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Sample records for dimensional radiotherapy treatment

  1. Progress of radiotherapy by three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Hajime; Nomoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    The recent progress of three-dimensional radiation treatment planning was reviewed. And clinical cases such as lung cancer and breast cancer are introduced. In the University of Occupational and Development Health, the treatment system FOCUS which is made up of CT simulator and linac was used mainly. Three-dimensional treatment planning was carried for about 90% of 330 patients who underwent radiotherapy for one year. The target becomes to be accurate and dose distribution with all CT slices in radiation field can be confirmed by using three-dimensional radiation treatment planning apparatus. High dose irradiation localized to tumor part is possible. Relations between total dose and volume of normal tissue and/or tumor can be estimated numerically and easily by DVH. A prediction of indication and affection became possible by this procedure. In conclusion, generalization of three-dimensional radiation treatment planning will bring progress of more effective radiotherapy with less adverse reaction. (K.H.). 21 refs

  2. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

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    Knoos, T; Nilsson, P [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Anders, A [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam`s eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam`s eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment.

  3. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoos, T.; Nilsson, P.; Anders, A.

    1995-01-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam's eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam's eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment

  4. Effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, indensity modulated radiotherapy, and conventional radiotherapy ON treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the irradiation volume, short-term and long-term efficacy of conventional radiotherapy (CR, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and indensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in the treatment of esophageal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis method was adopted. The patients were divided into CR group (n=42, 3D-CRT group (n=45, and IMRT group (n=40. A follow-up visit was paid to collect the short-term and long-term efficacy, and the occurrence of adverse reactions. The gross tumor voluem (GTV, clinical target volume (CTV, planning target volume (PTV, and irradiation volume of organs (bilateral lungs, spinal cord, and heart at risk (OAR in the three groups were compared. Results: It was found by target volume comparison that the mean values of GTV, CTV, and PTV in the three groups were significantly increased (P0.05. The occurrence rate of adverse reactions in 3D-CRT group and IMRT group was significantly lower than that in CR group (P0.05. The difference of 1-year survival rate among the three groups was not statistically significant (P=0.144, but 3-year and 5-year survival rates in 3D-CRT group and IMRT group were significantly higher than those in CR group (P<0.05. Conclusions: 3D-CRT and IMRT can significantly enhance the short-term and long-term efficacy for esophageal cancer patients, and alleviate the radioactive damage; therefore, they are deserved to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  5. Implementation of three dimensional treatment planning system for external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, Tibor; Kurup, P.G.G.; Stumpf, Janos

    1997-01-01

    A three dimensional (3D) treatment planning system was installed at Apollo Cancer Hospital, Chennai, India in 1995. This paper gives a short description of the system including hardware components, calculation algorithm, measured data requirements and specific three dimensional features. The concept and the structure of the system are shortly described. The first impressions along with critical opinions and the experiences are gained during the data acquisition are mentioned. Some improvements in the user interface are suggested. It is emphasized that although a 3D system offers more detailed and accurate dose distributions compared to a 2D system, it also introduces a greatly increased workload for the planning staff. (author)

  6. Four-dimensional treatment planning and fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy for moving tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shinichi; Kitamura, Kei; Nishioka, Takeshi; Kagei, Kenji; Hashimoto, Seiko; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Kunieda, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Nobuo; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve precise three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy for mobile tumors, a new radiotherapy system and its treatment planning system were developed and used for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: We developed a linear accelerator synchronized with a fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking system by which 3D coordinates of a 2.0-mm gold marker in the tumor can be determined every 0.03 second. The 3D relationships between the marker and the tumor at different respiratory phases are evaluated using CT image at each respiratory phase, whereby the optimum phase can be selected to synchronize with irradiation (4D treatment planning). The linac is triggered to irradiate the tumor only when the marker is located within the region of the planned coordinates relative to the isocenter. Results: The coordinates of the marker were detected with an accuracy of ± 1 mm during radiotherapy in the phantom experiment. The time delay between recognition of the marker position and the start or stop of megavoltage X-ray irradiation was 0.03 second. Fourteen patients with various tumors were treated by conformal radiotherapy with a 'tight' planning target volume (PTV) margin. They were surviving without relapse or complications with a median follow-up of 6 months. Conclusion: Fluoroscopic real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy following 4D treatment planning was developed and shown to be feasible to improve the accuracy of the radiotherapy for mobile tumors

  7. Comparison between conventional and three-dimensional conformal treatment planning for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, J.M.; Auliard, A.; Sarrazin, T.; Gibon, D.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Castelain, B.

    2001-01-01

    Comparison between conventional and three-dimensional conformal treatment planning for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors. Purpose. - We prospectively compared a conventional treatment planning (PT2D) and 3-dimensional conformal treatment planning (PT3D) for radiotherapy of cerebral tumours. Patients and methods.- Patients treated between 1/10/98 and 1/4/99 by irradiation for cerebral tumours were analysed. For each case, we planned PT2D using conventional orthogonal x-ray films, and afterward, PT3D using CT scan. Gross tumor volume, planning target volume and normal tissue volumes were defined. Dose was prescribed according to report 50 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). We compared surfaces of sagittal view targets defined on PT2D and PT3D and called them S2D and S3D, respectively. Irradiated volumes by 90% isodoses (VE-90%) and normal tissue volumes irradiated by 20, 50, 90% isodoses were calculated and compared using Student's paired t-test. Results. -There was a concordance of 84% of target surfaces defined on PT2D and PT3D. Percentages of target surface under- or-over defined by PT2D were 16 and 13% respectively. VE-90% was decreased by 15% (p = 0.07) with PT3D. Normal brain volume irradiated by 90% isodose was decreased by 27% with PT3D (p = 0.04). Conclusion.- For radiotherapy of cerebral tumors using only coplanar beams, PT3D leads to a reduction of normal brain tissue irradiated. We recommend PT3D for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors, particularly for low-grade or benign tumors (meningiomas, neuromas, etc.). (authors)

  8. Tumor motion in lung cancers: An overview of four-dimensional radiotherapy treatment of lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusheel Munshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most modern radiotherapy centers have adopted contouring based treatment. Sparing of the normal structures has been made more achievable than ever before by use of technologies such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT. However, unlike, sites such as brain or head neck, thorax is a site in active motion, mostly contributed by patient's respiratory movement. 4 D radiotherapy, that addresses the issues of motion in thoracic tumours answers this critical question. The present article outlines the scope of need for 4 D radiotherapy and discusses the options available for 4 D treatments of cancer patients.

  9. An interactive beam-weight optimization tool for three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burba, S.; Gardey, K.; Nadobny, J.; Stalling, D.; Seebass, M.; Beier, J.; Wust, P.; Budach, V.; Felix, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A computer software tool has been developed to aid the treatment planner in selecting beam weights for three-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning. An approach to plan optimization has been made that is based on the use of an iterative feasibility search algorithm combined with a quadratic convergence method that seeks a set of beam weights which satisfies all the dose constraints set by the planner. Materials and Methods: A FORTRAN module for dose calculation for radiotherapy (a VOXELPLAN modification) has been integrated into an object-oriented Silicon Graphics TM platform in an IRIS Inventor environment on basis of the OpenGL which up to now has been exclusively used for the calculation of E-field distributions in hyperthermia (HyperPlan TM ). After the successful calculation and representation of the dose distribution in the Silicon Graphics TM platform, an algorithm involving the minimization method according to the principle of quadratic convergence was developed for optimizing beam weights of a number of pre-calculated fields. The verification of the algorithms for dose calculation and dose optimization has been realized by use of a standardized interface to the program VIRTUOS as well as by the collapsed cone algorithm implemented in the commercial treatment planning system Helax TMS TM . Results: The search algorithm allows the planner to incorporate relative importance weightings to target volumes and anatomical structures, specifying, for example, that a dose constraint to the spinal cord is much more crucial to the overall evaluation of a treatment plan than a dose constraint to otherwise uninvolved soft tissue. In most cases the applied minimization method according to the model of Davidon-Fletcher-Powell showed ultimate fast convergence for a general function f(x) with continuous second derivatives and fast convergence for a positive definite quadratic function. In other cases, however, the absence of an acceptable solution may indicate

