, Tânia A; Calich, Vera L G

    2014-11-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, a primary fungal infection restricted to Latin America, is acquired by inhalation of fungal particles. The immunoregulatory mechanisms that control the severe and mild forms of paracoccidioidomycosis are still unclear. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an IFN-γ induced enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan metabolism, can control host-pathogen interaction by inhibiting pathogen growth, T cell immunity and tissue inflammation. In this study, we investigated the role of IDO in pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis of susceptible and resistant mice. IDO was blocked by 1-methyl-dl-tryptophan (1MT), and fungal infection studied in vitro and in vivo. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection was more severe in 1MT treated than untreated macrophages of resistant and susceptible mice, concurrently with decreased production of kynurenines and IDO mRNA. Similar results were observed in the pulmonary infection. Independent of the host genetic pattern, IDO inhibition reduced fungal clearance but enhanced T cell immunity. The early IDO inhibition resulted in increased differentiation of dendritic and Th17 cells, accompanied by reduced responses of Th1 and Treg cells. Despite these equivalent biological effects, only in susceptible mice the temporary IDO blockade caused sustained fungal growth, increased tissue pathology and mortality rates. In contrast, resistant mice were able to recover the transitory IDO blockade by the late control of fungal burdens without enhanced tissue pathology. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that in pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis, IDO is an important immunoregulatory enzyme that promotes fungal clearance and inhibits T cell immunity and inflammation, with prominent importance to susceptible hosts. In fact, only in the susceptible background IDO inhibition resulted in uncontrolled tissue pathology and mortality rates. Our findings open new perspectives to understand the immunopathology of paracoccidioidomycosis, and suggest

  15. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase controls fungal loads and immunity in Paracoccidioidomicosis but is more important to susceptible than resistant hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseu F Araújo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis, a primary fungal infection restricted to Latin America, is acquired by inhalation of fungal particles. The immunoregulatory mechanisms that control the severe and mild forms of paracoccidioidomycosis are still unclear. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, an IFN-γ induced enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan metabolism, can control host-pathogen interaction by inhibiting pathogen growth, T cell immunity and tissue inflammation.In this study, we investigated the role of IDO in pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis of susceptible and resistant mice. IDO was blocked by 1-methyl-dl-tryptophan (1MT, and fungal infection studied in vitro and in vivo. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection was more severe in 1MT treated than untreated macrophages of resistant and susceptible mice, concurrently with decreased production of kynurenines and IDO mRNA. Similar results were observed in the pulmonary infection. Independent of the host genetic pattern, IDO inhibition reduced fungal clearance but enhanced T cell immunity. The early IDO inhibition resulted in increased differentiation of dendritic and Th17 cells, accompanied by reduced responses of Th1 and Treg cells. Despite these equivalent biological effects, only in susceptible mice the temporary IDO blockade caused sustained fungal growth, increased tissue pathology and mortality rates. In contrast, resistant mice were able to recover the transitory IDO blockade by the late control of fungal burdens without enhanced tissue pathology.Our studies demonstrate for the first time that in pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis, IDO is an important immunoregulatory enzyme that promotes fungal clearance and inhibits T cell immunity and inflammation, with prominent importance to susceptible hosts. In fact, only in the susceptible background IDO inhibition resulted in uncontrolled tissue pathology and mortality rates. Our findings open new perspectives to understand the immunopathology of

  16. Molecular Characterization of the Genes pcaG and pcaH, Encoding Protocatechuate 3,4-Dioxygenase, Which Are Essential for Vanillin Catabolism in Pseudomonas sp. Strain HR199

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhage, Jörg; Kresse, Andreas U.; Priefert, Horst; Sommer, Horst; Krammer, Gerhard; Rabenhorst, Jürgen; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 is able to utilize eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol), vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), or protocatechuate as the sole carbon source for growth. Mutants of this strain which were impaired in the catabolism of vanillin but retained the ability to utilize eugenol or protocatechuate were obtained after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. One mutant (SK6169) was used as recipient of a Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 genomic library in cosmid pVK100, and phenotypic complementation was achieved with a 5.8-kbp EcoRI fragment (E58). The amino acid sequences deduced from two corresponding open reading frames (ORF) identified on E58 revealed high degrees of homology to pcaG and pcaH, encoding the two subunits of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Three additional ORF most probably encoded a 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-hydroxylase (PobA) and two putative regulatory proteins, which exhibited homology to PcaQ of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and PobR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. Since mutant SK6169 was also complemented by a subfragment of E58 that harbored only pcaH, this mutant was most probably lacking a functional β subunit of the protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Since this mutant was still able to grow on protocatechuate and lacked protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase and protocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase, the degradation had to be catalyzed by different enzymes. Two other mutants (SK6184 and SK6190), which were also impaired in the catabolism of vanillin, were not complemented by fragment E58. Since these mutants accumulated 3-carboxy muconolactone during cultivation on eugenol, they most probably exhibited a defect in a step of the catabolic pathway following the ortho cleavage. Moreover, in these mutants cyclization of 3-carboxymuconic acid seems to occur by a syn absolute stereochemical course, which is normally only observed for cis,cis-muconate lactonization in pseudomonads. In conclusion, vanillin is degraded through the ortho-cleavage pathway

  17. The metabolism of L-tryptophan by isolated rat liver cells. Effect of albumin binding and amino acid competition on oxidatin of tryptophan by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S A; Pogson, C I

    1980-01-01

    1. Novel methods, using L-[ring-2-14C]tryptophan, are described for the measurement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase activity and tryptophan accumulation in isolated rat liver cells. 2. The effects of bovine serum albumin, non-esterified fatty acids and neutral amino acids on tryptophan oxidation by hepatocytes and on the partition of tryptophan between free and albumin-bound forms were investigated. 3. Oxidation of physiological concentrations (0.1 mM) of tryptophan was inhibited by approx. 50%...

  18. Prokaryotic Homologs of the Eukaryotic 3-Hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-Dioxygenase and 2-Amino-3-Carboxymuconate-6-Semialdehyde Decarboxylase in the 2-Nitrobenzoate Degradation Pathway of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain KU-7†

    OpenAIRE

    Muraki, Takamichi; Taki, Masami; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Lau, Peter C. K.

    2003-01-01

    The 2-nitrobenzoic acid degradation pathway of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KU-7 proceeds via a novel 3-hydroxyanthranilate intermediate. In this study, we cloned and sequenced a 19-kb DNA locus of strain KU-7 that encompasses the 3-hydroxyanthranilate meta-cleavage pathway genes. The gene cluster, designated nbaEXHJIGFCDR, is organized tightly and in the same direction. The nbaC and nbaD gene products were found to be novel homologs of the eukaryotic 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase a...

  19. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in endometrial cancer: a targetable mechanism of immune resistance in mismatch repair-deficient and intact endometrial carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Anne; Zadeh, Sara; Sloan, Emily; Chinn, Zachary; Modesitt, Susan C; Ring, Kari L

    2018-03-20

    Mismatch repair-deficient endometrial carcinomas are optimal candidates for immunotherapy given their high neoantigen loads, robust lymphoid infiltrates, and frequent PD-L1 expression. However, co-opting the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is just one mechanism that tumors can utilize to evade host immunity. Another immune modulatory molecule that has been demonstrated in endometrial carcinoma is indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). We herein evaluate IDO expression in 60 endometrial carcinomas and assess results in relation to PD-L1 and mismatch repair status. IDO immunohistochemistry was performed on 60 endometrial carcinomas (20 Lynch syndrome (LS)-associated, 20 MLH1 promoter hypermethylated, and 20 mismatch repair-intact). Eight-five percent of endometrial carcinomas showed IDO tumor staining in >1% of cells. Twenty-five percent were positive in >25% of tumor cells and only 7% exceeded 50% staining. Mismatch repair-deficient cancers were more likely than mismatch repair-intact cancers to be >25% IDO-positive (35% vs. 5% p = 0.024). Differences were amplified when Lynch syndrome-associated cases were evaluated in isolation (50% Lynch syndrome-associated vs. 10% mismatch repair-intact and MLH1-hypermethylated, p = 0.001). Of the four cases showing >50% staining, three were Lynch syndrome-associated and one was MLH1-hypermethylated; no mismatch repair-intact cases had >50% staining. Forty-three percent of IDO-positive tumors were also positive for PD-L1, whereas only two cases showed tumoral PD-L1 in the absence of IDO. In summary, IDO expression is prevalent in endometrial carcinomas and diffuse staining is significantly more common in mismatch repair-deficient cancers, particularly Lynch syndrome-associated cases. Given that the majority of PD-L1 positive cancers also express IDO, synergistic combination therapy with anti-IDO and anti-PD1/PD-L1 may be relevant in this tumor type. Furthermore, anti-IDO therapy may be an option for a small subset of mismatch repair

  20. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (IDO) Enzyme Links Innate Immunity and Altered T-Cell Differentiation in Non-ST Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Chiara; Severino, Anna; Flego, Davide; Ruggio, Aureliano; Pedicino, Daniela; Giglio, Ada Francesca; Trotta, Francesco; Lucci, Claudia; D'Amario, Domenico; Vinci, Ramona; Pisano, Eugenia; La Rosa, Giulio; Biasucci, Luigi Marzio; Crea, Filippo; Liuzzo, Giovanna

    2017-12-26

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by a complex interplay between innate and adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation by promoting a tolerogenic environment through the expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an intracellular enzyme involved in tryptophan catabolism. IDO expression and activity was analyzed in monocytes derived DCs (MDDCs) from non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients, stable angina (SA) patients and healthy controls (HC) by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) before and after in vitro maturation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The amount of tryptophan catabolite; kynurenine; was evaluated in the culture supernatants of mature-MDDCs by ELISA assay. Autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) between mature-MDDCs and naïve T-cells was carried out to study the differentiation towards T-helper 1 (Th1) and induced regulatory T-cells (iTreg). Analysis of IDO mRNA transcripts in mature-MDDCs revealed a significant reduction in cells isolated from NSTEMI (625.0 ± 128.2; mean ± SEM) as compared with those from SA (958.5 ± 218.3; p = 0.041) and from HC (1183.6 ± 231.6; p = 0.034). Furthermore; the concentration of kynurenine was lower in NSTEMI patients (2.78 ± 0.2) and SA (2.98 ± 0.25) as compared with HC (5.1 ± 0.69 ng/mL; p = 0.002 and p = 0.016; respectively). When IDO-competent mature-MDDCs were co-cultured with allogeneic naïve T-cells, the ratio between the percentage of generated Th1 and iTreg was higher in NSTEMI (4.4 ± 2.9) than in SA (1.8 ± 0.6; p = 0.056) and HC (0.9 ± 0.3; p = 0.008). In NSTEMI, the tolerogenic mechanism of the immune response related to IDO production by activated MDDCs is altered, supporting their role in T-cell dysregulation.

  1. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (IDO Enzyme Links Innate Immunity and Altered T-Cell Differentiation in Non-ST Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Zara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by a complex interplay between innate and adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation by promoting a tolerogenic environment through the expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, an intracellular enzyme involved in tryptophan catabolism. IDO expression and activity was analyzed in monocytes derived DCs (MDDCs from non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI patients, stable angina (SA patients and healthy controls (HC by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR before and after in vitro maturation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The amount of tryptophan catabolite; kynurenine; was evaluated in the culture supernatants of mature-MDDCs by ELISA assay. Autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR between mature-MDDCs and naïve T-cells was carried out to study the differentiation towards T-helper 1 (Th1 and induced regulatory T-cells (iTreg. Analysis of IDO mRNA transcripts in mature-MDDCs revealed a significant reduction in cells isolated from NSTEMI (625.0 ± 128.2; mean ± SEM as compared with those from SA (958.5 ± 218.3; p = 0.041 and from HC (1183.6 ± 231.6; p = 0.034. Furthermore; the concentration of kynurenine was lower in NSTEMI patients (2.78 ± 0.2 and SA (2.98 ± 0.25 as compared with HC (5.1 ± 0.69 ng/mL; p = 0.002 and p = 0.016; respectively. When IDO-competent mature-MDDCs were co-cultured with allogeneic naïve T-cells, the ratio between the percentage of generated Th1 and iTreg was higher in NSTEMI (4.4 ± 2.9 than in SA (1.8 ± 0.6; p = 0.056 and HC (0.9 ± 0.3; p = 0.008. In NSTEMI, the tolerogenic mechanism of the immune response related to IDO production by activated MDDCs is altered, supporting their role in T-cell dysregulation.

  2. Electron Transport in a Dioxygenase-Ferredoxin Complex: Long Range Charge Coupling between the Rieske and Non-Heme Iron Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne K Dawson

    Full Text Available Dioxygenase (dOx utilizes stereospecific oxidation on aromatic molecules; consequently, dOx has potential applications in bioremediation and stereospecific oxidation synthesis. The reactive components of dOx comprise a Rieske structure Cys2[2Fe-2S]His2 and a non-heme reactive oxygen center (ROC. Between the Rieske structure and the ROC, a universally conserved Asp residue appears to bridge the two structures forming a Rieske-Asp-ROC triad, where the Asp is known to be essential for electron transfer processes. The Rieske and ROC share hydrogen bonds with Asp through their His ligands; suggesting an ideal network for electron transfer via the carboxyl side chain of Asp. Associated with the dOx is an itinerant charge carrying protein Ferredoxin (Fdx. Depending on the specific cognate, Fdx may also possess either the Rieske structure or a related structure known as 4-Cys-[2Fe-2S] (4-Cys. In this study, we extensively explore, at different levels of theory, the behavior of the individual components (Rieske and ROC and their interaction together via the Asp using a variety of density function methods, basis sets, and a method known as Generalized Ionic Fragment Approach (GIFA that permits setting up spin configurations manually. We also report results on the 4-Cys structure for comparison. The individual optimized structures are compared with observed spectroscopic data from the Rieske, 4-Cys and ROC structures (where information is available. The separate pieces are then combined together into a large Rieske-Asp-ROC (donor/bridge/acceptor complex to estimate the overall coupling between individual components, based on changes to the partial charges. The results suggest that the partial charges are significantly altered when Asp bridges the Rieske and the ROC; hence, long range coupling through hydrogen bonding effects via the intercalated Asp bridge can drastically affect the partial charge distributions compared to the individual isolated

  3. Preparation and evaluation of L- and D-5-[18F]fluorotryptophan as PET imaging probes for indoleamine and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tang; Gill, Herman S; Ogasawara, Annie; Tinianow, Jeff N; Vanderbilt, Alexander N; Williams, Simon-Peter; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; White, Sharla; Sandoval, Wendy; DeMent, Kevin; Wong, Mengling; Marik, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Indoleamine and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenases (IDO1 and TDO2) are pyrrolases catalyzing the oxidative cleavage of the 2,3-double bond of L-tryptophan in kynurenine pathway. In the tumor microenvironment, their increased activity prevents normal immune function, i.e. tumor cell recognition and elimination by cytotoxic T-cells. Consequently, inhibition of the kynurenine pathway may enhance the activity of cancer immunotherapeutics by reversing immune dysfunction. We sought to investigate the properties of radiolabeled 5-[ 18 F]fluorotryptophan with respect to its ability for measuring IDO1 and TDO2 activity by positron emission tomography (PET). L-5-[ 18 F]fluorotryptophan and D-5-[ 18 F]fluorotryptophan were synthesized by Cu(I) catalyzed [ 18 F]fluorodeboronylation of Boc/tBu protected precursors in moderate yields (1.5±0.6%) sufficient for pre-clinical studies. The specific activity of the product was 407-740GBq/μmol, radiochemical purity >99% and enantiomeric excess 90-99%. Enzymatic assay confirmed that L-5-fluorotryptophan is an IDO1 and TDO2 substrate whereas the D-isomer is not. In-vitro cell uptake experiments using CT26 cells with doxycycline-induced overexpression of human-IDO1 and human-TDO2 revealed an elevated cell uptake of L-5-[ 18 F]fluorotryptophan upon induction of IDO1 or TDO2 enzymes compared to baseline; however, the uptake was observed only in the presence of low L-tryptophan levels in media. PET imaging experiments performed using tumor bearing mouse models expressing IDO1 at various levels (CT26, CT26-hIDO1, 17082A, 17095A) showed tumor uptake of the tracer elevated up to 8%ID/g; however, the observed tumor uptake could not be attributed to IDO1 activity in the tumor tissue. The metabolism of L- and D- isomers was markedly different in vivo, the D-isomer was excreted by a combination of hepatobiliary and renal routes, the L-isomer underwent extensive metabolism to [ 18 F]fluoride. The observed in vivo tumor uptake of the tracer could not be

  4. Targeting Oxidative Stress, Cytokines and Serotonin Interactions Via Indoleamine 2, 3 Dioxygenase by Coenzyme Q10: Role in Suppressing Depressive Like Behavior in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelezz, Sally A; Hendawy, Nevien; Magdy, Yosra

    2017-06-01

    Depression is a major health problem in which oxidative stress and inflammation are inextricably connected in its pathophysiology. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an important anti-oxidant compound with anti-inflammatory and neuro-protective properties. This study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that CoQ10 by its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials can alleviate depressive- like behavior by restoring the balance of the tryptophan catabolites kynurenine/serotonin toward the serotonin pathway by down-regulation of hippocampal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO-1). Depressive-like behavior was induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) protocol including food or water deprivation, cage tilting, reversed light cycle etc. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups; Control, CUMS, CUMS and CoQ10 (50,100 and 200 mg/kg/day i.p. respectively) groups. CoQ10 effects on different behavioral and biochemical tests were analyzed. CoQ10 showed significant antidepressant efficacy, as evidenced by significantly decreased stress induced changes to forced swimming challenge and open field test, as well as attenuating raised corticosterone level and adrenal glands weight. The anti-oxidant effect of CoQ10 was exhibited by its ability to significantly reduce hippocampal elevated malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal levels and elevate the reduced glutathione and catalase levels. CoQ10 significantly reduced different pro-inflammatory cytokines levels including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. It suppressed hippocampal IDO-1 and subsequent production of kynurenine and enhanced the hippocampal contents of tryptophan and serotonin. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CoQ10 was able to attenuate the elevated microglial CD68 and elevate the astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein compared to CUMS group. CoQ10 exhibited antidepressant-like effects on rats exposed to CUMS. This could be attributed to its ability to reduce

  5. Role of dioxygenase α-DOX2 and SA in basal response and in hexanoic acid-induced resistance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Carlos; de la O Leyva, María; Finiti, Ivan; López-Cruz, Jaime; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; García-Agustín, Pilar; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2015-03-01

    Resistance of tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum) to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea requires complex interplay between hormonal signalling. In this study, we explored the involvement of new oxylipins in the tomato basal and induced response to this necrotroph through the functional analysis of the tomato α-dioxygenase2 (α-DOX2)-deficient mutant divaricata. We also investigated the role of SA in the defence response against this necrotrophic fungus using SA-deficient tomato nahG plants. The plants lacking dioxigenase α-DOX2, which catalyses oxylipins production from fatty acids, were more susceptible to Botrytis, and hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR) was impaired; hence α-DOX2 is required for both tomato defence and the enhanced protection conferred by natural inducer hexanoic acid (Hx) against B. cinerea. The divaricata plants accumulated less pathogen-induced callose and presented lower levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) upon infection if compared to the wild type. Glutathion-S-transferase (GST) gene expression decreased and ROS production significantly increased in Botrytis-infected divaricata plants. These results indicate that absence of α-DOX2 influences the hormonal changes, oxidative burst and callose deposition that occur upon Botrytis infection in tomato. The study of SA-deficient nahG tomato plants showed that the plants with low SA levels displayed increased resistance to Botrytis, but were unable to display Hx-IR. This supports the involvement of SA in Hx-IR. NaghG plants displayed reduced callose and ROS accumulation upon infection and an increased GST expression. This reflects a positive relationship between SA and these defensive mechanisms in tomato. Finally, Hx boosted the pathogen-induced callose in nahG plants, suggesting that this priming mechanism is SA-independent. Our results support the involvement of the oxylipins pathway and SA in tomato response to Botrytis, probably through complex crosstalk of

  6. Induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO detection in circulating monocyte subsets from Brazilian patients with Dengue-4 virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Gomes Fialho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among viral diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, dengue is characterized by its rapid dispersion around the world. Dengue severity is associated to a cytokine “storm” leading to vascular hemorrhagic manifestations, plasma leakage and shock, but also producing viral clearance. Macrophage/monocyte activation occurs during infection. Monocyte lineage cells are among those that allow virus replication. We investigated circulating human monocyte subsets - classical CD14+CD16− and non-classical CD14+CD16+ - during DENV-4 infection in patients. Intracellular inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and indoleamine 2,3–dioxygenase (IDO were detected in both monocyte subsets. Circulating CD14+CD16+ monocyte frequency is mildly increased during DENV-4 infection. INOS is more intensely detected in CD14+CD16− than in CD16+ monocytes and IDO in CD14+CD16+. DENV-4 patients show increase in NO, TNF-α, IFN-y, IP-10/CXL10, IL-10 and MCP-1/CCL2 plasma levels when compared to healthy individuals. The classical monocyte subset, CD14+CD16− was shown to be inversely correlated with IL-10 and IP-10/CXCL10 levels, while the non-classical CD14+CD16+ is positively correlated with IL-10 cytokine. TNF-α, IL-10 cytokines and IP-10/CXL10 chemokine are positively correlated with the CD14+iNOS+ monocyte population. Both CD14+ cells - CD16−iNOS+ and CD16+iNOS+ subsets - presented positive correlation with IL-10, IP-10/CXL10 and MCP-1/CCL2, besides TNF-α associated with CD16−iNOS+ cells. CD14+CD16−IDO+and CD16+IDO+ populations correlated positively with IL-10. Furthermore, CD16−IDO+ monocyte subset also presented a positive correlation with TNF-α and IP-10/CXCL10. According to these data, we considered that iNOS and IDO are activated in monocyte CD16− and CD16+ subsets, likely exerting both antiviral effects and modulating exacerbated immunological responses during dengue fever.

  7. Diet-induced obesity progressively alters cognition, anxiety-like behavior and lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior: focus on brain indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Caroline; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Ferreira, Guillaume; Layé, Sophie; Castanon, Nathalie

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of mood symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions that emerges as significant risk factors for important health complications such as cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is therefore important to identify the dynamic of development and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these neuropsychiatric symptoms. Obesity is also associated with peripheral low-grade inflammation and increased susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases. Excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and the resulting activation of the brain tryptophan catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) have been shown to promote neurobehavioral complications, particularly depression. In that context, questions arise about the impact of diet-induced obesity on the onset of neuropsychiatric alterations and the increased susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases displayed by obese patients, particularly through brain IDO activation. To answer these questions, we used C57Bl/6 mice exposed to standard diet or western diet (WD; consisting of palatable energy-dense food) since weaning and for 20 weeks. We then measured inflammatory and behavioral responses to a systemic immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in experimental conditions known to alter cognitive and emotional behaviors independently of any motor impairment. We first showed that in absence of LPS, 9 weeks of WD is sufficient to impair spatial recognition memory (in the Y-maze). On the other hand, 18 weeks of WD increased anxiety-like behavior (in the elevated plus-maze), but did not affect depressive-like behavior (in the tail-suspension and forced-swim tests). However, 20 weeks of WD altered LPS-induced depressive-like behavior compared to LPS-treated lean mice and exacerbated hippocampal and hypothalamic proinflammatory cytokine expression and brain IDO activation. Taken together, these results show that WD exposure alters cognition and anxiety in unstimulated

  8. Betalain production is possible in anthocyanin-producing plant species given the presence of DOPA-dioxygenase and L-DOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nilangani N; Javellana, John; Davies, Kevin M; Lewis, David H; Jameson, Paula E; Deroles, Simon C; Calcott, Kate E; Gould, Kevin S; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2012-03-12

    Carotenoids and anthocyanins are the predominant non-chlorophyll pigments in plants. However, certain families within the order Caryophyllales produce another class of pigments, the betalains, instead of anthocyanins. The occurrence of betalains and anthocyanins is mutually exclusive. Betalains are divided into two classes, the betaxanthins and betacyanins, which produce yellow to orange or violet colours, respectively. In this article we show betalain production in species that normally produce anthocyanins, through a combination of genetic modification and substrate feeding. The biolistic introduction of DNA constructs for transient overexpression of two different dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenases (DODs), and feeding of DOD substrate (L-DOPA), was sufficient to induce betalain production in cell cultures of Solanum tuberosum (potato) and petals of Antirrhinum majus. HPLC analysis showed both betaxanthins and betacyanins were produced. Multi-cell foci with yellow, orange and/or red colours occurred, with either a fungal DOD (from Amanita muscaria) or a plant DOD (from Portulaca grandiflora), and the yellow/orange foci showed green autofluorescence characteristic of betaxanthins. Stably transformed Arabidopsis thaliana (arabidopsis) lines containing 35S: AmDOD produced yellow colouration in flowers and orange-red colouration in seedlings when fed L-DOPA. These tissues also showed green autofluorescence. HPLC analysis of the transgenic seedlings fed L-DOPA confirmed betaxanthin production. The fact that the introduction of DOD along with a supply of its substrate (L-DOPA) was sufficient to induce betacyanin production reveals the presence of a background enzyme, possibly a tyrosinase, that can convert L-DOPA to cyclo-DOPA (or dopaxanthin to betacyanin) in at least some anthocyanin-producing plants. The plants also demonstrate that betalains can accumulate in anthocyanin-producing species. Thus, introduction of a DOD and an enzyme capable of converting

  9. Betalain production is possible in anthocyanin-producing plant species given the presence of DOPA-dioxygenase and L-DOPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Nilangani N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotenoids and anthocyanins are the predominant non-chlorophyll pigments in plants. However, certain families within the order Caryophyllales produce another class of pigments, the betalains, instead of anthocyanins. The occurrence of betalains and anthocyanins is mutually exclusive. Betalains are divided into two classes, the betaxanthins and betacyanins, which produce yellow to orange or violet colours, respectively. In this article we show betalain production in species that normally produce anthocyanins, through a combination of genetic modification and substrate feeding. Results The biolistic introduction of DNA constructs for transient overexpression of two different dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA dioxygenases (DODs, and feeding of DOD substrate (L-DOPA, was sufficient to induce betalain production in cell cultures of Solanum tuberosum (potato and petals of Antirrhinum majus. HPLC analysis showed both betaxanthins and betacyanins were produced. Multi-cell foci with yellow, orange and/or red colours occurred, with either a fungal DOD (from Amanita muscaria or a plant DOD (from Portulaca grandiflora, and the yellow/orange foci showed green autofluorescence characteristic of betaxanthins. Stably transformed Arabidopsis thaliana (arabidopsis lines containing 35S: AmDOD produced yellow colouration in flowers and orange-red colouration in seedlings when fed L-DOPA. These tissues also showed green autofluorescence. HPLC analysis of the transgenic seedlings fed L-DOPA confirmed betaxanthin production. Conclusions The fact that the introduction of DOD along with a supply of its substrate (L-DOPA was sufficient to induce betacyanin production reveals the presence of a background enzyme, possibly a tyrosinase, that can convert L-DOPA to cyclo-DOPA (or dopaxanthin to betacyanin in at least some anthocyanin-producing plants. The plants also demonstrate that betalains can accumulate in anthocyanin-producing species. Thus, introduction

  10. Influence of induction conditions on the expression of carbazole dioxygenase components (CarAa, CarAc, and CarAd) from Pseudomonas stutzeri in recombinant Escherichia coli using experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larentis, Ariane Leites; Sampaio, Haryana de Cássia Cunha; Martins, Orlando Bonifácio; Rodrigues, Maria Isabel; Alves, Tito Lívio Moitinho

    2011-08-01

    Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CarA), the first enzyme in the carbazole degradation pathway used by Pseudomonas sp., was expressed in E. coli under different conditions defined by experimental design. This enzyme depends on the coexistence of three components containing [2Fe-2S] clusters: CarAa, CarAc, and CarAd. The catalytic site is present in CarAa. The genes corresponding to components of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase from P. stutzeri were cloned and expressed by salt induction in E. coli BL21-SI (a host that allows the enhancement of overexpressed proteins in the soluble fraction), using the vector pDEST™14. The expression of these proteins was performed under different induction conditions (cell concentration, temperature, and time), with the help of two-level factorial design. Cell concentration at induction (measured by absorbance at 600 nm) was tested at 0.5 and 0.8. After salt induction, expression was performed at 30 and 37°C, for 4 h and 24 h. Protein expression was evaluated by densitometry analysis. Expression of CarAa was enhanced by induction at a lower cell concentration and temperature and over a longer time, according to the analysis of the experimental design results. The results were validated at Abs (ind) = 0.3, 25°C, and 24 h, at which CarAa expression was three times higher than under the standard condition. The behavior of CarAc and CarAd was the inverse, with the best co-expression condition tested being the standard one (Abs (ind) = 0.5, T = 37°C, and t = 4 h). The functionality of the proteins expressed in E. coli was confirmed by the degradation of 20 ppm carbazole.

