WorldWideScience

Sample records for dioxide emissions game

  1. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Du, Ding

    2015-09-01

    This study extends the literature on forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by applying the reduced-form econometrics approach of Schmalensee et al. (1998) to a more recent sample period, the post-1997 period. Using the post-1997 period is motivated by the observation that the strengthening pace of global climate policy may have been accelerated since 1997. Based on our parameter estimates, we project 25% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 according to an economic and population growth scenario that is more consistent with recent global trends. Our forecasts are conservative due to that we do not have sufficient data to fully take into account recent developments in the global economy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon dioxide abatement as a differential game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahvonen, O.

    1993-01-01

    The report combines predictions on greenhouse warming, CO 2 abatement costs and adaptation costs in a differential game framework. The specified model makes it possible to solve the payoffs of the subgame perfect solution of a two state variable nonautonomous problem with N unequal countries. Abatement cost parameters are calibrated with a global energy sector model and climate parameters are based on empirical time series. Simulation suggests that the backstop technology assumption in the abatement cost model may imply drastic cuts in optimal emission levels. Compared to the Nash noncooperative equilibrium a pareto optimal agreement is found to be beneficial for developing countries but more costly for the industrial world. Given the present damage estimates, the losses due to an emission stabilizing agreement may be 400 times higher than maximum potential gains from cooperation

  3. Anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions: 1850–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur aerosols impact human health, ecosystems, agriculture, and global and regional climate. A new annual estimate of anthropogenic global and regional sulfur dioxide emissions has been constructed spanning the period 1850–2005 using a bottom-up mass balance method, calibrated to country-level inventory data. Global emissions peaked in the early 1970s and decreased until 2000, with an increase in recent years due to increased emissions in China, international shipping, and developing countries in general. An uncertainty analysis was conducted including both random and systemic uncertainties. The overall global uncertainty in sulfur dioxide emissions is relatively small, but regional uncertainties ranged up to 30%. The largest contributors to uncertainty at present are emissions from China and international shipping. Emissions were distributed on a 0.5° grid by sector for use in coordinated climate model experiments.

  4. Tourism Transport, Technology, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Technological development from horse-drawn carriages to the new Airbus A380 has led to a remarkable increase in both the capacity and speed of tourist travel. This development has an endogenous systemic cause and will continue to increase carbon dioxide emissions/energy consumption if left

  5. Carbon dioxide emissions from Indian monsoonal estuaries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Viswanadham, R.; Rao, G.D.; Prasad, V.R.; Kumar, B; Naidu, S.A.; Kumar, N.A.; Rao, D.B; Sridevi, T.; Krishna, M.S.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Sadhuram, Y.; Murty, T.V.R.

    /CDIAC-74. Frankignoulle, M., G. Abril, A.V. Borges, I. Bourge, C. Canon, B. DeLille, E. Libert, and J.-M. Théate (1998), Carbon dioxide emissions from European estuaries. Science, 282, 434-436. Frankignoulle, M., I. Bourge, R. Wollast (1996). Atmospheric..., and transport of atmospheric CO 2 . Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1005, doi :10.1029/2008GB003349. Gupta, G.V.M., V.V.S.S. Sarma, R.S. Robin, A.V. Raman, M. Jai Kumar, M. Rakesh, and B.R. Subramanian (2008). Influence of net ecosystem metabolism...

  6. Demographic change and carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Brian C; Liddle, Brant; Jiang, Leiwen; Smith, Kirk R; Pachauri, Shonali; Dalton, Michael; Fuchs, Regina

    2012-07-14

    Relations between demographic change and emissions of the major greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO(2)) have been studied from different perspectives, but most projections of future emissions only partly take demographic influences into account. We review two types of evidence for how CO(2) emissions from the use of fossil fuels are affected by demographic factors such as population growth or decline, ageing, urbanisation, and changes in household size. First, empirical analyses of historical trends tend to show that CO(2) emissions from energy use respond almost proportionately to changes in population size and that ageing and urbanisation have less than proportional but statistically significant effects. Second, scenario analyses show that alternative population growth paths could have substantial effects on global emissions of CO(2) several decades from now, and that ageing and urbanisation can have important effects in particular world regions. These results imply that policies that slow population growth would probably also have climate-related benefits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Congo Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (measured in Dobson Units) are much higher in the more extensive Nyamuragira cloud, which contained roughly 420 kilotons of sulfur dioxide. Although several factors could affect the size of the observed cloud in each case-such as the delay between the onset of the eruption and the TOMS overpass, and the volume of lava emitted and the lava composition-the TOMS data suggest that the Nyiragongo magma may have been largely degassed before eruption. One possible mechanism by which this could be achieved is the cyclic degassing of magma in the subaerial lava lakes that have been intermittently present in Nyiragongo's summit crater over the past few decades. Images courtesy Simon Cairn, TOMS Volcanic Emissions Group, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland-Baltimore County

  8. Adverse effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Mpho Bosupeng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions for the period from 1997 to 2010 for diverse economies, as well as the relationships between carbon dioxide discharges and output. The study applies cointegration and causality tests to validate these associations. The results of the Johansen cointegration test depict long-run associations between the quantity of passenger cars and carbon dioxide emissions in France, Sweden, Spain, Hungary and Japa...

  9. Adverse effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho Bosupeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions for the period from 1997 to 2010 for diverse economies, as well as the relationships between carbon dioxide discharges and output. The study applies cointegration and causality tests to validate these associations. The results of the Johansen cointegration test depict long-run associations between the quantity of passenger cars and carbon dioxide emissions in France, Sweden, Spain, Hungary and Japan. In addition, significant relations were observed between output and carbon dioxide discharges in Spain, Canada, India and Japan. Changes in output had substantial impact on emissions in Germany, Canada and India. The results also show that the number of passenger cars influences the magnitude of emissions in multiple economies. In conclusion, the automotive industry has to be considered in policies that aim to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  10. Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions through Joint Implementation of Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Will

    2000-01-01

    Efficient reduction of carbon dioxide emissions requires coordination of international efforts. Approaches proposed include carbon taxes, emission quotas, and jointly implemented energy projects. To reduce emissions efficiently, requires equalizing the marginal costs of reduction between countries. The apparently large differentials between the costs of reducing emissions in industrial and...

  11. Cooperative Emissions Trading Game: International Permit Market Dominated by Buyers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Keita

    2015-01-01

    Rapid reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is required to mitigate disastrous impacts of climate change. The Kyoto Protocol introduced international emissions trading (IET) to accelerate the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The IET controls CO2 emissions through the allocation of marketable emission permits to sovereign countries. The costs for acquiring additional permits provide buyers with an incentive to reduce their CO2 emissions. However, permit price has declined to a low level during the first commitment period (CP1). The downward trend in permit price is attributed to deficiencies of the Kyoto Protocol: weak compliance enforcement, the generous allocation of permits to transition economies (hot air), and the withdrawal of the US. These deficiencies created a buyer's market dominated by price-making buyers. In this paper, I develop a coalitional game of the IET, and demonstrate that permit buyers have dominant bargaining power. In my model, called cooperative emissions trading (CET) game, a buyer purchases permits from sellers only if the buyer forms a coalition with the sellers. Permit price is determined by bargaining among the coalition members. I evaluated the demand-side and supply-side bargaining power (DBP and SBP) using Shapley value, and obtained the following results: (1) Permit price is given by the product of the buyer's willingness-to-pay and the SBP (= 1 - DBP). (2) The DBP is greater than or equal to the SBP. These results indicate that buyers can suppress permit price to low levels through bargaining. The deficiencies of the Kyoto Protocol enhance the DBP, and contribute to the demand-side dominance in the international permit market.

  12. Cooperative Emissions Trading Game: International Permit Market Dominated by Buyers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Honjo

    Full Text Available Rapid reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is required to mitigate disastrous impacts of climate change. The Kyoto Protocol introduced international emissions trading (IET to accelerate the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions. The IET controls CO2 emissions through the allocation of marketable emission permits to sovereign countries. The costs for acquiring additional permits provide buyers with an incentive to reduce their CO2 emissions. However, permit price has declined to a low level during the first commitment period (CP1. The downward trend in permit price is attributed to deficiencies of the Kyoto Protocol: weak compliance enforcement, the generous allocation of permits to transition economies (hot air, and the withdrawal of the US. These deficiencies created a buyer's market dominated by price-making buyers. In this paper, I develop a coalitional game of the IET, and demonstrate that permit buyers have dominant bargaining power. In my model, called cooperative emissions trading (CET game, a buyer purchases permits from sellers only if the buyer forms a coalition with the sellers. Permit price is determined by bargaining among the coalition members. I evaluated the demand-side and supply-side bargaining power (DBP and SBP using Shapley value, and obtained the following results: (1 Permit price is given by the product of the buyer's willingness-to-pay and the SBP (= 1 - DBP. (2 The DBP is greater than or equal to the SBP. These results indicate that buyers can suppress permit price to low levels through bargaining. The deficiencies of the Kyoto Protocol enhance the DBP, and contribute to the demand-side dominance in the international permit market.

  13. Direct carbon dioxide emissions from civil aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Matt; Williams, Ian; Preston, John

    2014-10-01

    Global airlines consume over 5 million barrels of oil per day, and the resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by aircraft engines is of concern. This article provides a contemporary review of the literature associated with the measures available to the civil aviation industry for mitigating CO2 emissions from aircraft. The measures are addressed under two categories - policy and legal-related measures, and technological and operational measures. Results of the review are used to develop several insights into the challenges faced. The analysis shows that forecasts for strong growth in air-traffic will result in civil aviation becoming an increasingly significant contributor to anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Some mitigation-measures can be left to market-forces as the key-driver for implementation because they directly reduce airlines' fuel consumption, and their impact on reducing fuel-costs will be welcomed by the industry. Other mitigation-measures cannot be left to market-forces. Speed of implementation and stringency of these measures will not be satisfactorily resolved unattended, and the current global regulatory-framework does not provide the necessary strength of stewardship. A global regulator with ‘teeth' needs to be established, but investing such a body with the appropriate level of authority requires securing an international agreement which history would suggest is going to be very difficult. If all mitigation-measures are successfully implemented, it is still likely that traffic growth-rates will continue to out-pace emissions reduction-rates. Therefore, to achieve an overall reduction in CO2 emissions, behaviour change will be necessary to reduce demand for air-travel. However, reducing demand will be strongly resisted by all stakeholders in the industry; and the ticket price-increases necessary to induce the required reduction in traffic growth-rates place a monetary-value on CO2 emissions of approximately 7-100 times greater than other common

  14. GAME: GAlaxy Machine learning for Emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucci, G.; Ferrara, A.; Pallottini, A.; Gallerani, S.

    2018-03-01

    We present an updated, optimized version of GAME (GAlaxy Machine learning for Emission lines), a code designed to infer key interstellar medium physical properties from emission line intensities of UV/optical/far infrared galaxy spectra. The improvements concern: (a) an enlarged spectral library including Pop III stars; (b) the inclusion of spectral noise in the training procedure, and (c) an accurate evaluation of uncertainties. We extensively validate the optimized code and compare its performance against empirical methods and other available emission line codes (pyqz and HII-CHI-mistry) on a sample of 62 SDSS stacked galaxy spectra and 75 observed HII regions. Very good agreement is found for metallicity. However, ionization parameters derived by GAME tend to be higher. We show that this is due to the use of too limited libraries in the other codes. The main advantages of GAME are the simultaneous use of all the measured spectral lines, and the extremely short computational times. We finally discuss the code potential and limitations.

  15. Low Energy, Low Emissions: Sulfur Dioxide; Nitrogen Oxides, and Carbon Dioxide in Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcamo, Joseph; De Vries, Bert

    1992-01-01

    Links proposed low-energy scenarios for different Western European countries with the amount of pollutants that may result from these scenarios. Sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions are calculated for the 10 countries for which low-energy scenarios are available, resulting in reductions of 54%, 37%, and 40%, respectively.…

  16. Airline emissions of carbon dioxide in the European trading system

    OpenAIRE

    John FitzGerald; Richard S. J. Tol

    2007-01-01

    A simulation model of international tourist flows is used to estimate the impact of including carbon dioxide emissions from aviation fuels in the European Trading System. The effect on global carbon dioxide emissions from international aviation is minimal: -0.01% at current permit prices, and ?0.13% for the aggressive climate policy advocated by the Stern Review. In the latter case, total CO2 emissions from fossil fuels would fall by 0.004%, and total greenhouse gas emissions by 0.002%. Touri...

  17. Systematic framework for carbon dioxide capture and utilization processes to reduce the global carbon dioxide emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Plaza, Cristina Calvera; Gani, Rafiqul

    In the year 2013, 9.5 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide gas was emitted into the air, and each year this amount is increasing [1]. Carbon dioxide emissions are of particular concern as they represent 80% of greenhouse gas emissions and therefore are a large contributor to global warming. Amon...... framework with its implemented methods and tools is a small but important step. Collaboration and integration of data, methods and tools is necessary to provide a more sustainable solution to the global carbon dioxide emission problem.......In the year 2013, 9.5 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide gas was emitted into the air, and each year this amount is increasing [1]. Carbon dioxide emissions are of particular concern as they represent 80% of greenhouse gas emissions and therefore are a large contributor to global warming. Among...... which the issue of global carbon dioxide emissions can be investigated in terms of different available capture-utilization technologies, solution methods, and benefit scenarios, with the objective to determine more sustainable solutions within an appropriate application boundary. The framework would...

  18. Convergence of carbon dioxide emissions in different sectors in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Kezhong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze differences in per capita carbon dioxide emissions from 1996 to 2010 in six sectors across 28 provinces in China and examine the σ-convergence, stochastic convergence and β-convergence of these emissions. We also investigate the factors that impact the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in each sector. The results show that per capita carbon dioxide emissions in all sectors converged across provinces from 1996 to 2010. Factors that impact the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in each sector vary: GDP (gross domestic product) per capita, industrialization process and population density impact convergence in the Industry sector, while GDP per capita and population density impact convergence in the Transportation, Storage, Postal, and Telecommunications Services sector. Aside from GDP per capita and population density, trade openness also impacts convergence in the Wholesale, Retail, Trade, and Catering Service sector. Population density is the only factor that impacts convergence in the Residential Consumption sector. - Highlights: • Analyze differences in CO 2 emissions in six sectors among 28 provinces in China. • Examine the convergence of CO 2 emissions in six sectors. • Investigate factors impact on convergence of CO 2 emissions in each sector. • Factors impact on convergence of per capita CO 2 emissions in each sector vary

  19. Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Steven J.; Andres, Robert; Conception , Elvira; Lurz, Joshua

    2004-01-25

    A global, self-consistent estimate of sulfur dioxide emissions over the last one and a half century were estimated by using a combination of bottom-up and best available inventory methods including all anthropogenic sources. We find that global sulfur dioxide emissions peaked about 1980 and have generally declined since this time. Emissions were extrapolated to a 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid for the time period 1850-2000 at annual resolution with two emission height levels and by season. Emissions are somewhat higher in the recent past in this new work as compared with some comprehensive estimates. This difference is largely due to our use of emissions factors that vary with time to account for sulfur removals from fossil fuels and industrial smelting processes.

  20. Drivers of Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: International Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Bosupeng, Mpho

    2015-01-01

    Studies pertaining to the effects of economic growth on the environment generally focused on diverse relationships between carbon dioxide, economic growth and energy consumption.This paper contributes to the literature by determining the effects of the US and China’s emissions on several economies carbon dioxide discharges from 1960 to 2010. The analysis uses a cointegration procedure proposed by Saikkonen and Lütkepohl. The study further applies the Granger causality test to test for causal...

  1. Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Different Composting Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsiung Chang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate green house gas emissions from compost preparations, methane and carbon dioxide concentrations and emission rates at different accumulative times and composting periods were determined. While the accumulative time was less than 10 min with a closed acrylic chamber, meth ane and carbon dioxide emissions in creased slightly but with high fluntuation in the sampling e ror, and these values decreased significantly when the accumulative time was more than 20 min. During the 8 weeks of composting, the methane emission rate reaches its peak near the end of the second week and the carbon dioxide emission rate does the same near the end of third week. Meth ane and carbon dioxide emissions had high val ues at the first stage of com post ing and then de creased grad u ally for the ma tu rity of com post. Carbon dioxide emission (y was significantly related to temperature (x1, moisture content (x2, and total or ganiccarbon (x3; and there gression equation is: y = 3.11907x1 + 6.19236x2 - 6.63081x3 - 50.62498. The re gres sion equa tion be tween meth ane emis sion (y? and mois ture con tent (x2, pH (x4, C/N ra tio (x5, and ash con tent (x6 is: y?= 0.13225x2 - 0.97046x4 - 1.10599x5 - 0.55220x6 + 50.77057 in the ini tial com post ing stage (weeks 1 to 3; while, the equa tion is: y?= 0.02824x2 - 0.0037x4 - 0.1499x5 - 0.07013x6 + 4.13589 in the later compost ing stage (weeks 4 to 8. Dif ferent stage composts have significant variation of properties and greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, the emissions may be reduced by manipulating the proper factors.

  2. Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, R.J.; Gregg, Jay Sterling; Losey, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950–2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80......% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly...

  3. Nuclear energy significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koprda, V.

    2006-01-01

    This article is devoted to nuclear energy, to its acceptability, compatibility and sustainability. Nuclear energy is non-dispensable part of energy sources with vast innovation potential. The safety of nuclear energy, radioactive waste deposition, and prevention of risk from misuse of nuclear material have to be very seriously adjudged and solved. Nuclear energy is one of the ways how to decrease the contamination of atmosphere with carbon dioxide and it solves partially also the problem of global increase of temperature and climate changes. Given are the main factors responsible for the renaissance of nuclear energy. (author)

  4. Trade, production fragmentation, and China's carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Erik; Pei, Jiansuo; Yang, Cuihong

    An input-output framework is adopted to estimate China's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions as generated by its exports in 2002. More than one half of China's exports are related to international production fragmentation. These processing exports generate relatively little value added but also

  5. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction Estimates: Potential Use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction Estimates: Potential Use of Biofuels in Mauritian. Transport Sector for Cars and Dual Cars. 513 transportation sector. Out of ... shift to local renewable sources of energy away from imported fossil fuel. ..... environmental concerns, foreign exchange savings, and socio−economic issues.

  6. Assessing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Energy Use at a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, William; Bhatia, Krishan Kumar; Parisi, Matthew; Foote, Jessica; Imperatore, John, III

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the carbon dioxide emissions associated with electric, HVAC, and hot water use from a US university. Design/methodology/approach: First, the total on-campus electrical, natural gas and oil consumption for an entire year was assessed. For each category of energy use, the carbon associated with…

  7. Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends report is the authoritative reference for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions,...

  8. Carbon dioxide emissions from biochar in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Sander; Clauson-Kaas, Anne Sofie Kjærulff; Bobuľská, L.

    2014-01-01

    The stability of biochar in soil is of importance if it is to be used for carbon sequestration and long-term improvement of soil properties. It is well known that a significant fraction of biochar is highly stable in soil, but carbon dioxide (CO2) is also released immediately after application....... This study investigated the nature of the early release of CO2 and the degree to which stabilizing mechanisms protect biochar from microbial attack. Incubations of 14C-labelled biochar produced at different temperatures were performed in soils with different clay contents and in sterilized and non......-sterilized soils. It emerged that carbonate may be concentrated or form during or after biochar production, resulting in significant carbonate contents. If CO2 released from carbonates in short-term experiments is misinterpreted as mineralization of biochar, the impact of this process may be significantly over...

  9. EU Emission Trading: Starting with Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Morten; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2003-01-01

    The Commission of the European Union wants to start a limited emission trading scheme by 2005 within the Community to enable "learning-by-doing" prior to the Kyoto Protocol. This to accomplish the desired 8% target level for six different greenhouse gases. However, in the EU it is not clear whether...

  10. urbanization and climate chang carbon dioxide emission

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    ABSTRACT. Large cities are characterized by concentra of commercial activities around their cores and consequently, emission of large amount study aims to estimate the average amoun. Kano Metropolis, Nigeria. The rela average density on the city's roads, estim automobiles and examining the situation a. Federal ...

  11. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Peter A.; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory P.; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert G.; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Durr, Hans H.; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8   petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32  Pg C yr−1 from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr−1 is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  12. Regional sulfur dioxide emissions: shall we achieve the goal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X.; Shi, L.; Wang, M.; Wang, JY

    2017-01-01

    Although economic growth is slowing down in the new normal period, air pollution is still a very serious problem in China. The 15% binding goal of sulfur dioxide emission reduction from 2016 to 2020, as stipulated in the 13th Five-Year Plan, has been an ambitious target for the Chinese government. This paper studies the synthetic evaluation and forecasting analysis of sulfur dioxide in China by means of a “grey model” approach combined with the grey relational analysis methods, with the panel data of 31 provinces from 2005 to 2015. Grey analysis used to analyse a system with imperfect information, such that a variety of available solutions is reviewed, and the optimal solution is identified. Some encouraging results show that national emissions and a majority of provinces will achieve the target. Over time, the gap of regional differences is rapidly closing. According to the results of grey relational analysis, we find industrial structure and energy consumption have a more significant impact on sulfur dioxide emissions than GDP. Atmospheric treatment investment and environmental protection manpower play a more important role in emissions variation. Based on the findings, we should distinguish different factors and take different measures to protect the environment.

  13. International mobility in carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duro, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the evolution of international mobility in per capita CO 2 emissions for the period 1971–2007. This concept reveals the distribution's degree of entrenchment which is fundamentally different from other distribution concepts. In particular, we use several different synthetic mobility measures in order to capture the various perceptions of mobility proposed in the literature. This approach can be seen as complementary to the dynamics of distribution approach. The empirical analysis yields the following main results. First, the evolution observed varies according to the mobility index used. Second, when broader mobility indices are used, the most recent years analysed (i.e. 2000–2007) and the 1970s appear to be the most dynamic periods. Third, their decomposition reveals the major role played by the non-high income countries group. Fourth, the calculation of fictitious indices associated with the three major decomposition components of general mobility indicates that exchange (i.e. changes in position) and dispersion (i.e. distribution effects) have typically been the most important mobility factors. Finally, there does not seem to be a clear, convincing relationship between mobility and the evolution of inequality, which to a certain extent underscores the need to carry out a differential analysis for mobility. The results obtained have some implications in terms of analysis and environmental policy. - Highlights: ► The evolution of international mobility in per capita CO 2 emissions for the period 1971–2007 is analysed. ► Several different synthetic mobility measures are used for capturing the various perceptions of mobility. ► The mobility is high and, in a significant way, without impact on distribution. ► There does not seem to be a clear, convincing relationship between mobility and the evolution of inequality. ► The results obtained have some implications in terms of analysis and environmental policy

  14. Effect Of Geothermal Heat Pump On Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. Atwan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research the calculations of carbon dioxide emissions CO2 in summer May to September 150 day and winter seasons December to February 90 day were performed by using the coefficient of performance for each air and ground source heat pump. The place of study case take relative to solar path in to account and the study case was three halls men women and surgery halls in Al-Musayyib hospital in Babylon.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 17 Years and Still Talking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Ch.

    2010-01-01

    This paper, written in French and in English, examines how the figures have changed from Kyoto base year 1990 up to 2007, before looking at certain countries' proposals for the future of their carbon dioxide emissions. Statistics are given concerning the emissions changes in various countries (or groups of countries) but also their developments in regards to the economy and energy use. Changes in CO 2 emissions, changes in the gross domestic product of a country, its CO 2 emissions per capita, its energy intensity (the ratio of energy use to the monetary value of GDP) and its carbon intensity of energy use as well as population change, are presented. The main countries considered are: United States, European Union, China, Japan, India, Brazil, South Africa and Russia

  16. Online Traffic Signal Control for Reducing Vehicle Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Toshihiko; Otokita, Tohru; Niikura, Satoshi

    In Japan, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions caused by vehicles have been increasing year by year and it is well known that CO2 causes a serious global warming problem. For urban traffic control systems, there is a great demand for realization of signal control measures as soon as possible due to the urgency of the recent environmental situation. This paper describes a new traffic signal control for reducing vehicle CO2 emissions on an arterial road. First, we develop a model for estimating the emissions using the traffic delay and the number of stops a driver makes. Second, to find the optimal control parameters, we introduce a random search method with rapid convergence suitable for an online traffic control. We conduct experiments in Kawasaki to verify the effectiveness of our method. The experiments show that our approach decreases not only the emissions but also congestion and travel time significantly, compared to the method implemented in the real system.

  17. The Tractor and Semitrailer Routing Considering Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqi Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of the minimization of carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions in the VRP is important to logistics companies. The paper deals with the tractor and semitrailer routing problem with full truckload between any two depots of the network; an integer programming model with the objective of minimizing CO2 emissions per ton-kilometer is proposed. A two-stage approach with the same core steps of the simulated annealing (SA in both stages is designed. The number of tractors is provided in the first stage and the CO2 emissions per ton-kilometer are then optimized in the second stage. Computational experiments on small-scale randomly generated instances supported the feasibility and validity of the heuristic algorithm. To a practical-scale problem, the SA algorithm can provide advice on the number of tractors, the routes, and the location of the central depot to realize CO2 emissions decrease.

  18. Evaluating carbon dioxide emissions in international trade of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Boqiang; Sun Chuanwang

    2010-01-01

    China is the world's largest emitter of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). As exports account for about one-third of China's GDP, the CO 2 emissions are related to not only China's own consumption but also external demand. Using the input-output analysis (IOA), we analyze the embodied CO 2 emissions of China's import and export. Our results show that about 3357 million tons CO 2 emissions were embodied in the exports and the emissions avoided by imports (EAI) were 2333 million tons in 2005. The average contribution to embodied emission factors by electricity generation was over 35%. And that by cement production was about 20%. It implies that the production-based emissions of China are more than the consumption-based emissions, which is evidence that carbon leakage occurs under the current climate policies and international trade rules. In addition to the call for a new global framework to allocate emission responsibilities, China should make great efforts to improve its energy efficiency, carry out electricity pricing reforms and increase renewable energy. In particular, to use advanced technology in cement production will be helpful to China's CO 2 abatement.

  19. Convergence in carbon dioxide emissions among industrialised countries revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Avila, Diego

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the existence of stochastic and deterministic convergence of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in 23 countries over the period 1960-2002. For that purpose, we conduct unit root testing by employing the recently developed panel stationarity test of Carrion-i-Silvestre et al. [Carrion-i-Silvestre, J-L, del Barrio-Castro, T., Lopez-Bazo, E., 2005. Breaking the panels: An application to the GDP per capita. Econometrics Journal 8, 159-175] which assumes a highly flexible trend function by incorporating an unknown number of structural breaks. We accommodate general forms of cross-sectional dependence as well as control for finite-sample bias through bootstrap methods. Overall, our analysis provides strong evidence supporting both stochastic and deterministic convergence in CO 2 emissions, thus confirming Strazicich and List [Strazicich, M.C., List, J.A., 2003. Are CO 2 emission levels converging among industrial countries? Environmental and Resource Economics 24, 263-271] and Westerlund and Basher [Westerlund, J., Basher, S.A., 2007. Testing for convergence in carbon dioxide emissions using a century of panel data. Environmental and Resource Economics, forthcoming] findings of convergence

  20. Balance of emissions and consumptions of carbon dioxide in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero, A.; Subiela, V.; Cortes, C.

    1994-01-01

    The amount of carbon dioxide in atmosphere increase due to deforestation and anthropogenic emissions. The consumption of this gas in vegetal ecosystems must also be considered to know the net mass of CO 2 that gets into the atmosphere. This article summarizes the methodology, results and conclusions of the carbon dioxide balance in Spain by autonomous communities. The different fossil fuel consumer sectors (Thermal power plants, industry, transport, domestic and agricultural), forest biomass reduction due to fires and wood extractions for firewood are considered as sources. As sinks, natural and reforested forests, and the equivalent sea are noticed. Basically, the article presents a new methodology to estimate carbon dioxide consumption in forest biomass. The average emissions for 1981 to 1990 are presented. A per capita value of 5 t(CO 2 /year is obtained in contrast to the EC average of 8,6 t(CO 2 ) year. The resulting net balance shows that it is only consumed between 20 and 50% of the emitted CO 2 . (Author) 47 refs

  1. Irreversible climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Plattner, Gian-Kasper; Knutti, Reto; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2009-02-10

    The severity of damaging human-induced climate change depends not only on the magnitude of the change but also on the potential for irreversibility. This paper shows that the climate change that takes place due to increases in carbon dioxide concentration is largely irreversible for 1,000 years after emissions stop. Following cessation of emissions, removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide decreases radiative forcing, but is largely compensated by slower loss of heat to the ocean, so that atmospheric temperatures do not drop significantly for at least 1,000 years. Among illustrative irreversible impacts that should be expected if atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase from current levels near 385 parts per million by volume (ppmv) to a peak of 450-600 ppmv over the coming century are irreversible dry-season rainfall reductions in several regions comparable to those of the "dust bowl" era and inexorable sea level rise. Thermal expansion of the warming ocean provides a conservative lower limit to irreversible global average sea level rise of at least 0.4-1.0 m if 21st century CO(2) concentrations exceed 600 ppmv and 0.6-1.9 m for peak CO(2) concentrations exceeding approximately 1,000 ppmv. Additional contributions from glaciers and ice sheet contributions to future sea level rise are uncertain but may equal or exceed several meters over the next millennium or longer.

  2. Life cycle study. Carbon dioxide emissions lower in electric heating than in oil heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, A.; Jaervinen, P.; Nikula, A.

    1996-11-01

    A primary objective of energy conservation is to cut carbon dioxide emissions. A comparative study on the various heating forms, based on the life cycle approach, showed that the carbon dioxide emissions resulting form heating are appreciably lower now that electric heating has become more common. The level of carbon dioxide emissions in Finland would have been millions of tonnes higher had oil heating been chosen instead of electric heating. (orig.)

  3. A laboratory-scale study of sulfur dioxide emission from combustion of pulverized coal blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyaraj, S.P.; Gollahalli, S.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the emission of sulfur dioxide in pulverized coal flames is studied as a function of coal blending parameters. This laboratory-scale study was performed to qualitatively determine the effect of blending different coals on the sulfur-dioxide emission of their flames. Coals of three ranks (anthracite, bituminous, and lignite), and of the same rank but of different origin (Oklahoma and Wyoming mines) were tested. The amount of sulfur dioxide emitted per MJ of heat release (emission index) was determined by integrating the radial concentration profiles of sulfur dioxide. The correlations of the emission index and the peak concentration with blend parameters at 95% confidence level are presented

  4. Heat pumps and tradable emission permits: On the carbon dioxide emissions of technologies that cross a tradable emission market boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Marcus; Vamling, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    Since January 2005, there is a system with tradable emission permits/allowances in the European Union. Currently, power producers and district heating plants are included in the system, but not the residential sector. In this analytical study, it is discussed how a separation between a trading sector, in which power producers are participating and a non-trading residential sector affect carbon dioxide emissions consequences from heat pumps in households. It is concluded that a replacement of heat pumps in the residential sector results in a leakage of emissions. The emission target in the trading sector is partly achieved at the expense of increased emissions in the residential sector

  5. Modelling carbon dioxide emissions from agricultural soils in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Wang, Junye

    2017-11-01

    Agricultural soils are a leading source of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and are major contributors to global climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) makes up 20% of the total GHG emitted from agricultural soil. Therefore, an evaluation of CO 2 emissions from agricultural soil is necessary in order to make mitigation strategies for environmental efficiency and economic planning possible. However, quantification of CO 2 emissions through experimental methods is constrained due to the large time and labour requirements for analysis. Therefore, a modelling approach is needed to achieve this objective. In this paper, the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC), a process-based model, was modified to predict CO 2 emissions for Canada from regional conditions. The modified DNDC model was applied at three experimental sites in the province of Saskatchewan. The results indicate that the simulations of the modified DNDC model are in good agreement with observations. The agricultural management of fertilization and irrigation were evaluated using scenario analysis. The simulated total annual CO 2 flux changed on average by ±13% and ±1% following a ±50% variance of the total amount of N applied by fertilising and the total amount of water through irrigation applications, respectively. Therefore, careful management of irrigation and applications of fertiliser can help to reduce CO 2 emissions from the agricultural sector. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 40 CFR 77.6 - Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. 77.6 Section 77.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. (a)(1) If excess emissions of sulfur dioxide occur at the affected source or nitrogen oxide occur at an affected unit during any year, the owners and operators respectively...

  7. The game of trading jobs for emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arto, I.; Rueda-Cantuche, J.M.; Andreoni, V.; Mongelli, I.; Genty, A.

    2014-01-01

    Following the debate on the implications of international trade for global climate policy, this paper introduces the topic of the economic benefits from trade obtained by exporting countries in relation to the emissions generated in the production of exports. In 2008, 24% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and 20% of the employment around the world were linked to international trade. China “exported” 30% of emissions and hosted 37.5% of the jobs generated by trade worldwide. The European Union and the United States of America were the destination of 25% and 18.4% of the GHG emissions embodied in trade. The imports of these two regions contributed to the creation of 45% of the employment generated by international trade. This paper proposes the idea of including trade issues in international climate negotiations, taking into account not only the environmental burden generated by developed countries when displacing emissions to developing countries through their imports, but also the economic benefits of developing countries producing the goods exported to developed countries. - Highlights: • Employment and trade issues should be considered in GHG emission reduction policies. • In 2008 24% of global GHG emissions and 20% of the employment are linked to trade. • 43% of GHG and 45% of employment embedded in trade are due to EU and US imports. • China exports 30% of the GHG and hosts 38% of the jobs generated by trade worldwide

  8. Is China’s Target of a 40-45% Reduction in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Plausible?

    OpenAIRE

    Bosupeng, Mpho

    2016-01-01

    In the early days of industrialisation, economists believed that the ramifications of economic growth will far outweigh the potential damage to the environment. Today the concern is the rising magnitude of emissions. Many economies are under immense pressure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon taxation and absorption technologies seem to be the main mechanisms controlling emissions in different nations. China proposed her target of reducing carbon dioxide emissions by 40-45% by 2025. T...

  9. Is China’s target of a 40-45% reduction in carbon dioxide emission plausible?

    OpenAIRE

    Bosupeng Mpho

    2017-01-01

    In the early days of industrialisation, economists believed that the ramifications of economic growth will far outweigh the potential damage to the environment. Today the concern is the rising magnitude of emissions. Many economies are under immense pressure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon taxation and absorption technologies seem to be the main mechanisms controlling emissions in different nations. China proposed her target of reducing carbon dioxide emissions by 40-45% by 2025. T...

  10. GOSAT observations of anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardanan, Rajesh; Maksyutov, Shamil; Oda, Tomohiro; Saito, Makoto; Ito, Akihiko; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ganshin, Alexander; Yoshida, Yukio; Yokota, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Tsuneo

    2017-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the most important greenhouse gases in terms of radiative forcing. Human activities such as combustion of fossil fuel (for CO2), and gas leakage, animal agriculture, rice cultivation and landfill emissions (for CH4), are considered to be major sources of their emissions. Global emissions datasets usually depend on emission estimates reported by countries, which are seldom evaluated in an objective way. Here we present a method for delineating anthropogenic contributions to global atmospheric CO2 and CH4 (2009-2014) concentration fields using GOSAT observations of column-average dry air mole fractions (XCO2 and XCH4) and atmospheric transport model simulations using high-resolution emissions datasets (ODIAC for CO2 and EDGAR for CH4). The XCO2 and XCH4 concentration enhancements due to anthropogenic emissions are estimated at all GOSAT observation locations using the transport model simulation. We calculated threshold values to classify GOSAT observations into two categories: (1) data influenced by the anthropogenic sources and (2) those not influenced. We defined a clean background (averaged concentrations of GOSAT data that are free from contamination) in 10˚ ×10˚ regions over the globe and subtracted the background values from individual GOSAT observations. The anomalies (GOSAT observed values minus background values) were binned and compared to model-based anomalies over continental regions and selected countries. For CO2, we have found global and regional linear relationships between model and observed anomalies especially for Eurasia and North America. The analysis for East Asian region showed a systematic bias that is somewhat comparable in magnitude to the uncertainties in emission inventories in that region, which were reported by recent studies. In the case of CH4, we found a good match between inventory-based estimates and GOSAT observations for continental regions and large countries. The inventory

  11. Estimating diesel fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from forest road construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Loeffler; Greg Jones; Nikolaus Vonessen; Sean Healey; Woodam Chung

    2009-01-01

    Forest access road construction is a necessary component of many on-the-ground forest vegetation treatment projects. However, the fuel energy requirements and associated carbon dioxide emissions from forest road construction are unknown. We present a method for estimating diesel fuel consumed and related carbon dioxide emissions from constructing forest roads using...

  12. A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2012-01-01

    This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms......; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions...... dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. This manuscript concludes that carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion continue to increase with time and that while much is known about the overall characteristics of these emissions, much is still to be learned about the detailed...

  13. Abatement and mitigation of carbon dioxide emissions from power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, P.; Audus, H.

    1998-01-01

    Current understanding of the world's climate indicates that human-induced changes are occurring and may be sufficient in magnitude to require preventative action, such as limiting atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. The main anthropogenic greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide and its largest source is combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. Many different technologies can be used for reducing emissions, as well as increasing the removal of CO 2 from the atmosphere through enhancement of natural sinks, such as by forestry. Some of these options are available today and could be implemented at relatively little overall cost. For example, improving energy efficiency and switching from high carbon fuels to low carbon fuels, if suitable supplies are available. These can achieve significant reductions in CO 2 emissions. Introduction of renewable sources of energy or nuclear power to displace fossil fuels would achieve deep reductions in emissions if applied widely. However, to avoid disruptive changes, it will also be necessary to find ways of continuing to use fossil fuels but with much less emissions. Capture and storage of CO 2 is a technology which could deliver deep reductions in emissions from fossil fuels. In this paper, methods of removing CO 2 from the flue gas streams of coal and gas-fired power plants are examined, considering both plant as built today as well as possible future variants. Methods of CO 2 storage are also discussed. The results on capture and storage of CO 2 are put into perspective by comparison with studies of the large-scale application of forestry for sequestering atmospheric CO 2 , and also large-scale use of renewable energy sources, in this case growth and harvesting of woody biomass for power generation. Each of these options has different characteristics, providing a range of choices of ways of tackling climate change

  14. UK company strategies in reducing carbon dioxide emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmei Bentley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated a number of large UK companies’ strategies in reducing emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 in their supply chain operations. In-depth interviews were conducted with logistics/supply chain (SC managers across different sectors. The research identified the main CO2 reduction strategies, and examined these in the light of existing literature in the research domain. One of the key findings was that there was a strong tension between cost reduction (identified as the major driver for reducing CO2 and lack of resources (the main barrier. It was also found that most CO2 reduction strategies had started only fairly recently, and so far, were mainly operational and tactical in nature. This study makes an empirical contribution to a better understanding of how companies form their CO2 reduction strategies in response to environmental pressures. It has implications for policy makers in terms of how to motivate logistics/SC managers to implement strategies to reduce the environmental impact of CO2 emissions in their business operations. Therefore, it is recommended that logistics/SC managers develop and implement practical initiatives and strategies to reduce CO2 emissions, and to embed these into corporate strategy.

  15. Driving factors behind carbon dioxide emissions in China: A modified production-theoretical decomposition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qunwei; Chiu, Yung-Ho; Chiu, Ching-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Research on the driving factors behind carbon dioxide emission changes in China can inform better carbon emission reduction policies and help develop a low-carbon economy. As one of important methods, production-theoretical decomposition analysis (PDA) has been widely used to understand these driving factors. To avoid the infeasibility issue in solving the linear programming, this study proposed a modified PDA approach to decompose carbon dioxide emission changes into seven drivers. Using 2005–2010 data, the study found that economic development was the largest factor of increasing carbon dioxide emissions. The second factor was energy structure (reflecting potential carbon), and the third factor was low energy efficiency. Technological advances, energy intensity reductions, and carbon dioxide emission efficiency improvements were the negative driving factors reducing carbon dioxide emission growth rates. Carbon dioxide emissions and driving factors varied significantly across east, central and west China. - Highlights: • A modified PDA used to decompose carbon dioxide emission changes into seven drivers. • Two models were proposed to ameliorate the infeasible occasions. • Economic development was the largest factor of increasing CO 2 emissions in China.

  16. Preparing for the emissions trading game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Although the deadline (1 April 2001) for the introduction of the climate change levy (or UK greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme) is near, it is difficult to assess the likely impact of the legislation since some of the architecture and much of the detail have yet to be revealed. Meanwhile, there is a growing fear that emissions trading may work against the sectoral energy efficiency agreements and the risks and costs for individual companies are not clear. The views of the CBI are discussed in detail; it is apparently concerned that the DETR's proposals are incomplete in a number of respects and these are discussed. The subjects of grandfathering, outsourcing, electricity generation and plant closures receive special attention. Other aspects discussed are legal issues, sanctions and liability, trading and risks. Tim Denne of Oxera doubts that the UK scheme will achieve the hoped for level of trading. The scheme is likely to be a subject of boardroom debate for several years to come

  17. Integrated biomass energy systems and emissions of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, U.R.; Turnbull, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have been funding a number of case studies under the initiative entitled ''Economic Development through Biomass Systems Integration'', with the objective of investigating the feasibility of integrated biomass energy systems utilizing a dedicated feedstock supply system (DFSS) for energy production. This paper deals with the full fuel cycle for four of these case studies, which have been examined with regard to the emissions of carbon dioxide., CO 2 . Although the conversion of biomass to electricity in itself does not emit more CO 2 than is captured by the biomass through photosynthesis, there will be some CO 2 emissions from the DFSS. External energy is required for the production and transportation of the biomass feedstock, and this energy is mainly based on fossil fuels. By using this input energy, CO 2 and other greenhouse gases are emitted. However, by utilizing biomass with fossil fuels as external input fuels, we would get about 10-15 times more electric energy per unit fossil fuel, compared with a 100% coal power system. By introducing a DFSS on former farmland the amount of energy spent for production of crops can be reduced, the amount of fertilizers can be decreased, the soil can be improved and a significant amount of energy will be produced compared with an ordinary farm crop. Compared with traditional coal-based electricity production, the CO 2 emissions are in the most cases reduced significantly by as much as 95%. The important conclusion is the great potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions through the offset of coal by biomass. (author)

  18. Evaluating measurements of carbon dioxide emissions using a precision source--A natural gas burner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Rodney; Bundy, Matthew; Zong, Ruowen

    2015-07-01

    A natural gas burner has been used as a precise and accurate source for generating large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate emissions measurements at near-industrial scale. Two methods for determining carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources are considered here: predicting emissions based on fuel consumption measurements-predicted emissions measurements, and direct measurement of emissions quantities in the flue gas-direct emissions measurements. Uncertainty for the predicted emissions measurement was estimated at less than 1%. Uncertainty estimates for the direct emissions measurement of carbon dioxide were on the order of ±4%. The relative difference between the direct emissions measurements and the predicted emissions measurements was within the range of the measurement uncertainty, therefore demonstrating good agreement. The study demonstrates how independent methods are used to validate source emissions measurements, while also demonstrating how a fire research facility can be used as a precision test-bed to evaluate and improve carbon dioxide emissions measurements from stationary sources. Fossil-fuel-consuming stationary sources such as electric power plants and industrial facilities account for more than half of the CO2 emissions in the United States. Therefore, accurate emissions measurements from these sources are critical for evaluating efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This study demonstrates how a surrogate for a stationary source, a fire research facility, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of measurements of CO2 emissions.

  19. Carbon dioxide emissions and nutrition on a drained pine mire - a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, M.; Karsisto, M.; Kaunisto, S. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland). Vantaa Research Centre

    1996-12-31

    Drainage of boreal peatlands intensify aerobic decomposition and carbon dioxide emission from the peat substrate and increase tree growth. CO{sub 2} emission rates depend on the ground water level and the soil temperature. Predicted rises in mean air temperatures due to anthropogenically induced climate change are expected to further increase carbon dioxide emission from drained boreal peatlands. The role of added nutrients is somewhat vague. The purpose of this presentation is to give some preliminary results on microbial biomass carbon and on carbon dioxide output/input relationship on a pine mire. (6 refs.)

  20. Carbon dioxide and methane emission dynamics in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Barlow, Janet F.; Wood, Curtis R.

    2013-04-01

    London, with a population of 8.2 million, is the largest city in Europe. It is heavily built-up (typically 8% vegetation cover within the central boroughs) and boasts some of the busiest arteries in Europe despite efforts to reduce traffic in the city centre with the introduction of a congestion charging scheme in 2007. We report on two substantial pollution monitoring efforts in the heart of London between October 2006 and present. Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) were measured continuously by eddy-covariance in central London from October 2006 until May 2008 from a 190 m telecommunication tower (BT tower; 51° 31' 17.4'' N 0° 8' 20.04'' W). The eddy-covariance system consisted of a Gill R3-50 ultrasonic anemometer operated at 20 Hz and a LI-COR 6262 infrared gas analyser. Air was sampled 0.3 m below the sensor head of the ultrasonic anemometer - which was itself mounted on a 3 m mast to the top of a 15 m lattice tower situated on the roof of the tower (instrument head at 190 m above street level) - and pulled down 45 m of 12.7 mm OD Teflon tubing. In addition, meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction) were also measured with a multi-sensor (Weather Transmitter WXT510, Vaisala). Eddy-covariance measurements at the BT tower location were reinstated in July 2011 and include methane (CH4), CO2 and H2O concentrations measured by a Picarro fast methane analyser (G2301-f). CO2 emissions were found to be mainly controlled by fossil fuel combustion (e.g. traffic, commercial and domestic heating). Diurnal averages of CO2 fluxes were found to be highly correlated to traffic. However changes in heating-related natural gas consumption and, to a lesser extent, photosynthetic activity in two large city centre green spaces (Hyde Park and Regent's Park) explained the seasonal variability. Annual estimates of net exchange of CO2 obtained by eddy-covariance agreed well with up-scaled data from the UK

  1. Dramatic reduction of sulfur dioxide emission in Northeastern China in the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of spatial and temporal variations of sulfur dioxide concentration in planetary boundary layer were conducted. The data were generated by NASA satellite daily from October of 2004 and were obtained through NASA Giovanni. The global monthly mean spatial distribution of sulfur dioxide showed several hot spots including: several spots on some islands in the Pacific Ocean, several spots in central America, and central Africa. Most of these hot spots of sulfur dioxide are related to known active volcanos. The biggest hot spot of sulfur dioxide were observed in Northeastern China. While high concentration sulfur dioxide was still observed in Northeastern China in 2017. The area averaged concentration of sulfur dioxide declined dramatically since its peak in 2008. This temporal trend indicates that sulfur reduction effort has been effective in the last decade or post 2008 financial crisis recovery lead an industry less sulfur dioxide emission.

  2. Carbon dioxide emissions due to Swedish imports and consumption: estimates using different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika; Assefa, Getachew; Wadeskog, Anders

    2007-04-01

    Global trade of products and services challenges the traditional way in which emissions of carbon dioxide are declared and accounted for. Instead of only considering territorial emissions there are now strong reasons to determine how the carbon dioxide emitted in the production of imports are partitioned around the world and how the total emissions change for a country's final consumption compared to final production. In this report results from four different methods of calculating the total carbon dioxide emissions from Sweden's overall consumption are presented. Total carbon dioxide emissions for Sweden's final consumption vary from 57 to 109 M tons during one year depending on the methodology. The four methods used for estimating these emissions give results of 57, 61, 68 and 109 Mton of carbon dioxide. Two methods are based on information concerning Sweden's imports and our national production of goods and services excluding production that is exported while two methods are based on final consumer expenditures. Three of the methods use mainly emission data from Sweden while one method depends entirely upon emission data from Sweden's trading partners. The last method also gives the highest emissions level, 109 Mton of carbon dioxide. The calculations performed here can be compared to the emissions reported by Sweden, 54 Mton of carbon dioxide per year. Our estimates give per capita emission levels of between 6,3 and 12 tons of carbon dioxide per year. The estimate of 12 tons per capita is a result of using emissions data from Sweden's trading partners. The total emissions as a result of Sweden's imports are 26 or 74 M tons of carbon dioxide depending on how they are calculated. The lower figure is based upon the imports of today but with emissions as if everything was produced as in Sweden. The higher level is based upon using existing but partly inadequate international emission statistics. These levels can be compared to the about 35 M tons of carbon dioxide

  3. The causal nexus between carbon dioxide emissions and agricultural ecosystem-an econometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel; Owusu, Phebe Asantewaa

    2017-01-01

    Achieving a long-term food security and preventing hunger include a better nutrition through sustainable systems of production, distribution, and consumption. Nonetheless, the quest for an alternative to increasing global food supply to meet the growing demand has led to the use of poor agricultural practices that promote climate change. Given the contribution of the agricultural ecosystem towards greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, this study investigated the causal nexus between carbon dioxide emissions and agricultural ecosystem by employing a data spanning from 1961 to 2012. Evidence from long-run elasticity shows that a 1 % increase in the area of rice paddy harvested will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 1.49 %, a 1 % increase in biomass-burned crop residues will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 1.00 %, a 1 % increase in cereal production will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 1.38 %, and a 1 % increase in agricultural machinery will decrease carbon dioxide emissions by 0.09 % in the long run. There was a bidirectional causality between carbon dioxide emissions, cereal production, and biomass-burned crop residues. The Granger causality shows that the agricultural ecosystem in Ghana is sensitive to climate change vulnerability.

  4. TSCA Section 21 Petition Requesting EPA to Regulate Anthropogenic Emissions Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    This petition requests EPA to promulgate regulations under section 6 of TSCA to protect “public health and the environment from the serious harms associated with anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide, including ocean acidification.

  5. Magmatic carbon dioxide emissions at Mammoth Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Christopher D.; Neil, John M.; Howle, James F.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) of magmatic origin is seeping out of the ground in unusual quantities at several locations around the flanks of Mammoth Mountain, a dormant volcano in Eastern California. The most recent volcanic activity on Mammoth Mountain was steam eruptions about 600 years ago, but seismic swarms and long-period earthquakes over the past decade are evidence of an active magmatic system at depth. The CO2 emission probably began in 1990 but was not recognized until 1994. Seismic swarms and minor ground deformation during 1989, believed to be results of a shallow intrusion of magma beneath Mammoth Mountain, probably triggered the release of CO2, which persists in 1998. The CO2 gas is at ambient temperatures and emanates diffusely from the soil surface rather than flowing from distinct vents. The CO2 has collected in the soil by displacing air in the pore spaces and reaches concentrations of greater than 95 percent by volume in places. The total area affected by high CO2 concentrations and high CO2 flux from the soil surface was estimated at 60 hectares in 1997. Coniferous forest covering about 40 hectares has been killed by high CO2 concentrations in the root zone. In more than 300 soil-gas samples collected from depths of 0.5 to 2 m in 1995, CO2 concentrations ranged from background levels (less than 1 percent) to greater than 95 percent by volume. At 250 locations, CO2 flux was measured using a closed chamber in 1996; values, in grams per square meter per day, ranged from background (less than 25) to more than 30,000. On the basis of these data, the total emission of magmatic CO2 in 1996 is estimated to be about 530 megagrams per day. Concentrations of CO2 exceeding Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards have been measured in pits dug in soil and snow, in poorly ventilated buildings, and in below-ground valve-boxes around Mammoth Mountain. CO2 concentrations greater than 10 percent in poorly ventilated spaces are not uncommon on some parts

  6. Is China’s target of a 40-45% reduction in carbon dioxide emission plausible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosupeng Mpho

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the early days of industrialisation, economists believed that the ramifications of economic growth will far outweigh the potential damage to the environment. Today the concern is the rising magnitude of emissions. Many economies are under immense pressure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon taxation and absorption technologies seem to be the main mechanisms controlling emissions in different nations. China proposed her target of reducing carbon dioxide emissions by 40-45% by 2025. The purpose of this study is to determine if China’s ambition of reducing its carbon dioxide emissions is feasible. This investigation also examines the potential effects of China's emissions on the economic growth of other countries. The study demonstrates that China’s target may not only reduce her output, but may also adversely affect the economic growth of others. This article further reveals that unemployment in China is likely to soar during the reduction in emissions and energy consumption. Additionally, this paper evaluates the effects of green taxation on carbon dioxide emissions. In conclusion, there is a possibility that China may reach her emissions target by 2025. However, the country faces a dilemma between economic growth and environmental preservation. It is recommended that China should explore techniques which will reduce emissions but not impinge negatively on economic growth.

  7. Production and emission of methane and carbon dioxide by ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouinard, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Animal digestion is responsible for the production of both carbon dioxide and methane, while breathing produces only carbon dioxide. The author described the digestion mechanism of ruminants, explaining that they produce higher levels of methane and carbon dioxide than other animals. Fermentation stoichiometry of ruminants was also discussed along with the influence that diet has on methane production. It was noted that methane production can be decreased by increasing animal productivity, or by using ionophore antibiotics and long chain fatty acids. Test results from each of these methods have revealed side effects and none appears to be applicable for the time being. 10 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  8. A multivariate causality test of carbon dioxide emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ching-Chih

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses multivariate co-integration Granger causality tests to investigate the correlations between carbon dioxide emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in China. Some researchers have argued that the adoption of a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption as a long term policy goal will result in a closed-form relationship, to the detriment of the economy. Therefore, a perspective that can make allowances for the fact that the exclusive pursuit of economic growth will increase energy consumption and CO 2 emissions is required; to the extent that such growth will have adverse effects with regard to global climate change. (author)

  9. Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends report is the authoritative reference for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, fuel economy, and powertrain technology trends for new personal vehicles in the United States. The ??Trends?? report has been published annually since 1975 and covers all passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, minivans, and all but the largest pickup trucks and vans. This report does not provide formal compliance values for EPA CO2 emissions standards and NHTSA CAFE standards. The downloadable data are available in PDF or spreadsheet (XLS) formats.

  10. A strategic decision-making model considering the social costs of carbon dioxide emissions for sustainable supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shih-Chang; Hung, Shiu-Wan

    2014-01-15

    Incorporating sustainability into supply chain management has become a critical issue driven by pressures from governments, customers, and various stakeholder groups over the past decade. This study proposes a strategic decision-making model considering both the operational costs and social costs caused by the carbon dioxide emissions from operating such a supply chain network for sustainable supply chain management. This model was used to evaluate carbon dioxide emissions and operational costs under different scenarios in an apparel manufacturing supply chain network. The results showed that the higher the social cost rate of carbon dioxide emissions, the lower the amount of the emission of carbon dioxide. The results also suggested that a legislation that forces the enterprises to bear the social costs of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from their economic activities is an effective approach to reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Research on Urban Road Congestion Pricing Strategy Considering Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yitian Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Congestion pricing strategy has been recognized as an effective countermeasure in the practical field of urban traffic congestion mitigation. In this paper, a bi-level programming model considering carbon dioxide emission is proposed to mitigate traffic congestion and reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The objective function of the upper level model is to minimize the sum of travel costs and the carbon dioxide emissions costs. The lower level is a multi-modal transportation network equilibrium model. To solve the model, the method of successive averages (MSA and the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA are introduced. The proposed method and algorithm are tested through the numerical example. The results show that the proposed congestion pricing strategy can mitigate traffic congestion and reduce carbon emissions effectively.

  12. The Increase of Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emission in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasana, Hadi; Putri, Annisa Eka

    2018-02-01

    In the last decade, the increase of energy consumption that has multiplied carbondioxide emissions becomes world problems, especially in the developing countries undergoing industrialization to be developed ones like Indonesia. This aim of this study was to analyze the effect of fossil energy consumption, population growth, and consumption of renewable energy on carbon dioxide emission. The method used was multiple linear regression analysis with Ordinary Least Square approach using time series in the period of 1990 - 2014. The result showed that fossil energy consumption and population growth have a positive influence on carbon dioxide emission in Indonesia. Meanwhile, the consumption variable of renewable energy has a negative effect on the level of carbon dioxide emissions produced.

  13. The Increase of Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide (CO2 Emission in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasana Hadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the increase of energy consumption that has multiplied carbondioxide emissions becomes world problems, especially in the developing countries undergoing industrialization to be developed ones like Indonesia. This aim of this study was to analyze the effect of fossil energy consumption, population growth, and consumption of renewable energy on carbon dioxide emission. The method used was multiple linear regression analysis with Ordinary Least Square approach using time series in the period of 1990 - 2014. The result showed that fossil energy consumption and population growth have a positive influence on carbon dioxide emission in Indonesia. Meanwhile, the consumption variable of renewable energy has a negative effect on the level of carbon dioxide emissions produced.

  14. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer UV camera for monitoring sulfur dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, J.; Kujanpää, J.; Ojanen, H.; Saari, H.; Näkki, I.; Tukiainen, S.; Kyrölä, E.

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel UV camera for sulfur dioxide emission monitoring.The camera is equipped with a piezo-actuated Fabry-Perot interferometer allowing thefilter transmission to be tuned to match the differential absorption features ofsulfur dioxide in the wavelength region 305-320 nm. The differential absorption structuresare exploited to reduce the interfering effects of weakly wavelength dependent absorbers, suchas aerosols and black carbon, present in the exhaust gas. A data processing algorithm basedon two air gaps of the filter is presented allowing collection of a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio fordetecting sulfur dioxide in the ship plumes even in the designated emission control areas, such as the Baltic Seawhere the sulfur content limit of fuel oil is 0.1 %. First field tests performed inLänsisatama harbour, Helsinki Finland, indicate that sulfur dioxide can be detectedin ship plumes. The camera is light-weight and can be mounted to a drone.

  15. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide from Redoubt Volcano, Alaska during the 1989-1990 eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, T.J.; Doukas, M.P.; Neal, C.A.; McGimsey, R.G.; Gardner, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates in the gas plume emitted from fumaroles in the summit crater of Redoubt Volcano were started on March 20, 1990 using the COSPEC method. During the latter half of the period of intermittent dome growth and destruction, between March 20 and mid-June 1990, sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from approximately 1250 to 5850 t/d, rates notably higher than for other convergent-plate boundary volcanoes during periods of active dome growth. Emission rates following the end of dome growth from late June 1990 through May 1991 decreased steadily to less than 75 t/d. The largest mass of sulfur dioxide was released during the period of explosive vent clearing when explosive degassing on December 14-15 injected at least 175,000 ?? 50,000 tonnes of SO2 into the atmosphere. Following the explosive eruptions of December 1989, Redoubt Volcano entered a period of intermittent dome growth from late December 1989 to mid-June 1990 during which Redoubt emitted a total mass of SO2 ranging from 572,000 ?? 90,000 tonnes to 680,000 ?? 90,000 tonnes. From mid-June 1990 through May 1991, the volcano was in a state of posteruption degassing into the troposphere, producing approximately 183,000 ?? 50,000 tonnes of SO2. We estimate that Redoubt Volcano released a minimum mass of sulfur dioxide of approximately 930,000 tonnes. While COSPEC data were not obtained frequently enough to enable their use in eruption prediction, SO2 emission rates clearly indicated a consistent decline in emission rates between March through October 1990 and a continued low level of emission rates through the first half of 1991. Values from consecutive daily measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates spanning the March 23, 1990 eruption decreased in the three days prior to eruption. That decrease was coincident with a several-fold increase in the frequency of shallow seismic events, suggesting partial sealing of the magma conduit to gas loss that resulted in

  16. Natural sources of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide emissions from volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Terrence

    1990-01-01

    Volcanic degassing of carbon dioxide plays an important role in keeping the atmosphere-ocean portion of the carbon geochemical cycle in balance. The atmosphere-ocean carbon deficit requires replenishment of 6??1012 mol CO2/yr, and places an upper limit on the output of carbon dioxide from volcanoes. The CO2 output of the global mid-oceanic ridge system is ca. 0.7??1012 mol/yr, thus supplying only a fraction of the amount needed to balance the carbon deficit. The carbon dioxide flux from subaerial volcanoes is poorly known, but it appears to be at least as large as the mid-oceanic ridge flux. Much (perhaps most) of the CO2 emitted from volcanoes is degassed noneruptively. This mode of degassing may lead to impacts on the environment and biosphere that are fundamentally different in character from those envisioned in published scenarios, which are based on the assumption that CO2 degassing occurs predominantly by eruptive processes. Although the flux of carbon dioxide from volcanoes is poorly constrained at present, it is clearly two orders of magnitude lower than the anthropogenic output of CO2.