  10. A comparison of different three-dimensional treatment planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koswig, S.; Dinges, S.; Buchali, A.; Boehmer, D.; Salk, J.; Rosenthal, P.; Harder, C.; Schlenger, L.; Budach, V.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Four different three-dimensional planning techniques for localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer were compared with regard to dose homogeneity within the target volume and dose to organs at risk, dependent upon tumor stage. Patients and Methods: Six patients with stage T1, 7 patients with stage T2 and 4 patients with stage T3 were included in this study. Four different 3D treatment plans (rotation, 4-field, 5-field and 6-field technique) were calculated for each patient. Dose was calculated with the reference point at the isocenter (100%). The planning target volume was encompassed within the 95% isodose surface. All the techniques used different shaped portal for each beam. Dose volume histograms were created and compared for the planning target volume and the organs at risk (33%, 50%, 66% volume level) in all techniques. Results: The 4 different three-dimensional planning techniques revealed no differences concerning dose homogeneity within the planning target volume. The dose volume distribution at organs at risk show differences between the calculated techniques. In our study the best protection for bladder and rectum in stage T1 and T2 was achieved by the 6-field technique. A significant difference was achieved between 6-field and 4-field technique only in the 50% volume of the bladder (p=0.034), between the 6-field and rotation technique (all volume levels) and between 5-field and rotation technique (all volume levels). In stage T1, T2 6-field and 4-field technique in 50% (p-0.033) and 66% (p=0.011) of the rectum volume. In stage T3 a significant difference was not observed between the 4 techniques. The best protection of head of the femur was achieved by the rotation technique. Conclusion: In the localized radiotherapy of prostate cancer in stage T1 or T2 the best protection for bladder and rectum was achieved by a 3D-planned conformal 6-field technique. If the seminal vesicles have been included in the target volume and in the case of large

  11. Bladder radiotherapy treatment: A retrospective comparison of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans

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    Pasciuti, Katia, E-mail: k.pasciuti@virgilio.it [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Kuthpady, Shrinivas [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Anderson, Anne; Best, Bronagh [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Waqar, Saleem; Chowdhury, Subhra [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    To examine tumor's and organ's response when different radiotherapy plan techniques are used. Ten patients with confirmed bladder tumors were first treated using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and subsequently the original plans were re-optimized using the intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-techniques. Targets coverage in terms of conformity and homogeneity index, TCP, and organs' dose limits, including integral dose analysis were evaluated. In addition, MUs and treatment delivery times were compared. Better minimum target coverage (1.3%) was observed in VMAT plans when compared to 3DCRT and IMRT ones confirmed by a statistically significant conformity index (CI) results. Large differences were observed among techniques in integral dose results of the femoral heads. Even if no statistically significant differences were reported in rectum and tissue, a large amount of energy deposition was observed in 3DCRT plans. In any case, VMAT plans provided better organs and tissue sparing confirmed also by the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) analysis as well as a better tumor control probability (TCP) result. Our analysis showed better overall results in planning using VMAT techniques. Furthermore, a total time reduction in treatment observed among techniques including gantry and collimator rotation could encourage using the more recent one, reducing target movements and patient discomfort.

  12. New customized patient repositioning system for use in three dimensional (3D) treatment planning and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Toshihiro; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Takekawa, Naomitu; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To develop a safe and easy method for customized patient repositioning and immobilization prior to 3-D treatment planning and during precise radiotherapy. Materials and methods: The new material consists of impression material, and covering material to fix and hold the impression. The impression material is composed of numerous effervescent polystyrene beads (3.1 mm in diameter) coated by polymerizing substance, urethane prepolymer. When being wet, the material beads adhere to each other due to polymelization, and it is hardened in 5 to 10 minutes. Within one hour the mold is sufficiently dry to be used for treatment planning utilizing computed tomography(CT). The physical characteristics of the material, the subjective comfort of the patient, the reduction in time required for repositioning in the treatment of the head and neck tumors, and the reduction in patient movement in the treatment of the breast cancers were investigated. Results: During the hardening stage, the maximum temperature of the material was 33 deg. C. Non-toxic CO 2 gas was produced and evaporated from the covering fabric. The mold, with a density of 0.095, was strong enough to endure compression, flexure, and scratching. In the healthy volunteers, no sensitivity to the skin was observed after 12 hours' attachment to the skin. The CT number of the material was less than minus 800, and no build-up effect was demonstrated in megavoltage photon therapy. Various molds were made and used as neck rest adjunctive to thermoplastic face mask, whole body cast, and arm rest (Figure). A questionnaire survey administered to 59 patients with brain, head and neck tumors, and to 18 patients with breast cancers, revealed that subjective comfort was markedly improved (90.9%) of improved (9.1%) by virtue of the new material. In the treatment of head and neck tumors, the mean time and SD for repositioning were 61.1 ± 13.6 seconds with the ready-made neck-rest and 49.4 ± 8.4 seconds with the

  13. Comparison of two dimensional and three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Elena M.; Joy Williams, Frances; Ethan Lyn, Basil; Aird, Edwin G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer being treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less (CHARTWEL) were planned and treated with a three dimensional (3D) conformal protocol and comparison made with two dimensional (2D) planning, as used previously, to compare past practice and methods. Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients were planned initially using 3D and then replanned using a 2D system. The 2D plans were transferred onto the 3D system and recalculated. Dose volume histograms could then be constructed of planning target volumes for phases 1 and 2 (PTV 1 and 2, respectively), lung and spinal cord for the 2D plans and compared with the 3D plans. Results: There was a significantly lower absolute dose to the isocentre with 2D compared to 3D planning with dose reductions of 3.9% for phase 1, 4.4% for phase 2 and 4.7% for those treated with a single phase. Maximum dose to spinal cord was greater in 17 of the 24 2D plans with a median dose reduction of 0.82 Gy for 3D (P=0.04). The percentage volume of whole lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V 20 ) was greater in 16 of the 24 2D plans with a median reduction in V 20 of 2.4% for 3D (P=0.03). Conclusions: A lower dose to tumour was obtained using 2D planning due to the method of dose calculation and spinal cord and lung doses were significantly higher

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of 103 Pd or 125 I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson χ 2 test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade ≥2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7

  15. Three-dimensional pre-treatment verification for intensity modulated radiotherapy using the 3DVH™ software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Lais P.; Silveira, Thiago B.; Garcia, Paulo L.; Trindade, Cassia; Santos, Maira R.; Batista, Delano V.S.

    2013-01-01

    The IMRT quality assurance is normally analyzed punctual or bi-dimensionally. One difficult of this procedure is to evaluate the clinical impact of the QA result on treatment. The 3DVHTM software gives a 3D measured dose distribution, providing DVH analysis for organs at risk and target volumes. The aim of this work is to validate and implement the software 3DVH™ for IMRT treatments and to verify advantages over the QA 2D. The software uses two groups of data to generate the dose distribution: one from the treatment planning system and another from the irradiation for traditional QA 2D, measured with MapCHECK (Sun Nuclear) (MC). To validate the software, a small volume ionization chamber was used to check if both calculated 3DVHTM dose and measured dose by the chamber were equivalent. For QA analysis, ten IMRT cases planned in Eclipse 8.6 (Varian) and treated in Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA) were selected. For all cases, verification plans were created and irradiated in MC, and the analysis were made using the gamma index. Among the cases, five DVH comparisons between planned and measured data presented a deviation lower than 4% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the PTV and GTV's coverage. Other cases showed differences larger than 4%, presented in areas where the movements of the MLC leaves were more complex, mostly in the neighborhood of organs at risk. The 3DVH™ software provides several clinical advantages to IMRT QA, generating refined analysis of the cases evaluated, in comparison to conventional QA 2D. (author)

  16. Pulmonary function following adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer and the issue of three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P.A.R.M.; Glas, U.; Fornander, T.; Rosfors, S.; Bevegard, S.; Wennberg, B.