  11. Social Contributions in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Gyorgy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Social contributions have an important impact on payroll policy. Also, social contributions represent a significant budgetary revenue item which can be viewed at the edge between taxation and insurance. Social contributions in Romania experienced many changes which ended in 2008. Nowadays, they are within a long transaction period towards partial externalization of the insurance activity to privately managed funds. The aim of this paper is to analyse the homogeneity of Romanian social security public scheme using annual data extracted from 2002-2009.The main findings reveal that social contributions reached the pinnacle of diversification, being too many, some of them with a small contribution rates; fiscal reforms which reduced contribution rates advantaged employers, and state will be interested to externalize this activity as far private sector will be able to assume this responsibility and the budgetary effects are acceptable for the public finance.

  12. Major contributions to science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Andre

    1991-01-01

    It may look difficult to describe the scientific contributions of Léon Van Hove, who started his career as a pure mathematician, and then a mathematical physicist, and ended it as a phenomenologist and an adseveral of Léon's students, in particular N. Hugenholtz. In this domain, his contributions were numerous and fundamental

  13. Probiotics Differently Affect Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Indolamine-2,3-Dioxygenase mRNA and Cerebrospinal Fluid Neopterin Levels in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV-1 Infected Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagnolari, Carolina; Corano Scheri, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Carla; Schietroma, Ivan; Najafi Fard, Saeid; Mastrangelo, Andrea; Giustini, Noemi; Serafino, Sara; Pinacchio, Claudia; Pavone, Paolo; Fanello, Gianfranco; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Vullo, Vincenzo; d'Ettorre, Gabriella

    2016-09-27

    Recently the tryptophan pathway has been considered an important determinant of HIV-1 infected patients' quality of life, due to the toxic effects of its metabolites on the central nervous system (CNS). Since the dysbiosis described in HIV-1 patients might be responsible for the microbial translocation, the chronic immune activation, and the altered utilization of tryptophan observed in these individuals, we speculated a correlation between high levels of immune activation markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-1 infected patients and the over-expression of indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) at the gut mucosal surface. In order to evaluate this issue, we measured the levels of neopterin in CSF, and the expression of IDO mRNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), in HIV-1-infected patients on effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), at baseline and after six months of probiotic dietary management. We found a significant reduction of neopterin and IDO mRNA levels after the supplementation with probiotic. Since the results for the use of adjunctive therapies to reduce the levels of immune activation markers in CSF have been disappointing so far, our pilot study showing the efficacy of this specific probiotic product should be followed by a larger confirmatory trial.

  14. A Mathematical Model of Tryptophan Metabolism via the Kynurenine Pathway Provides Insights into the Effects of Vitamin B-6 Deficiency, Tryptophan Loading, and Induction of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase on Tryptophan Metabolites123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Avila, Luisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Sitren, Harry S.; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B-6 deficiency is associated with impaired tryptophan metabolism because of the coenzyme role of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) for kynureninase and kynurenine aminotransferase. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we developed a mathematical model of tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. The model includes mammalian data on enzyme kinetics and tryptophan transport from the intestinal lumen to liver, muscle, and brain. Regulatory mechanisms and inhibition of relevant enzymes were included. We simulated the effects of graded reduction in cellular PLP concentration, tryptophan loads and induction of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) on metabolite profiles and urinary excretion. The model predictions matched experimental data and provided clarification of the response of metabolites in various extents of vitamin B-6 deficiency. We found that moderate deficiency yielded increased 3-hydroxykynurenine and a decrease in kynurenic acid and anthranilic acid. More severe deficiency also yielded an increase in kynurenine and xanthurenic acid and more pronounced effects on the other metabolites. Tryptophan load simulations with and without vitamin B-6 deficiency showed altered metabolite concentrations consistent with published data. Induction of TDO caused an increase in all metabolites, and TDO induction together with a simulated vitamin B-6 deficiency, as has been reported in oral contraceptive users, yielded increases in kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and xanthurenic acid and decreases in kynurenic acid and anthranilic acid. These results show that the model successfully simulated tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway and can be used to complement experimental investigations. PMID:23902960

  15. Newton's Contributions to Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 12. Newton's Contributions to Optics. Arvind Kumar. General Article Volume 11 Issue 12 December 2006 pp 10-20. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/12/0010-0020. Keywords.

  16. Newton's Contributions to Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 12. Newton's Contributions to Optics. Arvind Kumar. General Article Volume 11 Issue 12 December 2006 pp 10-20. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/12/0010-0020. Keywords.

  17. Newton's Contributions to Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Newton's Contributions to Optics. Arvind Kumar is Director,. Homi Bhabha Centre for. Science Education,. Mumbai. His main areas of interest are theoretical physics and physics education. He has been involved ... early 1666, when he was a scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge. He aligned a triangular prism in the path of a ...

  18. Fisher's Contributions to Statistics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research workers of various disciplines in designing their studies and in analysing data thereof. He is also called upon to advise organisations like the ... such visual aids. It is believed that this situation helped him develop a keen geometrical sense. Fisher's contributions to statistics have also given rise to a number of bitter ...

  19. Abstracts of contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  20. Contributions to statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Mahalanobis, P C

    1965-01-01

    Contributions to Statistics focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in statistics. The book is presented to Professor P. C. Mahalanobis on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The selection first offers information on the recovery of ancillary information and combinatorial properties of partially balanced designs and association schemes. Discussions focus on combinatorial applications of the algebra of association matrices, sample size analogy, association matrices and the algebra of association schemes, and conceptual statistical experiments. The book then examines latt

  1. Contributions to sampling statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Pier; Ranalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the ITACOSM 2013 Conference, held in Milan in June 2013. ITACOSM is the bi-annual meeting of the Survey Sampling Group S2G of the Italian Statistical Society, intended as an international  forum of scientific discussion on the developments of theory and application of survey sampling methodologies and applications in human and natural sciences. The book gathers research papers carefully selected from both invited and contributed sessions of the conference. The whole book appears to be a relevant contribution to various key aspects of sampling methodology and techniques; it deals with some hot topics in sampling theory, such as calibration, quantile-regression and multiple frame surveys, and with innovative methodologies in important topics of both sampling theory and applications. Contributions cut across current sampling methodologies such as interval estimation for complex samples, randomized responses, bootstrap, weighting, modeling, imputati...

  2. Tank waste isotope contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VANKEUREN, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the results of a calculation to determine the relative contribution of selected isotopes to the inhalation and ingestion doses for a postulated release of Hanford tank waste. The fraction of the dose due to 90 Sr, 90 Y, 137 Cs and the alpha emitters for single shell solids and liquids, double shell solids and liquids, aging waste solids and liquids and all solids and liquids. An effective dose conversion factor was also calculated for the alpha emitters for each composite of the tank waste

  3. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, by degrading L-tryptophan, enhances carnitine palmitoyltransferase I activity and fatty acid oxidation, and exerts fatty acid-dependent effects in human alloreactive CD4+ T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Sounidaki, Maria; Tsogka, Konstantina; Antoniadis, Nikolaos; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-11-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is expressed in antigen-presenting cells and by degrading L-tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway suppresses CD4+ T-cell proliferation, induces apoptosis and promotes differentiation towards a regulatory as opposed to an effector phenotype. Recent findings revealed that the above effects may be mediated through alterations in T-cell metabolism. In this study, the effect of IDO on fatty acid β-oxidation in CD4+ T-cells was evaluated in human mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) using the IDO inhibitor, 1-DL-methyl-tryptophan. Protein analysis of CD4+ T-cells isolated from the MLR showed that L-tryptophan degradation acts by activating the general control non‑derepressible 2 kinase and aryl-hydrocarbon receptor in T-cells. In the absence of IDO inhibition, fatty acid oxidation increased along with increased activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT1), the latter due to the increased expression of CPT1 isoenzymes and alterations in acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2, the enzyme that controls CPT1 activity. Increased fatty acid oxidation due to the action of IDO was accompanied by an increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) and a decreased expression of related orphan receptor γt (RORγt), the signature transcription factors of regulatory T-cells and T helper 17 cells, respectively. However, in MLR and in the presence of fatty acid in the culture medium, IDO did not inhibit proliferation. Additionally, fatty acid protected the CD4+ T-cells against apoptosis. Thus, IDO, by degrading L-tryptophan, enhances CPT1 activity and fatty acid oxidation, and exerts fatty acid-dependent effects in human alloreactive CD4+ T-cells.

  4. The Crystal Structure of a Quercetin 2,3-Dioxygenase from Bacillus subtilis Suggests Modulation of Enzyme Activity by a Change in the Metal Ion at the Active Site(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, B.; Madan, Lalima L.; Betz, Stephen F.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A. (Indian); (UC); (GeneFormatics)

    2010-11-10

    Common structural motifs, such as the cupin domains, are found in enzymes performing different biochemical functions while retaining a similar active site configuration and structural scaffold. The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis has 20 cupin genes (0.5% of the total genome) with up to 14% of its genes in the form of doublets, thus making it an attractive system for studying the effects of gene duplication. There are four bicupins in B. subtilis encoded by the genes yvrK, yoaN, yxaG, and ywfC. The gene products of yvrK and yoaN function as oxalate decarboxylases with a manganese ion at the active site(s), whereas YwfC is a bacitracin synthetase. Here we present the crystal structure of YxaG, a novel iron-containing quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase with one active site in each cupin domain. Yxag is a dimer, both in solution and in the crystal. The crystal structure shows that the coordination geometry of the Fe ion is different in the two active sites of YxaG. Replacement of the iron at the active site with other metal ions suggests modulation of enzymatic activity in accordance with the Irving-Williams observation on the stability of metal ion complexes. This observation, along with a comparison with the crystal structure of YvrK determined recently, has allowed for a detailed structure-function analysis of the active site, providing clues to the diversification of function in the bicupin family of proteins.

  5. Contributing to Functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törpel, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    advocated in this paper, emerges in the specific dynamic interplay of actors, objectives, structures, practices and means. In this view, functionality is the result of creating, harnessing and inhabiting computer supported joint action spaces. The successful creation and further development of a computer......The objective of this paper is the design of computer supported joint action spaces. It is argued against a view of functionality as residing in computer applications. In such a view the creation of functionality is equivalent to the creation of computer applications. Functionality, in the view...... supported joint action space comprises a whole range of appropriate design contributions. The approach is illustrated by the example of the creation of the computer supported joint action space "exchange network of voluntary union educators". As part of the effort a group of participants created...

  6. Ergonomics Contribution in Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourian, Kiumars; Seneviratne, Dammika; Galar, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase the maintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation conditions. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  7. Contribution to postnonclassical psychopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintino-Aires J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Any psychological paradigm needs a psychopathological system that helps professionals to describe and explain the behavioral expressions that deviate from “normal” (whether this term is used with the semantic property of statistical or ideal adaptations. In this work, I seek to present the system that I have been developing since 1998 among the psychologists at the Instituto Vegotsky de Lisboa (Vygotsky Institute of Lisbon, Portugal, to understand psychopathology with regard to the vygotskian approach. It was conceived and designed according to the work of Rita Mendes Leal and her contribution to socioemotional development theory, AR Luria’s systemic and dynamic theory of the human brain, the theory of Activity (dyatel’nost of AN Leont’ev, and the psychopathological German school of E Kraepelin, presented and disseminated in Portugal in the early twentieth century by Professor Sobral Cid. It is intended to be a proposal to colleagues who are interested in postnonclassical psychology and a request for arguments.

  8. EMSL Contribution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2008-12-01

    This Contribution Plan is EMSL’s template for achieving our vision of simultaneous excellence in all aspects of our mission as a national scientific user facility. It reflects our understanding of the long-term stewardship we must work toward to meet the scientific challenges faced by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. During the next decade, we will implement the strategies contained in this Plan, working closely with the scientific community, our advisory committees, DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and other key stakeholders. This Plan is fully aligned with the strategic plans of DOE, its Office of Science, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). We recognize that shifts in science and technology, national priorities, and resources made available through the Federal budget process create planning uncertainties and, ultimately, a highly dynamic planning environment. Accordingly, this Plan should be viewed as a living document and we continually evaluate the changing needs and opportunities posed by our stakeholders (i.e., DOE, users, staff, advisory committees), work closely with them to understand and respond to those changes, and align our strategy accordingly. This Plan is organized around two sections. Section 1 describes our vision and four strategic outcomes: 1) Scientific Innovation, 2) Capabilities that Transform Science, 3) Outstanding Management and Operations, and Engaged and Proactive Users. These outcomes provide the framework for seven critical actions we must take during the next 3 to 5 years: 1) Establishing leadership in EMSL science themes, 2) building and deploying transformational capabilities, 3) integrating computation with experiment, 4) ensuring EMSL’s workforce meets the scientific challenges of the future, 5) creating partnerships, 6) attracting and engaging users in EMSL’s long-term strategy, and 7) building a research infrastructure that meets emerging scientific needs. Section 2

  9. CONTRIBUTION OF INDIRECT TAXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHIRCULESCU MARIA FELICIA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The work is based on the fact that at any time and in any society, taxation is regarded as undesirable for all taxpayers. The existence and it's manifestation is justified, because the operation of any company involves costs that must be covered by sufficient resources. Since ancient times, each state has adopted its own tax system, more or less perfected, as the state has experienced a greater or lesser economic and military power At the base of this work stays the fact that tax systems are a key factor influencing the overall efficiency of the economy. They determine the size tendency to save, invest and work, influencing the increase in production and employment, which is essential sights integral economic strategy, making tax reform an important component of economic reform. This paper aims to analyze the indirect taxes and their contribution to the public revenues in Romania, the purpose paper contains an analysis based on statistical series as indirect taxation is where tax harmonization was possible. Through analyzes, the paper aims to provide answers to the problem of the contradiction between the growing need for budgetary revenues, which entails a continuous amplification and diversification of taxation, on the one hand, and the need to stimulate economic development, on the other hand. The harmonization of indirect taxation had been achieved since this touches the free movement of goods and the freedom to supply services, not being able to say the same thing about direct taxation, which is why the European Community Treaty does not specify expressly the alignment of direct taxation, considering that direct taxation is a matter of Internal Policies that, for a country free option.

  10. Ex vivo immunosuppressive effects of mesenchymal stem cells on Crohn's disease mucosal T cells are largely dependent on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity and cell-cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Cangemi, Giuseppina C; Kruzliak, Peter; Gallia, Alessandra; Betti, Elena; Badulli, Carla; Martinetti, Miryam; Cervio, Marila; Pecci, Alessandro; Bozzi, Valeria; Dionigi, Paolo; Visai, Livia; Gurrado, Antonella; Alvisi, Costanza; Picone, Cristina; Monti, Manuela; Bernardo, Maria E; Gobbi, Paolo; Corazza, Gino R

    2015-07-24

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a disabling chronic enteropathy sustained by a harmful T-cell response toward antigens of the gut microbiota in genetically susceptible subjects. Growing evidence highlights the safety and possible efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a new therapeutic tool for this condition. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of bone marrow-derived MSCs on pathogenic T cells with a view to clinical application. T-cell lines from both inflamed and non-inflamed colonic mucosal specimens of CD patients and from healthy mucosa of control subjects were grown with the antigen muramyl-dipeptide in the absence or presence of donors' MSCs. The MSC effects were evaluated in terms of T-cell viability, apoptotic rate, proliferative response, immunophenotype, and cytokine profile. The role of the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) was established by adding a specific inhibitor, the 1-methyl-DL-tryptophan, and by using MSCs transfected with the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IDO. The relevance of cell-cell contact was evaluated by applying transwell membranes. A significant reduction in both cell viability and proliferative response to muramyl-dipeptide, with simultaneous increase in the apoptotic rate, was found in T cells from both inflamed and non-inflamed CD mucosa when co-cultured with MSCs and was reverted by inhibiting IDO activity and expression. A reduction of the activated CD4(+)CD25(+) subset and increase of the CD3(+)CD69(+) population were also observed when T-cell lines from CD mucosa were co-cultured with MSCs. In parallel, an inhibitory effect was evident on the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, interleukin-17A and -21, whereas that of the transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-6 were increased, and production of the tolerogenic molecule soluble HLA-G was high. These latter effects were almost completely eliminated by blocking the IDO, whose activity was upregulated in

  11. Fully automated radiosynthesis of N(1)-[(18)F]fluoroethyl-tryptophan and study of its biological activity as a new potential substrate for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrottin, Jean; Lemaire, Christian; Egrise, Dominique; Zervosen, Astrid; Van den Eynde, Benoit; Plenevaux, Alain; Franci, Xavier; Goldman, Serge; Luxen, André

    2016-06-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyzes the initial step in the catabolism of l-tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway and exerts immunosuppressive properties in inflammatory and tumor tissues by blocking locally T-lymphocyte proliferation. Recently, 1-(2-[(19)F]fluoroethyl)-dl-tryptophan (1-[(19)F]FE-dl-Trp) was reported as a good and specific substrate of this enzyme. Herein, the radiosynthesis of its radioactive isotopomer (1-[(18)F]FE-dl-Trp, dl-[(18)F]5) is presented along with in vitro enzymatic and cellular uptake studies. The one-pot n.c.a. radiosynthesis of this novel potential PET imaging tracer, including HPLC purification and formulation, has been fully automated on a FASTlab™ synthesizer. Chiral separation of both isomers and their formulation were implemented on a second cassette. In vitro enzymatic and cellular uptake studies were then conducted with the d-, l- and dl-radiotracers. The radiolabeling of the tosylate precursor was performed in DMF (in 5min; RCY: 57% (d.c.), n=3). After hydrolysis, HPLC purification and formulation, dl-[(18)F]5 was obtained with a global radiochemical yield of 18±3% (not decay corrected, n=7, in 80min) and a specific activity of 600±180GBq/μmol (n=5). The subsequent separation of l- and d-enantiomers was performed by chiral HPLC and both were obtained after formulation with an RCY (d.c.) of 6.1% and 5.8%, respectively. In vitro enzymatic assays reveal that l-[(18)F]5 is a better substrate than d-[(18)F]5 for human IDO. In vitro cellular assays show an IDO-specific uptake of the racemate varying from 30% to 50% of that of l-[(18)F]5, and a negligible uptake of d-[(18)F]5. In vitro studies show that l-[(18)F]5 is a good and specific substrate of hIDO, while presenting a very low efflux. These results confirm that l-[(18)F]5 could be a very useful PET radiotracer for IDO expressing cells in cancer imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. COP 21: the national contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouette, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This article comments the content of the national contributions (the so-called Intended Nationally Determined Contributions or INDC) which every country should have transmitted to the UN before the COP 21. In fact, 148 contributions, i.e. 75 per cent of the expected ones, have been transmitted. The author recalls that the content of these contributions had to obey some principles which had been defined in Lima in 2014, and that each country must identify its objectives in terms of mitigation (reduction of greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (reduction of the vulnerability of natural and human systems). The author comments some specific commitments regarding climate, emission reduction, adaptation to climate change, and more particularly evokes the Ethiopian contribution which is considered as exemplary

  13. Introducing and modeling inefficiency contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Kronborg, Dorte; Matthews, Kent

    2016-01-01

    Whilst Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is the most commonly used non-parametric benchmarking approach, the interpretation and application of DEA results can be limited by the fact that radial improvement potentials are identified across variables. In contrast, Multi-directional Efficiency Analysis......-called inefficiency contributions, which are defined as the relative contributions from specific variables to the overall levels of inefficiencies. A statistical model for distinguishing the inefficiency contributions between subgroups is proposed and the method is illustrated on a data set on Chinese banks....

  14. ECN contributions to GLOBAL `95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report contains the 9 contributions of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN to the international conference on evaluation of emerging nuclear fuel cycle systems, GLOBAL `95, held in Versailles, France, on September 11-14, 1995. (orig./GL).

  15. Uncapacitated facility location problems: contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvão Roberto Diéguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to review my personal contributions in the field of uncapacitated facility location problems. These contributions took place throughout my academic career, from the time I was a Ph.D. student at Imperial College to the present day. They cover approximately 30 years, from 1973 to 2003; they address: algorithms developed for the p-median problem and for a general formulation of uncapacitated location problems; the study of dynamic location models; covering and hierarchical location problems; queuing-based probabilistic location models. The contributions encompass theoretical developments, computational algorithms and practical applications. All work took place in an academic environment, with the invaluable collaboration of colleagues (both in Brazil and abroad and research students at COPPE. Each section in the paper is dedicated to a topic that involves a personal contribution. Every one of them is placed within the context of the existing literature.

  16. 75 FR 34388 - Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... describes: (a) That default employee contributions equal to 3 percent of the employee's basic pay will be... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office #0; #0;Proposed Rules #0... Employees' Retirement System Act of 1986 (FERSA), Public Law 99-335, 100 Stat. 514. The TSP provisions of...

  17. Charm contribution to bulk viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, M.; Sohrabi, Kiyoumars A.

    2015-02-01

    In the range of temperatures reached in future heavy ion collision experiments, hadronic pair annihilations and creations of charm quarks may take place within the lifetime of the plasma. As a result, charm quarks may increase the bulk viscosity affecting the early stages of hydrodynamic expansion. Assuming thermalisation, we estimate the charm contribution to bulk viscosity within the same effective kinetic theory framework in which the light parton contribution has been computed previously. The time scale at which this physics becomes relevant is related to the width of the transport peak associated with the trace anomaly correlator and is found to be fm/c for MeV.

  18. Maxwell's Contributions to Thermal Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Maxwell's Contributions to Thermal Physics. Sisir Bhanja. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 57-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/05/0057-0072. Keywords.

  19. The Jewish contribution to medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-07-15

    Jul 15, 1989 ... History of Medicine. The Jewish contribution to medicine. Part 11. The 19th and 20th centuries. H.DUBOVSKY. Summary. Despite the opening of German universities to Jews in the .... private practice since religious prejudice prevented him from ..... investigations in orphanages and prisons he established a.

  20. Contributions of Maxwell to Electromagnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Contributions of Maxwell to Electromagnetism. P V Panat. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 17-29. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/05/0017-0029. Keywords.

  1. The Jewish contribution to medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their contribution to the an may be gauged by their forming 30%1 of Nobel Prize winners for medicine while constituting a fraction of 1% of the total world population. Garrison,2 Talbot,3 Roth4 and the Encyclopaedia Judaica5 were consulted for Jewish identification. The laner authority includes those of 'Jewish origin', ...

  2. Financial Network Systemic Risk Contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hautsch, N.; Schaumburg, J.; Schienle, M.

    2015-01-01

    We propose the realized systemic risk beta as a measure of financial companies' contribution to systemic risk, given network interdependence between firms' tail risk exposures. Conditional on statistically pre-identified network spillover effects and market and balance sheet information, we define

  3. CONTRIBUTIONS OF SUSHRUTA TO ANATOMY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-08-08

    Aug 8, 2005 ... Probably, the exhaustive knowledge of basic sciences he had would have made him a versatile surgeon. This article has compiled the contributions of this great stalwart to anatomy and interprets his perspective towards teaching this subject. Keywords: Sushruta, Dissection, Cadaver, Anatomy, Preservation.

  4. JC Bose's Contributions to Chronobiology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1122 printed pages offour monograph volumes. Reproduced here are his contributions to chronobiology in ... to J C Bose's work in the first monograph written on the subject of circadian clocks in German in 1958, ... account from his many passages in his inimitable English prose,. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ,AAAAA, _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _. 54.

  5. Processed foods: contributions to nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Connie M; Dwyer, Johanna; Fulgoni, Victor L; King, Janet C; Leveille, Gilbert A; MacDonald, Ruth S; Ordovas, Jose; Schnakenberg, David

    2014-06-01

    Both fresh and processed foods make up vital parts of the food supply. Processed food contributes to both food security (ensuring that sufficient food is available) and nutrition security (ensuring that food quality meets human nutrient needs). This ASN scientific statement focuses on one aspect of processed foods: their nutritional impacts. Specifically, this scientific statement 1) provides an introduction to how processed foods contribute to the health of populations, 2) analyzes the contribution of processed foods to "nutrients to encourage" and "constituents to limit" in the American diet as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 3) identifies the responsibilities of various stakeholders in improving the American diet, and 4) reviews emerging technologies and the research needed for a better understanding of the role of processed foods in a healthy diet. Analyses of the NHANES 2003-2008 show that processed foods provide both nutrients to encourage and constituents to limit as specified in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Of the nutrients to encourage, processed foods contributed 55% of dietary fiber, 48% of calcium, 43% of potassium, 34% of vitamin D, 64% of iron, 65% of folate, and 46% of vitamin B-12. Of the constituents to limit, processed foods contributed 57% of energy, 52% of saturated fat, 75% of added sugars, and 57% of sodium. Diets are more likely to meet food guidance recommendations if nutrient-dense foods, either processed or not, are selected. Nutrition and food science professionals, the food industry, and other stakeholders can help to improve the diets of Americans by providing a nutritious food supply that is safe, enjoyable, affordable, and sustainable by communicating effectively and accurately with each other and by working together to improve the overall knowledge of consumers. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Genetic contribution to vestibular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Martinez, Alvaro; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan Manuel; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2018-03-26

    Growing evidence supports the contribution of allelic variation to vestibular disorders. Heritability attributed to rare allelic variants is found in familial vestibular syndromes such as enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome or familial Meniere disease. However, the involvement of common allelic variants as key regulators of physiological processes in common and rare vestibular diseases is starting to be deciphered, including motion sickness or sporadic Meniere disease. The genetic contribution to most of the vestibular disorders is still largely unknown. This review will outline the role of common and rare variants in human genome to episodic vestibular syndromes, progressive vestibular syndrome, and hereditary sensorineural hearing loss associated with vestibular phenotype. Future genomic studies and network analyses of omic data will clarify the pathway towards a personalized stratification of treatments.

  7. Kant's contribution to social theory

    OpenAIRE

    González, A.M. (Ana Marta)

    2009-01-01

    Although Kant is not usually counted among the forerunners of social sciences, any look at the work of the most prominent social theorists of the past century shows the pervasive influence of Kant’s philosophy. This influence is obvious and crucial at the epistemological level, if only because Kant himself set the frame for subsequent discussion of the difference between human and natural sciences. Yet, Kant’s work is also rich in substantive contributions to social theory, whi...

  8. Galileo's contribution to modern orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastifer, James R; Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H; Gustafson, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), world-renowned Italian mathematician, astronomer, physicist and philosopher, made many contributions to science. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that Galileo's discovery of scaling principles permitted others to define and advance orthopaedic research and clinical sciences. The science and scaling principles of Galileo Galilei were extensively analyzed by reviewing his 1638 original work Discorsi e Demostrazioni Matematiche Intorno a Due Nuove Scienze. Works about Galileo's science were reviewed for the concept of the scaling principles and with the idea of shedding light on how his work influenced modern orthopaedics. Galileo strictly adhered to the Copernican heliocentric theory with the sun at the center of the universe, which caused him aggravation and made him the target of inquisition rage at the end of his prodigious life. With his attention away from the cosmos, Galileo--through the voices of Salviati, Sagredo and Simplicio in the Discourses on Two New Sciences--defined how scaling was important to the movement and function of objects. Galileo introduced important advances in scaling laws, which contributed to the development of the field of biomechanics. This discipline, in many ways, has defined modern clinical and research orthopaedics. Galileo, by introducing the principles of scaling, permitted their application to human physical capacity, to bone and tissue response after injury, and to clinical treatment of injuries. Galileo in this way made important contributions to the practice of modern orthopaedics.

  9. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  10. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male

  11. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  12. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  13. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  14. Cerebellar Contribution to Social Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoche, Franziska; Guell, Xavier; Sherman, Janet C; Vangel, Mark G; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2016-12-01

    Emotion attribution (EA) from faces is key to social cognition, and deficits in perception of emotions from faces underlie neuropsychiatric disorders in which cerebellar pathology is reported. Here, we test the hypothesis that the cerebellum contributes to social cognition through EA from faces. We examined 57 patients with cerebellar disorders and 57 healthy controls. Thirty-one patients had complex cerebrocerebellar disease (complex cerebrocerebellar disease group (CD)); 26 had disease isolated to cerebellum (isolated cerebellar disease group (ID)). EA was measured with the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test (RMET), and informants were administered a novel questionnaire, the Cerebellar Neuropsychiatric Rating Scale (CNRS). EA was impaired in all patients (CD p social skills (p social skills (CD p social skills and autism spectrum behaviors and experienced psychosocial difficulties on the CNRS. This has relevance for ataxias, the cerebellar cognitive affective/Schmahmann syndrome, and neuropsychiatric disorders with cerebellar pathology.

  15. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    CERN Document Server

    Davier, M; Malaescu, B; Zhang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle–antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e− annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingre...

  16. 22 CFR 130.6 - Political contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Political contribution. 130.6 Section 130.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.6 Political contribution. Political contribution means any loan, gift...