  17. Geographical Detector Model for Influencing Factors of Industrial Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Inner Mongolia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Studying the influencing factors of carbon dioxide emissions is not only practically but also theoretically crucial for establishing regional carbon-reduction policies, developing low-carbon economy and solving the climate problems. Therefore, we used a geographical detector model which is consists of four parts, i.e., risk detector, factor detector, ecological detector and interaction detector to analyze the effect of these social economic factors, i.e., GDP, industrial structure, urbanization rate, economic growth rate, population and road density on the increase of energy consumption carbon dioxide emissions in industrial sector in Inner Mongolia northeast of China. Thus, combining with the result of four detectors, we found that GDP and population more influence than economic growth rate, industrial structure, urbanization rate and road density. The interactive effect of any two influencing factors enhances the increase of the carbon dioxide emissions. The findings of this research have significant policy implications for regions like Inner Mongolia.

  18. Carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central Europe between 1995 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlčková Jana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and environmental policies are widely discussed, but much less is known about emissions embodied in goods traded internationally, and the distinction between emission producers and consumers. The carbon dioxide emissions embodied in international trade in Central European countries are subject to examination in this paper. As a result of industrial restructuring and environmental legislation, air pollution has improved significantly in Central European countries since the 1989 transition. On the other hand, economic growth has been accompanied by a rise in consumerism. Despite the increasing role of exports, the Visegrad group countries have become net importers of carbon dioxide emissions between 1995 and 2008. This seems to be the ‘standard trajectory’ of a country’s transition toward a more developed and consumption-oriented economy. The global patterns of carbon dioxide emissions embodied in manufacturing exports are also mapped, using network analysis and constructing ‘product space’. The analysis confirms that industrial re-structuring played an important role in lowering the production of carbon dioxide emissions in the Visegrad countries.

  19. Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, L.K.; Phylipsen, G.J.M.; Worrell, E.

    2001-04-01

    Iron and steel production consumes enormous quantities of energy, especially in developing countries where outdated, inefficient technologies are still used to produce iron and steel. Carbon dioxide emissions from steel production, which range between 5 and 15% of total country emissions in key developing countries (Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and South Africa), will continue to grow as these countries develop and as demand for steel products such as materials, automobiles, and appliances increases. In this report, we describe the key steel processes, discuss typical energy-intensity values for these processes, review historical trends in iron and steel production by process in five key developing countries, describe the steel industry in each of the five key developing countries, present international comparisons of energy use and carbon dioxide emissions among these countries, and provide our assessment of the technical potential to reduce these emissions based on best-practice benchmarking. Using a best practice benchmark, we find that significant savings, in the range of 33% to 49% of total primary energy used to produce steel, are technically possible in these countries. Similarly, we find that the technical potential for reducing intensities of carbon dioxide emissions ranges between 26% and 49% of total carbon dioxide emissions from steel production in these countries.

  20. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who like other scientists rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of CO2. In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU) caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc.) were calculated for the years 2005 2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  1. Direct greenhouse gas emissions of the game industry in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories did not include game as an emissions source. Recently game farming has become a recognized commercial enterprise in the agricultural sector in South Africa, contributing approximately R10 billion to the sectorial gross domestic product. The objective of this study was to ...

  2. An economic analysis of tradeable emission permits for sulphur dioxide emissions in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruitwagen, S.

    1996-01-01

    The central theme of this thesis is the analysis of the applicability of tradeable emission permits for cost-effective SO2 reduction in Europe. First, an economic theoretical background is presented based on a literature study. Second, integrated assessment models are presented and compared. One of these models is selected for simulation. Third, a new permit trading systems is developed and analysed by detailed simulations of trading schemes, including their economic and environmental implications. Chapter 2 discusses some general economic aspects of pollution control. Attention is paid to the cost effectiveness of pollution control, to the international dimension of acid rain policy and to the need for cooperation. Some general game theoretic concepts are reviewed. Also attention is paid to the alternative policy instruments for emission control, focusing on tradeable emission permits. The theory of tradeable emission permits is elaborated in Chapter 3. Permit trading for pollutants that are non-uniformly mixing is thoroughly discussed and illustrated by some empirical studies. After discussing both emission permit and deposition permit trading systems, alternative systems of tradeable permits for this kind of pollutants are examined. Two main aspects in examining permit trading systems concern (1) the kind of trading process assumed, involving the distinction between simultaneous multilateral permit trading versus bilateral sequential permit trading, and (2) the initial distribution of emission permits. The thorough discussion on tradeable permits contributes to a better understanding of this policy instrument and sheds light on the implications of permit trading for non-uniformly mixing pollutants. The findings of this chapter indicate that a new permit trading system has to be developed. Chapter 4 describes and compares integrated assessment models for simulation of acid rain control. First, three integrated assessment models for the European acid rain problem

  3. The travel-related carbon dioxide emissions of atmospheric researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Most atmospheric scientists agree that greenhouse gas emissions have already caused significant changes to the global climate system and that these changes will accelerate in the near future. At the same time, atmospheric scientists who – like other scientists – rely on international collaboration and information exchange travel a lot and, thereby, cause substantial emissions of CO2. In this paper, the CO2 emissions of the employees working at an atmospheric research institute (the Norwegian Institute for Air Research, NILU caused by all types of business travel (conference visits, workshops, field campaigns, instrument maintainance, etc. were calculated for the years 2005–2007. It is estimated that more than 90% of the emissions were caused by air travel, 3% by ground travel and 5% by hotel usage. The travel-related annual emissions were between 1.9 and 2.4 t CO2 per employee or between 3.9 and 5.5 t CO2 per scientist. For comparison, the total annual per capita CO2 emissions are 4.5 t worldwide, 1.2 t for India, 3.8 t for China, 5.9 t for Sweden and 19.1 t for Norway. The travel-related CO2 emissions of a NILU scientist, occurring in 24 days of a year on average, exceed the global average annual per capita emission. Norway's per-capita CO2 emissions are among the highest in the world, mostly because of the emissions from the oil industry. If the emissions per NILU scientist derived in this paper are taken as representative for the average Norwegian researcher, travel by Norwegian scientists would nevertheless account for a substantial 0.2% of Norway's total CO2 emissions. Since most of the travel-related emissions are due to air travel, water vapor emissions, ozone production and contrail formation further increase the relative importance of NILU's travel in terms of radiative forcing.

  4. Carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth: a multivariate and causality analysis for Ghana, 1971-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel; Owusu, Phebe Asantewaa

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the relationship between carbon dioxide emissions, GDP, energy use, and population growth in Ghana was investigated from 1971 to 2013 by comparing the vector error correction model (VECM) and the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL). Prior to testing for Granger causality based on VECM, the study tested for unit roots, Johansen's multivariate co-integration and performed a variance decomposition analysis using Cholesky's technique. Evidence from the variance decomposition shows that 21 % of future shocks in carbon dioxide emissions are due to fluctuations in energy use, 8 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in GDP, and 6 % of future shocks are due to fluctuations in population. There was evidence of bidirectional causality running from energy use to GDP and a unidirectional causality running from carbon dioxide emissions to energy use, carbon dioxide emissions to GDP, carbon dioxide emissions to population, and population to energy use. Evidence from the long-run elasticities shows that a 1 % increase in population in Ghana will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 1.72 %. There was evidence of short-run equilibrium relationship running from energy use to carbon dioxide emissions and GDP to carbon dioxide emissions. As a policy implication, the addition of renewable energy and clean energy technologies into Ghana's energy mix can help mitigate climate change and its impact in the future.

  5. The role of accelerated power generation technology development to carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, P.

    2004-01-01

    The paper focuses on the role of advanced power generation technology in the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. In order to quantify the importance of these technologies a scenario approach is applied comparing a 'business as usual' scenario with technology cases which assume the accelerated development and earlier availability of certain advanced technologies. The simulations with the POLES world energy model demonstrate that the availability of advanced technology for power generation alone does not lead to emission reductions needed to stabilise carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere at a sustainable level. To achieve that additional policy measures are necessary. It is however shown, that the availability of advanced technology has a crucial impact on the cost to meet emission reduction targets. (Author)

  6. The Probability of Tax Charges for Industrial Emission of Carbon Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arief-Goeritno

    2000-01-01

    Generally, although all industrial by product can be toxic and non-toxic pollutant that have potential hazard for human being and environmental. One of these pollutants is carbon dioxide that has potential contribution for greenhouse effect. Although carbon dioxide can be absorbed by plants at the forest but quantity of this emission more higher than quantity of forest area. For this reason rehabilitation of the forest and diversifications and energy saving can be used for decreasing of greenhouse effect. The synergy action such as economical instrumentation (specially microeconomics) can be implemented base on regulators, taxing and incentive and effluent charge by deeper assessment on environmental economics. By identification of quality and quantity fossil fuels that was burned in the industrial process so with stoichiometry calculation will be found quantity of carbon dioxide emission and the taxes can be estimated. (author)

  7. Analysis of carbon dioxide emission of gas fuelled cogeneration plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Adzuieen; Amin, M.; Majid, A.

    2013-12-01

    Gas turbines are widely used for power generation. In cogeneration system, the gas turbine generates electricity and the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam or chilled water. Besides enhancing the efficiency of the system, the process assists in reducing the emission of CO2 to the environment. This study analyzes the amount of CO2 emission by Universiti Teknologi Petronas gas fuelled cogeneration system using energy balance equations. The results indicate that the cogeneration system reduces the CO2 emission to the environment by 60%. This finding could encourage the power plant owners to install heat recovery systems to their respective plants.

  8. Spatial Aspects of Firm-level Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Japan (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    OKUBO Toshihiro; Robert J.R. ELLIOTT; Matthew A. COLE; Ying ZHOU

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the spatial distribution of Japanese pollution-intensive firms. Employing spatial econometric techniques, our results show that firm-level carbon dioxide emissions are spatially correlated and spatial correlations with our dependent variable are perhaps due to demonstration or imitation effects. We also find evidence of feedback effects where the emissions of firms affect those of other firms located nearby.

  9. Carbon dioxide emission implications if hydrofluorocarbons are regulated: a refrigeration case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Paul; Lownsbury, James M

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. is strongly considering regulating hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) due to their global climate change forcing effects. A drop-in replacement hydrofluoroether has been evaluated using a gate-to-grave life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions for the trade-offs between direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions compared to a current HFC and a historically used refrigerant. The results indicate current regulations being considered may increase global climate change.

  10. Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide adsorbents for diesel engine emission control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

    2011-03-15

    Disclosed herein are sorbents and devices for controlling sulfur oxides emissions as well as systems including such sorbents and devices. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the disclosed sorbents, devices and systems. In one embodiment the disclosed sorbents can be conveniently regenerated, such as under normal exhaust stream from a combustion engine, particularly a diesel engine. Accordingly, also disclosed are combustion vehicles equipped with sulfur dioxide emission control devices.

  11. Routing strategy including time and carbon dioxide emissions : effects on network performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Fan; Chen, Y.; Goni Ros, B.; GAO, Jian; Knoop, V.L.

    2016-01-01

    Traffic congestion leads to delays and increased carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Traffic management measures such as providing information on environmental route costs have been proposed to mitigate congestion. Multi-criteria routing dynamic traffic assignment (MCR-DTA) models are needed to evaluate

  12. Structural change and the environment : a case study of China's production recipe and carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lan, J.; Lenzen, M.; Dietzenbacher, Erik; Moran, D.; Kanemoto, K.; Murray, J.; Geschke, A.

    We use the input-output tables in constant prices extended with carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for examining the development of China, a country undergoing rapid growth. We undertake this empirical analysis in terms of a new and therefore rarely applied methodology: instead of average coefficients

  13. Are renewable energy policies upsetting carbon dioxide emissions? The case of Latin America countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuinhas, José Alberto; Marques, António Cardoso; Koengkan, Matheus

    2017-06-01

    The impact of renewable energy policies in carbon dioxide emissions was analysed for a panel of ten Latin American countries, for the period from 1991 to 2012. Panel autoregressive distributed lag methodology was used to decompose the total effect of renewable energy policies on carbon dioxide emissions in its short- and long-run components. There is evidence for the presence of cross-sectional dependence, confirming that Latin American countries share spatial patterns. Heteroskedasticity, contemporaneous correlation, and first-order autocorrelation cross-sectional dependence are also present. To cope with these phenomena, the robust dynamic Driscoll-Kraay estimator, with fixed effects, was used. It was confirmed that the primary energy consumption per capita, in both the short- and long-run, contributes to an increase in carbon dioxide emissions, and also that renewable energy policies in the long-run, and renewable electricity generation per capita both in the short- and long-run, help to mitigate per capita carbon dioxide emissions.

  14. Analysis of carbon dioxide emission from energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, S.; Koyama, S.

    1992-01-01

    A linear programming model MARKAL is used to explore technology options and cost for meeting energy demands while reducing CO 2 emissions from energy system of Japan. The model consists of an extension of the existing energy system and possible alternative energy technologies available during 45 years from 1983 to 2027. Using two scenarios of high- and low-energy demand, an optimal configuration of the model is examined under the mix of specified constraints on the use of technologies and fuels. The results show that energy conservation is robust in yielding reduction in CO 2 emissions under a variety of conditions, and that stringent constraints on the national CO 2 emissions produce major shifts in the market shares of fossil and non-fossil fuels that necessitate advanced technologies and an increase in the total system cost

  15. Impacts of temporary traffic control measures on vehicular emissions during the Asian games in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Zhang, Yingzhi; Shen, Xianbao; Wang, Xintong; Wu, Ye; He, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    To guarantee good traffic and air quality during the 16th Asian Games in Guangzhou, China, the government carried out two traffic control Drills before the Games and adopted traffic control measures during the Games. Vehicle activities before and during the first and second Drills, and during the Games, were surveyed. Based on the data under investigation, the impacts of control measures on traffic volumes and driving characteristics were analyzed during the first and second Drills, and the Games. The emission reduction of traffic control measures was also evaluated during the three stages using the MOBILE-China model. The results show that there were significant effects of implementing temporary traffic control measures on transportation activity and vehicular emissions. During the first and second Drills, and the Games, the average traffic volumes in monitored roads decreased, and the average speed of vehicles increased significantly The co-effects of traffic flow reduction, traffic congestion improvement, and the banning of high-emitting vehicles helped to greatly reduce the estimated emissions from motor vehicles in Guangzhou during the first and second Drills, and the Games. Estimated vehicular emissions were reduced by 38-52% during the first Drill and 28-36% for the second Drill. During the Asian Games, vehicular emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NO), and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter Guangzhou in the future. In addition, the effects of temporary transportation control measures will provide important awareness to other cities that will be hosting large-scale activities similar to the Asian Games.

  16. Assessing Uncertainties in Gridded Emissions: A Case Study for Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide (FFCO2) Emission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, T.; Ott, L.; Lauvaux, T.; Feng, S.; Bun, R.; Roman, M.; Baker, D. F.; Pawson, S.

    2017-01-01

    Fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (FFCO2) are the largest input to the global carbon cycle on a decadal time scale. Because total emissions are assumed to be reasonably well constrained by fuel statistics, FFCO2 often serves as a reference in order to deduce carbon uptake by poorly understood terrestrial and ocean sinks. Conventional atmospheric CO2 flux inversions solve for spatially explicit regional sources and sinks and estimate land and ocean fluxes by subtracting FFCO2. Thus, errors in FFCO2 can propagate into the final inferred flux estimates. Gridded emissions are often based on disaggregation of emissions estimated at national or regional level. Although national and regional total FFCO2 are well known, gridded emission fields are subject to additional uncertainties due to the emission disaggregation. Assessing such uncertainties is often challenging because of the lack of physical measurements for evaluation. We first review difficulties in assessing uncertainties associated with gridded FFCO2 emission data and present several approaches for evaluation of such uncertainties at multiple scales. Given known limitations, inter-emission data differences are often used as a proxy for the uncertainty. The popular approach allows us to characterize differences in emissions, but does not allow us to fully quantify emission disaggregation biases. Our work aims to vicariously evaluate FFCO2 emission data using atmospheric models and measurements. We show a global simulation experiment where uncertainty estimates are propagated as an atmospheric tracer (uncertainty tracer) alongside CO2 in NASA's GEOS model and discuss implications of FFCO2 uncertainties in the context of flux inversions. We also demonstrate the use of high resolution urban CO2 simulations as a tool for objectively evaluating FFCO2 data over intense emission regions. Though this study focuses on FFCO2 emission data, the outcome of this study could also help improve the knowledge of similar

  17. Possibilities for Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Resulting from Nuclear Power Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozicevic, M.; Tomsic, Z.; Kovacevic, T.

    1998-01-01

    Each energy resource is connected to certain environmental impacts and risks which must be taken into account. In recent years attention has been focused on the climate change effects of the burning fossil fuels, especially coal, due to the carbon dioxide which this releases into the atmosphere. If the electric energy produced in nuclear power plants were produced in coal-fired plants, global CO 2 emissions would rise for more than 2000 million tons, a significant value in comparison with 4000 million tons which is recommended as a target for emission reduction by the year 2005 at the Toronto Conference on the Changing Atmosphere. Possibilities for carbon dioxide emission reduction which would be the result of the nuclear option acceptance are discussed in this paper. (author)

  18. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction Estimates: Potential Use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , substituting a fraction of the currently used petroleum fuels ... Out of the 1,249,170 tCO2e emitted in 2007, the emissions of CO2 from gasoline and diesel were 25 % and 39 %, respectively. 151,950 vehicles using gasoline were circulating on ...

  19. Carbon dioxide emission from raised bog surface after peat extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turbiak Janusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on CO2 emission from a raised bog after completion of peat extraction was performed in 2011–2013. CO2 emissions were determined by the chamber method. Twenty years after the termination of peat extraction, the bog surface was almost entirely devoid of plants. CO2 emission from the bog varied depending on temperature and water conditions and was 418 mg·m−2·h−1 on average during the research period. CO2 losses on the raised bog were on average 19.7 Mg·ha−1·year−1 during the research period which corresponded to a carbon loss of 5.37 Mg·ha−1·year−1 or mineralisation of 9.6 Mg·ha−1·year−1 of organic mass of 56% carbon content. It is possible to reduce organic mass losses and CO2 emission to the atmosphere from the bog surface after peat extraction has been terminated by reconstruction of initial water conditions, i.e. retaining a high ground water level and restoration of aquatic plant communities.

  20. Decomposing the Influencing Factors of Industrial Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Inner Mongolia Based on the LMDI Method

    OpenAIRE

    Rina Wu; Jiquan Zhang; Yuhai Bao; Quan Lai; Siqin Tong; Youtao Song

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of the influencing factors of industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions is essential to reduce natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, we applied the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) decomposition method based on the extended Kaya identity to analyze the changes in industrial carbon dioxide emissions resulting from 39 industrial sectors in Inner Mongolia northeast of China over the period 2003–2012. The factors were divided into five types of eff...

  1. Carbon taxes, consumer demand and carbon dioxide emissions: a simulation analysis for the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Symons; John Proops; Philip Gay

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we examine the effects of a carbon tax, one of the possible instruments for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Such taxes are currently being proposed as a means of reducing CO2 emissions, motivated by concerns about the global greenhouse effect and its potential impact on global climate and sea levels (Cline, 1991) and on global economies (Nordhaus, 1991). We therefore take as our problem the reduction of CO2 emissions by the UK economy by use of a carbon tax, and the cor...

  2. Carbon dioxide emissions, output, and energy consumption categories in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Fethi

    2017-06-01

    This study examines the relation between CO 2 emissions, income, non-renewable, and renewable energy consumption in Algeria during the period extending from 1980 to 2011. Our work gives particular attention to the validity of environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis. The autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) with break point method outcome demonstrates the positive effect of non-renewable type of energy on CO 2 emissions consumption. On the contrary, the results reveal an insignificant effect of renewable energy on environment improvement. Moreover, the results accept the existence of EKC hypothesis but the highest gross domestic product value in logarithm scale of our data is inferior to the estimated turning point. Consequently, policy-makers in Algeria should expand the ratio of renewable energy and should decrease the quota of non-renewable energy consumption.

  3. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Adam; Blumsack, Seth A; Apt, Jay; Lave, Lester B; Morgan, M Granger

    2008-05-01

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO2 emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO2 emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO2 emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO2 emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO2 emissions that has been shown in earlier workto stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO2 reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale.

  4. Integrated biomass energy systems and emissions of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, U.R.; Turnbull, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and US Department of Energy (DOE) have been funding a number of case studies under the initiative entitled 'Economic Development through Biomass Systems Integration', with the objective to investigate the feasibility of integrated biomass energy systems, utilizing a dedicated feedstock supply system (DFSS) for energy production. This paper deals with the full cycle for four of these case studies, which have been examined with regard to the emissions of greenhouse gases, especially CO 2 . Although the conversion of biomass to electricity in itself does not emit more CO 2 than is captured by the biomass through photosynthesis, there will be some CO 2 -emissions from DFSS. External energy is required for the production and transportation of the biomass feedstock, and this energy is mainly based on fossil fuels. By using this input energy, CO 2 and other greenhouse gases are emitted. But, by utilizing biomass with fossil fuels as external input fuels, we would get about 10-15 times more electric energy per unit fossil fuel, compared to a 100% coal power system. By introducing a DFSS on former farmland, the amount of energy spent for production of crops can be reduced, the amount of fertilizers can be decreased, the soil can be improved, and a significant amount of energy will be produced, compared to an ordinary farm crop. Compared to traditional coal based electricity production, the CO 2 -emissions are in most cases reduced significantly, as much as 95%. The important conclusion is the great potential of reducing greenhouse gas emissions through the offset of coal by biomass. 23 refs,, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  5. A new method for estimating carbon dioxide emissions from transportation at fine spatial scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu Yuqin [School of Geographical Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Lam, Nina S N; Reams, Margaret, E-mail: gis_syq@126.com, E-mail: nlam@lsu.edu, E-mail: mreams@lsu.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 70803 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Detailed estimates of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions at fine spatial scales are useful to both modelers and decision makers who are faced with the problem of global warming and climate change. Globally, transport related emissions of carbon dioxide are growing. This letter presents a new method based on the volume-preserving principle in the areal interpolation literature to disaggregate transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission estimates from the county-level scale to a 1 km{sup 2} grid scale. The proposed volume-preserving interpolation (VPI) method, together with the distance-decay principle, were used to derive emission weights for each grid based on its proximity to highways, roads, railroads, waterways, and airports. The total CO{sub 2} emission value summed from the grids within a county is made to be equal to the original county-level estimate, thus enforcing the volume-preserving property. The method was applied to downscale the transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission values by county (i.e. parish) for the state of Louisiana into 1 km{sup 2} grids. The results reveal a more realistic spatial pattern of CO{sub 2} emission from transportation, which can be used to identify the emission 'hot spots'. Of the four highest transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission hotspots in Louisiana, high-emission grids literally covered the entire East Baton Rouge Parish and Orleans Parish, whereas CO{sub 2} emission in Jefferson Parish (New Orleans suburb) and Caddo Parish (city of Shreveport) were more unevenly distributed. We argue that the new method is sound in principle, flexible in practice, and the resultant estimates are more accurate than previous gridding approaches.

  6. Recyclables Valorisation as the Best Strategy for Achieving Landfill CO2e Emissions Abatement from Domestic Waste: Game Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Taboada-González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Various nations in the world have developed technologies and strategies for appropriate waste disposal, and to abate waste generation and greenhouse gasses. Alternatives like recovering materials can help, but they require reliable information to improve planning and management. This study quantifies the Carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions produced by the lack of valorisation of materials in a Mexican city. Two waste characterisations in a lower-class neighbourhood were carried out. For the CO2 emission estimation, two scenarios were considered. DEFRA emission factors for waste treatment processes were used. Waste generation was 0.64 kg/capita/day in the first study, and 0.50 kg/capita/day in the second. The CO2eq emissions of collected waste in the neighbourhood were estimated at 1824 kg for 2013 (0.20 kg/capita/day and 1636 kg for 2015 (0.19 kg/capita/day. The behaviour of solid waste management in the city can be explained by the “prisoner’s dilemma” model, studied in game theory, which is ideally suited to analysing situations affected by multiple agents, but requires an accurate understanding of solid waste actors and social implications.

  7. Carbon dioxide emission and economic growth of China-the role of international trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Kofi Baah; Du, Jianguo; Bediako, Isaac Asare; Boamah, Angela Jacinta; Abdul-Rasheed, Alhassan Alolo; Owusu, Samuel Mensah

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the role of international trade in mitigating carbon dioxide emission as a nation economically advances. This study disaggregated the international trade into total exports and total imports. A multivariate model framework was estimated for the time series data for the period of 1970-2014. The quantile regression detected all the essential relationship, which hitherto, the traditional ordinary least squares could not capture. A cointegration relationship was confirmed using the Johansen cointegration model. The findings of the Granger causality revealed the presence of a uni-directional Granger causality running from energy consumption to economic growth; from import to economic growth; from imports to exports; and from urbanisation to economic growth, exports and imports. Our study established the presence of long-run relationships amongst carbon dioxide emission, economic growth, energy consumption, imports, exports and urbanisation. A bootstrap method was further utilised to reassess the evidence of the Granger causality, of which the results affirmed the Granger causality in the long run. This study confirmed a long-run N-shaped relationship between economic growth and carbon emission, under the estimated cubic environmental Kuznet curve framework, from the perspective of China. The recommendation therefore is that China as export leader should transform its trade growth mode by reducing the level of carbon dioxide emission and strengthening its international cooperation as it embraces more environmental protectionisms.

  8. Carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth. Panel data evidence from developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Paresh Kumar; Narayan, Seema [School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Faculty of Business and Law, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); School of Economics, Finance, and Marketing, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    In this paper we test the Environment Kuznet's Curve (EKC) hypothesis for 43 developing countries. We suggest examining the EKC hypothesis based on the short- and long-run income elasticities; that is, if the long-run income elasticity is smaller than the short-run income elasticity then it is evident that a country has reduced carbon dioxide emissions as its income has increased. Our empirical analysis based on individual countries suggests that Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Yemen, Qatar, the UAE, Argentina, Mexico, Venezuela, Algeria, Kenya, Nigeria, Congo, Ghana, and South Africa - approximately 35 per cent of the sample - carbon dioxide emissions have fallen over the long run; that is, as these economies have grown emissions have fallen since the long-run income elasticity is smaller than the short-run elasticity. We also examine the EKC hypothesis for panels of countries constructed on the basis of regional location using the panel cointegration and the panel long-run estimation techniques. We find that only for the Middle Eastern and South Asian panels, the income elasticity in the long run is smaller than the short run, implying that carbon dioxide emission has fallen with a rise in income. (author)

  9. Game Changing Development Program - Next Generation Life Support Project: Oxygen Recovery From Carbon Dioxide Using Ion Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jiao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the Phase I research and development work performed during the March 13, 2015 to July 13, 2016 period. The proposal for this work was submitted in response to NASA Research Announcement NNH14ZOA001N, "Space Technology Research, Development, Demonstration, and Infusion 2014 (SpaceTech-REDDI-2014)," Appendix 14GCD-C2 "Game Changing Development Program, Advanced Oxygen Recovery for Spacecraft Life Support Systems Appendix" The Task Agreement for this Phase I work is Document Control Number: GCDP-02-TA-15015. The objective of the Phase I project was to demonstrate in laboratories two Engineering Development Units (EDU) that perform critical functions of the low temperature carbon dioxide electrolysis and the catalytic conversion of carbon monoxide into carbon and carbon dioxide. The low temperature carbon dioxide electrolysis EDU was built by the University of Delaware with Dr. Feng Jiao as the principal investigator in charge of this EDU development (under NASA Contract NNC15CA04C). The carbon monoxide catalytic conversion EDU was built by the NASA Glenn Research Center with Kenneth Burke as the principal investigator and overall project leader for the development of both EDUs. Both EDUs were successfully developed and demonstrated the critical functions for each process. The carbon dioxide electrolysis EDU was delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center and the carbon monoxide catalytic conversion EDU was delivered to the NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center.

  10. Pilot Study of Educational Gaming to Improve Adherence to an End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Monitoring Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Taylore D; Stutzman, Sonja; Yu, Christine; Parry, David; Olson, DaiWai M

    2018-02-01

    End-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring is an important part of patient care. Understanding and interpreting ETCO2 wavelengths can be a challenge. This pilot study explored the efficacy of a novel approach to educating clinicians on ETCO2 monitoring via game theory. A video game application for ETCO2 monitoring was developed. Clinicians were encouraged to play the game over a 3-month period. Compliance with the ETCO2 protocol was compared in a random selection of patients admitted before, during, and after the intervention. Thirty-eight clinicians completed the preand posttest, with a significant difference in test scores (p = .03). The intervention was associated with higher adherence to the ETCO2 protocol before and after the intervention (p < .05). The availability of new technologies has created opportunities to develop new approaches to educate clinicians. This study showed that the use of a game improved adherence to the ETCO2 protocol. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(2):79-83. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Convergence of carbon dioxide emissions in Chinese cities: A continuous dynamic distribution approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianxin; Wu, Yanrui; Guo, Xiumei; Cheong, Tsun Se

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the spatial dynamics of per capita carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in China. The analyses are conducted by employing a continuous dynamic distribution approach and panel data of 286 cities at the prefecture and above-prefecture level. The results show that per capita CO 2 emissions tend to converge during the sample period of 2002–2011. However, multimodality is found in the ergodic distribution of the full sample. It is also found that there is more persistence in cities with low per capita CO 2 emissions, and more mobility in cities with high per capita CO 2 emissions. The analyses also show that the dynamics of per capita CO 2 emissions are significantly different among various geographical, income and environmental policy groups. The conditional distribution analyses indicate that multimodality cannot be explained independently by any one of the two factors, namely geographical location or income level. The findings in this study may have important policy implications for CO 2 abatement in China. - Highlights: •Spatial dynamics of per capita carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in 286 Chinese cities. •A continuous dynamic distribution approach and panel data. •Multimodality is found in the ergodic distribution of the full sample. •Significantly different dynamics among various city groups.

  12. Urbanization and carbon dioxide emissions in Singapore: evidence from the ARDL approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hamisu Sadi; Abdul-Rahim, A S; Ribadu, Mohammed Bashir

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to examine empirically the impact of urbanization on carbon dioxide emissions in Singapore from 1970 to 2015. The autoregressive distributed lags (ARDL) approach is applied within the analysis. The main finding reveals a negative and significant impact of urbanization on carbon emissions in Singapore, which means that urban development in Singapore is not a barrier to the improvement of environmental quality. Thus, urbanization enhances environmental quality by reducing carbon emissions in the sample country. The result also highlighted that economic growth has a positive and significant impact on carbon emissions, which suggests that economic growth reduces environmental quality through its direct effect of increasing carbon emissions in the country. Despite the high level of urbanization in Singapore, which shows that 100 % of the populace is living in the urban center, it does not lead to more environmental degradation. Hence, urbanization will not be considered an obstacle when initiating policies that will be used to reduce environmental degradation in the country. Policy makers should consider the country's level of economic growth instead of urbanization when formulating policies to reduce environmental degradation, due to its direct impact on increasing carbon dioxide emissions.

  13. Particle and carbon dioxide emissions from passenger vehicles operating on unleaded petrol and LPG fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristovski, Z.D.; Jayaratne, E.R.; Morawska, L.; Ayoko, G.A.; Lim, M.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the particle and carbon dioxide emissions from a fleet of six dedicated liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) powered and five unleaded petrol (ULP) powered new Ford Falcon Forte passenger vehicles was carried out on a chassis dynamometer at four different vehicle speeds-0 (idle), 40, 60, 80 and 100 km h -1 . Emission factors and their relative values between the two fuel types together with a statistical significance for any difference were estimated for each parameter. In general, LPG was found to be a 'cleaner' fuel, although in most cases, the differences were not statistically significant owing to the large variations between emissions from different vehicles. The particle number emission factors ranged from 10 11 to 10 13 km -1 and was over 70% less with LPG compared to ULP. Corresponding differences in particle mass emission factor between the two fuels were small and ranged from the order of 10 μg km -1 at 40 to about 1000 μg km -1 at 100 km h -1 . The count median particle diameter (CMD) ranged from 20 to 35 nm and was larger with LPG than with ULP in all modes except the idle mode. Carbon dioxide emission factors ranged from about 300 to 400 g km -1 at 40 km h -1 , falling with increasing speed to about 200 g km -1 at 100 km h -1 . At all speeds, the values were 10% to 18% greater with ULP than with LPG

  14. Carbon dioxide emissions effects of grid-scale electricity storage in a decarbonizing power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael T.; Jaramillo, Paulina; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2018-01-01

    While grid-scale electricity storage (hereafter ‘storage’) could be crucial for deeply decarbonizing the electric power system, it would increase carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in current systems across the United States. To better understand how storage transitions from increasing to decreasing system CO2 emissions, we quantify the effect of storage on operational CO2 emissions as a power system decarbonizes under a moderate and strong CO2 emission reduction target through 2045. Under each target, we compare the effect of storage on CO2 emissions when storage participates in only energy, only reserve, and energy and reserve markets. We conduct our study in the Electricity Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) system and use a capacity expansion model to forecast generator fleet changes and a unit commitment and economic dispatch model to quantify system CO2 emissions with and without storage. We find that storage would increase CO2 emissions in the current ERCOT system, but would decrease CO2 emissions in 2025 through 2045 under both decarbonization targets. Storage reduces CO2 emissions primarily by enabling gas-fired generation to displace coal-fired generation, but also by reducing wind and solar curtailment. We further find that the market in which storage participates drives large differences in the magnitude, but not the direction, of the effect of storage on CO2 emissions.

  15. Prediction on carbon dioxide emissions based on fuzzy rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzi, Herrini; Abdullah, Lazim

    2014-06-01

    There are several ways to predict air quality, varying from simple regression to models based on artificial intelligence. Most of the conventional methods are not sufficiently able to provide good forecasting performances due to the problems with non-linearity uncertainty and complexity of the data. Artificial intelligence techniques are successfully used in modeling air quality in order to cope with the problems. This paper describes fuzzy inference system (FIS) to predict CO2 emissions in Malaysia. Furthermore, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used to compare the prediction performance. Data of five variables: energy use, gross domestic product per capita, population density, combustible renewable and waste and CO2 intensity are employed in this comparative study. The results from the two model proposed are compared and it is clearly shown that the ANFIS outperforms FIS in CO2 prediction.

  16. Tetraphenylethylene-based phosphine: tuneable emission and carbon dioxide fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianyong; Yang, Qiuli; Zhu, Yixuan; Liu, Haoliang; Chi, Zhenguo; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2014-11-14

    A tetraphenylethylene-based phosphine, 1,1,2,2-tetrakis((4-diphenylphosphino)phenyl)ethylene (TPE-P4), was synthesized and showed novel aggregation-induced and mechano-responsive emission. A mixture of TPE-P4 and Ag(+) could fix atmospheric CO2in situ as carbonate ions in neutral solution to yield a rare 3D metal-organic framework with zeolite-like SOD topology, [Ag2(TPE-P4)CO3]x⊃nH2O (Ag-TPE-P4). Ag-TPE-P4 showed turn-on luminescence of TPE-P4, emitting bright bluish green light in the solid state.

  17. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Potential climate engineering effectiveness and side effects during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, David P; Feng, Ellias Y; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-02-25

    The realization that mitigation efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions have, until now, been relatively ineffective has led to an increasing interest in climate engineering as a possible means of preventing the potentially catastrophic consequences of climate change. While many studies have addressed the potential effectiveness of individual methods there have been few attempts to compare them. Here we use an Earth system model to compare the effectiveness and side effects of afforestation, artificial ocean upwelling, ocean iron fertilization, ocean alkalinization and solar radiation management during a high carbon dioxide-emission scenario. We find that even when applied continuously and at scales as large as currently deemed possible, all methods are, individually, either relatively ineffective with limited (effects and cannot be stopped without causing rapid climate change. Our simulations suggest that the potential for these types of climate engineering to make up for failed mitigation may be very limited.

  19. Electric cars : The climate impact of electric cars, focusing on carbon dioxide equivalent emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Sandra; Sundin, Helena; Thell, Linda

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines and models the emissions of carbon dioxide equivalents of the composition of automobiles in Sweden 2012. The report will be based on three scenarios of electricity valuation principles, which are a snapshot perspective, a retrospective perspective and a future perspective. The snapshot perspective includes high and low values for electricity on the margin, the retrospective perspective includes Nordic and European electricity mix and the future perspective includ...

  20. The influence of travel decisions on the carbon dioxide emissions of transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norava, M.

    2001-01-01

    During the recent years the reduction of the energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions of transport have been essential objectives in transport policy. At the moment, technical means to reduce carbon dioxide emissions have been emphasized and the research has focused on the technical innovations. However, there are also substantial possibilities to reduce energy consumption by influencing the individual travel decisions and behaviour. This study is focused on the individual travel behaviour and how it can be influenced. Travel behaviour is studied by dividing the individual travel decisions into separate categories and assessing the possibilities of influence within each category. The study concentrates on daily travel choices, because the daily mobility is the most important factor in the total emissions. The travel decisions have divided into trip production, destination choice, mode choice, choice of the starting point of the trip, route choice and the choice of the driving style and car use habits. The trip production and mode choice are the most significant decisions, when energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions are concerned. For example, the amount of shopping trip and leisure trip mileage can be reduced by approximately 10 % by extending the trip chains. This reduction would decrease the carbon dioxide emissions of passenger car traffic by 6 %. Extending of the trip chains demands to some extent more detailed planning of the daily mobility, but does not limit the travel need. The attitudes towards mobility, car use habits and the travel behaviour were studied in an influence assessment study of 42 respondents from Helsinki Region and Tampere Region. The influence assessment study consisted of attitude survey and travel diary survey. After the first inquiries the respondents received information about motoring, car use habits, public transport, environment, walking and cycling. In addition, the respondents were offered a possibility to

  1. A new evaluation of the uncertainty associated with CDIAC estimates of fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Andres

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three uncertainty assessments associated with the global total of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel use and cement production are presented. Each assessment has its own strengths and weaknesses and none give a full uncertainty assessment of the emission estimates. This approach grew out of the lack of independent measurements at the spatial and temporal scales of interest. Issues of dependent and independent data are considered as well as the temporal and spatial relationships of the data. The result is a multifaceted examination of the uncertainty associated with fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission estimates. The three assessments collectively give a range that spans from 1.0 to 13% (2 σ. Greatly simplifying the assessments give a global fossil fuel carbon dioxide uncertainty value of 8.4% (2 σ. In the largest context presented, the determination of fossil fuel emission uncertainty is important for a better understanding of the global carbon cycle and its implications for the physical, economic and political world.

  2. Energy payback period and carbon dioxide emissions in different power generation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivistoe, A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy payback period, efficiency factor and carbon dioxide emissions in different power generation methods were studied. Nuclear, coal, peat, natural gas, wind and photovoltaic power were examined. To calculate the energy payback period of power generation, the energy inputs of different power generation methods were examined by using hybrid analysis, which is a combination of process analysis and the input-output method. The energy inputs of power generation were examined starting from raw material and fuel resources in the soil and ending up in the power station. The study also considered the handling of spent fuel and combustion residues. The energy payback periods were as follows: nuclear power 20-33 months, coal power 33 months, peat power 26-27 months, gas power 21-27 months, wind power 7 months and photovoltaic power 60-95 months. The energy payback period of nuclear power was strongly influenced by the uranium enrichment method. In natural gas power the energy payback period was influenced by the amount of natural gas used as fuel in compression stations and production fields and in photovoltaic power by the semiconductor material of the cells. The most significant carbon dioxide emissions were produced in the power generation methods based on combustion. Depending on the way of examination, both nuclear power, wind power and photovoltaic power produce carbon dioxide emissions, but on a significantly lower level. (author)

  3. An innovative indicator of carbon dioxide emissions for developing countries. A study of Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yu-Fen [Science and Technology Policy Research and Information Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, 14F, No. 106, Sec. 2, Heping E. Rd., Taipei 10636 (China); Lin, Yu-Chun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617 (China); Yang, Jing-Tang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617 (China); Office for Energy Strategy Development, National Science Council, 14F, No. 106, Sec. 2, Heping E. Rd., Taipei 10636 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Ever since the Kyoto Protocol entered into force, the issues of climate change and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have drawn more and more attention globally. However, the major concern of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce the overall GHG emissions might be inaccessible for most developing countries, which rely heavily on the energy-intensive industries for exports and economic growth. In this study, an innovative indicator of net carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions, which excludes the emissions corresponding to the exports, is proposed to explicitly reveal domestic situations of developing countries. By introducing the indicator of net CO{sub 2} emissions to top five energy-intensive industries in Taiwan, the analysis indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emissions from 1999 to 2004 is mostly contributed by the expanded exports rather than the domestic demand. The distinct growth patterns of the apparent and net CO{sub 2} emissions also imply the transformation of the industrial sector. It is expected that, for developing countries, the concept of net emissions may not only serve as a proper interim target during the process of international negotiations over GHG reductions but also highlights the prominence of addressing the emissions from the industrial sector as the top priority. (author)

  4. An innovative indicator of carbon dioxide emissions for developing countries: A study of Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.-F., E-mail: yfhuang@mail.stpi.org.t [Science and Technology Policy Research and Information Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, 14F, No. 106, Sec. 2, Heping E. Rd., Taipei 10636, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yang, J.-T., E-mail: jtyang@ntu.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Office for Energy Strategy Development, National Science Council, 14F, No. 106, Sec. 2, Heping E. Rd., Taipei 10636, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    Ever since the Kyoto Protocol entered into force, the issues of climate change and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have drawn more and more attention globally. However, the major concern of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce the overall GHG emissions might be inaccessible for most developing countries, which rely heavily on the energy-intensive industries for exports and economic growth. In this study, an innovative indicator of net carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions, which excludes the emissions corresponding to the exports, is proposed to explicitly reveal domestic situations of developing countries. By introducing the indicator of net CO{sub 2} emissions to top five energy-intensive industries in Taiwan, the analysis indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emissions from 1999 to 2004 is mostly contributed by the expanded exports rather than the domestic demand. The distinct growth patterns of the apparent and net CO{sub 2} emissions also imply the transformation of the industrial sector. It is expected that, for developing countries, the concept of net emissions may not only serve as a proper interim target during the process of international negotiations over GHG reductions but also highlights the prominence of addressing the emissions from the industrial sector as the top priority.

  5. Anthropogenic Sulfur Dioxide Emissions, 1850-2005: National and Regional Data Set by Source Category, Version 2.86

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Anthropogenic Sulfur Dioxide Emissions, 1850-2005: National and Regional Data Set by Source Category, Version 2.86 provides annual estimates of anthropogenic...

  6. Banking behavior under uncertainty: Evidence from the US Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Allowance trading program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousse, Olivier; Sevi, Benoit

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine portfolio management of emission allowances in the US Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Allowance Trading Program, to determine whether utilities have a real motive to bank when risk increases. We test a theoretical model linking the motivation of the firm to accumulate permits in order to prepare itself to face a risky situation in the future. Empirical estimation using data for years 2001 to 2004 provides evidence of a relationship between banking behavior and uncertainty the utility is facing with. (authors)

  7. Gridded uncertainty in fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission maps, a CDIAC example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Andres

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to a current lack of physical measurements at appropriate spatial and temporal scales, all current global maps and distributions of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (FFCO2 emissions use one or more proxies to distribute those emissions. These proxies and distribution schemes introduce additional uncertainty into these maps. This paper examines the uncertainty associated with the magnitude of gridded FFCO2 emissions. This uncertainty is gridded at the same spatial and temporal scales as the mass magnitude maps. This gridded uncertainty includes uncertainty contributions from the spatial, temporal, proxy, and magnitude components used to create the magnitude map of FFCO2 emissions. Throughout this process, when assumptions had to be made or expert judgment employed, the general tendency in most cases was toward overestimating or increasing the magnitude of uncertainty. The results of the uncertainty analysis reveal a range of 4–190 %, with an average of 120 % (2σ for populated and FFCO2-emitting grid spaces over annual timescales. This paper also describes a methodological change specific to the creation of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC FFCO2 emission maps: the change from a temporally fixed population proxy to a temporally varying population proxy.

  8. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from calcareous-marly rock under stress: experimental tests results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Plescia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The identified emissions of abiogenic carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane are generally attributed to volcanic activity or to geochemical processes associated with thermometamorphic effects. In this paper we show another possible abiogenic source of emission, induced by mechanical, and not thermal, stresses. We investigated the mechanochemical production of carbon dioxide and methane when friction is applied to marly-type rock and studied the mechanisms determining the strong CO2 and CH4 emissions observed. A ring mill was used to apply friction and oriented pressure upon a synthetic calcite-clay mixture of varying proportions. We found that the CO2 and CH4 release versus the grinding action has a non-linear trend reflecting the behaviour of decreasing crystallinity, which indicates a close link between crystallinity and gas production. For the CO2 emission, we propose a release mechanism connected with the friction-induced fractures and the increase in structural disorders induced by creep in the lattice. The CH4 emission could be explained by a Sabatier reaction in which CO2 and hydrogen are involved to form CH4 and water.

  9. Emissions to air in Sweden: sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The method for calculating emissions to air has been revised, which has led to adjustments. Because of this, emissions in 1999 cannot yet be compared with previous years. Emissions in 1990 - 1998 are being recalculated now using the new method and are expected to be ready during 2001. Emissions to air of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in Sweden was 56.58 million tonnes in 1999, not including emissions from biofuels and international bunkers. The major sources of CO 2 emissions are the combustion of fossil fuels and the use of fuels for mobile sources. Total emissions to air of sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x , counted as NO 2 ) in Sweden was 66 000 and 263 000 tonnes respectively in 1999. International bunkers are not included. The major source of SO 2 emissions is combustion of fossil fuels. Road traffic is the major source of NO x emissions. Emissions to air of methane (CH 4 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O), carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) in 1999 were 253 000, 26 000, 924 000 and 430 000 tonnes respectively, not including international bunkers. Agriculture is the major source of CH 4 and N 2 O emissions. CO mainly derives from road traffic and NMVOC mainly derives from household combustion and road traffic

  10. Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri, Cassi

    2014-01-01

    In ancient times games played an integral role in society. Whilst in today’s hyperlinked world, games have evolved into complex, sophisticated mechanisms that enthral millions. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/the-school-of-games/

  11. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from the scale model of open dairy lots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Luyu; Cao, Wei; Shi, Zhengxiang; Li, Baoming; Wang, Chaoyuan; Zhang, Guoqiang; Kristensen, Simon

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the impacts of major factors on carbon loss via gaseous emissions, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from the ground of open dairy lots were tested by a scale model experiment at various air temperatures (15, 25, and 35 °C), surface velocities (0.4, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.2 m sec(-1)), and floor types (unpaved soil floor and brick-paved floor) in controlled laboratory conditions using the wind tunnel method. Generally, CO2 and CH4 emissions were significantly enhanced with the increase of air temperature and velocity (P emissions, which were also affected by air temperature and soil characteristics of the floor. Although different patterns were observed on CH4 emission from the soil and brick floors at different air temperature-velocity combinations, statistical analysis showed no significant difference in CH4 emissions from different floors (P > 0.05). For CO2, similar emissions were found from the soil and brick floors at 15 and 25 °C, whereas higher rates were detected from the brick floor at 35 °C (P emission from the scale model was exponentially related to CO2 flux, which might be helpful in CH4 emission estimation from manure management. Gaseous emissions from the open lots are largely dependent on outdoor climate, floor systems, and management practices, which are quite different from those indoors. This study assessed the effects of floor types and air velocities on CO2 and CH4 emissions from the open dairy lots at various temperatures by a wind tunnel. It provided some valuable information for decision-making and further studies on gaseous emissions from open lots.

  12. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions from California high-rise layer houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X.-J.; Cortus, E. L.; Zhang, R.; Jiang, S.; Heber, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide are hazardous substances that are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through community right-to-know legislation (EPCRA, EPA, 2011). The emissions of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide from large commercial layer facilities are of concern to legislators and nearby neighbors. Particulate matter (PM 10 and PM 2.5) released from layer houses are two of seven criteria pollutants for which EPA has set National Ambient Air Quality Standards as required by the Clean Air Act. Therefore, it is important to quantify the baseline emissions of these pollutants. The emissions of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and PM from two California high-rise layer houses were monitored for two years from October 2007 to October 2009. Each house had 32,500 caged laying hens. The monitoring site was setup in compliance with a U.S. EPA-approved quality assurance project plan. The results showed the average daily mean emission rates of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide were 0.95 ± 0.67 (standard deviation) g d -1 bird -1, 1.27 ± 0.78 mg d -1 bird -1 and 91.4 ± 16.5 g d -1 bird -1, respectively. The average daily mean emission rates of PM 2.5, PM 10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) were 5.9 ± 12.6, 33.4 ± 27.4, and 78.0 ± 42.7 mg d -1 bird -1, respectively. It was observed that ammonia emission rates in summer were lower than in winter because the high airflow stabilized the manure by drying it. The reductions due to lower moisture content were greater than the increases due to higher temperature. However, PM 10 emission rates in summer were higher than in winter because the drier conditions coupled with higher internal air velocities increased PM 10 release from feathers, feed and manure.

  13. Causal nexus between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission for Malaysia using maximum entropy bootstrap approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sehrish; Zou, Xiang; Hassan, Che Hashim; Azam, Muhammad; Zaman, Khalid

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the relationship between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission in the causal framework, as the direction of causality remains has a significant policy implication for developed and developing countries. The study employed maximum entropy bootstrap (Meboot) approach to examine the causal nexus between energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission using bivariate as well as multivariate framework for Malaysia, over a period of 1975-2013. This is a unified approach without requiring the use of conventional techniques based on asymptotical theory such as testing for possible unit root and cointegration. In addition, it can be applied in the presence of non-stationary of any type including structural breaks without any type of data transformation to achieve stationary. Thus, it provides more reliable and robust inferences which are insensitive to time span as well as lag length used. The empirical results show that there is a unidirectional causality running from energy consumption to carbon emission both in the bivariate model and multivariate framework, while controlling for broad money supply and population density. The results indicate that Malaysia is an energy-dependent country and hence energy is stimulus to carbon emissions.

  14. EFFECT OF THE TYPE OF HEAT SOURCES ON CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Rabczak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A lot of attention is nowadays devoted to the problem of generally defined ecology. It is absolutely essential in case of systems and sources generating heat due to their direct influence on the environment through emitting post-process products to the atmosphere which are, most frequently a result of combustion. Therefore, constant searchers are made to optimize the operation of heat sources and to acquire energy from sources for which the general balance of carbon dioxide emission is zero or close to zero. This work compares the emissions of equivalent CO2 from selected systems with the following heat sources: coal, gas furnace, heat pump, and refers results of the analysis to aspects connected with regulations concerning environmental protection. The systems generating thermal energy in the gas furnaces, coal, biomass, as well as the compression heat pumps with the lower heat source as ambient air or ground were taken under consideration, as well as centralized systems for the production of heat based on the combustion of coal, gas, oil, and biomass. the Emission of carbon dioxide for the installation of cogeneration and absorption heat pump were also calculated. Similarly obtained amount of extra emission necessary for the proper operation maintenance of heating devices via the supplied electricity from external source, the mostly fuel-fired power plants for fuels as previously mentioned. The results of the calculations were presented in tables and graphs.

  15. A New Data Product: Gridded Uncertainty Maps of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, R. J.; Boden, T.

    2015-12-01

    Gridded uncertainty maps of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (FFCO2) emissions are a new data product that is currently in the process of being completed and published. This work is based on the relatively new assessment of the uncertainty associated with the mass of FFCO2 emissions (2014, Tellus B, 66, 23616, doi:10.3402/tellusb.v66.23616). The new data product was created to be paired with the long-used, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), emission year 1751-present, one degree latitude by one degree longitude (1x1) mass of emissions data product (http://cdiac.ornl.gov/epubs/ndp/ndp058/ndp058_v2013.html). Now, data users will have FFCO2 emission information that represents both mass and uncertainty, each of which varies in both time and space. The new data product was constructed by examining the individual uncertainties in each of the input data sets to the gridded mass maps and then combining these individual uncertainties into an overall uncertainty for the mass maps. The input data sets include a table of the mass of FFCO2 emissions by country and year, the one degree geographic map of emissions which includes changing borders on an annual time scale and ties the mass of emissions to location, and the one degree population proxy used to distribute the mass of emissions within each country. As the three input data sets are independent of each other, their combination for the overall uncertainty is accomplished by a simple square root of the sum of the squares procedure. The resulting uncertainty data product is gridded at 1x1 and exactly overlays the 1x1 mass emission maps. The default temporal resolution is annual, but a companion product is also available at monthly time scales. The monthly uncertainty product uses the same input data sets, but the mass uncertainty is scaled as described in the monthly mass product description paper (2011, Tellus B, 63:309-327, doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.2011.00530.x). The gridded uncertainty maps cover emission year

  16. Gridded Uncertainty Maps of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions: A New Data Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, R. J.; Boden, T.

    2014-12-01

    With the publication of a new assessment of the uncertainty associated with the mass of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (FFCO2) emissions (2014, Tellus B, 66, 23616, doi:10.3402/tellusb.v66.23616), it is now possible to extend that work with a gridded map of fossil fuel emission uncertainties. The new data product was created to be paired with the long-used, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), emission year 1751-present, one degree latitude by one degree longitude (1x1) mass of emissions data product (http://cdiac.ornl.gov/epubs/ndp/ndp058/ndp058_v2013.html). Now, for the first time, data users will have FFCO2 emission information that represents both mass and uncertainty, each of which varies in both time and space. The new data product was constructed by examining the individual uncertainties in each of the input data sets to the gridded mass maps and then combining these individual uncertainties into an overall uncertainty for the mass maps. The input data sets include a table of the mass of FFCO2 emissions by country and year, the one degree geographic map of emissions which includes changing borders on an annual time scale and ties the mass of emissions to location, and the one degree population proxy used to distribute the mass of emissions within each country. As the three input data sets are independent of each other, their combination for the overall uncertainty is accomplished by a simple square root of the sum of the squares procedure. The resulting uncertainty data product is gridded at 1x1 and exactly overlays the 1x1 mass emission maps. The default temporal resolution is annual, but a companion product is also available at monthly time scales. The monthly uncertainty product uses the same input data sets, but the mass uncertainty is scaled as described in the monthly mass product description paper (2011, Tellus B, 63:309-327, doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.2011.00530.x). The gridded uncertainty maps cover emission year 1950 to 2010. The start

  17. A modelling on estimation of the carbon dioxide emission from vehicles using logistic equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, E. W.; Andry, A.; Afra, F.; Sumarti, N.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the logistic differential equation is used in developing a model on carbon dioxide traces which potentially releases from a particular area. The improvement to a higher scale or scope is straightforward by considering the larger observed data or larger number of the potential CO2 sources. Let G(t) the total amount of the carbon dioxide emission from motorcycles and cars used by the resident of the area. G (t )=P (t )(r1(t )η (t )+r2(t )ξ (t )) where P(t) is the number of the resident of the observed area (population of Bandung Institute of Technology) at year t, r1(t) and r2(t) are the portion of the population who use motorcycles and cars respectively, η(t) and ξ(t) are the approximated total emission of the carbon dioxide from the related vehicles respectively. The number of resident is modeled by the logistic equation so the future number can be estimated. The model is implemented in a campus of Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) at Ganesha street, Indonesia. The results show that the amount of CO2 produced from the transport in Ganesha campus will reach the carrying capacity of the campus in the next 3 years, which will be at around 2.1 billion kilotons of CO2. Therefore, the need of reducing the usage of motorcycles and cars is inevitable in the near future.

  18. Dynamic analysis of sulfur dioxide monthly emissions in United States power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Kyung

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 marked a moving away from command-and-control air quality regulations towards a market-based approach, whereby polluters are assigned annual emission allowances, and are free to select the minimum-cost approach that will keep their actual annual emissions within this allowance limit. Within this context, the objectives of this research are to better understand (1) the temporal patterns of SO 2 emissions from power plants, and (2) the factors affecting fuel choice and SO2 emissions. Large power plant-related datasets from various sources are collected, processed, and combined for empirical analyses, to explain monthly fuel shipments, fuel consumptions, sulfur shipments, gross and net SO 2 emissions, and fuel choices. Because of the interdependency of these various sulfur dioxide, simultaneous equations estimation techniques are used. The empirical findings are as follows. First, forecasts of electricity demand and fuel prices are the main determinants of the amounts and types of fuel shipments. The relationship between fuel shipments and forecasted fuel needs is very strong for the current month, and gradually weakens over future months, due to forecasting difficulties and the costs of fuel inventories. Second, net SO2 emissions increase with allowances, although not proportionately, because of the likely effects of allowance banking and trading. Third, each plant reduces SO2 emissions gradually over time, to account for the future more stringent Phase II emissions constraints. Fourth, plants emit less in winter, possibly because higher electricity leads to reduced unit SO2 emission abatement costs. Finally, plants with an FGD usually consume more high-sulfur fuels due to their potential abatement capability. An integrated analysis of the effects of changing emission allowances and installing FGD is conducted through a simulation. Reducing allowances by 1% leads to an emissions reduction of 0.15% at the plant level

  19. Associations of individual, household and environmental characteristics with carbon dioxide emissions from motorised passenger travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christian; Goodman, Anna; Rutter, Harry; Song, Yena; Ogilvie, David

    2013-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from motorised travel are hypothesised to be associated with individual, household, spatial and other environmental factors. Little robust evidence exists on who contributes most (and least) to travel CO 2 and, in particular, the factors influencing commuting, business, shopping and social travel CO 2 . This paper examines whether and how demographic, socio-economic and other personal and environmental characteristics are associated with land-based passenger transport and associated CO 2 emissions. Primary data were collected from 3474 adults using a newly developed survey instrument in the iConnect study in the UK. The participants reported their past-week travel activity and vehicle characteristics from which CO 2 emissions were derived using an adapted travel emissions profiling method. Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were used to examine what characteristics predicted higher CO 2 emissions. CO 2 emissions from motorised travel were distributed highly unequally, with the top fifth of participants producing more than two fifth of emissions. Car travel dominated overall CO 2 emissions, making up 90% of the total. The strongest independent predictors of CO 2 emissions were owning at least one car, being in full-time employment and having a home-work distance of more than 10 km. Income, education and tenure were also strong univariable predictors of CO 2 emissions, but seemed to be further back on the causal pathway than having a car. Male gender, late-middle age, living in a rural area and having access to a bicycle also showed significant but weaker associations with emissions production. The findings may help inform the development of climate change mitigation policies for the transport sector. Targeting individuals and households with high car ownership, focussing on providing viable alternatives to commuting by car, and supporting planning and other policies that reduce commuting distances may provide an

  20. Associations of individual, household and environmental characteristics with carbon dioxide emissions from motorised passenger travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christian; Goodman, Anna; Rutter, Harry; Song, Yena; Ogilvie, David

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from motorised travel are hypothesised to be associated with individual, household, spatial and other environmental factors. Little robust evidence exists on who contributes most (and least) to travel CO2 and, in particular, the factors influencing commuting, business, shopping and social travel CO2. This paper examines whether and how demographic, socio-economic and other personal and environmental characteristics are associated with land-based passenger transport and associated CO2 emissions. Primary data were collected from 3474 adults using a newly developed survey instrument in the iConnect study in the UK. The participants reported their past-week travel activity and vehicle characteristics from which CO2 emissions were derived using an adapted travel emissions profiling method. Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were used to examine what characteristics predicted higher CO2 emissions. CO2 emissions from motorised travel were distributed highly unequally, with the top fifth of participants producing more than two fifth of emissions. Car travel dominated overall CO2 emissions, making up 90% of the total. The strongest independent predictors of CO2 emissions were owning at least one car, being in full-time employment and having a home-work distance of more than 10 km. Income, education and tenure were also strong univariable predictors of CO2 emissions, but seemed to be further back on the causal pathway than having a car. Male gender, late-middle age, living in a rural area and having access to a bicycle also showed significant but weaker associations with emissions production. The findings may help inform the development of climate change mitigation policies for the transport sector. Targeting individuals and households with high car ownership, focussing on providing viable alternatives to commuting by car, and supporting planning and other policies that reduce commuting distances may provide an equitable and

  1. A 2009 Mobile Source Carbon Dioxide Emissions Inventory for the University of Central Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Johanna M; Cooper, C David

    2012-09-01

    A mobile source carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the University of Central Florida (UCF) has been completed. Fora large urban university, more than 50% of the CO2 emissions can come from mobile sources, and the vast majority of mobile source emissions come from on-road sources: personal vehicles and campus shuttles carrying students, faculty, staff and administrators to and from the university as well as on university business trips. In addition to emissions from on-road vehicles, emissions from airplane-based business travel are significant, along with emissions from nonroad equipment such as lawnmowers, leaf blowers, and small maintenance vehicles utilized on campus. UCF has recently become one of the largest universities in the nation (with over 58,000 students enrolled in the fall 2011 semester) and emits a substantial amount of CO2 in the Central Florida area. For this inventory, students, faculty, staff and administrators were first surveyed to determine their commuting distances and frequencies. Information was also gathered on vehicle type and age distribution of the personal vehicles of students, faculty, administrators, and staff as well as their bus, car-pool, and alternate transportation usage. The latest US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved mobile source emissions model, Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES2010a), was used to calculate the emissions from on-road vehicles, and UCF fleet gasoline consumption records were used to calculate the emissions from nonroad equipment and from on-campus UCF fleet vehicles. The results of this UCF mobile source emissions inventory were compared with those for another large U.S. university. With the growing awareness of global climate change, a number of colleges/universities and other organizations are completing greenhouse gas emission inventories. Assumptions often are made in order to calculate mobile source emissions, but without field data or valid reasoning, the accuracy of those

  2. Decomposing the Influencing Factors of Industrial Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Inner Mongolia Based on the LMDI Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the influencing factors of industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions is essential to reduce natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, we applied the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI decomposition method based on the extended Kaya identity to analyze the changes in industrial carbon dioxide emissions resulting from 39 industrial sectors in Inner Mongolia northeast of China over the period 2003–2012. The factors were divided into five types of effects i.e., industrial growth effect, industrial structure effect, energy effect, energy intensity effect, population effect and comparative analysis of differential influences of various factors on industrial sector. Our results clearly show that (1 Industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions have increased from 134.00 million ton in 2003 to 513.46 million ton in 2012, with an annual average growth rate of 16.097%. The industrial carbon dioxide emissions intensity has decreased from 0.99 million ton/billion yuan to 0.28 million ton/billion yuan. Also, the energy structure has been dominated by coal; (2 Production and supply of electric power, steam and hot water, coal mining and dressing, smelting and pressing of ferrous metals, petroleum processing, coking and nuclear fuel processing, and raw chemical materials and chemical products account for 89.74% of total increased industrial carbon dioxide emissions; (3 The industrial growth effect and population effect are found to be a critical driving force for increasing industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions over the research period. The energy intensity effect is the crucial drivers of the decrease of carbon dioxide emissions. However, the energy structure effect and industrial structure effect have considerably varied over the study years without displaying any clear trend.