    1998-01-01

    Background and purpose: The frequency and grade of pulmonary complications following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer are still debated. This study focuses on loss of pulmonary function. Materials and methods: We have measured the reduction of pulmonary function 5 months following radiotherapy in 144 node-positive stage II breast cancer patients by using pulmonary function tests. Results: No deterioration of pulmonary function was detected among the patients who were treated with local radiotherapy. On the contrary, there was a mean increase in diffusion capacity by 7% (P=0.004) following radiotherapy, which most likely was explained by the adjuvant chemotherapy administered prior to the baseline pulmonary function tests. Patients undergoing loco-regional radiotherapy showed a mean reduction in diffusion capacity by 5% (P<0.001) and in vital capacity by 3% (P=0.001). The subset of patients (9%) who were diagnosed with severe pulmonary complications needing cortisone treatment had significantly larger mean paired differences in vital capacity (-0.446 L, -15% (equivalent to 15 years of normal ageing or the loss of 3/4 of a lung lobe)) compared to the patients who were asymptomatic (-0.084 L) (P<0.05). When the effects of potential confounding factors and different radiotherapy techniques were tested on the reduction of pulmonary function by stepwise multiple regression analysis, a significant correlation was found only to loco-regional radiotherapy including the lower internal mammary lymph nodes. Conclusions: We conclude that a clinically important reduction of pulmonary function is seen in the subset of patients who are diagnosed with severe pulmonary complication following loco-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer. The results of this study warrant further studies based on individual lung dose volume histograms. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. A comparison of four patient immobilization devices in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Paul Y.; Washington, Maxine; Vaida, Florin; Hamilton, Russell; Spelbring, Danny; Wyman, Brenda; Harrison, Joanne; Chen, George T. Y.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the variability of patient positioning during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer treated with no immobilization or one of four immobilization devices, and to determine the effects of patient body habitus and pelvic circumference on patient movement with each individual immobilization technique. Methods and Materials: To see whether our immobilization techniques have improved day-to-day patient movement, a retrospective analysis was carried out. A total of 62 patients treated at one facility on a single machine with 3D-CRT via a four-field box technique (anterior-posterior and opposed laterals) in the supine position with either no immobilization or one of four immobilization devices. Five groups of patients were compared: (a) group 1-no immobilization; (b) group 2-alpha cradle from the waist to upper thigh; (c) group 3-alpha cradle from waist to below the knees; (d) group 4-styrofoam leg immobilizer (below knees); and (e) group 5-aquaplast cast encompassing the entire abdomen and pelvis to midthigh with alpha cradle immobilization to their lower legs and feet. Prior to starting radiotherapy, portal films of all four treatment fields were obtained 1 day before treatment. Subsequently, portal films were then obtained at least once a week. Portal films were compared with the simulation films and appropriate changes were made and verified on the next day prior to treatment. A deviation of greater than 0.5 cm or greater was considered to be clinically significant in our analysis. We studied the difference among the types of immobilization and no immobilization by looking at the frequency of movements (overall, and on each of the three axes) that a patient had during the course of his treatment. Using a logistic regression model, the probability of overall and individual directional movement for each group was obtained. In addition, the effects of patient body habitus and pelvic circumference on movement were

  18. Quality evaluation of radiotherapy treatment planning using 3-dimensional CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Yutaka; Isobe, Yoshihide; Ozaki, Shin; Hosoki, Takuya; Mori, Shigeru; Ikeda, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Recently superimposition of dose distribution onto CT images has become available with the use of planning computers. However, the distribution is mostly along the plane of central axis of the beam, and evaluation of the quality of planning has not yet been established. In this paper, a method to evaluate the quality is demonstrated, using the extended definitions of ICRU 29 concept in to 3-dimensions. Therapeutic efficiency (Target Volume dose/Treatment Volume dose) is the main key to evaluate it. Concept and procedures are described in detail with two case examples. (author)

  19. Modification of a three-dimensional treatment planning system for the use of multi-leaf collimators in conformation radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesecke, R.; Becker, G.; Alandt, K.; Pastyr, O.; Doll, J.; Schlegel, W.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The multi-leaf collimator of the DKFZ is designed as a low cost add-on device for conventional linear accelerators for radiotherapy. The technical specification of the computer controlled collimator is briefly described . A major limitation in the use of the wide capabilities of multi-leaf collimators in the clinic is still an appropriate treatment planning system. This paper describes treatment planning and dose calculation techniques for multi-leaf collimators and shows examples where the capabilities of the collimators are used extensively. (author). 18 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. The study of treatment value of concurrent chemotherapy for patients with esophageal carcinoma received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lan; Wang Jun; Han Chun; Zhang Jing; Li Xiaoning; Gao Chao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the acute side effects, local control rate and survival rate of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CC) and radiotherapy alone (R) for patients with esophageal carcinoma. Methods: From June 2006 to February 2009, 209 patients with esophageal carcinoma were observed, 105 of them were treated with CC. Of all the patients, 117 received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 92 received intensity modulated radiotherapy, the median prescription dose was 60 Gy. The regimen of LFP (5-FU, cisplatin and calcium folinate) was selected for this study, side effects, local control rate and survival rate were observed and subsets analysis were performed. Results: The overall follow-up rate was 99.0%,there were 99 and 44 patients whose follow-up time was more than 2 and 3 years, respectively;for the CC group, the data were 45 and 14, respectively; and for the R group, 54 and 30, respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates of CC group and R group were 88.1%, 69.2%, 66.2% and 81.0%, 64.0%, 54.9% (χ 2 =2.31, P=0.128), respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-year overall survival rates of CC group and R group were 84.4%, 52.9%, 45.6% and 75.2%, 50.7%, 37.0%(χ 2 =1.57, P=0.210), respectively. Subset analysis indicated that for the patients of N 0 group and whose length of GTV >7 cm, the local control rate of CC was significantly higher than that of radiotherapy alone (χ 2 =5.11, 7.66; P=0.024, 0.006). For N 0 group, the survival rate of CC was higher than that of R alone. (χ 2 =5.07, P=0.024). The incidence of WBC, PLT and HGB reduction for the two groups were 81.9% and 49.0% (χ 2 =36.45, P=0.000), 14.3% and 1.9% (χ 2 =10.54, P=0.006), and 24.8% and 2.9% (χ 2 =22.95, P=0.000), respectively. The incidence of nausea, vomiting and constipation for the two groups were 63.8% and 7.7% (χ 2 =71.52, P=0.000), respectively. The incidence of ≥2 grade esophagitis of CC group and R group were 48.57% and 38.46% (χ 2 =2.17, P=0.141), respectively. The incidence of ≥2

  1. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

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    Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques B. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Palmer, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  2. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V 20/30 , and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V 20/30 of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V 20 of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future

  3. Three-Dimensional Non-Coplanar Conformal Radiotherapy Yields Better Results Than Traditional Beam Arrangements for Adjuvant Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W.; Melamud, Alex B.S.; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. Methods and Materials: A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field 'box' was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. Results: The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Conclusion: Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical

  4. Three-dimensional non-coplanar conformal radiotherapy yields better results than traditional beam arrangements for adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W; Melamud, Alex; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-10-01

    The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field "box" was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical practice.

  5. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-01-01

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 × 1−2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior–posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior–posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  6. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  7. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  8. Practical aspects and applications of the biological effective dose three-dimensional calculation for multi-phase radiotherapy treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauweloa, Kevin Ikaika

    The approximate BED (BEDA) is calculated for multi-phase cases due to current treatment planning systems (TPSs) being incapable of performing BED calculations. There has been no study on the mathematical accuracy and precision of BEDA relative to the true BED (BEDT), and how that might negatively impact patient care. The purpose of the first aim was to study the mathematical accuracy and precision in both hypothetical and clinical situations, while the next two aims were to create multi-phase BED optimization ideas for both multi-target liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases, and gynecological cases where patients are treated with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy along with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). MATLAB algorithms created for this work were used to mathematically analyze the accuracy and precision of BEDA relative to BEDT in both hypothetical and clinical situations on a 3D basis. The organs-at-risk (OARs) of ten head & neck and ten prostate cancer patients were studied for the clinical situations. The accuracy of BEDA was shown to vary between OARs as well as between patients. The percentage of patients with an overall BEDA percent error less than 1% were, 50% for the Optic Chiasm and Brainstem, 70% for the Left and Right Optic Nerves, as well as the Rectum and Bladder, and 80% for the Normal Brain and Spinal Cord. As seen for each OAR among different patients, there were always cases where the percent error was greater than 1%. This is a cause for concern since the goal of radiation therapy is to reduce the overall uncertainty of treatment, and calculating BEDA distributions increases the treatment uncertainty with percent errors greater than 1%. The revealed inaccuracy and imprecision of BEDA supports the argument to use BEDT. The multi-target liver study involved applying BEDT in order to reduce the number of dose limits to one rather than have one for each fractionation scheme in multi-target liver SBRT treatments. A BEDT limit

  9. Evaluation of the treatment planning system of three-dimensional conformal external radiotherapy in Hospital Mexico of San Jose, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venegas Rojas, Deybith