  17. Uruguay geology contributions no. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F.

    1989-01-01

    This Group is characterized by a volcano-sedimentary sequence of low grade into which are found the main Pb, Zn, Cu, Mo occurrences and vast limestones deposits and a laterally associated sequence of medium metamorphism. From a structural point of view it is characterized by a poly phasic evolution. At low metamorphic sequence is distinguished a volcanic-sedimentary series (s.s.) and a sedimentogenous series. The synchronism between both series is showed by transition by lateral facies changes. There is a pelitic carbonate zone associated to a basic calc o-alkaline and tholeitic volcanism and the another zone represented by a carbonaceous platform subjected lo de tri tic contribution of varied nature. The Iithologic succession permits establishing at the volcano-sedimentary sequence, five levels from base to top: -a phyllitic and meta pelitic level (500 meters thick), with basic volcanic rocks intercalated, -a level of limestones which evolves to the top by detritic contributions to a flisch alternation (300 m. thick) with basic volcanic rocks intercalated, -a level of rit mic alternation of rnetapelites, melasandstones, limes tones and phyllites (200 m. thick), -a basic volcanic unit, with intercalation of acid vulcanite s, at the lop are intercalated volcanoclastic rocks as tuffs and breccia s, 1000 meters thick, -a n el sedimentary unit integrated by limestones and phyllites wich evolve to the top of the series lo levels of dolomites. coarse-grained phyllites and jasper, 300 m. thick. Laterally this level passes lo a set integrated by quartzites, metaarcoses, limestones, acid tuffs and rarely rhyolites. The sedimentogenous series has the following base to top sequence: -150 m. of quartzites and meta sandstones wich lay unconformbly over a qranitic-gneissic set, -100 m. 01 phyllites, coarse-grained phyllites and metaarcoses, -ritmic alternance of calcareous, phyllites, coarse-grained phyllites, 800 m. thick (flisch). The megastructures were formed al the second

  18. The microbial contribution to macroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberán, Albert; Casamayor, Emilio O.; Fierer, Noah

    2014-01-01

    There has been a recent explosion of research within the field of microbial ecology that has been fueled, in part, by methodological improvements that make it feasible to characterize microbial communities to an extent that was inconceivable only a few years ago. Furthermore, there is increasing recognition within the field of ecology that microorganisms play a critical role in the health of organisms and ecosystems. Despite these developments, an important gap still persists between the theoretical framework of macroecology and microbial ecology. We highlight two idiosyncrasies of microorganisms that are fundamental to understanding macroecological patterns and their mechanistic drivers. First, high dispersal rates provide novel opportunities to test the relative importance of niche, stochastic, and historical processes in structuring biological communities. Second, high speciation rates potentially lead to the convergence of ecological and evolutionary time scales. After reviewing these unique aspects, we discuss strategies for improving the conceptual integration of microbes into macroecology. As examples, we discuss the use of phylogenetic ecology as an integrative approach to explore patterns across the tree of life. Then we demonstrate how two general theories of biodiversity (i.e., the recently developed theory of stochastic geometry and the neutral theory) can be adapted to microorganisms. We demonstrate how conceptual models that integrate evolutionary and ecological mechanisms can contribute to the unification of microbial ecology and macroecology. PMID:24829564

  19. Student Scientific Conference, 2009. Proceedings of reviewed contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (145 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (42 contributions); (iii) Geology (42 contributions); (iv) Environment (40 contributions); (v) Geography (28 contributions); (vi) Didactics (13 contributions). Contributions relevant of INIS interest has been inputted to INIS.

  20. Student Scientific Conference, 2010. Proceedings of reviewed contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (154 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (39 contributions); (iii) Geography; (41 contributions); (iv) Geology (22 contributions); (v) Environment (45 contributions); (vi) Didactics (6 contributions). Contributions relevant of INIS interest has been inputted to INIS.

  1. Reinvestigation of a Ru(2)-incorporated polyoxometalate dioxygenase precatalyst, "[WZnRu(2)(III)(H(2)O)(OH)(ZnW(9)O(34))(2)](11-)": evidence for marginal,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Aimee M; Anderson, Oren P; Finke, Richard G

    2009-05-18

    A 1997 Nature paper (Nature 1997, 388, 353-355) and subsequent 1998 J. Am. Chem. Soc. paper (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1998, 120, 11969-11976) reported that a putative Ru(2)-substituted polyoxoanion, "[WZnRu(2)(III)(H(2)O)(OH)(ZnW(9)O(34))(2)](11-)", (1), is an all inorganic dioxygenase able to incorporate one O(2) into two adamantane CH bonds to yield 2 equiv of 1-adamantanol as the primary product. In a subsequent 2005 Inorg. Chem. publication (Inorg. Chem. 2005, 44, 4175-4188), strong evidence was provided that the putative dioxygenase chemistry is, instead, the result of classic autoxidation catalysis. That research raised the question of whether the reported Ru(2) precatalyst, 1, was pure or even if it contained two Ru atoms, since Ru is known to be difficult to substitute into polyoxoanion structures (Nomiya, K.; Torii, H.; Nomura, K.; Sato, Y. J. Chem. Soc. Dalton Trans. 2001, 1506-1521). After our research group had contact with three other groups who also had difficulties reproducing the reported synthesis and composition of 1, we decided to re-examine 1 in some detail. Herein we provide evidence that the claimed 1 actually appears to be the parent polyoxoanion [WZn(3)(H(2)O)(2)(ZnW(9)O(34))(2)](12-) with small amounts of Ru (

  2. The GMOS contributions to GEOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirrone N.

    2013-04-01

    oceans, and in the UTLS will support the validation of regional and global atmospheric mercury models for use in evaluating different policy options for reducing mercury pollution and its impacts on human health and ecosystems. The data sets, the validated models, and the interoperable system that is produced within this program, will support the policymaking process in the framework of UNEP Governing Council activities, and in the UNECE-LRTAP convention. The task builds upon contributions from, among others, the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, the UNEP Mercury Programme, the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollutants Task Force (TF HTAP, the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP, the MercNet/AMNet initiative in the USA, the CAMNet in Canada, and other international monitoring and modelling efforts.

  3. Quarkonium Contribution to Meson Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cincioglu, E.; Yilmazer, A.U. [Ankara University, Department of Physics Engineering, Ankara (Turkey); Nieves, J. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC) Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Ozpineci, A. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Physics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-10-15

    Starting from a molecular picture for the X(3872) resonance, this state and its J{sup PC} = 2{sup ++} heavy-quark spin symmetry partner [X{sub 2}(4012)] are analyzed within a model which incorporates possible mixings with 2P charmonium (c anti c) states. Since it is reasonable to expect the bare χ{sub c1}(2P) to be located above the D anti D{sup *} threshold, but relatively close to it, the presence of the charmonium state provides an effective attraction that will contribute to binding the X(3872), but it will not appear in the 2{sup ++} sector. Indeed in the latter sector, the χ{sub c2}(2P) should provide an effective small repulsion, because it is placed well below the D{sup *} anti D{sup *} threshold. We show how the 1{sup ++} and 2{sup ++} bare charmonium poles are modified due to the D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} loop effects, and the first one is moved to the complex plane. The meson loops produce, besides some shifts in the masses of the charmonia, a finite width for the 1{sup ++} dressed charmonium state. On the other hand, X(3872) and X{sub 2}(4012) start developing some charmonium content, which is estimated by means of the compositeness Weinberg sum rule. It turns out that in the heavy-quark limit, there is only one coupling between the 2P charmonia and the D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} pairs. We also show that, for reasonable values of this coupling, leading to X(3872) molecular probabilities of around 70-90 %, the X{sub 2} resonance destabilizes and disappears from the spectrum, becoming either a virtual state or one being located deep into the complex plane, with decreasing influence in the D{sup *} anti D{sup *} scattering line. Moreover, we also discuss how around 10-30 % charmonium probability in the X(3872) might explain the ratio of radiative decays of this resonance into ψ(2S)γ and J/ψγ. Finally, we qualitatively discuss within this scheme, the hidden bottom flavor sector, paying a special attention to the implications for the X{sub b} and X

  4. 7 CFR 966.45 - Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... contributions but these shall only be used for production research, market research and development and..., or any person whose contributions would constitute a conflict of interest. Research and Development ...

  5. Scalar contribution to the BFKL kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, R. E.; Fadin, V. S.

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of scalar particles to the kernel of the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) equation is calculated. A great cancellation between the virtual and real parts of this contribution, analogous to the cancellation in the quark contribution in QCD, is observed. The reason of this cancellation is discovered. This reason has a common nature for particles with any spin. Understanding of this reason permits to obtain the total contribution without the complicated calculations, which are necessary for finding separate pieces.

  6. Contributing Chemistry and Compelling Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2013-04-01

    transplantation for haematological disorders and malignancies. With these two original research articles throwing a light upon the influence of various factors on stem cell proliferation, homing and engraftment, the article by Telpalo-Carpio et al has attempted to provide a general scenario of the state of the art in the Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells generation, giving a glimpse of the most important and promising emerging de-differentiation technologies of the various research groups all over the world who are extensively researching on this ‘most sought after cell type’. Though all ideas and innovations may not turn out to yield successful solutions and all researches may not end up in positive outcome, the article by Terunuma et al which provides an in-sight into the in vitro expansion of patients’ immune cells such as NK cells, and T cells using chemically synthesized culture media without any feeder layers, whose clinical outcome in tackling several tumours with long term follow-up is something really a tonic of encouragement to scientists. Contribution of chemical moieties having been studied and translated to clinical applications, the physical forces' real worth have not yet been explored to the fullest. Time has come to dig, hig or boson them! References: Engler AJ, Sen S, Sweeney HL, Discher DE. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell. 2006 Aug 25;126(4:677-89. Adams DS. A new tool for tissue engineers: ions as regulators of morphogenesis during development and regeneration. Tissue Eng Part A. 2008 Sep;14(9:1461-8.

  7. Contribution behavior of 401(k) plan participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, S; VanDerhei, J

    2001-10-01

    This Issue Brief examines the 1999 contribution behavior of 1.7 million 401(k) plan participants drawn from the EBRI/ICI Participant-Directed Retirement Plan Data Collection Project. The findings in this paper build on previous academic research examining the contribution activity of 401(k) participants, by using a large sample of participants in a wide range of plan sizes and by examining in detail the factors that influence contribution activity. Eighty-five percent of participants in the sample only made before-tax contributions to their plans, and 97 percent of all dollars contributed by employees were contributed on a before-tax basis. On average, participants contributed 6.8 percent of their salaries on a before-tax basis. Before-tax contribution activity varied among participants. About 61 percent of participants contributed more than 5 percent of their salaries on a before-tax basis and about 21 percent set aside more than 10 percent of their salaries on a before-tax basis. Eleven percent of participants analyzed in this study earning more than $40,000 a year contributed at the $10,000 before-tax IRC limit in 1999. Thirteen percent of participants with salaries between $70,000 and $80,000 contributed at the cap, and 18 percent of those with salaries between $80,000 and $90,000 were at the limit. However, it appears that among participants not contributing at the IRC limit, 52 percent could not have done so because of formal plan-imposed contribution limits below the IRC limit. Older participants tended to contribute a higher percentage of their salaries to plans than did younger participants, even after factoring out differences in salary and job tenure. Participants tended to increase the share of their salary (and amounts) contributed to their 401(k) plan as their salaries rose until salaries reached $80,000. For individuals with salaries above $80,000, before-tax contribution rates (though not the amounts contributed) tended to fall as salaries rose

  8. Public libraries' contribution to Sustainable Development Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Telo, Paula Alexandra Ochoa de Carvalho; Pinto, Leonor Gaspar

    2017-01-01

    UID/HIS/04666/2013 Initiated in November 2016, the project Public Libraries and Sustainability: Gathering Evidences of Contribution to SDGs (Project PLS) aims to develop a framework for evaluating public libraries’ contribution to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and tailor it to Portuguese public libraries. This paper discusses the role of impact evaluation practices and competencies in evidence gathering and advocacy processes of libraries’ contribution to the UN 2030 Agenda, focusin...

  9. 44 CFR 361.4 - Matching contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Earthquake Hazards Reduction Assistance Program § 361.4 Matching contributions. (a) All State...

  10. 7 CFR 550.15 - Resource contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... completion of the project. Required resource contributions must be substantial enough to substantiate a true... true stake in the project as determined by the ADO. The Cooperator's contribution must be maintained at... cost sharing or matching share shall be reasonable and shall not exceed the fair market value of the...

  11. 11 CFR 9034.2 - Matchable contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... one the principal purpose of which is political speech or discussion, such as the traditional... Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY... requirements will be considered matchable campaign contributions. (1) The contribution shall be a gift of money...

  12. National contributions to observed global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, H Damon; Graham, Tanya L; Keverian, Serge; Lamontagne, Cassandra; Seto, Donny; Smith, Trevor J

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying national contributions to global warming as a way of allocating historical responsibility for observed climate change. This task is made difficult by uncertainty associated with national estimates of historical emissions, as well as by difficulty in estimating the climate response to emissions of gases with widely varying atmospheric lifetimes. Here, we present a new estimate of national contributions to observed climate warming, including CO 2 emissions from fossil fuels and land-use change, as well as methane, nitrous oxide and sulfate aerosol emissions While some countries’ warming contributions are reasonably well defined by fossil fuel CO 2 emissions, many countries have dominant contributions from land-use CO 2 and non-CO 2 greenhouse gas emissions, emphasizing the importance of both deforestation and agriculture as components of a country’s contribution to climate warming. Furthermore, because of their short atmospheric lifetime, recent sulfate aerosol emissions have a large impact on a country’s current climate contribution We show also that there are vast disparities in both total and per-capita climate contributions among countries, and that across most developed countries, per-capita contributions are not currently consistent with attempts to restrict global temperature change to less than 2 °C above pre-industrial temperatures. (paper)

  13. 6-quark contribution to nuclear magnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic moments of nuclei with LS closed shell +/-1 particle are calculated. Core polarization and meson exchange current are treated realistically in order to single out the 6-quark contribution. Overall agreement with experimental values is quite good. It is shown that the 6-quark system contributes to the respective iso-vector and iso-scalar moments with reasonable magnitudes

  14. Contributions of Psychology to War and Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Daniel J.; Montiel, Cristina J.

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of American psychologists to war have been substantial and responsive to changes in U.S. national security threats and interests for nearly 100 years. These contributions are identified and discussed for four periods of armed conflict: World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and the Global War on Terror. In contrast, about 50 years…

  15. 13 CFR 120.910 - Borrower contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Borrower contributions. 120.910 Section 120.910 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development... must contribute to the Project cash (or property acceptable to SBA obtained with the cash) or land...

  16. 7 CFR 983.72 - Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contributions. 983.72 Section 983.72 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Expenses and Assessments § 983.72 Contributions. The committee may accept...

  17. Contribution of Renewables to Energy Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The environmental benefits of renewable energy are well known. But the contribution that they can make to energy security is less widely recognised. This report aims to redress the balance, showing how in electricity generation, heat supply, and transport, renewables can enhance energy security and suggesting policies that can optimise this contribution.

  18. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AGROFORESTRY TREE PRODUCTS TO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    philiph

    A study to evaluate the contributions and economic benefits of agro-forestry tree products to rural farmers in Karim-Lamido Local ... derivable from this practice and its contributions and economic benefit to farmers' livelihood should be intensified ..... and fast growing tree species, and replacement for every tree felled. Gideon ...

  19. HEALTH INSURANCE: FIXED CONTRIBUTION AND REIMBURSEMENT MAXIMA

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    Affected by the salary adjustments on 1 January 2001 and the evolution of the staff members and fellows population, the average reference salary, which is used as an index for fixed contributions and reimbursement maxima, has changed significantly. An adjustment of the amounts of the reimbursement maxima and the fixed contributions is therefore necessary, as from 1 January 2001. Reimbursement maxima The revised reimbursement maxima will appear on the leaflet summarizing the benefits for the year 2001, which will be sent out with the forthcoming issue of the CHIS Bull'. This leaflet will also be available from the divisional secretariats and from the UNIQA office at CERN. Fixed contributions The fixed contributions, applicable to some categories of voluntarily insured persons, are set as follows (amounts in CHF for monthly contributions) : voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with normal health insurance cover : 910.- (was 815.- in 2000) voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with reduced heal...

  20. The contribution of technology to added value

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, António S C

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide consensus that introduction of technology to the production process contributes to an overall economic value, however, confusion between technology, knowledge and capital often makes value calculations ambiguous and non-objective. The Contribution of Technology to Added Value addresses not only this issue of definition but also provides a production model to assess the value contribution of technology within the production process. A clarification  of fundamental semantics  provides a significant taxonomy for technology dependence, and allows understanding and modeling of how knowledge, technology and capital individually contribute to production and to value adding. A new technology dependence taxonomy is proposed and assessed following chapters explaining growth models, the KTC model and technology index values. Balancing theoretical knowledge with real-world data and applications The Contribution of Technology to Added Value clarifies the issue of value adding for a range of different vie...

  1. Clockwork graviton contributions to muon g -2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Deog Ki; Kim, Du Hwan; Shin, Chang Sub

    2018-02-01

    The clockwork mechanism for gravity introduces a tower of massive graviton modes, clockwork gravitons, with a very compressed mass spectrum, whose interaction strengths are much stronger than those of massless gravitons. In this work, we compute the lowest order contributions of the clockwork gravitons to the anomalous magnetic moment, g -2 , of muon in the context of an extra dimensional model with a five-dimensional Planck mass, M5. We find that the total contributions are rather insensitive to the detailed model parameters and are determined mostly by the value of M5. To account for the current muon g -2 anomaly, M5 should be around 0.2 TeV, and the size of the extra dimension has to be quite large, l5≳10-7 m . For M5≳1 TeV , the clockwork graviton contributions are too small to explain the current muon g -2 anomaly. We also compare the clockwork graviton contributions with other extra dimensional models such as Randall-Sundrum models or large extra dimensional models. We find that the leading contributions in the small curvature limit are universal, but the cutoff-independent subleading contributions vary for different background geometries and the clockwork geometry gives the smallest subleading contributions.

  2. Indian - American contributions to psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangi, Anand K

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Diaspora, especially in North America, is a visible force in the field of psychiatric medicine. An estimated 5000 persons of Indian origin practice psychiatry in the USA and Canada, and an estimated 10% of these are in academic psychiatry. Wide ranging contributions, from molecular biology of psychiatric disorders to community and cultural psychiatry, are being made by this vibrant group of researchers. This article is a brief summary and work-in-progress report of the contributions by Indian - American psychiatric researchers. Although not exhaustive in coverage, it is meant to give the reader an overview of the contributions made by three waves of researchers over a span of 50 years.

  3. Theodore Millon's Contributions to Conceptualizing Personality Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Aaron L; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    We review Theodore Millon's contributions to conceptualizing personality disorders in contemporary clinical science and practice. Millon worked tirelessly across professional domains and theoretical orientations, developing a rich integrative theory of personality and its pathology, directly and indirectly impacting the evolving iterations of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III through DSM-5), and advocating for the personality disorders through his contributions to cofounding the International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders and the Journal of Personality Disorders. We conclude with a closer look at Millon's final major contributions to conceptualizing personality disorders as well as the strengths and limitations of his approach.

  4. Children's contributions to pediatric outpatient encounters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Generally, increasing attention is being paid to the quality of doctor-patient communication. However, children's contributions have been, until now, primarily ignored in communication research, although there are indications that considering their views increases satisfaction and

  5. Frederick National Laboratory's Contribution to ATOM | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a founding member organization of ATOM, the Frederick National Laboratory will contribute scientific expertise in precision oncology, computational chemistry and cancer biology, as well as support for open sharing of data sets and predictive model

  6. Quantifying arthropod contributions to wood decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Ulyshen; Terry Wagner

    2013-01-01

    Termites carry large amounts of soil into dead wood, and this behaviour complicates efforts to measure their contributions to wood decay. A novel method for isolating termite soil by burning the wood is described, and some preliminary results are presented.

  7. 12 CFR 1291.2 - Required annual AHP contributions; allocation of contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required annual AHP contributions; allocation of contributions. 1291.2 Section 1291.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY HOUSING... future annual required AHP contributions an amount up to the greater of $5 million or 20% of its annual...

  8. How sonochemistry contributes to green chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatel, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Based on the analyses of papers from the literature, and especially those published in Ultrasonics Sonochemistry journal, the contribution of sonochemistry to green chemistry area has been discussed here. Important reminders and insights on the good practices and considerations have been made to understand and demonstrate how sonochemistry can continue to efficiently contribute to green chemistry area in the further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimating tourism contribution to Macedonian economy

    OpenAIRE

    Petrevska, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, tourism became an emerging sector in Macedonia. This research intends to investigate and estimate the impact of several factors that may be important in explaining tourism contribution to Macedonian economy. Moreover, this empirical study attempts to discover the relationship and the level of significance of several commonly applied variables representing tourism contribution. In this line, the investigation identifies the impacts of capital investment, foreign tourist ...

  10. Rules regarding voluntary contributions to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The texts of the following Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency are reproduced for the information of all Members of the Agency. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities - adopted by the Board of Governors on 10 March 2004; Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency - approved by the General Conference on 21 September 2001 (GC (45)/RES/9)

  11. Factors Contributing to School Bus Crashes

    OpenAIRE

    Yasmin, Shamsunnahar; Anowar, Sabreena; Tay, Richard

    2013-01-01

    School bus safety is a community concern because parents expect their children to be transported to and from school safely. However, relatively few studies have been devoted to examining the factors contributing to school bus crashes. In this study, a logistic regression model is used to delineate the factors that contribute to school bus collisions from collisions involving other types of buses. As expected, we find significant differences in crash factors arising from differences in exposur...

  12. OPTIMAL PORTFOLIOS IN DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PENSION SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    EDUARDO WALKER

    2006-01-01

    We study optimal portfolios for defined contribution (possibly mandatory) pension systems, which maximize expected pensions subject to a risk level. By explicitly considering the present value of future individual contributions and changing the risk-return numeraire to future pension units we obtain interesting insights, consistent with the literature, in a simpler context. Results naturally imply that the local indexed (inflation-adjusted) currency is the benchmark and that the investment ho...

  13. Jakob Nielsen and His Contributions to Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognition as one of the developers of combinatorial group theory and the topology of surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsen with emphasis on his contributions to topology.......The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognition as one of the developers of combinatorial group theory and the topology of surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsen with emphasis on his contributions to topology....

  14. Genomic contributions in livestock gene introgression programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hospital Frédéric

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The composition of the genome after introgression of a marker gene from a donor to a recipient breed was studied using analytical and simulation methods. Theoretical predictions of proportional genomic contributions, including donor linkage drag, from ancestors used at each generation of crossing after an introgression programme agreed closely with simulated results. The obligate drag, the donor genome surrounding the target locus that cannot be removed by subsequent selection, was also studied. It was shown that the number of backcross generations and the length of the chromosome affected proportional genomic contributions to the carrier chromosomes. Population structure had no significant effect on ancestral contributions and linkage drag but it did have an effect on the obligate drag whereby larger offspring groups resulted in smaller obligate drag. The implications for an introgression programme of the number of backcross generations, the population structure and the carrier chromosome length are discussed. The equations derived describing contributions to the genome from individuals from a given generation provide a framework to predict the genomic composition of a population after the introgression of a favourable donor allele. These ancestral contributions can be assigned a value and therefore allow the prediction of genetic lag.

  15. Incentives to Encourage Scientific Web Contribution (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    We suggest improvements to citation standards and creation of remuneration opportunities to encourage career scientist contributions to Web2.0 and social media science channels. At present, agencies want to accomplish better outreach and engagement with no funding, while scientists sacrifice their personal time to contribute to web and social media sites. Securing active participation by scientists requires career recognition of the value scientists provide to web knowledge bases and to the general public. One primary mechanism to encourage participation is citation standards, which let a contributor improve their reputation in a quantifiable way. But such standards must be recognized by their scientific and workplace communities. Using case studies such as the acceptance of web in the workplace and the growth of open access journals, we examine what agencies and individual can do as well as the time scales needed to secure increased active contribution by scientists. We also discuss ways to jumpstart this process.

  16. Greenhouse effect contributions of US landfill methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augenstein, D.

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect has recently been receiving a great deal of scientific and popular attention. The term refers to a cause-and-effect relationship in which ''heat blanketing'' of the earth, due to trace gas increases in the atmosphere, is expected to result in global warming. The trace gases are increasing as the result of human activities. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the trace gas contributing most importantly to the ''heat blanketing'' and currently receives the most attention. Less widely recognized has been the high importance of methane (CH 4 ). Methane's contribution to the increased heat blanketing occurring since 1980 is estimated to be over a third as much as that of carbon dioxide. Gas from landfills has in turn been recognized to be a source of methane to the atmospheric buildup. However the magnitude of the landfill methane contribution, and the overall significance of landfill methane to the greenhouse phenomenon has been uncertain and the subject of some debate. (Author)

  17. Formalized search strategies for human risk contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Pedersen, O.M.

    1982-07-01

    For risk management, the results of a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) as well as the underlying assumptions can be used as references in a closed-loop risk control; and the analyses of operational experiences as a means of feedback. In this context, the need for explicit definition and documentation of the PRA coverage, including the search strategies applied, is discussed and aids are proposed such as plant description in terms of a formal abstraction hierarchy and use of cause-consequence-charts for the documentation of not only the results of PRA but also of its coverage. Typical human risk contributions are described on the basis of general plant design features relevant for risk and accident analysis. With this background, search strategies for human risk contributions are treated: Under the designation ''work analysis'', procedures for the analysis of familiar, well trained, planned tasks are proposed. Strategies for identifying human risk contributions outside this category are outlined. (author)

  18. Contribution to encyclopedia of thermal stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Jan; Ocłoń, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    This paper lists the contribution in the international interdisciplinary reference - Encyclopedia of Thermal Stresses (ETS). The ETS, edited by the world famous expert in field of Thermal Stresses - Professor Richard Hetnarski from Rochester Institute of Technology, was published by Springer in 2014. This unique Encyclopedia, subdivided into 11 volumes is the most extensive and comprehensive work related to the Thermal Stresses topic. The entries were carefully prepared by specialists in the field of thermal stresses, elasticity, heat conduction, optimization among others. The Polish authors' contribution within this work is significant; over 70 entries were prepared by them.

  19. ZEUS contributed papers to CHEP92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    At the Computing in High Energy Physics conference, CHEP92 Annecy 21st - 25th September 1992, the ZEUS data acquisition groups contributed a number of papers, as a result of plenary, parallel and poster session contributions. These papers are appended after the index list and a figure which gives a schematic overview of the acquisition system. The papers give up-to-date information concerning the ZEUS data acquisition system and the experience gained during the first HERA running period in 1992. (orig.)

  20. Jakob Nielsen and his Contributions to Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1996-01-01

    The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognitionas one of the developers of combinatiorial group theory and the topologyof surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsenwith emphasis on his contributions to topology.The biography is to be included in the b......The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognitionas one of the developers of combinatiorial group theory and the topologyof surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsenwith emphasis on his contributions to topology.The biography is to be included...

  1. Formalized Search Strategies for Human Risk Contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Pedersen, O. M.

    and documentation of the PRA coverage, including the search strategies applied, is discussed and aids are proposed such as plant description in terms of a formal abstraction hierarchy and use of cause-consequence-charts for the documentation of not only the results of PRA but also of its coverage. Typical human...... risk contributions are described on the basis of general plant design features relevant for risk and accident analysis. With this background, search strategies for human risk contributions are treated: Under the designation "work analysis", procedures for the analysis of familiar, well trained, planned...

  2. DEDUCTIBILITY OF CONTRIBUTIONS TO VOLUNTARY PRIVATE PENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIANA MUNTEAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the notion of public and private pension in Romania. Pension can be seen in terms of a replacement income to individuals whose age no longer affords to operate in the labour market. Pension reform in Romania has allowed besides the public pension system, called Pillar I, which is a distributive system based on solidarity between generations also a private pension system that records the contributions of participants in individual accounts, based on capitalization, investment and accumulation of these contributions.

  3. Intergenerational Practice: Contributing to a Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sacha; Sousa, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    The ageing of the European population is creating a new demographic mix, increasing the relevance of intergenerational practice (IGP). To date, however, this field lacks an appropriate conceptual framework. This study aims to contribute to such a framework through an integrative review of peer-reviewed papers reporting on IGPs. Fifteen papers were…

  4. Arab Contributions to Civilization. ADC Issues #6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macron, Mary

    This booklet, designed to provide educational materials on Arab history and culture, describes the contributions of Islamic civilization to western civilization. To be Arab, like American, was and is a cultural trait rather than a racial mark. To be Arab meant to be from the Arabic speaking world of common traditions, customs, and values shaped by…

  5. Elements that contribute to healthy building design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftness, V.; Hakkinen, B.; Adan, O.; Nevalainen, A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The elements that contribute to a healthy building are multifactorial and can be discussed from different perspectives. Objectives: We present three viewpoints of designing a healthy building: the importance of sustainable development, the role of occupants for ensuring indoor air

  6. Land science contributions to ecosystem services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crossman, N.D.; Brett, A.; Bryan, A.; Groot, de R.S.; Lin, Y.P.; Minang, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    We provide an overview of the contribution of land science to improving ecosystem service quantification, valuation and management. We briefly review the impacts of land use and land management change on ecosystem services, the complexity of relationships between the land system and the supply and

  7. Protestant ethic: Contributing towards a meaningful workplace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the Protestant ethic can indeed contribute towards a meaningful experience whilst performing work-related tasks in workspace. The Protestant work ethic is more than a cultural norm that places a positive moral value on doing a good job. Based on a belief that work has intrinsic value for its own sake, it represents a value ...