  3. Sulfur dioxide emissions and market effects under the Clean Air Act Acid Rain Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, C.E.; Gilroy, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) established a national program to control sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions from electricity generation. CAAA90's market-based approach includes trading and banking of SO 2 -emissions allowances. The paper presents an analysis of data describing electric utility SO 2 emissions in 1995, the first year of the program's Phase I, and market effects over the 1990-95 period. Fuel switching and flue-gas desulfurization were the dominant means used in 1995 by targeted generators to reduce emissions to 51% of 1990 levels. Flue-gas desulfurization costs, emissions allowance prices, low-sulfur coal prices, and average sulfur contents of coals shipped to electric utilities declined over the 1990-95 period. Projections indicate that 13-15 million allowances will have been banked during the programs' Phase I, which ends in 1999, a quantity expected to last through the first decade of the program's stricter Phase II controls. In 1995, both allowance prices and SO 2 emissions were below pre-CAAA90 expectations. The reduction of SO 2 emissions beyond pre-CAAA90 expectations, combined with lower-than-expected allowance prices and declining compliance costs, can be viewed as a success for market-based environmental controls. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Trends in road freight transportation carbon dioxide emissions and policies in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongqi; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Tianyi

    2013-01-01

    We adopted the simple average Divisia index approach to explore the impacts of factors on the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from road freight transportation in China from 1985 to 2007. CO 2 emissions were investigated using the following as influencing factors: the emission coefficient, vehicle fuel intensity, working vehicle stock per freight transport operator, market concentration level, freight transportation distance, market share of road freight transportation, ton-kilometer per value added of industry, industrialization level and economic growth. Building on the results, we suggest that economic growth is the most important factor in increasing CO 2 emissions, whereas the ton-kilometer per value added of industry and the market concentration level contribute significantly to decreasing CO 2 emissions. We also discussed some recent important policies concerning factors contained in the decomposition model. - Highlights: ► We estimated road freight fuel consumption and CO 2 emissions in China. ► Factors implying features of road freight were considered in decomposition model. ► Some policies were discussed to affect CO 2 emissions from road freight

  5. [Effects of fungicide chlorothalonil on soil nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Man; Cai, Zu-cong

    2008-12-01

    A 14 d incubation test at 60% WHC and 25 degrees C was conducted to study the effects of fungicide chlorothalonil at its application rates of 0, 5.5 mg x kg(-1) (field application rate, FR), 110 mg x kg(-1) (20FR) and 220 mg x kg(-1) (40FR) on the nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from acidic, neutral, and alkaline soils. The results indicated that the effects of chlorothalonil on the two gases emissions depended on its application rate and soil type. Comparing with no chlorothalonil application, the chlorothalonil at 20FR and 40FR inhibited the N2O emission from acid soil significantly, while that at FR, 20FR and 40FR stimulated the N2O emission from neutral soil, with the strongest effect at FR. Higher application rates (20FR and 40FR) of chlorothalonil inhibited the N2O emission from alkaline soil at the early stage of incubation, but stimulated it at late incubation stage. Chlorothalonil at FR had no obvious effects on the CO2 emission from test soils, but that at 20FR and 40FR promoted the CO2 emission from acid soil while inhibited it from neutral and alkaline soils significantly.

  6. The sociology of ecologically unequal exchange and carbon dioxide emissions, 1960-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Andrew K

    2012-03-01

    The author engages the sociological theory of ecologically unequal exchange to assess the extent to which levels of per capita anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are a function of the "vertical flow" of exports to high-income nations. Results of cross-national fixed effects panel model estimates indicate that levels of such emissions are positively associated with the vertical flow of exports, and the relationship is much more pronounced for lower-income countries than for high-income countries. Additional findings suggest that the observed relationship for lower-income nations has grown in magnitude through time, indicating that structural associations between high-income and lower-income countries have become increasingly ecologically unequal, at least in the context of greenhouse gas emissions. These results hold, net of various important controls. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An economic analysis of tradeable emission permits for sulphur dioxide emissions in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruitwagen, S.

    1996-01-01

    7.1 Introduction
    This study has examined the question of whether a system of tradeable emission permits can contribute to a cost-effective reduction of SO 2 emissions in Europe, taking into account

  8. The annual cycle of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasing, T.J.; Marland, G.; Broniak, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    Time-series of estimated monthly carbon dioxide emissions from consumption of coal, petroleum and natural gas in the United States from 1981 to 2002 have been derived from energy consumption data. The data series for coal and natural gas each reveal a consistent seasonal pattern, with a winter peak for gas and two peaks (summer and winter) for coal. The annual cycle of total emissions has an amplitude of about 20 Tg-C, and is dominated by CO 2 released from consumption of natural gas. Summation of the monthly estimates to obtain annual values reveals good agreement with other estimates of CO 2 emissions. The varying proportions of CO 2 emitted from each fuel type over the course of a year lead to an annual cycle in the carbon isotope ratio ( 13 C), with a range of about 2 . These monthly carbon emissions estimates should be helpful in understanding the carbon cycle by providing (1) monthly/seasonal input for carbon cycle models, (2) estimates of the annual cycle of the 13 C isotope ratio in fossil-fuel CO 2 emissions and (3) data at fine enough time intervals to investigate effects of seasonal climate variations and changes in seasonally dependent use patterns of certain appliances (e.g. air conditioners) on fossil-fuel carbon emissions

  9. The Role of Rail Transit Systems in Reducing Energy and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: The Case of The City of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Sanches de Andrade

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has established, by municipal law, a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions of the transport system by 20% until 2020 compared to 2005. In order to reach this goal, the city’s public transport has been restructured with an emphasis on rail transit systems. The city will host the 2016 Olympic Games and this has encouraged the transformation of public transportation. One of the new projects is the construction of a new metro line, Line 4, to connect the downtown area to the city’s fastest growing part, the western region, which will also be a venue for many events during the Olympic Games. This article presents and applies a procedure for calculating energy use and emissions avoided by Line 4 by attracting users from other transport modes in the period from 2016 to 2040. The procedure uses a detailed demand forecast for this period and considers the local transport profile and the different fuels used. The net amount of carbon dioxide avoided was 55,449 tonnes per year and 44.53 grams per passenger kilometer. The avoided energy reached 0.76 MJ per passenger kilometer.

  10. Estimation of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Generated by Building and Traffic in Taichung City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Tsang Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The emissions of carbon dioxide generated by urban traffic is generally reflected by urban size. In order to discuss the traffic volume generated in developed buildings and road crossings in a single urban block, with the metropolitan area in Taichung, Taiwan as an example, this study calculates the mutual relationship between the carbon dioxide generated by the traffic volume and building development scale, in order to research energy consumption and relevance. In this research, the entire-day traffic volume of an important road crossing is subject to statistical analysis to obtain the prediction formula of total passenger car units in the main road crossing within 24 h. Then, the total CO2 emissions generated by the traffic volume in the entire year is calculated according to the investigation data of peak traffic hours within 16 blocks and the influential factors of the development scale of 95 buildings are counted. Finally, this research found that there is a passenger car unit of 4.72 generated in each square meter of land in the urban block every day, 0.99 in each square meter of floor area in the building and the average annual total CO2 emissions of each passenger car unit is 41.4 kgCO2/yr. In addition, the basic information of an integrated road system and traffic volume is used to present a readable urban traffic hot map, which can calculate a distribution map of passenger car units within one day in Taichung. This research unit can be used to forecast the development scale of various buildings in future urban blocks, in order to provide an effective approach to estimate the carbon dioxide generated by the traffic volume.

  11. Study of carbon dioxide emission inventory from transportation sector at Kualanamu International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryati, I.; Indrawan, I.; Alihta, K. N.

    2018-02-01

    Transportation includes sources of greenhouse gas emission contributor in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2). CO2 is one of the air pollutant gases that cause climate change. The source of CO2 emissions at airports comes from road and air transportation. Kualanamu International Airport is one of the public service airports in North Sumatera Province. The purpose of this study is to inventory the emission loads generated by motor vehicles and aircraft and to forecast contributions of CO2 emissions from motor vehicles and aircraft. The research method used is quantitative and qualitative methods. The quantitative method used is to estimate emission loads of motor vehicles based on vehicle volume and emission factors derived from the literature and using the Tier-2 method to calculate the aircraft emission loads. The results for the maximum CO2 concentration were 6,206,789.37 μg/m3 and the minimal CO2 concentration was 4,070,674.84 μg/Nm3. The highest aircraft CO2 emission load is 200,164,424.5 kg/hr (1.75 x 109 ton/year) and the lowest is 38,884,064.5 kg/hr (3.40 x 108 ton/year). Meanwhile, the highest CO2 emission load from motor vehicles was 51,299.25 gr/hr (449,38 ton/year) and the lowest was 38,990.42 gr/hr (341,55 ton/year). CO2 contribution from a motor vehicle is 65% and 5% from aircraft in Kualanamu International Airport.

  12. The impact of foreign direct investment and economic growth on carbon dioxide emissions in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Ha, Pham

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI), economic growth,and carbon dioxide (CO_2)emissions in Vietnam during the period 1988-2015 by applying the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach. The results reveal that pollution haven hypothesis does not exist in Vietnam since FDI is good for environment in the long-run,and it is not significant in the short-run. However,economic growth causes pollution in the long-run,and it is insignificant in the short-...

  13. 2002 Monthly Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Mexico at a 10x10k Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Gurney, K. R.; Geethakumar, S.; Zhou, Y.; Sahni, N.

    2009-12-01

    The contribution of fossil fuel CO2 emissions to the total measured amount of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere remains an important component of carbon cycle science, particularly as efforts to understand the net exchange of carbon at the surface move to smaller scales. In order to reduce the uncertainty of this flux, researchers led by Purdue University have built a high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 flux inventory for the United States, called “Vulcan”. The Vulcan inventory quantifies emissions for the United States at 10km resolution every hour for the year 2002 and can be seen as a key component of a national assessment and verification system for greenhouse gas emissions and emissions mitigation. As part of the North American Carbon Project, the 2002 carbon dioxide emissions from Mexico are presented at the monthly temporal and municipality spatial scale. Mexico is of particular importance because of the scientific integration under the North American Carbon Program. Furthermore, Mexico has seen a notable growth in its population as well as migration toward urban centers and increasing energy requirements due in part to industrial intensification. The native resolution of the emissions is geolocated (lat/lon) for point sources, such as power plants, airports, and large industry. The emissions are estimated at the municipality level for residential and commercial sources, and allocated to roads for the mobile transport sector. Data sources include the National Emissions Inventory (NEI), Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC), and Carbon Monitoring for Action (CARMA). CO2 emissions are calculated from the 1999 NEI data by converting CO emissions using sector and process-dependent emission factors, and is scaled up to 2002 using statistics obtained from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center CDIAC. CEC and CARMA data, which encompass power plant emissions, are already in units of CO2. Emissions are regridded to 10x10k and 0.1x0.1 deg grids to

  14. A locational gaming model with CO2 emission tax and limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.; Preckel, P.V.; Nderitu, G.; Sparrow, F.T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a locational (spatial) gaming model with CO 2 emission and transmission capacity limits. It is developed for simulating strategic behavior of electricity producers in deregulated electricity markets. The model has multiple players, each maximizing their individual profit with a CO 2 emission tax included to reflect the societal cost of environment damages caused by CO 2 emission from different locations. In the paper, the multiple-producer profits are converted into a set of Lagrangian functions with power production and supply as the primary control variables, resulting in a set of unconstrained, individual profit maximization equations. The Karush-Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions are then derived and solved simultaneously incorporating Cournot gaming strategy. Case studies show the successful application of the model. (author)

  15. Sharing responsibility for carbon dioxide emissions: A perspective on border tax adjustments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about the equity and efficiency of current allocation principles related to responsibility for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions have been presented in the recent literature. The objective of this paper is to design a calculation framework for shared responsibility from the perspective of border tax adjustments. The advantage of this framework is that it makes the shared responsibility principle and border carbon taxation complementary to each other; these are important policies for reducing global CO 2 emissions, but they are individually supported by developing and developed countries. As an illustration, the proposed framework is applied to data from China in 2007. The empirical results show that for the Chinese economy as a whole, changing from the production-based criterion to the shared responsibility approach would lead to an 11% decrease in its responsibility for CO 2 emissions. Moreover, the differences observed between the production-based criterion and the shared responsibility approach are considerable in several sectors; for example, changing from the production-based criterion to the shared principle would lead to a 60% decrease in the responsibility of the textile sector. - Highlights: • This paper designs a shared responsibility calculation framework for CO 2 emissions. • This paper suggests that the carbon tariff rate serve as a basis for calculating shared responsibility. • The proposed framework is applied to data from China in 2007. • Shared responsibility principle will significantly decrease China's responsibility for CO 2 emissions

  16. Emissions of carbon dioxide and methane from fields fertilized with digestate from an agricultural biogas plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czubaszek, Robert; Wysocka-Czubaszek, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    Digestate from biogas plants can play important role in agriculture by providing nutrients, improving soil structure and reducing the use of mineral fertilizers. Still, less is known about greenhouse gas emissions from soil during and after digestate application. The aim of the study was to estimate the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from a field which was fertilized with digestate. The gas fluxes were measured with the eddy covariance system. Each day, the eddy covariance system was installed in various places of the field, depending on the dominant wind direction, so that each time the results were obtained from an area where the digestate was distributed. The results showed the relatively low impact of the studied gases emissions on total greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. Maximum values of the CO2 and CH4 fluxes, 79.62 and 3.049 µmol s-1 m-2, respectively, were observed during digestate spreading on the surface of the field. On the same day, the digestate was mixed with the topsoil layer using a disc harrow. This resulted in increased CO2 emissions the following day. Intense mineralization of digestate, observed after fertilization may not give the expected effects in terms of protection and enrichment of soil organic matter.

  17. Carbon dioxide emissions and climate change: policy implications for the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehan, R.; Nehdi, M.

    2005-01-01

    There is growing awareness that the cement industry is a significant contributor to global carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. It is expected that this industry will come under increasing regulatory pressures to reduce its emissions and contribute more aggressively to mitigating global warming. It is important that the industry's stakeholders become more familiar with greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and associated global warming issues, along with emerging policies that may affect the future of the industry. This paper discusses climate change, the current and proposed actions for mitigating its effects, and the implications of such actions for the cement industry. International negotiations on climate change are summarized and mechanisms available under the Kyoto Protocol for reducing greenhouse gas emissions are explained. The paper examines some of the traditional and emerging policy instruments for greenhouse gas emissions and analyses their merits and drawbacks. The applicability, effectiveness and potential impact of these policy instruments for the global cement industry in general and the Canadian cement industry in particular are discussed with recommendations for possible courses of action

  18. The leverage of demographic dynamics on carbon dioxide emissions: does age structure matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagheni, Emilio

    2011-02-01

    This article provides a methodological contribution to the study of the effect of changes in population age structure on carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions. First, I propose a generalization of the IPAT equation to a multisector economy with an age-structured population and discuss the insights that can be obtained in the context of stable population theory. Second, I suggest a statistical model of household consumption as a function of household size and age structure to quantitatively evaluate the extent of economies of scale in consumption of energy-intensive goods, and to estimate age-specific profiles of consumption of energy-intensive goods and of CO(2) emissions. Third, I offer an illustration of the methodologies using data for the United States. The analysis shows that per-capita CO(2) emissions increase with age until the individual is in his or her 60s, and then emissions tend to decrease. Holding everything else constant, the expected change in U.S. population age distribution during the next four decades is likely to have a small, but noticeable, positive impact on CO(2) emissions.

  19. Foreign Direct Investment, Environmental INGO Presence and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Less-Developed Countries, 1980-2000

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Jorgenson; Christopher Dick

    2010-01-01

    The authors engage foreign investment dependence and world society theories to examine environmental harms in less-developed countries. Results of cross-national random effects panel regression models indicate that foreign investment in manufacturing contributes to total carbon dioxide emissions and emissions per unit of production. World society integration in the context of environmental international non-governmental organization presence does not directly suppress emissions. However, a st...

  20. Is There Convergence and Causality Between the Drivers of Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Among the Portuguese Tourism Industry?

    OpenAIRE

    Moutinho, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The various subsectors related to tourism have different impacts on the level of emissions but also different factors that contribute to these emissions. The purpose of this paper is to study: (i) Whether the various subsectors of tourism in Portugal behaved similarly in the period 1996-2009 in relation to the intensity of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and for their determinant ratios. This question is studied through the convergence analysis, dividing tourism subsectors between their direct...

  1. World relation per capita between income and emission of carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Artico Bigarani1

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to verify the existence of relation per capita between emission of carbon dioxide and the growth of the income. The used methodology is the exploratory analysis of space data for the years of 1994 and 2009. By means of maps and of the Index of Moran one searched to observe the existence of space autocorrelation enters carbonic gas emission the per capita and per capita Gross domestic product of the countries of the Europe and Africa and to verify the space existence of clusters. The analysis of the results presented significant space autocorrelation between the studied variable and allowed the space identification of clusters in the Europe and Africa. The conclusion confirms the theory of the Curve of Ambient Kuznets and also it was identified that the protocol of Kyoto was capable to promote alterations in univariate clusters analyzed in the period.

  2. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Gerald P.

    2012-11-13

    A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Due to Forest Fires in Bukit Batu Area, Bengkalis Regency, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anita, Sofia; Ariful Amri, T.; Abu Hanifah, T.; Furnando, Edo; Lukas, Amos

    2017-05-01

    High concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is the major cause of global warming. This study focuses on estimation of carbon emissions from forest fires in Indonesia, especially Bukit Batu area, Bengkalis Regency. Peatlands in this area are widely used as an agricultural cultivation and plantations. The aim of this study is to measure the concentration of CO2 emitted based on the relationship of physical and chemical properties of peat soil. Measurements carried out on these peatlands with different vegetation covered, i.e. bush land, palm plantations and secondary forests. Methods used in this research were Infrared Gas Analyzer and Gas Chromatography. The average of CO2 emissions obtained of bush land, palm plantations, and secondary forest were 497.4 ppm; 523. 2 ppm; and 457.2 ppm, respectively.

  4. Can carbon dioxide storage help cut greenhouse emissions? A simplified guide to the IPCC's 'Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    Fossil fuels account for 75 - 80% of today's global energy use and three quarters of humanity's total carbon dioxide emissions. Without specific actions to minimize our impact on the climate, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil-fuel energy are projected to swell over the course of the 21st century. The consequences - a global temperature rise of 1.4 - 5.8C and shifting patterns of weather and extreme events - could prove disastrous for future generations. Stabilizing or reducing global emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases over the coming decades will challenge human ingenuity. Fortunately, the IPCC's Third Assessment Report, published in 2001, concluded that existing and emerging technologies for limiting emissions could - if supported by the right policies - stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases by the end of the century at levels that would limit further climate change. No single technology will suffice by itself; instead, a combination of technologies will be required. Many of the most promising technologies will contribute by improving the energy efficiency of certain processes and products or by converting solar, wind and other noncarbon power sources into usable energy. But with oil, coal and gas set to remain the primary sources of energy for decades to come, governments and industry are also examining technologies for reducing emissions from these fuels. One such technology is known as carbon dioxide capture and storage. Abbreviated as CCS, this technology could be used by large c1 Introduction stationary 'point sources' such as fossil fuel-fired power plants and industrial facilities to prevent their CO2 emissions from entering the atmosphere and contributing to climate change. To learn more about this technology's potential, the member governments of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change asked the IPCC to assess the current state of knowledge about carbon dioxide storage and capture. The IPCC

  5. Energy consumption-economic growth relationship and carbon dioxide emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, Li; Dong, Suocheng; Xue, Li; Yang, Quanxi; Liang; Wangzhou

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies the panel unit root, heterogeneous panel cointegration and panel-based dynamic OLS to re-investigate the co-movement and relationship between energy consumption and economic growth for 30 provinces in mainland China from 1985 to 2007. The empirical results show that there is a positive long-run cointegrated relationship between real GDP per capita and energy consumption variables. Furthermore, we investigate two cross-regional groups, namely the east China and west China groups, and get more important results and implications. In the long-term, a 1% increase in real GDP per capita increases the consumption of energy by approximately 0.48-0.50% and accordingly increases the carbon dioxide emissions by about 0.41-0.43% in China. The economic growth in east China is energy-dependent to a great extent, and the income elasticity of energy consumption in east China is over 2 times that of the west China. At present, China is subject to tremendous pressures for mitigating climate change issues. It is possible that the GDP per capita elasticity of carbon dioxide emissions would be controlled in a range from 0.2 to 0.3 by the great effort. (author)

  6. Carbon dioxide emission in hydrogen production technology from coke oven gas with life cycle approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmistrz Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of Carbon Footprint (CF for technology of hydrogen production from cleaned coke oven gas was performed. On the basis of real data and simulation calculations of the production process of hydrogen from coke gas, emission indicators of carbon dioxide (CF were calculated. These indicators are associated with net production of electricity and thermal energy and direct emission of carbon dioxide throughout a whole product life cycle. Product life cycle includes: coal extraction and its transportation to a coking plant, the process of coking coal, purification and reforming of coke oven gas, carbon capture and storage. The values were related to 1 Mg of coking blend and to 1 Mg of the hydrogen produced. The calculation is based on the configuration of hydrogen production from coke oven gas for coking technology available on a commercial scale that uses a technology of coke dry quenching (CDQ. The calculations were made using ChemCAD v.6.0.2 simulator for a steady state of technological process. The analysis of carbon footprint was conducted in accordance with the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA.

  7. Energy utilization, carbon dioxide emission, and exergy loss in flavored yogurt production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorgüven, Esra; Özilgen, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of food production processes on the environment in terms of energy and exergy utilization and carbon dioxide emission. There are three different energy utilization mechanisms in food production: Utilization of solar energy by plants to produce agricultural goods; feed consumption by herbivores to produce meat and milk; fossil fuel consumption by industrial processes to perform mixing, cooling, heating, etc. Production of strawberry-flavored yogurt, which involves these three mechanisms, is investigated here thermodynamically. Analysis starts with the cultivation of the ingredients and ends with the transfer of the final product to the market. The results show that 53% of the total exergy loss occurs during the milk production and 80% of the total work input is consumed during the plain yogurt making. The cumulative degree of perfection is 3.6% for the strawberry-flavored yogurt. This value can rise up to 4.6%, if renewable energy resources like hydropower and algal biodiesel are employed instead of fossil fuels. This paper points the direction for the development of new technology in food processing to decrease waste of energy and carbon dioxide accumulation in the atmosphere. -- Highlights: ► Energy and exergy utilization and carbon dioxide emission during strawberry-flavored yogurt production. ► Cumulative degree of perfection of strawberry-flavored yogurt is 3.6%. ► 53% of the total exergy loss occurs during the milk production. ► 80% of the total work input is consumed during the plain yogurt making.

  8. The effect of trade between China and the UK on national and global carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, You; Hewitt, C.N.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate the amount of carbon dioxide embodied in bi-lateral trade between the UK and China in 2004. Developing and applying the method of Shui and Harriss [2006. The role of CO 2 embodiment in US-China trade. Energy Policy 34, 4063-4068], the most recently available data on trade and CO 2 emissions have been updated and adjusted to calculate the CO 2 emissions embodied in the commodities traded between China and the UK. It was found that through trade with China, the UK reduced its CO 2 emissions by approximately 11% in 2004, compared with a non-trade scenario in which the same type and volume of goods are produced in the UK. In addition, due to the greater carbon-intensity and relatively less efficient production processes of Chinese industry, China-UK trade resulted in an additional 117 Mt of CO 2 to global CO 2 emissions in the same one year period, compared with a non-trade scenario in which the same type and volume of goods are produced in the UK. This represents an additional 19% to the reported national CO 2 emissions of the UK (555 Mt/y in 2004) and 0.4% of global emissions. These findings suggest that, through international trade, very significant environmental impacts can be shifted from one country to another, and that international trade can (but does not necessarily) result in globally increased greenhouse gas emissions. These results are additional to the environmental consequences of transporting goods, which are not robustly quantified here. (author)

  9. Attributing Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Anthropogenic and Natural Sources Using AVIRIS-NG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Thompson, D. R.; Duren, R. M.; Aubrey, A. D.; Bue, B. D.; Green, R. O.; Gerilowski, K.; Krings, T.; Borchardt, J.; Kort, E. A.; Sweeney, C.; Conley, S. A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dennison, P. E.; Ayasse, A.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging spectrometers like the next generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG) can map large regions with the high spatial resolution necessary to resolve methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This capability is aided by real time detection and geolocation of gas plumes, permitting unambiguous identification of individual emission source locations and communication to ground teams for rapid follow up. We present results from AVIRIS-NG flight campaigns in the Four Corners region (Colorado and New Mexico) and the San Joaquin Valley (California). Over three hundred plumes were observed, reflecting emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources. Examples of plumes will be shown for a number of sources, including CH4 from well completions, gas processing plants, tanks, pipeline leaks, natural seeps, and CO2 from power plants. Despite these promising results, an imaging spectrometer built exclusively for quantitative mapping of gas plumes would have improved sensitivity compared to AVIRIS-NG. For example, an instrument providing a 1 nm spectral sampling (2,000-2,400 micron) would permit mapping CH4, CO2, H2O, CO, and N2O from more diffuse sources using both airborne and orbital platforms. The ability to identify emission sources offers the potential to constrain regional greenhouse gas budgets and improve partitioning between anthropogenic and natural emission sources. Because the CH4 lifetime is only about 9 years and CH4 has a Global Warming Potential 86 times that of CO2 for a 20 year time interval, mitigating these emissions is a particularly cost-effective approach to reduce overall atmospheric radiative forcing. Fig. 1. True color image subset with superimposed gas plumes showing concentrations in ppmm. Left: AVIRIS-NG observed CH4 plumes from natural gas processing plant extending over 500 m downwind of multiple emissions sources. Right: Multiple CO2 plumes observed from coal-fired power plant.

  10. Emissions of carbon dioxide and methane from a headwater stream network of interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John T.; Striegl, Robert G.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Dornblaser, Mark M.; Stanley, Emily H.

    2013-01-01

    Boreal ecosystems store significant quantities of organic carbon (C) that may be vulnerable to degradation as a result of a warming climate. Despite their limited coverage on the landscape, streams play a significant role in the processing, gaseous emission, and downstream export of C, and small streams are thought to be particularly important because of their close connection with the surrounding landscape. However, ecosystem carbon studies do not commonly incorporate the role of the aquatic conduit. We measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations and emissions in a headwater stream network of interior Alaska underlain by permafrost to assess the potential role of stream gas emissions in the regional carbon balance. First-order streams exhibited the greatest variability in fluxes of CO2 and CH4,and the greatest mean pCO2. High-resolution time series of stream pCO2 and discharge at two locations on one first-order stream showed opposing pCO2 responses to storm events, indicating the importance of hydrologic flowpaths connecting CO2-rich soils with surface waters. Repeated longitudinal surveys on the stream showed consistent areas of elevated pCO2 and pCH4, indicative of discrete hydrologic flowpaths delivering soil water and groundwater having varying chemistry. Up-scaled basin estimates of stream gas emissions suggest that streams may contribute significantly to catchment-wide CH4 emissions. Overall, our results indicate that while stream-specific gas emission rates are disproportionately high relative to the terrestrial landscape, both stream surface area and catchment normalized emission rates were lower than those documented for the Yukon River Basin as a whole. This may be due to limitations of C sources and/or C transport to surface waters.

  11. Carbon dioxide emissions from agricultural soils amended with livestock-derived organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzolla, D.; Said-Pullicino, D.; Gigliotti, G.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon dioxide gas xchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, as well as the carbon sink strength of various arable land ecosystems, is of primary interest for global change research. Measures for increasing soil C inputs include the preferential use of livestock-derived organic materials (e.g. animal manure and slurries, digestate from biogas production plants and compost). The application of such materials to agricultural soils returns essential nutrients for plant growth and organic matter to maintain long-term fertility. Whether or not such practices ultimately result in sustained C sequestration at the ecosystem level will depend on their mineralization rates. This work presents preliminary results from a laboratory incubation trial to evaluate carbon dioxide fluxes from two agricultural soils (a calcareous silt loam and a silty clay loam) amended with agricultural doses of (i) pig slurry (PSL), (ii) the digestate from the anaerobic fermentation of pig slurries (AAS) and (ii) a compost from the aerobic stabilisation of the digestate (LDC). These subsequent steps of slurry stabilisation resulted in a decrease in the content of labile organic matter which was reflected in a reduction in maximum carbon dioxide emission rates from amended soils. Measurements have shown that peak emissions from soils occur immediately after application of these organic materials (within 5 days) and decrease in the order PSL > AAS > LDC. Moreover, mean cumulative emissions over the first 40 days showed that a higher percentage (about 44%) of the C added with PSL was mineralised respect to C added with AAS (39%) and LDC (25%). Although it was hypothesised that apart from the quantity and stability of the added organic materials, even soil characteristics could influence C mineralisation rates, no significant differences were observed between emission fluxes for similarly treated soils. Mean cumulative emission fluxes after 40 days from treatment were of 114, 103 and

  12. Driving factors of carbon dioxide emissions in China: an empirical study using 2006-2010 provincial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Zhan-Ming; Xiao, Hongwei; Yang, Wei; Liu, Danhe; Chen, Bin

    2017-03-01

    The rapid urbanization of China has increased pressure on its environmental and ecological well being. In this study, the temporal and spatial profiles of China's carbon dioxide emissions are analyzed by taking heterogeneities into account based on an integration of the extended stochastic impacts using a geographically and temporally weighted regression model on population, affluence, and technology. Population size, urbanization rate, GDP per capita, energy intensity, industrial structure, energy consumption pattern, energy prices, and economy openness are identified as the key driving factors of regional carbon dioxide emissions and examined through the empirical data for 30 provinces during 2006‒2010. The results show the driving factors and their spillover effects have distinct spatial and temporal heterogeneities. Most of the estimated time and space coefficients are consistent with expectation. According to the results of this study, the heterogeneous spatial and temporal effects should be taken into account when designing policies to achieve the goals of carbon dioxide emissions reduction in different regions.

  13. Modeling and Computation of Transboundary Industrial Pollution with Emission Permits Trading by Stochastic Differential Game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Chang

    Full Text Available Transboundary industrial pollution requires international actions to control its formation and effects. In this paper, we present a stochastic differential game to model the transboundary industrial pollution problems with emission permits trading. More generally, the process of emission permits price is assumed to be stochastic and to follow a geometric Brownian motion (GBM. We make use of stochastic optimal control theory to derive the system of Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB equations satisfied by the value functions for the cooperative and the noncooperative games, respectively, and then propose a so-called fitted finite volume method to solve it. The efficiency and the usefulness of this method are illustrated by the numerical experiments. The two regions' cooperative and noncooperative optimal emission paths, which maximize the regions' discounted streams of the net revenues, together with the value functions, are obtained. Additionally, we can also obtain the threshold conditions for the two regions to decide whether they cooperate or not in different cases. The effects of parameters in the established model on the results have been also examined. All the results demonstrate that the stochastic emission permits prices can motivate the players to make more flexible strategic decisions in the games.

  14. Olympic Games promote the reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases in Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jisong; Zhang Yongjie

    2008-01-01

    Global climate change is one of the most serious global environmental problems faced by humankind at present. Serious attention should be paid and precautions should be taken before disasters occur. The amount of CO 2 emissions in China has increased during the past few years and the Chinese government and people have attached great importance to this phenomenon and treated it seriously. With the instruction of scientific development viewpoint, Beijing has made significant progress in emissions reduction through technological innovation, industrial structure adjustment, promoting energy efficiency and utilization of renewable energy, and absorption of CO 2 using forest and wetland, since bidding for Olympic Games. At the same time, energy conservation and emissions reduction measures taken in the construction of Beijing Olympic stadiums just incarnate the Beijing Green Olympics. Using the Beijing Olympic Games as a turning-point, adopting energy conservation and emissions reduction measures, Beijing will make contributions to reduction of greenhouse gases and slowing down climate changes and Beijing Olympic Games will leave behind an inheritance for future generations to enjoy

  15. Olympic Games promote the reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases in Beijing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jisong [China Centre of Recycle Economy Research, School of Economics and Management, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: js_wub@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang Yongjie [China Centre of Recycle Economy Research, School of Economics and Management, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-09-15

    Global climate change is one of the most serious global environmental problems faced by humankind at present. Serious attention should be paid and precautions should be taken before disasters occur. The amount of CO{sub 2} emissions in China has increased during the past few years and the Chinese government and people have attached great importance to this phenomenon and treated it seriously. With the instruction of scientific development viewpoint, Beijing has made significant progress in emissions reduction through technological innovation, industrial structure adjustment, promoting energy efficiency and utilization of renewable energy, and absorption of CO{sub 2} using forest and wetland, since bidding for Olympic Games. At the same time, energy conservation and emissions reduction measures taken in the construction of Beijing Olympic stadiums just incarnate the Beijing Green Olympics. Using the Beijing Olympic Games as a turning-point, adopting energy conservation and emissions reduction measures, Beijing will make contributions to reduction of greenhouse gases and slowing down climate changes and Beijing Olympic Games will leave behind an inheritance for future generations to enjoy.

  16. Olympic Games promote the reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases in Beijing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jisong; Zhang, Yongjie [China Centre of Recycle Economy Research, School of Economics and Management, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-09-15

    Global climate change is one of the most serious global environmental problems faced by humankind at present. Serious attention should be paid and precautions should be taken before disasters occur. The amount of CO{sub 2} emissions in China has increased during the past few years and the Chinese government and people have attached great importance to this phenomenon and treated it seriously. With the instruction of scientific development viewpoint, Beijing has made significant progress in emissions reduction through technological innovation, industrial structure adjustment, promoting energy efficiency and utilization of renewable energy, and absorption of CO{sub 2} using forest and wetland, since bidding for Olympic Games. At the same time, energy conservation and emissions reduction measures taken in the construction of Beijing Olympic stadiums just incarnate the Beijing Green Olympics. Using the Beijing Olympic Games as a turning-point, adopting energy conservation and emissions reduction measures, Beijing will make contributions to reduction of greenhouse gases and slowing down climate changes and Beijing Olympic Games will leave behind an inheritance for future generations to enjoy. (author)

  17. The Distribution Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Intensity across Chinese Provinces: A Weighted Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Xin Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the distribution dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions intensity across 30 Chinese provinces using a weighted distribution dynamics approach. The results show that CO2 emissions intensity tends to diverge during the sample period of 1995–2014. However, convergence clubs are found in the ergodic distributions of the full sample and two sub-sample periods. Divergence, polarization, and stratification are the dominant characteristics in the distribution dynamics. Weightings with economic and population sizes have important impacts on current distributions and hence long-run steady distributions. Neglecting the size of the economy may underestimate the deterioration in the long-run steady state. The result also shows that conditioning on space and income cannot eliminate the multimodality in the long-run distribution. However, capital intensity has an important impact on the formation of convergence clubs. Our findings will contribute to an understanding of the spatial dynamic behaviors of CO2 emissions across Chinese provinces, and have important policy implications for CO2 emissions reduction in China.

  18. Dynamics of diffuse carbon dioxide emissions from Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Rodríguez, Fátima; Melián, Gladys; Hernández, Pedro A.; Sumino, Hirochika; Padilla, Germán; Barrancos, José; Dionis, Samara; Notsu, Kenji; Calvo, David

    2015-04-01

    We report herein the results of 13 soil CO2 efflux surveys at Cumbre Vieja volcano, La Palma Island, the most active basaltic volcano in the Canary Islands. The CO2 efflux measurements were undertaken using the accumulation chamber method between 2001 and 2013 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area and to evaluate occasional CO2 efflux surveys as a volcanic surveillance tool for Cumbre Vieja. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 2442 g m-2 days-1, with the highest values observed in the south, where the last volcanic eruption took place (Teneguía, 1971). Isotopic analyses of soil gas carbon dioxide suggest an organic origin as the main contribution to the CO2 efflux, with a very small magmatic gas component observed at the southern part of the volcano. Total biogenic and magmatic combined CO2 emission rates showed a high temporal variability, ranging between 320 and 1544 t days-1 and averaging 1147 t days-1 over the 220-km2 region. Two significant increases in the CO2 emission observed in 2011 and 2013 were likely caused by an enhanced magmatic endogenous contribution revealed by significant changes in the 3He/4He ratio in a CO2-rich cold spring. The relatively stable emission rate presented in this work defines the background CO2 emission range for Cumbre Vieja during a volcanic quiescence period.

  19. Inventory of aerosol and sulphur dioxide emissions from India. Part 1 - Fossil fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekar Reddy, M.; Venkataraman, C.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive, spatially resolved (0.25 o x 0.25 o ) fossil fuel consumption database and emissions inventory was constructed, for India, for the first time. Emissions of sulphur dioxide and aerosol chemical constituents were estimated for 1996-1997 and extrapolated to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) study period (1998-1999). District level consumption of coal/lignite, petroleum and natural gas in power plants, industrial, transportation and domestic sectors was 9411 PJ, with major contributions from coal (54%) followed by diesel (18%). Emission factors for various pollutants were derived using India specific fuel characteristics and information on combustion/air pollution control technologies for the power and industrial sectors. Domestic and transportation emission factors, appropriate for Indian source characteristics, were compiled from literature. SO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion for 1996-1997 were 4.0Tg SO 2 yr -1 , with 756 large point sources (e.g. utilities, iron and steel, fertilisers, cement, refineries and petrochemicals and non-ferrous metals), accounting for 62%. PM 2.5 emitted was 0.5 and 2.0Tgyr -1 for the 100% and the 50% control scenario, respectively, applied to coal burning in the power and industrial sectors. Coal combustion was the major source of PM 2.5 (92%) primarily consisting of fly ash, accounting for 98% of the 'inorganic fraction' emissions (difference between PM 2.5 and black carbon + organic matter) of 1.6Tgyr -1 . Black carbon emissions were estimated at 0.1Tgyr -1 , with 58% from diesel transport, and organic matter emissions at 0.3Tgyr -1 , with 48% from brick-kilns. Fossil fuel consumption and emissions peaked at the large point industrial sources and 22 cities, with elevated area fluxes in northern and western India. The spatial resolution of this inventory makes it suitable for regional-scale aerosol-climate studies. These results are compared to previous studies and differences discussed. Measurements of

  20. Inventory of aerosol and sulphur dioxide emissions from India: I—Fossil fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. Shekar; Venkataraman, Chandra

    A comprehensive, spatially resolved (0.25°×0.25°) fossil fuel consumption database and emissions inventory was constructed, for India, for the first time. Emissions of sulphur dioxide and aerosol chemical constituents were estimated for 1996-1997 and extrapolated to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) study period (1998-1999). District level consumption of coal/lignite, petroleum and natural gas in power plants, industrial, transportation and domestic sectors was 9411 PJ, with major contributions from coal (54%) followed by diesel (18%). Emission factors for various pollutants were derived using India specific fuel characteristics and information on combustion/air pollution control technologies for the power and industrial sectors. Domestic and transportation emission factors, appropriate for Indian source characteristics, were compiled from literature. SO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion for 1996-1997 were 4.0 Tg SO 2 yr -1, with 756 large point sources (e.g. utilities, iron and steel, fertilisers, cement, refineries and petrochemicals and non-ferrous metals), accounting for 62%. PM 2.5 emitted was 0.5 and 2.0 Tg yr -1 for the 100% and the 50% control scenario, respectively, applied to coal burning in the power and industrial sectors. Coal combustion was the major source of PM 2.5 (92%) primarily consisting of fly ash, accounting for 98% of the "inorganic fraction" emissions (difference between PM 2.5 and black carbon+organic matter) of 1.6 Tg yr -1. Black carbon emissions were estimated at 0.1 Tg yr -1, with 58% from diesel transport, and organic matter emissions at 0.3 Tg yr -1, with 48% from brick-kilns. Fossil fuel consumption and emissions peaked at the large point industrial sources and 22 cities, with elevated area fluxes in northern and western India. The spatial resolution of this inventory makes it suitable for regional-scale aerosol-climate studies. These results are compared to previous studies and differences discussed. Measurements of

  1. Lagrangian transport simulations of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions: impact of meteorological data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Rößler, Thomas; Griessbach, Sabine; Heng, Yi; Stein, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from strong volcanic eruptions are an important natural cause for climate variations. We applied our new Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC) to perform simulations for three case studies of volcanic eruption events. The case studies cover the eruptions of Grímsvötn, Iceland, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, Chile, and Nabro, Eritrea, in May and June 2011. We used SO2 observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS/Aqua) and a backward trajectory approach to initialize the simulations. Besides validation of the new model, the main goal of our study was a comparison of simulations with different meteorological data products. We considered three reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, and NCAR/NCEP) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis. Qualitatively, the SO2 distributions from the simulations compare well with the AIRS data, but also with Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) aerosol observations. Transport deviations and the critical success index (CSI) are analyzed to evaluate the simulations quantitatively. During the first 5 or 10 days after the eruptions we found the best performance for the ECMWF analysis (CSI range of 0.25 - 0.31), followed by ERA-Interim (0.25 - 0.29), MERRA (0.23 - 0.27), and NCAR/NCEP (0.21 - 0.23). High temporal and spatial resolution of the meteorological data does lead to improved performance of Lagrangian transport simulations of volcanic emissions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Reference: Hoffmann L., Rößler, T., Griessbach, S., Heng, Y., and Stein, O., Lagrangian transport simulations of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions: impact of meteorological data products, J. Geophys. Res., 121(9), 4651-4673, doi:10.1002/2015JD023749, 2016.

  2. Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from constructed wetlands receiving anaerobically pretreated sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Varga, D; Ruiz, I; Álvarez, J A; Soto, M

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this research was to determine methane and carbon dioxide emissions from a hybrid constructed wetland (CW) treating anaerobically pre-treated sewage. The CW was constituted of two horizontal flow (free water surface followed by a subsurface) units. A long-term study was carried out as both CW units were monitored for three campaigns in Period 1 (0.9-1.5years after start-up), and four campaigns in Period 2 (4.5-5.8years after start-up). The closed chamber method with collecting surfaces of 1810cm(2) was used. For this system, variability due to position in the transverse section of CW, plant presence or absence and recommended sampling period was determined. Overall methane emissions ranged from 96 to 966mgCH4m(-2) d(-1), depending on several factors as the operation time, the season of the year and the position in the system. Methane emissions increased from 267±188mgCH4m(-2)d(-1) during the second year of operation to 543±161mgCH4m(-2)d(-1) in the sixth year of operation. Methane emissions were related to the age of the CW and the season of the year, being high in spring and becoming lower from spring to winter. Total CO2 emissions ranged mostly from 3500 to 5800mgCO2m(-2)d(-1) during the sixth year of operation, while nitrous oxide emissions were below the detection limit of the method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Energy use and carbon dioxide emission of Indonesian small and medium scale industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priambodo, A.; Kumar, S. [Asian Inst. of Technology, Pathumthani (Thailand). Energy Program

    2001-07-01

    In Asia, small and medium scale industries (SMIs) form a significant number of establishments contributing to economic growth, stimulating indigenous entrepreneurship, leading to overall development and serving as a training center for developing skills of industrial workers and entrepreneurs. Because of the nature of these enterprises with their inefficient use of energy and other resources, they contribute to local pollution and other environmental problems. Studies on the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from these industries are few, especially in developing countries. This article presents an estimation of CO{sub 2} emission due to energy (fuel and electricity) consumption in seven SMI sectors in Indonesia. The specific energy consumption and the energy intensity (energy use per value addition) of these sectors have been estimated. Results of the energy use survey and detailed energy audits show that the highest specific fuel consumption is found in the textile industry, followed by the fabricated metal and chemical industries, while the highest specific electricity consumption is found in the fabricated metal industry, followed by the textile and chemical industries. The highest energy intensity among small industry sectors is found in the food and beverages sector. CO{sub 2} emission from the SMI sectors of Indonesia was estimated based on Intergovernmental panel on Climate Change methodology by considering the emission from each audited factory and from the aggregated energy consumption data of the SMI sectors. The textile and fabricated metal industry contribute the highest specific CO{sub 2} emission. The analysis shows that the contribution of liquid fuels to CO{sub 2} emission is very significant in the SMI sector. The overall contribution by the small industrial sector is about 366,000 tons in 1993 compared to about 46 million tons generated by all industrial sectors. (Author)

  4. Sulfur dioxide and primary carbonaceous aerosol emissions in China and India, 1996–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available China and India are the two largest anthropogenic aerosol generating countries in the world. In this study, we develop a new inventory of sulfur dioxide (SO2 and primary carbonaceous aerosol (i.e., black and organic carbon, BC and OC emissions from these two countries for the period 1996–2010, using a technology-based methodology. Emissions from major anthropogenic sources and open biomass burning are included, and time-dependent trends in activity rates and emission factors are incorporated in the calculation. Year-specific monthly temporal distributions for major sectors and gridded emissions at a resolution of 0.1°×0.1° distributed by multiple year-by-year spatial proxies are also developed. In China, the interaction between economic development and environmental protection causes large temporal variations in the emission trends. From 1996 to 2000, emissions of all three species showed a decreasing trend (by 9 %–17 % due to a slowdown in economic growth, a decline in coal use in non-power sectors, and the implementation of air pollution control measures. With the economic boom after 2000, emissions from China changed dramatically. BC and OC emissions increased by 46 % and 33 % to 1.85 Tg and 4.03 Tg in 2010. SO2 emissions first increased by 61 % to 34.0 Tg in 2006, and then decreased by 9.2 % to 30.8 Tg in 2010 due to the wide application of flue-gas desulfurization (FGD equipment in power plants. Driven by the remarkable energy consumption growth and relatively lax emission controls, emissions from India increased by 70 %, 41 %, and 35 % to 8.81 Tg, 1.02 Tg, and 2.74 Tg in 2010 for SO2, BC, and OC, respectively. Monte Carlo simulations are used to quantify the emission uncertainties. The average 95 % confidence intervals (CIs of SO2, BC, and OC emissions are estimated to be −16 %–17 %, −43 %–93 %, and −43 %–80 % for China, and −15 %–16 %, −41 %–87 %, and −44 %–92

  5. Sulphur dioxide (SO2) emissions during the 2014-15 Fogo eruption, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrancos, José; Dionis, Samara; Quevedo, Roberto; Fernandes, Paulo; Rodríguez, Fátima; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Silva, Sónia; Cardoso, Nadir; Hernández, Pedro A.; Melián, Gladys V.; Padrón, Eleazar; Padilla, Germán; Asensio-Ramos, María; Calvo, David; Semedo, Helio; Alfama, Vera

    2015-04-01

    A new eruption started at Fogo volcanic island on November 23, 2014, an active stratovolcano, located in the SW of the Cape Verde Archipelago; rising over 6 km from the 4000m deep seafloor to the Pico do Fogo summit at 2829m above sea level (m.a.s.l.). Since settlement in the 15th century, 27 eruptions have been identified through analysis of incomplete written records (Ribeiro, 1960), with average time intervals of 20 yr and average duration of two months. The eruptions were mostly effusive (Hawaiian to Strombolian), with rare occurrences of highly explosive episodes including phreatomagmatic events (Day et al., 1999). This study reports sulphur dioxide (SO2) emission rate variations observed throughout the 2014-15 Fogo eruption, Cape Verde. More than 100 measurements of SO2 emission rate have been carried out in a daily basis by ITER/INVOLCAN/UNICV/OVCV/SNPC research team since November 28, 2014, five days after the eruption onset, by means of a miniDOAS using the traverse method with a car. The daily deviation obtained of the data is around 15%. Estimated SO2 emission rates ranged from 12,476 ± 981 to 492 ± 27 tons/day during the 2014-15 Fogo eruption until January 1, 2015. During this first five days of measurements, the observed SO2 emission rates were high with an average rate of 11,100 tons/day. On December 3, 2014 the SO2 emission rate dropped to values close to 4,000 tons/day, whereas few days later, on December 10, 2014, an increase to values close to 11,000 tons/day was recorded. Since then, SO2 emission rate has shown decrease trend to values close to 1,300 tons/day until December 21, 2014. The average of the observed SO2 emission rate was about 2,000 tons/day from December 21, 2014 to January 1, 2015, without detecting a specific either increasing or decreasing trend of the SO2 emission rate. The objective of this report is to clarify relations between the SO2 emission rate and surface eruptive activity during the 2014-15 Fogo eruption. Day, S. J

  6. Carbon dioxide emissions from peat soils under potato cultivation in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jenny; Langan, Charlie; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Organic wetland soils in south western Uganda are found in valley bottom wetlands, surrounded by steep, mineral soil hill slopes. Land use change in these papyrus dominated wetlands has taken place over the past forty years, seeing wetland areas cleared of papyrus, rudimentary drainage channel systems dug, and soil cultivated and planted with crops, predominantly potatoes. There has been little research into the cultivation of organic wetlands soils in Uganda, or the impacts on soil carbon dynamics and associated carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This study used two rounds of farmer interviews to capture the land management practices on these soils and how they vary over the period of a year. Three potato fields were also randomly selected and sampled for CO2 emissions at four points in time during the year; 1) just after the potato beds had been dug, 2) during the potato growing period, 3) after the potato harvest, and 4) at the end of the fallow season. Carbon dioxide emissions, soil and air temperatures, water table depth, vegetation cover and land use were all recorded in situ in each field on each sampling occasion, from both the raised potato beds and the trenches in between them. There appeared to be a delay in the disturbance effect of digging the peat, with heterotrophic CO2 emissions from the raised beds not immediately increasing after being exposed to the air. Excluding these results, there was a significant linear relationship between mean emissions and water table depth from the raised beds and trenches in each field over time (pmoisture content (p<0.001, r2=0.85). Temporal variability was observed, with significant differences in the means of emissions measured at the different sampling times (p<0.001, one-way ANOVA); this was the case in both raised beds and trenches in all fields studied, except for the trenches in one field which showed no significant difference between sampling times (p=0.55). Mean emissions from the raised beds were highest during

  7. Foreign Direct Investment, Environmental INGO Presence and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Less-Developed Countries, 1980-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jorgenson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors engage foreign investment dependence and world society theories to examine environmental harms in less-developed countries. Results of cross-national random effects panel regression models indicate that foreign investment in manufacturing contributes to total carbon dioxide emissions and emissions per unit of production. World society integration in the context of environmental international non-governmental organization presence does not directly suppress emissions. However, a stronger presence of such organizations in some less-developed nations appears to mitigate the impacts of foreign investment on anthropogenic emissions. These results hold, net of population, level of development, and other structural factors.

  8. Competitiveness and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Potential Electricity Generating Options in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.

    2008-01-01

    As part of analysis of options needed to generate additional 6-8 TWh of electrical energy for Croatian consumers by the end of next decade, a comparison between natural gas combined cycle plants jointly with wind electricity generator and nuclear power plants has been performed. The choice is a real challenge, but it is logical that the criteria for optimal option are maximal net cash flow and minimal carbon dioxide emission. Since the comparison has to include analysis of discounted net cash flow during plants operating period (including total life time period and period of most insensitive capital return) and since foreseen potential long term fuel cost variations (gas, uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment) contain substantial uncertainties, the best method is to calculate discounted net cash flow with probabilistic method. Prognosis for long term nuclear fuel cycle and gas costs is included in the analyses. Results, obtained in form of probabilistic distributions, showed that selection of option with nuclear plant would doubtlessly result in higher net cash flow for the investor, and of course, in lower CO 2 emissions. Effect of plant selection to net cash flow and CO 2 emissions is additionally analyzed by comparing systems containing wind and gas plants versus system with gas plants only. The difference is less pronounced in case when wind generators have low capacity factors (similar to experienced for wind plants already operating on Adriatic coast). (author)

  9. Comparing economic benefits and environmental impacts. A further explanation of differences in carbon dioxide emission figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Haan, M.; Verduin, H.

    2000-01-01

    To assist the development of international climate policies, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has developed instructions which can be used to calculate and report the emissions of greenhouse gases for each individual country. Bunkering, i.e., refuelling aircraft and ships, is reported separately. However, the agreements on reductions for countries or regions laid down in the Kyoto protocol do not take pollution from international transport into consideration. The Dutch economy generates a substantial amount of pollution outside its national borders through international transport. In 1998, for example, 26 of the total of 203 billion kg carbon dioxide were emitted outside the national borders. In addition, IPCC regulations result in incompatibilities between emission figures and economic key figures (gross domestic product, employment) from the national accounts. This paper reviews the various definitions of emission figures that are used in the Netherlands and their interrelationships. Special attention is paid to the analytical advantages of harmonising environmental statistics with the system of national accounts. 4 refs

  10. Effects of ultra-low sulphur diesel fuel and diesel oxidation catalysts on nitrogen dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachulak, J.S.; Zarling, D.

    2010-01-01

    Diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) are used on diesel equipment in underground mines to reduce exhaust emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (C) and odour that are associated with gaseous HCs. New catalysts have also been formulated to minimize sulphate production, but little is know about their effects on nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) emissions. DOCs are known to oxidize nitric oxide (NO) to NO 2 , which is more toxic than NO at low levels. Vale Inco uses ultra-low sulphur diesel (ULSD) fuel for its underground diesel equipment. Although ULSD is a cleaner burning fuel, its impact on the emissions performance of DOCs is not fully known. Technical material gathered during a literature review suggested that ULSD fuel may increase NO 2 production if DOCs are used, but that the increase would be small. This paper presented the results of a laboratory evaluation of DOCs with varying amounts of time-in service in Vale Inco mines. The 4 Vale Inco DOCs were found to produce excess NO 2 during some test conditions. In both steady-state and transient testing, there were no obvious trends in NO 2 increases with increasing DOC age. Two possibilities for these observations are that the DOCs may have been well within their useful life or their initial compositions differed. Future studies will make use of improved instrumentation, notably NO 2 analyzers, to definitely determine the influence of DOCs on NO 2 formation. 13 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  11. Multiple regression analysis in modelling of carbon dioxide emissions by energy consumption use in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, Sim Chong; Chun, Beh Boon; San, Lim Hwee; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat

    2015-04-01

    Climate change due to carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is one of the most complex challenges threatening our planet. This issue considered as a great and international concern that primary attributed from different fossil fuels. In this paper, regression model is used for analyzing the causal relationship among CO2 emissions based on the energy consumption in Malaysia using time series data for the period of 1980-2010. The equations were developed using regression model based on the eight major sources that contribute to the CO2 emissions such as non energy, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), diesel, kerosene, refinery gas, Aviation Turbine Fuel (ATF) and Aviation Gasoline (AV Gas), fuel oil and motor petrol. The related data partly used for predict the regression model (1980-2000) and partly used for validate the regression model (2001-2010). The results of the prediction model with the measured data showed a high correlation coefficient (R2=0.9544), indicating the model's accuracy and efficiency. These results are accurate and can be used in early warning of the population to comply with air quality standards.

  12. Carbon dioxide emissions from Deccan volcanism and a K/T boundary greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rampino, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    A greenhouse warming caused by increased emissions of carbon dioxide from the Deccan Traps volcanism has been suggested as the cause of the terminal Cretaceous extinctions on land and in the sea. Total eruptive and noneruptive CO2 output by the Deccan eruptions (from 6 to 20 x 10 to the 16th moles) over a period of several hundred thousand years is estimated based on best estimates of the CO2 weight fraction of the original basalts and basaltic melts, the fraction of CO2 degassed, and the volume of the Deccan Traps eruptions. Results of a model designed to estimate the effects of increased CO2 on climate and ocean chemistry suggest that increases in atmospheric pCO2 due to Deccan Traps CO2 emissions would have been less than 75 ppm, leading to a predicted global warming of less than 1 C over several hundred thousand years. It is concluded that the direct climate effects of CO2 emissions from the Deccan eruptions would have been too weak to be an important factor in the end-Cretaceous mass extinctions.

  13. Potential for reduced methane and carbon dioxide emissions from livestock and pasture management in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Philip K; Herrero, Mario

    2010-11-16

    We estimate the potential reductions in methane and carbon dioxide emissions from several livestock and pasture management options in the mixed and rangeland-based production systems in the tropics. The impacts of adoption of improved pastures, intensifying ruminant diets, changes in land-use practices, and changing breeds of large ruminants on the production of methane and carbon dioxide are calculated for two levels of adoption: complete adoption, to estimate the upper limit to reductions in these greenhouse gases (GHGs), and optimistic but plausible adoption rates taken from the literature, where these exist. Results are expressed both in GHG per ton of livestock product and in Gt CO(2)-eq. We estimate that the maximum mitigation potential of these options in the land-based livestock systems in the tropics amounts to approximately 7% of the global agricultural mitigation potential to 2030. Using historical adoption rates from the literature, the plausible mitigation potential of these options could contribute approximately 4% of global agricultural GHG mitigation. This could be worth on the order of $1.3 billion per year at a price of $20 per t CO(2)-eq. The household-level and sociocultural impacts of some of these options warrant further study, however, because livestock have multiple roles in tropical systems that often go far beyond their productive utility.

  14. [Measurement of methane and carbon dioxide emissions from ruminants based on the NDIR technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xue-Zhi; Long, Rui-Jun; Mi, Jian-Dui; Guo, Xu-Sheng

    2010-06-01

    Methane (CH4) production in the rumen represents a loss of energy for the host animal; in addition, methane eructated by ruminants may contribute to a greenhouse effect or global warming. The dinumal CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from sheep were continuously recorded using the flow-through chamber method. A type new type of non-disperse infrared (NDIR) gas sensors based on pulse IR source was introduced, and by using the high performance pyroelectric IR sensor with built in interference filter and the "single light and two wavelengths" technology, CH4 and CO2 measurement from ruminants was achieved. Animals were given dry oat hay as the basic diet and supplemented concentrate with the ratio of 7 : 3. The results showed that the recovery was 96.7% and 96.2% for CH4 and CO2, respectively. Methane and carbon dioxide output from sheep respectively averaged 15.6 g per day and 184.7 g per day, equivalent to 6.8 and 71.1 kg per animal. Diurnal fluctuations in hourly rates of CH4 and CO2 production in hourly of methane increased during day light to reach a peak at or near sunset and then declined towards sunrise, and consideration was given to the dry matter intake of the animals used in these studies and its possible effects on CH4 production.