    2014-01-01

    An evaluation and analysis are realized of dosimetry of the treatment planning system (TPS) of three-dimensional conformal external radiotherapy in the Servicio de Radioterapia of the Hospital Mexico of Costa Rica. An evaluation procedure is proposed based on IAEA-TECDOC-1540 document, and may continue to be applied periodically in this or other radiotherapy services. Tests realized have checked the representation of distances and electronics densities transferred to the TPS, match with those of real objects. The 16 tests applied have represented situations of real treatments with different configurations and beam modifiers in the equipment used daily. The tests have measured the absorbed dose to water in different significant points at different depths, using photon beams of 6 MeV and 18 MeV. The physical parameters of the tests were simulated. The absorbed dose has been calculated at specified points. The XiO and Eclipse TPS have been used with the calculation algorithms: Superposition, Convolution and AAA. The results of the calculations are evaluated with statistical methods and comparing them with the measurements of absorbed dose. A generalized tendency has been detected toward negative relative errors, implying an underestimation of the dose by the TPS; due to a difference found in the accelerator output factor respect to its commissioning. The AAA algorithm has determined a better performance, although with greater difficulties of calculus in the region of build-up. Convolution and Superposition algorithms have had similar performances and both have presented problems in high depths and out of edges of the fields. The result of the dosimetric evaluation has been satisfactory in real conditions of equipment; but several particularities have been found that should be reviewed and adjusted. The precision of the TPS has been adequate in the majority of situations important for treatment planning. [author] [es

  10. Comparative dosimetric study of three-dimensional conformal, dynamic conformal arc, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain tumor treatment using Novalis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Meisong; Newman, Francis M.S.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Stuhr, Kelly M.S.; Johnson, Tim K.; Gaspar, Laurie E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences among three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for brain tumor treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients treated with Novalis were selected. We performed 3D-CRT, DCAT, and IMRT plans for all patients. The margin for the planning target volume (PTV) was 1 mm, and the specific prescription dose was 90% for all plans. The target coverage at the prescription dose, conformity index (CI), and heterogeneity index were analyzed for all plans. Results: For small tumors (PTV ≤2 cm 3 ), the three dosimetric parameters had approximate values for both 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. The CI for the IMRT plans was high. For medium tumors (PTV >2 to ≤100 cm 3 ), the three plans were competitive with each other. The IMRT plans had a greater CI, better target coverage at the prescription dose, and a better heterogeneity index. For large tumors (PTV >100 cm 3 ), the IMRT plan had good target coverage at the prescription dose and heterogeneity index and approximate CI values as those in the 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that DCAT is suitable for most cases in the treatment of brain tumors. For a small target, 3D-CRT is useful, and IMRT is not recommended. For larger tumors, IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT and very competitive in sparing critical structures, especially for big tumors

  11. Real-time respiration monitoring using the radiotherapy treatment beam and four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-a conceptual study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiguo; Ruchala, Kenneth J; Chen, Ming-Li; Chen, Quan; Olivera, Gustavo H

    2006-01-01

    Real-time knowledge of intra-fraction motion, such as respiration, is essential for four-dimensional (4D) radiotherapy. Surrogate-based and internal-fiducial-based methods may suffer from one or many drawbacks such as false correlation, being invasive, delivering extra patient radiation, and requiring complicated hardware and software development and implementation. In this paper we develop a simple non-surrogate, non-invasive method to monitor respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatments in real time. This method directly utilizes the treatment beam and thus imposes no additional radiation to the patient. The method requires a pre-treatment 4DCT and a real-time detector system. The method combines off-line processes with on-line processes. The off-line processes include 4DCT imaging and pre-calculating detector signals at each phase of the 4DCT based on the planned fluence map and the detector response function. The on-line processes include measuring detector signal from the treatment beam, and correlating the measured detector signal with the pre-calculated signals. The respiration phase is determined as the position of peak correlation. We tested our method with extensive simulations based on a TomoTherapy machine and a 4DCT of a lung cancer patient. Three types of simulations were implemented to mimic the clinical situations. Each type of simulation used three different TomoTherapy delivery sinograms, each with 800 to 1000 projections, as input fluences. Three arbitrary breathing patterns were simulated and two dose levels, 2 Gy/fraction and 2 cGy/fraction, were used for simulations to study the robustness of this method against detector quantum noise. The algorithm was used to determine the breathing phases and this result was compared with the simulated breathing patterns. For the 2 Gy/fraction simulations, the respiration phases were accurately determined within one phase error in real time for most projections of the treatment, except for a few

  12. Analysis of the efficacy and safety of conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients after modified radical mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Lin Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the efficacy and safety of conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: A total of 84 patients who were admitted in our hospital after modified radical mastectomy were included in the study and divided into the conventional radiotherapy group (n=42 and the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group (n=42 according to different radiotherapy methods. The patients in the conventional radiotherapy group were given conventional radiotherapy of chest wall and clavicular field, while the patients in the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group were given three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The serum tumor markers and peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets 6-8 weeks after treatment in the two groups were detected. The clinical efficacy, and toxic and side effects in the two groups were evaluated. Results: The serum CA15-3, CA125, CEA, and CK19 levels after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, CD3 +,CD4 +, and CD4 +/CD8 + were significantly elevated, while CD8 + was significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, but the comparison of the above indicators between the two groups was not statistically significant. The occurrence rate of radioactive skin damage and pneumonia after treatment in the conventional radiotherapy group was significantly higher than that in the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy group. Conclusions: The two kinds of radiotherapy schemes have an equal efficacy, but the toxic and side effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy are significantly lower than those by the conventional radiotherapy, with a certain advantage.

  13. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: low risk of chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large series of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.; McLaughlin, P. William; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Addison, Heather; Forman, Jeffrey; Lichter, Allen

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) may provide a technique to increase the dose delivered to target tissues while sparing uninvolved normal structures. To evaluate the role of 3D treatment in reducing the treatment toxicity, we analyzed the chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large group of patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1987 through 1992, 721 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D CRT at the University of Michigan or Providence Hospital. All had axial computed tomography (CT) specifically for RT planning, multiple structures contoured on the axial images, and beam's-eye-view conformal beams edited to provide 3D dose coverage. Using current American Joint Commission (AJCC) staging, 537 patients had T1-T2 tumors, 123 had T3-T4 tumors, and 60 were treated postprostatectomy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated in 462 patients. Prostate boosts were delivered with four-field axial, six-field axial, or four-field oblique, nonaxial fields. The median dose was 68.40 Gy (range 59.4-80.4). Median follow-up was 20.4 months; 175 were followed more than 3 years. All complications have been graded conservatively using the RTOG system. Results: Using a Cox proportional hazard's model, patient age, T-stage, prescribed dose, pelvic treatment, and boost technique were analyzed. The factor most strongly related to risk of morbidity was dose (p = 0.05); however, the boost technique was also related: the four-field oblique field had the lowest relative risk. Most episodes of rectal morbidity have been mild: 82 Grade 1 or 2. There have been only 14 more serious complications including 12 Grade 3 and 2 Grade 4. The actuarial risk of a Grade 3 or 4 complication is 3% at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: A very small proportion of patients treated with 3D CRT had significant rectal morbidity related to RT, supporting the use of conformal treatment planning and dose delivery as a mechanism to minimize complications

  14. Refinement of Treatment Setup and Target Localization Accuracy Using Three-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiheng; Nelson, John W.; Yoo, Sua; Wu, Q. Jackie; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Yin Fangfang

    2009-01-01

    Purposes: To quantitatively compare two-dimensional (2D) orthogonal kV with three-dimensional (3D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) for target localization; and to assess intrafraction motion with kV images in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients with 58 lesions received 178 fractions of SBRT. After clinical setup using in-room lasers and skin/cradle marks placed at simulation, patients were imaged and repositioned according to orthogonal kV/MV registration of bony landmarks to digitally reconstructed radiographs from the planning CT. A subsequent CBCT was registered to the planning CT using soft tissue information, and the resultant 'residual error' was measured and corrected before treatment. Posttreatment 2D kV and/or 3D CBCT images were compared with pretreatment images to determine any intrafractional position changes. Absolute averages, statistical means, standard deviations, and root mean square (RMS) values of observed setup error were calculated. Results: After initial setup to external marks with laser guidance, 2D kV images revealed vector mean setup deviations of 0.67 cm (RMS). Cone-beam CT detected residual setup deviations of 0.41 cm (RMS). Posttreatment imaging demonstrated intrafractional variations of 0.15 cm (RMS). The individual shifts in three standard orthogonal planes showed no obvious directional biases. Conclusions: After localization based on superficial markings in patients undergoing SBRT, orthogonal kV imaging detects setup variations of approximately 3 to 4 mm in each direction. Cone-beam CT detects residual setup variations of approximately 2 to 3 mm