  8. Mapping Academic Library Contributions to Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Steven W.; Kutner, Laurie; Cooper, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This study surveyed academic libraries across the United States to establish baseline data on their contributions to campus internationalization. Supplementing data from the American Council on Education (ACE) on internationalization of higher education, this research measured the level of international activities taking place in academic…

  9. ENERGY SYSTEM CONTRIBUTIONS DURING INCREMENTAL EXERCISE TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Bertuzzi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of the aerobic and glycolytic systems during an incremental exercise test (IET. Ten male recreational long-distance runners performed an IET consisting of three-minute incremental stages on a treadmill. The fractions of the contributions of the aerobic and glycolytic systems were calculated for each stage based on the oxygen uptake and the oxygen energy equivalents derived by blood lactate accumulation, respectively. Total metabolic demand (WTOTAL was considered as the sum of these two energy systems. The aerobic (WAER and glycolytic (WGLYCOL system contributions were expressed as a percentage of the WTOTAL. The results indicated that WAER (86-95% was significantly higher than WGLYCOL (5-14% throughout the IET (p < 0.05. In addition, there was no evidence of the sudden increase in WGLYCOL that has been previously reported to support to the "anaerobic threshold" concept. These data suggest that the aerobic metabolism is predominant throughout the IET and that energy system contributions undergo a slow transition from low to high intensity

  10. 215 ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION OF CASSAVA PRODUCTION (A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2010-06-01

    Jun 1, 2010 ... ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION OF CASSAVA PRODUCTION (A CASE STUDY OF. KUJE AREA COUNCIL FEDERAL ... transportation were found to be affecting cassava production in the area. It was recommended ... of the Federal Government policy on cassava production for both local and international.

  11. Contributions to Analytic Number Theory | Lucht | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on some recent contributions to the theory of multiplicative arithmetic semigroups, which have been initiated by John Knopfmacher's work on analytic number theory. They concern weighted inversion theorems of the. Wiener type, mean-value theorems for multiplicative functions, and, Ramanujan

  12. Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders: Prevalence, contributing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority of the participants indicated that the following work factors contributed to WRMDs: treating a large number of patients per day (97.5%), repeatedly performing the same task (94.9%), performing manual therapy techniques (93.2%), working in the same position for long periods (92.1%), and lifting and transferring ...

  13. Neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadim Guzey

    2008-01-22

    Using a simple model for nuclear GPDs, we study the role of the neutron contribution to nuclear DVCS observables. As an example, we use the beam-spin asymmetry $A_{LU}^A$ measured in coherent and incoherent DVCS on a wide range of nuclear targets in the HERMES and JLab kinematics. We find that at small values of the momentum transfer $t$, $A_{LU}^A$ is dominated by the coherent-enriched contribution, which enhances $A_{LU}^A$ compared to the free proton asymmetry $A_{LU}^p$, $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=1.8-2.2$. At large values of $t$, the nuclear asymmetry is dominated by the incoherent contribution and $A_{LU}^A/(\\phi)A_{LU}^p(\\phi)=0.66-0.74$. The deviation of $A_{LU}^A(\\phi)/A_{LU}^p(\\phi)$ from unity at large $t$ is a result of the neutron contribution, which gives a possibility to constain neutron GPDs in incoherent nuclear DVCS. A similar trend is expected for other DVCS asymmetries.

  14. contributions to a physiotherapy HIV curriculum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... 2 AJHPE. Micro, meso and macro issues emerging from focus group discussions: Contributions to a physiotherapy HIV curriculum. H Myezwa,1 PhD; A Stewart,1 PhD; P Solomon,2 PhD. 1 Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences,University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

  15. Do School Lunches Contribute to Childhood Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses whether school lunches contribute to childhood obesity. I employ two methods to isolate the causal impact of school lunches on obesity. First, using panel data, I ?nd that children who consume school lunches are more likely to be obese than those who brown bag their lunches even though they enter kindergarten with the same…

  16. Health Care Workers Contribution to Missed Immunization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at identifying the health workers' knowledge and inappropriate practices that potentially contribute to missed immunization opportunities in children. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in August 2007 among Primary Health Care workers in Khana Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria ...

  17. Resource Contributions, Gender Orientation, and Childbearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resource Contributions, Gender Orientation, and Childbearing Decision Making in Ghana; The case of Urban Couples. Akosua Adomako Ampofo. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/rrias.v15i2.22886 · AJOL African Journals Online.

  18. Neuromuscular contributions to age-related weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related physiological change of neuromuscular function is not a linear process and is likely influenced by various biological and behavioral factors (e.g., genetics, nutrition, physical activity level, comorbidities, etc.). These factors contribute to heterogeneity among older adults, which chal...

  19. Nutrient composition and contribution of plantain ( Musa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some plantain (Musa paradisiacea) products, which serve as dietary staple in Nigeria were studied for their nutrient composition and contribution to dietary diversification of consumers. Unripe plantain was purchased from Oje market in Ibadan, Nigeria. Proximate, mineral and vitamin composition of raw, sundried, ...

  20. Mathematical Contributions of Archimedes: Some Nuggets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 10. Mathematical Contributions of Archimedes: Some Nuggets. C S Yogananda. General Article Volume 11 Issue 10 October 2006 pp 8-17. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. The Manchester contribution to peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2011-01-01

    Two names emerge when considering the contribution of Manchester in the development of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The first is Ram Gokal; the second is icodextrin. As there will be a separate article on icodextrin, this one will focus more on other aspects of the activities performed by the Renal

  2. Perceived Contribution of Agricultural Transformation Agenda to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    through ATA would enhance participation. Keyword: Perception of ATA, contribution of ATA, farm families. Introduction. The Agricultural Transformation Agenda (ATA) was designed to achieve a hunger-free Nigeria through an agricultural sector that drives income growth, accelerates achievement of food and nutrition ...

  3. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  4. Can Inferentialism Contribute to Social Epistemology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that Robert Brandom's work can be used to develop ideas in the area of social epistemology. It suggests that this work, precisely because it was influenced by Hegel, can make a significant contribution with philosophical anthropology at its centre. The argument is developed using illustrations from education: the first, from…

  5. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  6. 13 CFR 120.911 - Land contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Land contributions. 120.911 Section 120.911 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development... Project Property) previously acquired by the Borrower. [68 FR 57987, Oct. 7, 2003] ...

  7. Gender Differences among Contributing Leadership Development Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences among contributing student leadership development resources were examined within the context of theory-based perspectives of leadership-related attributes. The findings suggest that students' increased engagement with institutional constituencies cultivates an environment conducive to students' cognitive development toward…

  8. Our contributions to the study of carbonatites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Our contributions to the study of carbonatites. Carbonatite magmatism in flood basalt provinces has important implications. Liquid immiscibility is responsible for evolution of carbonate and silicate parental magmas. Crustal contamination of the primary magma is ...

  9. Contributions of Psychology to Limiting Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology can make a significant contribution to limiting the magnitude of climate change by improving understanding of human behaviors that drive climate change and human reactions to climate-related technologies and policies, and by turning that understanding into effective interventions. This article develops a framework for psychological…

  10. Contribution of Bilingualism in Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipra, Muhammad Aslam

    2013-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the contribution of the use of bilingualism as an aid in learning/teaching English as a foreign language and bilingualism in EFL classroom does not reduce students' communicative abilities but in effect can assist in teaching and learning process. The study employed a qualitative, interpretive research design…

  11. In the suppression of regge cut contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, S.P.

    1975-07-01

    It is shown that contributions of reggeon-pomeron cuts are suppressed in amplitudes with opposite natural to the reggeon. This suppression grows logarithmically with energy. The suppression in the πP cut is, however, found to be weak. Consequence on conspiracy is discussed

  12. Instanton contributions in reggeon quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciafaloni, M.

    1978-01-01

    The full semiclassical approximation to reggeon field theory without transverse dimensions is derived. By using Polyakov's method in Lagrangian form and paying due attention to the quantum terms of the potential it is shown that instanton contributions are able to explain the tunnel-like energy gap for α(0)-1>>lambda. (Auth.)

  13. The economic contribution of tourism in Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Edward Samuel

    2010-01-01

    How much tourism contributes to the economies of developing countries is controversial and often not measured rigorously. Focusing on Mozambique, this study presents a simple accounting tool – a tourist-focused Social Accounting Matrix – which makes it possible to estimate the economic contributi...... are already evident and careful attention must be paid to the full tourism value chain....

  14. Exploring the contribution of Klippies Kritzinger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-30

    May 30, 2016 ... This article explores the contribution of Klippies Kritzinger, a South African missiologist and theologian, to a white critical and anti-racist theology. As will be pointed out below, this emphasis has been central to Kritzinger's academic work since his doctoral studies (completed in 1988) but has not been ...

  15. The value contribution of strategic foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Schwarz, Jan Oliver

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on exploring the potential and empirically observable value creation of strategic foresight activities in firms. We first review the literature on strategic foresight, innovation management and strategic management in order to identify the potential value contributions. We use ...

  16. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE PANGA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE PANGA, PTEROGYMNUS. LA NIARIUS (PISCES: SPARIDAE): AGE, GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION. T HECHT AND D BAIRD. Department of Zoology, University of Port Elizabeth. Accepted: April 1977. ABSTRACT. All the fish used in this investigation were caught by ...

  17. Detection of meta- and ortho-cleavage dioxygenases in bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    was defined as the initial rate of indigo formation or enzyme specific activity normalized to the protein content of the sample. ... One unit of activity was defined as the amount of enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of 1 mmol NADH min .... degrade hydrocarbons. These can easily allow the formation of new mixed metabolic ...

  18. Employer involvement in defined contribution investment education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, G; VanDerhei, J L

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the authors consider the personnel problems that may arise for defined contribution plan sponsors if major market corrections cause older employees to delay retirement beyond previous expectations. We move from that basic premise to argue that, given the continued evolution from defined benefit (DB) to defined contribution (DC) retirement plans, employers need to be more "proactive" in educating their employees about their retirement planning. A human resources perspective is used to support this argument, apart from and in addition to legal considerations such as ERISA Section 404(c). Specifics of employer involvement and its place as a component of an organization's culture are discussed. Finally, recommendations are given for employers to consider.

  19. Contributions of Public Health to nursing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Káren Mendes Jorge de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Analyze the perceptions of undergraduate nursing students about the contributions of public health to nursing practice in the Unified Health System. Method: Qualitative Descriptive Study. Data collection was carried out through semi-directed interviews with 15 students. The language material was analyzed according to content and thematic analysis. Results: Thematic categories were established, namely: "Perceptions about Public Health" and "Contribution of Public Health to nursing practice in the Unified Health System". Final considerations: Perceptions about Public Health are diversified, but converge to the recognition of this field as the basis for training nurses qualified to work in the SUS with technical competence, autonomy and focusing on the integrality in health care.

  20. CONTRIBUTING FACTORS TO THE STUDENTS’ SPEAKING ABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of English in Indonesia has developed quickly in all of the fields. It is affected by many things in many ways. The need of English has also increased quickly in many parts of Indonesian life. To face it, teaching English at young ages or studentseems like the solution. Speaking is one of the skills that should be tough to the student. To get effective learning, it's useful to know what are factors contributing to the student speaking development. This research showed that there are some contributing factors to the students’ speaking development. Those factors are Teacher, Daily Practice, Listening to English Music, Family Support, Watching English Video and Movie, Motivation to Learn, Classroom Environment, Learning Material. Such as a good teacher would provide good learning. Support of the family would also give an effective outcome for the student's development. So, the factors should be known to get a better outcome for the students

  1. Contribution to Numerical Simulation of Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turňa, Milan; Taraba, Bohumil; Ambrož, Petr; Sahul, Miroslav

    Contribution deals with numerical simulation of thermal and stress fields in welding tubes made of austenitic stainless CrNi steel type AISI 304 with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Process simulation was realised by use of ANSYS 10 software. Experiments were aimed at solution of asymptotic, standard and the so-called shell model. Thermally dependent properties of AISI 304 steel were considered. Thermal fields developed in the course of welding process and also shape of weld pool were assessed. Contribution is aimed at simulation of technological welding process with input parameters regarding the thermal and strain task and comparison of attained results with real experiment. The achieved results of numerical simulation were almost identical with a real weldment thermally affected by welding process.

  2. Forgotten intrauterine device contributing to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel O. Igberase

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to show that long standing forgotten intrauterine device contributes to infertility, reporting three cases presented at Central Hospital Warri, Nigeria, a government tertiary health center. Three cases of forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD contributing to infertility were seen. Two were inserted for contraceptive reasons while one was inserted while being managed for uterine synechae. Health care providers should ensure proper documentation of all procedures carried out, adequate counseling which should include taking an informed consent and also ensuring both short and long term follow up of their clients. Also all patients being evaluated for infertility and clients with past history of intrauterine device must have a speculum examination and ultrasound scan carried out.

  3. Some feminist contributions to community social psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mayorga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the contributions of feminist debate about intersectionality of social categories for Community Social Psychology in Brazil. This was set up as dedicated to theoretical analyze the social inequalities that characterize contemporary societies and propose methodological processes of intervention for questioning and processing of these realities. We discuss how the emergence of new actors and demands on public space, as distinct from the 60/70, is required to understand the oppression from various power systems such as gender, race and sexuality. We conclude that intersectional analysis should consider different levels of relationships between categories, the history of the same differential and common aspects of different systems of power as naturalization of inequality, the relationship between public and private relationship between equality and difference. Analyses based on intersectionality can contribute to processes of social intervention that considers the complexity of contemporary societies.

  4. Making a meaningful contribution to theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boer, Harry; Holweg, Matthias; Kilduff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    matters. The authors further argue that the choice of theory is critical, as a common mistake is trying to contribute to high-level theories borrowed from other fields. Finally, the authors recommend using theory parsimoniously, yet with confidence. Originality/value – The paper presents a collection...... discussed in the “OM Theory” workshop in Dublin in 2011 and the special sessions at the 2011 and the 2013 EurOMA Conferences in Cambridge and Dublin. Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents six short essays that explore the role and use of theory in management research, and specifically ask what...... is a good or meaningful contribution to theory. The authors comment on the current state of theory in OperationsManagement (OM) (Harry Boer), the type of theories the authors have in OM (Chris Voss), the role of theory in increasing the general understanding of OM problems (Roger Schmenner), whether...

  5. General relativistic contributions in transformation optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Robert T

    2012-01-01

    One potentially realistic specification for devices designed with transformation optics is that they operate with high precision in curved space–time, such as Earth orbit. This raises the question of what, if any, role does space–time curvature play in determining transformation media? Transformation optics has been based on a 3-vector representation of Maxwell's equations in flat Minkowski space–time. I discuss a completely covariant, manifestly four-dimensional approach that enables transformations in arbitrary space–times, and demonstrate this approach for stable circular orbits in the spherically symmetric Schwarzschild geometry. Finally, I estimate the magnitude of curvature induced contributions to satellite-borne transformation media in Earth orbit and comment on the level of precision required for metamaterial fabrication before such contributions become important

  6. Japan's yen contribution to UNFPA unchanged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    As a result of the Japanese government's cabinet decision to cut Japan's total official development assistance (ODA) budget by 10%, the UNFPA expected to receive less financial support from Japan for 1998. In 1997, Japan provided 18% of UNFPA's budget. However, despite the government's announcement that the 10% cut would be applied across the board without exception, the Japanese government announced on December 24 that its yen contribution to UNFPA in 1998 will stay at its 1997 level. This decision was announced following top-level negotiations with the prime minister involving the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) and the Ministry of Finance, and reflects the success of a major advocacy effort both inside and outside of Japan. In yen, the budgets of neither the UNFPA, UNICEF, nor UNHCR were reduced. However, in real terms, Japan will contribute fewer US dollars to UNFPA due to the depreciation of the yen.

  7. Contributions of Literature to Social Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasio Ovejero

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There are two main kind of psychology: a intuitive psychology, and an academic and professional psychology. These two psychologies are different, but they can make important reciprocals contributions. And the best of the intuitive psychology, that in my opinion is in the literature and overall in the romance, can be very useful for professional psychologists. The main end of this paper is to show how the social psychologists can learn from the intuitive psychology of the great romances. This contribution of the romance to the social psychology is, at least, at these two levels. At the level of construction of the subjectivity and the modern subject and the, therefore, of the psychology’s arise, and at the level of some concrete subjects studied by the psychologists (romantic love, jealousy, infidelity, compunction, emotions, vengeance, human relations…

  8. The Contribution of Festivals to City Branding

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, H.

    2016-01-01

    The economic contribution of festivals and events has been widely acknowledged, but the relationship between a festival and city branding has received little attention. This thesis explores the role of festival stakeholders in the development of a city brand, providing a detailed account of city branding and festival sponsorship. The research focuses particular attention on cultural festivals by examining their role in the city branding process. To this end, one city (Seoul) and two festivals...

  9. MR contribution in surgery of epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiners, L.C.; Valk, J.; Jansen, G.H.; Veelen, C.W.M. van

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of MR imaging in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy considered for surgical therapy is discussed. In this review we focus on: (a) focal abnormalities (mesial temporal sclerosis, focal migration disorders, hamartomatous lesions and low-grade tumours, phakomatosis and vascular malformations) associated with therapy-resistant partial epilepsy, requiring resective surgery; (b) abnormalities leading to generalized seizures that require more drastic surgical procedures, such as callosotomy and functional hemispherectomy; and (c) localisation of implanted depth-electrodes. (orig.)

  10. Contributing to Peace, Health and Prosperity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2013-01-01

    This issue of the IAEA Bulletin edition considers the ideas and innovations that led to the IAEA’s formation and influenced its evolution. In this issue of the IAEA Bulletin, you will learn more about how countries use nuclear technology to improve health and prosperity and protect the environment through the technical cooperation programme. Together, the Member States and the IAEA are making a lasting contribution to achieving the Millennium Development Goals that challenge us to significantly reduce hunger, poverty and disease

  11. Who Contributes to the Knowledge Sharing Economy?

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, Arthi; Chaintreau, Augustin

    2015-01-01

    Information sharing dynamics of social networks rely on a small set of influencers to effectively reach a large audience. Our recent results and observations demonstrate that the shape and identity of this elite, especially those contributing \\emph{original} content, is difficult to predict. Information acquisition is often cited as an example of a public good. However, this emerging and powerful theory has yet to provably offer qualitative insights on how specialization of users into active ...

  12. Assessing ambition of nationally determined contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höhne, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    A key for a successful new international climate agreement by December 2015 will be the collective assessment of ambition of individual proposals by countries on how and how much to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. We conclude that there is nothing right or wrong in choosing one or several of these approaches to assess the level of ambition of contributions. An approach using several of many methods described can take into account the difference in national circumstances.

  13. THE CONTEXTUAL CONTRIBUTION TO INDIVIDUAL HEALTH.

    OpenAIRE

    GIANNANTONI, PATRIZIA

    2013-01-01

    Background Many Countries consider health as a fundamental right for their citizens. In terms of health policy, this means equal opportunity of prevention and access to care guaranteed to all. Thus, a major concern in research has been given to health inequalities and their determinants. A body of evidence has shown that individual characteristics primary affect health, however contextual factors also substantially contribute to the final perception of health and/or mediate the effect of t...

  14. Occipito-temporal contributions to reading

    OpenAIRE

    Kawabata Duncan, K. J.

    2010-01-01

    The debate regarding the role of ventral occipito-temporal cortex (vOTC) in visual word recognition arises in part from difficulty delineating the functional contributions of vOTC as separate from other areas of the reading network. Successful transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the area could provide a novel source of information regarding the area’s function, by offering the possibility of temporarily, non-invasively perturbing its information processing and assessing the consequence...

  15. Contribution to Asterisk Open Source Project

    OpenAIRE

    González Martín, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    With this final master thesis we are going to contribute to the Asterisk open source project. Asterisk is an open source project that started with the main objective of develop an IP telephony platform, completely based on Software (so not hardware dependent) and under an open license like GPL. This project was started on 1999 by the software engineer Mark Spencer at Digium. The main motivation of that open source project was that the telecommunications sector is lack of open solutions, and m...

  16. Human Resource Development's Contribution to Continuous Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Hyland, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Continuous Improvement (CI) is an approach to organizational change that requires active involvement of skilled and motivated employees, which implies an important role for HRD practitioners. The findings from a literature review and a survey of 168 Danish manufacturing companies indicate however...... that HRD is rarely integrated with CI. The paper contributes by offering a model that depicts how HR and HRD functions could be exploited to support successful CI development and implementation....

  17. Gluonic contributions in the chiral hyperbag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B.Y.; Vento, V.; Valencia Univ./CSIC, Valencia

    1990-01-01

    We incorporate into a non-perturbative chiral bag model scheme the gluons and the η' in a perturbative fashion. We analyze in this context the proton matrix element for the flavor singlet axial current, where due account is taken of the anomaly, and the delta-nucleon mass difference. Our results show that the contribution due to the gluons is significant for large bag radii and that they are crucial in order to establish the Cheshire cat principle. (orig.)

  18. [Epilepsy with normal CT: the MR contribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Asensio, S; Guelbenzu, S; Barrena, R; López del Val, J; Mazas, L; Macho, J

    1995-01-01

    We present a study of 165 patients with fits with normal brain computerized tomography (CT) scan or else who showed no evidence as to the etiology of such attacks. We analyzed the magnetic resonance (MR) results obtained. In 36.6% of cases MR was pathological, the most frequent finding in our series being cerebral atrophy (12.8%). We comment on the most important pathology groups, highlighting the contribution MR made in our patients.

  19. CONTRIBUTION OF CULTURAL TOURISM ON TURKISH ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    Demet ÇAK; Þeref BOZOKLU; Faruk ALAEDDÝNOÐLU; Murat ÇAK

    2015-01-01

    The positive effects of Turkey’s tourism sector on the economy are increasing with each passing day. To increase tourism revenues that have a positive contribution on Turkey’s current account balance year by year, have a great importance. Therefore, the diversification of tourism types and expansion of deseasonalized cultural tourism applications are necessary. For such purposes within this work, cultural tourism has been introduced by mentioning about the place of the tourism in the economy....

  20. Contributions of psychology to war and peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Daniel J; Montiel, Cristina J

    2013-10-01

    The contributions of American psychologists to war have been substantial and responsive to changes in U.S. national security threats and interests for nearly 100 years. These contributions are identified and discussed for four periods of armed conflict: World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and the Global War on Terror. In contrast, about 50 years ago, largely in reaction to the threat of nuclear war, some psychologists in the United States and around the world broke with the tradition of supporting war and began focusing their scholarship and activism on the prevention of war and promotion of peace. Today, peace psychology is a vibrant area of psychology, with theory and practice aimed at understanding, preventing, and mitigating both episodes of organized violence and the pernicious worldwide problem of structural violence. The growth, scope, and content of peace psychology are reviewed along with contributions to policies that promote peace, social justice, and human well-being. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  1. Health Care Ergonomics: Contributions of Thomas Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole Wilson, Tiffany; Davis, Kermit G

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the contributions of Thomas Waters's work in the field of health care ergonomics and beyond. Waters's research of safe patient handling with a focus on reducing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in health care workers contributed to current studies and prevention strategies. He worked with several groups to share his research and assist in developing safe patient handling guidelines and curriculum for nursing students and health care workers. The citations of articles that were published by Waters in health care ergonomics were evaluated for quality and themes of conclusions. Quality was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and centrality to original research rating. Themes were documented by the type of population the citing articles were investigating. In total, 266 articles that referenced the top seven cited articles were evaluated. More than 95% of them were rated either medium or high quality. The important themes of these citing articles were as follows: (a) Safe patient handling is effective in reducing MSDs in health care workers. (b) Shift work has negative impact on nurses. (c) There is no safe way to manually lift a patient. (d) Nurse curriculums should contain safe patient handling. The research of Waters has contributed significantly to the health care ergonomics and beyond. His work, in combination with other pioneers in the field, has generated multiple initiatives, such as a standard safe patient-handling curriculum and safe patient-handling programs. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  2. U.S. Contributions to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, Ned R.

    2005-01-01

    The United States participates in the ITER project and program to enable the study of the science and technology of burning plasmas, a key programmatic element missing from the world fusion program. The 2003 U.S. decision to enter the ITER negotiations followed an extensive series of community and governmental reviews of the benefits, readiness, and approaches to the study of burning plasmas. This paper describes both the technical and the organizational preparations and plans for U.S. participation in the ITER construction activity: in-kind contributions, staff contributions, and cash contributions as well as supporting physics and technology research. Near-term technical activities focus on the completion of R and D and design and mitigation of risks in the areas of the central solenoid magnet, shield/blanket, diagnostics, ion cyclotron system, electron cyclotron system, pellet fueling system, vacuum system, tritium processing system, and conventional systems. Outside the project, the U .S. is engaged in preparations for the test blanket module program. Organizational activities focus on preparations of the project management arrangements to maximize the overall success of the ITER Project; elements include refinement of U.S. directions on the international arrangements, the establishment of the U.S. Domestic Agency, progress along the path of the U.S. Department of Energy's Project Management Order, and overall preparations for commencement of the fabrication of major items of equipment and for provision of staff and cash as specified in the upcoming ITER agreement

  3. CODE's contribution to the IGS MGEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Lars; Dach, Rolf; Lutz, Simon; Schaer, Stefan; Jäggi, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    The Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) is contributing as a global analysis center to the International GNSS Service (IGS) since many years. The processing of GPS and GLONASS data is well established in CODE's ultra-rapid, rapid, and final product lines. Since 2012 CODE contributes to the "Multi GNSS EXperiment" (MGEX), launched by the IGS as a testbed for the incorporation of new GNSS and their signals into the existing IGS processing chains and software packages. The focus of CODE's MGEX activities was on Galileo so far. Comparisons with other groups results proved the quality of CODE's Galileo orbit (based on a 3-day long-arc solution) and clock products. The MGEX processing at CODE is currently extended to the BeiDou system, which will result in a fully consistent quadruple-system solution including GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and BeiDou. We present the latest status of the CODE MGEX processing. The quality of the orbit and clock solutions will be evaluated. The characteristics and the impact of the contributing GNSS on the products will be assessed. The CODE MGEX orbit and clock products are publicly available in the IGS MGEX products directory at the CDDIS data center: ftp://cddis.gsfc.nasa.gov/gnss/products/mgex (the solution ID "com" stands for CODE-MGEX).

  4. Active and passive contributions to spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Warren, William H

    2012-02-01

    It seems intuitively obvious that active exploration of a new environment will lead to better spatial learning than will passive exposure. However, the literature on this issue is decidedly mixed-in part, because the concept itself is not well defined. We identify five potential components of active spatial learning and review the evidence regarding their role in the acquisition of landmark, route, and survey knowledge. We find that (1) idiothetic information in walking contributes to metric survey knowledge, (2) there is little evidence as yet that decision making during exploration contributes to route or survey knowledge, (3) attention to place-action associations and relevant spatial relations contributes to route and survey knowledge, although landmarks and boundaries appear to be learned without effort, (4) route and survey information are differentially encoded in subunits of working memory, and (5) there is preliminary evidence that mental manipulation of such properties facilitates spatial learning. Idiothetic information appears to be necessary to reveal the influence of attention and, possibly, decision making in survey learning, which may explain the mixed results in desktop virtual reality. Thus, there is indeed an active advantage in spatial learning, which manifests itself in the task-dependent acquisition of route and survey knowledge.

  5. Group Contribution Methods for Phase Equilibrium Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmehling, Jürgen; Constantinescu, Dana; Schmid, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    The development and design of chemical processes are carried out by solving the balance equations of a mathematical model for sections of or the whole chemical plant with the help of process simulators. For process simulation, besides kinetic data for the chemical reaction, various pure component and mixture properties are required. Because of the great importance of separation processes for a chemical plant in particular, a reliable knowledge of the phase equilibrium behavior is required. The phase equilibrium behavior can be calculated with the help of modern equations of state or g(E)-models using only binary parameters. But unfortunately, only a very small part of the experimental data for fitting the required binary model parameters is available, so very often these models cannot be applied directly. To solve this problem, powerful predictive thermodynamic models have been developed. Group contribution methods allow the prediction of the required phase equilibrium data using only a limited number of group interaction parameters. A prerequisite for fitting the required group interaction parameters is a comprehensive database. That is why for the development of powerful group contribution methods almost all published pure component properties, phase equilibrium data, excess properties, etc., were stored in computerized form in the Dortmund Data Bank. In this review, the present status, weaknesses, advantages and disadvantages, possible applications, and typical results of the different group contribution methods for the calculation of phase equilibria are presented.

  6. Understanding the CDM's contribution to technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Malte; Holzer, Andreas; Hoffmann, Volker H.