  15. Contributions of Vehicular Traffic to Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Kaduna and Abuja, Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ndoke NDOKE

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The quantity of carbon dioxide (CO2 contributed by automobile emissions to the environment was determined at some areas in Kaduna and Abuja in Northern Nigeria. Five census stations were selected in each of the two towns. In Kaduna, Jabi road in Ungwan Rimi, Kawo Motor park, Stadium round-about, Sabo and Kasuwa (Kaduna Main Market, were selected, while Asokoro (behind ECOWAS, Area One junction, A.Y.A. junction, Wuse market bus-stop, and Mabushi round-about were selected for Abuja. A gas sampling pump and tubes that could detect carbon dioxide were used to detect the quantity of CO2 in the environment at a certain time. The results obtained show a variation in the amount of CO2 in the environment. Areas with relatively heavy congestion show a high concentration of CO2, while areas with minimal traffic show a lower concentration of CO2. Sabo in Kaduna has an average concentration of 1840 ppm being the highest, while Asokoro (behind ECOWAS, Abuja has the least average concentration of 1160 ppm. Review of literature showed that increasing CO2 levels have adverse effects such as the Greenhouse Effect, which may lead to Global Warming, as well as a number of other climatic events. These concentrations are still not high enough to cause any serious health effects but they provide a baseline study for Policy makers and Town planners.

  16. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to lower carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Gerald P

    2012-09-18

    A method for producing liquid fuels includes the steps of gasifying a starting material selected from a group consisting of coal, biomass, carbon nanotubes and mixtures thereof to produce a syngas, subjecting that syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to produce a hyrdrocarbon product stream, separating that hydrocarbon product stream into C1-C4 hydrocarbons and C5+ hydrocarbons to be used as liquid fuels and subjecting the C1-C4 hydrocarbons to catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen produced by CDH is recycled to be mixed with the syngas incident to the FTS reactor in order to raise the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the syngas to values of 2 or higher, which is required to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This is accomplished with little or no production of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The carbon is captured in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), while huge emissions of carbon dioxide are avoided and very large quantities of water employed for the water-gas shift in traditional FTS systems are saved.

  17. Lifecycle cost assessment and carbon dioxide emissions of diesel, natural gas, hybrid electric, fuel cell hybrid and electric transit buses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajunen, Antti; Lipman, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the lifecycle costs and carbon dioxide emissions of different types of city buses. The simulation models of the different powertrains were developed in the Autonomie vehicle simulation software. The carbon dioxide emissions were calculated both for the bus operation and for the fuel and energy pathways from well to tank. Two different operating environment case scenarios were used for the primary energy sources, which were Finland and California (USA). The fuel and energy pathways were selected appropriately in relation to the operating environment. The lifecycle costs take into account the purchase, operating, maintenance, and possible carbon emission costs. Based on the simulation results, the energy efficiency of city buses can be significantly improved by the alternative powertrain technologies. Hybrid buses have moderately lower carbon dioxide emissions during the service life than diesel buses whereas fully-electric buses have potential to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, by up to 75%. The lifecycle cost analysis indicates that diesel hybrid buses are already competitive with diesel and natural gas buses. The high costs of fuel cell and battery systems are the major challenges for the fuel cell hybrid buses in order to reduce lifecycle costs to more competitive levels. - Highlights: • Alternative powertrains can significantly improve energy efficiency of transit buses. • Operating environment has an important impact on the lifecycle costs of buses. • Diesel hybrid buses are already cost effective solution for public transportation. • The cost of fuel cell technology is the major challenge for fuel cell hybrid buses. • Fully-electric buses have potential to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  18. Biochar and earthworm effects on soil nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustenborg, Cara A; Hepp, Simone; Kammann, Claudia; Hagan, David; Schmidt, Olaf; Müller, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Biochar is the product of pyrolysis produced from feedstock of biological origin. Due to its aromatic structure and long residence time, biochar may enable long-term carbon sequestration. At the same time, biochar has the potential to improve soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. However, the effect of biochar application on GHG fluxes from soil must be investigated before recommendations for field-scale biochar application can be made. A laboratory experiment was designed to measure carbon dioxide (CO) and nitrous oxide (NO) emissions from two Irish soils with the addition of two different biochars, along with endogeic (soil-feeding) earthworms and ammonium sulfate, to assist in the overall evaluation of biochar as a GHG-mitigation tool. A significant reduction in NO emissions was observed from both low and high organic matter soils when biochars were applied at rates of 4% (w/w). Earthworms significantly increased NO fluxes in low and high organic matter soils more than 12.6-fold and 7.8-fold, respectively. The large increase in soil NO emissions in the presence of earthworms was significantly reduced by the addition of both biochars. biochar reduced the large earthworm emissions by 91 and 95% in the low organic matter soil and by 56 and 61% in the high organic matter soil (with and without N fertilization), respectively. With peanut hull biochar, the earthworm emissions reduction was 80 and 70% in the low organic matter soil, and only 20 and 10% in the high organic matter soil (with and without N fertilization), respectively. In high organic matter soil, both biochars reduced CO efflux in the absence of earthworms. However, soil CO efflux increased when peanut hull biochar was applied in the presence of earthworms. This study demonstrated that biochar can potentially reduce earthworm-enhanced soil NO and CO emissions. Hence, biochar application combined with endogeic earthworm activity did not reveal unknown risks for GHG emissions

  19. Spatial and temporal disaggregation of transport-related carbon dioxide emissions in Bogota - Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. A.; Jimenez Pizarro, R.; Néstor Y. Rojas, N. Y.

    2011-12-01

    As a result of rapid urbanization during the last 60 years, 75% of the Colombian population now lives in cities. Urban areas are net sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) and contribute significantly to national GHG emission inventories. The development of scientifically-sound GHG mitigation strategies require accurate GHG source and sink estimations. Disaggregated inventories are effective mitigation decision-making tools. The disaggregation process renders detailed information on the distribution of emissions by transport mode, and the resulting a priori emissions map allows for optimal definition of sites for GHG flux monitoring, either by eddy covariance or inverse modeling techniques. Fossil fuel use in transportation is a major source of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Bogota. We present estimates of CO2 emissions from road traffic in Bogota using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reference method, and a spatial and temporal disaggregation method. Aggregated CO2 emissions from mobile sources were estimated from monthly and annual fossil fuel (gasoline, diesel and compressed natural gas - CNG) consumption statistics, and estimations of bio-ethanol and bio-diesel use. Although bio-fuel CO2 emissions are considered balanced over annual (or multi-annual) agricultural cycles, we included them since CO2 generated by their combustion would be measurable by a net flux monitoring system. For the disaggregation methodology, we used information on Bogota's road network classification, mean travel speed and trip length for each vehicle category and road type. The CO2 emission factors were taken from recent in-road measurements for gasoline- and CNG-powered vehicles and also estimated from COPERT IV. We estimated emission factors for diesel from surveys on average trip length and fuel consumption. Using IPCC's reference method, we estimate Bogota's total transport-related CO2 emissions for 2008 (reference year) at 4.8 Tg CO2. The disaggregation method estimation is

  20. Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-08-01

    The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a

  1. 2001-2002 carbon dioxide emissions in OECD; Emissions de CO{sub 2} dues a l'energie dans l'OCDE en 2001-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-11-01

    This document provides carbon dioxide emissions data, from energy uses and production, from 2001 to 2002 in the OECD. It concerns the climate corrected CO{sub 2} emissions in France, the non corrected CO{sub 2} emissions (M tons), the emissions intensity / the Gross Domestic Product and the emissions intensity / the population (tons per inhabitant). (A.L.B.)

  2. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 52 - Determination of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions From Stationary Sources by Continuous Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the event that significant repair work is performed in the system, the company shall demonstrate to... which a measurement system is expected to operate within certain performance specifications without... dioxide by a continuously operating emission measurement system. Performance specifications for the...

  3. The costs of different energy taxes for stabilizing U.S. carbon dioxide emissions: An application of the Gemini model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leary, N.A.; Scheraga, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    In the absence of policies to mitigate emissions of carbon dioxide, US emissions will grow substantially over the period 1990 to 2030. One option for mitigation of carbon dioxide emissions is to tax energy use. For example, fossil energy might be taxed according to its carbon content, heating value, or market value. Using a partial equilibrium model of US energy markets that combines detailed representation of technological processes with optimizing behavior by energy users and suppliers, the authors compare the costs of using carbon, Btu, and ad valorem taxes as instruments to implement a policy of emission stabilization. The authors also examine the differential impacts of these taxes on the mix of primary energy consumed in the US. The carbon tax induces the substitution of renewables and natural gas for coal and stabilizes carbon dioxide emissions at an estimated annual cost of $125 billion. The Btu tax induces the substitution of renewables for coal, but does not encourage the use of natural gas. The estimated cost of stabilization with the Btu tax is $210 billion per year. The ad valorem tax, like the Btu tax, does not encourage the substitution of natural gas for coal. It also causes a significant shift away from oil in comparison to the carbon tax. The cost of stabilizing emissions with the ad valorem tax is estimated at $450 billion per year

  4. Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Chircop, David

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades a relatively new sort of board gaming has emerged which you might not have heard about. ‘Hobby’ or ‘modern’ board gaming is sweeping across the world. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/rise-of-the-ancients/

  5. [Impact of industrial pollution on emission of carbon dioxide by soils in the Kola Subarctic Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptsik, G N; Kadulin, M S; Zakharova, A I

    2015-01-01

    Soil emission of carbon dioxide, the key component of carbon cycle and the characteristic of soil biological activity, has been studied in background and polluted ecosystems in the Kola subarctic, the large industrial region of Russia. Long-term air pollution by emissions of "Pechenganikel" smelter, the largest source of sulphur dioxide and heavy metals in Northern Europe, has caused the technogenic digression of forest ecosystems. As a result of the digression, the tree layer was destructed, the number of plant species was diminished, the activity of soil biota was weakened, the soils were polluted and exhausted, biogeochemical cycles of elements were disturbed and productivity of ecosystems shrunk. Field investigations revealed the decrease of the in.situ soil respiration in average from 190-230 mg C-CO2/m2 x per h in background pine forests to 130-160, 100, and 20 mg C-CO2/m2.per h at the stages of pine defoliation, sparse pine forest and technogenic barrens of the technogenic succession, respectively. The soil respira- tion in birch forests was more intense than in pine forests and tended to decrease from about 290 mg C-CO2/m2 x per h in background forests to 210-220 and 170-190 mg C-CO2/m2 x per h in defoliating forests and technogenic sparse forests, respectively. Due to high spatial variability of soil respiration in both pine and birch forests significant differences from the background level were found only in technogenic sparse forests and barrens. Soil respiration represents total production of carbon dioxide by plant roots and soil microorganisms. The decrease in share of root respiration in the total soil respiration with the rise of pollution from 38-57% in background forests up to zero in technogenic barrens has been revealed for the first time for this region. This indicates that plants seem to be more sensitive to pollution as compared to relatively resistant microorganisms. Soil respiration and the contribution of roots to the total respiration

  6. A Method for Improving Temporal and Spatial Resolution of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, J. S.; Andres, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Using United States data, a method is developed to estimate the monthly consumption of solid, liquid and gaseous fossil fuels for each state in the union. This technique employs monthly sales data to estimate the relative monthly proportions of the total annual national fossil fuel use. These proportions are then used to estimate the total monthly carbon dioxide emissions for each state. To assess the success of this technique, the results from this method are compared with the data obtained from other independent methods. To determine the temporal success of the method, the resulting national time series is compared to the model produced by Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the current model being developed by T. J. Blasing and C. Broniak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The University of North Dakota (UND) method fits well temporally with the results of the CDIAC and current ORNL research. To determine the success of the spatial component, the individual state results are compared to the annual state totals calculated by ORNL. Using ordinary least squares regression, the annual state totals of this method are plotted against the ORNL data. This allows a direct comparison of estimates in the form of ordered pairs against a one-to-one ideal correspondence line, and allows for easy detection of outliers in the results obtained by this estimation method. Analyzing the residuals of the linear regression model for each type of fuel permits an improved understanding of the strengths and shortcomings of the spatial component of this estimation technique. Spatially, the model is successful when compared to the current ORNL research. The primary advantages of this method are its ease of implementation and universal applicability. In general, this technique compares favorably to more labor-intensive methods that rely on more detailed data. The more detailed data is generally not available for most countries in the world. The methodology used

  7. Net carbon dioxide emissions from alternative firewood-production systems in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, K.I.; Booth, T.H.; Jovanovic, T.; Polglase, P.J.; Elliott, A.; Kirschbaum, M.U.F.

    2006-01-01

    The use of firewood for domestic heating has the potential to reduce fossil-fuel use and associated CO 2 emissions. The level of possible reductions depends upon the extent to which firewood off-sets the use of fossil fuels, the efficiency with which wood is burnt, and use of fossil fuels for collection and transport of firewood. Plantations grown for firewood also have a cost of emissions associated with their establishment. Applying the FullCAM model and additional calculations, these factors were examined for various management scenarios under three contrasting firewood production systems (native woodland, sustainably managed native forest, and newly established plantations) in low-medium rainfall (600-800mm) regions of south-eastern Australia. Estimates of carbon dioxide emissions per unit of heat energy produced for all scenarios were lower than for non-renewable energy sources (which generally emit about 0.3-1.0kgCO 2 kWh -1 ). Amongst the scenarios, emissions were greatest when wood was periodically collected from dead wood in woodlands (0.11kgCO 2 kWh -1 ), and was much lower when obtained from harvest residues and dead wood in native forests ( 2 kWh -1 ). When wood was obtained from plantations established on previously cleared agricultural land, use of firewood led to carbon sequestration equivalent to -0.06kgCO 2 kWh -1 for firewood obtained from a coppiced plantation, and -0.17kgCO 2 kWh -1 for firewood collected from thinnings, slash and other residue in a plantation grown for sawlog production. An uncertainty analysis, where inputs and assumptions were varied in relation to a plausible range of management practices, identified the most important influencing factors and an expected range in predicted net amount of CO 2 emitted per unit of heat energy produced from burning firewood. (author)

  8. Dairy farm effluent effects on urine patch nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Tim J; Kelliher, Francis M

    2005-01-01

    Dairy farm effluent (DFE) comprises animal feces, urine, and wash-down water collected at the milking shed. This is collected daily during the milking season and sprayed onto grazed dairy pastures. Urine patches in grazed pastures make a significant contribution to anthropogenic N(2)O emissions. The DFE could potentially mitigate N(2)O emissions by influencing the N(2)O to dinitrogen (N(2)) ratio, since it contains water-soluble carbon (WSC). Alternatively, DFE may enhance N(2)O emissions from urine patches. The application of DFE may also provide a substrate for the production of CO(2) in pasture soils. The effects of DFE on the CO(2) and N(2)O emissions from urine patches are unknown. Thus a laboratory experiment was performed where repeated DFE applications were made to repacked soil cores. Dairy farm effluent was applied at 0, 7, or 14 d after urine deposition. The urine was applied once on Day 0. Urine contained (15)N-enriched urea. Measurements of N(2)O, N(2), and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) fluxes, soil pH, and soil inorganic N concentrations were made. After 43 d the DFE had not mitigated N(2)O fluxes from urine patches. A small increase in the N(2)O flux occurred from the urine-treated soils where DFE was applied 1 wk after urine deposition. The amount of WSC applied in the DFE proved to be insignificant compared with the amount of soil C released as CO(2) following urine application. The priming of soil C in urine patches has implications for the understanding of soil C processes in grazed pasture ecosystems and the budgeting of C within these ecosystems.

  9. Sulfur dioxide emissions in China and sulfur trends in East Asia since 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of the economy, the sulfur dioxide (SO2 emission from China since 2000 is of increasing concern. In this study, we estimate the annual SO2 emission in China after 2000 using a technology-based methodology specifically for China. From 2000 to 2006, total SO2 emission in China increased by 53%, from 21.7 Tg to 33.2 Tg, at an annual growth rate of 7.3%. Emissions from power plants are the main sources of SO2 in China and they increased from 10.6 Tg to 18.6 Tg in the same period. Geographically, emission from north China increased by 85%, whereas that from the south increased by only 28%. The emission growth rate slowed around 2005, and emissions began to decrease after 2006 mainly due to the wide application of flue-gas desulfurization (FGD devices in power plants in response to a new policy of China's government. This paper shows that the trend of estimated SO2 emission in China is consistent with the trends of SO2 concentration and acid rain pH and frequency in China, as well as with the increasing trends of background SO2 and sulfate concentration in East Asia. A longitudinal gradient in the percentage change of urban SO2 concentration in Japan is found during 2000–2007, indicating that the decrease of urban SO2 is lower in areas close to the Asian continent. This implies that the transport of increasing SO2 from the Asian continent partially counteracts the local reduction of SO2 emission downwind. The aerosol optical depth (AOD products of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS are found to be highly correlated with the surface solar radiation (SSR measurements in East Asia. Using MODIS AOD data as a surrogate of SSR, we found that China and East Asia excluding Japan underwent a continuous dimming after 2000, which is in line with the dramatic increase in SO2 emission in

  10. Green vessel scheduling in liner shipping: Modeling carbon dioxide emission costs in sea and at ports of call

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim A. Dulebenets

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering a substantial increase in volumes of the international seaborne trade and drastic climate changes due to carbon dioxide emissions, liner shipping companies have to improve planning of their vessel schedules and improve energy efficiency. This paper presents a novel mixed integer non-linear mathematical model for the green vessel scheduling problem, which directly accounts for the carbon dioxide emission costs in sea and at ports of call. The original non-linear model is linearized and then solved using CPLEX. A set of numerical experiments are conducted for a real-life liner shipping route to reveal managerial insights that can be of importance to liner shipping companies. Results indicate that the proposed mathematical model can serve as an efficient planning tool for liner shipping companies and may assist with evaluation of various carbon dioxide taxation schemes. Increasing carbon dioxide tax may substantially change the design of vessel schedules, incur additional route service costs, and improve the environmental sustainability. However, the effects from increasing carbon dioxide tax on the marine container terminal operations are found to be very limited.

  11. Research on Bifurcation and Chaos in a Dynamic Mixed Game System with Oligopolies Under Carbon Emission Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junhai; Yang, Wenhui; Lou, Wandong

    This paper establishes an oligopolistic game model under the carbon emission reduction constraint and investigates its complex characteristics like bifurcation and chaos. Two oligopolistic manufacturers comprise three mixed game models, aiming to explore the variation in the status of operating system as per the upgrading of benchmark reward-penalty mechanism. Firstly, we set up these basic models that are respectively distinguished with carbon emission quantity and study these models using different game methods. Then, we concentrate on one typical game model to further study the dynamic complexity of variations in the system status, through 2D bifurcation diagrams and 4D parameter adjustment features based on the bounded rationality scheme for price, and the adaptive scheme for carbon emission. The results show that the carbon emission constraint has significant influence on the status variation of two-oligopolistic game operating systems no matter whether it is stable or chaotic. Besides, the new carbon emission regulation meets government supervision target and achieves the goal of being environment friendly by motivating the system to operate with lower carbon emission.

  12. Analyzing carbon dioxide and methane emissions in California using airborne measurements and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. S.; Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations have increased over the past decades and are linked to global temperature increases and climate change. These changes in climate have been suggested to have varying effects, and uncertain consequences, on agriculture, water supply, weather, sea-level rise, the economy, and energy. To counteract the trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations of GHGs, the state of California has passed the California Global Warming Act of 2006 (AB-32). This requires that by the year 2020, GHG (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4)) emissions will be reduced to 1990 levels. To quantify GHG fluxes, emission inventories are routinely compiled for the State of California (e.g., CH4 emissions from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) Project). The major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the state of California are: transportation, electricity production, oil and gas extraction, cement plants, agriculture, landfills/waste, livestock, and wetlands. However, uncertainties remain in these emission inventories because many factors contributing to these processes are poorly quantified. To alleviate these uncertainties, a synergistic approach of applying air-borne measurements and chemical transport modeling (CTM) efforts to provide a method of quantifying local and regional GHG emissions will be performed during this study. Additionally, in order to further understand the temporal and spatial distributions of GHG fluxes in California and the impact these species have on regional climate, CTM simulations of daily variations and seasonality of total column CO2 and CH4 will be analyzed. To assess the magnitude and spatial variation of GHG emissions and to identify local 'hot spots', airborne measurements of CH4 and CO2 were made by the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in January and February 2013 during the Discover-AQ-CA study. High mixing ratios of GHGs were

  13. Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electricity Sector Using Smart Electric Grid Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamiaa Abdallah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of global CO2 emissions are emitted from electricity generation through the combustion of fossil fuels to generate heat needed to power steam turbines. Burning these fuels results in the production of carbon dioxide (CO2—the primary heat-trapping, “greenhouse gas” responsible for global warming. Applying smart electric grid technologies can potentially reduce CO2 emissions. Electric grid comprises three major sectors: generation, transmission and distribution grid, and consumption. Smart generation includes the use of renewable energy sources (wind, solar, or hydropower. Smart transmission and distribution relies on optimizing the existing assets of overhead transmission lines, underground cables, transformers, and substations such that minimum generating capacities are required in the future. Smart consumption will depend on the use of more efficient equipment like energy-saving lighting lamps, enabling smart homes and hybrid plug-in electric vehicles technologies. A special interest is given to the Egyptian case study. Main opportunities for Egypt include generating electricity from wind and solar energy sources and its geographical location that makes it a perfect center for interconnecting electrical systems from the Nile basin, North Africa, Gulf, and Europe. Challenges include shortage of investments, absence of political will, aging of transmission and distribution infrastructure, and lack of consumer awareness for power utilization.

  14. Elevated carbon dioxide reduces emission of herbivore-induced volatiles in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Anna; Vaughan, Martha M; Christensen, Shawn A; Alborn, Hans T; Tumlinson, James H

    2017-09-01

    Terpene volatiles produced by sweet corn (Zea mays) upon infestation with pests such as beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) function as part of an indirect defence mechanism by attracting parasitoid wasps; yet little is known about the impact of climate change on this form of plant defence. To investigate how a central component of climate change affects indirect defence, we measured herbivore-induced volatile emissions in plants grown under elevated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). We found that S. exigua infested or elicitor-treated Z. mays grown at elevated CO 2 had decreased emission of its major sesquiterpene, (E)-β-caryophyllene and two homoterpenes, (3E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene and (3E,7E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene. In contrast, inside the leaves, elicitor-induced (E)-β-caryophyllene hyper-accumulated at elevated CO 2 , while levels of homoterpenes were unaffected. Furthermore, gene expression analysis revealed that the induction of terpene synthase genes following treatment was lower in plants grown at elevated CO 2 . Our data indicate that elevated CO 2 leads both to a repression of volatile synthesis at the transcriptional level and to limitation of volatile release through effects of CO 2 on stomatal conductance. These findings suggest that elevated CO 2 may alter the ability of Z. mays to utilize volatile terpenes to mediate indirect defenses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Potential of Demand Side Management to Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with the Operation of Heat Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. G. Cooper

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work considers the potential reduction in the carbon dioxide emissions associated with the operation of Air Source Heat Pump which could be achieved by using demand side management. In order to achieve significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions, it is widely envisioned that electrification of the heating sector will need to be combined with decarbonisation of the electrical supply. By influencing the times at when electric heat pumps operate such that they coincide more with electricity generation which has a low marginal carbon emissions factor, it has been suggested that these emissions could be reduced further. In order to investigate this possibility, models of the UK electrical grid based on scenarios for 2020 to 2050 have been combined with a dynamic model of an air source heat pump unit and thermal models of a population of dwellings. The performance and carbon dioxide emissions associated with the heat pumps are compared both with and without demand side management interventions intended to give preference to operation when the marginal emissions factor of the electricity being generated is low. It is found that these interventions are unlikely to be effective at achieving further reductions in emissions. A reduction of around 3% was observed in scenarios based around 2035 but in other scenarios the reduction was insignificant. In the scenarios with high wind generation (2050, the DSM scheme considered here tends to improve thermal comfort (with minimal increases in emissions rather than achieving a decrease in emissions. The reasons for this are discussed and further recommendations are made.

  16. Multimodel precipitation responses to removal of U.S. sulfur dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Conley, A. J.; Fiore, A. M.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, D.; Previdi, M.; Faluvegi, G.; Correa, G.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2017-05-01

    Emissions of aerosols and their precursors are declining due to policies enacted to protect human health, yet we currently lack a full understanding of the magnitude, spatiotemporal pattern, statistical significance, and physical mechanisms of precipitation responses to aerosol reductions. We quantify the global and regional precipitation responses to U.S. SO2 emission reductions using three fully coupled chemistry-climate models: Community Earth System Model version 1, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Coupled Model 3, and Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE2. We contrast 200 year (or longer) simulations in which anthropogenic U.S. sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are set to zero with present-day control simulations to assess the aerosol, cloud, and precipitation response to U.S. SO2 reductions. In all three models, reductions in aerosol optical depth up to 70% and cloud droplet number column concentration up to 60% occur over the eastern U.S. and extend over the Atlantic Ocean. Precipitation responses occur both locally and remotely, with the models consistently showing an increase in most regions considered. We find a northward shift of the tropical rain belt location of up to 0.35° latitude especially near the Sahel, where the rainy season length and intensity are significantly enhanced in two of the three models. This enhancement is the result of greater warming in the Northern versus Southern Hemispheres, which acts to shift the Intertropical Convergence Zone northward, delivering additional wet season rainfall to the Sahel. Two of our three models thus imply a previously unconsidered benefit of continued U.S. SO2 reductions for Sahel precipitation.

  17. Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by solar water heating systems and passive technologies in social housing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Vanessa M.T.; Prado, Racine T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Growing global concern regarding climate change motivates technological studies to minimize environmental impacts. In this context, solar water heating (SWH) systems are notably prominent in Brazil, primarily because of the abundance of solar energy in the country. However, SWH designs have not always been perfectly developed. In most projects, the installation option of the solar system only considers the electric power economy aspects and not the particular characteristics of each climatic zone. Thus, the primary objective of this paper is to assess the potential of carbon dioxide reduction with the use of SWH in comparison with electric showers in social housing in several Brazilian climatic zones. The Brazilian government authorities have created public policies to encourage the use of these technologies primarily among the low-income population. The results of this paper indicate that hot climactic regions demonstrate a low reduction of CO 2 emissions with SWH installations. Thus, solar radiation is not useful for water heating in those regions, but it does lead to a large fraction of household cooling loads, implying a demand for electrical energy for air conditioning or requiring the adoption of passive techniques to maintain indoor temperatures below threshold values. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Brazil has created public policies to increase the use of solar water heating in social housing. •We have evaluated the potential for reduction of CO 2 emissions installing solar water heating. •We have found that the coldest regions have the greatest potential for reducing emissions. •Passive technologies for thermal comfort in hot climate households are more useful than solar water heating systems

  18. The marginal impact of carbon dioxide under two scenarios of future emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahba, Mohammed; Hope, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses the PAGE2002 model to calculate the marginal impact of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) under the A2 and B2 marker scenarios of the IPCC, and its distribution across regions, sectors, and over time. PAGE2002 considers the possibility of large-scale discontinuities, a major concern in the IPCC TAR. PAGE2002 estimates the mean value of the marginal impact for CO 2 under scenario A2 to be $19 per tonne of carbon (tC), equivalent to $5 per tonne of CO 2 . The 95% and 5% values for the marginal impact are $49/tC and $5/tC. The mean value under scenario B2 is estimated to be $14/tC, with 95% and 5% points as $41/tC and $3/tC, respectively. The marginal impact is sensitive to the pure rate of time preference, and doubles for a 1% reduction from 3% to 2%. Additionally, adaptation policy affects the marginal impact estimates; they increase by 50% if no adaptation policy is implemented. Benefits from reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will affect the globe as a whole, but with various regions being more affected than others. Developing countries would receive about 50% of the benefit, whereas the European Union's benefits would be about 7%; only about 2% of the benefits would be felt in the USA. Benefits from an immediate reduction in CO 2 emissions peak around the year 2100. About 60% of the benefits from reducing greenhouse gas emissions are non-economic, with economic and large-scale discontinuities being about 20% each

  19. Assessing carbon dioxide removal through global and regional ocean alkalinization under high and low emission pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lenton

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 levels continue to rise, increasing the risk of severe impacts on the Earth system, and on the ecosystem services that it provides. Artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA is capable of reducing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and surface warming and addressing ocean acidification. Here, we simulate global and regional responses to alkalinity (ALK addition (0.25 PmolALK yr−1 over the period 2020–2100 using the CSIRO-Mk3L-COAL Earth System Model, under high (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5; RCP8.5 and low (RCP2.6 emissions. While regionally there are large changes in alkalinity associated with locations of AOA, globally we see only a very weak dependence on where and when AOA is applied. On a global scale, while we see that under RCP2.6 the carbon uptake associated with AOA is only ∼ 60 % of the total, under RCP8.5 the relative changes in temperature are larger, as are the changes in pH (140 % and aragonite saturation state (170 %. The simulations reveal AOA is more effective under lower emissions, therefore the higher the emissions the more AOA is required to achieve the same reduction in global warming and ocean acidification. Finally, our simulated AOA for 2020–2100 in the RCP2.6 scenario is capable of offsetting warming and ameliorating ocean acidification increases at the global scale, but with highly variable regional responses.

  20. Bleaching and mortality of a photosymbiotic bioeroding sponge under future carbon dioxide emission scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, James K H; Schönberg, Christine H L; Mello-Athayde, Matheus A; Achlatis, Michelle; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Dove, Sophie

    2018-03-24

    The bioeroding sponge Cliona orientalis is photosymbiotic with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and is pervasive on the Great Barrier Reef. We investigated how C. orientalis responded to past and future ocean conditions in a simulated community setting. The experiment lasted over an Austral summer under four carbon dioxide emission scenarios: a pre-industrial scenario (PI), a present-day scenario (PD; control), and two future scenarios of combined ocean acidification and ocean warming, i.e., B1 (intermediate) and A1FI (extreme). The four scenarios also simulated natural variability of carbon dioxide partial pressure and temperature in seawater. Responses of C. orientalis generally remained similar between the PI and PD treatments. C. orientalis under B1 displayed a dramatic increase in lateral tissue extension, but bleached and displayed reduced rates of respiration and photosynthesis. Some B1 sponge replicates died by the end of the experiment. Under A1FI, strong bleaching and subsequent mortality of all C. orientalis replicates occurred at an early stage of the experiment. Mortality arrested bioerosion by C. orientalis under B1 and A1FI. Overall, the absolute amount of calcium carbonate eroded by C. orientalis under B1 or A1FI was similar to that under PI or PD at the end of the experiment. Although bioerosion rates were raised by short-term experimental acidification in previous studies, our findings from the photosymbiotic C. orientalis imply that the effects of bioerosion on reef carbonate budgets may only be temporary if the bioeroders cannot survive long-term in the future oceans.

  1. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions based on a hybrid of mixed data sampling regression model and back propagation neural network in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Meng; Ding, Lili; Calin, Adrian Cantemir

    2018-01-01

    The accurate forecast of carbon dioxide emissions is critical for policy makers to take proper measures to establish a low carbon society. This paper discusses a hybrid of the mixed data sampling (MIDAS) regression model and BP (back propagation) neural network (MIDAS-BP model) to forecast carbon dioxide emissions. Such analysis uses mixed frequency data to study the effects of quarterly economic growth on annual carbon dioxide emissions. The forecasting ability of MIDAS-BP is remarkably better than MIDAS, ordinary least square (OLS), polynomial distributed lags (PDL), autoregressive distributed lags (ADL), and auto-regressive moving average (ARMA) models. The MIDAS-BP model is suitable for forecasting carbon dioxide emissions for both the short and longer term. This research is expected to influence the methodology for forecasting carbon dioxide emissions by improving the forecast accuracy. Empirical results show that economic growth has both negative and positive effects on carbon dioxide emissions that last 15 quarters. Carbon dioxide emissions are also affected by their own change within 3 years. Therefore, there is a need for policy makers to explore an alternative way to develop the economy, especially applying new energy policies to establish a low carbon society.

  2. Technology advance and the carbon dioxide emission in China – Empirical research based on the rebound effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lisha; Li, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    At present, technology advance is the greatest contributor to the carbon dioxide mitigation. However, the real effect of technology advance on mitigation is worth further studying due to the existence of rebound effect (RE). A key issue is how to quantify the relationship between technology advance and carbon dioxide emission accurately. This paper figures out a comprehensive and modified framework involving around the RE of carbon emission from the macroeconomic perspective. Using this framework, this paper quantitatively evaluates the relationship between technical change and carbon emission based on the data of 30 provinces in China. It is founded that: (1) the carbon RE is about 10–60% in Chinese provinces; (2) the RE of carbon emission differs among the regions in China; (3) carbon reduction and environment issues should be solved step by step regionally in China. (4) According to our results, a reasonable control on total energy consumption and fossil-energy pricing adjustment, should be taken as the supplementary policy in China; at the same time, carbon financing, carbon trading and other aspects of institutional innovation should be taken into account at the appropriate time. - Highlights: • Build a macroresearch framework for carbon emission rebound effect. • Further extend the definition of the technological progress. • The macrocarbon emission rebound effect is distributed between 10% and 60%. • Confirms the regional differences of the carbon emission rebound effect in China.

  3. Role of C3 plant species on carbon dioxide and methane emissions in Mediterranean constructed wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Maucieri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available C3 plant species are widely used to vegetate constructed wetlands (CW, but so far no information is available on their effect on CW CO2(eq balance in the Mediterranean climate. The aim of this research was to study carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 emissions and CO2(eq budgets of CW horizontal sub-surface flow pilot-plant beds vegetated with Arundo donax L. and Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin. ex Steud. compared with an unvegetated bed in Sicily. The highest total plant biomass production was measured in the bed vegetated with A. donax (17.0 kg m–2, whereas P. australis produced 7.6 kg m–2. CO2 and CH4 emissions and showed significant correlation with average air temperature and solar radiation for each bed. The CO2 emission values ranged from 0.8±0.1 g m–2 d–1, for the unvegetated bed in April, to 24.9±0.6 g m–2 d–1 for the bed with P. australis in August. The average CO2 emissions of the whole monitored period were 15.5±7.2, 15.1±7.1 and 3.6±2.4 g m–2 d–1 for A. donax, P. australis and unvegetated beds respectively. The CH4 fluxes differed significantly over the monitored seasons, with the highest median value being measured during spring (0.963 g m–2 d–1. No statistical differences were found for CH4 flux among the studied beds. Cumulative estimated CH4 emissions during the study period (from April to December were 159.5, 134.1 and 114.7 g m–2 for A. donax, P. australis and unvegetated beds respectively. CO2(eq balance showed that the two vegetated beds act as CO2(eq sinks, while the unvegetated bed, as expected, acts as a CO2(eq source. Considering only the above-ground plant biomass in the CO2(eq budgets, P. australis and A. donax determined uptakes of 1.30 and 8.35 kg CO2(eq m–2 respectively.

  4. Governance Mechanism for Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Stochastic Differential Game Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today developed and developing countries have to admit the fact that global warming is affecting the earth, but the fundamental problem of how to divide up necessary greenhouse gas reductions between developed and developing countries remains. In this paper, we propose cooperative and noncooperative stochastic differential game models to describe greenhouse gas emissions decision makings of developed and developing countries, calculate their feedback Nash equilibrium and the Pareto optimal solution, characterize parameter spaces that developed and developing countries can cooperate, design cooperative conditions under which participants buy the cooperative payoff, and distribute the cooperative payoff with Nash bargaining solution. Lastly, numerical simulations are employed to illustrate the above results.

  5. A mobile sensor network to map carbon dioxide emissions in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph K.; Christen, Andreas; Ketler, Rick; Nesic, Zoran

    2017-03-01

    A method for directly measuring carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions using a mobile sensor network in cities at fine spatial resolution was developed and tested. First, a compact, mobile system was built using an infrared gas analyzer combined with open-source hardware to control, georeference, and log measurements of CO2 mixing ratios on vehicles (car, bicycles). Second, two measurement campaigns, one in summer and one in winter (heating season) were carried out. Five mobile sensors were deployed within a 1 × 12. 7 km transect across the city of Vancouver, BC, Canada. The sensors were operated for 3.5 h on pre-defined routes to map CO2 mixing ratios at street level, which were then averaged to 100 × 100 m grid cells. The averaged CO2 mixing ratios of all grids in the study area were 417.9 ppm in summer and 442.5 ppm in winter. In both campaigns, mixing ratios were highest in the grid cells of the downtown core and along arterial roads and lowest in parks and well vegetated residential areas. Third, an aerodynamic resistance approach to calculating emissions was used to derive CO2 emissions from the gridded CO2 mixing ratio measurements in conjunction with mixing ratios and fluxes collected from a 28 m tall eddy-covariance tower located within the study area. These measured emissions showed a range of -12 to 226 CO2 ha-1 h-1 in summer and of -14 to 163 kg CO2 ha-1 h-1 in winter, with an average of 35.1 kg CO2 ha-1 h-1 (summer) and 25.9 kg CO2 ha-1 h-1 (winter). Fourth, an independent emissions inventory was developed for the study area using buildings energy simulations from a previous study and routinely available traffic counts. The emissions inventory for the same area averaged to 22.06 kg CO2 ha-1 h-1 (summer) and 28.76 kg CO2 ha-1 h-1 (winter) and was used to compare against the measured emissions from the mobile sensor network. The comparison on a grid-by-grid basis showed linearity between CO2 mixing ratios and the emissions inventory (R2 = 0. 53 in summer and R

  6. Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torvanger, A.

    1990-11-01

    In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs

  7. Soil carbon dioxide emissions from a rubber plantation on tropical peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhid, Nur; Hirano, Takashi; Okimoto, Yosuke; Nurzakiah, Siti; Nursyamsi, Dedi

    2017-03-01

    Land-use change in tropical peatland potentially results in a large amount of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions owing to drainage, which lowers groundwater level (GWL) and consequently enhances oxidative peat decomposition. However, field information on carbon balance is lacking for rubber plantations, which are expanding into Indonesia's peatlands. To assess soil CO 2 emissions from an eight-year-old rubber plantation established on peat after compaction, soil CO 2 efflux was measured monthly using a closed chamber system from December 2014 to December 2015, in which a strong El Niño event occurred, and consequently GWL lowered deeply. Total soil respiration (SR) and oxidative peat decomposition (PD) were separately quantified by trenching. In addition, peat surface elevation was measured to determine annual subsidence along with GWL. With GWL, SR showed a negative logarithmic relationship (p0.05). Peat surface elevation varied seasonally in almost parallel with GWL. After correcting for GWL difference, annual total subsidence was determined at 5.64±3.20 and 5.96±0.43cmyr -1 outside and inside the trenching, respectively. Annual subsidence only through peat oxidation that was calculated from the annual PD, peat bulk density and peat carbon content was 1.50cmyr -1 . As a result, oxidative peat decomposition accounted for 25% of total subsidence (5.96cmyr -1 ) on average on an annual basis. The contribution of peat oxidation was lower than those of previous studies probably because of compaction through land preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ozone effects on Sphagnum mosses, carbon dioxide exchange and methane emission in boreal peatland microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, Riikka; Holopainen, Toini; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Silvola, Jouko

    2002-01-01

    Microcosms of a boreal peatland originating from an oligotrophic fen in Eastern Finland were fumigated under four ozone concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 ppb O 3 ) in laboratory growth chambers during two separate experiments (autumn and summer) for 4 and 6 weeks, respectively. Ozone effects on Sphagnum mosses and the fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane were evaluated. In both experiments, the three Sphagnum species studied showed only a few significant responses to ozone. In the autumn experiment, membrane permeability of S. angustifolium, measured as conductivity and magnesium leakage, was significantly higher under ozone fumigation (P=0.005 and 2 exchange during the 6-week-long summer experiment, but dark ecosystem respiration was transiently increased by ozone concentration of 100 ppb after 14 days of exposure (P<0.05). Fumigation with 100 ppb of ozone, however, more than doubled (P<0.05) methane emission from the peatland monoliths. Our results suggest that increasing tropospheric ozone concentration may cause substantial changes in the carbon gas cycling of boreal peatlands, even though these changes are not closely associated with the changes in Sphagnum vegetation

  9. Impact of future nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions on the stratospheric ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Oman, Luke D.; Waugh, Darryn W.

    2015-03-01

    The atmospheric levels of human-produced chlorocarbons and bromocarbons are projected to make only small contributions to ozone depletion by 2100. Increases in carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) will become increasingly important in determining the future of the ozone layer. N2O increases lead to increased production of nitrogen oxides (NOx), contributing to ozone depletion. CO2 increases cool the stratosphere and affect ozone levels in several ways. Cooling decreases the rate of many photochemical reactions, thus slowing ozone loss rates. Cooling also increases the chemical destruction of nitrogen oxides, thereby moderating the effect of increased N2O on ozone depletion. The stratospheric ozone level projected for the end of this century therefore depends on future emissions of both CO2 and N2O. We use a two-dimensional chemical transport model to explore a wide range of values for the boundary conditions for CO2 and N2O, and find that all of the current scenarios for growth of greenhouse gases project the global average ozone to be larger in 2100 than in 1960.

  10. Particulate and carbon dioxide emissions from diesel fires : the mobile 1997 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Lambert, P.; Ackerman, F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Nelson, R.; Goldthorp, M.; Punt, M.; Whiticar, S. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Campagna, P.; Mickunas, D.; Turpin, R.; Nadeau, R. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States); Schuetz, S.; Morganti, M.; Roy, F. [Weston REAC, Edison, NJ (United States); Hiltabrand, R.A. [U.S. Coast Guard. Research Centre, Groton, CT (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Various aspects of in-situ burning of diesel oil were studied in a series of 12 mesoscale burns. One of the objectives of the study was to assess five fire-resistant booms and to determine the level of emissions from in-situ burning which has become a common practice for cleanup in oil spills on water. Real-time air monitoring was conducted with MIE RAM and DataRAM Portable real-time aerosol monitors which were set up around the burn to sample and analyse for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Particulates were found to be at greater than recommended exposure levels but only up to 50 metres downwind at ground level. The downwind distribution of soot could be characterized by simple mathematical functions. Comparisons were also made between real-time monitors and approved fixed devices. Combustion gases, such as carbon dioxide, did not reach exposure level maximums. These gases were emitted over a wide area around the fire and were not directly associated with the plume trajectory. It was suggested that in-situ burning is an acceptable tradeoff when weighed against the environmental risks and cleanup costs of shoreline contamination. 5 refs., 19 tabs., 5 figs.

  11. Evolutionary Game Analysis of Government Regulation and Enterprise Emission from the Perspective of Environmental Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Yazong

    2017-12-01

    In the context of the upcoming implementation of the environmental tax policy, there is a need for a focus on the relationship between government regulation and corporate emissions. To achieve the real effect of environmental tax policy, government need to regulate the illegal emissions of enterprises. Based on the hypothesis of bounded rationality, this paper analyses the strategic set of government regulators and polluting enterprises in the implementation of environmental tax policy. By using the evolutionary game model, the utility function and payoff matrix of the both sides are constructed, and the evolutionary analysis and strategy adjustment of the environmental governance target and the actual profit of the stakeholders are carried out. Thus, the wrong behaviours could be corrected so that the equilibrium of the evolutionary system can be achieved gradually, which could also get the evolutionary stable strategies of the government and the polluting enterprises in the implementation of environmental tax policy.

  12. Economic and game-theoretical analysis of CO{sub 2} emission abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahvonen, O. [Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Current decisions on greenhouse gas emissions may have effects on human well being for centuries. This project has aimed to extend the economic models designed for analyzing this particular issue. A closely related topic follows from the fact that emitting CO{sub 2} can be interpreted as a utilization of a free access resource, i.e., when countries gain from utilizing cheap fossil fuels (relative to noncarbon energy sources), the possible loss any country suffers from climate change is only a negligible fraction of the total loss of all countries. Thus, from a global point of view, the incentives for an individual country to abate emissions is low. Economic understanding of these problems calls for dynamic game-theoretical models

  13. Evaluation of Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Devices in Energy Cascade Systems under the Restriction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Yoichi; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    It is necessary to introduce energy cascade systems into the industrial sector in Japan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the refrigerating and air conditioning devices in cases of introducing both energy cascade systems and thermal recycling systems in industries located around urban areas. The authors have developed an energy cascade model based on linear programming so as to minimize the total system costs with carbon taxes. Five cases are investigated. Limitation of carbon dioxide emissions results in the enhancement of heat cascading, where high temperature heat is supplied for process heating while low temperature one is shifted to refrigeration. It was found that increasing the amount of garbage combustor waste heat can reduce electric power for the turbo refrigerator by promoting waste heat driven ammonia absorption refrigerator.

  14. Gaming

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Als Richard Duke sein Buch ""Gaming: The Future's Language"" 1974 veröffentlichte, war er ein Pionier für die Entwicklung und Anwendung von Planspielen in Politik, Strategieentwicklung und Management. Das Buch wurde zu einem viel zitierten Standardwerk. 2014 feiert die von Richard D. Duke gegründete International Simulation and Gaming Association (ISAGA) ihr 45-jähriges Bestehen. Gleichzeitig legt Richard D. Duke eine überarbeitete Auflage seines Klassikers vor.   Inhaltsverzeichnis TABLE OF CONTENTSAcknowledgments Preface SECTION I1. The ProblemSECTION II2. Modes of Human Communication3. Mode

  15. Carbon dioxide emissions from forestry and peat land using land-use/land-cover changes in North Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Sulistyono, N.; Slamet, B.; Wati, R.

    2018-03-01

    Forestry and peat land including land-based is one of the critical sectors in the inventory of CO2 emissions and mitigation efforts of climate change. The present study analyzed the land-use and land-cover changes between 2006 and 2012 in North Sumatra, Indonesia with emphasis to CO2 emissions. The land-use/land-cover consists of twenty-one classes. Redd Abacus software version 1.1.7 was used to measure carbon emission source as well as the predicted 2carbon dioxide emissions from 2006-2024. Results showed that historical emission (2006-2012) in this province, significant increases in the intensive land use namely dry land agriculture (109.65%), paddy field (16.23%) and estate plantation (15.11%). On the other hand, land-cover for forest decreased significantly: secondary dry land forest (7.60%), secondary mangrove forest (9.03%), secondary swamp forest (33.98%), and the largest one in the mixed dry land agriculture (79.96%). The results indicated that North Sumatra province is still a CO2 emitter, and the most important driver of emissions mostly derived from agricultural lands that contributed 2carbon dioxide emissions by 48.8%, changing from forest areas into degraded lands (classified as barren land and shrub) shared 30.6% and estate plantation of 22.4%. Mitigation actions to reduce carbon emissions was proposed such as strengthening the forest land, rehabilitation of degraded area, development and plantation forest, forest protection and forest fire control, and reforestation and conservation activity. These mitigation actions have been simulated to reduce 15% for forestry and 18% for peat land, respectively. This data is likely to contribute to the low emission development in North Sumatra.

  16. Analysis of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in ceramic tile manufacture; Analisis de consumos energeticos y emisiones de dioxido de carbono en la fabricacion de baldosas ceramicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monfort, E.; Mezquita, A.; Granel, R.; Vaquer, E.; Escrig, A.; Miralles, A.; Zaera, V.

    2010-07-01

    The ceramic tile manufacturing process is energy intensive since it contains several stages in which the product is subject to thermal treatment. The thermal energy used in the process is usually obtained by combustion of natural gas, which is a fossil fuel whose oxidation produces emissions of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. Energy costs account for 15% of the average direct manufacturing costs, and are strongly influenced by the price of natural gas, which has increased significantly in the last few years. Carbon dioxide emissions are internationally monitored and controlled in the frame of the Kyoto Protocol. Applicable Spanish law is based on the European Directive on emissions trading, and the assignment of emissions rights is based on historical values in the sectors involved. Legislation is scheduled to change in 2013, and the resulting changes will directly affect the Spanish ceramic tile manufacturing industry, since many facilities will become part of the emissions trading system. The purpose of this study is to determine current thermal energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in the ceramic tile manufacturing process. A comprehensive sectoral study has been carried out for this purpose on several levels: the first analyses energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in the entire industry; the second determines energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in industrial facilities over a long period of time (several months); while the third level breaks down these values, determining energy consumption and emissions in terms of the product made and the manufacturing stage. (Author) 8 refs.

  17. Process systems engineering issues and applications towards reducing carbon dioxide emissions through conversion technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roh, Kosan; Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews issues and applications for design of sustainable carbon dioxide conversion processes, specifically through chemical conversion, and the integration of the conversion processes with other systems from a process systems engineering (PSE) view-point. Systematic and computer...... conversion processes with other systems including coexisting infrastructure and carbon dioxide sources is described.Then, the importance of PSE based studies for such application is discussed. Finally, some perspectives on the status and future directions of carbon dioxide conversion technology...

  18. Global Warming: Predicting OPEC Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Petroleum Consumption Using Neural Network and Hybrid Cuckoo Search Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiroma, Haruna; Abdul-kareem, Sameem; Khan, Abdullah; Nawi, Nazri Mohd; Gital, Abdulsalam Ya'u; Shuib, Liyana; Abubakar, Adamu I; Rahman, Muhammad Zubair; Herawan, Tutut

    2015-01-01

    Global warming is attracting attention from policy makers due to its impacts such as floods, extreme weather, increases in temperature by 0.7°C, heat waves, storms, etc. These disasters result in loss of human life and billions of dollars in property. Global warming is believed to be caused by the emissions of greenhouse gases due to human activities including the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from petroleum consumption. Limitations of the previous methods of predicting CO2 emissions and lack of work on the prediction of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) CO2 emissions from petroleum consumption have motivated this research. The OPEC CO2 emissions data were collected from the Energy Information Administration. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) adaptability and performance motivated its choice for this study. To improve effectiveness of the ANN, the cuckoo search algorithm was hybridised with accelerated particle swarm optimisation for training the ANN to build a model for the prediction of OPEC CO2 emissions. The proposed model predicts OPEC CO2 emissions for 3, 6, 9, 12 and 16 years with an improved accuracy and speed over the state-of-the-art methods. An accurate prediction of OPEC CO2 emissions can serve as a reference point for propagating the reorganisation of economic development in OPEC member countries with the view of reducing CO2 emissions to Kyoto benchmarks--hence, reducing global warming. The policy implications are discussed in the paper.

  19. Global Warming: Predicting OPEC Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Petroleum Consumption Using Neural Network and Hybrid Cuckoo Search Algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruna Chiroma

    Full Text Available Global warming is attracting attention from policy makers due to its impacts such as floods, extreme weather, increases in temperature by 0.7°C, heat waves, storms, etc. These disasters result in loss of human life and billions of dollars in property. Global warming is believed to be caused by the emissions of greenhouse gases due to human activities including the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 from petroleum consumption. Limitations of the previous methods of predicting CO2 emissions and lack of work on the prediction of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC CO2 emissions from petroleum consumption have motivated this research.The OPEC CO2 emissions data were collected from the Energy Information Administration. Artificial Neural Network (ANN adaptability and performance motivated its choice for this study. To improve effectiveness of the ANN, the cuckoo search algorithm was hybridised with accelerated particle swarm optimisation for training the ANN to build a model for the prediction of OPEC CO2 emissions. The proposed model predicts OPEC CO2 emissions for 3, 6, 9, 12 and 16 years with an improved accuracy and speed over the state-of-the-art methods.An accurate prediction of OPEC CO2 emissions can serve as a reference point for propagating the reorganisation of economic development in OPEC member countries with the view of reducing CO2 emissions to Kyoto benchmarks--hence, reducing global warming. The policy implications are discussed in the paper.

  20. Global Warming: Predicting OPEC Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Petroleum Consumption Using Neural Network and Hybrid Cuckoo Search Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiroma, Haruna; Abdul-kareem, Sameem; Khan, Abdullah; Nawi, Nazri Mohd.; Gital, Abdulsalam Ya’u; Shuib, Liyana; Abubakar, Adamu I.; Rahman, Muhammad Zubair; Herawan, Tutut

    2015-01-01

    Background Global warming is attracting attention from policy makers due to its impacts such as floods, extreme weather, increases in temperature by 0.7°C, heat waves, storms, etc. These disasters result in loss of human life and billions of dollars in property. Global warming is believed to be caused by the emissions of greenhouse gases due to human activities including the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from petroleum consumption. Limitations of the previous methods of predicting CO2 emissions and lack of work on the prediction of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) CO2 emissions from petroleum consumption have motivated this research. Methods/Findings The OPEC CO2 emissions data were collected from the Energy Information Administration. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) adaptability and performance motivated its choice for this study. To improve effectiveness of the ANN, the cuckoo search algorithm was hybridised with accelerated particle swarm optimisation for training the ANN to build a model for the prediction of OPEC CO2 emissions. The proposed model predicts OPEC CO2 emissions for 3, 6, 9, 12 and 16 years with an improved accuracy and speed over the state-of-the-art methods. Conclusion An accurate prediction of OPEC CO2 emissions can serve as a reference point for propagating the reorganisation of economic development in OPEC member countries with the view of reducing CO2 emissions to Kyoto benchmarks—hence, reducing global warming. The policy implications are discussed in the paper. PMID:26305483

  1. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  2. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  3. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment

  4. Partitioning Carbon Dioxide Emission and Assessing Dissolved Organic Carbon Leaching of a Drained Peatland Cultivated with Pineapple at Saratok, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Nuriati Lim Kim Choo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pineapples (Ananas comosus (L. Merr. cultivation on drained peats could affect the release of carbon dioxide (CO2 into the atmosphere and also the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. Carbon dioxide emission needs to be partitioned before deciding on whether cultivated peat is net sink or net source of carbon. Partitioning of CO2 emission into root respiration, microbial respiration, and oxidative peat decomposition was achieved using a lysimeter experiment with three treatments: peat soil cultivated with pineapple, bare peat soil, and bare peat soil fumigated with chloroform. Drainage water leached from cultivated peat and bare peat soil was also analyzed for DOC. On a yearly basis, CO2 emissions were higher under bare peat (218.8 t CO2 ha/yr than under bare peat treated with chloroform (205 t CO2 ha/yr, and they were the lowest (179.6 t CO2 ha/yr under cultivated peat. Decreasing CO2 emissions under pineapple were attributed to the positive effects of photosynthesis and soil autotrophic activities. An average 235.7 mg/L loss of DOC under bare peat suggests rapid decline of peat organic carbon through heterotrophic respiration and peat decomposition. Soil CO2 emission depended on moderate temperature fluctuations, but it was not affected by soil moisture.

  5. Partitioning carbon dioxide emission and assessing dissolved organic carbon leaching of a drained peatland cultivated with pineapple at Saratok, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim Kim Choo, Liza Nuriati; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna

    2014-01-01

    Pineapples (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) cultivation on drained peats could affect the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere and also the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Carbon dioxide emission needs to be partitioned before deciding on whether cultivated peat is net sink or net source of carbon. Partitioning of CO2 emission into root respiration, microbial respiration, and oxidative peat decomposition was achieved using a lysimeter experiment with three treatments: peat soil cultivated with pineapple, bare peat soil, and bare peat soil fumigated with chloroform. Drainage water leached from cultivated peat and bare peat soil was also analyzed for DOC. On a yearly basis, CO2 emissions were higher under bare peat (218.8 t CO2 ha/yr) than under bare peat treated with chloroform (205 t CO2 ha/yr), and they were the lowest (179.6 t CO2 ha/yr) under cultivated peat. Decreasing CO2 emissions under pineapple were attributed to the positive effects of photosynthesis and soil autotrophic activities. An average 235.7 mg/L loss of DOC under bare peat suggests rapid decline of peat organic carbon through heterotrophic respiration and peat decomposition. Soil CO2 emission depended on moderate temperature fluctuations, but it was not affected by soil moisture.

  6. Multiple calibration decomposition analysis: Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the Japanese economy, 1970-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okushima, Shinichiro; Tamura, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a new approach to evaluating structural change of the economy in a multisector general equilibrium framework. The multiple calibration technique is applied to an ex post decomposition analysis of structural change between periods, enabling the distinction between price substitution and technological change to be made for each sector. This approach has the advantage of sounder microtheoretical underpinnings when compared with conventional decomposition methods. The proposed technique is empirically applied to changes in energy use and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in the Japanese economy from 1970 to 1995. The results show that technological change is of great importance for curtailing energy use and CO 2 emissions in Japan. Total CO 2 emissions increased during this period primarily because of economic growth, which is represented by final demand effects. On the other hand, the effects such as technological change for labor or energy mitigated the increase in CO 2 emissions

  7. Is Fuel-Switching a No-Regrets Environmental Policy? VAR Evidence on Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Energy Consumption and Economic Performance in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Alfredo Marvão; Pereira, Rui Manuel Marvão

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate the impact of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion activities on economic activity in Portugal in order to evaluate the economic costs of policies designed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. We find that energy consumption has a significant impact on macroeconomic activity. In fact, a one ton of oil equivalent permanent reduction in aggregate energy consumption reduces output by €6,340 over the long term, an aggregate impact which hi...

  8. Using OCO-2 Observations and Lagrangian Modeling to Constrain Urban Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. G.; Kort, E. A.; Ware, J.; Ye, X.; Lauvaux, T.; Wu, D.; Lin, J. C.; Oda, T.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are greatly perturbing the Earth's carbon cycle. Rising emissions from the developing world are increasing uncertainties in global CO2 emissions. With the rapid urbanization of developing regions, methods of constraining urban CO2 emissions in these areas can address critical uncertainties in the global carbon budget. In this study, we work toward constraining urban CO2 emissions in the Middle East by comparing top-down observations and bottom-up simulations of total column CO2 (XCO2) in four cities (Riyadh, Cairo, Baghdad, and Doha), both separately and in aggregate. This comparison involves quantifying the relationship for all available data in the period of September 2014 until March 2016 between observations of XCO2 from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite and simulations of XCO2 using the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model coupled with Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) reanalysis products and multiple CO2 emissions inventories. We discuss the extent to which our observation/model framework can distinguish between the different emissions representations and determine optimized emissions estimates for this domain. We also highlight the implications of our comparisons on the fidelity of the bottom-up inventories used, and how these implications may inform the use of OCO-2 data for urban regions around the world.

  9. Altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism in internet game overusers: a 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Hee; Bang, Seong Ae; Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2010-03-01

    Internet game overuse is an emerging disorder and features diminished impulse control and poor reward-processing. In an attempt to understand the neurobiological bases of Internet game overuse, we investigated the differences in regional cerebral glucose metabolism at resting state between young individuals with Internet game overuse and those with normal use using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study. Twenty right-handed male participants (9 normal users: 24.7+/-2.4 years of age, 11 overusers: 23.5+/-2.9 years of age) participated. A trait measure of impulsivity was also completed after scanning. Internet game overusers showed greater impulsiveness than the normal users and there was a positive correlation between the severity of Internet game overuse and impulsiveness. Imaging data showed that the overusers had increased glucose metabolism in the right middle orbitofrontal gyrus, left caudate nucleus, and right insula, and decreased metabolism in the bilateral postcentral gyrus, left precentral gyrus, and bilateral occipital regions compared to normal users. Internet game overuse may be associated with abnormal neurobiological mechanisms in the orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, and sensory regions, which are implicated in impulse control, reward processing, and somatic representation of previous experiences. Our results support the idea that Internet game overuse shares psychological and neural mechanisms with other types of impulse control disorders and substance/non-substance-related addiction.

  10. Does Historical Urban Density Explain the Variation in Per Capita Carbon Dioxide Emissions Across U.S. Cities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    The shape a city takes can have long-term impacts. The built environment is durable, and urban infrastructure is costly to alter post-construction, so decisions made early in a city's history have a lasting effect. Cities are some of the biggest aggregate sources of CO2 emissions but are also the areas with the lowest per capita emissions. Even though per capita emissions in urban areas are less than their rural counterparts, the variation in emissions across cities is drastic and understanding this variation can improve the way we build and plan cities. Research has been conducted on how density correlates with per capita emissions, but little has been done on how historical growth has influenced emissions. Using historical census data and the Vulcan Project's fossil fuel CO2 emissions data product, I investigate in greater detail whether historical population density in U.S. cities has had a significant impact on future CO2 emissions in the urban area and in the surrounding region. The census data includes all places that have reported a population of over 100,000 people in any decennial census between 1790 and 2000 and the land area the year that the city first crosses that 100,000-population threshold. This data is used to create the historical density measure. The Vulcan CO2 emissions data is broken down by sector. For this project I use the residential, commercial, and transportation (on road and non-road) emissions sectors on a 10x10km grid in 2002. I also control for regional variation in heating and cooling days, current urban density, average house age, median income, and variation in residential heating (gas, electric, fuel oil, and coal) as these are all known correlates of carbon dioxide emissions. Understanding if historical density better explains the variation in per capita carbon dioxide emissions across cities will help urban planners and city governments decide if it is appropriate to regulate growth during the initial boom of a city, a

  11. Application of the Denitrification-Decomposition Model to Predict Carbon Dioxide Emissions under Alternative Straw Retention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Straw retention has been shown to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2 emission from agricultural soils. But it remains a big challenge for models to effectively predict CO2 emission fluxes under different straw retention methods. We used maize season data in the Griffith region, Australia, to test whether the denitrification-decomposition (DNDC model could simulate annual CO2 emission. We also identified driving factors of CO2 emission by correlation analysis and path analysis. We show that the DNDC model was able to simulate CO2 emission under alternative straw retention scenarios. The correlation coefficients between simulated and observed daily values for treatments of straw burn and straw incorporation were 0.74 and 0.82, respectively, in the straw retention period and 0.72 and 0.83, respectively, in the crop growth period. The results also show that simulated values of annual CO2 emission for straw burn and straw incorporation were 3.45 t C ha−1 y−1 and 2.13 t C ha−1 y−1, respectively. In addition the DNDC model was found to be more suitable in simulating CO2 mission fluxes under straw incorporation. Finally the standard multiple regression describing the relationship between CO2 emissions and factors found that soil mean temperature (SMT, daily mean temperature (Tmean, and water-filled pore space (WFPS were significant.