  15. On-line estimations of delivered radiation doses in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatments of carcinoma uterine cervix patients in linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putha, Suman Kumar; Saxena, P U; Banerjee, S; Srinivas, Challapalli; Vadhiraja, B M; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Joan, Mary; Pai, K Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of radiation fluence through patient's body has a correlation to the planned target dose. A method to estimate the delivered dose to target volumes was standardized using a beam level 0.6 cc ionization chamber (IC) positioned at electronic portal imaging device (EPID) plane from the measured transit signal (S t ) in patients with cancer of uterine cervix treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). The IC with buildup cap was mounted on linear accelerator EPID frame with fixed source to chamber distance of 146.3 cm, using a locally fabricated mount. S t s were obtained for different water phantom thicknesses and radiation field sizes which were then used to generate a calibration table against calculated midplane doses at isocenter (D iso,TPS ), derived from the treatment planning system. A code was developed using MATLAB software which was used to estimate the in vivo dose at isocenter (D iso,Transit ) from the measured S t s. A locally fabricated pelvic phantom validated the estimations of D iso,Transit before implementing this method on actual patients. On-line dose estimations were made (3 times during treatment for each patient) in 24 patients. The D iso,Transit agreement with D iso,TPS in phantom was within 1.7% and the mean percentage deviation with standard deviation is -1.37% ±2.03% ( n = 72) observed in patients. Estimated in vivo dose at isocenter with this method provides a good agreement with planned ones which can be implemented as part of quality assurance in pelvic sites treated with simple techniques, for example, 3DCRT where there is a need for documentation of planned dose delivery.

  16. Head and neck cancers: clinical benefits of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and of intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Jaulerry, C.; Brunin, F.; Zefkili, S.; Helfre, S.; Chauvet, I.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The conformal radiotherapy approach, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is based on modern imaging modalities, efficient 3-D treatment planning systems, sophisticated immobilization systems and rigorous quality assurance and treatment verification. The central objective of conformal radiotherapy is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume while reducing exposure of normal tissues. These techniques would then allow further tumor dose escalation. Head-and-neck tumors are some of the most attractive localizations to test conformal radiotherapy. They combine ballistic difficulties due to particularly complex shapes (nasopharynx, ethmoid) and problems due to the number and low tolerance of neighbouring organs like parotids, eyes, brainstem and spinal cord. The therapeutic irradiation of head-and-neck tumors thus remains a challenge for the radiation oncologist. Conformal radiotherapy does have a significant potential for improving local control and reducing toxicity when compared to standard radiotherapy. However, in the absence of prospective randomized trials, it is somewhat difficult at present to evaluate the real benefits drawn from 3DCRT and IMRT. The published clinical reports on the use of conformal radiotherapy are essentially dealing with dosimetric comparisons on relatively small numbers of patients. Recently, a few publications have emphasized the clinical experience several precursor teams with a suitable follow-up. This paper describes the current state-of-the-art of 3DCRT and IMRT in order to evaluate the impact of these techniques on head-and-neck cancers irradiation. (authors)

  17. The value of 18F-FDG PET in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Huiqing; Zhang Zhongmin; Lv Zhonghong

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is based on an extensive use of modern medical imaging techniques. Delineation of the gross tumor volume and organs at risk constitutes one of the most important phases of conformal radiotherapy procedures. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET possesses greater sensitivity and accuracy in detecting diseased lymph nodes, is an important staging examination for patients considered for radiation treatment with curative intent. 18 F-FDG PET has an important role in delineation of gross tumor volume for patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (authors)

  18. Dosimetric comparison of standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost schedule (sequential IMRT plan) with simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT (SIB IMRT) treatment plan in patients with localized carcinoma prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, A; Kapoor, R; Singh, S K; Kumar, N; Oinam, A S; Sharma, S C

    2012-07-01

    DOSIMETERIC AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL COMPARISON OF TWO RADIATION SCHEDULES IN LOCALIZED CARCINOMA PROSTATE: Standard Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3DCRT) followed by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) boost (sequential-IMRT) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost IMRT (SIB-IMRT). Thirty patients were enrolled. In all, the target consisted of PTV P + SV (Prostate and seminal vesicles) and PTV LN (lymph nodes) where PTV refers to planning target volume and the critical structures included: bladder, rectum and small bowel. All patients were treated with sequential-IMRT plan, but for dosimetric comparison, SIB-IMRT plan was also created. The prescription dose to PTV P + SV was 74 Gy in both strategies but with different dose per fraction, however, the dose to PTV LN was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions over 5 weeks for sequential-IMRT and 54 Gy delivered in 27 fractions over 5.5 weeks for SIB-IMRT. The treatment plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms. Also, Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) obtained with the two plans were compared. The volume of rectum receiving 70 Gy or more (V > 70 Gy) was reduced to 18.23% with SIB-IMRT from 22.81% with sequential-IMRT. SIB-IMRT reduced the mean doses to both bladder and rectum by 13% and 17%, respectively, as compared to sequential-IMRT. NTCP of 0.86 ± 0.75% and 0.01 ± 0.02% for the bladder, 5.87 ± 2.58% and 4.31 ± 2.61% for the rectum and 8.83 ± 7.08% and 8.25 ± 7.98% for the bowel was seen with sequential-IMRT and SIB-IMRT plans respectively. For equal PTV coverage, SIB-IMRT markedly reduced doses to critical structures, therefore should be considered as the strategy for dose escalation. SIB-IMRT achieves lesser NTCP than sequential-IMRT.

  19. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wagter, C [ed.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions.

  20. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wagter, C.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions

  1. The construction of trunk voxel phantom by using CT images and application to 3 dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. S.; Lee, J. K. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    Trunk voxel phantom was constructed by using whole body CT images and tumor doses were calculated by using Monte Carlo method after simulating situation of radiotheraphy treatment planning. The whole body CT images of VHP (Visual Human Project) man were acquired from National Library of Medicine of USA. 153 slices of trunk part were extracted from whole body CT images and MCNP4B, a general purpose Monte Carlo code, was used for dose calculation. Gray scale of CT images were converted into density of medium and processed into trunk voxel phantom ported to MCNP4B input deck. The conversion method was verified by comparing cross sectional images of voxel phantom with original CT images. Tumor volumes with diameter of 3 cm were defined in liver, stomach and right lung and irradiated with 5, 10 and 15 MeV gamma beam with diameter of 6 cm. The technical basis for 3D dose calculation was established through this study for localization of 3D RTP system.

  2. Three-dimensional intrafractional movement of prostate measured during real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy in supine and prone treatment positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Onimaru, Rikiya; Oda, Makoto; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Shinichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Harabayashi, Toru; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify three-dimensional (3D) movement of the prostate gland with the patient in the supine and prone positions and to analyze the movement frequency for each treatment position. Methods and Materials: The real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RTRT) system was developed to identify the 3D position of a 2-mm gold marker implanted in the prostate 30 times/s using two sets of fluoroscopic images. The linear accelerator was triggered to irradiate the tumor only when the gold marker was located within the region of the planned coordinates relative to the isocenter. Ten patients with prostate cancer treated with RTRT were the subjects of this study. The coordinates of the gold marker were recorded every 0.033 s during RTRT in the supine treatment position for 2 min. The patient was then moved to the prone position, and the marker was tracked for 2 min to acquire data regarding movement in this position. Measurements were taken 5 times for each patient (once a week); a total of 50 sets for the 10 patients was analyzed. The raw data from the RTRT system were filtered to reduce system noise, and the amplitude of movement was then calculated. The discrete Fourier transform of the unfiltered data was performed for the frequency analysis of prostate movement. Results: No apparent difference in movement was found among individuals. The amplitude of 3D movement was 0.1-2.7 mm in the supine and 0.4-24 mm in the prone positions. The amplitude in the supine position was statistically smaller in all directions than that in the prone position (p < 0.0001). The amplitude in the craniocaudal and AP directions was larger than in the left-right direction in the prone position (p < 0.0001). No characteristic movement frequency was detected in the supine position. The respiratory frequency was detected for all patients regarding movement in the craniocaudal and AP directions in the prone position. The results of the frequency analysis suggest that prostate movement is