    2008-01-01

    Developing countries are increasingly contributing to global greenhouse gas emissions and, consequently, climate change as a result of their rapid economic growth. In order to reduce their impact, the private sector needs to be engaged in the transfer of low-carbon technology to those countries. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is currently the only market mechanism aimed at triggering changes in the pattern of emissions-intensive activities in developing countries and is likely to play a role in future negotiations. In this paper, we analyse how the CDM contributes to technology transfer. We first develop a framework from the literature that delineates the main factors which characterise technology transfer. Second, we apply this framework to the CDM by assessing existing empirical studies and drawing on additional expert interviews. We find that the CDM does contribute to technology transfer by lowering several technology-transfer barriers and by raising the transfer quality. On the basis of this analysis, we give preliminary policy recommendations

  7. Perturbative QCD contributions to inclusive processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritbergen, T. van

    1996-09-24

    This thesis treats the calculation of quantum corrections to a number of high energy processes that are measured in current and future accelerator experiments. The main objective of these experiments is to accurately verify the generally accepted theory of electro-weak and strong interactions, known as the Standard model, and to look for possible deviations. Most of the processes that are treated in this thesis are of a type for which the final state of of a highly energetic scattering or decay process is measured inclusively. The higher order quantum corrections discussed in this thesis are due to strong interactions. To the inclusive decay rate of Z{sup 0} bosons into all possible final states consisting of hadrons third order QCD contributions have been obtained. Also in the third order QCD an expansion for the inclusive hadronic decay rate of a {tau}-lepton was obtained. Then the top-quark-mass effects on the decay channels of a Higgs boson: Higgs{yields}b-quarks and Higgs{yields}gluons, were investigated. Thereafter the calculation of 3-loop contributions to the deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering process is discussed. Finally the 3-loop contributions to the q{sup 2}-dependence of the lower moments {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1}x{sup N-1}F(x,q{sup 2})dx, N=2,4,6,8 of the structure functions F{sub 2} and F{sub L} were obtained. (orig./HSI).

  8. Knowledge Contribution in Knowledge Networks: Effects of Participants’ Central Positions on Contribution Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Hamedi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge networks play a crucial role in contemporary organisations to improve participation for knowledge sharing. Examining employees’ knowledge contribution play an important role for in success implementing knowledgenetworks. Whereas most part of studies emphasis on the quantity aspect of

  9. Contribution mapping: a method for mapping the contribution of research to enhance its impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Maarten O

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At a time of growing emphasis on both the use of research and accountability, it is important for research funders, researchers and other stakeholders to monitor and evaluate the extent to which research contributes to better action for health, and find ways to enhance the likelihood that beneficial contributions are realized. Past attempts to assess research 'impact' struggle with operationalizing 'impact', identifying the users of research and attributing impact to research projects as source. In this article we describe Contribution Mapping, a novel approach to research monitoring and evaluation that aims to assess contributions instead of impacts. The approach focuses on processes and actors and systematically assesses anticipatory efforts that aim to enhance contributions, so-called alignment efforts. The approach is designed to be useful for both accountability purposes and for assisting in better employing research to contribute to better action for health. Methods Contribution Mapping is inspired by a perspective from social studies of science on how research and knowledge utilization processes evolve. For each research project that is assessed, a three-phase process map is developed that includes the main actors, activities and alignment efforts during research formulation, production and knowledge extension (e.g. dissemination and utilization. The approach focuses on the actors involved in, or interacting with, a research project (the linked actors and the most likely influential users, who are referred to as potential key users. In the first stage, the investigators of the assessed project are interviewed to develop a preliminary version of the process map and first estimation of research-related contributions. In the second stage, potential key-users and other informants are interviewed to trace, explore and triangulate possible contributions. In the third stage, the presence and role of alignment efforts is

  10. Contribution mapping: a method for mapping the contribution of research to enhance its impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background At a time of growing emphasis on both the use of research and accountability, it is important for research funders, researchers and other stakeholders to monitor and evaluate the extent to which research contributes to better action for health, and find ways to enhance the likelihood that beneficial contributions are realized. Past attempts to assess research 'impact' struggle with operationalizing 'impact', identifying the users of research and attributing impact to research projects as source. In this article we describe Contribution Mapping, a novel approach to research monitoring and evaluation that aims to assess contributions instead of impacts. The approach focuses on processes and actors and systematically assesses anticipatory efforts that aim to enhance contributions, so-called alignment efforts. The approach is designed to be useful for both accountability purposes and for assisting in better employing research to contribute to better action for health. Methods Contribution Mapping is inspired by a perspective from social studies of science on how research and knowledge utilization processes evolve. For each research project that is assessed, a three-phase process map is developed that includes the main actors, activities and alignment efforts during research formulation, production and knowledge extension (e.g. dissemination and utilization). The approach focuses on the actors involved in, or interacting with, a research project (the linked actors) and the most likely influential users, who are referred to as potential key users. In the first stage, the investigators of the assessed project are interviewed to develop a preliminary version of the process map and first estimation of research-related contributions. In the second stage, potential key-users and other informants are interviewed to trace, explore and triangulate possible contributions. In the third stage, the presence and role of alignment efforts is analyzed and the preliminary

  11. The Contribution of Fusion to Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.

    2006-01-01

    The world demand for energy is projected to more than double over the next 50 years, indeed this will be essential to bring much of the world out of poverty. At the same time there is increasing pressure to substantially reduce atmospheric pollution, most notably of carbon dioxide. Together, these conflicting goals drive a need to produce enormous amounts of non-carbon energy supply, much greater than our total present energy supply. This presents an enormous challenge. As one of very few options for large-scale, non-carbon future supply of energy, fusion has the potential to make an important contribution to sustained energy supplies. Fusion's advantages of large fuel reserves, low atmospheric emissions and high levels of safety make it an important consideration in future energy strategies. - Fuel supplies are sufficient for at least thousands of years, and probably up to millions of years, of energy use. - Atmospheric emissions of CO 2 are very low and minor emissions of other pollutants are less harmful than those from most existing energy sources. - Hazards to the public will be very low because of the high levels of passive safety. - Waste materials will require little, or no, use of repository storage. Conceptual designs of fusion power plants have been optimised against safety and environmental criteria. The optimum designs vary both with the assessed progress in the development programme and according to the weight given to different criteria. The impact of this weighting on design, and the comparison of the outcomes with other energy sources, is described. To make a contribution to sustainable development, fusion must also be economically viable to enter the energy market. The calculated cost of electricity from fusion and other technologies, both new and existing, show that, particularly in an energy market where environmental constraints are playing an increasing role, fusion can make an important contribution. (author)

  12. Audits contribute to pride, productivity and profit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Q.

    1984-01-01

    The object of this writing is to demonstrate that audits (in general) when used as a ''management tool' can contribute to pride, productivity, and profit. The goal of ''pride'' achievement is demonstrated through the use of techniques developed from behavioral sciences. Discussed is dealing with people and their basic needs. This is intended to point out the fact that satisfying individual needs and concerns is the first step to achieving the goals of pride, productivity, and profit. Also discussed are the basic needs of safety (security), social, ego/esteem, and self-fulfillment as well as providing some basic techniques of auditing which will help assure general satisfaction of these needs. Also noted are reporting methods. The goal of ''productivity'' is approached by demonstrating that objectives must be clear and workable. Objectives must be translated into specific action and that action must be compatible with the overall company objectives. All objectives must be known and understood by those affected. Consideration must be given to men, money, and machines (present technology). All of the objectives must also be weighed against external constraints. The goal of ''profit'' then becomes the product of a combination of ''pride'' and ''productivity''. Audits must be cost conscious. Value engineer the problem, the cause, and the solution. Discussion continues with quality cost programs briefly indicating that ''Q'' costs could be considered a type of audit. Identifying deficiencies and weaknesses, then correcting them, contributes to profit. Increased pride and productivity contributes to profit. Consider the employee's awareness and commitment for doing a good job when auditing

  13. Autophagy contributes to degradation of Hirano bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Davis, Richard C; Furukawa, Ruth; Fechheimer, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Hirano bodies are actin-rich inclusions reported most frequently in the hippocampus in association with a variety of conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. We have developed a model system for formation of Hirano bodies in Dictyostelium and cultured mammalian cells to permit detailed studies of the dynamics of these structures in living cells. Model Hirano bodies are frequently observed in membrane-enclosed vesicles in mammalian cells consistent with a role of autophagy in the degradation of these structures. Clearance of Hirano bodies by an exocytotic process is supported by images from electron microscopy showing extracellular release of Hirano bodies, and observation of Hirano bodies in the culture medium of Dictyostelium and mammalian cells. An autophagosome marker protein Atg8-GFP, was co-localized with model Hirano bodies in wild type Dictyostelium cells, but not in atg5(-) or atg1-1 autophagy mutant strains. Induction of model Hirano bodies in Dictyostelium with a high level expression of 34 kDa DeltaEF1 from the inducible discoidin promoter resulted in larger Hirano bodies and a cessation of cell doubling. The degradation of model Hirano bodies still occurred rapidly in autophagy mutant (atg5(-)) Dictyostelium, suggesting that other mechanisms such as the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome pathway could contribute to the degradation of Hirano bodies. Chemical inhibition of the proteasome pathway with lactacystin, significantly decreased the turnover of Hirano bodies in Dictyostelium providing direct evidence that autophagy and the proteasome can both contribute to degradation of Hirano bodies. Short term treatment of mammalian cells with either lactacystin or 3-methyl adenine results in higher levels of Hirano bodies and a lower level of viable cells in the cultures, supporting the conclusion that both autophagy and the proteasome contribute to degradation of Hirano bodies.

  14. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, Andrija; Koller, Monika; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2013-02-06

    'Neuromarketing' is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods 'neuromarketing' and scientific ones 'consumer neuroscience'. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology:First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington's disease.Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom.Third, trust research in the medical context lacks

  15. BRAND POLICY INSTRUMENTS:CONTRIBUTIONS TO BRANDEQUITY

    OpenAIRE

    Roxana Dumitriu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we attempted to establish the contributions of brand elements to the brand equity. Building brand equity is realized and is based on a series of visible elements, easy to recognize and to remember by the public. A name, a symbol, a slogan are just a part of the visible elements of the brand meaning. The brand elements are a shortcut of clients’ perception regarding the brand utility and brand image, suggesting some benefices of performance and competence. The brand elements that...

  16. Fermionic NNLO contributions to Bhabha scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actis, S.; Riemann, T.; Czakon, M.; Uniwersytet Slaski, Katowice; Gluza, J.

    2007-10-01

    We derive the two-loop corrections to Bhabha scattering from heavy fermions using dispersion relations. The double-box contributions are expressed by three kernel functions. Convoluting the perturbative kernels with fermionic threshold functions or with hadronic data allows to determine numerical results for small electron mass m e , combined with arbitrary values of the fermion mass m f in the loop, m 2 e 2 f , or with hadronic insertions. We present numerical results for m f =m μ , m τ ,m top at typical small- and large-angle kinematics ranging from 1 GeV to 500 GeV. (orig.)

  17. Factors Contributing to Crashes among Young Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndel J. Bates

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Young drivers are the group of drivers most likely to crash. There are a number of factors that contribute to the high crash risk experienced by these drivers. While some of these factors are intrinsic to the young driver, such as their age, gender or driving skill, others relate to social factors and when and how often they drive. This article reviews the factors that affect the risk of young drivers crashing to enable a fuller understanding of why this risk is so high in order to assist in developing effective countermeasures.

  18. Microwave filters and circuits contributions from Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Akio

    1970-01-01

    Microwave Filters and Circuits: Contributions from Japan covers ideas and novel circuits used to design microwave filter that have been developed in Japan, as well as network theory into the field of microwave transmission networks. The book discusses the general properties and synthesis of transmission-line networks; transmission-line filters on the image-parameter basis; and experimental results on a class of transmission-line filter constructed only with commensurate TEM lossless transmission lines. The text describes lines constants, approximation problems in transmission-line networks, as

  19. [Contribution of animal experimentation to pharmacology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassard, Jean; Hamon, Michel; Galibert, Francis

    2009-11-01

    Animal experimentation is of considerable importance in pharmacology and cannot yet be avoided when studying complex, highly integrated physiological functions. The use of animals has been drastically reduced in the classical phases of pharmacological research, for example when comparing several compounds belonging to the same pharmacological class. However, animal experiments remain crucial for generating and validating new therapeutic concepts. Three examples of such research, conducted in strict ethical conditions, will be used to illustrate the different ways in which animal experimentation has contributed to human therapeutics.

  20. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom

  1. [Nursing contribution in health decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueda-Díaz, Angélica; Mendoza-Parra, Sara; Jofré-Aravena, Viviane

    2014-01-01

    Decision making in health is a frequent situation, although potentially difficult, depending on patient/user characteristics and the context or the situation of health. This causes decisional conflicts in patients/users. The present study proposes to analyze the decision making process in health, conceptually, and nurses' contributions to understand and confront the phenomenon. The Ottawa the Model of Decisions Making in Health, proposed by Annette O'Connor, arises as a useful tool that enables nurses to carry out effective interventions with persons who face decision problems. Patients/users can assume a more active participation in the decisions on their own health.

  2. Medical contribution to the comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J M

    2011-12-01

    The coordination of the Military, Diplomatic and Economic/Development levers of power, the so-called "hard" and "soft" powers, to bring about the strategic aims of governments, supported by Non-Governmental Organisations and international organisations, is commonly known as the Comprehensive Approach (CA). The CA is now part of both NATO and UK military doctrine and concepts development. This article describes how medical branch HQ Allied Rapid Reaction Corp, as part of the HQs work to operationalise the CA, has sought and developed training opportunities to improve individual skill-sets to enable the branch to better contribute to the CA process.

  3. [Placebo effect: a contribution of social psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balez, R; Leroyer, C; Couturaud, F

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the psychosocial variables, which are of interest in the relationship between the patient and the physician. According to a classical model of social psychology, such a relationship might contribute to the placebo/nocebo effects. We develop herein various relational and contextual variables, taking into account four dimensions (intra-individual, interpersonal, positional and ideological) and their potential effects on therapeutic responses. This applies both in the setting of daily clinical practice and of clinical trials. The placebo effect offers an opportunity for collaboration and dialogue between social scientists and physicians.

  4. Capitalizing the contribution of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnadieu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The main contributions of the French nuclear industry to the country, and ways to make the most of them are presented. The advantages acquired include the nuclear power stations built; mastering of the combustion cycle; a powerful, well structured nuclear construction industry; and a nuclear-industrial complex giving France an important industrial potential. It is recommended that the industrial and research effort be maintained. The proposed strategy consists of defining an electronuclear program and associated economic development program and sticking to them; promoting exports; possibly merging certain industrial capacities; and strengthening the national position and independence concerning the fuel cycle [fr

  5. Climate change - the contribution from air travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesley, Colin

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses the Intergovernment Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on Aviation and the Global Atmosphere (published in 1999). It was considered necessary to treat air transport on its own since aircraft are unique in delivering emissions into the upper atmosphere rather than at ground level. The study was commissioned at the request of the International Civil Aviation Organisation and the Montreal Protocol. More than 300 experts contributed and the report has quantified the effect of aviation on the atmosphere on a world wide basis and highlighted areas where improved data are required. (UK)

  6. Adam Smith’s contribution to secularisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Simons

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examined several crucial themes in Adam Smith’s philosophy with the purpose of highlighting and assessing his contribution to the secularisation of Western society. The article, written from the perspective of reformational philosophy, begins with a brief biography and sketch of Adam Smith’s influence on modern society, followed by a summary of Ponti Venter’s view on Smith. This sets the scene for a discussion of Adam Smith’s project, his method of tackling it, and his views on systems, philosophy of history and the concept of philosophy.

  7. Research for the thermal change. Contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczepanski, Petra; Wunschick, Franziska; Martin, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    The energy transition in the heating sector is not a sure-fire success and it is too slow. This is alarming since the heating / cooling sector is responsible for more than half of the final energy demand. That the ''thermal change'' has accelerated hardly despite many efforts by politics, industry and research in recent years, is the reason for the scientists the FVEE institutes to examine the perspectives of renewable energy and the need to increase efficiency in the heating sector systematically. therefore FVEE-2015 Annual Meeting, is entitled ''Research for the thermal change''. The contributions of this conference proceedings present the latest research results and show ways to implement the heat change technically, economically and politically. They are dedicated to the drivers, but also the barriers of heat change. The authors report on innovative projects to provide buildings with heat from geothermal energy, biomass and solar thermal energy. Several contributions are dedicated to the application of efficient components, such as thermal insulation, thermal storage and heat pumps. [de

  8. Gut Microbiota: A Contributing Factor to Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakeh, Steve M.; Khan, Imran; Kumosani, Taha; Barbour, Elie; Almasaudi, Saad B.; Bahijri, Suhad M.; Alfadul, Sulaiman M.; Ajabnoor, Ghada M. A.; Azhar, Esam I.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, a global epidemic of the modern era, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes. The pervasiveness of obesity and overweight in both developed as well as developing populations is on the rise and placing a huge burden on health and economic resources. Consequently, research to control this emerging epidemic is of utmost importance. Recently, host interactions with their resident gut microbiota (GM) have been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of many metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and CVD. Around 1014 microorganisms reside within the lower human intestine and many of these 1014 microorganisms have developed mutualistic or commensal associations with the host and actively involved in many physiological processes of the host. However, dysbiosis (altered gut microbial composition) with other predisposing genetic and environmental factors, may contribute to host metabolic disorders resulting in many ailments. Therefore, delineating the role of GM as a contributing factor to obesity is the main objective of this review. Obesity research, as a field is expanding rapidly due to major advances in nutrigenomics, metabolomics, RNA silencing, epigenetics, and other disciplines that may result in the emergence of new technologies and methods to better interpret causal relationships between microbiota and obesity. PMID:27625997

  9. Gut Microbiota: a contributing factor to obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve M Harakeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, a global epidemic of the modern era, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD and diabetes. The pervasiveness of obesity and overweight in both developed as well as developing populations is on the rise and placing a huge burden on health and economic resources. Consequently, research to control this emerging epidemic is of utmost importance. Recently, host interactions with their resident gut microbiota (GM have been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of many metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and CVD. Around 1014 microorganisms reside within the lower human intestine and many of these 1014microorganisms have developed mutualistic or commensal associations with the host and actively involved in many physiological processes of the host. However, dysbiosis (altered gut microbial composition with other predisposing genetic and environmental factors, may contribute to host metabolic disorders resulting in many ailments. Therefore, delineating the role of GM as a contributing factor to obesity is the main objective of this review.Obesity research, as a field is expanding rapidly due to major advances in nutrigenomics, metabolomics, RNA silencing, epigenetics and other disciplines that may result in the emergence of new technologies and methods to better interpret causal relationships between microbiota and obesity.

  10. Deep Ocean Contribution to Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L.; Sun, W.; Tang, H.; Wang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    The ocean temperature and salinity change in the upper 2000m can be detected by Argo floats, so we can know the steric height change of the ocean. But the ocean layers above 2000m represent only 50% of the total ocean volume. Although the temperature and salinity change are small compared to the upper ocean, the deep ocean contribution to sea level might be significant because of its large volume. There has been some research on the deep ocean rely on the very sparse situ observation and are limited to decadal and longer-term rates of change. The available observational data in the deep ocean are too spares to determine the temporal variability, and the long-term changes may have a bias. We will use the Argo date and combine the situ data and topographic data to estimate the temperature and salinity of the sea water below 2000m, so we can obtain a monthly data. We will analyze the seasonal and annual change of the steric height change due to the deep ocean between 2005 and 2016. And we will evaluate the result combination the present-day satellite and in situ observing systems. The deep ocean contribution can be inferred indirectly as the difference between the altimetry minus GRACE and Argo-based steric sea level.

  11. Control practices contribute to premature transformer failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauch, E.T. [Beckwith Electric Company Inc., Largo, FL (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Studies of premature load tap changer (LTC) transformer failures on utility systems have shown the tap changers to be the primary contributing factor. Some of the LTC factors that lead to transformer failures include oil quality and particulate contamination; LTC contact temperature rise; contact coking; carbon film build-up; short circuit mechanical forces; and contact wear and arcing. These factors create increasing contact resistance thereby increasing voltage drop, localized heating, contact pitting, oil contamination and general deterioration. This paper discussed utility tapchanger control practices and methods of determining control functions to be activated as well as the determination of optimum settings contributing to excessive or untimely tap change operations. The transformer applications that were considered included transmission tie transformers as well as transmission distribution interface transformers. The paper discussed the circulating current paralleling method and the circulating reactive current or var sharing paralleling method. Several common practices were discussed, including basic voltage control ranges and setting effects; timing options available; LDC misapplications; first house protection methods; and various paralleling techniques. It was concluded that although there are several other methods of paralleling power transformers, many are not applicable under certain system configurations. In these applications, improper use of a paralleling method or improper setting and commissioning may cause hunting for appropriate tap positions and dramatically increase the number of tap changes, causing wear and degradation of the tap changer contacts. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  12. The contribution of adhesion signaling to lactogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Bethanie; Cutler, Mary Lou

    2010-10-01

    The mammary gland undergoes hormonally controlled cycles of pubertal maturation, pregnancy, lactation, and involution, and these processes rely on complex signaling mechanisms, many of which are controlled by cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. The adhesion of epithelial cells to the extracellular matrix initiates signaling mechanisms that have an impact on cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation throughout lactation. The control of integrin expression on the mammary epithelial cells, the composition of the extracellular matrix and the presence of secreted matricellular proteins all contribute to essential adhesion signaling during lactogenesis. In vitro and in vivo studies, including the results from genetically engineered mice, have shed light on the regulation of these processes at the cell and tissue level and have led to increased understanding of the essential signaling components that are regulated in temporal and cell specific manner during lactogenesis. Recent studies suggest that a secreted matricellular protein, CTGF/CCN2, may play a role in lactogenic differentiation through binding to β1 integrin complexes, enhancing the production of extracellular matrix components and contributions to cell adhesion signaling.

  13. What causes autism? Exploring the environmental contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrigan, Philip J

    2010-04-01

    Autism is a biologically based disorder of brain development. Genetic factors--mutations, deletions, and copy number variants--are clearly implicated in causation of autism. However, they account for only a small fraction of cases, and do not easily explain key clinical and epidemiological features. This suggests that early environmental exposures also contribute. This review explores this hypothesis. Indirect evidence for an environmental contribution to autism comes from studies demonstrating the sensitivity of the developing brain to external exposures such as lead, ethyl alcohol and methyl mercury. But the most powerful proof-of-concept evidence derives from studies specifically linking autism to exposures in early pregnancy - thalidomide, misoprostol, and valproic acid; maternal rubella infection; and the organophosphate insecticide, chlorpyrifos. There is no credible evidence that vaccines cause autism. Expanded research is needed into environmental causation of autism. Children today are surrounded by thousands of synthetic chemicals. Two hundred of them are neurotoxic in adult humans, and 1000 more in laboratory models. Yet fewer than 20% of high-volume chemicals have been tested for neurodevelopmental toxicity. I propose a targeted discovery strategy focused on suspect chemicals, which combines expanded toxicological screening, neurobiological research and prospective epidemiological studies.

  14. Crystal field contribution to Moessbauer isomer shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Avtar; Shrivastava, K.N.

    1975-01-01

    A new temperature dependent contribution to isomer shift in Fe 3+ (ed 5 ) is proposed. The static crystal field gives rise to a new second-order correction to Mossbauer resonance line and crystal field hamiltonian Hc=B 2 0 Y 2 0 +B 2 2 (Y 22 ) usually used in the study of electronspin resonance is employed. The electron charge density at the nuclear site, responsible for the isomer shift is affected by the crystal field through excitation of an electron from 3d to 4s subshell. Further, temperature dependence is analysed by the variation of crystal field parameters with temperature which occurs as a square in the final result. The importance of the sign of the field parameter (KD) is also realised in the isomer shift studies. Although the proposed new second-order contribution to Moessbauer isomer shift is static in nature, yet it is expected to have important implications in the study of temperature depedence of centre shift of a Moessbauer line. Numerical estimates of the shift are also presented. (author)

  15. Eijkman's contribution to the discovery of vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, K J; Sutherland, B

    1995-02-01

    The work by Christiaan Eijkman in Batavia (now Djakarta, the capital of Indonesia) between 1890 and 1900, for which he received a Nobel Prize, is reviewed. While searching for a microorganism responsible for beriberi, he found that a condition of polyneuritis, with similarities to beriberi, could be produced consistently in chickens by feeding them polished rice, and that addition of the silverskin removed during polishing prevented this. He showed further that the silverskin did not act by physically preventing the entry of microorganisms into the endosperm, nor was its action explained by the protein and salts that it contributed. His tentative hypothesis was that this fraction contributed an antidote to a nerve poison produced by the fermentation of starch in the chickens' crop. However, his successor continued to use Eijkman's animal model and was able to show that silverskin supplied some unknown factor(s) that was required regardless of whether or not the diet contained starch. Fractionation eventually showed thiamin to be the active factor.

  16. Contribution to the strategy of energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciconkov, Risto

    2003-01-01

    An explanation for the greenhouse effect, i.e.global warming and reasons which contribute to this effect. Greenhouse gasses (GHG) and GWP (Global Warming Potential) as a factor for estimating their contributing on the greenhouse effect. Indicators of the climate change in the previous period and projecting of likely scenarios for the future. Consequences on the environment and human activities: industry, energy, agriculture, water resource. The main lines of the Kyoto Protocol and problems in its realization. Suggestions to the country strategy concerning to the acts of the Kyoto Protocol. A special attention is pointed out on the energy, its resource, the structure of energy consumption and energy efficiency. Main sectors of the energy efficiency: buildings, industry and transport. Buildings: importance of heat insulation. District heating, suggestions for space heating. Heat pumps and CHP. Air conditioning and refrigeration. Industry: process heating, and integrated energy system heat recovery, refrigeration, compressed air. Need of quality maintenance and servicing. Monitoring and automatic control. Education for energy and its saving. (Original)

  17. Ted Irving's early contributions to paleomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Edward (Ted) Irving (1927 - 2014) was one of the most deeply and widely respected paleomagnetists, making significant contributions to the field throughout his career which spanned six decades. Restricting attention to the first decade of his career, the 1950s, he discovered from work on the Torridonian (1951-1953) that fine-grained red sandstones were generally suitable for paleomagnetic work (1951-1952). He rediscovered (1951) that paleomagnetism could be used to test continental drift, and initiated (1951) the first paleomagnetic test of whether India had drifted northward relative to Asia and argued (1954) that it had. He also made significant contributions to the first APW path for Great Britain (Creer, Irving, and Runcorn, 1954). He was the first to draw two APW paths to explain results from Great Britain and North America (1956) and to use paleomagnetism and paleoclimatology together to argue for continental drift (1954, 1956). With Ron Green, his first student, he first APW path for Australia (1958). He was the first to invoke axial rotations to explain away an apparent anomaly with an APW path (1959). His work on the Torridonian led to the first description of stratigraphically sequential reversals in sedimentary rocks. Moreover, his 1959 superb review of the paleomagnetic support for continental drift was instrumental in Hess's becoming a continental drifter before he came up with the idea of seafloor spreading.

  18. Gut Microbiota: A Contributing Factor to Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakeh, Steve M; Khan, Imran; Kumosani, Taha; Barbour, Elie; Almasaudi, Saad B; Bahijri, Suhad M; Alfadul, Sulaiman M; Ajabnoor, Ghada M A; Azhar, Esam I

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, a global epidemic of the modern era, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes. The pervasiveness of obesity and overweight in both developed as well as developing populations is on the rise and placing a huge burden on health and economic resources. Consequently, research to control this emerging epidemic is of utmost importance. Recently, host interactions with their resident gut microbiota (GM) have been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of many metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and CVD. Around 10(14) microorganisms reside within the lower human intestine and many of these 10(14) microorganisms have developed mutualistic or commensal associations with the host and actively involved in many physiological processes of the host. However, dysbiosis (altered gut microbial composition) with other predisposing genetic and environmental factors, may contribute to host metabolic disorders resulting in many ailments. Therefore, delineating the role of GM as a contributing factor to obesity is the main objective of this review. Obesity research, as a field is expanding rapidly due to major advances in nutrigenomics, metabolomics, RNA silencing, epigenetics, and other disciplines that may result in the emergence of new technologies and methods to better interpret causal relationships between microbiota and obesity.

  19. A Contribution Towards A Grammar of Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Berry

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past thirty years there has been an increasing interest in the social and cultural implications of digital technologies and ‘informationalism’ from the social sciences and humanities. Generally this has concentrated on the implications of the “convergence” of digital devices and services, understood as linked to the discrete processing capabilities of computers, which rely on logical operations, binary processing and symbolic representation. In this paper, I wish to suggest that a ‘grammar of code’ might provide a useful way of thinking about the way in which digital technologies operate as a medium and can contribute usefully to this wider debate. I am interested in the way in which the dynamic properties of code can be understood as operating according to a grammar reflected in its materialisation and operation in the lifeworld – the discretisation of the phenomenal world. As part of that contribution in this paper I develop some tentative Weberian ‘ideal-types’. These ideal-types are then applied to the work of the Japanese composer, Masahiro Miwa, whose innovative ‘Reverse-Simulation music’ models the operation of basic low-level digital circuitry for the performance and generation of musical pieces.