  12. Game Analysis and Simulation of the River Basin Sustainable Development Strategy Integrating Water Emission Trading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water emission trading (WET is promising in sustainable development strategy. However, low participation impedes its development. We develop an evolutionary game model of two enterprise populations’ dynamics and stability in the decision-making behavior process. Due to the different perceived value of certain permits, enterprises choose H strategy (bidding for permit or D strategy (not bidding. External factors are simplified according to three categories: rH-bidding related cost, G-price and F-penalty. Participation increase equals reaching point (H,H in the model and is treated as an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS. We build a system dynamics model on AnyLogic 7.1.1 to simulate the aforementioned game and draw four conclusions: (1 to reach ESS more quickly, we need to minimize the bidding related cost rH and price G, but regulate the heavy penalty F; (2 an ESS can be significantly transformed, such as from (D,D to (H,H by regulating rH, G and F accordingly; (3 the initial choice of strategy is essential to the final result; (4 if participation seems stable but unsatisfying, it is important to check whether it is a saddle point and adjust external factors accordingly. The findings benefit both water management practice and further research.

  13. Household consumption, associated fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Greece between 1990 and 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papathanasopoulou, Eleni

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores how Greece's household consumption has changed between 1990 and 2006 and its environmental implications in terms of fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. The results show that the 44% increase in Greece's household expenditure between 1990 and 2006 was accompanied by a 67% increase in fossil fuel demand. Of this total, indirect demand accounted for approximately 60% throughout the 16-year period, increasing by 56% overall, whereas direct fossil fuel demand grew by 80%. The results also show that associated CO 2 emissions increased by 60%, resulting in a 'relative decoupling' from energy demand. This relative decoupling is shown to be due to fossil fuel mix changes from the supply side rather than action from consumers. These insights highlight the opportunities for demand-side policies to further reduce fossil fuel demand and CO 2 emissions, allowing Greece to set more proactive and ambitious post-Kyoto targets.

  14. Sourcing methane and carbon dioxide emissions from a small city: Influence of natural gas leakage and combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Samuel D; Ingraffea, Anthony R; Sparks, Jed P

    2016-11-01

    Natural gas leakage and combustion are major sources of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), respectively; however, our understanding of emissions from cities is limited. We mapped distribution pipeline leakage using a mobile CH 4 detection system, and continuously monitored atmospheric CO 2 and CH 4 concentrations and carbon isotopes (δ 13 C-CO 2 and δ 13 C-CH 4 ) for one-year above Ithaca, New York. Pipeline leakage rates were low (emission source in that wind sector. Our results demonstrate pipeline leakage rates are low in cities with a low extent of leak prone pipe, and natural gas power facilities may be an important source of urban and suburban emissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Time scales and ratios of climate forcing due to thermal versus carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Caldeira, Ken

    2015-06-01

    The Earth warms both when fossil fuel carbon is oxidized to carbon dioxide and when greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide inhibits longwave radiation from escaping to space. Various important time scales and ratios comparing these two climate forcings have not previously been quantified. For example, the global and time-integrated radiative forcing from burning a fossil fuel exceeds the heat released upon combustion within 2 months. Over the long lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere, the cumulative CO2-radiative forcing exceeds the amount of energy released upon combustion by a factor >100,000. For a new power plant, the radiative forcing from the accumulation of released CO2 exceeds the direct thermal emissions in less than half a year. Furthermore, we show that the energy released from the combustion of fossil fuels is now about 1.71% of the radiative forcing from CO2 that has accumulated in the atmosphere as a consequence of historical fossil fuel combustion.

  16. LBA-ECO LC-07 Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Balbina Reservoir, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides flux measurements of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from surface waters to the atmosphere. It also provides CH4, CO2, and oxygen (O2)...

  17. LBA-ECO LC-07 Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Balbina Reservoir, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides flux measurements of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from surface waters to the atmosphere. It also provides CH4, CO2, and...

  18. Estimating the opportunity costs of reducing carbon dioxide emissions via avoided deforestation, using integrated assessment modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmars, K.P.; Stehfest, E.; Tabeau, A.A.; Meijl, van J.C.M.; Beltran, A.M.; Kram, T.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates show that, in recent years, deforestation and forest degradation accounted for about 17% of global greenhouse gas emissions. The implementation of REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries) is suggested to provide substantial emission

  19. The POETICs of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japan: an urban and institutional extension of the IPAT identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Stephan

    2006-09-27

    This study applies the POETICs framework (population, organization, environment, technology, institutions and culture) to an analysis of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japanese cities. The inclusion of institutional variables in the form of International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives membership, ISO 14001 implementation, and non-profit sector activity addresses the ecological limitations of the often used IPAT (impact = population x affluence x technology) approach. Results suggest the weak existence of an environmental Kuznets curve, in which the wealthiest cities are reducing their emissions through increased efficiency. Significant institutional impacts are also found to hold in the predicted directions. Specifically, panel and cross-sectional regressions indicate that membership in the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives and non-profit organizational presence have negative effects on industrial carbon dioxide emissions. The presence of institutional drivers at the city level provides empirical support for the POETICs rubric, which recasts the ecological framing of the IPAT identity in a more sociological mold. The results also indicate that Japanese civil society has a role to play in carbon mitigation. More refined studies need to take into consideration an expanded set of methods, drivers, and carbon budgets, as applied to a broader range of cases outside of Japan, to more accurately assess how civil society can bridge the issue of scale that separates local level policy concerns from global level climate dynamics.

  20. The POETICs of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japan: an urban and institutional extension of the IPAT identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Stephan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study applies the POETICs framework (population, organization, environment, technology, institutions and culture to an analysis of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japanese cities. The inclusion of institutional variables in the form of International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives membership, ISO 14001 implementation, and non-profit sector activity addresses the ecological limitations of the often used IPAT (impact = population × affluence × technology approach. Results Results suggest the weak existence of an environmental Kuznets curve, in which the wealthiest cities are reducing their emissions through increased efficiency. Significant institutional impacts are also found to hold in the predicted directions. Specifically, panel and cross-sectional regressions indicate that membership in the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives and non-profit organizational presence have negative effects on industrial carbon dioxide emissions. Conclusion The presence of institutional drivers at the city level provides empirical support for the POETICs rubric, which recasts the ecological framing of the IPAT identity in a more sociological mold. The results also indicate that Japanese civil society has a role to play in carbon mitigation. More refined studies need to take into consideration an expanded set of methods, drivers, and carbon budgets, as applied to a broader range of cases outside of Japan, to more accurately assess how civil society can bridge the issue of scale that separates local level policy concerns from global level climate dynamics.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Emissions as an Indicator of Reduction of Negative Externalities Related to Road Motor Vehicle Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Břetislav Andrlík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with issues of carbon dioxide emissions generated by road motor vehicles in the Czech Republic and the European Union. We discuss the current need for the introduction of environmental features to the system of taxation of motor vehicles, aiming at the mitigation of harmful substances emitted into the atmosphere. The most harmful substance produced during the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels by motor vehicles is CO2, whose emissions are subsequently used as an instrument for green tax reforms in the European Union member states. In this article we define the main EU legal standards regulating harmful substances emitted into the atmosphere as a result of road motor transport. We may cite for instance the Regulation (EC No. 443/2009 setting CO2 emission performance standards for new passenger cars. The aim of the European Union is to reduce average emission values of new passenger cars sold in the EU to 130 g CO2/km by 2015 and to 95 g CO2/km by 2020. Assessment of tax on motor vehicles according to CO2 emissions shall help fulfil commitments from the Kyoto Protocol, aiming at the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

  2. Decomposition and decoupling effects of carbon dioxide emission from highway transportation in Taiwan, Germany, Japan and South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, I.J.; Lin, Sue J.; Lewis, Charles

    2007-01-01

    We adopted the Divisia index approach to explore the impacts of five factors on the total carbon dioxide emissions from highway vehicles in Germany, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan during 1990-2002. CO 2 emission was decomposed into emission coefficient, vehicle fuel intensity, vehicle ownership, population intensity and economic growth. In addition, the decoupling effects among economic growth, transport energy demand and CO 2 emission were analyzed to better understand the fuel performance and CO 2 mitigation strategies for each country. From our results, we suggest that the rapid growths of economy and vehicle ownership were the most important factors for the increased CO 2 emissions , whereas population intensity contributed significantly to emission decrease. Energy conservation performance and CO 2 mitigation in each country are strongly correlated with environmental pressure and economic driving force, except for Germany in 1993 and Taiwan during 1992-1996. To decouple the economic growth and environmental pressure, proponents of sustainable transport policy in Taiwan should focus on improving the operation and energy use of its highway transportation system by implementing an intelligent transportation system (ITS) with demand management, constructing an integrated feeder system, and encouraging the use of green transport modes

  3. Comparison of carbon dioxide emissions with fluid upflow, chemistry, and geologic structures at the Rotorua geothermal system, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Cynthia; Cardellini, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    During 2002 and 2003, carbon dioxide fluxes were measured across the Rotorua geothermal system in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand. The results of a 956-measurement survey and of modeling studies show that CO 2 fluxes could be used to determine the main hot fluid upflow areas in Rotorua, and perhaps in undeveloped geothermal regions. Elevated degassing was observed along inferred fault traces and structures, lending confidence to their existence at depth. Degassing was also observed along lineaments that were consistent with the alignment of basement faulting in the TVZ. Areas where elevated degassing was spatially extensive typically overlapped with known regions of hot ground; however, elevated CO 2 fluxes were also observed in isolated patches of non-thermal ground. The total emission rate calculated from sequential Gaussian simulation modeling of CO 2 fluxes across the geothermal system was 620td -1 from an 8.9-km 2 area. However, because approximately one-third of the geothermal system is known to extend beneath Lake Rotorua, we expect the emissions could be minimally on the order of 1000td -1 . Comparing the emission rate with geochemical analyses of geothermal fluids and estimated upflows suggests that the majority of deep carbon reaches the surface in the form of carbon dioxide gas, and that less than one tenth of the CO 2 emissions is dissolved in, or released from, the fluids at depth. Thus, the geothermal reservoir exerts very little control on deep degassing of CO 2 . Carbon isotopic analyses of soil gases suggest a primarily magmatic source for the origin of the CO 2 . The total Rotorua emission rate is comparable to those from active volcanoes such as at White Island, New Zealand, and, when normalized by geothermal area, is comparable to other volcanic and hydrothermal regions worldwide. (author)

  4. Multi-objective dynamic economic emission dispatch of electric power generation integrated with game theory based demand response programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwulu, Nnamdi I.; Xia, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In this work, a game theory based DR program is integrated into the DEED problem. • Objectives are to minimize fuel and emissions costs and maximize the DR benefit. • Optimal generator output, customer load and customer incentive are determined. • Developed model is tested with two different scenarios. • Model provides superior results than independent optimization of DR or DEED. - Abstract: The dynamic economic emission dispatch (DEED) of electric power generation is a multi-objective mathematical optimization problem with two objective functions. The first objective is to minimize all the fuel costs of the generators in the power system, whilst the second objective seeks to minimize the emissions cost. Both objective functions are subject to constraints such as load demand constraint, ramp rate constraint, amongst other constraints. In this work, we integrate a game theory based demand response program into the DEED problem. The game theory based demand response program determines the optimal hourly incentive to be offered to customers who sign up for load curtailment. The game theory model has in built mechanisms to ensure that the incentive offered the customers is greater than the cost of interruption while simultaneously being beneficial to the utility. The combined DEED and game theoretic demand response model presented in this work, minimizes fuel and emissions costs and simultaneously determines the optimal incentive and load curtailment customers have to perform for maximal power system relief. The developed model is tested on two test systems with industrial customers and obtained results indicate the practical benefits of the proposed model

  5. Analysis on carbon dioxide emission reduction during the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology of sludge and kitchen waste: Taking kitchen waste synergetic digestion project in Zhenjiang as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qia; Dai, Xiaohu

    2017-11-01

    With the popularization of municipal sewage treatment facilities, the improvement of sewage treatment efficiency and the deepening degree of sewage treatment, the sludge production of sewage plant has been sharply increased. Carbon emission during the process of municipal sewage treatment and disposal has become one of the important sources of greenhouse gases that cause greenhouse effect. How to reduce carbon dioxide emissions during sewage treatment and disposal process is of great significance for reducing air pollution. Kitchen waste and excess sludge, as two important organic wastes, once uses anaerobic synergetic digestion technology in the treatment process can on the one hand, avoid instability of sludge individual anaerobic digestion, improve sludge degradation rate and marsh gas production rate, and on the other hand, help increase the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to a great extent. The paper uses material balance method, analyzes and calculates the carbon dioxide emissions from kitchen waste and sludge disposed by the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology, compares the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology with traditional sludge sanitary landfill technology and works out the carbon dioxide emission reductions after synergetic digestion. It takes the kitchen waste and sludge synergetic digestion engineering project of Zhenjiang city in Jiangsu province as an example, makes material balance analysis using concrete data and works out the carbon dioxide daily emission reductions. The paper analyzes the actual situation of emission reduction by comparing the data, and found that the synergetic digestion of kitchen waste and sludge can effectively reduce the carbon dioxide emission, and the reduction is obvious especially compared with that of sludge sanitary landfill, which has a certain effect on whether to promote the use of the technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A New Method for Production of Titanium Dioxide Pigment - Eliminating CO2 Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak [University of Utah

    2013-11-05

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the potential of a new process technology to reduce the energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emission from the production of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) pigment. TiO{sub 2} is one of the most commonly used minerals in the chemical manufacturing industry. It has been commercially processed as a pigment since the early 1900's, and has a wide variety of domestic and industrial applications. TiO{sub 2} pigment is currently produced primarily by the use of the so called chloride process. A key step of the chloride process relies on high temperature carbo-chlorination of TiO{sub 2} bearing raw materials, hence producing large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The new method uses a chemical/metallurgical sequential extraction methodology to produce pigment grade TiO{sub 2} from high-TiO{sub 2} slag. The specific project objectives were to 1) study and prove the scientific validity of the concept, 2) understand the primary chemical reactions and the efficiency of sequential extraction schemes, 3) determine the properties of TiO{sub 2} produced using the technology, and 4) model the energy consumptions and environmental benefits of the technology. These objectives were successfully met and a new process for producing commercial quality TiO{sub 2} pigment was developed and experimentally validated. The process features a unique combination of established metallurgical processes, including alkaline roasting of titania slag followed by leaching, solvent extraction, hydrolysis, and calcination. The caustic, acidic, and organic streams in the process will also be regenerated and reused in the process, greatly reducing environmental waste. The purpose and effect of each of these steps in producing purified TiO{sub 2} is detailed in the report. The levels of impurities in our pigment meet the requirements for commercial pigment, and are nearly equivalent to those of two commercial pigments. Solvent extraction with an amine extractant

  7. Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+): game changer or just another quick fix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Oscar; Koh, Lian Pin

    2012-02-01

    Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) provides financial compensation to land owners who avoid converting standing forests to other land uses. In this paper, we review the main opportunities and challenges for REDD+ implementation, including expectations for REDD+ to deliver on multiple environmental and societal cobenefits. We also highlight a recent case study, the Norway-Indonesia REDD+ agreement and discuss how it might be a harbinger of outcomes in other forest-rich nations seeking REDD+ funds. Looking forward, we critically examine the fundamental assumptions of REDD+ as a solution for the atmospheric buildup of greenhouse gas emissions and tropical deforestation. We conclude that REDD+ is currently the most promising mechanism driving the conservation of tropical forests. Yet, to emerge as a true game changer, REDD+ must still demonstrate that it can access low transaction cost and high-volume carbon markets or funds, while also providing or complimenting a suite of nonmonetary incentives to encourage a developing nation's transition from forest losing to forest gaining, and align with, not undermine, a globally cohesive attempt to mitigate anthropogenic climate change. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. World-Economy Centrality and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: A New Look at the Position in the Capitalist World-System and Environmental Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-growing concern of climate change, much attention has been paid to the factors driving carbon dioxide emissions. Previous research in the World-Systems perspective has identified a relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy. This study intends to build on the previous research by developing a new, more parsimonious indicator of World-System position based on Immanuel Wallerstein’s theoretical concepts of incorporation and core-periphery processes. The new World-System indicator is derived from the centrality measure in network analysis based on import data from the International Monetary Fund’s Direction of Trade Statistics. Based on the theoretical concepts of core-periphery processes, carbon dioxide emissions are predicted to rise based on the predominance of energy-intensive, high-technology, core processes within the nation. The results tend to demonstrate a strong relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy, and the new World-System position indicator is more strongly related with carbon dioxide emissions than Gross Domestic Product per capita.

  9. Household carbon dioxide emissions from peasants and herdsmen in northwestern arid-alpine regions, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Jiansheng; Zeng, Jingjing; Li, Yan; Wang, Qin; Maraseni, Tek; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Clarke-Sather, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed household CO 2 emissions (related to the consumption of necessary and luxury goods and services) of peasants and herdsmen households in arid-alpine regions in Gansu, Qinghai and Ningxia provinces, China. We also explored whether agriculture types, family income and family size have played any role in household CO 2 emissions. In order to address these issues, we: (i) developed assessment indicators for household emissions; (ii) conducted semi-structured questionnaire household surveys; and (iii) employed input-output analysis (IOA). The results showed that, the average household CO 2 emission per capita is 1.43 tons (t) CO 2 ; the proportion of subsistence emissions (related to the consumption of necessary goods and services) accounts for 93.24%, whereas luxury emissions (generated due to consumption of specific goods and services that are consumed only when household income improves) only account for 6.76%t. Moreover, household CO 2 emissions increase with family income and family size, but per capita emissions are inversely related to family size. The highest average household emissions were found in the alpine agricultural and pastoral region (6.18 t CO 2 ), followed by the irrigated agricultural region (6.07 t CO 2 ) and the rain-fed agricultural region (5.34 t CO 2 ). In consideration of insignificant amount of household emissions from these poor and vulnerable groups of the society, this study suggests to follow the principle of fairness while making energy conservation, emission reduction and adaptation policies. - Highlights: ► Per capita emissions decrease as the household size increases. ► The subsistence emissions accounts for 93.24% of the total emissions. ► If heating related emissions are excluded, household emissions are negligible. ► The reduction of emissions below current levels is almost impossible. ► Poor and vulnerable groups should be given special consideration

  10. Carbon dioxide emissions from an Acacia plantation on peatland in Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hooijer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Peat surface CO2 emission, groundwater table depth and peat temperature were monitored for two years along transects in an Acacia plantation on thick tropical peat (>4 m in Sumatra, Indonesia. A total of 2300 emission measurements were taken at 144 locations, over a 2 year period. The autotrophic root respiration component of CO2 emission was separated from heterotrophic emission caused by peat oxidation in three ways: (i by comparing CO2 emissions within and beyond the tree rooting zone, (ii by comparing CO2 emissions with and without peat trenching (i.e. cutting any roots remaining in the peat beyond the tree rooting zone, and (iii by comparing CO2 emissions before and after Acacia tree harvesting. On average, the contribution of autotrophic respiration to daytime CO2 emission was 21% along transects in mature tree stands. At locations 0.5 m from trees this was up to 80% of the total emissions, but it was negligible at locations more than 1.3 m away. This means that CO2 emission measurements well away from trees were free of any autotrophic respiration contribution and thus represent only heterotrophic emissions. We found daytime mean annual CO2 emission from peat oxidation alone of 94 t ha−1 y−1 at a mean water table depth of 0.8 m, and a minimum emission value of 80 t ha−1 y−1 after correction for the effect of diurnal temperature fluctuations, which may result in a 14.5% reduction of the daytime emission. There is a positive correlation between mean long-term water table depth and peat oxidation CO2 emission. However, no such relation is found for instantaneous emission/water table depth within transects and it is clear that factors other than water table depth also affect peat oxidation and total CO2 emissions. The increase in the temperature of the surface peat due to plantation establishment may explain over 50% of peat oxidation emissions. Our study sets a standard for greenhouse gas flux studies from tropical peatlands under

  11. Sulphur dioxide emission from the fossil fuels combustion processes in the Republic of Macedonia for the period from 1988 to 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushevska, Ljubica; Davkova, Katica

    1994-01-01

    The sulphur dioxide represents the major air pollutant. In the region of Republic of Macedonia, the most important sulphur dioxide quantities are emitted from the fossil fuels combustion processes. In this paper the values for the emitted sulphur dioxide quantities per annum, for the period from 1988 to 1992 are given. The presented values were obtained on the basis of three types of input data: the quantities of consumed coal and oil derivatives per annum, the sulphur content in the fossil fuels and the sulphur emission coefficient for coals. (author)

  12. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions in Latin America: Looking for the Existence of Environmental Kuznets Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Paudel, Krishna P.; Zapata, Hector O.; Diaz, Alehandro; Bhattarai, Keshav

    2005-01-01

    We estimated environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) for carbon dioxide for 16 Latin American countries using nonparametric, semi-parametric, and parametric specifications. Results indicated that most of the Latin American countries are still in the rising portion of the EKC with respect to CO2 pollution.

  13. Carbon dioxide emissions from the electricity sector in major countries: a decomposition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangzheng; Liao, Hua; Du, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ce; Wang, Jin-Wei; Liu, Yanan

    2018-03-01

    The electric power sector is one of the primary sources of CO 2 emissions. Analyzing the influential factors that result in CO 2 emissions from the power sector would provide valuable information to reduce the world's CO 2 emissions. Herein, we applied the Divisia decomposition method to analyze the influential factors for CO 2 emissions from the power sector from 11 countries, which account for 67% of the world's emissions from 1990 to 2013. We decompose the influential factors for CO 2 emissions into seven areas: the emission coefficient, energy intensity, the share of electricity generation, the share of thermal power generation, electricity intensity, economic activity, and population. The decomposition analysis results show that economic activity, population, and the emission coefficient have positive roles in increasing CO 2 emissions, and their contribution rates are 119, 23.9, and 0.5%, respectively. Energy intensity, electricity intensity, the share of electricity generation, and the share of thermal power generation curb CO 2 emissions and their contribution rates are 17.2, 15.7, 7.7, and 2.8%, respectively. Through decomposition analysis for each country, economic activity and population are the major factors responsible for increasing CO 2 emissions from the power sector. However, the other factors from developed countries can offset the growth in CO 2 emissions due to economic activities.

  14. Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from monoculture and rotational cropping of corn, soybean and winter wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, C.F.; Yang, X.M.; Reynolds, W.D.; McLaughlin, N.B.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from agricultural soils are influenced by different types of crops, the amounts and types of nitrogen fertilizers used, and the soil and climatic conditions under which the crops are grown. Crop rotation also has an impact on N 2 O emissions, as the crop residues used to supply soluble carbon to soil biota often differ from the crops being grown. This study compared the influence of crops and residues from preceding crops on N 2 O and CO 2 emissions from monoculture crops of soybeans, corn, and winter wheat at a site in Ontario. The phases of different rotations were compared with 2- and 3-year crop rotations. Results of the study showed that N 2 O emissions were approximately 3.1 to 5.1 times higher in monoculture corn than levels observed in winter wheat or soybean crops. When corn followed corn, average N 2 O emissions twice as high as when corn followed soybeans, and 65 per cent higher than when corn followed winter wheat. The higher levels of both N 2 O and CO 2 were attributed to higher inorganic nitrogen (N) application rates in corn crops. In the corn phase, CO 2 levels were higher when the preceding crop was winter wheat. It was concluded that N 2 O and CO 2 emissions from agricultural fields are influenced by both current and preceding crops, a fact which should be considered and accounted for in estimates and forecasts of agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. 21 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs

  15. Effects of manure and cultivation on carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide emissions from a corn field under Mediterranean conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Hadar; Bar-Tal, Asher; Tamir, Guy; Bloom, Paul; Venterea, Rodney T; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Yi; Clapp, C Edward; Fine, Pinchas

    2010-01-01

    The use of organic residues as soil additives is increasing, but, depending on their composition and application methods, these organic amendments can stimulate the emissions of CO(2) and N(2)O. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of management practices in irrigated sweet corn (Zea mays L.) on CO(2) and N(2)O emissions and to relate emissions to environmental factors. In a 3-yr study, corn residues (CR) and pasteurized chicken manure (PCM) were used as soil amendments compared with no residue (NR) under three management practices: shallow tillage (ST) and no tillage (NT) under consecutive corn crops and ST without crop. Tillage significantly increased (P Carbon dioxide and N(2)O fluxes were correlated with soil NH(4) concentrations and with days since tillage and days since seeding. Fluxes of CO(2) were correlated with soil water content, whereas N(2)O fluxes had higher correlation with air temperature. Annual CO(2) emissions were higher with PCM than with CR and NR (9.7, 2.9, and 2.3 Mg C ha(-1), respectively). Fluxes of N(2)O were 34.4, 0.94, and 0.77 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) with PCM, CR, and NR, respectively. Annual amounts of CO(2)-C and N(2)O-N emissions from the PCM treatments were 64 and 3% of the applied C and N, respectively. Regardless of cultivation practices, elevated N(2)O emissions were recorded in the PCM treatment. These emissions could negate some of the beneficial effects of PCM on soil properties.

  16. The role of carbon dioxide in emission of ammonia from manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Montes, Felipe; Alan Rotz, C.

    2013-02-01

    Ammonia emission from manure is a significant loss of fixed N from agricultural systems and contributes to air pollution and ecosystem degradation. Despite the development of numerous mathematical models for predicting ammonia emission, the interactions between CO2 emission, manure pH, and ammonia emission are not completely understood. Others have recognized that CO2 emission from manure can increase the surface pH, and so increase the rate of NH3 emission, but this interaction has not been completely described or quantified. In this work, we present a model of simultaneous NH3 and CO2 emission that includes equilibrium acid/base reactions, kinetically-limited CO2 hydration/dehydration reactions, and diffusive transport. Our model accurately predicted the increase in NH3 emission from simple solutions due to CO2 emission, while an equilibrium-only model did not. Model predictions showed that when NH3 and CO2 emission occur simultaneously, CO2 emission generally increases NH3 emission rate by causing an elevation in surface pH. For thin stagnant layers, this response occurs under a wide range of conditions, although the magnitude of the effect is dependent on manure composition, temperature, surface mass transfer coefficient, and other parameters. Kinetically-limited CO2 hydration/dehydration reactions moderate this interaction, so equilibrium-based models tend to over-predict NH3 emission in the absence of significant carbonic anhydrase activity. Predicted emission from deep, mixed manure showed less dependence on CO2 emission, although higher rates of CO2 hydration/dehydration increase this effect. Interactions between CO2 and NH3 emission influence the effect of model parameters on NH3 emission and result in some unexpected responses. Future work should clarify the processes controlling CO2 speciation and transport in manure, including CO2 minerals, bubble transport, and CO2 hydration/dehydration rates. Our model can inform the development of simpler models for

  17. CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION ASSOCIATED WITH THE PRODUCTION OF PLASTICS - A COMPARISON OF PRODUCTION FROM CRUDE OIL AND RECYCLING FOR THE DUTCH CASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rem, Peter C.; Olsen, Stig Irving; Welink, Jan-Henk

    2009-01-01

    Literature data show that in general, plastics produced through the mechanical recycling route involve less carbon dioxide emission than when produced from crude oil. A review of readily available data shows that road transport of untreated waste plastics account for a significant portion...... of the carbon dioxide emission generated during recycling. Therefore, much carbon dioxide emission can be saved by optimizing the logistics in the recycling of plastics. On the example of polyolefins originating from household packaging waste, this paper attempts to compare two different scenarios of mechanical...... recycling to the production of plastics from crude oil as a reference. The first scenario deals with packaging waste from selective collection, in which data from the current practice of the German DSD system were translated for the Dutch situation. In the second scenario, plastic packaging recovered from...

  18. Carbon Dioxide Emission Evaluation of Porous Vegetation Concrete Blocks for Ecological Restoration Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang-Hee Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the mix proportions that can minimize CO2 emissions while satisfying the target performance of porous vegetation concrete. The target performance of porous vegetation concrete was selected as compressive strength (>15 MPa and void ratio (>25%. This study considered the use of reinforcing fiber and styrene butadiene (SB latex to improve the strength of porous vegetation concrete, as well as the use of blast furnace slag aggregate to improve the CO2 emissions-reducing effect, and analyzed and evaluated the influence of fiber reinforcing, SB latex, and blast furnace slag aggregate on the compressive strength and CO2 emissions of porous vegetation concrete. The CO2 emissions of the raw materials were highest for cement, followed by aggregate, SB latex, and fiber. Blast furnace slag aggregate showed a 30% or more CO2 emissions-reducing effect versus crushed aggregate, and blast furnace slag cement showed a 78% CO2 emissions-reducing effect versus Portland cement. The CO2 emissions analyses for each raw material showed that the CO2 emissions during transportation were highest for the aggregate. Regarding CO2 emissions in each production stage, the materials stage produced the highest CO2 emissions, while the proportion of CO2 emissions in the transportation stage for each raw material, excluding fiber, were below 3% of total emissions. Use of blast furnace slag aggregate in porous vegetation concrete produced CO2 emissions-reducing effects, but decreased its compressive strength. Use of latex in porous vegetation concrete improved its compressive strength, but also increased CO2 emissions. Thus, it is appropriate to use latex in porous vegetation concrete to improve its strength and void ratio, and to use a blast furnace slag aggregate replacement ratio of 40% or less.

  19. Carbon dioxide emissions from passenger transport in China since 1949: Implications for developing sustainable transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loo, Becky P.Y.; Li, Linna

    2012-01-01

    This paper traces the historical evolution and spatial disparity of CO 2 emissions from passenger transport in China. The general trends of CO 2 emissions from four passenger transport modes are estimated by both the distance-based and fuel-based methods. The results suggest that CO 2 emissions from road transport represented the leading source of passenger transport CO 2 emissions in China. Moreover, they have continued to grow rapidly. Air transport was the second largest contributor since 1998. Emissions from rail and water transport have remained relatively stable with lower emission intensity. At the provincial level, great regional disparity was noticeable, especially in road transport. Moreover, the decomposition analysis shows that income growth was the principal factor leading to the growth of passenger transport CO 2 emissions in China for both the 1949–1979 and 1980–2009 periods. The second most important factor was increased transport intensity and modal shifts for the former and the latter period, respectively. The main factor contributed to emission reduction was the lower emission intensity supported by policies, although the effect was weak. In the future, more policies to encourage modal shifts toward sustainable transport modes and travel reduction should be encouraged. - Highlights: ► CO 2 emissions from passenger transport in China were estimated. ► Road transport was the largest contributor to CO 2 emission. Air transport followed. ► Factors influencing CO 2 emissions growth are analyzed by decomposition analysis. ► Income growth, higher travel intensity and modal shift were driving CO 2 emissions up. ► Policies to promote modal shifts and travel demand reduction should be encouraged.

  20. Natural emissions of CO2 from the geosphere and their bearing on the geological storage of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, S.; Pearce, J.M.; Hards, V.L.; Ohsumi, T.; Gale, J.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage has the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Although leakage from monitored CO 2 injection sites has been minimal to non-existent, experience from the natural gas storage industry suggests that, if it becomes a widely deployed technology, leaks may be expected from some storage sites. Natural occurrences of CO 2 in the geosphere, some of which have been exploited, provide insights into the types of emissions that might be expected from anthropogenic CO 2 storage sites. CO 2 emission sites are commonly found in clusters in CO 2 -prone geological provinces: the most common natural emissions sites in sedimentary basins consist of carbonated springs and mofettes. These represent at worst only a local hazard. In volcanic and hydrothermal provinces, more energetic emissions may occur due to active supply from degassing magma. These include rare, sudden emissions from fissures and craters that have caused fatalities. It is unlikely that such provinces would be considered for CO 2 storage. Major lake overturn events such as occurred at Lake Nyos in 1986 are considered highly unlikely to occur as a result of CO 2 storage, not least because CO 2 levels in lake waters can be monitored and remediated. Natural CO 2 fields indicate that under favourable conditions CO 2 can be retained in the subsurface for millions of years. The main risk from man-made CO 2 storage sites that does not have any close analogy in nature is considered to be a well blowout. A blowout that took place at a natural CO 2 field provides some indication of the likely hazard. (author)

  1. Long-term ocean oxygen depletion in response to carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, G.; Olsen, S.M.; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing global warming could persist far into the future, because natural processes require decades to hundreds of thousands of years to remove carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning from the atmosphere(1-3). Future warming may have large global impacts including ocean oxygen depletion and assoc......Ongoing global warming could persist far into the future, because natural processes require decades to hundreds of thousands of years to remove carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning from the atmosphere(1-3). Future warming may have large global impacts including ocean oxygen depletion...... solubility from surface-layer warming accounts for most of the enhanced oxygen depletion in the upper 500 m of the ocean. Possible weakening of ocean overturning and convection lead to further oxygen depletion, also in the deep ocean. We conclude that substantial reductions in fossil-fuel use over the next...

  2. Changes of the carbon dioxide emissions and the overshoot ratio resulting from the implementation of the 2nd Energy Master Plan in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, M.J.; Kim, Y.P.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the national greenhouse gas emission reduction target for 2030 (“GHG target for 2030″) and the 2nd Energy Master Plan (“2nd EMP”), several power mix configuration scenarios were tested to estimate the sensitivity of the carbon dioxide emissions and the ‘overshoot ratio’, which is the ratio of ecological footprint to biocapacity. It would be only possible to achieve the GHG target for 2030 if the fraction of non-emission energy be more than 70% of the total input primary energy for power generation with the current conversion efficiency (40%). Even the conversion efficiency is changed to 50%, still the carbon dioxide emissions are larger than the targeted carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector. The overshoot ratio would still increase from 5.9 in 2009 to 7.6 in 2035 even with the successful implementation of the 2nd EMP. Thus, additional efforts to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions and the overshoot ratio from the energy sector are required beyond adjusting the supply mix configuration for power generation and the conversion efficiency. Policies and programs encouraging the changes in consumer behavior toward reduction of goods consumption and energy savings are expected to impact on reducing the carbon dioxide emissions and the overshoot ratio. - Highlights: •The overshoot ratio will increase in 2035 even if the 2nd EMP is fully implemented. •Power mix configuration changes would not be enough to achieve the GHG target. •Increasing the conversion efficiency is good in long-term to achieve the GHG target.

  3. Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

    2008-08-13

    Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

  4. Different figures for carbon dioxide emissions; Verschillende cijfers voor kooldioxide-emissies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonneveld, E. [Sector Milieu, Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek CBS, Voorburg/Heerlen (Netherlands)

    1999-08-01

    In publications often three different figures for the emission of CO2 occur. The figures are based on the same elements but on different starting points. In this article it is explained why the differences exist, and how they are composed from elements of the emission calculation method. 2 refs.

  5. Emissions of Water and Carbon Dioxide from Fossil-Fuel Combustion Contribute Directly to Ocean Mass and Volume Increases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuce, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The direct, non-climate, contribution of carbon dioxide and water emissions from fossil-fuel (FF) combustion to the volume and mass of the oceans has been omitted from estimates of sea-level rise (SLR) in IPCC reports. Following the method of Gornitz et al. (1997), H2O emissions are estimated using carbon emissions from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, along with typical carbon and hydrogen contents of FF. Historic H2O emissions from 1750 to 2010 amount to 430 ±50 PgH2O, equivalent to 1.2 ±0.2 mmSLR. Sometime in this decade the volume of H2O from historic FF combustion will exceed the volume of Lake Erie (480 km3). CO2 dissolved in the ocean increases the seawater volume by 31-33 mL mol-1 CO2. From 1750 to 2010, 370 ±70 PgCO2 from FF combustion has dissolved in the oceans, causing 0.7 ±0.2 mmSLR. Combined H2O+CO2emissions from FF have therefore added 1.9 ±0.4 mm to sea levels in the Industrial Era. Combustion of FF in 2010 resulted in emissions of 32 PgCO2 and 12 ±1 PgH2O. SLR contributions for that year from FF emissions were 0.033 ±0.005 mm from H2O and 0.011±0.003 mm from dissolved CO2, a total rate of 0.044 ±0.008 mm yr-1. Emissions incorporated in socio-economic models underlying the RCP 8.5 and 2.6 scenarios are used along with concentration-driven CMIP5 Earth System Models results to estimate future sea-level rise from FF combustion. From 2010 to 2100, RCP8.5 and 2.6 models respectively produce 9 ±2 mmSLR and 5 ±1 mmSLR from FF H2O+CO2. For perspective, these amounts are larger than the modelled contributions from loss of glaciers in the Andes. The direct contribution of FF emissions to SLR is small (1-2%) relative to current rates and projected estimates under RCP scenarios up to 2100. The magnitude is similar to SLR estimates from other minor sources such as the melting of floating ice, land-use emissions and produced water from oil operations, none of which are currently included in SLR assessments. As uncertainties in

  6. Experimental study on the nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter emissions from diesel engine retrofitted with particulate oxidation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiangyu; Ge, Yunshan; Ma, Chaochen; Tan, Jianwei; Yu, Linxiao; Li, Jiaqiang; Wang, Xin

    2014-02-15

    A particulate oxidation catalyst (POC) was employed to perform experiments on the engine test bench to evaluate the effects on the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from diesel engine. The engine exhaust was sampled from both upstream and downstream of the POC. The results showed that the POC increased the ratios of NO2/NOx significantly in the middle and high loads, the ratio of NO2/nitrogen oxides (NOx) increased 4.5 times on average under all experiment modes with the POC. An engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) was used to study the particle number-weighted size distributions and the abnormal particle emissions with the POC. The results indicated that the average reduction rate of particle number (PN) was 61% in the operating range of the diesel engine. At the engine speed of 1,400 r/min, the reduction rates of PN tended to decrease with the larger particle size. In the long time run under the steady mode (520 Nm, 1,200 r/min), abnormal particle emissions after the POC happened seven times in the first hour, and the average PN concentration of these abnormal emission peaks was much higher than that in normal state. The particle emissions of peaks 1-5 equaled the particles emitted downstream of the POC in normal state for 1.9h in number concentration, and for 3.6h in mass concentration. The PN concentrations tended to increase over time in 5h under the steady engine mode and the increase of the PN in the size range of 6.04-14.3 nm was more evident. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The future of airborne sulfur-containing particles in the absence of fossil fuel sulfur dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraud, Véronique; Horne, Jeremy R; Martinez, Andrew S; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Meinardi, Simone; Dawson, Matthew L; Wingen, Lisa M; Dabdub, Donald; Blake, Donald R; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-11-03

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed from oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted during fossil fuel combustion, is a major precursor of new airborne particles, which have well-documented detrimental effects on health, air quality, and climate. Another precursor is methanesulfonic acid (MSA), produced simultaneously with SO2 during the atmospheric oxidation of organosulfur compounds (OSCs), such as dimethyl sulfide. In the present work, a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine how contributions of H2SO4 and MSA to particle formation will change in a large coastal urban area as anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of SO2 decline. The 3-dimensional University of California Irvine-California Institute of Technology airshed model is used to compare atmospheric concentrations of gas phase MSA, H2SO4, and SO2 under current emissions of fossil fuel-associated SO2 and a best-case futuristic scenario with zero fossil fuel sulfur emissions. Model additions include results from (i) quantum chemical calculations that clarify the previously uncertain gas phase mechanism of formation of MSA and (ii) a combination of published and experimental estimates of OSC emissions, such as those from marine, agricultural, and urban processes, which include pet waste and human breath. Results show that in the zero anthropogenic SO2 emissions case, particle formation potential from H2SO4 will drop by about two orders of magnitude compared with the current situation. However, particles will continue to be generated from the oxidation of natural and anthropogenic sources of OSCs, with contributions from MSA and H2SO4 of a similar order of magnitude. This could be particularly important in agricultural areas where there are significant sources of OSCs.

  8. Vanadium Dioxide as a Natural Disordered Metamaterial: Perfect Thermal Emission and Large Broadband Negative Differential Thermal Emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Kats

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally demonstrate that a thin (approximately 150-nm film of vanadium dioxide (VO_{2} deposited on sapphire has an anomalous thermal emittance profile when heated, which arises because of the optical interaction between the film and the substrate when the VO_{2} is at an intermediate state of its insulator-metal transition (IMT. Within the IMT region, the VO_{2} film comprises nanoscale islands of the metal and dielectric phases and can thus be viewed as a natural, disordered metamaterial. This structure displays “perfect” blackbodylike thermal emissivity over a narrow wavelength range (approximately 40  cm^{-1}, surpassing the emissivity of our black-soot reference. We observe large broadband negative differential thermal emittance over a >10 °C range: Upon heating, the VO_{2}-sapphire structure emits less thermal radiation and appears colder on an infrared camera. Our experimental approach allows for a direct measurement and extraction of wavelength- and temperature-dependent thermal emittance. We anticipate that emissivity engineering with thin-film geometries comprising VO_{2} and other thermochromic materials will find applications in infrared camouflage, thermal regulation, and infrared tagging and labeling.

  9. Catalysts for cleaner combustion of coal, wood and briquettes sulfur dioxide reduction options for low emission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.V. [Global Environmental Solutions, Inc., Morton Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Coal fired, low emission sources are a major factor in the air quality problems facing eastern European cities. These sources include: stoker-fired boilers which feed district heating systems and also meet local industrial steam demand, hand-fired boilers which provide heat for one building or a small group of buildings, and masonary tile stoves which heat individual rooms. Global Environmental Systems is marketing through Global Environmental Systems of Polane, Inc. catalysts to improve the combustion of coal, wood or fuel oils in these combustion systems. PCCL-II Combustion Catalysts promotes more complete combustion, reduces or eliminates slag formations, soot, corrosion and some air pollution emissions and is especially effective on high sulfur-high vanadium residual oils. Glo-Klen is a semi-dry powder continuous acting catalyst that is injected directly into the furnace of boilers by operating personnel. It is a multi-purpose catalyst that is a furnace combustion catalyst that saves fuel by increasing combustion efficiency, a cleaner of heat transfer surfaces that saves additional fuel by increasing the absorption of heat, a corrosion-inhibiting catalyst that reduces costly corrosion damage and an air pollution reducing catalyst that reduces air pollution type stack emissions. The reduction of sulfur dioxides from coal or oil-fired boilers of the hand fired stoker design and larger, can be controlled by the induction of the Glo-Klen combustion catalyst and either hydrated lime or pulverized limestone.

  10. Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide from Broadband Infrared Limb Emission Measurements Taken from the TIMED/SABER Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Russell III, James M.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; She, Chiao-Yao; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Picard, Richard H.; Winick, Jeremy R.; hide

    2008-01-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment is one of four instruments on NASA's Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. SABER measures broadband infrared limb emission and derives vertical profiles of kinetic temperature (Tk) from the lower stratosphere to approximately 120 km, and vertical profiles of carbon dioxide (CO2) volume mixing ratio (vmr) from approximately 70 km to 120 km. In this paper we report on SABER Tk/CO2 data in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region from the version 1.06 dataset. The continuous SABER measurements provide an excellent dataset to understand the evolution and mechanisms responsible for the global two-level structure of the mesopause altitude. SABER MLT Tk comparisons with ground-based sodium lidar and rocket falling sphere Tk measurements are generally in good agreement. However, SABER CO2 data differs significantly from TIME-GCM model simulations. Indirect CO2 validation through SABER-lidar MLT Tk comparisons and SABER-radiation transfer comparisons of nighttime 4.3 micron limb emission suggest the SABER-derived CO2 data is a better representation of the true atmospheric MLT CO2 abundance compared to model simulations of CO2 vmr.

  11. The dynamic links between carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, health spending and GDP growth: A case study for 51 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabouni, Sami; Saidi, Kais

    2017-10-01

    This document investigated the causal relationship between carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, health spending and GDP growth for 51 countries (divided into three groups of countries: low-income countries; group of countries with lower and upper middle income; group of middle income countries) covering the annual period 1995-2013. Dynamic simultaneous-equations models and generalized method of moments (GMM) are used to investigate this relationship. The main results provide evidence of a causal relationship between the three variables. The empirical results show that there is a bidirectional causality between CO 2 emissions and GDP per capita, between health spending and economic growth for the three groups of estimates. The results also indicate that there is a unidirectional causality from CO 2 emissions to health spending, except low income group countries. We found that health plays an important role in GDP per capita; it limits its effect on a growing deterioration in the quality of the environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.. China Energy Group; Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Dept.. China Energy Group; Arens, Marlene [Fraunhofer Inst. for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-01-31

    Iron and steel manufacturing is among the most energy-intensive industries and accounts for the largest share, approximately 27 percent, of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the manufacturing sector. The ongoing increase in world steel demand means that this industry’s energy use and CO2 emissions continue to grow, so there is significant incentive to develop, commercialize and adopt emerging energy-efficiency and CO2 emissions-reduction technologies for steel production. Although studies from around the world have identified a wide range of energy-efficiency technologies applicable to the steel industry that have already been commercialized, information is limited and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on 56 emerging iron and steel industry technologies, with the intent of providing a well-structured database of information on these technologies for engineers, researchers, investors, steel companies, policy makers, and other interested parties. For each technology included, we provide information on energy savings and environmental and other benefits, costs, and commercialization status; we also identify references for more information.

  13. Towards constraints on fossil fuel emissions from total column carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Keppel-Aleks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We assess the large-scale, top-down constraints on regional fossil fuel emissions provided by observations of atmospheric total column CO2, XCO2. Using an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM with underlying fossil emissions, we determine the influence of regional fossil fuel emissions on global XCO2 fields. We quantify the regional contrasts between source and upwind regions and probe the sensitivity of atmospheric XCO2 to changes in fossil fuel emissions. Regional fossil fuel XCO2 contrasts can exceed 0.7 ppm based on 2007 emission estimates, but have large seasonal variations due to biospheric fluxes. Contamination by clouds reduces the discernible fossil signatures. Nevertheless, our simulations show that atmospheric fossil XCO2 can be tied to its source region and that changes in the regional XCO2 contrasts scale linearly with emissions. We test the GCM results against XCO2 data from the GOSAT satellite. Regional XCO2 contrasts in GOSAT data generally scale with the predictions from the GCM, but the comparison is limited by the moderate precision of and relatively few observations from the satellite. We discuss how this approach may be useful as a policy tool to verify national fossil emissions, as it provides an independent, observational constraint.

  14. Carbon dioxide emission drivers for a typical metropolis using input–output structural decomposition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yafei; Zhao, Hongyan; Li, Liying; Liu, Zhu; Liang, Sai

    2013-01-01

    As the capital of China, Beijing is regarded as a major metropolis in the world. Study of the variation in temporal CO 2 emissions generated by the driving forces in Beijing can provide guidance for policy decisions on CO 2 emissions mitigation in global metropolises. Based on input–output structural decomposition analysis (IO-SDA), we analysed the driving forces for the increment in CO 2 emissions in Beijing from both production and final demand perspectives during 1997–2010. According to our results, the CO 2 emission growth in Beijing is driven mainly by production structure change and population growth, partly offset by CO 2 emission intensity reduction as well as the decline in per capita final demand volume during the study period. Final demand structure change has a limited effect on the change in the CO 2 emissions in Beijing. From the final demand perspective, urban trades, urban residential consumption, government consumption and fixed capital formation are mainly responsible for the booming emissions. This study showed how the “top-down” IO-SDA methodology was implemented on a city scale. Policy implications from this study would be helpful for addressing CO 2 emissions mitigation in global capital cities and metropolises. - Highlights: • Changes in production structure and population are drivers of CO 2 increment. • Changes in CO 2 intensity and per capita GDP are forces to offset CO 2 increment. • Final demand structure change has limited effect on Beijing's CO 2 emission change. • Beijing's key final demand categories and economic sectors are identified. • Policy implications of Beijing's results are analyzed

  15. Evaluating the impacts of new walking and cycling infrastructure on carbon dioxide emissions from motorized travel: a controlled longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christian; Goodman, Anna; Ogilvie, David

    2014-09-01

    Walking and cycling is widely assumed to substitute for at least some motorized travel and thereby reduce energy use and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. While the evidence suggests that a supportive built environment may be needed to promote walking and cycling, it is unclear whether and how interventions in the built environment that attract walkers and cyclists may reduce transport CO 2 emissions. Our aim was therefore to evaluate the effects of providing new infrastructure for walking and cycling on CO 2 emissions from motorised travel. A cohort of 1849 adults completed questionnaires at baseline (2010) and one-year follow-up (2011), before and after the construction of new high-quality routes provided as part of the Sustrans Connect2 programme in three UK municipalities. A second cohort of 1510 adults completed questionnaires at baseline and two-year follow-up (2012). The participants reported their past-week travel behaviour and car characteristics from which CO 2 emissions by mode and purpose were derived using methods described previously. A set of exposure measures of proximity to and use of the new routes were derived. Overall transport CO 2 emissions decreased slightly over the study period, consistent with a secular trend in the case study regions. As found previously the new infrastructure was well used at one- and two-year follow-up, and was associated with population-level increases in walking, cycling and physical activity at two-year follow-up. However, these effects did not translate into sizeable CO 2 effects as neither living near the infrastructure nor using it predicted changes in CO 2 emissions from motorised travel, either overall or disaggregated by journey purpose. This lack of a discernible effect on travel CO 2 emissions are consistent with an interpretation that some of those living nearer the infrastructure may simply have changed where they walked or cycled, while others may have walked or cycled more but few, if any, may have

  16. Effects of biodiesel made from swine and chicken fat residues on carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddern, Vivian; Cunha Junior, Anildo; De Prá, Marina C; Busi da Silva, Marcio L; Nicoloso, Rodrigo da S; Higarashi, Martha M; Coldebella, Arlei; de Abreu, Paulo G

    2017-07-01

    dioxide (CO 2 ), and/or nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emissions can vary largely depending on type of feedstock used to produce biodiesel. In this work, the authors demonstrated animal fat feasibility in replacing petrodiesel with less impact regarding greenhouse gas emissions than other sources.

  17. Evaluating the impacts of new walking and cycling infrastructure on carbon dioxide emissions from motorized travel: a controlled longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christian; Goodman, Anna; Ogilvie, David

    2015-01-01

    Walking and cycling is widely assumed to substitute for at least some motorized travel and thereby reduce energy use and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. While the evidence suggests that a supportive built environment may be needed to promote walking and cycling, it is unclear whether and how interventions in the built environment that attract walkers and cyclists may reduce transport CO2 emissions. Our aim was therefore to evaluate the effects of providing new infrastructure for walking and cycling on CO2 emissions from motorised travel. A cohort of 1849 adults completed questionnaires at baseline (2010) and one-year follow-up (2011), before and after the construction of new high-quality routes provided as part of the Sustrans Connect2 programme in three UK municipalities. A second cohort of 1510 adults completed questionnaires at baseline and two-year follow-up (2012). The participants reported their past-week travel behaviour and car characteristics from which CO2 emissions by mode and purpose were derived using methods described previously. A set of exposure measures of proximity to and use of the new routes were derived. Overall transport CO2 emissions decreased slightly over the study period, consistent with a secular trend in the case study regions. As found previously the new infrastructure was well used at one- and two-year follow-up, and was associated with population-level increases in walking, cycling and physical activity at two-year follow-up. However, these effects did not translate into sizeable CO2 effects as neither living near the infrastructure nor using it predicted changes in CO2 emissions from motorised travel, either overall or disaggregated by journey purpose. This lack of a discernible effect on travel CO2 emissions are consistent with an interpretation that some of those living nearer the infrastructure may simply have changed where they walked or cycled, while others may have walked or cycled more but few, if any, may have substituted

  18. Imaging for carbon translocation to a fruit of tomato with carbon-11-labeled carbon dioxide and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawachi, N.; Suzui, N.; Ishii, S.; Fujimaki, S.; Ishioka, N. [Plant Positron Imaging Group, Quantum Beam Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kikuchi, K. [Molecular Genetics and Physiology Research Team, National Institute of Vegetable and Tea Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Kusawa, Tsu, Mie 514-239 (Japan); Watanbe, H. [Department of Investigative Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, 565-8565 (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    Carbon kinetics in the fruit is an agricultural issue on the growth and development of the fruit to be harvested. Particularly, photo-assimilate translocation and distribution are important topics for understanding the mechanism. In the present work, carbon-11 ({sup 11}C) labeled photo-assimilate translocation into fruits of tomato has been imaged using carbon-11-labeled carbon dioxide and the positron emission tomography (PET). Dynamic PET data of gradual increasing of {sup 11}C activity and its distribution is acquired quantitatively in intact plant body. This indicates that the three dimensional photo-assimilate translocation into the fruits is imaged successfully and carbon kinetics is analyzed to understand the plant physiology and nutrition. (authors)

  19. Sulfur dioxide emissions and sectorial contributions to sulfur deposition in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Richard L.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Streets, David G.; Bhatti, Neeloo

    Anthropogenic and volcanic emissions of SO 2 in Asia for 1987-1988 are estimated on a 1° × 1° grid. Anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 31.6 Tg of SO 2 with the regions' volcanoes emitting an additional 3.8 Tg. For Southeast Asia and the Indian sub-continent, the emissions are further partitioned into biomass, industrial, utilities, and non-specific sources. In these regions emissions from biomass, utilities and industrial sources account for 16.7, 21.7, and 12.2%, respectively. In Bangladesh, ˜ 90% of the SO 2 emissions result from biomass burning and nearly 20% of India's 5 Tg of SO 2 emissions are due to biomass burning. Malaysia and Singapore's emissions are dominated by the utilities with 42 and 62% of their respective emissions coming from that sector. The spatial distribution of sulfur deposition resulting from these emissions is calculated using an atmospheric transport and deposition model. Sulfur deposition in excess of 2 g m -2 yr -1 is predicted in vast regions of east Asia, India, Thailand, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Indonesia with deposition in excess of 5 g m -2 yr -1 predicted in southern China. For the Indian sub-continent and Southeast Asia the contribution of biomass burning, industrial activities, and utilities to total sulfur emissions and deposition patterns are evaluated. Biomass burning is found to be a major source of sulfur deposition throughout southeast Asia. Deposition in Bangladesh and northern India is dominated by this emissions sector. Deposition in Thailand, the Malay Peninsula and the island of Sumatra is heavily influenced by emissions from utilities. The ecological impact of the deposition, in 1988 and in the year 2020, is also estimated using critical loads data developed in the RAINS-ASIA projects. Much of eastern China, the Korean Peninsula, Japan, Thailand, and large regions of India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, and sections of Vietnam are at risk due to deposition in excess of their

  20. Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Anna; Brand, Christian; Ogilvie, David Bruce; iConnect, consortium

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Motorised travel and associated carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions generate substantial health costs; in the case of motorised travel, this may include contributing to rising obesity levels. Obesity has in turn been hypothesised to increase motorised travel and/or CO2 emissions, both because heavier people may use motorised travel more and because heavier people may choose larger and less fuel-efficient cars. These hypothesised associations have not been examined empirically, ...

  1. ISLSCP II Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuels, Cement, and Gas Flaring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains decadal (1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990 and 1995) estimates of gridded fossil-fuel emissions, expressed in 1,000 metric tons C per...

  2. ISLSCP II Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuels, Cement, and Gas Flaring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains decadal (1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990 and 1995) estimates of gridded fossil-fuel emissions, expressed in 1,000 metric tons C per year per one...

  3. Non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting carbon dioxide emissions: bottom-up estimates for the world as a whole and for major developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, M.; Neelis, M.L.; Blok, K.; Patel, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    We present and apply a simple bottom–up model for estimating non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions.We apply this model for the year 2000: (1) to the world as a whole, (2) to the aggregate of Annex I countries and non-Annex I countries, and (3) to the ten

  4. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2. We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80%–20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. Surface sulfate concentrations are dominated by local anthropogenic sources. Of the sulfate produced from sources other than local anthropogenic emissions (defined here as "background" sulfate, EA sources account for approximately 30%–50% (over the Western US and 10%–20% (over the Eastern US. The surface concentrations of sulfate from EA sources over the Western US are highest in MAM (up to 0.15 μg/m3, and lowest in DJF (less than 0.06 μg/m3. Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence (represented by the areas where at least 0.1 μg m−3 of sulfate originates from EA over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 hPa in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (in particular of H2O2, which oxidizes SO2 to sulfate in the aqueous phase. We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be

  5. Sulfur dioxide emissions in Asia in the period 1985-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streets, David G.; Tsai, Nancy Y.; Akimoto, Hajime; Oka, Kaoru

    A consistent set of SO 2 emission trends has been developed for Asian countries for the time period 1985-1997. The trend is based on extrapolation of a detailed 1990 inventory, which was constructed as part of the World Bank's RAINS-ASIA project, using IEA energy-use data. The trend shows Asian SO 2 emissions growing from 33.7 Tg in 1990 to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Estimates interpolated from the RAINS-ASIA computer model suggest a value for 1997 of 46.4 Tg, assuming no major changes in emission abatement policies after 1990. The reduction in the 1997 value, by some 16%, is primarily due to regulatory requirements and other trends toward lower sulfur content of oil products and coal. A slowdown in the growth of emissions in China - due to a reduction in economic growth, the mining of higher-quality coals, enhanced environmental awareness, and a reduction in industrial coal use - has been instrumental in arresting the growth of Asian emissions. Most of the positive developments have occurred in East Asia, and high-emission growth rates persist in Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent. The outlook for the future is that Asian SO 2 emissions may well peak in the region of 40-45 Tg by the year 2020 or earlier, in contrast to previous predictions of 2020 emissions as high as 80-110 Tg. The trends developed in this paper are good news for the local and regional environment, particularly in East Asia. However, they also signify lower-than-anticipated concentrations of sulfate aerosol over the Asian continent, with the resulting possibility of greater-than-anticipated regional and global warming.

  6. Predicting ammonia and carbon dioxide emissions from carbon and nitrogen biodegradability during animal waste composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillat, Jean-Marie; Robin, Paul; Hassouna, Mélynda; Leterme, Philippe

    During composting of livestock manure, transformations of organic matter result in gaseous emissions, which can harm the environment. Two experiments were done in enclosures to measure the fluxes of NH 3, N 2O, CO 2, CH 4 and H 2O emitted by 8 heaps of compost representing the range of biodegradability of nitrogen and carbon in the livestock manure. The heaps were monitored for the first 2 months, corresponding to the thermophilic phase during which nearly all-mass losses occur. Four parameters describe the NH 3 emission kinetics and the main influential factors were noted: (1) the response time to reach maximum intensity is affected mainly by the initial micro-flora; (2) the amplitude depends mainly on C biodegradability and also on micro-flora; (3) the emission duration depends mainly on N biodegradability; and (4) the cumulative emission, which varied from 16.5 to 48.9% of the nitrogen initially present in the heap, depends both on C and N biodegradability. A predictive model for NH 3 and CO 2 emissions for the thermophilic phase of the composting of livestock manure is proposed. The variability in cumulative emissions of CO 2 and of NH 3 is well explained by the contents of soluble elements and hemicellulose in the dry matter (Van Soest fractioning), and soluble nitrogen (12 h extraction at 4 °C in water). In our conditions of favourable aeration and humidity, N 2O and CH 4 emissions were low. The role of the biodegradable carbon in reducing NH 3 emission is highlighted.

  7. Driving Factors of Carbon Dioxide Emissions and the Impact from Kyoto Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole Grunewald; Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between environmental quality and economic development. According to the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis this relationship may be described by an inverted-U curve. However, recent evidence rejects the EKC hypothesis for GHG emissions in a broad sense. In this paper we aim to investigate whether the EKC behavior for CO2 emissions could be proved on the behalf of institutional regulations. We analyze the...