  3. Volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy vs. 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for primary chemoradiotherapy of anal carcinoma. Effects on treatment-related side effects and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Hanne Elisabeth; Droege, Leif Hendrik; Hennies, Steffen; Herrmann, Markus Karl; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas [University Medical Center Goettingen, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Goettingen (Germany); Gaedcke, Jochen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Dept. of General Surgery, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced anal carcinoma. This study compared volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of treatment-related side effects and survival. From 1992-2014, 103 consecutive patients with anal carcinoma UICC stage I-III were treated. Concomitant CRT consisted of whole pelvic irradiation, including the iliac and inguinal lymph nodes, with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy per fractions) by VMAT (n = 17) or 3DCRT (n = 86) as well as two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Acute organ and hematological toxicity were assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events version 3.0. Side effects ≥ grade 3 were scored as high-grade toxicity. High-grade acute organ toxicity CTC ≥ 3 (P < 0.05), especially proctitis (P = 0.03), was significantly reduced in VMAT patients. The 2-year locoregional control (LRC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were both 100 % for VMAT patients compared with 80 and 73 % for 3DCRT patients. VMAT was shown to be a feasible technique, achieving significantly lower rates of acute organ toxicity and promising results for LRC and DFS. Future investigations will aim at assessing the advantages of VMAT with respect to late toxicity and survival after a prolonged follow-up time. (orig.) [German] Die primaere Radiochemotherapie (RCT) gilt als Standardtherapie fuer lokal fortgeschrittene Analkarzinome. In dieser Studie wurde die volumetrisch modulierte Rotationstherapie (''volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy'', VMAT) mit der klassischen dreidimensionalen konformalen Radiotherapie (3DCRT) hinsichtlich therapieassoziierter Nebenwirkungen und Ueberleben verglichen. Von 1992-2014 wurden 103 aufeinanderfolgende Patienten mit einem Analkarzinom im UICC-Stadium I-III behandelt. Die kombinierte RCT bestand aus der Bestrahlung des gesamten Beckens inklusive der iliakalen und der inguinalen

  4. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Postoperative radiotherapy of the parotid gland could be achieved with various radiotherapy techniques. However they irradiate differently the surrounding organs at risk (OARs) in particular the cochlea, oral cavity & contralateral parotid causing significant increase in the risk of oral mucositis, xerostomia, and ...

  5. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, K.-H.; Duchesne, G.; See, A.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Three-dimensional treatment planning for postoperative radiotherapy in patients with node-positive cervical cancer. Comparison between a conventional and a conformal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsen-van Acht, M.J.J.; Quint, S.; Seven, M.; Berg, H.A. van den; Levendag, P.C. [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Santvoort, J.P.C. van [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Subdivision of Clinical Physics; Logmans, A. [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Reduction of irradiated small bowel volume, using a conformal three-dimensional treatment planning technique in postoperative radiotherapy of cervical cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Large gynecological treatment fields including the para-aortic nodes were analyzed in 15 patients. A conventional treatment plan with anterior and posterior (AP-PA) parallel opposed fields and a 3D 4-field conformal radiotherapy plan with a central blocking of small bowel were compared for each patient. Dose-volume histograms and dose parameters were established. Because of the tolerance constraints of the small bowel, the cumulative dose applied to the target was 48.6 Gy. Results: The mean Tumor Control Probability (TCP) values for both the conventional and the conformal technique were 0.60 and 0.61, respectively, with ranges of 0.56 to 0.67 and 0.57 to 0.66, respectively. The mean volume receiving 95% or more of the prescribed dose (V95) of the small bowel was 47.6% (32.5 to 66.3%) in the AP-PA technique and 14.9% (7.0 to 22.5%) in the conformal technique (p<0.001), indicating a significant reduction in irradiated volume of small bowel in the higher dose range. The mean Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) decreased from 0.11 to 0.03 with the conformal plan. In patients who received a pedicled omentoplasty during surgery, the mean V95 for small bowel could be reduced to 8.5% (7.0 to 9.9%). The mean median dose to the kidneys was only slightly elevated in the conformal treatment. Especially the mean dose to the right kidney in conventional vs conformal treatment was 3.3 vs 7.9 Gy. The mean near-minimum dose (D95) to the rectosigmoid decreased from 48.4 to 30.1 Gy in the conformal plan compared to the conventional plan. Conclusion: The small bowel dose can be significantly reduced with 3D treatment planning, particularly if a predicled omentoplasty is performed. This allows dose escalation to the tumor region without unacceptable toxicity for the small bowel

  7. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldebawy, Eman [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Cancer Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Parker, William, E-mail: william.parker@mcgill.ca [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Abdel Rahman, Wamied [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Freeman, Carolyn R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  8. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Mallik, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  9. Moving toward multi-dimensional radiotherapy and the role of radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oita, Masataka; Uto, Yoshihiro; Aoyama, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Recent radiotherapy for cancer treatment enable the high-precision irradiation to the target under the computed image guidance. Developments of such radiotherapy has played large role in the improved strategy of cancer treatments. In addition, the molecular mechanistic studies related to proliferations of cancer cell contribute the multidisciplinary fields of clinical radiotherapies. Therefore, the combination of the image guidance and molecular targeting of cancer cells make it possible for individualized cancer treatment. Especially, the use of particle beam or boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been spotlighted, and installations of such devices are planned widely. As the progress and collaborations of radiation biology and engineering physics, establishment of a new style of radiotherapy becomes available in post-genome era. In 2010s, the hi-tech machines controlling the spaciotemporal radiotherapy become in practice. Although, there still remains to be improved, e.g., more precise prediction of radiosensitivity or growth of individual tumors, and adverse outcomes after treatments, multi-dimensional optimizations of the individualized irradiations based on the molecular radiation biologies and medical physics are important for further development of radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    This Ph.d. project describes the development of a workflow for Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for clinical radiotherapy plans. The workflow may be utilized to perform an independent dose verification of treatment plans. Modern radiotherapy treatment delivery is often conducted by dynamically...... modulating the intensity of the field during the irradiation. The workflow described has the potential to fully model the dynamic delivery, including gantry rotation during irradiation, of modern radiotherapy. Three corner stones of Monte Carlo Treatment Planning are identified: Building, commissioning...... and validation of a Monte Carlo model of a medical linear accelerator (i), converting a CT scan of a patient to a Monte Carlo compliant phantom (ii) and translating the treatment plan parameters (including beam energy, angles of incidence, collimator settings etc) to a Monte Carlo input file (iii). A protocol...

  11. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, M.K.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Madhu, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma

  12. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-02-27

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  13. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Strategies for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Selek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care in patients with advanced inoperable stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT has been a trusted method for a long time and has well-known drawbacks, most of which could be improved by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT. IMRT is not currently the standard treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, but almost all patients could benefit to a degree in organ at risk sparing, dose coverage conformality, or dose escalation. The most critical step for a radiation oncology department is to strictly evaluate its own technical and physical capabilities to determine the ability of IMRT to deliver an optimal treatment plan. This includes calculating the internal tumor motion (ideally 4DCT or equivalent techniques, treatment planning software with an up-to-date heterogeneity correction algorithm, and daily image guidance. It is crucial to optimise and individualise the therapeutic ratio for each patient during the decision of 3DCRT versus IMRT. The current literature rationalises the increasing use of IMRT, including 4D imaging plus PET/CT, and encourages the applicable knowledge-based and individualised dose escalation using advanced daily image-guided radiotherapy.

  15. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza Helal

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... during postoperative 3DCRT treatment of parotid gland cancer patients. ... contralateral parotid, oral cavity, cochlea, spinal cord, brain stem, eyes, lenses and ... xerostomia, dry ear, ear infections, hearing deficits and ipsilat-.

  16. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  17. Radiotherapy in the treatment of solitary plasmacytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothirmayi, R; Gangadharan, V P; Nair, M K; Rajan, B

    1997-05-01

    Solitary plasmacytoma of bone (SPB) and extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) are rare. High local control rates are reported with radiotherapy, although the optimal dose and extent of radiotherapy portals remains controversial. Between 1983 and 1993, 30 patients with solitary plasmacytoma were seen at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, India. 23 patients had SPB and seven EMP. The mean age was 52 years and the male to female ratio 3.2:1. Diagnosis of SPB was confirmed by biopsy in 16 patients and tumour excision in seven. 20 patients received megavoltage radiotherapy to the bone lesion with limited margins, and one received chemotherapy. Two patients who underwent complete tumour excision received no further treatment. All seven patients with EMP received megavoltage radiotherapy, four following biopsy and three after tumour excision. Local control was achieved in all patients with SPB. Nine progressed to multiple myeloma and one developed a solitary plasmacytoma in another bone. Six patients with EMP achieved local control. Three later progressed to multiple myeloma and one had local relapse. Median time to relapse was 28 months in SPB and 30 months in EMP. 5-year overall survival rates were 82% and 57% for patients with SPB and EMP, respectively. The corresponding progression free survival rates were 55% and 50%, respectively. Age, sex, site of tumour, serum M protein and haemoglobin levels did not significantly influence progression free survival. The extent of surgery, radiotherapy dose or time to relapse were not significant prognostic factors. Radiotherapy appears to be an effective modality of treatment of solitary plasmacytoma. No dose-response relationship is observed, and high local control rates are achieved with limited portals. Progression to multiple myeloma is the commonest pattern of failure, although no prognostic factors for progression are identified. The role of chemotherapy in preventing disease progression needs further evaluation.