  20. Factors Contributing Decreased Performance Of Slow Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. L. Kannan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Back ground Even experienced teaching faculty and administrators can be challenged by learners who have not able to perform up to expected need in their annual performance of their students these students are called as slow learnersStruggle learners. There should be a designed study to foster discussion about diagnosing particular problems that contribute with meeting objectives of slow learners. Methodology The study was performed on the entire current first year of Medical students were all the three internal assessments of 250 students performance is taken in to consideration for the study. This study is of cross section type.After obtaining the list of all students marks in internal examination from medical education unit supporting mentors are contacted to meet the students and confidentiality is maintained throughout the study. After obtaining informed consent a questionnaire was administered to the students by the investigator. The questionnaire contains the following sections. Section I will be on the background characteristics of the student name age sex type of family. Section II will be on the details of their learning capabilities. Section III will focus on the awareness of the slow learners in which the precipitating factors contributing to them. Results The prevalence of slow learners as low achievers were contributed to be 32.4 percentages.The performance of the students is based on combination of all three internal assessment marks including theory and practical performance. In this the students age ranges from 17 to 21 years the mean age of student was contributed to be 17.81 and majority of the students were in the age group of 18 years which contributed to be 16867.2.In the present study majority were males 13252.8 compared to females 11847.2.but when study is compared to percentage of attendance majority of the individual 15177 scored more than 50 percentage of marks have more than 80 percentage of attendance but when

  1. Malaysia's contributions towards global climate change concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzlaini Mohd Yusop; Yvonne Lunsong; Norhayati Kamaruddin

    2000-01-01

    Concerns about Green House Gas (GHG) emissions and global climate change were voiced by the scientific community as far back as the International Geophysical year in 1957 when climate changes scenarios and impacts were analysed. More recently, the United Nations Framework Convention on climate change (UNFCCC) was adopted in 1992, renewing a global acknowledgement and commitment towards curbing GHG emissions. Little progress was made until the adoption of Kyoto Protocol in December 1997, over 5 years later. Basically, developed countries would not commit to strong measures if there were no global effort (i. e. corresponding efforts by developing countries) while developing countries are waiting for developed countries to show concrete results first. Since 1950, developed countries cumulatively produced more than 80% of worldwide GHG emissions. Between 1950 and 1990, North America alone contributed 40 billion tons of carbon while Western and Eastern Europe contributed 57 billion tons. Developing countries produced only 24 billion tons of carbon emissions during the same period. At present, per capita emission in developed countries are also about ten times higher than those of developing countries. This imbalance has caused most developing countries to adopt a wait till others do it stance and justifiably so. Nonetheless, curbing GHG emissions should be a larger community effort (which includes business and the public) and not just the efforts of Governments and officials. Thus, the deciding factors should make more business or economic sense. It is likely that business and the general public would listen and contribute positively if they are made aware of potential cost savings and international competitiveness to be derived from these efforts. During the current economic slowdown, especially in East Asia, it makes business sense to defer the capital investment in new electricity generating capacity and related energy supply infrastructure. Pusat Tenaga Malaysia

  2. Worldwide academic contributions of Japanese neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tomio; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Yoshimoto, Koji; Nakamizo, Akira; Mizoguchi, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Based on the data reported in the National Institute of Science and Technology Policy 2010, Japan is ranked in fourth place in the world in terms of the numbers of the articles in the fields of clinical medicine. However, there had not been any objective data regarding the numbers of publications by neurosurgeons. As it is important for neurosurgeons to realize the extent of academic contributions by the neurosurgeons in different countries, the numbers of publications in the major journals by the members of the Japan Neurosurgical Society and those from neurosurgical institutions around the world were analyzed using both the biomedical literature database PubMed and the publication database "ISI Web of Knowledge." Parts of the results were presented in the 69th Annual Meeting of the Japan Neurosurgical Society. As to the number of neurosurgical publications in English from the top 9 countries, the US has been consistently in first place and Japan in second. However, the number of publications from Japan has been decreasing since 2000. With regards to the "top 8 journals" such as the Lancet and the Journal of the American Medical Association, the number of first-author publications by Japanese neurosurgeons increased in the late 1980s and had been 2-9 articles per year until recently. In the "top 12 neuroscience journals" which include Stroke, Neuro-Oncology, Cancer Research, and others, Japan had been in the third next to the US and UK till 2004, but Germany surpassed Japan in 2005. In the "top 6 clinical journals" such as the Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery, the US has been consistently keeping first place and Japan second place since 1977. Searches using the key word elucidated that Japanese neurosurgeons are greatly contributing in the field of "aneurysm." Regarding the number of publications per neurosurgeon, Canada and UK are in the forefront and Japan is down to eighth place. Japanese neurosurgeons have been contributing greatly next to the

  3. Contributions to In Silico Genome Annotation

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal M.

    2017-11-30

    Genome annotation is an important topic since it provides information for the foundation of downstream genomic and biological research. It is considered as a way of summarizing part of existing knowledge about the genomic characteristics of an organism. Annotating different regions of a genome sequence is known as structural annotation, while identifying functions of these regions is considered as a functional annotation. In silico approaches can facilitate both tasks that otherwise would be difficult and timeconsuming. This study contributes to genome annotation by introducing several novel bioinformatics methods, some based on machine learning (ML) approaches. First, we present Dragon PolyA Spotter (DPS), a method for accurate identification of the polyadenylation signals (PAS) within human genomic DNA sequences. For this, we derived a novel feature-set able to characterize properties of the genomic region surrounding the PAS, enabling development of high accuracy optimized ML predictive models. DPS considerably outperformed the state-of-the-art results. The second contribution concerns developing generic models for structural annotation, i.e., the recognition of different genomic signals and regions (GSR) within eukaryotic DNA. We developed DeepGSR, a systematic framework that facilitates generating ML models to predict GSR with high accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, no available generic and automated method exists for such task that could facilitate the studies of newly sequenced organisms. The prediction module of DeepGSR uses deep learning algorithms to derive highly abstract features that depend mainly on proper data representation and hyperparameters calibration. DeepGSR, which was evaluated on recognition of PAS and translation initiation sites (TIS) in different organisms, yields a simpler and more precise representation of the problem under study, compared to some other hand-tailored models, while producing high accuracy prediction results. Finally

  4. Contribution of autophagy to antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Riedel, Claudia A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-11-14

    Although identified in the 1960's, interest in autophagy has significantly increased in the past decade with notable research efforts oriented at understanding as to how this multi-protein complex operates and is regulated. Autophagy is commonly defined as a "self-eating" process evolved by eukaryotic cells to recycle senescent organelles and expired proteins, which is significantly increased during cellular stress responses. In addition, autophagy can also play important roles during human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative and autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, novel findings suggest that autophagy contributes to the host defense against microbial infections. In this article, we review the role of macroautophagy in antiviral immune responses and discuss molecular mechanisms evolved by viral pathogens to evade this process. A role for autophagy as an effector mechanism used both, by innate and adaptive immunity is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Citizen Science: Contributions to Astronomy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Carol; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon; Fortson, Lucy; Bamford, Steven

    2012-08-01

    The contributions of everyday individuals to significant research has grown dramatically beyond the early days of classical birdwatching and endeavors of amateurs of the 19th century. Now people who are casually interested in science can participate directly in research covering diverse scientific fields. Regarding astronomy, volunteers, either as individuals or as networks of people, are involved in a variety of types of studies. Citizen Science is intuitive, engaging, yet necessarily robust in its adoption of scientific principles and methods. Herein, we discuss Citizen Science, focusing on fully participatory projects such as Zooniverse (by several of the authors CL, AS, LF, SB), with mention of other programs. In particular, we make the case that citizen science (CS) can be an important aspect of the scientific data analysis pipelines provided to scientists by observatories.

  6. NASA contributions to the global habitability program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconnell, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of developments occurring over the last two decades, the data acquisition, storage, analysis, and transmission facilities are now available for a concerted long-term interdisciplinary and international study of the global environmental system. Such a study is the essence of the 'Global Habitability' concept introduced in 1982. The aims of Global Habitability research are considered, taking into account an understanding of the vital global processes of the earth's energy balance, the global hydrological cycle, and the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. Details of NASA planning for Global Habitability are discussed along with international data exchange arrangements. Attention is given to the possible contributions of satellite data and associated techniques to Global Habitability, examples of specific research conducted by NASA in support of the Global Habitability and the international sharing of data and results for Global Habitability.

  7. Contributions from the CYGNUS/Milagro Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, G.E.; Chang, C.Y.; Chen, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    This document consists of eleven reports contributed to the XXIV International Cosmic Ray Conference (Rome, Italy, August 28--September 8, 1995) from the CYGNUS/Milagro Collaboration: ``Search for Ultra-High-Energy Radiation from Gamma-Ray Bursts``, ``Gamma-Ray Bursts: Detection and Distance Estimates with Milagro``, ``Searching for Gamma-Ray Bursts with Water-Cerenkov-Detector Single-Particle Rates``, ``The Milagro Detector``, ``The Milagro Data Acquisition System``, ``Source Searches Using the CYGNUS Water-Cerenkov Array``, ``Search for UHE Emission from Supernova Remnants``, ``Solar Physics with the Milagro Telescope``, ``An Experiment to Detect Correlations Between Cerenkov and Muon Lateral Distributions in EAS``, ``A Study of Large-Zenith-Angle Air Showers with the CYGNUS Experiment``, and ``Mass Resolution of Ground Based Air Shower Experiments in the 10 to 10000 TeV range.``

  8. The Amtex DAMA Project: The Brookhaven contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Amtex Partnership organized in 1993 as a Technology Transfer Collaboration among members of the integrated textile industry, the DOE National Laboratories, a number of universities, and several research/education/technology transfer organizations (RETTs). Under the Amtex umbrella organization, a number of technology areas were defined and individual projects were launched addressing various aspects of improving the health and competitiveness of the American textile industry. The first and, to date, the largest of these has been the computer-based Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project. Brookhaven National Laboratory became involved in DAMA beginning in March of 1993 and remained an active participant through January of 1995. It was staffed almost exclusively with personnel of the Computing and Communications Division. This document summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Brookhaven team in working with the larger collaboration. Detailed information about the Amtex Partnership, the DAMA Project, and specific BNL contributions are documented elsewhere.

  9. Global climate: Methane contribution to greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1992-01-01

    The global atmospheric concentration of methane greatly contributes to the severity of the greenhouse effect. It has been estimated that this concentration, due mainly to human activities, is growing at the rate of roughly 1.1% per year. Environmental scientists suggest that a reduction, even as small as 10%, in global methane emissions would be enough to curtail the hypothetical global warning scenarios forecasted for the up-coming century. Through the recovery of methane from municipal and farm wastes, as well as, through the control of methane leaks and dispersions in coal mining and petrochemical processes, substantial progress towards the abatement of greenhouse gas effects could be achieved without having to resort to economically detrimental limitations on the use of fossil fuels

  10. Ions and their contribution for living space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Svoboda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is dealing with more than up to date topic. Nowadays more than one third of human population suffers from some form of allergies – dust, pollen or mites. The air we breathe the whole day does not come from outside, on the contrary it comes from closed rooms used for living. the important part of air are the negative ions which are neccessary for life. Therefore, the optimal level of ions should be maintained. Living enviroment which does not contain enough negative ions causes various diseases, such as allergies, asthma, headache, tiredness and depressions. Increased concentration of negative ions inside a house is the basic prevention of tiredness and other diseases.

  11. Contributions of the communication sciences to physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, W M

    1978-05-01

    This paper reviews the impact on physiology of the revolutions in the communication sciences and technology that have occurred in the last 35 years. Particular attention is given to the significance of the cybernetic suggestions of Norbert Wiener--specifically, the ideas of negative feedback, of the computer as a brain metaphor, and of signal-and-noise considerations in information processing. It is argued that the first two of these have not in fact made much lasting contribution to physiology beyond providing loose analogies. On the other hand, the ready availability of a wide variety of electronic measuring and signal-processing devices from communication technology has clearly had a substantial impact. And it is proposed that the kind of models and concepts that are necessary for the characterization of the nervous system as an information-processing device play now, and will continue to play in the future, a major role in physiology.

  12. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  13. The enduring scientific contributions of Sigmund Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedo, John E

    2002-01-01

    Through the development of a novel observational method, Sigmund Freud made possible the collection of reliable data about man's inner life. The scientific hypotheses he formulated about these formed the initial version of psychoanalysis. Many of these first thoughts have had to be revised in the light of subsequent scientific findings about the operations of the central nervous system, but even these refuted propositions often had much heuristic value. Despite the passage of a whole century, many Freudian hypotheses have retained their scientific standing. Most important among these was Freud's realization that human thought is usually unconscious. His understanding of the role of the automatic repetition of basic patterns of behavior, of the fateful consequences of early childhood emotional vicissitudes in structuring enduring mental dispositions, and of the distinction between two distinct modes of thinking are the most significant among his many contributions.

  14. Contribution of Lean Management to Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Fresno Palmira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To continuously and systematically improve efficiency and efficacy of processes, organizations need the implication of all employees in continuous improvement and innovation through suitable Quality Management Programs (QMPs. Effectiveness of these programs is directly linked to the requirement employees understand the methodologies and tools used for QM and the benefits that will derivate from their implementation, individually and collectively, so they can commit and implicate. Lean Management is a friendly methodology to continuously and systematically achieve process improvement, so helping the organization seeking operational excellence that contributes to overall excellence. This paper identifies Critical Success Factors (CSFs for an effective implementation of QMPs, suggests Lean Management as an easy-to-understand, powerful and friendly methodology for operational excellence and overall excellence, and presents a case experience of implementation of Lean Management in a health care organization that applies the EFQM model, and the lessons learnt.

  15. How could haloalkaliphilic microorganisms contribute to biotechnology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baisuo; Yan, Yanchun; Chen, Shulin

    2014-11-01

    Haloalkaliphiles are microorganisms requiring Na(+) concentrations of at least 0.5 mol·L(-1) and an alkaline pH of 9 for optimal growth. Their unique features enable them to make significant contributions to a wide array of biotechnological applications. Organic compatible solutes produced by haloalkaliphiles, such as ectoine and glycine betaine, are correlated with osmoadaptation and may serve as stabilizers of intracellular proteins, salt antagonists, osmoprotectants, and dermatological moisturizers. Haloalkaliphiles are an important source of secondary metabolites like rhodopsin, polyhydroxyalkanoates, and exopolysaccharides that play essential roles in biogeocycling organic compounds. These microorganisms also can secrete unique exoenzymes, including proteases, amylases, and cellulases, that are highly active and stable in extreme haloalkaline conditions and can be used for the production of laundry detergent. Furthermore, the unique metabolic pathways of haloalkaliphiles can be applied in the biodegradation and (or) biotransformation of a broad range of toxic industrial pollutants and heavy metals, in wastewater treatment, and in the biofuel industry.

  16. Hysteria to conversion disorders: Babinski's contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to present the importance of hysteria on Babinski's oeuvre, and the conceptions of pithiatism from Babinski until the one of conversion disorder. Babinski gave a mental basis for hysteria in the place of Charcot's encephalopatic one, and several important semiotic tools to differentiate organic from hysterical manifestations based on studies from 1893-1917/8. His teachings were spread worldwide, and in Brazil they were also appreciated in the work on hysteria by Antonio Austregesilo, the first Brazilian neurology chairman. The neurobiological basis of hysteria conceived by Charcot is nowadays reappraised, and Babinski's neurosemiological contribution is everlasting. The patients believed to be hysterical, and the two outstanding neurologists, Charcot and Babinski, gave support for the development of the modern neurology.

  17. Hysteria to conversion disorders: Babinski's contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marleide da Mota; Engelhardt, Eliasz

    2014-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present the importance of hysteria on Babinski's oeuvre, and the conceptions of pithiatism from Babinski until the one of conversion disorder. Babinski gave a mental basis for hysteria in the place of Charcot's encephalopatic one, and several important semiotic tools to differentiate organic from hysterical manifestations based on studies from 1893-1917/8. His teachings were spread worldwide, and in Brazil they were also appreciated in the work on hysteria by Antonio Austregesilo, the first Brazilian neurology chairman. The neurobiological basis of hysteria conceived by Charcot is nowadays reappraised, and Babinski's neurosemiological contribution is everlasting. The patients believed to be hysterical, and the two outstanding neurologists, Charcot and Babinski, gave support for the development of the modern neurology.

  18. Pregnant teenagers' group: contributions to prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Maria Veraci Oliveira; Menezes, Giselle Maria Duarte; Silva, Thaís Jormanna Pereira; Brasil, Eysler Gonçalves Maia; Silva, Raimunda Magalhães da

    2017-06-05

    To describe changes in nurses' care following the implementation of a group of pregnant teenagers in prenatal care based on the expectations and experiences of pregnant teenagers. Qualitative and descriptive study conducted from February to November 2013 at a Primary Care Unit in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, through focus groups with 16 adolescents from the group of pregnant women in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. The analysis identified central ideas and units of meanings that formed the categories. The strategy of a group of pregnant teenagers, which provides a space for coexistence and the establishment of ties encourages these individuals to talk about their needs, re-signifying their ties. Educational strategies to promote self-care of pregnant teenagers and care for their babies involve the sharing of experiences, doubts and beliefs. Considerations and suggestions of the adolescents contributed to guide nurses' practice and provide a strategic space of care and support for pregnant adolescents in primary care.

  19. PSI contribution to the EU project ECOMONT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portmann, W.; Siegwolf, R.T.; Saurer, M.; Scheidegger, Y.; Geissbuehler, P.; Furger, M.; Poggio, L.; Erne, R.; Richter, R.; Buerki, D.; Graber, W.K. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Land-use changes (intensification, extensification and abandonment) in agriculture and forestry are considered to be the major driving forces for changes in ecosystem function and dynamics, and in landscape patterns in Europe. The aim of the EU project ECOMONT is to investigate the potential risks due to land-use change in the mountainous ecosystem. Fluxes of sensible and latent heat, water vapour, CO{sub 2} and pollutants between the vegetation and the atmosphere are sensitive and critical factors characterising landscape function. The Atmospheric Pollution Section of the PSI contributes to this project with the measurements of these fluxes. The measuring techniques, the experimental setup and first results are presented. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  20. Contributions to the 1999 particle accelerator conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, M.; Fartoukh, S.; Jablonka, M.; Joly, J.M.; Lalot, M.; Magne, C.; Napoly, O.; Baboi, N.; Schreiber, S.; Simrock, S.; Weise, H.

    2000-06-01

    This document puts together the 10 contributions of the laboratory to the 1999 particle accelerator conference. The titles of the papers are: 1) Evidence for a strongly coupled dipole mode with insufficient damping in the first accelerating module of the TESLA test facility (TTF); 2) An alternative scheme for stiffening superconducting RF cavities by plasma spraying; 3) A laser triggered electron source for pulsed radiolysis; 4) A cure for the energy spread increasing related bunch lengthening in electron storage rings; 5) Single bunch longitudinal instabilities in proton storage rings; 6) Analytical investigation on the halo formation in space charge dominated beams; 7) Analytical investigation on the dynamic apertures of circular accelerators; 8) The intrinsic upper limit to the beam energy of an electron-positron circular collider; 9) Coaxial disc windows for a high power superconducting cavity input coupler; and 10) RF pulsed tests on 3 GHz niobium cavities

  1. Japan's contribution to nuclear medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.; Sakamoto, Junichi; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the degree of Japan's contribution to the nuclear medical research in the last decade. Articles published in 1991-2000 in highly reputed nuclear medical journals were accessed through the MEDLINE database. The number of articles having affiliation with a Japanese institution was counted along with publication year. In addition, shares of top-ranking countries were determined along with their trends over time. Of the total number of articles (7,788), Japan's share of articles in selected nuclear medical journals was 11.4% (889 articles) and ranked 2nd in the world after the USA (2,645 articles). The recent increase in the share was statistically significant for Japan (p=0.02, test for trend). Japan's share in nuclear medical research output is much higher than that in other biomedical fields. (author)

  2. The Contributions of Immigrants to American Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschman, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The standard account of American immigration focuses on the acculturation and assimilation of immigrants and their children to American society. This analysis typically ignores the significant contributions of immigrants to the creation of American culture through the performing arts, sciences, and other cultural pursuits. Immigrants and their children are not born with more creative talents than native-born citizens, but their selectivity and marginality may have pushed and pulled those with ability into high-risk career paths that reward creative work. The presence of large numbers of talented immigrants in Hollywood, academia, and the high-tech industries has pushed American institutions to be more meritocratic and open to innovation than they would be otherwise.

  3. Rapidly moving contact lines and damping contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Contact angle varies dynamically with contact line (CL) speed when a liquid moves across a solid support, as when a liquid spreads rapidly. For sufficiently rapid spreading, inertia competes with capillarity to influence the interface shape near the support. We use resonant-mode plane-normal support oscillations of droplets to drive lateral contact-line motion. Reynolds numbers based on CL speeds are high and capillary numbers are low. These are inertial-capillary motions. By scanning the driving frequency, we locate the frequency at peak amplification (resonance), obtain the scaled peak height (amplification factor) and a measure of band-width (damping ratio). We report how a parameter for CL mobility depends on these scanning metrics, with the goal of distinguishing contributions from the bulk- and CL-dissipation to overall damping.

  4. AJO Centennial: AJO contributions to Ophthalmic Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ian M; Sieving, Pamela C

    2018-03-09

    To review the contributions to ophthalmic genetics through the American Journal of OphthalmologyDesign: Perspective. A literature search to retrieve original articles, letters, editorials, and published lectures from 1966 to 2017, providing a 50 year review. Titles were excluded that gave no reference to genetics or presented findings related to a non-genetic ocular condition. From a search of the Scopus database, 719 articles were ascertained. Of these 115 were excluded as the title did not reference a genetic condition or have a focus on genetic factors. Of these, four were excluded describing animal phenotypes (1966-7) and four were excluded having received no citations up to and including 2015. The highest number of citations was 283 times for a single article on familial aggregation in age-related macular degeneration. The Web of Science database yielded 771 articles; of these, 118 were excluded as not reporting human genetic studies; 55 received no citations. The highest number of citations was 307 for a single article, a 1991 paper on Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. The Journal's contributions to our understanding of the heritability of human ocular traits have been broad and deep, with international reach. The development of new techniques fostered new concepts and new approaches to rapidly expand the number of known single gene disorders with a defined molecular genetic cause. Reports on Mendelian and complex traits in the Journal abound along with six Edward Jackson Memorial Lectures on retinal dystrophies, Leber congenital amaurosis, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Contribution of Donana wetlands to carbon sequestration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward P Morris

    Full Text Available Inland and transitional aquatic systems play an important role in global carbon (C cycling. Yet, the C dynamics of wetlands and floodplains are poorly defined and field data is scarce. Air-water CO2 fluxes in the wetlands of Doñana Natural Area (SW Spain were examined by measuring alkalinity, pH and other physiochemical parameters in a range of water bodies during 2010-2011. Areal fluxes were calculated and, using remote sensing, an estimate of the contribution of aquatic habitats to gaseous CO2 transport was derived. Semi-permanent ponds adjacent to the large Guadalquivir estuary acted as mild sinks, whilst temporal wetlands were strong sources of CO2 (-0.8 and 36.3 mmol(CO2 m(-2 d(-1. Fluxes in semi-permanent streams and ponds changed seasonally; acting as sources in spring-winter and mild sinks in autumn (16.7 and -1.2 mmol(CO2 m(-2 d(-1. Overall, Doñana's water bodies were a net annual source of CO2 (5.2 mol(C m(-2 y(-1. Up-scaling clarified the overwhelming contribution of seasonal flooding and allochthonous organic matter inputs in determining regional air-water gaseous CO2 transport (13.1 Gg(C y(-1. Nevertheless, this estimate is about 6 times < local marsh net primary production, suggesting the system acts as an annual net CO2 sink. Initial indications suggest longer hydroperiods may favour autochthonous C capture by phytoplankton. Direct anthropogenic impacts have reduced the hydroperiod in Doñana and this maybe exacerbated by climate change (less rainfall and more evaporation, suggesting potential for the modification of C sequestration.

  6. Contribution of Latin America to pharmacovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan Camilo; Arango, Victoria E; Einarson, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance activities have been ongoing for 4 decades. However, little is known (especially outside of the area) about the contribution of Latin America to this field. To review and quantify the published literature on pharmacovigilance in Latin American countries. We searched electronic databases including MEDLINE (1966-2004), EMBASE (1980-2004), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-2004), Toxline (1992-2004), Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (1982-2004), Sistema de Información Esencial en Terapéutica y Salud (1980-2004), and the Pan American Health Organization Web site (1970-2004) for articles on pharmacovigilance or adverse drug reactions in any of the 19 major Latin American countries. Papers were retrieved and categorized according to content and country of origin by 2 independent reviewers. There were 195 usable articles from 13 countries. Fifty-one of the papers retrieved dealt with pharmacovigilance centers (15 national centers, 10 hospitals, 26 other), 55 covered pharmacovigilance itself (21 theoretical papers, 9 with description of models, 25 educational papers), and 89 were pharmacoepidemiologic studies of adverse drug reactions (69 case reports, 13 observational cohorts, 2 cohort studies, 1 randomized clinical trial, 4 clinical papers on adverse reaction management). Studies have increased exponentially since 1980. Five countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Venezuela) published reports from national centers. No studies were found from 6 countries: Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, or Uruguay. Most studied categories were antiinfectives and drugs affecting the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, and musculoskeletal system. Contributions of Latin American countries to the field of pharmacovigilence have been remarkable, considering the constraints on these countries. A need exists for an increased number of formal pharmacovigilance studies and research

  7. Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B.; Scuteri, Angelo; Black, Sandra E.; DeCarli, Charles; Greenberg, Steven M.; Iadecola, Costantino; Launer, Lenore J.; Laurent, Stephane; Lopez, Oscar L.; Nyenhuis, David; Petersen, Ronald C.; Schneider, Julie A.; Tzourio, Christophe; Arnett, Donna K.; Bennett, David A.; Chui, Helena C.; Higashida, Randall T.; Lindquist, Ruth; Nilsson, Peter M.; Roman, Gustavo C.; Sellke, Frank W.; Seshadri, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose This scientific statement provides an overview of the evidence on vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia of later life are common. Definitions of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), neuropathology, basic science and pathophysiological aspects, role of neuroimaging and vascular and other associated risk factors, and potential opportunities for prevention and treatment are reviewed. This statement serves as an overall guide for practitioners to gain a better understanding of VCI and dementia, prevention, and treatment. Methods Writing group members were nominated by the writing group co-chairs on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, the Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and the Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writing group used systematic literature reviews (primarily covering publications from 1990 to May 1, 2010), previously published guidelines, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and, when appropriate, formulate recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the recommendations and approved the final version of this document. After peer review by the American Heart Association, as well as review by the Stroke Council leadership, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention Council, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee, the statement was approved by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Results The construct of VCI has been introduced to capture the entire spectrum of cognitive disorders associated with all forms of cerebral vascular brain injury—not solely stroke—ranging from mild cognitive impairment through fully developed

  8. Biomass burning contribution to Beijing aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cheng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning, the largest global source of elemental carbon (EC and primary organic carbon (OC, is strongly associated with many subjects of great scientific concern, such as secondary organic aerosol and brown carbon which exert important effects on the environment and on climate in particular. This study investigated the relationships between levoglucosan and other biomass burning tracers (i.e., water soluble potassium and mannosan based on both ambient samples collected in Beijing and source samples. Compared with North America and Europe, Beijing was characterized by high ambient levoglucosan concentrations and low winter to summer ratios of levoglucosan, indicating significant impact of biomass burning activities throughout the year in Beijing. Comparison of levoglucosan and water soluble potassium (K+ levels suggested that it was acceptable to use K+ as a biomass burning tracer during summer in Beijing, while the contribution of fireworks to K+ could be significant during winter. Moreover, the levoglucosan to K+ ratio was found to be lower during the typical summer period (0.21 ± 0.16 compared with the typical winter period (0.51 ± 0.15. Levoglucosan correlated strongly with mannosan (R2 = 0.97 throughout the winter and the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio averaged 9.49 ± 1.63, whereas levoglucosan and mannosan exhibited relatively weak correlation (R2 = 0.73 during the typical summer period when the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio averaged 12.65 ± 3.38. Results from positive matrix factorization (PMF model analysis showed that about 50% of the OC and EC in Beijing were associated with biomass burning processes. In addition, a new source identification method was developed based on the comparison of the levoglucosan to K+ ratio and the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio among different types of biomass. Using this method, the major source of biomass burning aerosol in Beijing was suggested to be the combustion of crop residuals, while the

  9. Satellite Contributions to Global Change Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    By providing a global view with a level playing field (no region missed because of unfavorable surface conditions or political boundaries), satellites have made major contributions to improved monitoring and understanding of our constantly changing planet. The global view has allowed surprising realizations like the relative sparsity of lightning strikes over oceans and the large-scale undulations on the massive Antarctic ice sheet. It has allowed the tracking of all sorts of phenomena, including aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, as they move with the atmospheric circulation and impact weather and human health. But probably nothing that the global view allows is more important in the long term than its provision. of unbiased data sets to address the issue of global change, considered by many to be among the most important issues facing humankind today. With satellites we can monitor atmospheric temperatures at all latitudes and longitudes, and obtain a global average that lessens the likelihood of becoming endlessly mired in the confusions brought about by the certainty of regional differences. With satellites we can monitor greenhouse gases such as CO2 not just above individual research stations but around the globe. With satellites we can monitor the polar sea ice covers, as we have done since the late 1970s, determining and quantifying the significant reduction in Arctic sea ice and the slight growth in Antarctic sea ice over that period, With satellites we can map the full extent and changes in the Antarctic stratospheric ozone depletions that were first identified from using a single ground station; and through satellite data we have witnessed from afar land surface changes brought about by humans both intentionally, as with wide-scale deforestation, and unintentionally, as with the decay of the Aral Sea. The satellite data are far from sufficient for all that we need in order to understand the global system and forecast its changes, as we also need

  10. Quantifying emission reduction contributions by emerging economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moltmann, Sara; Hagemann, Markus; Eisbrenner, Katja; Hoehne, Niklas [Ecofys GmbH, Koeln (Germany); Sterk, Wolfgang; Mersmann, Florian; Ott, Hermann E.; Watanabe, Rie [Wuppertal Institut (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Further action is needed that goes far beyond what has been agreed so far under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol to 'prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system', the ultimate objective of the UNFCCC. It is out of question that developed countries (Annex I countries) will have to take a leading role. They will have to commit to substantial emission reductions and financing commitments due to their historical responsibility and their financial capability. However, the stabilisation of the climate system will require global emissions to peak within the next decade and decline well below half of current levels by the middle of the century. It is hence a global issue and, thus, depends on the participation of as many countries as possible. This report provides a comparative analysis of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, including their national climate plans, of the major emitting developing countries Brazil, China, India, Mexico, South Africa and South Korea. It includes an overview of emissions and economic development, existing national climate change strategies, uses a consistent methodology for estimating emission reduction potential, costs of mitigation options, provides an estimate of the reductions to be achieved through the national climate plans and finally provides a comparison of the results to the allocation of emission rights according to different global effort-sharing approaches. In addition, the report discusses possible nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) the six countries could take based on the analysis of mitigation options. This report is an output of the project 'Proposals for quantifying emission reduction contributions by emerging economies' by Ecofys and the Wuppertal Institute for the Federal Environment Agency in Dessau. It builds upon earlier joint work ''Proposals for contributions of emerging economies to the climate

  11. Contribution inequality in the spatial public goods game: Should the rich contribute more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Scale-free property exists in resource distribution, and the rich pay more in public goods is commonplace in reality. What will happen if the rich are expected to contribute more in the spatial public goods game? This paper therefore proposes a new contribution paradigm, in which individual contribution is determined by his payoff in the last evolution step. Tunable parameter w is used to characterize the contribution rate of nodes whose payoff is larger than the average. The results of simulations reveal that the impact of w on cooperation is associated with the enhancement factor r. When r is low, the higher w is, the lower the cooperation rate is. With the increment of r, the value of w to optimize cooperation rate increases with r. The relationship of cooperation rate and wealth on the network has also been investigated. Interestingly, higher cooperation rate does not always lead to higher wealth. Finally, the impact of w on the wealth distribution on the network is explored. The higher w reduces the inequality in wealth distribution by the shrinking of lower-class, which is enhanced by a higher r.