  8. Effects of air pollutants on the carbon dioxide (CO2) emission rate of human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bako-Biro, Zsolt; Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David

    2004-01-01

    Several laboratory studies have shown the negative effects of emissions from typical indoor pollution sources on perceived air quality, SBS symptoms and the performance of office work. The subjects performed typical office tasks at their own pace while they were exposed for several hours...... to different air quality conditions. A re-analysis of the CO2 measurements obtained in two independent studies showed that human CO2 emission rates were affected by air quality (P...

  9. Game Theoretic Analysis of Carbon Emission Abatement in Fashion Supply Chains Considering Vertical Incentives and Channel Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei He

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study an emission-dependent dyadic fashion supply chain made up of a supplier and a manufacturer, both of which can reduce their own component/product emissions to serve the carbon-footprint sensitive consumers. With Carbon Tax regulation, we consider four scenarios resulting from two ways in form of adopting transfer price contract and/or introducing third-party emission-reduction service (TPERS to enhance the efficiency of systematic emission reductions. We refine four models from these corresponding scenarios, which in turn constitute a decision-making framework composed of determining vertical incentives and choosing supply chain structures. By exploiting Stackelberg games in all models, we compare their emission reduction efficiencies and profitability for each pair of settings. Theoretic analysis and numerical studies show that adopting vertical transfer payment schemes can definitely benefit channel carbon footprint reduction and Pareto improvement of supply chain profitability, regardless of whether the emission-reduction service exists or not. However, whether introducing TPERS or not is heavily depending on systematic parameters when the transfer payment incentive is adopted there. We also provide insights on the sensitivity of carbon tax parameters with respect to the supply chain performance, overall carbon emission reduction, vertical incentive and TPERS adopting decision-makings.

  10. A Model of Climate Policy Using Board Game Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Castronova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a case study of how a board game can be modified to generate a serious game. We argue that board games are an interesting medium for serious games, especially when the goal is to teach players about particularly complex systems. In that case, the transparency of a board game makes it possible for players to “see the whole boards” – to see all of the various moving parts at work. That transparency also makes it very easy to modify board games. To demonstrate these claims, we present a modification to the board game CO2 that accurately models different policy options with regard to global warming. We show how a few major changes to the original game’s point systems, as well as removal of certain extraneous features, can significantly improve the game, adding an instructional value. The game allows players to experiment with several policy options, including carbon taxes, carbon emissions permit sales, and clean energy research support, and lets players see how these policies interact. We discuss ways that teachers, advocates, journalists, and others can the Climate Policy mod to more easily explain the incredibly complex interactions of power markets, carbon dioxide emissions, and public policy.

  11. Carbon dioxide emissions and change in prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the United States: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheutlin, Alexander R; Adar, Sara D; Park, Sung Kyun

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that increasing levels of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), may influence weight gain and thus may play a role in rising trends in obesity and diabetes. We conducted an ecological study to examine the associations between CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and changes in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the United States. County-level data on CO2 emissions, prevalence of obesity and diagnosed diabetes, other sociodemographic factors and neighborhood characteristics related to urbanicity, and fine particles (PM2.5) between 2004 and 2008 were obtained from the Vulcan Project, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and American Community Survey. Linear mixed effect modeling of 3019 counties for the associations between average CO2 emissions and changes in diabetes and obesity prevalence between 2004 and 2008 was performed. The average obesity and diabetes prevalence increased between 2004 and 2008 by 3.65% (SD: 1.88%) and 1.65% (SD: 1.70%), respectively. A marginally significant positive association between CO2 emission and changes in obesity prevalence was found with adjustment for sociodemographic factors, indicators of urbanicity and spatial autocorrelation (p-trend=0.06). The association became weaker and nonsignificant with further adjustment for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.17). There was a significant positive association between CO2 emission and changes in diabetes prevalence before controlling for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.05) but the association became null after controlling for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.49), suggesting that PM2.5 is a critical confounder in the association between CO2 emission and changes in diabetes prevalence. This study does not support the hypothesis that CO2 emissions, a leading driver of climate change, may be linked to increasing trends in obesity and diabetes, though there was an indication of possible link between CO2 and obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emission Decrease Through Waste Composting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apinan Pitaratae

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic waste disposal under anaerobic conditions emits Methane, which causes increased global warming. This study attempts to find the emission factor in windrow waste composting systems from two sizes of gathered organic waste piles. Designed to compare two groups of composting piles, one pile consisted of 500 kilograms of waste originating from local authorities while the other amounted to 250 kilograms of waste collected from households. With six piles of each type, aeration was done by manual turning and emissions were sampled in closed flux chambers and analyzed by gas chromatographs. A control experiment, modeling landfill sites, was set up in a one x one x one meter hole. Results from the experiment showed that emission ratios from the 500 kg was 1.3613 x 10-3 g CO2-eq kg-1 wet waste, and 1.3427 x 10-3 g CO2-eq kg-1 wet waste from the 250 kg experiment. The 500 kg experiment decreased emissions by 0.059185 g CO2-eq kg-1 wet waste and the 250 kg experiment, emissions decreased by 0.059206 g CO2-eq kg-1 wet waste when compared to the control group. In summary, pile size has no effect on emission ratios. Statistical testing found no significance difference between emissions from the 500 kg compared with the 250 kg. This study tells us that massive landfill or waste composting is difference effect.INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTVolume-5, Issue-4, Sep-Nov 2016, Page: 44-55

  13. ON A COURNOT DUOPOLY GAME WITH DIFFERENTIATED GOODS, HETEROGENEOUS EXPECTATIONS AND A COST FUNCTION INCLUDING EMISSION COSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges SARAFOPOULOS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the dynamics of a nonlinear Cournot- type duopoly game with differentiated goods, linear demand and a cost function that includes emission costs. The game is modeled with a system of two difference equations. Existence and stability of equilibria of this system are studied. We show that the model gives more complex chaotic and unpredictable trajectories as a consequence of change in the parameter of horizontal product differentiation and a higher (lower degree of product differentiation (weaker or fiercer competition destabilize (stabilize the economy. The chaotic features are justified numerically via computing Lyapunov numbers and sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Also, we show that in this case there are stable trajectories and a higher (lower degree of product differentiation does not tend to destabilize the economy.

  14. A Stackelberg Game Approach in an Integrated Inventory Model with Carbon-Emission and Setup Cost Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Sarkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper formulates an integrated inventory model that allows Stackelberg game policy for optimizing joint total cost of a vendor and buyer system. After receiving the lot, the buyer commences an inspection process to determine the defective items. All defective items the buyer sends to vendor during the receiving of the next lot. Due to increasing number of shipments fixed and variable transportation, as well as carbon emissions, are considered, which makes the model sustainable integrated model forever. To reduce the setup cost for the vendor, a discrete setup reduction is considered for maximization more profit. The players of the integrated model are with unequal power (as leader and follower and the Stackelberg game strategy is utilized to solve this model for obtaining global optimum solution over the finite planning horizon. An illustrative numerical example is given to understand this model clearly.

  15. Evaluation of carbon dioxide emission control strategies in New York State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, S.C.; Lee, J.; Goldstein, G.; Hill, D.

    1992-01-01

    A MARKAL model was developed for the State of New York. It represents the state's energy system as a set of typical technologies for generating, converting, and using energy as it evolves over a 45-year period. NYMARKAL was applied here in demonstration analyses to explore strategies to reduce CO 2 emissions. NYMARKAL was installed at the State Energy Office and in the Offices of the New York Power Pool. Staff members from both organizations and other state agencies were trained in its use. Example scenarios showed that it is more difficult and more expensive to reduce carbon emissions in New York State than in the United States as a whole. Were a common carbon tax instituted, it would have less effect in New York and most carbon emissions reduction would take place elsewhere in the country where it is more cost-effective. Alternatively, were all states required to reduce CO 2 emission an equal percentage (say by 20%), the cost per unit emissions reduction to New York would be much greater than in the rest of the country

  16. Grey relation performance correlations among economics, energy use and carbon dioxide emission in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Sue J.; Lu, I.J.; Lewis, Charles

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the inter-relationships among economy, energy and CO 2 emissions of 37 industrial sectors in Taiwan in order to provide insight regarding sustainable development policy making. Grey relation analysis was used to analyse the productivity, aggregate energy consumption, and the use of fuel mix (electricity, coal, oil and gas) in relation to CO 2 emission changes. An innovative evaluative index system was devised to explore grey relation grades among economics, energy and environmental quality. Results indicate that a rapid increase in electricity generation during the past 10 years is the main reason for CO 2 emission increase in Taiwan. The largest CO 2 emitting sectors include iron and steel, transportation, petrochemical materials, commerce and other services. Therefore, it is important to reduce the energy intensity of these sectors by energy conservation, efficiency improvement and adjustment of industrial structure towards high value-added products and services. Economic growth for all industries has a more significant influence, than does total energy consumption, on CO 2 emission increase in Taiwan. It is also important to decouple the energy consumption and production to reduce the impacts of CO 2 on economic growth. Furthermore, most of the sectors examined had increased CO 2 emissions, except for machinery and road transportation. For high energy intensive and CO 2 intensive industries, governmental policies for CO 2 mitigation should be directed towards low carbon fuels as well as towards enhancement of the demand side management mechanism, without loss of the nation's competitiveness

  17. Global economic potential for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from mangrove loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siikamäki, Juha; Sanchirico, James N; Jardine, Sunny L

    2012-09-04

    Mangroves are among the most threatened and rapidly disappearing natural environments worldwide. In addition to supporting a wide range of other ecological and economic functions, mangroves store considerable carbon. Here, we consider the global economic potential for protecting mangroves based exclusively on their carbon. We develop unique high-resolution global estimates (5' grid, about 9 × 9 km) of the projected carbon emissions from mangrove loss and the cost of avoiding the emissions. Using these spatial estimates, we derive global and regional supply curves (marginal cost curves) for avoided emissions. Under a broad range of assumptions, we find that the majority of potential emissions from mangroves could be avoided at less than $10 per ton of CO(2). Given the recent range of market price for carbon offsets and the cost of reducing emissions from other sources, this finding suggests that protecting mangroves for their carbon is an economically viable proposition. Political-economy considerations related to the ability of doing business in developing countries, however, can severely limit the supply of offsets and increases their price per ton. We also find that although a carbon-focused conservation strategy does not automatically target areas most valuable for biodiversity, implementing a biodiversity-focused strategy would only slightly increase the costs.

  18. Use of videoconferencing in Wales to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, travel costs and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Delyth; Tranter, Glynis; Axford, Alan T

    2009-01-01

    In September 2005 a telemedicine service was started to assist multidisciplinary teams in Wales to improve cancer services. In October 2006 and October 2007 users of videoconferencing equipment at one site completed questionnaires. During October 2006 a total of 18,000 km of car travel were avoided, equivalent to 1696 kg of CO(2) emission. During October 2007 a total of 20,800 km of car travel were avoided, equivalent to 2590 kg of CO(2) emission. We estimate that 48 trees would take a year to absorb that quantity of CO(2). The results of the surveys show that exploiting telemedicine makes better use of staff time, reduces the time spent travelling and assists in reducing climate change by limiting the emissions of CO(2).

  19. Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of China’s Non-Metallic Mineral Products Industry: Present State, Prospects and Policy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available China is the largest non-metallic mineral producer in the world and one of the key consumers of four major non-metallic mineral products, including cement, refractories, plate glass and ceramics. The non-metallic mineral products industry’s rapid growth has brought about a large demand for energy. The present study provides an overview of China’s non-metallic mineral products industry in terms of production, energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. In this industry, the energy efficiency is relatively low and the level of carbon dioxide emission is much higher than developed countries’ average. This study interprets the effects of some newly issued policies and analyses the influential factors in achieving energy conservation and emission reduction goals. It also discusses the prospects for saving energy and emission reduction in the industry. Retrofitting facilities and using new production technologies is imperative. Additionally, implementing market-based policies, promoting industrial transformation and effective international cooperation would help decrease carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption.

  20. Unconsidered sporadic sources of carbon dioxide emission from soils in taiga forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelin, D V; Zamolodchikov, D G; Isaev, A S

    2017-07-01

    Long-term monitoring in the Russian taiga zone has shown that all known extreme destructive effects resulting in the weakening and death of tree stands (windfalls, pest attacks, drought events, etc.) can be sporadic, but significant sources of CO 2 soil emission. Among them are (i) a recently found effect of the multiyear CO 2 emission from soil at the bottom of deadwood of spruce trees that died due to climate warming and subsequent pest outbreaks, (ii) increased soil CO 2 emissions due to to the fall of tree trunks during massive windfalls, and (iii) pulse CO 2 emission as a result of the so-called Birch effect after drought events in the taiga zone. According to the modeling, while depending on the spatial and temporal scales of their manifestation, the impact of these sporadic effects on the regional and global soil respiration fluxes could be significant and should be taken into consideration. This is due to continuing Climate Change, and further increase of local, regional and Global human impacts on the atmospheric greenhouse gases balance, and land use, as well.

  1. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide, trace gases and metals from Mount Erebus, Antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, P.R.; Meeker, K. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro (USA)); Finnegan, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-11-01

    SO{sub 2} emission rates have been measured annually since 1983 at Mount Erebus, Antarctica by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC V). Following a 4 month period of sustained strombolian activity in late 1984, SO{sub 2} emissions declined from 230 Mg/day in 1983 to 25 Mg/day and then slowly increased from 16 Mg/day in 1985 to 51 Mg/day in 1987. Nine sets of filter packs containing partcle and {sup 7}LiOH treated filters were collected in the plume in 1986 and analyzed by neutron activation. Using the COSPEC data and measured element/S ratios on the filters, emission rates have been determined for trace gases and metals. The authors infer HCl and HF emissions in 1983 to be about 1200 and 500 Mg/day, respectively. Mt Erebus has therefore been an important source of halogens to the Anarctic atmosphere and could be responsible for excess Cl found in Central Antarctica snow.

  2. On the accuracy of HITEMP-2010 calculated emissivities of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, Michael; Weber, Roman; Mancini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Line-by-line (LbL) calculations using either HITRAN or HITEMP spectral data bases are often used for predicting gas radiation properties like absorption coefficients or emissivities. Due to the large size of these data bases, calculations are computationally too expensive to be used in regular CF...

  3. The impact of a carbon tax on economic growth and carbon dioxide emissions in Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conefrey, Thomas; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Valeri, Laura Malaguzzi; Tol, Richard S J

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the medium-term effects of a carbon tax on growth and CO2 emissions in Ireland, a small open economy. We find that a double dividend exists if the carbon tax revenue is recycled through reduced income taxes. If the revenue is recycled by giving a lump-sum transfer to households,

  4. Atmospheric emissions of nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide from different nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistani, K R; Jn-Baptiste, M; Lovanh, N; Cook, K L

    2011-01-01

    Alternative N fertilizers that produce low greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soil are needed to reduce the impacts of agricultural practices on global warming potential (GWP). We quantified and compared growing season fluxes of NO, CH, and CO resulting from applications of different N fertilizer sources, urea (U), urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN), ammonium nitrate (NHNO), poultry litter, and commercially available, enhanced-efficiency N fertilizers as follows: polymer-coated urea (ESN), SuperU, UAN + AgrotainPlus, and poultry litter + AgrotainPlus in a no-till corn ( L.) production system. Greenhouse gas fluxes were measured during two growing seasons using static, vented chambers. The ESN delayed the NO flux peak by 3 to 4 wk compared with other N sources. No significant differences were observed in NO emissions among the enhanced-efficiency and traditional inorganic N sources, except for ESN in 2009. Cumulative growing season NO emission from poultry litter was significantly greater than from inorganic N sources. The NO loss (2-yr average) as a percentage of N applied ranged from 0.69% for SuperU to 4.5% for poultry litter. The CH-C and CO-C emissions were impacted by environmental factors, such as temperature and moisture, more than the N source. There was no significant difference in corn yield among all N sources in both years. Site specifics and climate conditions may be responsible for the differences among the results of this study and some of the previously published studies. Our results demonstrate that N fertilizer source and climate conditions need consideration when selecting N sources to reduce GHG emissions. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by modernisation or substitution of existing coal power stations in the EC and the resulting cost effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folke, C.

    2000-01-01

    Trends in carbon dioxide emissions and cost of coal power stations are analyzed EC-wide. The data base derives from several generations of power stations for the period between 2000 and 2050 assuming several different substitution strategies. The reference scenario is one in which decisions on new power station types are made purely on the basis of short-term economic aspects (annual minimisation of the nominal cost). The method and the parameters used for calculating and analyzing carbon dioxide strategies in the context of this study are presented and explained [de

  6. The Use of an Automated System (GreenFeed) to Monitor Enteric Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Ruminant Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Alexander N; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler; Weeks, Holley; Zimmerman, Patrick R; Harper, Michael T; Hristova, Rada A; Zimmerman, R Scott; Branco, Antonio F

    2015-09-07

    Ruminant animals (domesticated or wild) emit methane (CH4) through enteric fermentation in their digestive tract and from decomposition of manure during storage. These processes are the major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from animal production systems. Techniques for measuring enteric CH4 vary from direct measurements (respiration chambers, which are highly accurate, but with limited applicability) to various indirect methods (sniffers, laser technology, which are practical, but with variable accuracy). The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas method is commonly used to measure enteric CH4 production by animal scientists and more recently, application of an Automated Head-Chamber System (AHCS) (GreenFeed, C-Lock, Inc., Rapid City, SD), which is the focus of this experiment, has been growing. AHCS is an automated system to monitor CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) mass fluxes from the breath of ruminant animals. In a typical AHCS operation, small quantities of baiting feed are dispensed to individual animals to lure them to AHCS multiple times daily. As the animal visits AHCS, a fan system pulls air past the animal's muzzle into an intake manifold, and through an air collection pipe where continuous airflow rates are measured. A sub-sample of air is pumped out of the pipe into non-dispersive infra-red sensors for continuous measurement of CH4 and CO2 concentrations. Field comparisons of AHCS to respiration chambers or SF6 have demonstrated that AHCS produces repeatable and accurate CH4 emission results, provided that animal visits to AHCS are sufficient so emission estimates are representative of the diurnal rhythm of rumen gas production. Here, we demonstrate the use of AHCS to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes from dairy cows given a control diet or a diet supplemented with technical-grade cashew nut shell liquid.

  7. Avoiding emissions of carbon dioxide through the use of fuels derived from sugar cane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinguelli-Rosa, L.; Kahn-Ribeiro, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows that the use of ethyl alcohol and sugar cane bagasse as fuel substitutions for gasoline, and natural gas, fuel oil or coal, can have an important role to avoid GHG emissions. The Brazilian Alcohol program and the use of sugar cane bagasse for generating electricity may prove to be an important alternative for the reduction of GHG emissions. Large-scale production and the use of renewable energy from biomass may qualify Brazil for recognition at an international level. It is shown that the cost of alcohol is higher than that of gasoline with the present low price of oil on the international market, but the costs could be reduced by feasible technological improvements 10 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  8. The Effects of the Tractor and Semitrailer Routing Problem on Mitigation of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqi Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of CO2 emissions minimization in the vehicle routing problem (VRP is of critical importance to enterprise practice. Focusing on the tractor and semitrailer routing problem with full truckloads between any two terminals of the network, this paper proposes a mathematical programming model with the objective of minimizing CO2 emissions per ton-kilometer. A simulated annealing (SA algorithm is given to solve practical-scale problems. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, a lower bound is developed. Computational experiments on various problems generated randomly and a realistic instance are conducted. The results show that the proposed methods are effective and the algorithm can provide reasonable solutions within an acceptable computational time.

  9. On the accuracy of HITEMP-2010 calculated emissivities of Water Vapor and Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, M.; Weber, R.; Mancini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, spectral Line-by-Line calculations using either HITRAN or HITEMP data bases are frequently used for calculating gas radiation properties like absorption coefficients or emissivities. Such calculations are computationally very expensive because of the vast number of spectral lines and......, therefore, these calculations are usually taken as a benchmark to validate less complex models. In order to evaluate the accuracy of these simplified models, the accuracy of the Line-by-Line predictions using HITEMP data base must be known. We present here some of our recent full spectrum measurements...... of spectral transmissivities which were done for H2O-CO2-N2 mixtures for temperatures up to 1770K. Using these measured data it is possible to compare the Line-by-Line calculation using HITEMP-2010 on the basis of total (spectrally averaged) emissivity. At high pressures, also a proper lineshape treatment...

  10. Assessing the risk of carbon dioxide emissions from blue carbon ecosystems

    KAUST Repository

    Lovelock, Catherine E.

    2017-05-15

    "Blue carbon" ecosystems, which include tidal marshes, mangrove forests, and seagrass meadows, have large stocks of organic carbon (C) in their soils. These carbon stocks are vulnerable to decomposition and - if degraded - can be released to the atmosphere in the form of CO. We present a framework to help assess the relative risk of CO emissions from degraded soils, thereby supporting inclusion of soil C into blue carbon projects and establishing a means to prioritize management for their carbon values. Assessing the risk of CO emissions after various kinds of disturbances can be accomplished through knowledge of both the size of the soil C stock at a site and the likelihood that the soil C will decompose to CO.

  11. Vegetation sensitivity to global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in a topographically complex region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenbaugh, N.S.; Sloan, L.C.; Snyder, M.A.; Bell, J.L.; Kaplan, J.; Shafer, S.L.; Bartlein, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations may affect vegetation distribution both directly through changes in photosynthesis and water-use efficiency, and indirectly through CO2-induced climate change. Using an equilibrium vegetation model (BIOME4) driven by a regional climate model (RegCM2.5), we tested the sensitivity of vegetation in the western United States, a topographically complex region, to the direct, indirect, and combined effects of doubled preindustrial atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Those sensitivities were quantified using the kappa statistic. Simulated vegetation in the western United States was sensitive to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, with woody biome types replacing less woody types throughout the domain. The simulated vegetation was also sensitive to climatic effects, particularly at high elevations, due to both warming throughout the domain and decreased precipitation in key mountain regions such as the Sierra Nevada of California and the Cascade and Blue Mountains of Oregon. Significantly, when the direct effects of CO2 on vegetation were tested in combination with the indirect effects of CO2-induced climate change, new vegetation patterns were created that were not seen in either of the individual cases. This result indicates that climatic and nonclimatic effects must be considered in tandem when assessing the potential impacts of elevated CO2 levels.

  12. Potential carbon emissions dominated by carbon dioxide from thawed permafrost soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädel, Christina; Bader, Martin K.-F.; Schuur, Edward A.G.; Biasi, Christina; Bracho, Rosvel; Čapek, Petr; De Baets, Sarah; Diáková, Kateřina; Ernakovich, Jessica; Estop-Aragones, Cristian; Graham, David E.; Hartley, Iain P.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Kane, Evan S.; Knoblauch, Christian; Lupascu, Massimo; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Natali, Susan M.; Norby, Richard J.; O'Donnell, Jonathan A.; Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Šantrůčková, Hana; Shaver, Gaius; Sloan, Victoria L.; Treat, Claire C.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Wickland, Kimberly P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing temperatures in northern high latitudes are causing permafrost to thaw, making large amounts of previously frozen organic matter vulnerable to microbial decomposition. Permafrost thaw also creates a fragmented landscape of drier and wetter soil conditions that determine the amount and form (carbon dioxide (CO2), or methane (CH4)) of carbon (C) released to the atmosphere. The rate and form of C release control the magnitude of the permafrost C feedback, so their relative contribution with a warming climate remains unclear. We quantified the effect of increasing temperature and changes from aerobic to anaerobic soil conditions using 25 soil incubation studies from the permafrost zone. Here we show, using two separate meta-analyses, that a 10 °C increase in incubation temperature increased C release by a factor of 2.0 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8 to 2.2). Under aerobic incubation conditions, soils released 3.4 (95% CI, 2.2 to 5.2) times more C than under anaerobic conditions. Even when accounting for the higher heat trapping capacity of CH4, soils released 2.3 (95% CI, 1.5 to 3.4) times more C under aerobic conditions. These results imply that permafrost ecosystems thawing under aerobic conditions and releasing CO2 will strengthen the permafrost C feedback more than waterlogged systems releasing CO2 and CH4 for a given amount of C.

  13. Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Petroleum Refining Sector in Mexico from 2015 to 2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granados-Hernández Elías

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the volume of production of petroleum products of high demand, such as gasoline, rises the use of energy and therefore emissions of CO2 in oil refineries. In Mexico, for example, gasoline demand scenario for the next 20 years growth will increase the fuel consumption by almost 55%, considering a historical trend in traffic. The purpose of this study as to determine the impact of energy consumption per unit of processing oil and CO2 emissions using the methodology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC as well as employing the stoichiometric calculation based on the carbon content. Different projections were made using four technological options of oil refining, processing three types of pure raw (Olmeca, Istmo, Maya and four blends (M1, M2, M3, M4. When performing an energy balance results show that projecting very complex refineries to meet a specific demand for gasoline will consume less energy and therefore CO2 emissions will be lower. This study is important as a tool for energy planning and environmental pollution in Mexico, as well as an object of analysis of the energy sector worldwide.

  14. Ammonia and carbon dioxide emissions by stabilized conventional nitrogen fertilizers and controlled release in corn crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Lima de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The market of stabilized, slow and controlled release nitrogen (N fertilizers represents 1% of the world fertilizer consumption. On the other hand, the increase in availability, innovation and application of these technologies could lead to the improvement of N use efficiency in agroecossystems and to the reduction of environmental impacts. The objective of this study was to quantify agronomic efficiency relative index, ammonia volatilization, and CO2 emissions from conventional, stabilized and controlled release N fertilizers in corn summer crop. The experiment was carried out in a corn crop area located in Lavras, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, without irrigation. All treatments were applied in topdressing at rate of 150 kg ha-1 N. N-NH3 losses from N fertilizers were: Granular urea (39% of the applied N = prilled urea (38% > urea coated with 16% S0 (32% = blend of urea + 7.9% S0 + polymers + conventional urea (32% > prilled urea incorporated at 0.02 m depth (24% > urea + 530 mg kg-1 of NBPT (8% = Hydrolyzed leather (9% > urea + thermoplastic resin (3% = ammonium sulfate (1% = ammonium nitrate (0.7%. Thermoplastic resin coated urea, ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate presented low values of cumulative CO2 emissions in corn crop. On the other hand, hydrolyzed leather promoted greater C-CO2 emission, when compared with other nitrogen fertilizers.

  15. Stochastic Convergence in Per Capita Carbon Dioxide (CO2 Emissions: Evidence from OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu OZCAN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the validity of stochastic convergence hypothesis in relative per capita CO2 emissions in OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries for the period 1960-2013. In other words, it is aimed to reveal the nature of shocks to relative per capita CO2 emissions. As such, divergence holds if shocks are permanent, whereas convergence holds if shocks are temporary. To that aim, the two-break LM (Lagrange multiplier and three-step RALS-LM (residual augmented least squares Lagrange multiplier unit root tests are employed. The results mostly provide evidence of convergence in case of two breaks. However, when structural breaks are not taken into consideration, divergence gains empirical validity. From the viewpoint of government policy, these results indicate that energy usage or environmental protection policies of OECD countries have not long-run impacts on the relative per capita emissions series of the sample countries. Concerning the break dates, the first breaks mostly cumulated around the two energy crises period, whereas the second breaks generally occurred in the 1990s

  16. Women's status and carbon dioxide emissions: A quantitative cross-national analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergas, Christina; York, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Global climate change is one of the most severe problems facing societies around the world. Very few assessments of the social forces that influence greenhouse gas emissions have examined gender inequality. Empirical research suggests that women are more likely than men to support environmental protection. Various strands of feminist theory suggest that this is due to women's traditional roles as caregivers, subsistence food producers, water and fuelwood collectors, and reproducers of human life. Other theorists argue that women's status and environmental protection are linked because the exploitation of women and the exploitation of nature are interconnected processes. For these theoretical and empirical reasons, we hypothesize that in societies with greater gender equality there will be relatively lower impacts on the environment, controlling for other factors. We test this hypothesis using quantitative analysis of cross-national data, focusing on the connection between women's political status and CO(2) emissions per capita. We find that CO(2) emissions per capita are lower in nations where women have higher political status, controlling for GDP per capita, urbanization, industrialization, militarization, world-system position, foreign direct investment, the age dependency ratio, and level of democracy. This finding suggests that efforts to improve gender equality around the world may work synergistically with efforts to curtail global climate change and environmental degradation more generally. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Historical Carbon Dioxide Emissions Caused by Land-Use Changes are Possibly Larger than Assumed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneth, A.; Sitch, S.; Pongratz, J.; Stocker, B. D.; Ciais, P.; Poulter, B.; Bayer, A. D.; Bondeau, A.; Calle, L.; Chini, L. P.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The terrestrial biosphere absorbs about 20% of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. The overall magnitude of this sink is constrained by the difference between emissions, the rate of increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and the ocean sink. However, the land sink is actually composed of two largely counteracting fluxes that are poorly quantified: fluxes from land-use change andCO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. Dynamic global vegetation model simulations suggest that CO2 emissions from land-use change have been substantially underestimated because processes such as tree harvesting and land clearing from shifting cultivation have not been considered. As the overall terrestrial sink is constrained, a larger net flux as a result of land-use change implies that terrestrial uptake of CO2 is also larger, and that terrestrial ecosystems might have greater potential to sequester carbon in the future. Consequently, reforestation projects and efforts to avoid further deforestation could represent important mitigation pathways, with co-benefits for biodiversity. It is unclear whether a larger land carbon sink can be reconciled with our current understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling. Our possible underestimation of the historical residual terrestrial carbon sink adds further uncertainty to our capacity to predict the future of terrestrial carbon uptake and losses.

  18. Carbon dioxide emissions after application of different tillage systems for loam in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongwen, Li; Lifeng, Hu; Fub, Chen; Xuemin, Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Tillage operations influence soil physical properties and crop growth, and thus both directly and indirectly the cropland CO2 exchange with the atmosphere. In this study, the results of CO2 flux measurements on cropland, under different tillage practices in northern China, are presented. CO2 flux on croplands with a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea may L.) rotation was monitored on plots with conventional tillage (CT), rotary tillage (RT) and no tillage (NT). Soil CO2 flux was generally greater in CT than in NT, and the RT CO2 flux was only slightly smaller than the CT. Daily soil CO2 emissions for CT, RT, and NT averaged 11.30g m-2, 9.63 g m-2 and 7.99 g m-2, respectively, during the growing period. Analysis of variance shows that these differences are significant for the three tillage treatments. Peak CO2 emissions were recorded on the CT and RT croplands after tillage operations. At the same time, no obviously increased emission of CO2 occurred on the NT plot. These differences demonstrate that tillage results in a rapid physical release of CO2.

  19. Training for emergencies: Emissions trading as a strategic management game; Ueben fuer den Ernstfall: der Emissionsrechtehandel als Planspiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, J. [Fraunhofer Inst. fuer Systemtechnik und Innovationsforschung, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ehrhart, K.M.; Hoppe, C. [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Statistik und Mathematische Wirtschaftstheorie; Seifert, S. [Takon GmbH Spieltheoretische Beratung, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Historically, German environmental policy has always been based on order policy, so Germany is lagging behind, as compared with Denmark or England, in accumulating initial experience with emissions trading as a clean air policy instrument. The Baden-Wuerttemberg Environmental Ministry therefore initiated a strategic game, in which trading of greenhouse gas emissions can be learned by Baden-Wuerttemberg's industrial organisations. The project called SET UP is presented, results are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn. [German] Da die deutsche Umweltpolitik traditionell ordnungspolitisch gepraegt ist, liegen bisher - im Unterschied zu anderen EU-Mitgliedstaaten wie Daenemark oder England - kaum praktische Erfahrungen mit dem marktwirtschaftlichen Instrument Emissionsrechthandel vor. Deshalb hat das Ministerium fuer Umwelt und Verkehr Baden-Wuerttemberg ein Planspiel initiiert: Simulation eines Emissionshandels fuer Treibhausgase in der baden-wuerttembergischen Unternehmenspraxis (SET UP). Ueber Projektaufbau, Ergebnisanalyse und Schlussfolgerungen wird im Folgenden berichtet. (orig.)

  20. Glucosinolate breakdown products as insect fumigants and their effect on carbon dioxide emission of insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coats Joel R

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucosinolate breakdown products are volatile, therefore good candidates for insect fumigants. However, although they are insecticidal, the mode of action of such natural products is not clear. We studied the insecticidal effect of these compounds as fumigants, and monitored the production of carbon dioxide by the insects as a probe to the understanding of their mode of action. Results The fumigation 24-h LC50 against the house fly (Musca domestica L. of allyl thiocyanate, allyl isothiocyanate, allyl cyanide, and l-cyano-2-hydroxy-3-butene was 0.1, 0.13, 3.66, and 6.2 μg cm-3, respectively; they were 0.55, 1.57, 2.8, and > 19.60 μg cm-3, respectively, against the lesser grain borer (Rhyzopertha dominica Fabricius. The fumigation toxicity of some of the glucosinolate products was very close to or better than that of the commercial insect fumigants such as chloropicrin (LC50: 0.08 and 1.3 μg cm-3 against M. domestica and R. dominica, respectively and dichlorovos (LC50: -3 against M. domestica and R. dominica, respectively in our laboratory tests. Significantly increased CO2 expiration was found in insects exposed to the vapor of allyl isothiocyanate, allyl thiocyanate and allyl isocyanate. Allyl isothiocyanate was also found to increase the CO2 expiration of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana L.. Conclusions Glucosinolate breakdown products have potential as biodegradable and safe insect fumigants. They may act on the insect respiratory system in their mode of action.

  1. Development of the Croatian Energy Sector by 2050 in Terms of Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granic, G.; Pesut, D.; Tot, M.; Juric, Z.; Horvath, L.; Bacan, A.; Kulisic, B.; Majstorovic, G.

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyzes the question: is it possible to achieve and what would be the consequences of energy development while reducing CO 2 emissions by 80% by year 2050. Thereby, the growth of costs is not the only expected consequence, but there are also desirable and possible impacts of the energy sector on technological development, science, the economy and increasing the added value. In paper, the development of the energy sector by 2050 is modeled and simulated using two models for the evaluation of the energy systems: model for the analysis of energy consumption (MAED - Model for Energy System Analysis ) and model for optimization of energy supply systems (MESSAGE - Model for Energy Supply Strategy Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts ). MESSAGE use the results of MAED model as input assumptions and data. Development opportunities in the sectors of industry, households, services and transport were modeled in the simulation, i.e. possible trajectories of development were considered, in order to achieve the objectives of the sectoral reducing of CO 2 emissions in line with the stated objectives which are discussed at the EU level. The average cost of electricity production in year 2050 will increase by nearly 140% compared to the year 2015. The answer is: the reduction of CO 2 emissions in Croatia by 80% in total and by 95% in the power sector is possible from a technical and technological point of view, but with the high financial impact and significant changes in the energy sector, to which should precede changes in scientific and industrial development.(author)

  2. Mitigation potential of carbon dioxide emissions by management of forests in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Sandra

    1996-01-01

    Substantial areas of available forest lands in Asia could be managed for conservation and sequestration of carbon. These include 133 Mha for establishment of plantations and agroforests, 33.5 Mha for slowed tropical deforestation, and 48 Mha for natural and assisted regeneration of tropical forests. The potential quantity of C conserved and sequestered on these lands was conservatively estimated to be 24 Pg C (1 Pg = 10 15 g) by 2050. Establishment of plantations and agroforests could account for 58% of the total mitigation potential on Asian forest lands. The amount of C that could be conserved and sequestered by all forest sector practices by 2050 under baseline conditions is equivalent to about 4% of the global fossil fuel emissions over the same time period. The uncertainties in estimates of mitigation potential presented in this paper are likely to be high, particularly with respect to the land area available for forestation projects and the rate at which deforestation could be slowed. The uncertainty terms are compounded in making global estimates of the mitigation potential, perhaps to large proportions, but to what extent is presently unknown. An example of a forestry project in China whose main goal was to rehabilitate degraded lands and at the same time provide biomass fuel for the local rural inhabitants is presented to demonstrate that C sequestration, and thus mitigation, is an added benefit to more traditional uses of forests. This forestry project is currently mitigating CO 2 emissions (up to 1.4 Mg C ha -1 yr -1 ) and, with a change in management, an almost two-fold increase in the current reduction of net C emissions would occur. 33 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  3. UV Digital Imaging of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions: Enhancing the Technique With Empirical Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, M. P.; Bluth, G. J.; Shannon, J. M.; Watson, I. M.

    2006-12-01

    SO2 emission measurements are an important component of monitoring volcanic processes, providing insight into the driving forces behind eruptions. Current spectrometric methods (COSPEC, DOAS) typically measure only a cross-section of the plume, which may not be representative of the actual emission flux, and coupled with the difficulty in determining wind speeds affecting the air mass, often leads to erratic SO2 flux values. In order to address these problems, we have developed a ground-based ultraviolet digital camera for the imaging and measurement of SO2 volcanic plumes. This camera improves on the spectrometric methods of SO2 observation by capturing a large portion of the plume in one measurement- a single image. The UV digital camera can also record multiple images every minute, producing a data set that is more comparable with other monitoring techniques. The UV digital camera has proven capable of imaging volcanic plumes under fairly demanding conditions, and determining SO2 fluxes that have roughly agreed with other SO2 measurement techniques. Initial field tests suggest that the data produced by the UV camera are significantly affected by atmospheric scattering. To better evaluate the errors and limitations associated with this new instrument, field experiments have been conducted to assess the effects that background sky brightness, meteorological conditions, and distance to the target have on the calculated SO2 concentrations and flux measurements. Our results will allow us to more accurately model and correct for changing atmospheric conditions and quantify the error associated with atmospheric background scattering. These corrections will make this remarkable new instrument a more accurate and valuable tool for monitoring volcanic emissions.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Littoral Zone of a Chinese Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increase in the number of reservoirs globally has raised important questions about the environmental impact of their greenhouse gases emissions. In particular, the littoral zone may be a hotspot for production of greenhouse gases. We investigated the spatiotemporal variation of CO2 flux at the littoral zone of a Chinese reservoir along a wet-to-dry transect from permanently flooded land, seasonally flooded land to non-flooded dry land, using the static dark chamber technique. The mean total CO2 emission was 346 mg m−2 h−1 and the rate varied significantly by water levels, months and time of day. The spatiotemporal variation of flux was highly correlated with biomass, temperature and water level. Flooding could play a positive role in carbon balance if water recession occurs at the time when carbon gains associated with plant growth overcomes the carbon loss of ecosystem. The overall carbon balance was analysed using cumulative greenhouse gases fluxes and biomass, bringing the data of the present study alongside previously published, simultaneously measured CH4 and N2O fluxes. For the growing season, 12.8 g C m−2 was absorbed by the littoral zone. Taking CH4 and N2O into the calculation showed that permanently flooded sites were a source of greenhouse gases, rather than a sink. Our study emphasises how water level fluctuation influenced CO2, CH4 and N2O in different ways, which greatly affected the spatiotemporal variation and emission rate of greenhouse gases from the littoral zone.

  5. Carbon-dioxide emissions trading and hierarchical structure in worldwide finance and commodities markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zeyu; Yamasaki, Kazuko; Tenenbaum, Joel N.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    In a highly interdependent economic world, the nature of relationships between financial entities is becoming an increasingly important area of study. Recently, many studies have shown the usefulness of minimal spanning trees (MST) in extracting interactions between financial entities. Here, we propose a modified MST network whose metric distance is defined in terms of cross-correlation coefficient absolute values, enabling the connections between anticorrelated entities to manifest properly. We investigate 69 daily time series, comprising three types of financial assets: 28 stock market indicators, 21 currency futures, and 20 commodity futures. We show that though the resulting MST network evolves over time, the financial assets of similar type tend to have connections which are stable over time. In addition, we find a characteristic time lag between the volatility time series of the stock market indicators and those of the EU CO2 emission allowance (EUA) and crude oil futures (WTI). This time lag is given by the peak of the cross-correlation function of the volatility time series EUA (or WTI) with that of the stock market indicators, and is markedly different (>20 days) from 0, showing that the volatility of stock market indicators today can predict the volatility of EU emissions allowances and of crude oil in the near future.

  6. Carbon-dioxide emissions trading and hierarchical structure in worldwide finance and commodities markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zeyu; Yamasaki, Kazuko; Tenenbaum, Joel N; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    In a highly interdependent economic world, the nature of relationships between financial entities is becoming an increasingly important area of study. Recently, many studies have shown the usefulness of minimal spanning trees (MST) in extracting interactions between financial entities. Here, we propose a modified MST network whose metric distance is defined in terms of cross-correlation coefficient absolute values, enabling the connections between anticorrelated entities to manifest properly. We investigate 69 daily time series, comprising three types of financial assets: 28 stock market indicators, 21 currency futures, and 20 commodity futures. We show that though the resulting MST network evolves over time, the financial assets of similar type tend to have connections which are stable over time. In addition, we find a characteristic time lag between the volatility time series of the stock market indicators and those of the EU CO(2) emission allowance (EUA) and crude oil futures (WTI). This time lag is given by the peak of the cross-correlation function of the volatility time series EUA (or WTI) with that of the stock market indicators, and is markedly different (>20 days) from 0, showing that the volatility of stock market indicators today can predict the volatility of EU emissions allowances and of crude oil in the near future.

  7. Carbon dioxide emissions from Tucuruí reservoir (Amazon biome): New findings based on three-dimensional ecological model simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtarelli, Marcelo Pedroso; Ogashawara, Igor; de Araújo, Carlos Alberto Sampaio; Lorenzzetti, João Antônio; Leão, Joaquim Antônio Dionísio; Alcântara, Enner; Stech, José Luiz

    2016-05-01

    We used a three-dimensional model to assess the dynamics of diffusive carbon dioxide flux (F(CO2)) from a hydroelectric reservoir located at Amazon rainforest. Our results showed that for the studied periods (2013 summer/wet and winter/dry seasons) the surface averaged F(CO2) presented similar behaviors, with regular emissions peaks. The mean daily surface averaged F(CO2) showed no significant difference between the seasons (p>0.01), with values around -1338mg Cm-2day-1 (summer/wet) and -1395mg Cm-2day-1 (winter/dry). At diel scale, the F(CO2) was large during the night and morning and low during the afternoon in both seasons. Regarding its spatial distribution, the F(CO2) showed to be more heterogeneous during the summer/wet than during the winter/dry season. The highest F(CO2) were observed at transition zone (-300mg Cm-2h-1) during summer and at littoral zone (-55mg Cm-2h-1) during the winter. The total CO2 emitted by the reservoir along 2013 year was estimated to be 1.1Tg C year-1. By extrapolating our results we found that the total carbon emitted by all Amazonian reservoirs can be around 7Tg C year-1, which is 22% lower than the previous published estimate. This significant difference should not be neglected in the carbon inventories since the carbon emission is a key factor when comparing the environmental impacts of different sources of electricity generation and can influences decision makers in the selection of the more appropriate source of electricity and, in case of hydroelectricity, the geographical position of the reservoirs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Economic and legal problems arising in connection with an EC tax on carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ressing, W.

    1993-01-01

    Having regard to maintaining the competitiveness of the German industry, the German Federal Government decided not to start a solo attempt with introducing in Germany a tax on CO 2 emissions, but instead is backing a proposed directive of the EC Commission, suggesting such tax to be established in the EC member states. There are various concepts on the table open for debate, intended to safeguard competitiveness of the industries by a mix of principles including e.g.: conditionality, the tax to be neutral in its effect on revenue, conditions for tax relieves for energy-intensive business, and tax relieves for investment into technologies and equipment for CO 2 abatement. (orig.) [de

  9. Carbon taxes, consumer demand and carbon dioxide emission: a simulation analysis for the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, E.J.; Proops, J.L.R.; Gay, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines a policy instrument that has been proposed as a means of reducing 'greenhouse gases', the introduction of a carbon tax on fossil fuels. It investigates the implication of a carbon tax for consumer prices using an input-output framework. Thus the effect of a tax on use of fossil fuels is allowed to affect consumer prices. These are then used in a micro-simulation program that features estimates of a system of demand equations obtained using 116,000 observations from the Family Expenditure System. This predicts the behavioural reaction of each household to the tax changes and the consequent effect on CO 2 emission, government revenue and any distributional effects. We illustrate the impact of a variety of carbon taxes, changes to indirect tax rates and lump-sum compensatory payments. (author)

  10. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gases: A Technological Review Emphasizing Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Songolzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs such as CO2 in the atmosphere is a global warming. Human activities are a major cause of increased CO2 concentration in atmosphere, as in recent decade, two-third of greenhouse effect was caused by human activities. Carbon capture and storage (CCS is a major strategy that can be used to reduce GHGs emission. There are three methods for CCS: pre-combustion capture, oxy-fuel process, and post-combustion capture. Among them, post-combustion capture is the most important one because it offers flexibility and it can be easily added to the operational units. Various technologies are used for CO2 capture, some of them include: absorption, adsorption, cryogenic distillation, and membrane separation. In this paper, various technologies for post-combustion are compared and the best condition for using each technology is identified.

  11. Does “Greening” of Neotropical Cities Considerably Mitigate Carbon Dioxide Emissions? The Case of Medellin, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carley C. Reynolds

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cities throughout the world are advocating highly promoted tree plantings as a climate change mitigation measure. Assessing the carbon offsets associated with urban trees relative to other climate change policies is vital for sustainable development, planning, and solving environmental and socio-economic problems, but is difficult in developing countries. We estimated and assessed carbon dioxide (CO2 storage, sequestration, and emission offsets by public trees in the Medellin Metropolitan Area, Colombia, as a viable Nature-Based Solution for the Neotropics. While previous studies have discussed nature-based solutions and explored urban tree carbon dynamics in high income countries, few have been conducted in tropical cities in low-middle income countries, particularly within South America. We used a public tree inventory for the Metropolitan Area of the Aburrá Valley and an available urban forest functional model, i-Tree Streets, calibrated for Colombia’s context. We found that CO2 offsets from public trees were not as effective as cable cars or landfills. However, if available planting spaces are considered, carbon offsets become more competitive with cable cars and other air quality and socio-economic co-benefits are also provided. The use of carbon estimation models and the development of relevant carbon accounting protocols in Neotropical cities are also discussed. Our nature-based solution approach can be used to better guide management of urban forests to mitigate climate change and carbon offset accounting in tropical cities lacking available information.

  12. VEGETATION SYNTAXONOMY AND LAND MANAGEMENT EFFECT ON METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM WETLANDS: A CASE STUDY FROM TIDAL SALT AND BRACKISH MARSH

    OpenAIRE

    Annisa Satyanti; Evi Saragih; Paul Egan; Nuria Simon Cid; Elise Knecht; Marieke Euwe

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emission from wetlands significantly contribute to climate change and global warming. The interaction between among vegetation type, various environmental factors, and management regimes such as grazing and mowing is considered important in the calculation of CO2 and CH4 gas flux for an ecosystem. In this study, vegetation composition, CH4 and CO2 flux, soil characteristics, air temperature and humidity from the brackish marsh and salt marsh wetland ecos...

  13. A hybrid modelling approach to develop scenarios for China's carbon dioxide emissions to 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, Ajay; Schulz, Niels; Napp, Tamaryn; Tong, Danlu; Munuera, Luis; Faist, Mark; Riahi, Keywan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid modelling approach to assess the future development of China's energy system, for both a “hypothetical counterfactual baseline” (HCB) scenario and low carbon (“abatement”) scenarios. The approach combines a technology-rich integrated assessment model (MESSAGE) of China's energy system with a set of sector-specific, bottom-up, energy demand models for the transport, buildings and industrial sectors developed by the Grantham Institute for Climate Change at Imperial College London. By exploring technology-specific solutions in all major sectors of the Chinese economy, we find that a combination of measures, underpinned by low-carbon power options based on a mix of renewables, nuclear and carbon capture and storage, would fundamentally transform the Chinese energy system, when combined with increasing electrification of demand-side sectors. Energy efficiency options in these demand sectors are also important. - Highlights: • Combining energy supply and demand models reveals low-carbon technology choices across China's economy. • China could reduce its CO 2 emissions to close to 3 Gt in 2050, costing around 2% of GDP. • Decarbonising the power sector underpins the energy system transformation. • Electrification of industrial processes, building heating and transport is required. • Energy efficiency across the demand side is also important

  14. Carbon dioxide emission from maize straw incubated with soil under various moisture and nitrogen levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abro, S.A.; Tian, X.; Hussain, Q.; Talpur, M.; Singh, U.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the decomposition of maize straw incorporated into soil amended with nitrogen (N) and moisture (M) levels. Clay loam topsoil amended with maize straw was adjusted to four initial nitrogen treatments (C/N ratios of 72, 36, 18, and 9) and four moisture levels (60%, 70%, 80% and 90 % of field capacity) for the total of 16 treatments and incubated at 20 deg. C for 51 days. CO/sub 2/-C evolved was regularly recorded for all treatments during entire incubation period. Results showed that the mixing of straw with soil accelerated decomposition rates and enhanced cumulative CO/sub 2/-C production. The incorporation of straw brought about 50% increase in the cumulative CO/sub 2/-C production as compared with controls. About 45% of added maize straw C was mineralized to CO/sub 2/-C in 51 days. We conclude that incorporation of straw into soil along with the addition of N and moisture levels significantly affected CO/sub 2/-C evolution, cumulative CO/sub 2-C/, C mineralization and soil organic carbon deposition. The CO/sub 2/ emission was in positive correlation with (R2=0.99) N, moisture and incubation time (days). The straw returning into soil may enhance carbon pools and, thus will improve soil and environmental quality. (author)

  15. Impacts of emission reduction and meteorological conditions on air quality improvement during the 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Wang, Tijian; Chen, Pulong; Huang, Xiaoxian; Zhu, Jialei; Zhuang, Bingliang

    2017-11-01

    As the holding city of the 2nd Youth Olympic Games (YOG), Nanjing is highly industrialized and urbanized, and faces several air pollution issues. In order to ensure better air quality during the event, the local government took great efforts to control the emissions from pollutant sources. However, air quality can still be affected by synoptic weather, not only emission. In this paper, the influences of meteorological factors and emission reductions were investigated using observational data and numerical simulations with WRF-CMAQ (Weather Research and Forecasting - Community Multiscale Air Quality). During the month in which the YOG were held (August 2014), the observed hourly mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, PM10, PM2.5, CO and O3 were 11.6 µg m-3, 34.0 µg m-3, 57.8 µg m-3, 39.4 µg m-3, 0.9 mg m-3 and 38.8 µg m-3, respectively, which were below China National Ambient Air Quality Standard (level 2). However, model simulation showed that the weather conditions, such as weaker winds during the YOG, were adverse for better air quality and could increase SO2, NO2, PM10, PM2.5 and CO by 17.5, 16.9, 18.5, 18.8, 7.8 and 0.8 %. Taking account of local emission abatement only, the simulated SO2, NO2, PM10, PM2.5 and CO decreased by 24.6, 12.1, 15.1, 8.1 and 7.2 %. Consequently, stringent emission control measures can reduce the concentrations of air pollutants in the short term, and emission reduction is very important for air quality improvement during the YOG. A good example has been set for air quality protection for important social events.

  16. The impact of an emerging port on the carbon dioxide emissions of inland container transport. An empirical study of Taipei port

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Chun-Hsiung; Tseng, Po-Hsing; Lu, Chin-Shan [Department of Transportation and Communication Management Science, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan City 701 (China); Cullinane, Kevin [Transport Research Institute (TRI), Edinburgh Napier University, Merchiston Campus, Edinburgh EH10 5DT (United Kingdom); School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2010-09-15

    This study analyzes the changes in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions resulting from the movement of containers from established ports through the emerging port of Taipei in Northern Taiwan. An activity-based emissions model is used to estimate the CO{sub 2} emissions of container transport under four scenarios where there are switches of market share from existing ports to the emerging port. The results show that there are greater reductions in CO{sub 2} when transhipment routes are changed from the ports of Kaohsiung, Taichung and Keelung to the emerging port of Taipei. The paper concludes that the analytical approach adopted in the paper can help decision-makers understand potential CO{sub 2} emissions reduction strategies in the route selection of inland container transportation and such consideration should provide a broader and more meaningful basis for the socio-economic evaluation of port investment projects. (author)

  17. The impact of an emerging port on the carbon dioxide emissions of inland container transport: An empirical study of Taipei port

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, C.-H., E-mail: chliao@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Transportation and Communication Management Science, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Tseng, P.-H., E-mail: tzeng_ypo@yahoo.com.t [Department of Transportation and Communication Management Science, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Cullinane, Kevin, E-mail: k.cullinane@napier.ac.u [Transport Research Institute (TRI), Edinburgh Napier University, Merchiston Campus, Edinburgh EH10 5DT (United Kingdom); School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Lu, C.-S., E-mail: lucs@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Transportation and Communication Management Science, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-15

    This study analyzes the changes in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions resulting from the movement of containers from established ports through the emerging port of Taipei in Northern Taiwan. An activity-based emissions model is used to estimate the CO{sub 2} emissions of container transport under four scenarios where there are switches of market share from existing ports to the emerging port. The results show that there are greater reductions in CO{sub 2} when transhipment routes are changed from the ports of Kaohsiung, Taichung and Keelung to the emerging port of Taipei. The paper concludes that the analytical approach adopted in the paper can help decision-makers understand potential CO{sub 2} emissions reduction strategies in the route selection of inland container transportation and such consideration should provide a broader and more meaningful basis for the socio-economic evaluation of port investment projects.

  18. Quantifying UK emissions of carbon dioxide using an integrative measurement strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzi, S.; Palmer, P.

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) programme is to quantify the magnitude and uncertainty of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes from the UK. GAUGE builds on the tall tower network established by the UK Government to estimate fluxes from England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. The GAUGE measurement programme includes two additional tall tower sites (one in North Yorkshire and one downwind of London); regular measurements of CO2 and CH4 isotopologues; instrumentation installed on a ferry that travels daily along the eastern coast of the UK from Scotland to Belgium; a research aircraft that has been deployed on a campaign basis; and a high-density network over East Anglia that is primarily focused on the agricultural sector. We have also included satellite observations from the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) through ongoing activities within the UK National Centre for Earth Observation. In this presentation, we will present new CO2 flux estimates for the UK inferred from GAUGE measurements using a nested, high-resolution (25 km) version of the GEOS-Chem atmospheric transport model and an ensemble Kalman filter. We will present our current best estimate for CO2 fluxes and a preliminary assessment of the efficacy of individual GAUGE data sources to spatially resolve CO2 flux estimates over the UK. We will also discuss how flux estimates inferred from the different models used within GAUGE can help to assess the role of transport model error and to determine an ensemble CO2 flux estimate for the UK.

  19. Tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on dryland soil carbon dioxide emission and carbon content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainju, Upendra M; Jabro, Jalal D; Caesar-Tonthat, Thecan

    2010-01-01

    Management practices are needed to reduce dryland soil CO(2) emissions and to increase C sequestration. We evaluated the effects of tillage and cropping sequence combinations and N fertilization on dryland crop biomass (stems + leaves) and soil surface CO(2) flux and C content (0- to 120-cm depth) in a Williams loam from May to October, 2006 to 2008, in eastern Montana. Treatments were no-tilled continuous malt barley (Hordeum vulgaris L.) (NTCB), no-tilled malt barley-pea (Pisum sativum L.) (NTB-P), no-tilled malt barley-fallow (NTB-F), and conventional-tilled malt barley-fallow (CTB-F), each with 0 and 80 kg N ha(-1). Measurements were made both in Phase I (malt barley in NTCB, pea in NTB-P, and fallow in NTB-F and CTB-F) and Phase II (malt barley in all sequences) of each cropping sequence in every year. Crop biomass varied among years, was greater in the barley than in the pea phase of the NTB-P treatment, and greater in NTCB and NTB-P than in NTB-F and CTB-F in 2 out of 3 yr. Similarly, biomass was greater with 80 than with 0 kg N ha(-1) in 1 out of 3 yr. Soil CO(2) flux increased from 8 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in early May to 239 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in mid-June as temperature increased and then declined to 3 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in September-October. Fluxes peaked immediately following substantial precipitation (>10 mm), especially in NTCB and NTB-P. Cumulative CO(2) flux from May to October was greater in 2006 and 2007 than in 2008, greater in cropping than in fallow phases, and greater in NTCB than in NTB-F. Tillage did not influence crop biomass and CO(2) flux but N fertilization had a variable effect on the flux in 2008. Similarly, soil total C content was not influenced by treatments. Annual cropping increased CO(2) flux compared with crop-fallow probably by increasing crop residue returns to soils and root and rhizosphere respiration. Inclusion of peas in the rotation with malt barley in the no-till system, which have been known to reduce N fertilization rates and

  20. Carbon dioxide emissions through oxidative peat decomposition on a burnt tropical peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi; Kusin, Kitso; Limin, Suwido; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2014-02-01

    In Southeast Asia, a huge amount of peat has accumulated under swamp forests over millennia. Fires have been widely used for land clearing after timber extraction, thus land conversion and land management with logging and drainage are strongly associated with fire activity. During recent El Niño years, tropical peatlands have been severely fire-affected and peatland fires enlarged. To investigate the impact of peat fires on the regional and global carbon balances, it is crucial to assess not only direct carbon emissions through peat combustion but also oxidative peat decomposition after fires. However, there is little information on the carbon dynamics of tropical peat damaged by fires. Therefore, we continuously measured soil CO2 efflux [peat respiration (RP)] through oxidative peat decomposition using six automated chambers on a burnt peat area, from which about 0.7 m of the upper peat had been lost during two fires, in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. The RP showed a clear seasonal variation with higher values in the dry season. The RP increased logarithmically as groundwater level (GWL) lowered. Temperature sensitivity or Q10 of RP decreased as GWL lowered, mainly because the vertical distribution of RP would shift downward with the expansion of an unsaturated soil zone. Although soil temperature at the burnt open area was higher than that in a near peat swamp forest, model simulation suggests that the effect of temperature rise on RP is small. Annual gap-filled RP was 382 ± 82 (the mean ± 1 SD of six chambers) and 362 ± 74 gC m(-2)  yr(-1) during 2004-2005 and during 2005-2006 years, respectively. Simulated RP showed a significant negative relationship with GWL on an annual basis, which suggests that every GWL lowering by 0.1 m causes additional RP of 89 gC m(-2)  yr(-1) . The RP accounted for 21-24% of ecosystem respiration on an annual basis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Modeling real-world fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions with high resolution for light-duty passenger vehicles in a traffic populated city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Un, Puikei; Fu, Lixin; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Modeling fuel consumption of light-duty passenger vehicles has created substantial concerns due to the uncertainty from real-world operating conditions. Macao is world-renowned for its tourism industry and high population density. An empirical model is developed to estimate real-world fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions for gasoline-powered light-duty passenger vehicles in Macao by considering local fleet configuration and operating conditions. Thanks to increasingly stringent fuel consumption limits in vehicle manufacturing countries, estimated type-approval fuel consumption for light-duty passenger vehicles in Macao by model year was reduced from 7.4 L/100 km in 1995 to 5.9 L/100 km in 2012, although a significant upsizing trend has considerably offset potential energy-saving benefit. However, lower driving speed and the air-conditioning usage tend to raise fleet-average fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emission factors, which are estimated to be 10.1 L/100 km and 240 g/km in 2010. Fleet-total fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions are modeled through registered vehicle population-based and link-level traffic demand approaches and the results satisfactorily coincide with the historical record of fuel sales in Macao. Temporal and spatial variations in fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from light-duty passenger vehicles further highlight the importance of effective traffic management in congested areas of Macao. - Highlights: • A fuel consumption model is developed for Macao's light-duty passenger cars. • Increased vehicle size partially offset energy benefit from tightened fuel consumption standard. • Lower speed and use of air-conditioning greatly increase fuel use of Macao light-duty passenger cars. • A high resolution inventory of fuel use and carbon dioxide emissions is built with link-level traffic data. • Policy suggestions are provided to mitigate fuel use in a traffic populated city.

  2. A novel approach to mitigating sulphur dioxide emissions and producing a mercury sorbent material using oil-sands fluid coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, E.; Jia, C.Q.; Tong, S.