  18. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Vega C, H. R.; Uribe, M. del R.

    2014-08-01

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm 3 was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  19. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J H E; McGowan, T; Redmond-Misner, R; Beca, J; Warde, P; Gutierrez, E; Hoch, J S

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption.

  20. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  1. Three-dimensional radiotherapy planning system for esophageal tumors: comparison of treatment techniques and analysis of probability of complications; Planejamento tridimensional para radioterapia de tumores de esofago: comparacao de tecnicas de tratamento e analise de probabilidade de complicacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justino, Pitagoras Baskara; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Ferauche, Debora; Ros, Renato [Sao Paulo Uni., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Instituto de Radioterapia (InRad)]. E-mail: pitagorasb@hotmail.com

    2003-06-01

    Radiotherapy techniques for esophageal cancer were compared using a three-dimensional planning system. We studied the following treatment techniques used for a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the middle third of the esophagus: two antero-posterior and two latero-lateral parallel opposed fields, three fields ('Y' and 'T'), and four fields ('X'). Dose-volume histograms were obtained considering spinal cord and lungs as organs at risk. Analysis was performed comparing doses in these organs as recommended by the Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP). When only the lungs were considered the best technique was two antero-posterior parallel opposed fields. The spinal cord was best protected using latero-lateral fields. We suggest the combination of at least two treatment techniques: antero-posterior fields with 'Y' or 'T' techniques, or latero-lateral fields in order to balance the doses in the lungs and the spinal cord. Another option may be the use of any of the three-field techniques during the whole treatment. (author)

  2. Treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadasaki, Koichi; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Ito, Katsuhide; Kiriu, Hiroshi; Ito, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    The indications for and the efficacy of radiation therapy after radical operation for patients with prostate cancer are not clear. We analyzed the treatment results of adjuvant radiotherapy and salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Between September 1997 and November 2004, 57 patients received adjuvant radiotherapy or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients received radiation therapy because of positive margins and/or extracapsular invasion in surgical specimens (adjuvant group). Forty-two patients received radiation therapy because of rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) during follow-up (salvage group). Radiation therapy was delivered to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles by a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique to a total dose of 60-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Biochemical control was defined as the maintenance of a PSA level of less than 0.2 ng/ml. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 33 months (range, 12-98 months). Three-year biochemical control rates were 87% for the adjuvant group and 61% for the salvage group. For patients in the salvage group treated without hormone therapy, the preradiation PSA value was the most significant factor for the biochemical control rate. The 3-year biochemical control rate was 93% in patients whose preradiation PSA was 0.5 ng/ml or less and 29% in patients whose preradiation PSA was more than 0.5 ng/ml. No severe adverse effects (equal to or more than grade 3) were seen in treated patients. Radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy seemed to be effective for adjuvant therapy and for salvage therapy in patients with a preradiation PSA of 0.5 ng/ml or less. Also, radiation to the fossa of the prostate±seminal vesicles, to a total dose of 60-66 Gy, using a three-dimensional (3-D) conformal technique, seemed to be safe. (author)

  3. Surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Testori, A; Rutkowski, P; Marsden, J

    2009-01-01

    on individual circumstances. Radiotherapy is indicated as a treatment option in select patients with lentigo maligna melanoma and as an adjuvant in select patients with regional metastatic disease. Radiotherapy is also indicated for palliation, especially in bone and brain metastases....

  4. Hyperdosed radiotherapy in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machidon, Vasile; Jovmir, Vasile; Stanislav, Anastasia; Scurtu, Elena; Gazibar, Valeria; Lungu, Viorica

    2010-01-01

    The results of 328 patients with metastasizing breast cancer (BCM) are presented in the article. The distant metastases development in 4,5 % from the lot, which received the neoadjuvant treatment, is a high assurance in argumentation of preoperative hyperdosed X-ray therapy in breast cancer treatment. 15,8% from 100% - that is the significance of hyper dosed X-ray therapy versus classic X-ray therapy used preoperative in case of metastasizing breast cancer. The obtained data can not deny the efficacy of hyperdosed X-ray therapy in preoperative treatment of breast cancer. The hyperdosed X-ray therapy in the present moment remains current in the treatment of breast cancer and different localized cancers. (authors)

  5. Incidental irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer: conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy versus conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Ugino, Rafael Tsuneki; Lopes, Mauricio Russo; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes da, E-mail: eltontt@gmail.com [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia; Santana, Marco Antonio; Ferreira, Denis Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to evaluate incidental irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) through opposed tangential fields with conventional two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy techniques and to compare the results between the two techniques. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 80 breast cancer patients in whom radiotherapy of the IMLNs was not indicated: 40 underwent 2D radiotherapy with computed tomography for dosimetric control, and 40 underwent 3D radiotherapy. The total prescribed dose was 50.0 Gy or 50.4 Gy (2.0 or 1.8 Gy/day, respectively). We reviewed all plans and defined the IMLNs following the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations. For the IMLNs, we analyzed the proportion of the volume that received 45 Gy, the proportion of the volume that received 25 Gy, the dose to 95% of the volume, the dose to 50% of the volume, the mean dose, the minimum dose (Dmin), and the maximum dose (Dmax). Results: Left-sided treatments predominated in the 3D cohort. There were no differences between the 2D and 3D cohorts regarding tumor stage, type of surgery (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy with immediate reconstruction), or mean delineated IMLN volume (6.8 vs. 5.9 mL; p = 0.411). Except for the Dmin, all dosimetric parameters presented higher mean values in the 3D cohort (p < 0.05). The median Dmax in the 3D cohort was 50.34 Gy. However, the mean dose to the IMLNs was 7.93 Gy in the 2D cohort, compared with 20.64 Gy in the 3D cohort. Conclusion: Neither technique delivered enough doses to the IMLNs to achieve subclinical disease control. However, all of the dosimetric parameters were significantly higher for the 3D technique. (author)

  6. Accuracy requirements in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzdar, S. A.; Afzal, M.; Nazir, A.; Gadhi, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy attempts to deliver ionizing radiation to the tumour and can improve the survival chances and/or quality of life of patients. There are chances of errors and uncertainties in the entire process of radiotherapy that may affect the accuracy and precision of treatment management and decrease degree of conformation. All expected inaccuracies, like radiation dose determination, volume calculation, complete evaluation of the full extent of the tumour, biological behaviour of specific tumour types, organ motion during radiotherapy, imaging, biological/molecular uncertainties, sub-clinical diseases, microscopic spread of the disease, uncertainty in normal tissue responses and radiation morbidity need sound appreciation. Conformity can be increased by reduction of such inaccuracies. With the yearly increase in computing speed and advancement in other technologies the future will provide the opportunity to optimize a greater number of variables and reduce the errors in the treatment planning process. In multi-disciplined task of radiotherapy, efforts are needed to overcome the errors and uncertainty, not only by the physicists but also by radiologists, pathologists and oncologists to reduce molecular and biological uncertainties. The radiation therapy physics is advancing towards an optimal goal that is definitely to improve accuracy where necessary and to reduce uncertainty where possible. (author)

  7. Prevention and treatment of the orofacial complications of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiotherapy of malignant head and neck tumors often causes extensive, permanent changes in salivary glands, peridental alveolar bone, and mucosal structures. Dental neglect and inappropriate dental management can cause complications. The potential orofacial side effects of radiotherapy are reviewed, as are preventive strategies for the dental treatment of patients scheduled to undergo radiotherapy