  12. [Cognitive neuroscience of aging. Contributions and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Fernando; Pereiro, Arturo X

    The cognitive neuroscience of aging is a young discipline that has emerged as a result of the combination of: A) the theoretical and explanatory frameworks proposed by the cognitive psychology perspective throughout the second half of the twentieth century; B) the designs and methodological procedures arising from experimental psychology and the need to test the hypotheses proposed from the cognitive psychology perspective; C) the contributions of the computer sciences to the explanation of brain functions; and D) the development and use of neuroimaging techniques that have enabled the recording of brain activity in humans while tasks that test some cognitive process or function are performed. An analysis on the impact of research conducted from this perspective over the last 3decades has been carried out, including its shortcomings, as well as the potential directions and usefulness that will advantageously continue to drive this discipline in its description and explanation of the process es of cerebral and cognitive aging. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Centers of Excellence Contribution to Knowledge Augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignone, O.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge management is a key need of the nuclear industry to cope with the knowledge limited augmentation and the risks of knowledge loss due to a number of reasons, such as: staff attrition, organizational changes, upgraded technologies, new projects implementation, and the nuclear power evolution in recent years (i.e., post-Fukushima upgrades). This document describes the contribution of nuclear centers of excellence to knowledge augmentation. The effective implementation of nuclear centers of excellence is a key success factor for the knowledge management programme of nuclear organizations. This document, is based on a real example of operating organization approach in launching such initiative for staff knowledge augmentation and performance improvement. Eventually, any type of organizations in the nuclear sector could apply the proposed technique to reach better knowledge usage. The nuclear centers of excellence are a key knowledge management initiative for the learning organizations that are caring about organizational intellectual capital and striving for performance improvement. The nuclear centers of excellence can be realized as a forum to exchange ideas, knowledge, information, experiences; to collect lessons learned; and to identify areas for improvement where further organizational competence building is needed. Usual realization of this initiative is going through an active staff involvement in knowledge sharing in a form of different technical communities of practice focusing on specific knowledge domains. (author

  14. Does coring contribute to tree mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mantgem, P.J.; Stephenson, N.L.

    2004-01-01

    We assess the potential of increment coring, a common method for measuring tree ages and growth, to contribute to mortality. We used up to 21 years of annual censuses from two cored and two uncored permanent plots in the Sierra Nevada of California, to detect changes in mortality rates 12 years following coring for individuals >5 cm DBH from two coniferous species, Abies concolor (Gordon & Glend.) Lindl. (white fir) and Abies magnifica A. Murr. (red fir). Using a randomized before-after control impact (BACI) design, we found no differences in mortality rates following coring for 825 cored and 525 uncored A. concolor and 104 cored and 66 uncored A. magnifica. These results support the view that collecting tree cores can be considered nondestructive sampling, but we emphasize that our 12-year postcoring records are short compared with the maximum life-span of these trees and that other species in different environments may prove to be more sensitive to coring. ?? 2004 NRC Canada.

  15. Epibiotic pressure contributes to biofouling invader success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Kaeden; Hewitt, Chad L; Campbell, Marnie L; Primo, Carmen; Miller, Steven D

    2017-07-12

    Reduced competition is a frequent explanation for the success of many introduced species. In benthic marine biofouling communities, space limitation leads to high rates of overgrowth competition. Some species can utilise other living organisms as substrate (epibiosis), proffering a competitive advantage for the epibiont. Additionally, some species can prevent or reduce epibiotic settlement on their surfaces and avoid being basibionts. To test whether epibiotic pressure differs between native and introduced species, we undertook ex situ experiments comparing bryozoan larval settlement to determine if introduced species demonstrate a greater propensity to settle as epibionts, and a reduced propensity to be basibionts, than native species. Here we report that introduced species opportunistically settle on any space (bare, native, or introduced), whereas native species exhibit a strong tendency to settle on and near other natives, but avoid settling on or near introduced basibionts. In addition, larvae of native species experience greater larval wastage (mortality) than introduced species, both in the presence and absence of living substrates. Introduced species' ability to settle on natives as epibionts, and in turn avoid epibiosis as basibionts, combined with significantly enhanced native larval wastage, provides a comprehensive suite of competitive advantages contributing to the invasion success of these biofouling species.

  16. Dan Joseph's contributions to disperse multiphase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    During his distinguished career, Dan Joseph worked on a vast array of problems. One of these, which occupied him off and on over the last two decades of his life, was that of flows with suspended finite-size particles at finite Reynolds numbers. He realized early on that progress in this field had to rely on the insight gained from numerical simulation, an area in which he was a pioneer. On the basis of the early numerical results he recognized the now famous ``drafting, kissing and tumbling'' mechanism of particle-particle interaction, the possibility of fluidization by lift and many others. With a number of colleagues and a series of gifted students he produced a significant body of work summarized in his on-line book Interrogations of Direct Numerical Simulation of Solid-Liquid Flows available from http://www.efluids.com/efluids/books/joseph.htm. This presentation will describe Joseph's contribution to the understanding of disperse multiphase flow and conclude with some examples from the author's recent work in this area. Supported by NSF.

  17. Towards psychoanalytic contribution to linguistic metaphor theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Tair

    2017-07-05

    This paper lays out a formulation of the psychoanalytical contribution to linguistic metaphor theory. The author's main argument is that psychoanalysis can help enrich and shed light on linguistic metaphor theories, since these have focused on the cognitive aspect, to the exclusion of the role played by affect. Based on the tight link between metaphor and symbol - both configurations of figurative language - the author shall apply ideas sourced from some of the key psychoanalytic symbolization theories, focusing in particular on Klein, Winnicott, and Ogden. The course of exploration will serve to trace the unconscious emotional aspects that participate in the metaphor's mechanism, just as they participate in the symbol's workings. The study leads to the main conclusion that the intersubjective transitional space is of substantial importance to metaphor's constitution, particularly in regard to novel metaphors. Expanding the understanding of metaphor's modus operandi has important implications in conceptual clarification and for an in-depth analytical work, and is of immense significance when it comes to analytical work with patients who suffer impairment of their metaphoric ability. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  18. Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1992-02-01

    An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth's interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges

  19. The Contribution of IVS to IGGOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagel, A.

    2002-05-01

    Since its inauguration in 1999, the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry has made significant progress in the coordination and utilisation of worldwide VLBI resources. Improving the visibility of the IVS components to a wider public in turn led to a higher motivation of the individuals to contribute to the global effort. Not only the number of IVS components but also their investments in terms of funds and manpower demonstrate the increased awareness of the importance of this joint international endeavour. The different demands of the users but also of the contributors often require the definition of priorities which are only being acceptable due to the existence of a strong umbrella organisation like the IVS. Significant progress has also been made in the area of routine data analysis and combination of results. By now, six IVS Analysis Centers provide the redundancy necessary for a robust combination of the results. The use of ITRF2000 station coordinates as the basis for the IVS combined EOP series is the most recent step towards the generation of a consistent chain from the quasi-inertial frame of radio sources to system Earth.

  20. Contribution of Gut Bacteria to Liver Pathobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gakuhei Son

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests a strong interaction between the gut microbiota and health and disease. The interactions of the gut microbiota and the liver have only recently been investigated in detail. Receiving approximately 70% of its blood supply from the intestinal venous outflow, the liver represents the first line of defense against gut-derived antigens and is equipped with a broad array of immune cells (i.e., macrophages, lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells to accomplish this function. In the setting of tissue injury, whereby the liver is otherwise damaged (e.g., viral infection, toxin exposure, ischemic tissue damage, etc., these same immune cell populations and their interactions with the infiltrating gut bacteria likely contribute to and promote these pathologies. The following paper will highlight recent studies investigating the relationship between the gut microbiota, liver biology, and pathobiology. Defining these connections will likely provide new targets for therapy or prevention of a wide variety of acute and chronic liver pathologies.

  1. Assessing Urban Landscape Variables’ Contributions to Microclimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy E. Parece

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The well-known urban heat island (UHI effect recognizes prevailing patterns of warmer urban temperatures relative to surrounding rural landscapes. Although UHIs are often visualized as single features, internal variations within urban landscapes create distinctive microclimates. Evaluating intraurban microclimate variability presents an opportunity to assess spatial dimensions of urban environments and identify locations that heat or cool faster than other locales. Our study employs mobile weather units and fixed weather stations to collect air temperatures across Roanoke, Virginia, USA, on selected dates over a two-year interval. Using this temperature data, together with six landscape variables, we interpolated (using Kriging and Random Forest air temperatures across the city for each collection period. Our results estimated temperatures with small mean square errors (ranging from 0.03 to 0.14; landscape metrics explained between 60 and 91% of temperature variations (higher when the previous day’s average temperatures were included as a variable. For all days, similar spatial patterns appeared for cooler and warmer areas in mornings, with distinctive patterns as landscapes warmed during the day and over successive days. Our results revealed that the most potent landscape variables vary according to season and time of day. Our analysis contributes new dimensions and new levels of spatial and temporal detail to urban microclimate research.

  2. THE CONTRIBUTION OF GESTURES TO PERSONAL BRANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brînduşa-Mariana Amălăncei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A form of (self-promotion but also an authentic strategic choice, the personal brand has become a topical preoccupation of marketing specialists. Personal branding or self-marketing represents an innovative concept that associates the efficiency of personal development with the effectiveness of communication and marketing techniques adapted to the individual and that comprises the entire collection of techniques allowing the identification and promotion of the self/individual. The main objective is a clear communication with regard to personal identity, no matter by means of which method, so that it gives uniqueness and offers a competitive advantage. Although online promotion is increasingly gaining ground for the creation of a personal brand, an individual’s verbal and nonverbal behaviour represent very important differentiating elements. Starting from the premise that gestures often complement, anticipate, substitute or contradict the verbal, we will endeavour to highlight a number of significations that can be attributed to the various body movements and that can successfully contribute to the creation of a powerful personal brand.

  3. Quantification of social contributions to earthquake mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, I. G.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; McCloskey, J.; Pelling, M.; Naylor, M.

    2013-12-01

    Death tolls in earthquakes, which continue to grow rapidly, are the result of complex interactions between physical effects, such as strong shaking, and the resilience of exposed populations and supporting critical infrastructures and institutions. While it is clear that the social context in which the earthquake occurs has a strong effect on the outcome, the influence of this context can only be exposed if we first decouple, as much as we can, the physical causes of mortality from our consideration. (Our modelling assumes that building resilience to shaking is a social factor governed by national wealth, legislation and enforcement and governance leading to reduced levels of corruption.) Here we attempt to remove these causes by statistically modelling published mortality, shaking intensity and population exposure data; unexplained variance from this physical model illuminates the contribution of socio-economic factors to increasing earthquake mortality. We find that this variance partitions countries in terms of basic socio-economic measures and allows the definition of a national vulnerability index identifying both anomalously resilient and anomalously vulnerable countries. In many cases resilience is well correlated with GDP; people in the richest countries are unsurprisingly safe from even the worst shaking. However some low-GDP countries rival even the richest in resilience, showing that relatively low cost interventions can have a positive impact on earthquake resilience and that social learning between these countries might facilitate resilience building in the absence of expensive engineering interventions.

  4. FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO PERINATAL MORTALITY : OPTIMIZING OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the various causes of perinatal deaths and adopt strategies to improve perinatal outcome at a referral teaching hospital in North Kerala. METHODS: A prospective observational study conducted at Institute of Maternal and Child Health, Government Medical College, Kozhikode. All perinatal deaths during the period January 2013 to December 2014 were analysed and from this factors responsible for perinatal deaths were identified. RESULTS: Out of total 30,042 deliveries , there were 966 perinatal deaths during the study period. 566 were still births and 400 early neonatal deaths. The perinatal mortality rate was 31.1 per 1000 live births. Perinatal asphyxia was the major cause of perinatal mortality. The important factors contributing to perinatal asphyxia were prematurity (39%, abruptio placenta (19% and MSAF ( 12%. Among the antenatal factors, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy leading to iatrogenic elective preterm delivery were the most important. CONCLUSION: Perinatal asphyxia due to prematurity and low birth weight emerged as the most important cause of perinatal mortality in this study and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were the most important antenatal complication leading to prematurity

  5. The Contribution of Missionaries to Shona Lexicography*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Advice Viriri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: The article discusses the developments in Shona lexicography during the colonial eraand the contribution made by the missionaries in general and Father M. Hannan in particularwhich later resulted in the on-going process of compiling monolingual dictionaries by the AfricanLanguages Research Institute (ALRI (into which the ALLEX project has been transformed. Themissionaries employed various methods that did not only signal the beginning of an economicallyexploitative relationship between "the West and the rest of us" but also had ancillary cultural consequences(Dathorne 1975: 3. Their motives towards the development of African literature in generaland Zimbabwean lexicographic work in particular were primarily evangelical and not to furthercreative writing. This caused Father Hannan to experience problems not only in his translationof the Shona Bible but also in his Standard Shona Dictionary. Hannan is used as an example becausehis translation problems were typical of those experienced by all missionaries. Hannan's dictionarywas a welcome new development using the orthography introduced in 1931 and revised in 1955.The aim of his dictionary was "to record Shona words in Standard Shona spelling" (Hannan 1959:ix. Hannan's dictionary has made a considerable contribution to standardising Shona orthography.

    Keywords: LEXICOGRAPHY, MISSIONARY, COBUILD, SHONA DICTIONARY, MONOLINGUALDICTIONARY, BILINGUAL DICTIONARY, CULTURE, TRANSLATION, STANDARDORTHOGRAPHY, COLONIALISM, CULTURAL IMPERIALISM, SHONA PROVERBS,AFRICAN LANGUAGES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (ALRI, INFLUENCE.

    Opsomming: Die bydrae van sendelinge tot die Sjonaleksikografie. Die artikelbespreek die ontwikkelinge in Sjonaleksikografie gedurende die koloniale tydperk en die bydraegemaak deur die sendelinge in die algemeen en Vader M. Hannan in die besonder, wat later uitgeloophet op die voortgaande proses van die samestelling van eentalige woordeboeke deur dieAfrican Languages

  6. Neuronal glycogen synthesis contributes to physiological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinadinos, Christopher; Valles-Ortega, Jordi; Boulan, Laura; Solsona, Estel; Tevy, Maria F; Marquez, Mercedes; Duran, Jordi; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Calbó, Joaquim; Blasco, Ester; Pumarola, Marti; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-10-01

    Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose and the carbohydrate energy store for animal cells. In the brain, it is essentially found in glial cells, although it is also present in minute amounts in neurons. In humans, loss-of-function mutations in laforin and malin, proteins involved in suppressing glycogen synthesis, induce the presence of high numbers of insoluble polyglucosan bodies in neuronal cells. Known as Lafora bodies (LBs), these deposits result in the aggressive neurodegeneration seen in Lafora's disease. Polysaccharide-based aggregates, called corpora amylacea (CA), are also present in the neurons of aged human brains. Despite the similarity of CA to LBs, the mechanisms and functional consequences of CA formation are yet unknown. Here, we show that wild-type laboratory mice also accumulate glycogen-based aggregates in the brain as they age. These structures are immunopositive for an array of metabolic and stress-response proteins, some of which were previously shown to aggregate in correlation with age in the human brain and are also present in LBs. Remarkably, these structures and their associated protein aggregates are not present in the aged mouse brain upon genetic ablation of glycogen synthase. Similar genetic intervention in Drosophila prevents the accumulation of glycogen clusters in the neuronal processes of aged flies. Most interestingly, targeted reduction of Drosophila glycogen synthase in neurons improves neurological function with age and extends lifespan. These results demonstrate that neuronal glycogen accumulation contributes to physiological aging and may therefore constitute a key factor regulating age-related neurological decline in humans. © 2014 The Authors. Aging cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Contribution of systematic reviews to management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Carly N; Possingham, Hugh P; Fuller, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reviews comprehensively summarize evidence about the effectiveness of conservation interventions. We investigated the contribution to management decisions made by this growing body of literature. We identified 43 systematic reviews of conservation evidence, 23 of which drew some concrete conclusions relevant to management. Most reviews addressed conservation interventions relevant to policy decisions; only 35% considered practical on-the-ground management interventions. The majority of reviews covered only a small fraction of the geographic and taxonomic breadth they aimed to address (median = 13% of relevant countries and 16% of relevant taxa). The likelihood that reviews contained at least some implications for management tended to increase as geographic coverage increased and to decline as taxonomic breadth increased. These results suggest the breadth of a systematic review requires careful consideration. Reviews identified a mean of 312 relevant primary studies but excluded 88% of these because of deficiencies in design or a failure to meet other inclusion criteria. Reviews summarized on average 284 data sets and 112 years of research activity, yet the likelihood that their results had at least some implications for management did not increase as the amount of primary research summarized increased. In some cases, conclusions were elusive despite the inclusion of hundreds of data sets and years of cumulative research activity. Systematic reviews are an important part of the conservation decision making tool kit, although we believe the benefits of systematic reviews could be significantly enhanced by increasing the number of reviews focused on questions of direct relevance to on-the-ground managers; defining a more focused geographic and taxonomic breadth that better reflects available data; including a broader range of evidence types; and appraising the cost-effectiveness of interventions. © 2013 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley

  8. Ketogenesis contributes to intestinal cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingding; Zhou, Yuning; Rychahou, Piotr; Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark

    2017-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium undergoes a continual process of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Previously, we have shown that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway has a critical role in intestinal homeostasis. However, the downstream targets mediating the effects of mTOR in intestinal cells are not known. Here, we show that the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) induces intestinal cell differentiation as noted by the increased expression of differentiation markers (Mucin2 (MUC2), lysozyme, IAP, sucrase-isomaltase, KRT20, villin, Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) and p21 Waf1 ). Conversely, knockdown of the ketogenic mitochondrial enzyme hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) attenuated spontaneous differentiation in the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Overexpression of HMGCS2, which we found is localized specifically in the more differentiated portions of the intestinal mucosa, increased the expression of CDX2, thus further suggesting the contributory role of HMGCS2 in intestinal differentiation. In addition, mice fed a ketogenic diet demonstrated increased differentiation of intestinal cells as noted by an increase in the enterocyte, goblet and Paneth cell lineages. Moreover, we showed that either knockdown of mTOR or inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin increases the expression of HMGCS2 in intestinal cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a possible cross-talk between mTOR and HMGCS2/βHB signaling in intestinal cells. In contrast, treatment of intestinal cells with βHB or feeding mice with a ketogenic diet inhibits mTOR signaling in intestinal cells. Together, we provide evidence showing that HMGCS2/βHB contributes to intestinal cell differentiation. Our results suggest that mTOR acts cooperatively with HMGCS2/βHB to maintain intestinal homeostasis.

  9. FAM5C contributes to aggressive periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia M Carvalho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive periodontitis is characterized by a rapid and severe periodontal destruction in young systemically healthy subjects. A greater prevalence is reported in Africans and African descendent groups than in Caucasians and Hispanics. We first fine mapped the interval 1q24.2 to 1q31.3 suggested as containing an aggressive periodontitis locus. Three hundred and eighty-nine subjects from 55 pedigrees were studied. Saliva samples were collected from all subjects, and DNA was extracted. Twenty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms were selected and analyzed by standard polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan chemistry. Non-parametric linkage and transmission distortion analyses were performed. Although linkage results were negative, statistically significant association between two markers, rs1935881 and rs1342913, in the FAM5C gene and aggressive periodontitis (p = 0.03 was found. Haplotype analysis showed an association between aggressive periodontitis and the haplotype A-G (rs1935881-rs1342913; p = 0.009. Sequence analysis of FAM5C coding regions did not disclose any mutations, but two variants in conserved intronic regions of FAM5C, rs57694932 and rs10494634, were found. However, these two variants are not associated with aggressive periodontitis. Secondly, we investigated the pattern of FAM5C expression in aggressive periodontitis lesions and its possible correlations with inflammatory/immunological factors and pathogens commonly associated with periodontal diseases. FAM5C mRNA expression was significantly higher in diseased versus healthy sites, and was found to be correlated to the IL-1beta, IL-17A, IL-4 and RANKL mRNA levels. No correlations were found between FAM5C levels and the presence and load of red complex periodontopathogens or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. This study provides evidence that FAM5C contributes to aggressive periodontitis.

  10. Physical Design Factors Contributing to Patient Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo; Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Freier, Patricia; Harvey, Thomas E; Lee, Jaehoon

    2017-02-03

    The aim of this study was to identify physical design elements that contribute to potential falls in patient rooms. An exploratory, physical simulation-based approach was adopted for the study. Twenty-seven subjects, older than 70 years (11 male and 16 female subjects), conducted scripted tasks in a mockup of a patient bathroom and clinician zone. Activities were captured using motion-capture technology and video recording. After biomechanical data processing, video clips associated with potential fall moments were extracted and then examined and coded by a group of registered nurses and health care designers. Exploratory analyses of the coded data were conducted followed by a series of multivariate analyses using regression models. In multivariate models with all personal, environmental, and postural variables, only the postural variables demonstrated statistical significance-turning, grabbing, pushing, and pulling in the bathroom and pushing and pulling in the clinician zone. The physical elements/attributes associated with the offending postures include bathroom configuration, intravenous pole, door, toilet seat height, flush, grab bars, over-bed table, and patient chair. Postural changes, during interactions with the physical environment, constitute the source of most fall events. Physical design must include simultaneous examination of postural changes in day-to-day activities in patient rooms and bathrooms. Among discussed testable recommendations in the article, the followings design strategies should be considered: (a) designing bathrooms to reduce turning as much as possible and (b) designing to avoid motions that involve 2 or more of the offending postures, such as turning and grabbing or grabbing and pulling, and so on.

  11. Traits contributing to the autistic spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D Steer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly recognised that traits associated with autism reflect a spectrum with no clear boundary between typical and atypical behaviour. Dimensional traits are needed to investigate the broader autism phenotype.Ninety-three individual measures reflecting components of social, communication and repetitive behaviours characterising autistic spectrum disorder (ASD were identified between the ages of 6 months and 9 years from the ALSPAC database. Using missing value imputation, data for 13,138 children were analysed. Factor analysis suggested the existence of 7 factors explaining 85% of the variance. The factors were labelled: verbal ability, language acquisition, social understanding, semantic-pragmatic skills, repetitive-stereotyped behaviour, articulation and social inhibition. Four factors (1, 3, 5 and 7 were specific to ASD being more strongly associated with this phenotype than other co-morbid conditions while other factors were more associated with learning difficulties and specific language impairment. Nevertheless, all 7 factors contributed independently to the explanation of ASD (p<0.001. Exploration of putative genetic causal factors such as variants in the CNTNAP2 gene showed a varying pattern of associations with these traits. An alternative predictive model of ASD was derived using four individual measures: the coherence subscale of the Children's Communication Checklist (9y, the Social and Communication Disorders Checklist (91 m, repetitive behaviour (69 m and the sociability subscale of the Emotionality Activity and Sociability measure (38 m. Although univarably these traits performed better than some factors, their combined explanations of ASD were similar (R(2 =  0.48.These results support the fractional nature of ASD with different aetiological origins for these components despite pleiotropic genetic effects being observed. These traits are likely to be useful in the exploration of ASD.

  12. Elements that contribute to healthy building design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftness, Vivian; Hakkinen, Bert; Adan, Olaf; Nevalainen, Aino

    2007-06-01

    The elements that contribute to a healthy building are multifactorial and can be discussed from different perspectives. WE PRESENT THREE VIEWPOINTS OF DESIGNING A HEALTHY BUILDING: the importance of sustainable development, the role of occupants for ensuring indoor air quality, and ongoing developments related to indoor finishes with low chemical emissions and good fungal resistance. Sustainable design rediscovers the social, environmental, and technical values of pedestrian and mixed-use communities, using existing infrastructures including "main streets" and small-town planning principles and recapturing indoor-outdoor relationships. This type of design introduces nonpolluting materials and assemblies with lower energy requirements and higher durability and recyclability. Building occupants play a major role in maintaining healthy indoor environments, especially in residences. Contributors to indoor air quality include cleaning habits and other behaviors; consumer products, furnishings, and appliances purchases, as well as where and how the occupants use them. Certification of consumer products and building materials as low-emitting products is a primary control measure for achieving good indoor air quality. Key products in this respect are office furniture, flooring, paints and coatings, adhesives and sealants, wall coverings, wood products, textiles, insulation, and cleaning products. Finishing materials play a major role in the quality of indoor air as related to moisture retention and mold growth. Sustainable design emphasizes the needs of infrastructure, lower energy consumption, durability, and recyclability. To ensure good indoor air quality, the product development for household use should aim to reduce material susceptibility to contaminants such as mold and should adopt consumer-oriented product labeling.

  13. Clinical Research Informatics Contributions from 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, C; Choquet, R

    2016-11-10

    To summarize key contributions to current research in the field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) and to select best papers published in 2015. A bibliographic search using a combination of MeSH and free terms search over PubMed on Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) was performed followed by a double-blind review in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be then peer-reviewed by external reviewers. A consensus meeting between the two section editors and the editorial team was finally organized to conclude on the selection of best papers. Among the 579 returned papers published in the past year in the various areas of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) - i) methods supporting clinical research, ii) data sharing and interoperability, iii) re-use of healthcare data for research, iv) patient recruitment and engagement, v) data privacy, security and regulatory issues and vi) policy and perspectives - the full review process selected four best papers. The first selected paper evaluates the capability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM) to support the representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data) during a complete clinical study lifecycle. The second selected paper describes a prototype for secondary use of electronic health records data captured in non-standardized text. The third selected paper presents a privacy preserving electronic health record linkage tool and the last selected paper describes how big data use in US relies on access to health information governed by varying and often misunderstood legal requirements and ethical considerations. A major trend in the 2015 publications is the analysis of observational, "nonexperimental" information and the potential biases and confounding factors hidden in the data that will have to be carefully taken into account to validate new predictive models. In addiction, researchers have to understand

  14. The soil physics contributions of Edgar Buckingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, J.R.; Landa, E.R.