    2008-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical smelting operations are a major source of sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) which is a precursor to acid rain and increased levels of UV-B penetration in boreal lakes. Mercury is also released in copper smelter off-gas, which can bioaccumulate and cause neurological disorders and death in humans. Fluid coke is produced in massive quantities as a by-product of bitumen upgrading at Syncrude Canada's facility in Fort McMurray, Alberta. Oilsands fluid coke can be used to reduce SO 2 and produce elemental sulphur as a co-product. This process was dubbed SOactive. The reaction physically activates the fluid coke to produce a sulphur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC) which is known as ECOcarbon. Some studies have indicated that SIAC is well suited for the removal of vapour phase mercury, mainly due to the formation of stable mercuric sulphide species. This paper discussed the findings made to date in relation to the SOactive process and the characterization of ECOcarbons. The paper discussed the use of fluid coke for reducing SO 2 emissions while producing elemental sulphur as well as coke-SO 2 -oxygen (O 2 ) and coke-SO 2 -water (H 2 O) systems. The paper also examined the production of SIAC products for use in capturing vapour phase mercury. The paper presented the materials and methodology, including an illustration of the apparatus used in reduction of SO 2 and activation of fluid coke. It was concluded that more work is still needed to analyse the effect of O 2 and SO 2 reduction and SIAC properties under smelter flue gas conditions. 10 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  3. Warming of subarctic tundra increases emissions of all three important greenhouse gases - carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Carolina; Lamprecht, Richard E; Marushchak, Maija E; Lind, Saara E; Novakovskiy, Alexander; Aurela, Mika; Martikainen, Pertti J; Biasi, Christina

    2017-08-01

    Rapidly rising temperatures in the Arctic might cause a greater release of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. To study the effect of warming on GHG dynamics, we deployed open-top chambers in a subarctic tundra site in Northeast European Russia. We determined carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) fluxes as well as the concentration of those gases, inorganic nitrogen (N) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) along the soil profile. Studied tundra surfaces ranged from mineral to organic soils and from vegetated to unvegetated areas. As a result of air warming, the seasonal GHG budget of the vegetated tundra surfaces shifted from a GHG sink of -300 to -198 g CO 2 -eq m -2 to a source of 105 to 144 g CO 2 -eq m -2 . At bare peat surfaces, we observed increased release of all three GHGs. While the positive warming response was dominated by CO 2 , we provide here the first in situ evidence of increasing N 2 O emissions from tundra soils with warming. Warming promoted N 2 O release not only from bare peat, previously identified as a strong N 2 O source, but also from the abundant, vegetated peat surfaces that do not emit N 2 O under present climate. At these surfaces, elevated temperatures had an adverse effect on plant growth, resulting in lower plant N uptake and, consequently, better N availability for soil microbes. Although the warming was limited to the soil surface and did not alter thaw depth, it increased concentrations of DOC, CO 2, and CH 4 in the soil down to the permafrost table. This can be attributed to downward DOC leaching, fueling microbial activity at depth. Taken together, our results emphasize the tight linkages between plant and soil processes, and different soil layers, which need to be taken into account when predicting the climate change feedback of the Arctic. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation. Feasibility of enhanced natural weathering as a CO2 emission reduction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonates. Potential advantages of mineral CO2 sequestration compared to, e.g., geological CO2 storage include (1) the permanent and inherently safe sequestration of CO2, due to the thermodynamic stability of the carbonate product formed and (2) the vast potential sequestration capacity, because of the widespread and abundant occurrence of suitable feedstock. In addition, carbonation is an exothermic process, which potentially limits the overall energy consumption and costs of CO2 emission reduction. However, weathering processes are slow, with timescales at natural conditions of thousands to millions of years. For industrial implementation, a reduction of the reaction time to the order of minutes has to be achieved by developing alternative process routes. The aim of this thesis is an investigation of the technical, energetic, and economic feasibility of CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. In Chapter 1 the literature published on CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation is reviewed. Among the potentially suitable mineral feedstock for mineral CO2 sequestration, Ca-silicates, more particularly wollastonite (CaSiO3), a mineral ore, and steel slag, an industrial alkaline solid residue, are selected for further research. Alkaline Ca-rich residues seem particularly promising, since these materials are inexpensive and available near large industrial point sources of CO2. In addition, residues tend to react relatively rapidly with CO2 due to their (geo)chemical instability. Various process routes have been proposed for mineral carbonation, which often include a pre-treatment of the solid feedstock (e.g., size reduction and

  5. Emission factors and characteristics of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter at two high-rise layer hen houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ji-Qin; Liu, Shule; Diehl, Claude A.; Lim, Teng-Teeh; Bogan, Bill W.; Chen, Lide; Chai, Lilong; Wang, Kaiying; Heber, Albert J.

    2017-04-01

    Air pollutants emitted from confined animal buildings can cause environmental pollution and ecological damage. Long-term (>6 months) and continuous (or high frequency) monitoring that can reveal seasonal and diurnal variations is needed to obtain emission factors and characteristics about these pollutants. A two-year continuous monitoring of ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon dioxide (CO2) and particulate matter (PM10) emissions from two 218,000-hen high-rise layer houses (H-A and H-B) in Indiana, USA was conducted from June 2007 to May 2009. Gaseous pollutant concentrations were measured with two gas analyzers and PM10 concentrations were measured with three Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalances. The operation and performance of ventilation fans were continuously monitored with multiple methods. Only the emission rates calculated with valid data days (days with more than 18 h, or 75%, of valid data) are reported in this paper. The two-house and two-year mean ± standard deviation emissions per day per hen for NH3, H2S, CO2, and PM10 were 1.08 ± 0.42 g, 1.37 ± 0.83 mg, 76.7 ± 14.6 g, and 20.6 ± 22.5 mg, respectively. Seasonal emission variations were demonstrated for NH3 and CO2, but not evident for H2S and PM10. Ammonia and CO2 emissions were higher in winter than in summer. Significant daily mean emission variations were observed for all four pollutants between the two houses (P 9% of that from bird respiration. Emissions of CO2 during molting were about 80% of those during normal egg production days. Emissions of H2S were not a major concern due to their very low quantities. Emissions of PM10 were more variable than other pollutants. However, not all of the emission statistics are explainable.

  6. Does population have a larger impact on carbon dioxide emissions than income? Evidence from a cross-regional panel analysis in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yang; Liu, Yansui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We reassessed the impact of demographic and GDP changes on CO 2 emissions in China. • Income rather than population growth was a major contributor to growing emissions. • Urbanisation increases energy use and CO 2 emissions, except in western China. • Shrinking household size did not reduce energy use and emissions. • The impact of human activities on the environment varies across regions. - Abstract: As global warming intensifies, the accumulation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gases have attracted great global attention. However, questions regarding whether, how and to what extent demographic factors and processes affect carbon emissions have not yet been fully explained – particularly in China. This study used an improved STIRPAT model to reassess the impact of demographic and income changes on China’s energy-related CO 2 emissions at the national and regional levels using balanced provincial panel data from the 1990–2012 period. Whereas most previous studies of emission–population/income elasticity in China have yielded wide-ranging estimates, this study showed that income rather than demographic change has been the dominant driving force behind China’s growing CO 2 emissions. Urbanisation has increased energy consumption and emissions, except in western China. Changes in the age structure have had a statistically insignificant effect on energy use, but resulted in increased national emissions – particularly in eastern China. Shrinking household size did not reduce energy use and emissions, indicating that improved residential energy efficiency might reduce emissions. Changing the traditional mode of economic growth, reasonable controlling the pace of urbanisation, improving energy efficiency and upgrading industrial structures may yet be necessary to mitigate the environmental impact of human activities in China.

  7. The Emissions of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Nitrous Oxide during Winter without Cultivation in Local Saline-Alkali Rice and Maize Fields in Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural ecosystems are important contributors to atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHGs; however, in situ winter emission data in saline-alkali fields are scarce. Gas samples were collected during different periods, from three rice (R1–R3 and three maize (M1–M3 fields with different soil pH levels and salinity conditions. Carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions in the rice and maize fields decreased with decreasing temperature during the freezing period and increased with the rising temperature during the thawing period, with the majority of winter CO2 emissions occurring during these two periods. Peaks in methane (CH4 emissions were observed during the freezing period in the rice fields and during the snow-melting period in the rice and maize fields. CH4 emissions in the rice fields and CH4 uptake rates in the maize fields were significantly (P < 0.05 related to surface soil temperature. Nitrous oxide (N2O emissions remained relatively low, except for during the peaks observed during the snow-melting period in both the rice and maize fields, leading to the high GHG contribution of the snow-melting period throughout the winter. Higher pH and salinity conditions consistently resulted in lower CO2, CH4, and N2O emissions, CH4 uptake, and lower global warming potential (GWP. These results can contribute to the assessment of the GWP during winter in saline-alkali regions.

  8. A projection of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in the electricity sector for Saudi Arabia: The case for carbon capture and storage and solar photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansouri, Noura Y.; Crookes, Roy J.; Korakianitis, Theodosios

    2013-01-01

    The paper examined the case study of the Saudi electricity sector and provided projections for energy use and respective carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions for the period 2010–2025 with and without cleaner energy technologies. Based on two sets of 20 life cycle assessment studies for carbon capture and storage and solar photovoltaic technologies, CO 2 emission reduction rates were used for projecting future CO 2 emissions. Results showed enormous savings in CO 2 emissions, for the most likely case, year 2025 reported savings that range from 136 up to 235 MtCO 2 . Including low growth and high growth cases, these savings could range from 115 up to 468 MtCO 2 presenting such an unrivalled opportunity for Saudi Arabia. These projections were developed as a way of translating the inherent advantages that cleaner energy technologies could provide for CO 2 emissions savings. It is hoped that the results of this paper would inform energy policymaking in Saudi Arabia. - Highlights: • Electricity use in Saudi Arabia is predicted in the period 2010–2025. • Use of photovoltaic plants and carbon capture and storage are considered. • Life cycle assessment of the options is conducted. • Carbon emissions with and without the renewable energy are estimated. • The projections showcase the CO 2 emissions savings

  9. A new approach for monthly updates of anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions from space: Application to China and implications for air quality forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Henze, Daven K.; Wang, Yuxuan; Qu, Zhen

    2016-09-01

    SO2 emissions, the largest source of anthropogenic aerosols, can respond rapidly to economic and policy driven changes. However, bottom-up SO2 inventories have inherent limitations owing to 24-48 months latency and lack of month-to-month variation in emissions (especially in developing countries). This study develops a new approach that integrates Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) SO2 satellite measurements and GEOS-Chem adjoint model simulations to constrain monthly anthropogenic SO2 emissions. The approach's effectiveness is demonstrated for 14 months in East Asia; resultant posterior emissions not only capture a 20% SO2 emission reduction in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games but also improve agreement between modeled and in situ surface measurements. Further analysis reveals that posterior emissions estimates, compared to the prior, lead to significant improvements in forecasting monthly surface and columnar SO2. With the pending availability of geostationary measurements of tropospheric composition, we show that it may soon be possible to rapidly constrain SO2 emissions and associated air quality predictions at fine spatiotemporal scales.

  10. The trading game : emissions trading schemes offer pollution as a market commodity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, D.

    2005-07-01

    This paper discussed the market mechanisms for emissions trading. The concept emerged in signatory countries to the Kyoto Protocol in response to their commitment to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Emissions trading systems allow large polluters to buy and sell pollution credits in order to meet emission reduction targets. While member states in the European Union (EU) started trading in February 2005, Canada is still developing its own proposal that will be introduced in 2008 to correspond with the first phase of the Kyoto Protocol. In contrast to the European model that places absolute limits on GHG emissions, the Canadian system is intensity-based. Heavy polluters, known as large final emitters, will have to cut emissions of the 6 GHGs covered under the Kyoto Protocol as a percentage of their total industrial output. Companies that reduce their emissions more than their defined targets can trade the surplus as credits on the open domestic market. It was argued that this allows businesses to meet their own emissions targets while failing to contribute effectively to Canada's overall Kyoto target. In addition, in order to lessen the burden to industry, Canada has imposed a $15 cap on the price of credits, which is in contrast to the European system. It was argued that businesses in Europe will be more motivated to meet their targets because of the higher value on European pollution credits. With less onus on business in Canada to reduce absolute targets, the burden of reducing GHG emissions has shifted to federal taxpayers. The paper addressed some of the factors that led to Canada's decision to use an intensity-based system. One main factor was the refusal of the United States to ratify the Kyoto Protocol and the cost disadvantage this would create for Canadian firms. However, some argue that by paying more attention to energy use, companies can reduce emissions and increase shareholder value by achieving cost savings that are greater than the

  11. The relationship between national-level carbon dioxide emissions and population size: an assessment of regional and temporal variation, 1960-2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K Jorgenson

    Full Text Available This study examines the regional and temporal differences in the statistical relationship between national-level carbon dioxide emissions and national-level population size. The authors analyze panel data from 1960 to 2005 for a diverse sample of nations, and employ descriptive statistics and rigorous panel regression modeling techniques. Initial descriptive analyses indicate that all regions experienced overall increases in carbon emissions and population size during the 45-year period of investigation, but with notable differences. For carbon emissions, the sample of countries in Asia experienced the largest percent increase, followed by countries in Latin America, Africa, and lastly the sample of relatively affluent countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania combined. For population size, the sample of countries in Africa experienced the largest percent increase, followed countries in Latin America, Asia, and the combined sample of countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania. Findings for two-way fixed effects panel regression elasticity models of national-level carbon emissions indicate that the estimated elasticity coefficient for population size is much smaller for nations in Africa than for nations in other regions of the world. Regarding potential temporal changes, from 1960 to 2005 the estimated elasticity coefficient for population size decreased by 25% for the sample of Africa countries, 14% for the sample of Asia countries, 6.5% for the sample of Latin America countries, but remained the same in size for the sample of countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania. Overall, while population size continues to be the primary driver of total national-level anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, the findings for this study highlight the need for future research and policies to recognize that the actual impacts of population size on national-level carbon emissions differ across both time and region.

  12. The Relationship between National-Level Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Population Size: An Assessment of Regional and Temporal Variation, 1960–2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Andrew K.; Clark, Brett

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the regional and temporal differences in the statistical relationship between national-level carbon dioxide emissions and national-level population size. The authors analyze panel data from 1960 to 2005 for a diverse sample of nations, and employ descriptive statistics and rigorous panel regression modeling techniques. Initial descriptive analyses indicate that all regions experienced overall increases in carbon emissions and population size during the 45-year period of investigation, but with notable differences. For carbon emissions, the sample of countries in Asia experienced the largest percent increase, followed by countries in Latin America, Africa, and lastly the sample of relatively affluent countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania combined. For population size, the sample of countries in Africa experienced the largest percent increase, followed countries in Latin America, Asia, and the combined sample of countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania. Findings for two-way fixed effects panel regression elasticity models of national-level carbon emissions indicate that the estimated elasticity coefficient for population size is much smaller for nations in Africa than for nations in other regions of the world. Regarding potential temporal changes, from 1960 to 2005 the estimated elasticity coefficient for population size decreased by 25% for the sample of Africa countries, 14% for the sample of Asia countries, 6.5% for the sample of Latin America countries, but remained the same in size for the sample of countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania. Overall, while population size continues to be the primary driver of total national-level anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, the findings for this study highlight the need for future research and policies to recognize that the actual impacts of population size on national-level carbon emissions differ across both time and region. PMID:23437323

  13. The relationship between national-level carbon dioxide emissions and population size: an assessment of regional and temporal variation, 1960-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Andrew K; Clark, Brett

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the regional and temporal differences in the statistical relationship between national-level carbon dioxide emissions and national-level population size. The authors analyze panel data from 1960 to 2005 for a diverse sample of nations, and employ descriptive statistics and rigorous panel regression modeling techniques. Initial descriptive analyses indicate that all regions experienced overall increases in carbon emissions and population size during the 45-year period of investigation, but with notable differences. For carbon emissions, the sample of countries in Asia experienced the largest percent increase, followed by countries in Latin America, Africa, and lastly the sample of relatively affluent countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania combined. For population size, the sample of countries in Africa experienced the largest percent increase, followed countries in Latin America, Asia, and the combined sample of countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania. Findings for two-way fixed effects panel regression elasticity models of national-level carbon emissions indicate that the estimated elasticity coefficient for population size is much smaller for nations in Africa than for nations in other regions of the world. Regarding potential temporal changes, from 1960 to 2005 the estimated elasticity coefficient for population size decreased by 25% for the sample of Africa countries, 14% for the sample of Asia countries, 6.5% for the sample of Latin America countries, but remained the same in size for the sample of countries in Europe, North America, and Oceania. Overall, while population size continues to be the primary driver of total national-level anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, the findings for this study highlight the need for future research and policies to recognize that the actual impacts of population size on national-level carbon emissions differ across both time and region.

  14. Embodied carbon dioxide emission at supra-national scale: A coalition analysis for G7, BRIC, and the rest of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.M.; Chen, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    Presented in this study is an empirical analysis of embodied carbon dioxide emissions induced by fossil fuel combustion for the world divided into three supra-national coalitions, i.e., G7, BRIC, and the rest of the world (ROW), via the application of a multi-region input-output modeling for 2004. Embodied emission intensities for the three coalitions are calculated and compared, with market exchange rate and purchase power parity separately used to investigate the difference between nominal and real production efficiencies. Emissions embodied in different economic activities such as production, consumption, import, and export are calculated and analyzed accordingly, and remarkable carbon trade imbalances associated with G7 (surplus of 1.53 billion tons, or 36% its traded emissions) and BRIC (deficit of 1.37 billion tons, or 51% its traded emissions) and approximate balance with ROW (deficit of 0.16 billion tons, or 3% its traded emissions) are concretely revealed. Carbon leakages associated with industry transfer and international trades are illustrated in terms of impacts on global climate policies. The last but not least, per capita consumption based emissions for G7, BRIC, and ROW are determined as 12.95, 1.53, and 2.22 tons, respectively, and flexible abatement policies as well as equity on per capita entitlement are discussed. - Research highlights: → We compare the embodied CO 2 emissions in 2004 for G7, BRIC, and ROW. → Emissions embodied in production, consumption, import, and export are investigated. → Considerable CO 2 trade surplus and deficit are obtained by G7 and BRIC, respectively. → Per head embodied emissions are 13, 1.5, and 2.2 tons for G7, BRIC, and ROW, respectively.

  15. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

    1994-10-01

    This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

  16. Mathematical games, abstract games

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, Joao Pedro

    2013-01-01

    User-friendly, visually appealing collection offers both new and classic strategic board games. Includes abstract games for two and three players and mathematical games such as Nim and games on graphs.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (regional atmospheric modeling system)-CMAQ (community multi-scale air quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008. Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind, temperature and ozone, but NOx concentration is overestimated. Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics, high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 microg/m3 at Aoyuncun site, respectively. The analysis of sensitive test, with and without emission controls, shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning. The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate. Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August, horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer. On 24 July, as the wind velocity was smaller, the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious.

  18. Adapting sustainable low-carbon techologies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Peter Shyr-Jye

    1997-09-01

    The scientific community is deeply concerned about the effect of greenhouse-gases (GHGs) on global climate change. A major climate shift can result in tragic destruction to our world. Carbon dioxide (COsb2) emissions from coal-fired power plants are major anthropogenic sources that contribute to potential global warming. The People's Republic of China, with its rapidly growing economy and heavy dependence on coal-fired power plants for electricity, faces increasingly serious environmental challenges. This research project seeks to develop viable methodologies for reducing the potential global warming effects and serious air pollution arising from excessive coal burning. China serves as a case study for this research project. Major resolution strategies are developed through intensive literature reviews to identify sustainable technologies that can minimize adverse environmental impacts while meeting China's economic needs. The research thereby contributes technological knowledge to the field of Applied Sciences. The research also integrates modern power generation technologies with China's current and future energy requirements. With these objectives in mind, this project examines how China's environmental issues are related to China's power generation methods. This study then makes strategic recommendations that emphasize low-carbon technologies as sustainable energy generating options to be implemented in China. These low-carbon technologies consist of three options: (1) using cleaner fuels converted from China's plentiful domestic coal resources; (2) applying high-efficiency gas turbine systems for power generation; and (3) integrating coal gasification processes with energy saving combined cycle gas turbine systems. Each method can perform independently, but a combined strategy can achieve the greatest COsb2 reductions. To minimize economic impacts caused by technological changes, this study also addresses additional alternatives that can be implemented in

  19. Renegotiation-proof equilibria in a global emission game when players are impatient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finus, M.; Rundshagen, B.

    1998-01-01

    In a two-country model, in which countries differ with respect to the perception of environmental damages and abatement costs, the stability of international environmental agreements is analyzed in a dynamic framework. Three types of agreements are considered: A socially optimal solution, a uniform emission tax (a tax equally applied in both countries) and a uniform emission reduction quota (an equal percentage emission reduction from a base year). Stability is checked for these agreements according to the concept of renegotiation-proofness. It is shown that the stability requirements depend crucially on the parameters defining the interests of the two countries and the type of agreement. Moreover, it is demonstrated that if punishment options are restricted for some reason the stability of an agreement may suffer. One important result of the paper is that if countries exhibit asymmetric interests, stability in the quota regime is higher than in the tax regime and in the social optimum. This might explain why emission reduction quotas have been so popular in international politics despite recommendations of economists to use market-based instruments. 28 refs

  20. Comparing Mass Balance and Adjoint-Based 4D-VAR Methods for Inverse Modeling of Nitrogen Dioxide Columns for Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M.; Martin, R.; Henze, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) emission inventories can be improved through top-down constraints provided by inverse modeling of observed nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns. Here we compare two methods of inverse modeling for emissions of NOx from synthetic NO2 columns generated from known emissions using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint. We treat the adjoint-based 4D-VAR approach for estimating top-down emissions as a benchmark against which to evaluate variations on the mass balance method. We find that the standard mass balance algorithm can be improved by using an iterative process and using finite difference to calculate the local sensitivity of a change in NO2 columns to a change in emissions, resulting in a factor of two reduction in inversion error. In a simplified case study to recover local emission perturbations, horizontal smearing effects due to NOx transport were better resolved by the adjoint-based approach than by mass balance. For more complex emission changes that reflect real world scenarios, the iterative finite difference mass balance and adjoint methods produce similar top-down inventories when inverting hourly synthetic observations, both reducing the a priori error by factors of 3-4. Inversions of data sets that simulate satellite observations from low Earth and geostationary orbits also indicate that both the mass balance and adjoint inversions produce similar results, reducing a priori error by a factor of 3. As the iterative finite difference mass balance method provides similar accuracy as the adjoint-based 4D-VAR method, it offers the ability to efficiently estimate top-down emissions using models that do not have an adjoint.

  1. Implication of Land-Use and Land-Cover Change into Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Karang Gading and Langkat Timur Wildlife Reserve, North Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Basyuni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove forest in the context of climate change is important sector to be included in the inventory of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. The present study describes land-use and land-cover change during 2006–2012 of a mangrove forest conservation area, Karang Gading and Langkat Timur Laut Wildlife Reserve (KGLTLWR in North Sumatra, Indonesia and their implications to carbon dioxide emissions. A land-use change matrix showed that the decrease of mangrove forest due to increases of other land-use such as aquaculture (50.00% and oil palm plantation (28.83%. Furthermore, the net cumulative of carbon emissions in KGLTLWR for 2006 was 3804.70 t CO2-eq year-1, whereas predicting future emissions in 2030 was 11,318.74 t CO2-eq year-1 or an increase of 33.61% for 12 years. Source of historical emissions mainly from changes of secondary mangrove forests into aquaculture and oil palm plantation were 3223.9 t CO2-eq year-1 (84.73% and 959.00 t CO2-eq year-1 (25.21%, respectively, indicating that the KGLTLWR is still a GHG emitter. Mitigation scenario with no conversion in secondary mangrove forest reduced 16.21% and 25.8% carbon emissions in 2024 and 2030, respectively. This study suggested that aquaculture and oil palm plantation are drivers of deforestation as well as the largest of GHG emission source in this area. Keywords: carbon emission, climate change, deforestation, forest degradation, mangrove conservation

  2. Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motorised travel and associated carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions generate substantial health costs; in the case of motorised travel, this may include contributing to rising obesity levels. Obesity has in turn been hypothesised to increase motorised travel and/or CO2 emissions, both because heavier people may use motorised travel more and because heavier people may choose larger and less fuel-efficient cars. These hypothesised associations have not been examined empirically, however, nor has previous research examined associations with other health characteristics. Our aim was therefore to examine how and why weight status, health, and physical activity are associated with transport CO2 emissions. Methods 3463 adults completed questionnaires in the baseline iConnect survey at three study sites in the UK, reporting their health, weight, height and past-week physical activity. Seven-day recall instruments were used to assess travel behaviour and, together with data on car characteristics, were used to estimate CO2 emissions. We used path analysis to examine the extent to which active travel, motorised travel and car engine size explained associations between health characteristics and CO2 emissions. Results CO2 emissions were higher in overweight or obese participants (multivariable standardized probit coefficients 0.16, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.25 for overweight vs. normal weight; 0.16, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.28 for obese vs. normal weight. Lower active travel and, particularly for obesity, larger car engine size explained 19-31% of this effect, but most of the effect was directly explained by greater distance travelled by motor vehicles. Walking for recreation and leisure-time physical activity were associated with higher motorised travel distance and therefore higher CO2 emissions, while active travel was associated with lower CO2 emissions. Poor health and illness were not independently associated with CO2 emissions. Conclusions Establishing

  3. Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Anna; Brand, Christian; Ogilvie, David

    2012-08-03

    Motorised travel and associated carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions generate substantial health costs; in the case of motorised travel, this may include contributing to rising obesity levels. Obesity has in turn been hypothesised to increase motorised travel and/or CO₂ emissions, both because heavier people may use motorised travel more and because heavier people may choose larger and less fuel-efficient cars. These hypothesised associations have not been examined empirically, however, nor has previous research examined associations with other health characteristics. Our aim was therefore to examine how and why weight status, health, and physical activity are associated with transport CO₂ emissions. 3463 adults completed questionnaires in the baseline iConnect survey at three study sites in the UK, reporting their health, weight, height and past-week physical activity. Seven-day recall instruments were used to assess travel behaviour and, together with data on car characteristics, were used to estimate CO2 emissions. We used path analysis to examine the extent to which active travel, motorised travel and car engine size explained associations between health characteristics and CO₂ emissions. CO₂ emissions were higher in overweight or obese participants (multivariable standardized probit coefficients 0.16, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.25 for overweight vs. normal weight; 0.16, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.28 for obese vs. normal weight). Lower active travel and, particularly for obesity, larger car engine size explained 19-31% of this effect, but most of the effect was directly explained by greater distance travelled by motor vehicles. Walking for recreation and leisure-time physical activity were associated with higher motorised travel distance and therefore higher CO₂ emissions, while active travel was associated with lower CO₂ emissions. Poor health and illness were not independently associated with CO₂ emissions. Establishing the direction of causality between weight status

  4. Road fugitive dust emission characteristics in Beijing during Olympics Game 2008 in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou-bin, Fan; Gang, Tian; Gang, Li; Yu-hu, Huang; Jian-ping, Qin; Shui-yuan, Cheng

    2009-12-01

    Eighty road dust-fall (DF) monitoring sites and 14 background monitoring sites were established in the Beijing metropolitan area, and monitoring was conducted from January 2006 to December 2008. The dust-fall attributable to roads (ΔDF) showed a clear decline from 2006 to 2008. Dust-fall levels decreased across different road types from freeway > major arterial roads > minor arterial roads > collector roads > background sites. The ΔDF showed declines of 65%, 55%, 65% and 84% respectively for freeways, major arterial, minor arterial and collector roads from August 2007 to August 2008, and declines of 77%, 76%, 82% and 82% between August 2006 and August 2008. The ΔDF declined by 80%, 79%, 82% and 69% for freeways, major arterial, minor arterial and collector roads respectively between September 2007 and September 2008, and declined by 84%, 88%, 80% and 81% between September 2006 and September 2008. Eighty samples were collected in August 2007 and August 2008 and analyzed for silt loading. PM 10 emission factors and emission strengths were calculated using the AP-42 model. The silt loading reduced by 77%, 35%, 61%, 59% and 75% for freeways, major arterial, minor arterial, collector and local roads respectively. The PM 10 emission factors were reduced by 57%, 15%, 36%, 51% and 61% and the PM 10 emission strength declined by 70%, 40%, 55%, 65% and 72% for freeways, major arterial, minor arterial, collector and local roads respectively between August 2007 and August 2008. The decline is consistent with the reduction in road dust-fall.

  5. Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-06-01

    The ''International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries

  6. Evaluation of refrigerating and air-conditioning technologies in heat cascading systems under the carbon dioxide emissions constraint: the proposal of the energy cascade balance table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Yoichi

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the refrigerating and air-conditioning technologies in cases of introducing both heat cascading systems and thermal recycling systems in industries located around urban areas. It is necessary to introduce heat cascading systems in the industrial sector in Japan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The concept of heat cascading is the multi-stage use of thermal energy by temperature level. This paper introduces three energy policies for introducing the heat cascading systems. The author develops an energy cascade model based on linear programming so as to minimize the total system costs with carbon taxes. Five cases are investigated. Carbon dioxide emission constraints result in the enhancement of heat cascading, where high temperature heat is supplied for process heating while low temperature heat is shifted to refrigeration. It was found that increasing the amount of garbage combustion waste heat could reduce electric power for the turbo compression refrigerator by promoting waste heat driven ammonia absorption refrigerator. In addition, this study proposes an energy cascade balance table with respect to the temperature level

  7. A case study of the relative effects of power plant nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide emission reductions on atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Seigneur, Christian; Bronson, Rochelle; Chen, Shu-Yun; Karamchandani, Prakash; Walters, Justin T; Jansen, John J; Brandmeyer, Jo Ellen; Knipping, Eladio M

    2010-03-01

    The contrasting effects of point source nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) air emission reductions on regional atmospheric nitrogen deposition are analyzed for the case study of a coal-fired power plant in the southeastern United States. The effect of potential emission reductions at the plant on nitrogen deposition to Escambia Bay and its watershed on the Florida-Alabama border is simulated using the three-dimensional Eulerian Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. A method to quantify the relative and individual effects of NOx versus SO2 controls on nitrogen deposition using air quality modeling results obtained from the simultaneous application of NOx and SO2 emission controls is presented and discussed using the results from CMAQ simulations conducted with NOx-only and SO2-only emission reductions; the method applies only to cases in which ambient inorganic nitrate is present mostly in the gas phase; that is, in the form of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3). In such instances, the individual effects of NOx and SO2 controls on nitrogen deposition can be approximated by the effects of combined NOx + SO2 controls on the deposition of NOy, (the sum of oxidized nitrogen species) and reduced nitrogen species (NHx), respectively. The benefit of controls at the plant in terms of the decrease in nitrogen deposition to Escambia Bay and watershed is less than 6% of the overall benefit due to regional Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) controls.

  8. Emissions of ammonia, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide from swine wastewater during and after acidification treatment: effect of pH, mixing and aeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Xiao-Rong; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of swine slurry acidification and acidification-aeration treatments on ammonia (NH(3)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) emissions during slurry treatment and subsequent undisturbed storage. The study was conducted in an experimental...... setup consisting of nine dynamic flux chambers. Three pH levels (pH = 6.0, pH = 5.8 and pH = 5.5), combined with short-term aeration and venting (with an inert gas) treatments were studied. Acidification reduced average NH(3) emissions from swine slurry stored after acidification treatment compared...... to emissions during storage of non-acidified slurry. The reduction were 50%, 62% and 77% when pH was reduce to 6.0, 5.8 and 5.5, respectively. However, it had no significant effect on average CO(2) and H(2)S emissions during storage of slurry after acidification. Aeration of the slurry for 30 min had no effect...

  9. Carbon dioxide emissions as affected by alternative long-term irrigation and tillage management practices in the lower Mississippi River Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S F; Brye, K R

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring the sustainability of cultivated soils is an ever-increasing priority for producers in the Lower Mississippi River Valley (LMRV). As groundwater sources become depleted and environmental regulations become more strict, producers will look to alternative management practices that will ensure the sustainability and cost-effectiveness of their production systems. This study was conducted to assess the long-term (>7 years) effects of irrigation (i.e., irrigated and dryland production) and tillage (conventional and no-tillage) on estimated carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soil respiration during two soybean (Glycine max L.) growing seasons from a wheat- (Triticum aestivum L.-) soybean, double-cropped production system in the LMRV region of eastern Arkansas. Soil surface CO2 fluxes were measured approximately every two weeks during two soybean growing seasons. Estimated season-long CO2 emissions were unaffected by irrigation in 2011 (P > 0.05); however, during the unusually dry 2012 growing season, season-long CO2 emissions were 87.6% greater (P = 0.044) under irrigated (21.9 Mg CO2 ha(-1)) than under dryland management (11.7 Mg CO2 ha(-1)). Contrary to what was expected, there was no interactive effect of irrigation and tillage on estimated season-long CO2 emissions. Understanding how long-term agricultural management practices affect soil respiration can help improve policies for soil and environmental sustainability.

  10. Effect of irrigation, nitrogen application, and a nitrification inhibitor on nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an olive (Olea europaea L.) orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, S C; Teira-Esmatges, M R; Arbonés, A; Rufat, J

    2015-12-15

    Drip irrigation combined with nitrogen (N) fertigation is applied in order to save water and improve nutrient efficiency. Nitrification inhibitors reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A field study was conducted to compare the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) associated with the application of N fertiliser through fertigation (0 and 50kgNha(-1)), and 50kgNha(-1)+nitrification inhibitor in a high tree density Arbequina olive orchard. Spanish Arbequina is the most suited variety for super intensive olive groves. This system allows reducing production costs and increases crop yield. Moreover its oil has excellent sensorial features. Subsurface drip irrigation markedly reduced N2O and N2O+N2 emissions compared with surface drip irrigation. Fertiliser application significantly increased N2O+N2, but not N2O emissions. Denitrification was the main source of N2O. The N2O losses (calculated as emission factor) ranging from -0.03 to 0.14% of the N applied, were lower than the IPCC (2007) values. The N2O+N2 losses were the largest, equivalent to 1.80% of the N applied, from the 50kgNha(-1)+drip irrigation treatment which resulted in water filled pore space >60% most of the time (high moisture). Nitrogen fertilisation significantly reduced CO2 emissions in 2011, but only for the subsurface drip irrigation strategies in 2012. The olive orchard acted as a net CH4 sink for all the treatments. Applying a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), the cumulative N2O and N2O+N2 emissions were significantly reduced with respect to the control. The DMPP also inhibited CO2 emissions and significantly increased CH4 oxidation. Considering global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity, cumulative N2O emissions and oil production, it can be concluded that applying DMPP with 50kgNha(-1)+drip irrigation treatment was the best option combining productivity with keeping greenhouse gas emissions under control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Contribution of nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide exposure from power plant emissions on respiratory symptom and disease prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amster, Eric D; Haim, Maayan; Dubnov, Jonathan; Broday, David M

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the association between exposure to ambient NOx and SO2 originating from power plant emissions and prevalence of obstructive pulmonary disease and related symptoms. The Orot Rabin coal-fired power plant is the largest power generating facility in the Eastern Mediterranean. Two novel methods assessing exposure to power plant-specific emissions were estimated for 2244 participants who completed the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. The "source approach" modeled emissions traced back to the power plant while the "event approach" identified peak exposures from power plant plume events. Respiratory symptoms, but not prevalence of asthma and COPD, were associated with estimates of power plant NOx emissions. The "source approach" yielded a better estimate of exposure to power plant emissions and showed a stronger dose-response relationship with outcomes. Calculating the portion of ambient pollution attributed to power plants emissions can be useful for air quality management purposes and targeted abatement programs. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Spatial Pattern of Residential Carbon Dioxide Emissions in a Rapidly Urbanizing Chinese City and Its Mismatch Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cities undergoing rapid urbanization are characterized by quick successions of spatiotemporal patterns, meaning that traditional methods cannot adequately assess carbon emissions from urban residential areas, which prevents the study of spatial mismatch. Therefore, this study utilizes night-time lights to construct a spatial emissions model that enables the analysis of the evolution of emissions patterns in China. The results indicate that, compared to the traditional method, the spatial modeling based on night-time lights reflects the spatial emissions trajectories in a more timely and accurate manner in rapidly urbanizing cities. Additionally, we found a relatively low degree of spatial match between emissions and economic activities, with the former, which are greatly affected by urbanization, having a larger dynamism and instability than the latter. Such spatial mismatch effect illustrates that policy makers should focus on factors beyond economics in order to reduce residential carbon emissions during China’s rapid urbanization process.

  13. Temporal characteristics of atmospheric ammonia and nitrogen dioxide over China based on emission data, satellite observations and atmospheric transport modeling since 1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen (Nr. Atmospheric ammonia (NH3 and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 are the most important precursors for Nr compounds (including N2O5, HNO3, HONO and particulate NO3− and NH4+ in the atmosphere. Understanding the changes in NH3 and NO2 has important implications for the regulation of anthropogenic Nr emissions and is a requirement for assessing the consequence of environmental impacts. We conducted the temporal trend analysis of atmospheric NH3 and NO2 on a national scale since 1980 based on emission data (during 1980–2010, satellite observation (for NH3 since 2008 and for NO2 since 2005 and atmospheric chemistry transport modeling (during 2008–2015.Based on the emission data, during 1980–2010, significant continuous increasing trends in both NH3 and NOx were observed in REAS (Regional Emission inventory in Asia, for NH3 0.17 and for NOx 0.16 kg N ha−1 yr−2 and EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research, for NH3 0.24 and for NOx 0.17 kg N ha−1 yr−2 over China. Based on the satellite data and atmospheric chemistry transport model (CTM MOZART-4 (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4, the NO2 columns over China increased significantly from 2005 to 2011 and then decreased significantly from 2011 to 2015; the satellite-retrieved NH3 columns from 2008 to 2014 increased at a rate of 2.37 % yr−1. The decrease in NO2 columns since 2011 may result from more stringent strategies taken to control NOx emissions during the 12th Five Year Plan, while no control policy has focused on NH3 emissions. Our findings provided an overall insight into the temporal trends of both NO2 and NH3 since 1980 based on emission data, satellite observations and atmospheric transport modeling. These findings can provide a scientific background for policy makers that are attempting to control atmospheric

  14. Temporal characteristics of atmospheric ammonia and nitrogen dioxide over China based on emission data, satellite observations and atmospheric transport modeling since 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiuying; Xu, Wen; Liu, Xuejun; Li, Yi; Lu, Xuehe; Zhang, Yuehan; Zhang, Wuting

    2017-08-01

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen (Nr). Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are the most important precursors for Nr compounds (including N2O5, HNO3, HONO and particulate NO3- and NH4+) in the atmosphere. Understanding the changes in NH3 and NO2 has important implications for the regulation of anthropogenic Nr emissions and is a requirement for assessing the consequence of environmental impacts. We conducted the temporal trend analysis of atmospheric NH3 and NO2 on a national scale since 1980 based on emission data (during 1980-2010), satellite observation (for NH3 since 2008 and for NO2 since 2005) and atmospheric chemistry transport modeling (during 2008-2015).Based on the emission data, during 1980-2010, significant continuous increasing trends in both NH3 and NOx were observed in REAS (Regional Emission inventory in Asia, for NH3 0.17 and for NOx 0.16 kg N ha-1 yr-2) and EDGAR (Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research, for NH3 0.24 and for NOx 0.17 kg N ha-1 yr-2) over China. Based on the satellite data and atmospheric chemistry transport model (CTM) MOZART-4 (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4), the NO2 columns over China increased significantly from 2005 to 2011 and then decreased significantly from 2011 to 2015; the satellite-retrieved NH3 columns from 2008 to 2014 increased at a rate of 2.37 % yr-1. The decrease in NO2 columns since 2011 may result from more stringent strategies taken to control NOx emissions during the 12th Five Year Plan, while no control policy has focused on NH3 emissions. Our findings provided an overall insight into the temporal trends of both NO2 and NH3 since 1980 based on emission data, satellite observations and atmospheric transport modeling. These findings can provide a scientific background for policy makers that are attempting to control atmospheric pollution in China. Moreover, the multiple datasets

  15. Seasonal greenhouse gas emissions (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide) from engineered landfills: Daily, intermediate, and final California cover soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    We quantified the seasonal variability of CH4, CO2, and N2O emissions from fresh refuse and daily, intermediate, and final cover materials at two California landfills. Fresh refuse fluxes (g m-2 d-1) averaged CH4 0.053[+/-0.03], CO2 135[+/-117], and N2O 0.063[+/-0.059]. Average CH4 emissions across ...

  16. Carbon dioxide emission trends in cars and light trucks: A comparative analysis of emissions and methodologies for Florida's counties (2000 and 2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garren, S.J.; Pinjari, A.R.; Brinkmann, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates methodologies to quantify CO 2 emissions from cars and light trucks in Florida. The most widely used methodology to calculate greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector at the local level uses a harmonic average (HA) methodology based on nationally averaged fuel economies that assume 55% city and 45% highway VMTs. This paper presents a local condition (LC) methodology that accounts for county-level variations in city and highway VMTs, as opposed to assumed uniform driving conditions. Both HA and LC methodologies were used to estimate and compare absolute and per capita CO 2 emissions both statewide and counties for 2000 and 2008. From 2000 to 2008, statewide absolute and per capita CO 2 emissions increased similarly using HA and LC methodologies; however, the percent change varied considerably among counties. Statewide CO 2 emissions calculated from HA and LC methodologies differed by only -0.2% (2000) and 1.7% (2008); however, the differences in the county-level emissions ranged from -8.0% to 14.9% (2000) and from -5.6% to 17.0% (2008). While either the HA or the LC methodology yields a similar result statewide, significant variation exists at the county level, warranting the need to consider local driving conditions when estimating county-level emissions. - Highlights: → The paper evaluates GHG emission methods for on-road passenger vehicles in Florida. → The paper compares methods that assume the harmonic average with actual VMTs driven. → The paper analyzes statewide GHG emissions aggregated by county for 2000 and 2008. → The paper improves on methods that balance bottom-up with top-down GHG emissions.

  17. Methane emissions among individual dairy cows during milking quantified by eructation peaks or ratio with carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M J; Saunders, N; Wilcox, R H; Homer, E M; Goodman, J R; Craigon, J; Garnsworthy, P C

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to compare methods for examining measurements of CH₄ and CO₂ emissions of dairy cows during milking and to assess repeatability and variation of CH₄ emissions among individual dairy cows. Measurements of CH₄ and CO₂ emissions from 36 cows were collected in 3 consecutive feeding periods. In the first period, cows were fed a commercial partial mixed ration (PMR) containing 69% forage. In the second and third periods, the same 36 cows were fed a high-forage PMR ration containing 75% forage, with either a high grass silage or high maize silage content. Emissions of CH₄ during each milking were examined using 2 methods. First, peaks in CH₄ concentration due to eructations during milking were quantified. Second, ratios of CH₄ and CO₂ average concentrations during milking were calculated. A linear mixed model was used to assess differences between PMR. Variation in CH₄ emissions was observed among cows after adjusting for effects of lactation number, week of lactation, diet, individual cow, and feeding period, with coefficients of variation estimated from variance components ranging from 11 to 14% across diets and methods of quantifying emissions. No significant difference was detected between the 3 PMR in CH₄ emissions estimated by either method. Emissions of CH₄ calculated from eructation peaks or as CH₄ to CO₂ ratio were positively associated with forage dry matter intake. Ranking of cows according to CH₄ emissions on different diets was correlated for both methods, although rank correlations and repeatability were greater for CH₄ concentration from eructation peaks than for CH₄-to-CO₂ ratio. We conclude that quantifying enteric CH₄ emissions either using eructation peaks in concentration or as CH₄-to-CO₂ ratio can provide highly repeatable phenotypes for ranking cows on CH₄ output. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New evidence on the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions from panel seemingly unrelated regressions augmented Dickey-Fuller tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.-C.; Chang, C.-P.

    2008-01-01

    Using the data for per capita carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions relative to the average per capita emissions for 21 countries in the organisation for economic co-operation and development (OECD) covering the period 1960-2000, this paper seeks to determine whether the stochastic convergence and β-convergence of CO 2 emissions are supported in countries with the same level of development. In other words, are shocks to relative per capita CO 2 emissions temporary in industrialized countries? We respond to this question by utilizing Breuer et al.'s [Breuer JB, McNown R, Wallace MS. Misleading inferences from panel unit-root tests with an illustration from purchasing power parity. Review of International Economics 2001;9(3):482-93; Breuer JB, McNown R, Wallace MS. Series-specific unit-root tests with panel data. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics 2002 64(5):527-46] panel seemingly unrelated regressions augmented Dickey-Fuller (SURADF) unit-root tests, which allow us to account for possible cross-sectional effects and to identify how many and which members of the panel contain a unit root. Our empirical findings provide evidence that relative per capita CO 2 emissions in OECD countries are a mixture of I(0) and I(1) processes, in which 14 out of 21 OECD countries exhibit divergence. The results reveal that conventional panel unit-root tests can lead to misleading inferences biased towards stationarity even if only one series in the panel is strongly stationary

  19. Potential for reducing paper mill energy use and carbon dioxide emissions through plant-wide energy audits: A case study in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Lingbo; Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Liu, Huanbin; Li, Jigeng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We audited a paper mill in China to reduce its energy use and CO 2 emissions. ► The energy use and CO 2 emissions of the mill and each paper machine are presented. ► The energy saving potential for the paper machine is estimated at 8–37%. ► The energy saving potential is 967.8 TJ, equal to 14.4% of the mill’s energy use. ► The CO 2 reduction potential is 93,453 tonnes CO 2 for the studied paper mill. -- Abstract: The pulp and paper industry is one of the most energy-intensive industries worldwide. In 2007, it accounted for 5% of total global industrial energy consumption and 2% of direct industrial carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. An energy audit is a primary step toward improving energy efficiency at the facility level. This paper describes a plant-wide energy audit aimed at identifying energy conservation and CO 2 mitigation opportunities at a paper mill in Guangdong province, China. We describe the energy audit methods, relevant Chinese standards, methods of calculating energy and carbon indicators, baseline energy consumption and CO 2 emissions of the audited paper mill, and nine energy-efficiency improvement opportunities identified by the audit. For each of the nine options, we evaluate the energy conservation and associated CO 2 mitigation potential. The total technical energy conservation potential for these nine opportunities is 967.8 terajoules (TJ), and the total CO 2 mitigation potential is equal to 93,453 tonnes CO 2 annually, representing 14.4% and 14.7%, respectively, of the mill’s total energy consumption and CO 2 emissions during the audit period.

  20. A modified impulse-response representation of the global near-surface air temperature and atmospheric concentration response to carbon dioxide emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Millar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Projections of the response to anthropogenic emission scenarios, evaluation of some greenhouse gas metrics, and estimates of the social cost of carbon often require a simple model that links emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 to atmospheric concentrations and global temperature changes. An essential requirement of such a model is to reproduce typical global surface temperature and atmospheric CO2 responses displayed by more complex Earth system models (ESMs under a range of emission scenarios, as well as an ability to sample the range of ESM response in a transparent, accessible and reproducible form. Here we adapt the simple model of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 5th Assessment Report (IPCC AR5 to explicitly represent the state dependence of the CO2 airborne fraction. Our adapted model (FAIR reproduces the range of behaviour shown in full and intermediate complexity ESMs under several idealised carbon pulse and exponential concentration increase experiments. We find that the inclusion of a linear increase in 100-year integrated airborne fraction with cumulative carbon uptake and global temperature change substantially improves the representation of the response of the climate system to CO2 on a range of timescales and under a range of experimental designs.

  1. VEGETATION SYNTAXONOMY AND LAND MANAGEMENT EFFECT ON METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM WETLANDS: A CASE STUDY FROM TIDAL SALT AND BRACKISH MARSH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Satyanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 emission from wetlands significantly contribute to climate change and global warming. The interaction between among vegetation type, various environmental factors, and management regimes such as grazing and mowing is considered important in the calculation of CO2 and CH4 gas flux for an ecosystem. In this study, vegetation composition, CH4 and CO2 flux, soil characteristics, air temperature and humidity from the brackish marsh and salt marsh wetland ecosystems on Terschelling Island in Northern Holland were measured. We aimed to investigate the relationship between vegetation composition, grazing, and mowing on CH4 and CO2 emission. The abundance and number of plant species were higher in brackish than in salt marsh. Grazing was found to influence species richness, 39 species being found in a grazed site of brackish marsh compared to 31 species in a similar ungrazed site. CO2 fluxes in salt and brackish marsh were found to be similar while CH4 flux in the salt marsh was found to be lower than in the brackish marsh. Within the brackish marsh, a higher methane emission was recorded in the grazed zone. However the overall effect of grazing and mowing was found to be negligible for CH4 flux but is suggested to clearly reduce CO2 flux in both the salt and brackish marsh.

  2. Effect of irrigation, nitrogen application, and a nitrification inhibitor on nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an olive (Olea europaea L.) orchard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, S.C., E-mail: stefania@macs.udl.cat [University of Lleida, Environment and Soil Science Department, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, E-25198 Lleida (Spain); Teira-Esmatges, M.R. [University of Lleida, Environment and Soil Science Department, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, E-25198 Lleida (Spain); Arbonés, A.; Rufat, J. [Programa Ús Eficient de l’Aigua, Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroalimentàries (IRTA), Parc Científic i Tecnològic Agroalimentari de Lleida (PCiTAL). Parc de Gardeny, Edifici Fruitcentre, E-2503 Lleida (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Drip irrigation combined with nitrogen (N) fertigation is applied in order to save water and improve nutrient efficiency. Nitrification inhibitors reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A field study was conducted to compare the emissions of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) associated with the application of N fertiliser through fertigation (0 and 50 kg N ha{sup −1}), and 50 kg N ha{sup −1} + nitrification inhibitor in a high tree density Arbequina olive orchard. Spanish Arbequina is the most suited variety for super intensive olive groves. This system allows reducing production costs and increases crop yield. Moreover its oil has excellent sensorial features. Subsurface drip irrigation markedly reduced N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} emissions compared with surface drip irrigation. Fertiliser application significantly increased N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2}, but not N{sub 2}O emissions. Denitrification was the main source of N{sub 2}O. The N{sub 2}O losses (calculated as emission factor) ranging from − 0.03 to 0.14% of the N applied, were lower than the IPCC (2007) values. The N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} losses were the largest, equivalent to 1.80% of the N applied, from the 50 kg N ha{sup −1} + drip irrigation treatment which resulted in water filled pore space > 60% most of the time (high moisture). Nitrogen fertilisation significantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions in 2011, but only for the subsurface drip irrigation strategies in 2012. The olive orchard acted as a net CH{sub 4} sink for all the treatments. Applying a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), the cumulative N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} emissions were significantly reduced with respect to the control. The DMPP also inhibited CO{sub 2} emissions and significantly increased CH{sub 4} oxidation. Considering global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity, cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions and oil production, it can be concluded that applying DMPP with 50 kg N ha{sup −1

  3. Effects of ozone exposure on `Golden' papaya fruit by photoacoustic phase-resolved method: Physiological changes associated with carbon dioxide and ethylene emission rates during ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Savio Figueira; Mota, Leonardo; Paiva, Luisa Brito; Couto, Flávio Mota do; Silva, Marcelo Gomes da; Oliveira, Jurandi Gonçalves de; Sthel, Marcelo Silva; Vargas, Helion; Miklós, András

    2011-06-01

    This work addresses the effects of ozone activity on the physiology of `Golden' papaya fruit. Depth profile analysis of double-layer biological samples was accomplished using the phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by singling out the spectra of the cuticle and the pigment layers of papaya fruit. The same approach was used to monitor changes occurring on the fruit during ripening when exposed to ozone. In addition, one has performed real time studies of fluorescence parameters and the emission rates of carbon dioxide and ethylene. Finally, the amount of pigments and the changes in waxy cuticle have been monitored. Results indicate that a fruit deliberately subjected to ozone at a level of 6 ppmv underwent ripening sooner (at least 24-48 h) than a fruit stored at ambient conditions. Moreover, ozone caused a reduction in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthetic apparatus located within the skin of papaya fruit.

  4. High fluxes but different patterns of nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from soil in a cattle overwintering area

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hynšt, Jaroslav; Šimek, Miloslav; Brůček, Petr; Petersen, S. O.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 120, 2-4 (2007), s. 269-279 ISSN 0167-8809 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/04/0325 Grant - others:Evropská unie(XE) EVK2-CT-2000-00096; MŠMT(CZ) 21-1072/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : nitrous oxide * carbon dioxide * denitrification Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.308, year: 2007

  5. Estimation of the efficiency of hydrocarbon mineralization in soil by measuring CO2-emission and variations in the isotope composition of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskaya, Ekaterina; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2010-05-01

    Estimation of the efficiency of hydrocarbon mineralization in soil by measuring CO2-emission and variations in the isotope composition of carbon dioxide E. Dubrovskaya1, O. Turkovskaya1, A. Tiunov2, N. Pozdnyakova1, A. Muratova1 1 - Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, RAS, Saratov, 2 - A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, RAS, Moscow, Russian Federation Hydrocarbon mineralization in soil undergoing phytoremediation was investigated in a laboratory experiment by estimating the variation in the 13С/12С ratio in the respired СО2. Hexadecane (HD) was used as a model hydrocarbon pollutant. The polluted soil was planted with winter rye (Secale cereale) inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense strain SR80, which combines the abilities to promote plant growth and to degrade oil hydrocarbon. Each vegetated treatment was accompanied with a corresponding nonvegetated one, and uncontaminated treatments were used as controls. Emission of carbon dioxide, its isotopic composition, and the residual concentration of HD in the soil were examined after two and four weeks. At the beginning of the experiment, the CO2-emission level was higher in the uncontaminated than in the contaminated soil. After two weeks, the quantity of emitted carbon dioxide decreased by about three times and did not change significantly in all uncontaminated treatments. The presence of HD in the soil initially increased CO2 emission, but later the respiration was reduced. During the first two weeks, nonvegetated soil had the highest CO2-emission level. Subsequently, the maximum increase in respiration was recorded in the vegetated contaminated treatments. The isotope composition of plant material determines the isotope composition of soil. The soil used in our experiment had an isotopic signature typical of soils formed by C3 plants (δ13C,-22.4‰). Generally, there was no significant fractionation of the carbon isotopes of the substrates metabolized by the

  6. Understanding the Causality between Carbon Dioxide Emission, Fossil Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in Developed Countries: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Issues on climate change have been recognized as serious challenges for regional sustainable development both at a global and local level. Given the background that most of the artificial carbon emissions are resulted from the energy consumption sector and the energy is also the key element resource for economic development, this paper investigated the relationship between CO2 emission, fossil energy consumption, and economic growth in the period 1970–2008 of nine European countries, based on the approach of Granger Causality Test, followed by the risk analysis on impacts of CO2 reduction to local economic growth classified by the indicator of causality degree. The results show that there are various feedback causal relationships between carbon emission, energy consumption and economic growth, with both unidirectional and dual-directional Granger causality. The impact of reducing CO2 emission to economic growth varies between countries as well.

  7. Carbon dioxide observations at Cape Rama, India for the period 1993–2002: implications for constraining Indian emissions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, Y.K.; Patra, P.K.; Chevallier, F.; Francey, R.J.; Krummel, P.B.; Allison, C.E.; Revadekar, J.V.; Chakraborty, S.; Langenfelds, R.L.; Bhattacharya, S.K.; Borole, D.V.; RaviKumar, K.; Steele, L.P.

    India has the second largest population, one of fastest growing economies and is ranked third in greenhouse gas emissions by fossil-fuel burning in the world. However, there has been little monitoring of atmospheric CO sub(2) concentration over...

  8. A Step towards Sustainable Society: The Awareness of Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Climate Change and Carbon Capture in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazali, Zulkipli; Zahid, Muhammad; Kee, Tan Siok; Ibrahim, M. Yussoff

    2016-01-01

    Public awareness is crucial to mitigate negative impacts on the environment. The aim of the study is to explore the level of public awareness in five states of Malaysia (Perak, Melaka, Johor, Pahang and Terengganu) regarding CO2 emissions, climate change and carbon capture and storage (CCS). A questionnaire floated for exploring public awareness regarding CO2 emissions, climate change and CCS. Based on the questionnaire data was collected from five states (Perak, Melaka, Johor, Pahang and Ter...

  9. Measurement and modelling of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions: a marker for traffic-related air pollution in Doha, Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Naimi, Noora; Balakrishnan, Perumal; Goktepe, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Qatar, recent statistics show a continued increase in the motor-vehicle fleet commensurate with population growth and economic development. This trend, together with the rapid expansion of urban areas and the increased dependence on automobiles, has resulted in an increase in pollution near traffic sources, indicating that the risk of exposure to vehicles’ emissions is higher and that these emissions must be considered in terms of their spatial and temporal occurrence. So far,...

  10. A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin 15, Ireland

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

  11. 3,4-Dimethylpyrazol phosphate effect on nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, ammonia, and carbon dioxide emissions from grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, S; Merino, P; Pinto, M; González-Murua, C; Estavillo, J M

    2006-01-01

    Intensively managed grasslands are potentially a large source of NH3, N2O, and NO emissions because of the large input of nitrogen (N) in fertilizers. Addition of nitrification inhibitors (NI) to fertilizers maintains soil N in ammonium form. Consequently, N2O and NO losses are less likely to occur and the potential for N utilization is increased, and NH3 volatilization may be increased. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazol phosphate (DMPP) on NH3, N2O, NO, and CO2 emissions following the application of 97 kg N ha(-1) as ammonium sulfate nitrate (ASN) and 97 kg NH4+ -N ha(-1) as cattle slurry to a mixed clover-ryegrass sward in the Basque Country (northern Spain). After slurry application, 16.0 and 0.7% of the NH4+ -N applied was lost in the form of N2O and NO, respectively. The application of DMPP induced a decrease of 29 and 25% in N2O and NO emissions, respectively. After ASN application 4.6 and 2.8% of the N applied was lost as N2O and NO, respectively. The application of DMPP with ASN (as ENTEC 26; COMPO, Münster, Germany) unexpectedly did not significantly reduce N2O emissions, but induced a decrease of 44% in NO emissions. The amount of NH4+ -N lost in the form of NH3 following slurry and slurry + DMPP applications was 7.8 and 11.0%, respectively, the increase induced by DMPP not being statistically significant. Levels of CO2 emissions were unaffected in all cases by the use of DMPP. We conclude that DMPP is an efficient nitrification inhibitor to be used to reduce N2O and NO emissions from grasslands.

  12. A multiresolution spatial parameterization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ray

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2 emissions is paramount to carbon cycle studies, but the use of atmospheric inverse modeling approaches for this purpose has been limited by the highly heterogeneous and non-Gaussian spatiotemporal variability of emissions. Here we explore the feasibility of capturing this variability using a low-dimensional parameterization that can be implemented within the context of atmospheric CO2 inverse problems aimed at constraining regional-scale emissions. We construct a multiresolution (i.e., wavelet-based spatial parameterization for ffCO2 emissions using the Vulcan inventory, and examine whether such a~parameterization can capture a realistic representation of the expected spatial variability of actual emissions. We then explore whether sub-selecting wavelets using two easily available proxies of human activity (images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas yields a low-dimensional alternative. We finally implement this low-dimensional parameterization within an idealized inversion, where a sparse reconstruction algorithm, an extension of stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP, is used to identify the wavelet coefficients. We find that (i the spatial variability of fossil-fuel emission can indeed be represented using a low-dimensional wavelet-based parameterization, (ii that images of lights at night can be used as a proxy for sub-selecting wavelets for such analysis, and (iii that implementing this parameterization within the described inversion framework makes it possible to quantify fossil-fuel emissions at regional scales if fossil-fuel-only CO2 observations are available.

  13. Fermentation and distillation of cheese whey: Carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions and water use in the production of whey spirits and white whiskey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Derrick; Shayevitz, Avi; Haapala, Karl; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth; Hughes, Paul

    2018-02-02

    Whey disposal can be both an environmental and economic challenge for artisanal creameries. Lactose in whey can be fermented to produce ethanol and subsequently distilled. The objective of this study was to use a process-based life cycle analysis to compare carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO 2 e) emissions and water usage associated with the artisanal or craft production of clear, unaged spirits using whey or malted barley as fermentation substrate. Differences in production were assessed based on key process differences: energy used, water used, distillation by-product disposal, and mass of CO 2 produced during fermentation. For this study, whey was assumed removed from the artisanal creamery waste stream. Quantifiable differences were evaluated per 750-mL (45% alcohol by volume) functional unit and expressed as mass-equivalent CO 2 emissions (kg of CO 2 e) and mass of water (kg) used. The CO 2 e emissions and water usage were quantified using published data, thermodynamic calculations, and mass-balance calculations for a hypothetical distillation system. The process-based life cycle analysis estimated that distillation of fermented whey reduced overall CO 2 e emissions by 8.4 kg per functional unit and required 0.44 kg less water added into the production process compared with production of a similar clear, unaged spirit using malted barley as substrate. Our preliminary analysis suggests that conversion to distilled whey spirit is a more environmentally responsible approach compared with landfill disposal of whey. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide via zero emissions--an alternative way to a stable global environment. Part 2: a practical zero-emissions scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, Taroh; Maruyama, Koki; Tsutsui, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Following Part 1, a comparison of CO(2)-emissions pathways between "zero-emissions stabilization (Z-stabilization)" and traditional stabilization is made under more realistic conditions that take into account the radiative forcings of other greenhouse gases and aerosols with the constraint that the temperature rise must not exceed 2 °C above the preindustrial level. It is shown that the findings in Part 1 on the merits of Z-stabilization hold under the more realistic conditions. The results clarify the scientific basis of the policy claim of 50% reduction of the world CO(2) emissions by 2050. Since the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) concentration and temperature occur only temporarily in Z-stabilization pathways, we may slightly relax the upper limit of the temperature rise. We can then search for a scenario with larger emissions in the 21st century; such a scenario may have potential for practical application. It is suggested that in this Z-stabilization pathway, larger emissions in the near future may be important from a socioeconomic viewpoint.

  15. Estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels combustion in the main sectors of selected countries 1971-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primio, J.C. di.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of sectoral CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel burning in the period 1971-1990 were done for the 15 countries at the top of the list of nations ordered by decreasing contribution to global emissions, namely: United States of America, Soviet Union, People's Republic of China, Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdom, India, Poland, Canada, France, Italy, German Democratic Republic, South Africa, Mexico and Czechoslovakia. In addition, the CO 2 emission of two groups of industrialized countries, namely the OECD and the European Economic Community (EEC) were calculated. The main recommendations of the IPCC/OECD current methodology have been adopted for the calculations, with the principal exception that CO 2 emissions from the use of bunker fuels have not been included in the national estimates. The sectors are: 1. Transformations. Total emissions and the part stemming from power plants 2. Industry (excluding Feedstocks) 3. Transportation 4. Agriculture 5. Residential 6. Commerce and Public Services 7. Non-specified Other 8. Non-Energy Use 9. Feedstocks (in Industry). Data are presented in tables and diagrams. (orig./KW)

  16. Application of System Dynamics model as decision making tool in urban planning process toward stabilizing carbon dioxide emissions from cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Wee-Kean; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Lun, Yu-Fat

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the fact that cities are the main sources of CO 2 emissions, presently there are still no specific measures directly addressing the global warming issue in the urban planning process in Malaysia. The present study thus aims to shed new light in the urban planning sector in Malaysia by adopting System Dynamics Model as one of the decision making tools in the urban planning process, with specific considerations on the future CO 2 emission trends. This paper presented projections of future CO 2 emission trends based on the case of Iskandar Development Region of Malaysia, under various options of urban policies, using the System Dynamics Model. The projections demonstrated the capability of the said model in serving as a decision making tool in the urban planning process, with specific reference to CO 2 emissions from cities. Recommendations have been made on the possible approach of adopting the model in the process of Structure Plan study. If the current model was successfully adopted in the urban planning process in Malaysia, it will mark the first step for Malaysia in taking specific considerations on the issues of CO 2 emissions and global warming in the urban planning process. (author)

  17. Fuel-Specific Carbon Dioxide Emissions and GDP Elasticities of Energy Consumption: a Bounds Test Analysis for Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel M. KAYA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Current paper investigates the short-run and the long-run relationships between energy use, GDP and fuel-specific CO2 emissions (namely solid, liquid and gas by developing separate models for each emission for Israel in 1971-2011. ARDL Bounds Test is utilized for cointegration and we find that each model has cointegrating relationship. Then the short-run and the long-run coefficients are estimated. Error-correction models for all models suggest that long-run equilibriums take about 15-19 months. According to the long-run coefficient estimates, when elasticities of CO2 emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are 0.04, 0.30 and -0.02, respectively; GDP elasticities for all models vary between 0.66 and 0.96.

  18. Strategies for carbon dioxide emissions reductions: Residential natural gas efficiency, economic, and ancillary health impacts in Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, Matthias; Blohm, Andrew; Mauer, Joanna; Gabriel, Steven A.; Kesana, Vijay G.; Chen Yihsu; Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Irani, Daraius

    2010-01-01

    As part of its commitments to the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the State of Maryland, USA, auctions emission permits to electric utilities, creating revenue that can be used to benefit consumers and the environment. This paper explores the CO 2 emissions reductions that may be possible by allocating some of that revenue to foster efficiency improvements in the residential sector's use of natural gas. Since these improvements will require changes to the capital stock of houses and end use equipment, efficiency improvements may be accompanied by economic and ancillary health impacts, both of which are quantified in this paper.

  19. Technological potential for the future development of diesel engines that fulfil future emissions regulations at low carbon dioxide emission rates.; Darstellung des Technologiepotentials von zukuenftigen Dieselmotoren zur Erfuellung zukuenftiger Emissionsvorschriften bei niedrigem CO{sub 2} Ausstoss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, P.; Bertola, A.; Boulouchos, K. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Labor fuer Aerothermochemie und Verbrennungssysteme, ETH-Zentrum, Zuerich (Switzerland); Mohr, M.; Etissa, D.; Schreiber, D. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This yearly report for 2004 presents a review of work being done on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) at the Laboratory for Aero-thermochemistry and Combustion Systems at the Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, on the technological potential for the future development of diesel engines that fulfil future emissions regulations at low carbon dioxide emission rates. Work done included the construction of an internal gas extraction probe (IGE probe). The development and simulation of the probe and the choice of materials used are discussed. Co-operation with the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research in the area of measurement technology and exhaust-gas analysis is discussed. The development of a 3-D simulation model for a commercial diesel engine is commented on and the problems involved discussed. Future work on this new four-cylinder engine with respect to its fulfilling of the TIER 3 and TIER 4 emissions norms is reviewed.

  20. Grubbing by wild boars (Sus scrufa L.) and its impact on hardwood forest soil carbon dioxide emissions in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anita Risch; Sven Wirthner; Matt Busse; Deborah Page-Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    Interest in soil C storage and release has increased in recent years. In addition to factors such as climate/land-use change, vertebrate animals can have a considerable impact on soil CO2 emissions. To date, most research has considered herbivores, while the impact of omnivorous animals has rarely been investigated. Our goal was to determine how...

  1. Assessing the potential impact of the CO2 performance ladder on the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.G.; Blok, K.

    2013-01-01

    Green public procurement is often promoted as a tool to reduce energy use and CO2 emissions in the supply chains of public entities. However, only a limited number of studies has quantitatively assessed the environmental impacts of green public procurement schemes. The aim of this paper was to

  2. Modeling the Relationship between Transportation-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Hybrid-Online Courses at a Large Urban University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Matthew; Cordero, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the relationship between hybrid classes (where a per cent of the class meetings are online) and transportation-related CO[subscript 2] emissions at a commuter campus similar to San José State University (SJSU). Design/methodology/approach: A computer model was developed to calculate the number of trips to…

  3. Carbon dioxide emission-intensity in climate projections: Comparing the observational record to socio-economic scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretis, Felix; Roser, Max

    2017-09-15

    The wide spread of projected temperature changes in climate projections does not predominately originate from uncertainty across climate models; instead it is the broad range of different global socio-economic scenarios and the implied energy production that results in high uncertainty about future climate change. It is therefore important to assess the observational tracking of these scenarios. Here we compare these socio-economic scenarios created in both 1992 and 2000 against the recent observational record to investigate the coupling of economic growth and fossil-fuel CO 2 emissions. We find that global emission intensity (fossil fuel CO 2 emissions per GDP) rose in the first part of the 21st century despite all major climate projections foreseeing a decline. Proposing a method to disaggregate differences between scenarios and observations in global growth rates to country-by-country contributions, we find that the relative discrepancy was driven by unanticipated GDP growth in Asia and Eastern Europe, in particular in Russia and China. The growth of emission intensity over the 2000s highlights the relevance of unforeseen local shifts in projections on a global scale.

  4. Dazzled by diesel? The impact on carbon dioxide emissions of the shift to diesels in Europe through 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipper, Lee; Fulton, Lew

    2013-01-01

    This paper identifies trends in new gasoline and diesel passenger car characteristics in the European Union between 1995 and 2009. By 2009 diesels had captured over 55% of the new vehicle market. While the diesel version of a given car model may have as much as 35% lower fuel use/km and 25% lower CO 2 emissions than its gasoline equivalent, diesel buyers have chosen increasingly large and more powerful cars than the gasoline market. As a result, new diesels bought in 2009 had only 2% lower average CO 2 emissions than new gasoline cars, a smaller advantage than in 1995. A Laspeyres decomposition investigates which factors were important contributors to the observed emission reductions and which factors offset savings in other areas. More than 95% of the reduction in CO 2 emissions per km from new vehicles arose because both diesel and gasoline new vehicle emissions/km fell, and only 5% arose because of the shift from gasoline to diesel technology. Increases in vehicle mass and power for both gasoline and diesel absorbed much of the technological efficiency improvements offered by both technologies. We also observe changes in the gasoline and diesel fleets in eight EU countries and find changes in fuel and emissions intensities consistent with the changes in new vehicles reported. While diesel cars continue to be driven far farther than gasoline cars, we attribute only some of this difference to a “rebound effect”. We conclude that while diesel technology has permitted significant fuel savings, the switch from gasoline to diesel in the new vehicle market contributed little itself to the observed reductions in CO 2 emissions from new vehicles. - Highlights: ► By 2009 diesels had captured over 55% of the new car market in the EU. ► New diesels in 2009 emitted only 2% lower average CO 2 than new gasoline cars. ► Diesel cars continue to be driven farther than gasoline cars. ► Overall there has been little net CO 2 reduction from the switch to diesels in

  5. Carbon dioxide emissions and energy balance closure before, during, and after biomass burning in mid-South rice fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, B.; Adviento-Borbe, A.; Reba, M. L.; Runkle, B.; Suvocarev, K.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning or field burning is a crop management practice that removes rice straw, reduces tillage, controls pests and releases nutrients for the next cropping season. Current field burning emissions are not included in agricultural field annual emissions largely because of the lack of studies, especially on the field scale. Field burning measurements are important for greenhouse gas emission inventories and quantifying the annual carbon footprint of rice. Paired eddy covariance systems were used to measure energy balance, CO2 fluxes, and H2O fluxes in mid-South US rice fields (total area of 25 ha) before, during and after biomass burning for 20 days after harvest. During the biomass burning, air temperatures increased 29°C, while ambient CO2 concentration increased from 402 to 16,567 ppm and H2O concentrations increased from 18.73 to 25.62 ppt. For the burning period, 67-86 kg CO2 ha-1 period-1 was emitted calculated by integrating fluxes over the biomass burning event. However, the estimated emission using aboveground biomass and combustion factors was calculated as 11,733 kg CO2 ha-1 period-1. Part of the difference could be attributed to sensor sensitivity decreasing 80% during burning for two minutes due to smoke. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) increased by a factor of two, 1.14 before burning to 2.44 μmol m-2 s-1 possibly due to greater reduction of plant material and photosynthesis following burning. This study highlights the contribution of rice straw burning to total CO2 emissions from rice production.

  6. Remote sensing of sulphur dioxide emissions of sea-going vessels through lidar; Zwaveldioxide-uitstoot van zeeschepen op afstand gemeten met lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhout, A.J.C.; Swart, D.P.J.; Van der Hoff, G.R.; Bergwerff, J.B.

    2011-12-15

    RIVM developed an instrument to measure from the shore sulphur dioxide emissions of passing sea-going vessels. This instrument uses the lidar technique (Light Detection And Ranging). The instrument uses a laser beam to scan the exhaust plume from a passing ship and determine the emission, unnoticed. It was used from 2006 to 2008 to measure sulphur dioxide emissions from a large number of ships sailing on the Westerscheldt estuary and on the North Sea Canal. The highest measured emission was 37 gram per second. The total emission of sulphur dioxide in the Netherlands has been declining for many years. Since 2006, emissions from ocean shipping are declining as well, but not as fast as those from other sources. Therefore, the contribution from ocean shipping is gaining importance. In 2010, 55 percent of the Dutch sulphur dioxide emissions originated with sea-going vessels. In 1990, this was 21 percent. Sea-going ships are not allowed to use sulphur-rich fuel in territorial waters and at the North Sea. This relatively cheap fuel may be on board, though, for use elsewhere at sea. To what extent ship owners comply with this ban is not known. Traditional measurement methods involve taking fuel samples on board. This requires someone boarding the ship. The crew therefore knows a measurement is taking place and can adjust the type of fuel used. Moreover, with traditional methods, only a few ships per day can be checked. Lidar is not yet recognised as a law enforcement instrument. Therefore, no fines can be imposed based on lidar measurements only. The lidar may be used, though, to identify possible offenders. A law enforcement official may then board that ship to ascertain that the law was breached. When used in this way, the use of the lidar is cost-effective even now. This is because the lidar can measure almost all passing ships. Expensive patrol ships can then be directed to only visit those ships that are the most likely offenders. Moreover, this greatly increases the

  7. Bisphosphine dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloy, Kenneth G. (Charleston, WV)

    1990-01-01

    A process for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  8. Bisphosphine dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moloy, K.G.

    1990-02-20

    A process is described for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

  9. Online Games

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Aphra; Ivory, James D.

    2015-01-01

    When we agreed to edit the theme on online games for this Encyclopedia our first question was, “What is meant by online games?” Scholars of games distinguish between nondigital games (such as board games) and digital games, rather than between online and offline games. With networked consoles and smartphones it is becoming harder and harder to find players in the wealthy industrialized countries who play “offline” digital games. Most games developers now include ...

  10. Temporal variations of flux and altitude of sulfur dioxide emissions during volcanic eruptions: implications for long-range dispersal of volcanic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boichu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur-rich degassing, which is mostly composed of sulfur dioxide (SO2, plays a major role in the overall impact of volcanism on the atmosphere and climate. The accurate assessment of this impact is currently hampered by the poor knowledge of volcanic SO2 emissions. Here, using an inversion procedure, we show how assimilating snapshots of the volcanic SO2 load derived from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI allows for reconstructing both the flux and altitude of the SO2 emissions with an hourly resolution. For this purpose, the regional chemistry-transport model CHIMERE is used to describe the dispersion of SO2 when released in the atmosphere. As proof of concept, we study the 10 April 2011 eruption of the Etna volcano (Italy, which represents one of the few volcanoes instrumented on the ground for the continuous monitoring of SO2 degassing. We find that the SO2 flux time-series retrieved from satellite imagery using the inverse scheme is in agreement with ground observations during ash-poor phases of the eruption. However, large discrepancies are observed during the ash-rich paroxysmal phase as a result of enhanced plume opacity affecting ground-based ultraviolet (UV spectroscopic retrievals. As a consequence, the SO2 emission rate derived from the ground is underestimated by almost one order of magnitude. Altitudes of the SO2 emissions predicted by the inverse scheme are validated against an RGB image of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS capturing the near-source atmospheric pathways followed by Etna plumes, in combination with forward trajectories from the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model. At a large distance from the source, modelled SO2 altitudes are compared with independent information on the volcanic cloud height. We find that the altitude predicted by the inverse scheme is in agreement with snapshots of the SO2 height retrieved from recent algorithms

  11. Liming induces carbon dioxide (CO2) emission in PSB inoculated alkaline soil supplemented with different phosphorus sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Shah, Zahir; Sharif, Muhammad; Rahman, Hidayatur

    2018-01-20

    Agricultural land is a major sink of global organic carbon (C). Its suitable management is crucial for improving C sequestration and reducing soil CO 2 emission. Incubation experiments were performed to assess the impact of phosphate solubilizing bacterial (PSB) inoculation (inoculated and uninoculated) and soil calcification (4.78, 10, 15, and 20% crushed CaCO 3 ) with phosphorus (P) sources [single superphosphate (SSP), rock phosphate (RP), farm yard manure (FYM), and poultry manure (PM)] in experiment 1 and with various rates of PM (4, 8, and 12 kg ha -1 ) in experiment 2 on cumulative soil respiration. These experiments were arranged in three factorial, complete randomize design (CRD) with three replications. Interactively, lime with P sources (at day 1 and 3) and lime with PSB (at day 1) significantly expedited soil respiration. Mainly, PSB inoculation, liming, PM fertilization, and its various rates significantly enhanced soil respiration with time over control/minimum in alkaline soil at all incubation periods. Higher CO 2 emission was detected in soil supplemented with organic P sources (PM and FYM) than mineral sources (SSP and RP). CO 2 emission was noted to increase with increasing PM content. Since liming intensified CO 2 discharge from soil, therefore addition of lime to an alkaline soil should be avoided; instead, integrated approaches must be adopted for P management in alkaline calcareous soils for climate-smart agriculture.

  12. Thermal energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in ceramic tile manufacture - Analysis of the Spanish and Brazilian industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfort, E.; Mezquita, A.; Vaquer, E.; Mallol, G.; Alves, H. J.; Boschi, A. O.

    2012-01-01

    Spain and Brazil are two of the world's biggest ceramic tile producers. The tile manufacturing process consumes a great quantity of thermal energy that, in these two countries, is mainly obtained from natural gas combustion, which entails CO 2 emission, a greenhouse gas. This study presents a comparative analysis of the thermal energy consumption and CO 2 emissions in the ceramic tile manufacturing process in Spain and Brazil, in terms of the different production technologies and different products made. The energy consumption and CO 2 emissions in ceramic tile manufacture by the wet process are very similar in both countries. In the dry process used in Brazil, less thermal energy is consumed and less CO 2 is emitted than in the wet process, but it is a process that is only used in manufacturing one particular type of product, which exhibits certain technical limitations. While in Spain the use of cogeneration systems in spray-dryers improves significantly the global energy efficiency. The average energy consumption in the different process stages, in both countries, lies within the range indicated in the Reference Document on Best Available Techniques in the Ceramic Manufacturing Industry (BREF of the Ceramic Manufacturing Industry) of the European Union. (Author) 14 refs.

  13. Supermodular Games and Potential Games

    OpenAIRE

    Brânzei, R.; Mallozzi, L.; Tijs, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Potential games and supermodular games are attractive games, especially because under certain conditions they possess pure Nash equilibria. Subclasses of games with a potential are considered which are also strategically equivalent to supermodular games. The focus is on two-person zero-sum games and two-person Cournot games.

  14. Mobile game for Kaamos Games

    OpenAIRE

    Takkunen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was conducted for a startup game company called Kaamos Games Oy. The company specializes in the development of mobile games, and was looking to expand their expertise and list of developed games. The aim of this thesis was to develop a mobile game for Kaamos Games. The thesis introduces concepts which are relevant to mobile game development and the game development process. The general stages of a game development process are explained and the activities that went into this de...

  15. Carbon dioxide emissions from semi-arid soils amended with biochar alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José M; Nieto, M Aurora; López-de-Sá, Esther G; Gascó, Gabriel; Méndez, Ana; Plaza, César

    2014-06-01

    Semi-arid soils cover a significant area of Earth's land surface and typically contain large amounts of inorganic C. Determining the effects of biochar additions on CO2 emissions from semi-arid soils is therefore essential for evaluating the potential of biochar as a climate change mitigation strategy. Here, we measured the CO2 that evolved from semi-arid calcareous soils amended with biochar at rates of 0 and 20tha(-1) in a full factorial combination with three different fertilizers (mineral fertilizer, municipal solid waste compost, and sewage sludge) applied at four rates (equivalent to 0, 75, 150, and 225kg potentially available Nha(-1)) during 182 days of aerobic incubation. A double exponential model, which describes cumulative CO2 emissions from two active soil C compartments with different turnover rates (one relatively stable and the other more labile), was found to fit very well all the experimental datasets. In general, the organic fertilizers increased the size and decomposition rate of the stable and labile soil C pools. In contrast, biochar addition had no effects on any of the double exponential model parameters and did not interact with the effects ascribed to the type and rate of fertilizer. After 182 days of incubation, soil organic and microbial biomass C contents tended to increase with increasing the application rates of organic fertilizer, especially of compost, whereas increasing the rate of mineral fertilizer tended to suppress microbial biomass. Biochar was found to increase both organic and inorganic C contents in soil and not to interact with the effects of type and rate of fertilizer on C fractions. As a whole, our results suggest that the use of biochar as enhancer of semi-arid soils, either alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers, is unlikely to increase abiotic and biotic soil CO2 emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Situation and development of worldwide agri-environment: Agricultural land uses, fertilizers consumption and carbon dioxide equivalent emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on FAO data on agri-environment worldwide, we choose ten major countries to analyse agrienvironment situation and development worldwide. The results showed that China has the greatest agricultural area, seconded by Australia and USA, and third by Brazil and India. USA is the largest country in arable land area, seconded by India, and third by China. Since earlier 1990s, China has become the largest country in the area of permanent crops, seconded by India. Brazil is the largest country in the annual growth of arable land area, seconded by China, and third by Australia. In the area of permanent meadows and pastures, China grows mostly and seconded by Brazil and third by India. India has the largest harvested area, closely seconded by China, and third by USA. Australia is the most fast growing country in area harvested, seconded by Brazil and third by India. China and India are the two countries with most emissions of agricultural CO2 and equivalents, seconded by Brazil, and third by USA. China grows mostly in emissions of agricultural CO2 and equivalents, seconded by Brazil and India, and followed by Canada and USA. China is the largest country of fertilizers consumption, seconded by India, and third by USA and Brazil. China grows mostly in P and K fertilizers consumption. India holds the No. 1 position in the annual growth of N consumption. In general, China and India have the largest amount of emissions of agricultural CO2 and equivalents and fertilizers consumption. Annual growths of arable land area and permanent meadows and pastures of China are also the highest. Agri-environment of China, India, and Brazil has deteriorated significantly. Agri-environment of Australia seems to be deteriorated in the past years. Agri-environment of European countries is relatively optimistic.

  17. Performance, digestion, nitrogen balance, and emission of manure ammonia, enteric methane, and carbon dioxide in lactating cows fed diets with varying alfalfa silage-to-corn silage ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, C; Powell, J M; Aguerre, M J; Wattiaux, M A

    2015-01-01

    Two trials were conducted simultaneously to study the effects of varying alfalfa silage (AS) to corn silage (CS) ratio in diets formulated to avoid excess protein or starch on lactating dairy cow performance, digestibility, ruminal parameters, N balance, manure production and composition, and gaseous emissions [carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and ammonia-N (NH3-N)]. In trial 1 all measurements, except gas emissions, were conducted on 8 rumen-cannulated cows in replicated 4×4 Latin squares. In trial 2, performance and emissions were measured on 16 cows randomly assigned to 1 of 4 air-flow controlled chambers in a 4×4 Latin square. Dietary treatments were fed as total mixed rations with forage-to-concentrate ratio of 55:45 [dietary dry matter (DM) basis] and AS:CS ratios of 20:80, 40:60, 60:40, and 80:20 (forage DM basis). Measurements were conducted the last 3d of each 21-d period. Treatments did not affect DM intake, DM digestibility, and milk/DM intake. However, responses were quadratic for fat-and-protein-corrected milk, fat, and protein production, which reached predicted maxima for AS:CS ratio of 50:50, 49:51, and 34:66, respectively. Nitrogen use efficiency (milk N/N intake) decreased from 31 to 24g/100g as AS:CS ratio increased from 20:80 to 80:20. Treatments did not alter NH3-N/milk-N but tended to have a quadratic effect on daily NH3-N emission. Treatments had a quadratic effect on daily CH4 emission, which was high compared with current literature; they influenced CH4 emission per unit of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) intake and tended to influence CO2/NDF intake. Ruminal acetate-to-propionate ratio and total-tract NDF digestibility increased linearly with increasing AS:CS ratio. In addition, as AS:CS ratio increased from 20:80 to 80:20, NDF digested increased linearly from 2.16 to 3.24kg/d, but CH4/digested NDF decreased linearly from 270 to 190g/kg. These 2 counterbalancing effects likely contributed to the observed quadratic response in daily CH4

  18. Evolution and world-wide projections of the carbon dioxide emissions; Evolucion y proyecciones mundiales de las emisiones de bioxido de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravia, Marisela; Gay, Carlos [Instituto de Ingenieria, UNAM (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    In the frame of the present preoccupation on the global climatic change and its influence in the human activities, the possible mitigation scenarios of green house effect gases are analyzed (GEG) in the world-wide scope, the contribution of carbon dioxide future emissions as main green house effect gas originating from the burning of fossil fuels; taking into account two large classifications: Developed and developing countries. In accordance with the world-wide evolution in the 1972-1995 period and to diverse adjustments of future emissions a study of the necessary levels of these emissions is made to obtain the stabilization of the greenhouse effect gases in the atmosphere in a level in the vicinity of 550 ppmv. The considered projections are: emissions in accordance with the present tendency, basic scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climatic Change (Panel Intergubernamental de Cambio Climatico) (IPCC-IS92a), mitigation proposals of the Netherlands (NL-1%, NL-2%) and profiles that entail the atmospheric CO{sub 2} stabilization. In addition the reduction in the contribution of future emissions that the developing countries would have to face to obtain the stabilization are compared, emissions that will depend on changes in factors such as population growth, economic, emissions per capita and carbon content of the power fuels, changes that would have to take place in all the countries, or certain key countries, in order to arrive to the necessary atmospheric stabilization of the emissions in accordance with those profiles. [Spanish] En el marco de la preocupacion actual sobre el cambio climatico global y su influencia en las actividades humanas, se analizan los posibles escenarios de mitigacion de gases efecto invernadero (GEI) en el ambito mundial, las cuotas de emisiones futuras de dioxido de carbono como principal gas invernadero proveniente de la quema de combustibles fosiles; tomando en cuenta dos grandes clasificaciones: Paises desarrollados y paises

  19. In-situ virtual metrology for the silicon-dioxide etch rate by using optical emission spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Boomsoo; Hong, Sangjeen

    2014-01-01

    As a useful tool for process control in a high volume semiconductor manufacturing environment, virtual metrology for the etch rate in a plasma etch process is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) data. Virtual metrology is a surrogate measurement taken from the process instead of from direct measurement, and it can provide in-situ metrology of a wafer's geometry from a predictive model. A statistical regression model that correlates the selected wavelengths of the optical emission spectra to the etch rate is established using the OES data collected over 20 experimental runs. In addition, an argon actinometry study is employed to quantify the OES data, and it provides valuable insight into the analysis of the OES data. The established virtual metrology model is further verified with an additional 20 runs of data. As a result, the virtual metrology model with both process recipe tool data and in-situ data shows higher prediction accuracy by as much as 56% compared with either the process recipe tool data or the in-situ data alone.

  20. Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions during the Seasonal Permafrost Thaw at the Bonanza Creek Research Forest: Results from the May 2016 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E. L.; DiGregorio, A.; Carter, L. M.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Edgar, C.; Hoffman, C.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Duncan, B. N.; Ott, L. E.; Liang, Q.; Melocik, K. A.; Tucker, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    We present field measurements from a May 2016 campaign funded under NASA's Interdisciplinary Science (IDS) program to track methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions above thawing permafrost at three sites near Fairbanks, AK. Each of the sites, located in the Bonanza Creek Research Forest, represent a different ecosystem including black spruce with cold soils and stable permafrost, collapse scar bog with thermokarst formation, and a site with moderately rich fen lacking near surface permafrost. Field experiments were carried out in May during the seasonal ground thaw of the active layer. Measurements included permafrost depth and subsurface structure using ground penetrating radar, meteorological variables (air and soil temperature, net radiation, albedo, precipitation, snow depth, vapor pressure, etc.), eddy covariance data from a 3-D sonic anemometer, and surface and column concentrations of CH4 and CO2 with an open-path infrared gas analyzer (LICOR) and Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (Mini-LHR) respectively. We have referred to this effort as a pilot study because our intent is to expand our observational network in the future to other sites in North America, which will aid in the monitoring of changes in GHG emissions in the Arctic as well as complement and help interpret data collected by space-borne instruments, such as GOSAT, IASI, and AIRS. This is the first time that these types of measurements have been combined to provide a holistic view of the evolution of, and the atmospheric response to permafrost thaw. The final year of this effort will focus on estimating a global source of GHG emissions from thawing permafrosts. We will use MODIS and Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager and Thermal Infrared Sensor data to "scale up" the data collected at the three sites on the basis of land surface type information. Based on the data collected at the three sites and a variety of existing satellite data sets, we will develop a computationally

  1. Writerly Gaming: Political Gaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    The correspondence between game and reality is usually regarded as a representational relationship. Discussing the correspondence, one must, however, also look into the relation between game and player: The interests of the player and the staging of the player in the game. Games can be consumer...... software for private entertainment (looking/feeling real) or they can be pragmatic software used for training of professionals (affecting soldiers’, pilots’, etc. perception of the real). A third, and less debated game-reality relationship, based on public awareness and typically a socio-political agenda...... seem to be emerging in the field of gaming. The presentation focuses on this new correspondence, describes its different appearances, elaborates various historical traces and argues that user access to a textual, constitutive level of the game seems intrinsically linked to the genre....

  2. Spatio-Temporal Variation and Futuristic Emission Scenario of Ambient Nitrogen Dioxide over an Urban Area of Eastern India Using GIS and Coupled AERMOD-WRF Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharadia Dey

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the spatio-temporal variation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 during June 2013 to May 2015 and its futuristic emission scenario over an urban area (Durgapur of eastern India. The concentration of ambient NO2 shows seasonal as well as site specific characteristics. The site with high vehicular density (Muchipara shows highest NO2 concentration followed by industrial site (DVC- DTPS Colony and the residential site (B Zone, respectively. The seasonal variation of ambient NO2 over the study area is portrayed by means of Geographical Information System based Digital Elevation Model. Out of the total urban area under consideration (114.982 km2, the concentration of NO2 exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS permissible limit over an area of 5.000 km2, 0.786 km2 and 0.653 km2 in post monsoon, winter and pre monsoon, respectively. Wind rose diagrams, correlation and regression analyses show that meteorology plays a crucial role in dilution and dispersion of NO2 near the earth's surface. Principal component analysis identifies vehicular source as the major source of NO2 in all the seasons over the urban region. Coupled AMS/EPA Regulatory Model (AERMOD-Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is used for predicting the concentration of NO2. Comparison of the observed and simulated data shows that the model overestimates the concentration of NO2 in all the seasons (except winter. The results show that coupled AERMOD-WRF model can overcome the unavailability of hourly surface as well as upper air meteorological data required for predicting the pollutant concentration, but improvement of emission inventory along with better understanding of the sinks and sources of ambient NO2 is essential for capturing the more realistic scenario.

  3. Photoacoustic study of ethylene emission and respiration rate of carbon dioxide from insulin germinated beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista-Filho, M.; Corrêa, S. F.; da Silva, L. B.; Xavier-Filho, J.; de Oliveira, J. G.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) technique was used to study ethylene and CO2 respiration emission rates from germinating bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) seeds. The concentration of ethylene was measured at 10P(12) and 10P(14) lines of the CO2 laser with the PA cell in the intracavity configuration. On the other hand, the respiration rate of CO2 was deduced (precision 1 ppm) from the concentration data measured by the commercial PA analyser operating in the infrared range. The objective of this study was to obtain better understanding of insulin signalling in the germinating seeds. The experiments were performed with seeds imbibed either in water or in aqueous solution of insulin (0,9 μg.mL-1 H2O).

  4. Changing Arctic Ecosystems: Updated forecast: Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions required to improve polar bear outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Karen L.; Atwood, Todd C.; Mugel, Douglas N.; Rode, Karyn D.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than other regions of the world due to the loss of snow and ice, which increases the amount of solar energy absorbed by the region. The most visible consequence has been the rapid decline in sea ice over the last 3 decades-a decline projected to bring long ice-free summers if greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are not significantly reduced. The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice over the biologically productive continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean as a platform for hunting seals. In 2008, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the polar bear as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to the threat posed by sea ice loss. The polar bear was the first species to be listed due to forecasted population declines from climate change.

  5. Quantification of gas and solid emissions during Strombolian explosions using simultaneous sulphur dioxide and infrared camera observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnie, Talfan; Bombrun, Maxime; Burton, Michael R.; Harris, Andrew; Sawyer, Georgina

    2015-07-01

    We present simultaneous measurements of gas and solid emissions from Strombolian explosions acquired on Stromboli volcano on 30 September 2012 using an SO2 camera and an infrared camera. We find no significant correlation between solid and gas masses, consistent with the postulated independence of the processes controlling bubble film rupture and gas slug mass, which determine emitted solid and gas masses respectively. Our observations demonstrate the utility of simultaneous multi-parametric imaging of volcanic events at different wavelengths to elucidate the relationships between disparate volcanic processes. We also further demonstrate the utility of the SO2 camera in quantifying explosion dynamics, and that by combining ultra violet camera images and spectral measurements we are able to image the spatial distribution of absorbance by SO2 in volcanic plumes and, crucially, to calibrate the images to total SO2 masses while compensating for light dilution effects.

  6. Determination of Pb in river water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation with manganese dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa Bispo, Marcia; Santos da Boa Morte, Elane; Korn das Gracas Andrade, Maria; Sena Gomes Teixeira, Leonardo; Korn, Mauro; Costa, Antonio Celso Spinola

    2005-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for separation and pre-concentration using ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation with manganese dioxide was developed for Pb determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). The optimization process was carried out using a two-level factorial design and a Doehlert matrix. Three variables (i.e. concentration of oxidizing solution-KMnO 4 , concentration of MnSO 4 solution and time of ultrasonic irradiation) were used as factors in the optimization. The recoveries, based on the analysis of spiked samples, were between 90% and 105%, and the precision was ≤ 5%. The detection limit and quantification limit for Pb determination were 3.2 and 10.7 μg L -1 , respectively. The proposed method was applied for the determination of Pb in water samples from a river heavily polluted by industrial effluents. The recovery measured by analyte addition technique showed that the proposed pre-concentration method had good accuracy

  7. Climate change convention : reallocation of carbon dioxide emissions; Convenzione sui cambiamenti climatici: ipotesi per una assegnazione di quote di emissioni di anidride carbonica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, P.; Venanzi, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1995-07-01

    In 1992, during the United Nation`s Conference on Environment and Development, held in Rio de Janeiro, the Framework Convention on Climate Change was signed. The ultimate objective of this Convention is the control and the reduction of greenhouse gas releases from human activities, to achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The purpose of this research is to provide a reallocation of carbon dioxide important greenhouse gas, among nine countries representing the different geopolitical worldwide situations. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental criteria have been taken into account. Some of these issues have been proposed in the international negotiating context. In order to apportion emissions the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) has been used. The AHP is a multi objective decision-making technique employing a method of pairwise comparisons to rank order alternatives of a problem formulated in a hierarchic structure by computing the largest eigenvalue of the pairwise comparisons matrix. Moreover, the AHP approach enables one to deal with both quantitative and qualitative factors in a logical fashion. The findings summarize the different indicators considered representing the proposals of the parties involved in the international debate.

  8. Carbon sequestration by mangrove forest: One approach for managing carbon dioxide emission from coal-based power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Raghab; Jana, Tapan Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Mangroves are known as natural carbon sinks, taking CO2 out of the atmosphere and store it in their biomass for many years. This study aimed to investigate the capacity of world's largest mangrove, the Sundarbans (Indian part) to sequester anthropogenic CO2 emitted from the proximate coal-based thermal power plant in Kolaghat (∼100 km away from mangrove site). Study also includes Kolkata, one of the largest metropolises of India (∼150 km away from mangrove site) for comparing micrometeorological parameters, biosphere-atmosphere CO2 exchange fluxes and atmospheric pollutants between three distinct environments: mangrove-power plant-metropolis. Hourly sampling of atmospheric CO2 in all three sites (late December 2011 and early January 2012) revealed that CO2 concentrations and emission fluxes were maximum around the power plant (360-621 ppmv, 5.6-56.7 mg m-2s-1 respectively) followed by the metropolis (383-459 ppmv, 3.8-20.4 mg m-2s-1 respectively) and mangroves (277-408 ppmv, -8.9-11.4 mg m-2s-1, respectively). Monthly coal consumption rates (41-57, in 104 ton month-1) were converted to CO2 suggesting that 2.83 Tg C was added to the atmosphere in 2011 for the generation of 7469732 MW energy from the power plant. Indian Sundarbans (4264 km2) sequestered total of 2.79 Tg C which was 0.64% of the annual fossil fuel emission from India in the same time period. Based on these data from 2010 to 2011, it is calculated that about 4328 km2 mangrove forest coverage is needed to sequester all CO2 emitted from the Kolaghat power plant.

  9. Productive Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Brandstätter , Ulrich; Sommerer , Christa

    2016-01-01

    Part 4: Short Papers; International audience; Video games can be appropriated for productive purposes. Commercial games and game engines are often used for video productions, and game development companies provide development kits and modding environments to gaming communities and independent developers. With gamification, game principles are deployed in non-game contexts for benefits beyond pure entertainment. Most approaches are more focused on using games and their design elements rather t...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon dioxide...

  11. A Microalgae-Based Platform for the Beneficial Re-use of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Mark; Groppo, Jack; Kesner, Stephanie; Mohler, Daniel; Pace, Robby; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo; Wilson, Michael; Schambach, Jenna; Stewart, Jennifer; Zeller, Ashton

    2018-02-02

    This project sought to address the technical and economic barriers to carbon dioxide capture and utilization using microalgae. Operating data were collected in 2016 and 2017 during cultivation of Scenedesmus acutus at Duke Energy’s East Bend Station – a coal-fired power plant located in northern Kentucky – using flue gas as the CO2 source. Algae were grown in a 1200 L “cyclic flow” photobioreactor (PBR) designed by the University of Kentucky. A key finding was that the harvested algae contained only very low concentrations of heavy metals (As, Cd, Hg, Se), consistent with heavy metals incorporation from the supplied nutrients. This indicates that algal biomass produced from coal-derived flue gas would be suitable for a variety of applications, including the production of bioplastics, use as fertilizer, etc. A lifecycle assessment showed that the UK-designed PBR employed in this work qualifies as a net CO2 capture technology. Indeed, over a 30-year period, net CO2 capture would equate to 43% of the targeted amount, i.e., the amount captured from the supplied flue gas. A techno-economic analysis indicated that the minimum production cost of Scenedesmus acutus biomass in the US is in the order of $875/ton, excluding the cost of capital. While this figure is not too dissimilar to values reported for open raceway ponds in similar scenarios, it emphasizes that for current cultivation technology any pathway to economic viability will require applications for which algal boimass can be sold at prices in excess of $1,000/ton. Currently, such applications represent relatively small markets, such as pigments (e.g., astaxanthin) and nutraceuticals (ω-3 unsaturated fatty acids), as well as nutritional supplements (whole algae) for human consumption and for use in pet food. Consequently, the commercialization of large-scale algae-based CO2 capture and utilization will require the development of new technologies to reduce the cost of

  12. Effects of digestate solid fraction fertilisation on yield and soil carbon dioxide emission in a horticulture succession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Maucieri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the agronomical and environmental effects of digestate solid fraction (DSF used as fertiliser in a vegetable crop succession (green bean, savoy cabbage, cabbage and cauliflower in Northeast Italy (45°20’ N; 11°57’ E. Three fertilisation treatments were tested using DSF to substitute 0% (Tmin, 50% (T50 and 100% (T100 optimal level of mineral nitrogen fertilisation. The experiment was carried out from 22nd May 2014 (green bean sowing to 3rd June 2015 (cabbage harvest. Summer and spring crops did not show significantly different marketable yield among fertilisation treatments with an average value (±standard error of 9.0±0.5, 9.9±1.2 and 51.3±6.4 Mg ha–1 for green bean, cauliflower and cabbage, respectively. Lower DSF fertilisation effect was monitored on winter crop (savoy cabbage with a marketable yield reduction of -35.1% than mineral fertilisation (25.9 Mg ha–1, whereas the T50 treatment was not significantly different compared to the two previous ones. Crop species significantly influenced the N use efficiencies with negative recovery and use efficiency indexes for the DSF fertilisation treatments. Soil CO2 emissions were not significantly influenced by fertilisation in all studied crops with median values always lower than 1 g m–2 h–1.

  13. MAMAP – a new spectrometer system for column-averaged methane and carbon dioxide observations from aircraft: retrieval algorithm and first inversions for point source emission rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bovensmann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available MAMAP is an airborne passive remote sensing instrument designed to measure the dry columns of methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2. The MAMAP instrument comprises two optical grating spectrometers: the first observing in the short wave infrared band (SWIR at 1590–1690 nm to measure CO2 and CH4 absorptions, and the second in the near infrared (NIR at 757–768 nm to measure O2 absorptions for reference/normalisation purposes. MAMAP can be operated in both nadir and zenith geometry during the flight. Mounted on an aeroplane, MAMAP surveys areas on regional to local scales with a ground pixel resolution of approximately 29 m × 33 m for a typical aircraft altitude of 1250 m and a velocity of 200 km h−1. The retrieval precision of the measured column relative to background is typically ≲1% (1σ. MAMAP measurements are valuable to close the gap between satellite data, having global coverage but with a rather coarse resolution, on the one hand, and highly accurate in situ measurements with sparse coverage on the other hand. In July 2007, test flights were performed over two coal-fired power plants operated by Vattenfall Europe Generation AG: Jänschwalde (27.4 Mt CO2 yr−1 and Schwarze Pumpe (11.9 Mt CO2 yr−1, about 100 km southeast of Berlin, Germany. By using two different inversion approaches, one based on an optimal estimation scheme to fit Gaussian plume models from multiple sources to the data, and another using a simple Gaussian integral method, the emission rates can be determined and compared with emissions reported by Vattenfall Europe. An extensive error analysis for the retrieval's dry column results (XCO2 and XCH4 and for the two inversion methods has been performed. Both methods – the Gaussian plume model fit and the Gaussian integral method – are capable of deriving

  14. Meta-analysis of calorimeter data to establish relationships between methane and carbon dioxide emissions or oxygen consumption for dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Aubry

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments suggest the use of other gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2 to estimate methane (CH4 emissions from livestock, yet little information is available on the relationship between these two gases for a wide range of animals. A large respiration calorimeter dataset with dairy cattle (n = 987 from 30 experiments was used to investigate relationships between CH4 and CO2 production and oxygen (O2 consumption and to assess whether the predictive power of these relationships could be improved by taking into account some dietary variables, including forage proportion, fibre and metabolisable energy concentrations. The animals were of various physiological states (young n = 60, dry cows n = 116 and lactating cows n = 811 and breeds (Holstein-Friesian cows n = 876, Jersey × Holstein-Friesian n = 47, Norwegian n = 50 and Norwegian × Holstein-Friesian n = 14. The animals were offered forage as a sole diet or a mixture of forage and concentrate (forage proportion ranging from 10 to 100%, dry matter basis. Data were analysed using a series of mixed models. There was a strong positive linear relationship between CH4 and CO2, and observations within an experiment were very predictable (adjusted R2 = 0.93. There was no effect of breed on the relationship between CH4 and CO2. Using O2 instead of CO2 to predict CH4 production also provided a very good fit to the observed empirical data, but the relationship was weaker (adjusted R2 = 0.86. The inclusion of dietary variables to the observed CO2 emissions, in particular forage proportion and fibre concentration, provided a marginal improvement to the prediction of CH4. The observed variability in the CH4:CO2 ratio could only marginally be explained by animal physiological state (lactating vs. dry cows and young cattle and dietary variables, and thus most likely reflected individual animal differences. The CH4:CO2 ratio can therefore be particularly useful to identify low CH4 producing cows. These

  15. Evaluation of avoided carbon dioxide emissions in cogeneration projects; Evaluacion de las emisiones evitadas de bioxido de carbono en proyectos de cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Zamudio, Jesus Antonio; Fernandez Montiel, Manuel Francisco; Alcaraz Calderon, Agustin Moises [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: jesus.flores@iie.org.mx; mffm@iie.org.mx; malcaraz@iie.org.mx

    2010-11-15

    In this paper, presents a methodology of how to calculate the emissions of CO{sub 2} (Carbon Dioxide) in cogeneration of plants for evaluate future cases with the type of fuel and fuel flow used in the plant. The methodology was in spreadsheets developed a series of stoichiometric balances. The methodology was done for three types of fossil fuels: solid, liquid and gas. The analysis is made only to the percentages of the items contained in the fuel flow automatically used and results in the combustion products in tons per hour. This method was compared with the results obtained in the software Thermoflow Inc. (Used in Gerencia de Procesos Termicos of Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas for evaluate various process systems that produce energy power) using different cogeneration systems, that is to say about the technology used emissions compared according to the amount of excess air for each type of technology and at one point before the gas cleaning systems. The results can be evaluated for emissions avoided through the fuel type used and developing a cogeneration plant compared to a conventional plant. [Spanish] En este articulo, se presenta una metodologia de como calcular las emisiones de CO{sub 2} (Bioxido de carbono) en plantas de cogeneracion, para evaluar casos a futuro por medio del tipo de combustible y flujo de combustible a utilizar en la planta. La metodologia se realizo en hojas de calculo, donde se desarrollaron una serie de balances estequiometricos. La metodologia se hizo para tres tipos de combustibles fosiles: solido, liquido y gas. El analisis se realiza con solo dar los porcentajes de los elementos que contiene el combustible y el flujo a utilizarse y automaticamente da como resultado los productos de la combustion en toneladas por hora. Esta metodologia se comparo con los resultados obtenidos en el software Thermoflow Inc. (Empleado en la Gerencia de Procesos Termicos del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas para evaluar diversos

  16. Supermodular Games and Potential Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brânzei, R.; Mallozzi, L.; Tijs, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Potential games and supermodular games are attractive games, especially because under certain conditions they possess pure Nash equilibria. Subclasses of games with a potential are considered which are also strategically equivalent to supermodular games. The focus is on two-person zero-sum games and

  17. Methane and carbon dioxide emission in a two-phase olive oil mill sludge windrow pile during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manios, Thrassyvoulos; Maniadakis, Konstantinos; Boutzakis, Panagiotis; Naziridis, Yiannis; Lasaridi, Katia; Markakis, George; Stentiford, Edward I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to make some preliminary evaluations on CO(2) and CH(4) emissions during composting of two-phase olive oil mill sludge (OOMS). OOMS, olive tree leaves (OTL) and shredded olive tree branches (OTB) were used as feedstock for Pile I and Pile II with a 1:1:1 and 1:1:2v/v ratio, respectively. Each pile was originally 1.2m high, 2.0m wide and approximately 15.0m long. Four 500 ml volume glass funnels were inverted and introduced in each pile, two in the core (buried 50-60 cm from the surface) and two near the surface under a thin 10-15 cm layer of the mixture. Thin (0.5 cm diameter) plastic, 80 cm long tubes were connected to the funnels. A mobile gas analyser (GA2000) was used to measure the composition (by volume) of O2, CO2 and CH4 on a daily basis. The funnels were removed prior to each turning and reinserted afterwards. From each pair of funnels (core and surface) of both piles, one was kept closed between samplings. Two way ANOVA was used to test differences between piles and among the tubes. Post hoc Tukey tests were also used to further investigate these differences. There was a significant difference (at pparticle size of OTB in Pile II (resulting in increasing porosity) are the probable causes of these significant differences. Samples from open funnels presented lower, but not significantly lower, O2 composition (higher for CO2 and CH4) in comparison with closed funnels in both depths and both piles. Not significant were also the different mean gas compositions between core and surface funnels in the same pile.

  18. Carbon dioxide emissions from lakes and reservoirs of China: A regional estimate based on the calculated pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhidan; Song, Kaishan; Shang, Yingxin; Fang, Chong; Li, Lin; Lv, Lili; Lv, Xianguo; Chen, Lijiang

    2017-12-01

    The role of inland water in CO2 exchange with the atmosphere was evaluated on the basis of calculated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) from sampling of 207 lakes and 84 reservoirs across China in late summer. The results suggested that almost 60% of these water bodies were supersaturated with CO2 with respect to atmosphere, and the collected reservoirs samples exhibited higher mean pCO2 than lakes. The mean pCO2 in fresh water lakes was about 3.5 times of the value in saline lakes. The lakes and reservoirs were divided into five groups (Inner Mongolia -Xinjiang plateau region, Tibetan Plateau region, Northeastern plain and mountainous region, Yunnan- Guizhou Plateau region, and Eastern plain region). The Yunnan- Guizhou Plateau region showed the highest pCO2 compared with other regions, most likely due to the typical karst landforms, karst processes may promote aqueous CO2 concentration, and karstification has a significant effect on the capture of atmospheric CO2. Inner Mongolia-Xinjiang plateau and Tibetan Plateau region reserviors showed negative CO2 flux to atmosphere, other waters in this study all supersaturated with CO2 with respect to the atmosphere. A which We analyzed the relationship between pCO2 and environmental variables, and results showed that some indicators had correlations with pCO2 in individual region such as total phosphorus, dissolved organic matter, and total suspended solids, but the relationship could not be observed with all surveyed waters. This indicated that it might be much more effective in a smaller regional scale than the broadened scale when the environmental factors were used as the predictor of pCO2 in lakes. Therefore, the common algorithm that extrapolates CO2 concentration or emission flux from the study region to a wider scale might not be accurate because of the changes in the environmental and water quality conditions.

  19. Optimizing test procedures for estimating daily methane and carbon dioxide emissions in cattle using short-term breath measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, P F; Barchia, I M; Weber, C; Bird-Gardiner, T; Donoghue, K A; Herd, R M; Hegarty, R S

    2017-02-01

    Respiration chambers are considered the reference method for quantifying the daily CH production rate (MPR) and CO production rate (CPR) of cattle; however, they are expensive, labor intensive, cannot be used in the production environment, and can be used to assess only a limited number of animals. Alternative methods are now available, including those that provide multiple short-term measures of CH and CO, such as the GreenFeed Emission Monitoring (GEM) system. This study was conducted to provide information for optimizing test procedures for estimating MPR and CPR of cattle from multiple short-term CH and CO records. Data on 495 Angus steers on a 70-d ad libitum feedlot diet with 46,657 CH and CO records and on 121 Angus heifers on a 15-d ad libitum roughage diet with 7,927 CH and CO records were used. Mean (SD) age and BW were 554 d (SD 92) and 506 kg (SD 73), respectively, for the steers and 372 d (SD 28) and 348 kg (SD 37), respectively, for the heifers. The 2 data sets were analyzed separately but using the same procedures to examine the reduction in variance as more records are added and to evaluate the level of precision with 2 vs. 3 min as the minimum GEM visit duration for a valid record. The moving averages procedure as well as the repeated measures procedure were used to calculate variances for both CH and CO, starting with 5 records and progressively increasing to a maximum of 80 records. For both CH and CO and in both data sets, there was a sharp reduction in the variances obtained by both procedures as more records were added. However, there was no substantial reduction in the variance after 30 records had been added. Inclusion of records with a minimum of 2-min GEM visit duration resulted in reduction in precision relative to a minimum of 3 min, as indicated by significantly ( < 0.05) more heterogeneous variances for all cases except CH4 in steers. In addition, more records were required to achieve the same level of precision relative to data with

  20. Game theory : Noncooperative games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.; Wright, J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe noncooperative game models and discuss game theoretic solution concepts. Some applications are also noted. Conventional theory focuses on the question ‘how will rational players play?’, and has the Nash equilibrium at its core. We discuss this concept and its interpretations, as well as

  1. Differential games

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2006-01-01

    This volume lays the mathematical foundations for the theory of differential games, developing a rigorous mathematical framework with existence theorems. It begins with a precise definition of a differential game and advances to considerations of games of fixed duration, games of pursuit and evasion, the computation of saddle points, games of survival, and games with restricted phase coordinates. Final chapters cover selected topics (including capturability and games with delayed information) and N-person games.Geared toward graduate students, Differential Games will be of particular interest

  2. Emission inventory; Inventaire des emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontelle, J.P. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    Statistics on air pollutant (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and ammonium) emissions, acid equivalent emissions and their evolution since 1990 in the various countries of Europe and the USA, are presented. Emission data from the industrial, agricultural, transportation and power sectors are given, and comparisons are carried out between countries based on Gnp and population, pollution import/export fluxes and compliance to the previous emission reduction objectives

  3. Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenkert, A.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Andres, R.J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Fung, I. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Matthews, E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

    1997-03-01

    Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

  4. Convex Games versus Clan Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brânzei, R.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Tijs, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we provide characterizations of convex games and total clan games by using properties of their corresponding marginal games.We show that a "dualize and restrict" procedure transforms total clan games with zero worth for the clan into monotonic convex games.Furthermore, each monotonic

  5. Convex games versus clan games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brânzei, R.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Tijs, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we provide characterizations of convex games and total clan games by using properties of their corresponding marginal games. We show that a "dualize and restrict" procedure transforms total clan games with zero worth for the clan into monotonic convex games. Furthermore, each monotonic

  6. Game on! : Evaluation malaria games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rob Willems

    2014-01-01

    The goal of GameOn! is to develop a serious video game. The object: to develop a serious game that aims to change behavior through awareness. The setup A multidisciplinary group which unites expertise from didactic and game production backgrounds produces an educational game for an international

  7. Game mechanics : advanced game design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Ernest; Dormans, Joris

    2012-01-01

    Game Mechanics is aimed at game design students and industry professionals who want to improve their understanding of how to design, build, and test the mechanics of a game. Game Mechanics will show you how to design, test, and tune the core mechanics of a game—any game, from a huge role-playing

  8. Space–time dynamics of carbon and environmental parameters related to carbon dioxide emissions in the Buor-Khaya Bay and adjacent part of the Laptev Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Semiletov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to improve understanding of carbon cycling in the Buor-Khaya Bay (BKB and adjacent part of the Laptev Sea by studying the inter-annual, seasonal, and meso-scale variability of carbon and related hydrological and biogeochemical parameters in the water, as well as factors controlling carbon dioxide (CO2 emission. Here we present data sets obtained on summer cruises and winter expeditions during 12 yr of investigation. Based on data analysis, we suggest that in the heterotrophic BKB area, input of terrestrially borne organic carbon (OC varies seasonally and inter-annually and is largely determined by rates of coastal erosion and river discharge. Two different BKB sedimentation regimes were revealed: Type 1 (erosion accumulation and Type 2 (accumulation. A Type 1 sedimentation regime occurs more often and is believed to be the quantitatively most important mechanism for suspended particular matter (SPM and particulate organic carbon (POC delivery to the BKB. The mean SPM concentration observed in the BKB under a Type 1 regime was one order of magnitude greater than the mean concentration of SPM (~ 20 mg L−1 observed along the Lena River stream in summer 2003. Loadings of the BKB water column with particulate material vary by more than a factor of two between the two regimes. Higher partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2, higher concentrations of nutrients, and lower levels of oxygen saturation were observed in the bottom water near the eroded coasts, implying that coastal erosion and subsequent oxidation of eroded organic matter (OM rather than the Lena River serves as the predominant source of nutrients to the BKB. Atmospheric CO2 fluxes from the sea surface in the BKB vary from 1 to 95 mmol m−2 day−1 and are determined by specific features of hydrology and wind conditions, which change spatially, seasonally, and inter-annually. Mean values of CO2 emission from the shallow Laptev Sea were similar in September 1999 and 2005 (7.2 and 7

  9. CHP Energy and Emissions Savings Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Download the CHP Emissions Calculator, a tool that calculates the difference between the anticipated carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions from a CHP system to those of a separate heat and power system.

  10. Research Progress in Carbon Dioxide Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Keliang; Wang, Gang; Lu, Chunjing

    2018-02-01

    With the rapid development of global economy, human beings have become highly dependent upon fossil fuel such as coal and petroleum. Much fossil fuel is consumed in industrial production and human life. As a result, carbon dioxide emissions have been increasing, and the greenhouse effects thereby generated are posing serious threats to environment of the earth. These years, increasing average global temperature, frequent extreme weather events and climatic changes cause material disasters to the world. After scientists’ long-term research, ample evidences have proven that emissions of greenhouse gas like carbon dioxide have brought about tremendous changes to global climate. To really reduce carbon dioxide emissions, governments of different countries and international organizations have invested much money and human resources in performing research related to carbon dioxide emissions. Manual underground carbon dioxide storage and carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery are schemes with great potential and prospect for reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Compared with other schemes for reducing carbon dioxide emissions, aforementioned two schemes exhibit high storage capacity and yield considerable economic benefits, so they have become research focuses for reducing carbon dioxide emissions. This paper introduces the research progress in underground carbon dioxide storage and enhanced oil recovery, pointing out the significance and necessity of carbon dioxide-driven enhanced oil recovery.

  11. CO2 emissions abatement in the Nordic carbon-intensive industry – An end-game in sight?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rootzén, Johan; Johnsson, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Analysing different future trajectories of technological developments we assess the prospects for Nordic carbon-intensive industries to significantly reduce direct CO 2 emissions in the period 2010–2050. This analysis covers petroleum refining, integrated iron and steel production, and cement manufacturing in the four largest Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Our results show that the implementation of currently available abatement measures will not be enough to meet the ambitious emissions reduction targets envisaged for the Year 2050. We show how an extensive deployment of CCS (carbon capture and storage) could result in emissions reductions that are in line with such targets. However, large-scale introduction of CCS would come at a significant price in terms of energy use and the associated flows of captured CO 2 would place high requirements on timely planning of infrastructure for the transportation and storage of CO 2 . Further the assessment highlights the importance of, especially in the absence of successful deployment of CO 2 capture, encouraging increased use of biomass in the cement and integrated iron and steel industries, and of promoting the utilisation of alternative raw materials in cement manufacturing to complement efforts to improve energy efficiency. - Highlights: • Scenarios exploring the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions in Nordic industry. • Current measures not sufficient to comply with stringent emission reduction targets. • CCS enables carbon-intensive industries to comply with stringent reduction targets. • CCS would come at a high price in terms of energy use. • Without CO 2 capture increased use of biomass and alternative raw materials vital

  12. Personalised gaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakkes, S.; Tan, C.T.; Pisan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on personalised games, which we define as games that utilise player models for the purpose of tailoring the game experience to the individual player. The main contribution of the article is a motivation for personalised gaming, supported by an extensive overview of scientific

  13. Game Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Game Theory is a collection of short interviews based on 5 questions presented to some of the most influential and prominent scholars in game theory. We hear their views on game theory, its aim, scope, use, the future direction of game theory and how their work fits in these respects....

  14. Game theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent F.

    Game Theory is a collection of short interviews based on 5 questions presented to some of the most influential and prominent scholars in game theory. We hear their views on game theory, its aim, scope, use, the future direction of game theory and how their work fits in these respects....

  15. Game Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raessens, J.F.F.

    2016-01-01

    This entry describes game studies as a dynamic interdisciplinary field of academic study and research that focuses on digital games and play in a wide variety of social and cultural contexts. It examines the history of game studies from its prehistory, when games were looked at as part of other

  16. Differential games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaiya, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    General discussion of the theory of differential games with two players and zero sum. Games starting at a fixed initial state and ending at a fixed final time are analyzed. Strategies for the games are defined. The existence of saddle values and saddle points is considered. A stochastic version of a differential game is used to examine the synthesis problem.

  17. Balancing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T.J. (Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory, Univ. of the West Indies (JM))

    1990-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide and global temperatures are causing increasing worldwide concern, and pressure towards an international law of the atmosphere is rapidly escalating, yet widespread misconceptions about the greenhouse effect's inevitability, time scale, and causes have inhibited effective consensus and action. Observations from Antarctic ice cores, Amazonian rain forests, and Carribean coral reefs suggest that the biological effects of climate change may be more severe than climate models predict. Efforts to limit emissions from fossil-fuel combustion alone are incapable of stabilizing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide requires coupled measures to balance sources and sinks of the gas, and will only be viable with large-scale investments in increased sustainable productivity on degraded tropical soils, and in long-term research on renewable energy and biomass product development in the developing countries. A mechanism is outlined which directly links fossil-fuel combustion sources of carbon dioxide to removal via increasing biotic productivity and storage. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that such measures are very affordable, costing far less than inaction. (With 88 refs.).

  18. Personalised gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Bakkes, S.; Tan, C.T.; Pisan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on personalised games, which we define as games that utilise player models for the purpose of tailoring the game experience to the individual player. The main contribution of the article is a motivation for personalised gaming, supported by an extensive overview of scientific literature. The motivation concerns (a) the psychological foundation, (b) the effect on player satisfaction, (c) the contribution to game development, and (d) the requirement for achieving ambitions....

  19. Online Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Curran; Paul Canning; Martin Laughlin; Ciarán McGowan; Rory Carlin

    2005-01-01

    Computer gaming is a medium by which we can entertain ourselves, a medium that has expanded to the online worldwide market as part as globalization. The growth of online gaming has close ties with the use of broadband, as a good online gaming experience requires a broadband connection. Through online gaming, people can play and communicate with each other freely in almost any country, at any given time. This paper examines the phenomenon of online gaming.