    2005-01-01

    During 1902 to 1906 as a soil physicist at the USDA Bureau of Soils (BOS), Edgar Buckingham originated the concepts of matric potential, soil-water retention curves, specific water capacity, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) as a distinct property of a soil. He applied a formula equivalent to Darcy's law (though without specific mention of Darcy's work) to unsaturated flow. He also contributed significant research on quasi-empirical formulas for K as a function of water content, water flow in capillary crevices and in thin films, and scaling. Buckingham's work on gas flow in soils produced paradigms that are consistent with our current understanding. His work on evaporation elucidated the concept of self-mulching and produced sound and sometimes paradoxical generalizations concerning conditions that favor or retard evaporation. Largely overshadowing those achievements, however, is that he launched a theory, still accepted today, that could predict transient water content as a function of time and space. Recently discovered documents reveal some of the arguments Buckingham had with BOS officials, including the text of a two-paragraph conclusion of his famous 1907 report on soil water, and the official letter documenting rejection of that text. Strained interpersonal relations motivated the departure of Buckingham and other brilliant physicists (N.E. Dorsey, F.H. King, and Lyman Briggs) from the BOS during 1903 to 1906. Given that Buckingham and his BOS colleagues had been rapidly developing the means of quantifying unsaturated flow, these strained relations probably slowed the advancement of unsaturated flow theory. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  15. French contribution to develop Prussian blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse Bardot, Isabelle; Bardot, Sebastien; Menetrier, Florence; Leiterer, Alexandra; Pech, Annick

    2014-11-01

    Prussian blue is an antidote indicated for the treatment of internal cesium radioisotope contamination. The French armed forces develop and manufacture some antidotal drugs meeting regulatory, analytical and pharmaceutical requirements in order to submit marketing authorization documentation. Prior to an initial meeting with the French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM) in 2011, the authors were following regulatory developments in free cyanide release, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) synthesis, API specifications, ability of cesium/Prussian blue binding products and collection of pre-clinical data. Free cyanide release was assessed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometry at 615 nm. The kinetics of cesium were evaluated in vitro by flame atomic absorption. Good laboratory practice (GLP) and mutagenic assays were examined in rat studies to assess 'no absorption'. A validated method makes it possible to assess the free cyanide in API according to the published tolerability in humans. The French synthesizer meets good manufacturing practice (GMP) to give a drug that is compliant with all specifications, ensuring its high quality. Two standard mutagenic assays showed mutagenic potential, leading to further tests to obtain more information on any induced chromosomal aberrations. Absorption could be an important factor in determining the risk posed by the drug. The French health service provides the country with several antidotal drugs reducing Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) risks. Using their GMP manufacturing facilities and pharmaceutical expertise, the French armed forces have contributed to developing drugs with marketing authorization, such as pentetate calcium trisodium (Ca-DTPA) for infusion, or under development with the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), such as Ca-DTPA by inhalation.

  16. Serotonergic contribution to boys' behavioral regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Nantel-Vivier

    Full Text Available Animal and human adult studies reveal a contribution of serotonin to behavior regulation. Whether these findings apply to children is unclear. The present study investigated serotonergic functioning in boys with a history of behavior regulation difficulties through a double-blind, acute tryptophan supplementation procedure.Participants were 23 boys (age 10 years with a history of elevated physical aggression, recruited from a community sample. Eleven were given a chocolate milkshake supplemented with 500 mg tryptophan, and 12 received a chocolate milkshake without tryptophan. Boys engaged in a competitive reaction time game against a fictitious opponent, which assessed response to provocation, impulsivity, perspective taking, and sharing. Impulsivity was further assessed through a Go/No-Go paradigm. A computerized emotion recognition task and a staged instrumental help incident were also administered.Boys, regardless of group, responded similarly to high provocation by the fictitious opponent. However, boys in the tryptophan group adjusted their level of responding optimally as a function of the level of provocation, whereas boys in the control group significantly decreased their level of responding towards the end of the competition. Boys in the tryptophan group tended to show greater perspective taking, tended to better distinguish facial expressions of fear and happiness, and tended to provide greater instrumental help to the experimenter.The present study provides initial evidence for the feasibility of acute tryptophan supplementation in children and some effect of tryptophan supplementation on children's behaviors. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential impact of increased serotonergic functioning on boys' dominant and affiliative behaviors.

  17. Salivary contribution to exhaled nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterquist, W; Pedroletti, C; Lundberg, J O; Alving, K

    1999-02-01

    Dietary and metabolic nitrate is distributed from the blood to the saliva by active uptake in the salivary glands, and is reduced to nitrite in the oral cavity by the action of certain bacteria. Since it has been reported that nitric oxide may be formed nonenzymatically from nitrite this study aimed to determine whether salivary nitrite could influence measurements of exhaled NO. Ten healthy subjects fasted overnight and ingested 400 mg potassium nitrate, equivalent to approximately 200 g spinach. Exhaled NO and nasal NO were regularly measured with a chemiluminescence technique up to 3 h after the ingestion. Measurements of exhaled NO were performed with a single-breath procedure, standardized to a 20-s exhalation, at a flow of 0.15 L x s(-1), and oral pressure of 8-10 cmH2O. Values of NO were registered as NO release rate (pmol x s(-1)) during the plateau of exhalation. Exhaled NO increased steadily over time after nitrate load and a maximum was seen at 120 min (77.0+/-15.2 versus 31.2+/-3.0 pmol x s(-1), pnitrite concentrations increased in parallel; at 120 min there was a four-fold increase compared with baseline (1.56+/-0.44 versus 0.37+/-0.09 mM, pnitrite-reducing conditions in the oral cavity were also manipulated by the use of different mouthwash procedures. The antibacterial agent chlorhexidine acetate (0.2%) decreased NO release by almost 50% (pnitrate loading and reduced the preload control levels by close to 30% (pnitric oxide formation contributes to nitric oxide in exhaled air and a large intake of nitrate-rich foods before the investigation might be misinterpreted as an elevated inflammatory activity in the airways. This potential source of error and the means for avoiding it should be considered in the development of a future standardized method for measurements of exhaled nitric oxide.

  18. Contributions to Pursuit-Evasion Game Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler, Dave Wilson

    is developed that requires minimal information and highlights a limitation of dominance regions. These contributions extend pursuit-evasion game theory to a number of games that have not previously been solved, and in some cases, the solutions presented are more amenable to implementation than previous methods.

  19. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS): Monthly Contributions for 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    For 2016, the contribution rate for active and retired CHIS members will be 4.86%. The amounts of the fixed contributions for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and other associates), as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity or with a retirement pension (including a CERN pension), are thus as follows:   1. Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is 1218 CHF per month. This fixed contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and other associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount, 609 CHF, is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and other associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 487 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insurance cover on a voluntary and temporary basis. 2. Supplementary contributions The supplementary contribution for the spouse or registered partner of a staff member, fellow or pensioner is now as follows, according to the spouse’s month...

  20. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR Workshop, phase IIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomabechi, Ken; Hiraoka, Tohru; Fujisawa, Noboru; Nishio, Satoshi; Sawada, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Takeshi.

    1982-11-01

    Japanese contributions at INTOR Phase 2A are summarized as a first three chapters of the report, Japanese Contributions to INTOR Workshop, Phase 2A. This report contains Introduction, Summary of the total report and INTOR Concepts. (author)

  1. The contributions of construction material waste to project cost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Material wastage on construction sites can contribute to cost overruns. Research to provide evidence of the extent of material wastages' contribution to cost overruns on construction sites is based mostly on surveys. Thus, the actual contribution is not yet ascertained. The purpose of this article is to report the results of an ...

  2. 26 CFR 1.408A-5 - Recharacterized contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transfers to a traditional IRA the $160,000 plus allocable net income. No other contributions have been made... the FIRST IRA, and any net income transferred with the recharacterized contribution is treated as..., then is moved (with net income attributable to the contribution) in a tax-free transfer to another IRA...

  3. 5 CFR 831.405 - Interest on voluntary contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....405 Section 831.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... contributions stop earning interest on the earliest of— (1) The date when OPM authorizes payment to the... voluntary contributions to purchase additional annuity, voluntary contributions stop earning interest on the...

  4. 76 FR 18490 - Contributions to the Telecommunications Relay Service Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ...] Contributions to the Telecommunications Relay Service Fund AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... service to participate in and contribute to the Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS) Fund. The law... INFORMATION: This is a summary of the Commission's Contributions to the Telecommunications Relay Service Fund...

  5. Shear Strength of Concrete I-Beams - Contributions of Flanges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teoh, B. K.; Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of flanges to the shear strength of reinforced concrete beams has up to now either been neglected or evaluated by very simple empirical formulas. However, the contribution may sometimes be large, up to 20-30%. In this paper the flange contribution for shear reinforced I-beams has...

  6. 26 CFR 1.704-4 - Distribution of contributed property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fact that A was entitled to 50 percent of the $20,000 post-contribution appreciation in Property B. The... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Distribution of contributed property. 1.704-4... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Partners and Partnerships § 1.704-4 Distribution of contributed property...

  7. 75 FR 39034 - Public Housing Annual Contributions Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Contributions Contract AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... Contributions Contract (ACC) with certain requirements applicable to all project and other requirements... Contributions Contract. OMB Approval Number: 2577-New. Form Numbers: Certain information collections do not have...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3231(e)-2 - Contribution base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contribution base. 31.3231(e)-2 Section 31.3231... Contribution base. The term compensation does not include any remuneration paid during any calendar year by an employer to an employee for services rendered in excess of the applicable contribution base. For rules...

  9. Contributions of GRACE to Climate Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Famiglietti, James; Chambers, Don P.; Wahr, John

    2011-01-01

    western Antarctica. For 2002 to present, the rate of ice mass loss has been 200 to 300 GT/yr in Greenland and 70 to 210 GT/yr in Antarctica, and some scientists are suggesting that the rates are accelerating. Similarly, GRACE has been used to monitor mass changes in alpine glaciers. Tamisiea et al. first characterized glacier melt along the southern coast of Alaska, more recently estimated to be occurring at a rate of 84 GT/yr. Chen et al. estimated that Patagonian glaciers are melting at a rate of 28 GT/yr, and estimated that the high mountains of central Asia lose ice at a rate of 47 GT/yr. Tapley et al. and Wahr et al. presented the first GRACE based estimates of changes in column-integrated terrestrial water storage (TWS; the sum of ground-water, soil moisture, surface waters, snow, ice, and water stored in vegetation) at continental scales. Since then, dozens of studies have shown that GRACE based estimates of regional to continental scale TWS variations agree with independent information, and some innovative uses of GRACE data have been developed. Rodell et al. (2004) and Swenson and Wahr (2006) demonstrated that by combining GRACE derived terrestrial water storage changes with observations of precipitation and runoff in a river basin scale water budget, it was possible to produce new estimates of evapotranspiration and atmospheric moisture convergence, essential climate variables that are difficult to estimate accurately. Similarly, GRACE has been used to constrain estimates of global river discharge and the contribution of changes in TWS to sea level rise. Crowley et al. observed a negative correlation between interannual TWS anomalies in the Amazon and the Congo River basin. Yeh et al. and Rodell et al. estimated regionally averaged groundwater storage variations based on GRACE and auxiliary observations. Rodell et al. and Tiwari et al. applied that method to quantify massive groundwater depletion in northern India caused by over reliance on aquifers for irration

  10. The Italian contribution to the CSES satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Livio

    2016-04-01

    We present the Italian contribution to the CSES (China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite) mission. The CSES satellite aims at investigating electromagnetic field, plasma and particles in the near-Earth environment in order to study in particular seismic precursors, particles fluxes (from Van Allen belts, cosmic rays, solar wind, etc.), anthropogenic electromagnetic pollution and more in general the atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling mechanisms that can affect the climate changes. The launch of CSES - the first of a series of several satellite missions - is scheduled by the end of 2016. The CSES satellite has been financed by the CNSA (China National Space Agency) and developed by CEA (China Earthquake Administration) together with several Chinese research institutes and private companies such as the DFH (that has developed the CAST2000 satellite platform). Italy participates to the CSES satellite mission with the LIMADOU project funded by ASI (Italian Space Agency) in collaboration with the Universities of Roma Tor Vergata, Uninettuno, Trento, Bologna and Perugia, as well as the INFN (Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics), INGV (Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology) and INAF-IAPS (Italian National Institute of Astrophysics and Planetology). Many analyses have shown that satellite observations of electromagnetic fields, plasma parameters and particle fluxes in low Earth orbit may be useful in order to study the existence of electromagnetic emissions associated with the occurrence of earthquakes of medium and high magnitude. Although the earthquakes forecasting is not possible today, it is certainly a major challenge - and perhaps even a duty - for science in the near future. The claims that the reported anomalies (of electromagnetic, plasma and particle parameters) are seismic precursors are still intensely debated and analyses for confirming claimed correlations are still lacking. In fact, ionospheric currents, plasma

  11. Less work, less respect: authors' perceived importance of research contributions and their declared contributions to research articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaniš, Ana; Hren, Darko; Marušić, Matko; Marušić, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Attitudes towards authorship are connected with authors' research experience and with knowledge of authorship criteria of International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). The objective of this study was to assess association between authors' perceived importance of contributions for authorship qualification and their participation in manuscripts submitted to a journal. Authors (n = 1181) of 265 manuscripts submitted to the Croatian Medical Journal were asked to identify and rate their contribution in the preparation of the submitted manuscript (0-none to 4-full for 11 listed contributions) and the importance of these contributions as authorship qualifications (0-none to 4-full). They were randomly allocated into 3 groups: the first (n = 90 manuscripts, n = 404 authors) first received the contribution disclosure form and then contribution importance-rating questionnaire; the second (n = 88 manuscripts, n = 382 authors) first received the rating questionnaire and then the contribution disclosure form, and the third group (n = 87 manuscripts, n = 395 authors) received both questionnaires at the same time. We compared authors' perception of importance of contribution categories. 1014 (85.9%) authors of 235 manuscripts responded. Authors who declared contribution to a specific category rated it as more important for authorship than those authors who did not contribute to the same category (P>0.005 for all contribution categories, Mann-Withney test). Authors qualifying for ICMJE authorship rated all contribution categories higher than non-qualifying authors. For all contributions, associations between perceived importance of contribution and actual author's contribution were statistically significant. Authorship seems to be not a normative issue subjective to categorization into criteria, but also a very personal view of the importance and value of one's contributions.

  12. Measurement of the contribution of neutrons to hadron calorimeter signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, N.; Berntzon, L.; Cardini, A.; Ferrari, R.; Gaudio, G.; Hauptman, J.; Kim, H.; La Rotonda, L.; Livan, M.; Meoni, E.; Paar, H.; Penzo, A.; Pinci, D.; Policicchio, A.; Popescu, S.; Susinno, G.; Roh, Y.; Vandelli, W.; Wigmans, R.

    2007-01-01

    The contributions of neutrons to hadronic signals from the DREAM calorimeter are measured by analyzing the time structure of these signals. The neutrons, which mainly originate from the evaporation stage of nuclear breakup in the hadronic shower development process, contribute through elastic scattering off protons in the plastic scintillating fibers which provide the dE/dx information in this calorimeter. This contribution is characterized by an exponential tail in the pulse shape, with a time constant of ∼25ns. The relative contribution of neutrons to the signals increases with the distance from the shower axis. As expected, the neutrons do not contribute to the DREAM Cherenkov signals

  13. Contribution of Systematic Reviews to Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    COOK, CARLY N; POSSINGHAM, HUGH P; FULLER, RICHARD A

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews comprehensively summarize evidence about the effectiveness of conservation interventions. We investigated the contribution to management decisions made by this growing body of literature. We identified 43 systematic reviews of conservation evidence, 23 of which drew some concrete conclusions relevant to management. Most reviews addressed conservation interventions relevant to policy decisions; only 35% considered practical on-the-ground management interventions. The majority of reviews covered only a small fraction of the geographic and taxonomic breadth they aimed to address (median = 13% of relevant countries and 16% of relevant taxa). The likelihood that reviews contained at least some implications for management tended to increase as geographic coverage increased and to decline as taxonomic breadth increased. These results suggest the breadth of a systematic review requires careful consideration. Reviews identified a mean of 312 relevant primary studies but excluded 88% of these because of deficiencies in design or a failure to meet other inclusion criteria. Reviews summarized on average 284 data sets and 112 years of research activity, yet the likelihood that their results had at least some implications for management did not increase as the amount of primary research summarized increased. In some cases, conclusions were elusive despite the inclusion of hundreds of data sets and years of cumulative research activity. Systematic reviews are an important part of the conservation decision making tool kit, although we believe the benefits of systematic reviews could be significantly enhanced by increasing the number of reviews focused on questions of direct relevance to on-the-ground managers; defining a more focused geographic and taxonomic breadth that better reflects available data; including a broader range of evidence types; and appraising the cost-effectiveness of interventions. Contribuciones de las Revisiones Sistemáticas a las

  14. CHIS - Annual adjustment of benefits and fixed contributions

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    As foreseen by the CHIS Rules, an annual adjustment is applied to: ceilings for certain benefits contributions for voluntary membership as well as supplementary contributions for spouses/partners. Benefits The ceilings have been maintained at the level of 2009. The full list of benefits is available on the CHIS Website.   Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on reference salary II is now 975 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntary affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this rate (487 CHF) is applied to apprentices as well as to voluntary affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. A rate of 390 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insurance cover on a voluntary and temporarily basis.   Supplementary contributions From 1st January 2010 the supplementary contribution for the spouse or registered partner of a staff member, fellow or pensioner is as follow...

  15. Contribution of Heavy Water Board in nuclear fuel cycle technologies. Contributed Paper IT-03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    The three stage Indian nuclear power programme envisages use of closed nuclear fuel cycle and thorium utilization as its mainstay for long term energy security on sustainable basis. India is committed to realize this objective through the development and deployment of frontier technologies pertaining to all aspects of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Comprehensive indigenous capabilities have been developed in all aspects of nuclear power and associated fuel cycles. Heavy Water Board (HWB), with its abiding objective of fulfilling demand of heavy water for India's flourishing nuclear power program, is one of the frontrunner in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology. HWB is now engaged in wide spectrum of activities in various facets of fuel cycle covering all the three stages of Indian Nuclear Power Programme. HWB is contributing to Nuclear Fuel Cycle through large scale production and sustained supply of key input materials including heavy water, solvents for nuclear hydrometallurgy, 10 B enriched boron etc

  16. CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS) Contributions – Changes for 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Following the 2010 five-yearly review of financial and social conditions, which included the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), the CERN Council decided in December 2010 to progressively increase the level of contributions over the period 2011-2015.   For 2012, the contribution rate of active and retired CHIS members will be 4.41%. The amounts of the fixed premiums for voluntarily insured members (e.g. users and associates) as well as the supplementary contributions for spouses with income from a professional activity increase accordingly : Voluntary contributions The full contribution based on Reference Salary II is now 1094 CHF per month. This fixed amount contribution is applied to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with normal coverage. Half of this amount (547 CHF) is applied to apprentices as well as to voluntarily affiliated users and associates with reduced coverage. Finally, an amount of 438 CHF is applied to children maintaining their insurance cover on a voluntary and tempo...

  17. Proposed level of Member States' contributions as from 2006

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The document "The scientific activities of CERN and budget estimates for the years 2006-2009 and Projections for the year 2010" was presented to the Finance Committee in June. At its June Session, the Council requested the Management to prepare the Preliminary Draft Budget for 2006 on the basis of an income level corresponding to the 2005 contributions at 2005 prices, excluding the additional income resulting from the exceptional indexation of the two Host States. This document contains a proposal for a contribution level that takes account of these constraints, and expresses the need for a decision on the special cases of three Member States contributions. The Finance Committee is invited to recommend and the Council to approve the minimum level of contributions of 977.3 MCHF in 2006, with the consideration of possible transition measures for the contributions of Finland, Greece and Portugal. Additional voluntary contributions from the Host States and application of agreed transition measures will allow the ...

  18. Dissociating contributions of head and torso to spatial reference frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian J T; Ferrè, Elisa R; Longo, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    contribution of each part to spatial judgments. Both the head and the torso contributed to judgements, though with greater contributions from the torso. A second experiment manipulating visual contrast of the torso showed that this does not reflect low-level differences in visual salience between body parts....... Our results demonstrate that spatial perspective-taking relies on a weighted combination of reference frames centred on different parts of the body....

  19. Contribution of different body segments in Sit and Reach Test

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Perin; Leandra Ulbricht; Eduardo Borba Neves

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to determine the contributions of the hip joint, lumbar and thoracic spine in the execution of Sit and Reach (SR) in young Brazilians. Subjects were 195 boys from 18 to 19 years., Sit and Reach  was evaluated with angular kinematic analysis through of Photogrammetry to identify the contribution of body segments in trunk flexion.  A protocol was developed for evaluating reference angles that were transformed into percentage contribution of the segments. Based on the results,...

  20. Contributions from Women to the Radiation Sciences: A Brief History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Nicole E

    2017-04-01

    Contributions from men to radiation science are well known, particularly the early contributions from such luminaries as William Roentgen, James Chadwick, Niels Bohr, Robert Oppenheimer, and the like. Although not ignored per se, beyond Marie Curie and Lise Meitner, the contributions of female nuclear scientists are not as widely recognized. This paper provides a concise historical summary of contributions to radiation science from the discovery of radiation through the current status of international leadership within the radiation protection community. Beyond lead scientists and academics, this paper also considers support personnel as well as the role women have played in the advancement of radiation epidemiology.

  1. Influence Of The Social Contributions On The Enterprise Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta MIHĂILĂ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The current fiscal system comprises a multitude of taxes, dues and contributions which the enterprise has to pay. The large number of taxes and dues to be paid put a high fiscal pressure on the enterprise and the social contributions are a determining factor in the manifestation of the fiscal behaviour of the enterprises. The employer has to pay to the state a significant proportion of the gross wage of the employee, almost 30%, which includes: the contribution to the social insurances, the contribution to the unemployment fund, the contribution to the Single National Fund for Health Social Insurance, the contribution to the guarantee fund for wages, the contribution to the health insurances, the contribution to the fund for accidents and the fee for the Chamber of Labour. The employee must also pay the state a total of 32.5% which consists of the contribution to the social insurances, the contribution to the unemployment fund, the contribution to the health insurances and the income tax. A simple calculation shows that the net income of the employee from his/her gross income is much lower than the revenue to the state from this wage. The state charges a burdening 45% on each job, while the employee earns almost 55%. This percentage is an obstacle for business development in Romania, where the labour force is overtaxed. Within this context, the pressure presumed by any increase of the minimal national wage is very strong for the employers and it generates unemployment, informal work and tax evasion.

  2. Student Scientific Conference PriF UK 2017. Proceedings of reviewed contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, M.; Dzugasova, V.; Bobovska, A.

    2017-01-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (132 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (52 contributions); (iii) Geology (33 contributions); (iv) Geography (15 contributions); (v) Didactics (4 contributions); (vi) Environmental Science (9 contributions);) Contributions relevant of INIS interest (42 contributions) has been inputted to INIS.

  3. Factors contributing to, and effects of, teenage pregnancy in Juba

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the factors contributing to, and effecting, pregnancy among teenagers in Juba. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in Juba Teaching Hospital among 50 randomly sampled pregnant teenagers in 2015. RESULTS: The factors contributing to teenage pregnancy included: ...

  4. Infant Visual Recognition Memory: Independent Contributions of Speed and Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Susan A.; Feldman, Judith F.; Jankowski, Jeffery J.

    2003-01-01

    Examined contributions of cognitive processing speed, short-term memory capacity, and attention to infant visual recognition memory. Found that infants who showed better attention and faster processing had better recognition memory. Contributions of attention and processing speed were independent of one another and similar at all ages studied--5,…

  5. Contribution Paternelle De Genotypes Sauvages d\\'Hevea ( Hevea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the genetic brewing within this collection, the paternal contribution of 50 genotypes transplanted in a seeds orchard, has been studied with 8 microsatellites loci through paternity analysis in 2 years successively. ... Thus, paternal contribution appear to be a clonal characteristic of rubber tree species. Keywords: ...

  6. 23 CFR 710.507 - State and local contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State and local contributions. 710.507 Section 710.507 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT RIGHT-OF-WAY AND REAL ESTATE Property Acquisition Alternatives § 710.507 State and local contributions. (a...

  7. 24 CFR 982.151 - Annual contributions contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Contract and PHA Administration of Program § 982.151 Annual contributions contract. (a) Nature of ACC. (1) An annual contributions contract (ACC) is a written contract between HUD and a PHA. Under the ACC... owners and for the PHA administrative fee. The ACC specifies the maximum payment over the ACC term. The...

  8. Contribution of "Women's Gold" to West African livelihoods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouliot, Mariéve

    2012-01-01

    Contribution of ``Women's Gold'' to West African Livelihoods: The Case of Shea ( Vitellaria paradoxa ) in Burkina Faso. This paper (i) quantifies the contribution that Vitellaria paradoxa makes to the total income of rural households belonging to different economic groups in two areas of Burkina...

  9. Arab Contributions to World Knowledge: A Contemporary Curriculum Imperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hazza, Tami Craft; Lucking, Robert

    2015-01-01

    American K-12 school curricula are often bereft of acknowledgements of the historical contributions of Arab societies to our present-day intellectual heritage, an oversight most apparent in the sciences. Teachers in a thriving democracy are obliged to introduce contemporary scholarship that reflects the contributions of Arab scientists between the…

  10. Factors contributing to delay in commencement of immunization in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delay in receipt of immunization may result in a child being susceptible to vaccine preventable diseases for prolonged periods. Identification of factors which contribute to delay in receipt of immunization will help in developing targeted interventions. This study examined prospectively factors contributing to delay in the ...

  11. Availability, Use and Contribution of Support Services to Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the university's support services is to support, enable and promote worldclass learning, discovery and enterprise and so make vital contribution to students' success and well-being. This work examined the availability, use and contribution of these support services to students' academic activities and social life.

  12. Why Should Learners Contribute to the Self-Access Centre?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Diane

    2004-01-01

    As one element of a self-directed learning program at the Arabian Gulf University in Bahrain, students make a contribution to the self-access center (SAC) in the form of a language learning worksheet or other English-enhancing activity. The student contributions are evaluated by other students and added to the SAC materials banks. This initiative…

  13. John Nelson Darby: His Contributions to Evangelical Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Winston Terrance

    2010-01-01

    The study reported in this article focused on the contributions of John Nelson Derby to biblical hermeneutics and contemporary eschatological thought. Darby continues to exert a great influence on Christianity, particularly conservative evangelical Christianity. This research provides a discussion of Darby's contributions to contemporary…

  14. 76 FR 65965 - Contributions to the Telecommunications Relay Services Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ...] Contributions to the Telecommunications Relay Services Fund AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS) Fund in a manner prescribed by regulation that is consistent with and... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This is a summary of the Commission's Contributions to the Telecommunications Relay...

  15. 25 CFR 141.29 - Political contributions restricted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Political contributions restricted. 141.29 Section 141.29 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES BUSINESS PRACTICES ON THE NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.29 Political contributions...

  16. Reading beyond statistics: The contribution of Kiswahili video film ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper identifies and analyses the contributions of the video film industry in the Tanzanian economy beyond provided statistics. It highlights the challenges one could encounter in obtaining data which represent 'actual' and 'direct' contribution of the industry to the national economy. The paper also assesses the need for ...

  17. Training in Counseling Psychology: An Introduction to the Major Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Charles R.; Mollen, Debra

    2011-01-01

    This Major Contribution, consisting of four articles, critically evaluates the status of training in counseling psychology, especially at the entry level, and offers a model for moving the field forward. In this first article, we provide a rationale for the contribution, laying the foundation for the subsequent three articles. Specifically, we ask…

  18. B. F. Skinner's Contributions to Applied Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Edward K.; Smith, Nathaniel G.; Altus, Deborah E.

    2005-01-01

    Our paper reviews and analyzes B. F. Skinner's contributions to applied behavior analysis in order to assess his role as the field's originator and founder. We found, first, that his contributions fall into five categorizes: the style and content of his science, his interpretations of typical and atypical human behavior, the implications he drew…

  19. Government's contribution to the development of translation in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African government has contributed tremendously to the development of translation, a contribution which is not always rightfully acknowledged or valued. The development of translation benefited significantly from the country's official bilingualism policy of 1910 which necessitated the translation of a variety of text ...

  20. Daniel L. Schacter: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Daniel L. Schacter as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Daniel L. Schacter's major theoretical and empirical contributions include groundbreaking research on the psychological and neural foundations of implicit and explicit memory, memory distortions and…