  8. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  9. Four and five dimensional radiotherapy with reference to prostate cancer - definitions, state of the art and further directions - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennernaes, Bo (Dept. of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Hospital and Academy, Univ. of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)), e-mail: bo.lennernas@telia.com; Castellanos, Enrique; Nilsson, Sten; Levitt, Seymour (Dept. of Oncology/Pathology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-06-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) always requires a compromise between tumor control and normal tissue side-effects. Technical innovation in radiation therapy (RT), such as three dimensional RT, is now established. Concerning prostate cancer (PC), it is reasonable to assume that RT of PC will increase in the future. The combination of small margins, a movable target (prostate), few fractions and high doses will probably demand dynamically positioning systems and in real time. This is called four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT). Moreover, biological factors must be included in new treatments such as hypofractionation schedules. This new era is called five dimensional radiotherapy, 5DRT. In this paper we discuss new concepts in RT in respect to PC

  10. Results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and thalidomide for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Wei-Chung; Chung, Na-Na; Wang, Po-Ming; Ying, Kung-Shih; Shin, Jeng-Shiann; Chao, Che-Jen; Lin, Gau-De; Chan, Sue-Ching; Ting, Lai-Lei

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and thalidomide in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Between 1999 and 2003, 121 patients (mean age, 54.4±12.4 years; range, 20-81 years) with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and thalidomide. Radiation was delivered in 1.5 Gy fractions twice daily for 5 days a week, for a total dose of 45-75 Gy. Mean treatment volume was 429.52±408.50 cm 3 (range, 26.89-2284.82 cm 3 ). Thalidomide was given concomitantly: 200 mg/day in 109 patients, 300 mg/day in 8 patients and 400 mg/day in 4 patients. Treatment responses, survival rates and factors affecting survival were analyzed. Treatment responses were observed in 61% of the patients. Liver cirrhosis (P=0.001) and tumor size (P=0.001) significantly affected the tumor responses. Overall survival at 6, 12 and 24 months was 84.8, 60.0 and 44.6%, respectively. On univariate analysis, liver cirrhosis (P=0.003), Karnofsky performance status (P=0.007), tumor size (P<0.001), portal vein tumor thrombosis (P<0.001) and alpha-fetoprotein level (P=0.003) were shown to significantly affect survival. On multivariate analysis, only thrombosis (P=0.039) and alpha-fetoprotein level (P=0.006) were shown to be factors affecting survival. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with thalidomide seems to be effective in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. (author)

  11. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy as adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, A Yuriko; Hsu, Annie; La, Trang; Kunz, Pamela; Fisher, George A; Ford, James M; Norton, Jeffrey A; Visser, Brendan; Goodman, Karyn A; Koong, Albert C; Chang, Daniel T

    2010-08-15

    The current study was performed to compare the clinical outcomes and toxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT). Fifty-seven patients with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer were treated postoperatively: 26 with 3D CRT and 31 with IMRT. Concurrent chemotherapy was capecitabine (n=31), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (n=25), or none (n=1). The median radiation dose was 45 Gy. Dose volume histogram parameters for kidney and liver were compared between treatment groups. The 2-year overall survival rates for 3D CRT versus IMRT were 51% and 65%, respectively (P=.5). Four locoregional failures occurred each in the 3D CRT (15%) and the IMRT (13%) patients. Grade>or=2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was found to be similar between the 3D CRT and IMRT patients (61.5% vs 61.2%, respectively) but more treatment breaks were needed (3 vs 0, respectively). The median serum creatinine from before radiotherapy to most recent creatinine was unchanged in the IMRT group (0.80 mg/dL) but increased in the 3D CRT group from 0.80 mg/dL to 1.0 mg/dL (P=.02). The median kidney mean dose was higher in the IMRT versus the 3D CRT group (13.9 Gy vs 11.1 Gy; P=.05). The median kidney V20 was lower for the IMRT versus the 3D CRT group (17.5% vs 22%; P=.17). The median liver mean dose for IMRT and 3D CRT was 13.6 Gy and 18.6 Gy, respectively (P=.19). The median liver V30 was 16.1% and 28%, respectively (PCancer Society.

  12. Recent advances in Optical Computed Tomography (OCT) imaging system for three dimensional (3D) radiotherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul; Farah Rosli, Nurul; Zain, Shafirah Mohd; Zin, Hafiz M.

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy delivery techniques for cancer treatment are becoming more complex and highly focused, to enable accurate radiation dose delivery to the cancerous tissue and minimum dose to the healthy tissue adjacent to tumour. Instrument to verify the complex dose delivery in radiotherapy such as optical computed tomography (OCT) measures the dose from a three-dimensional (3D) radiochromic dosimeter to ensure the accuracy of the radiotherapy beam delivery to the patient. OCT measures the optical density in radiochromic material that changes predictably upon exposure to radiotherapy beams. OCT systems have been developed using a photodiode and charged coupled device (CCD) as the detector. The existing OCT imaging systems have limitation in terms of the accuracy and the speed of the measurement. Advances in on-pixel intelligence CMOS image sensor (CIS) will be exploited in this work to replace current detector in OCT imaging systems. CIS is capable of on-pixel signal processing at a very fast imaging speed (over several hundred images per second) that will allow improvement in the 3D measurement of the optical density. The paper will review 3D radiochromic dosimeters and OCT systems developed and discuss how CMOS based OCT imaging will provide accurate and fast optical density measurements in 3D. The paper will also discuss the configuration of the CMOS based OCT developed in this work and how it may improve the existing OCT system.

  13. Tolerance and early outcome results of postprostatectomy three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Aschkenasy, Eric; Kelsen, Suzanne; Leibel, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) has been associated with a reduction in acute and late toxicity among patients treated for localized prostatic cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the acute and late toxicity of 3D-CRT delivered to patients in the postprostatectomy setting and to analyze which factors predict for durable biochemical control in this group of patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1994, 42 patients were treated after prostatectomy with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The median time from prostatectomy to radiotherapy was 11 months. Indications for treatment included a rising serum PSA level in 28 patients (65%) and positive surgical margins without a rising PSA level in 14 (35%). Twenty-five patients (60%) had pathologic stage T3 disease, and 32 (74%) had tumor at or close to the surgical margins. The median dose was 64.8 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2 years. Results: 3D-CRT in the postprostatectomy setting was well tolerated. Three patients (7%) experienced Grade II acute genitourinary toxicity and nine patients (21%) experienced Grade II acute gastrointestinal toxicity during treatment. No patient experienced Grade III or higher acute morbidity. The 2-year actuarial risk for Grade II late genitourinary and gastrointestinal late complications were 5 and 9%, respectively. In patients with existing incontinence, the incidence of worsening stress incontinence 6 months after treatment was 17%, which resolved within 12 months to its preradiotherapy level in four of six cases (66%). The overall 2-year postirradiation PSA relapse-free survival rate was 53%. The 2-year PSA relapse-free survival was 66% for patients with undetectable PSA levels in the immediate postoperative period compared to 26% for those with detectable levels of PSA after surgery (p 1.0 ng/ml (p 1 ng/ml (p < 0.002) was the most important covariate predicting for a rising PSA after radiotherapy. Conclusions: After

  14. Telemedicine in radiotherapy treatment planning: requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.R.; Bruland, O.S.; Davis, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    Telemedicine facilitates decentralized radiotherapy services by allowing remote treatment planning and quality assurance of treatment delivery. A prerequisite is digital storage of relevant data and an efficient and reliable telecommunication system between satellite units and the main radiotherapy clinic. The requirements of a telemedicine system in radiotherapy is influenced by the level of support needed. In this paper we differentiate between three categories of telemedicine support in radiotherapy. Level 1 features video conferencing and display of radiotherapy images and dose plans. Level 2 involves replication of selected data from the radiotherapy database - facilitating remote treatment planning and evaluation. Level 3 includes real-time, remote operations, e.g. target volume delineation and treatment planning performed by the team at the satellite unit under supervision and guidance from more experienced colleagues at the main clinic. (author)

  15. Treatment planning systems for high precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Computerized Treatment Planning System (TPS) play an important role in radiotherapy with the intent to maximize tumor control and minimize normal tissue complications. Treatment planning during earlier days was generally carried out through the manual summations of standard isodose charts on to patient body contours that were generated by direct tracing or lead wire representation, and relied heavily on the careful choices of beam weights and wedging. Since then there had been tremendous advances in field of Radiation Oncology in last few decades. The linear accelerators had evolved from MLC's to IGRT, the techniques like 3DCRT, IMRT has become almost routine affair. The simulation has seen transition from simple 2D film/fluoroscopy localization to CT Simulator with added development in PET, PET- CT and MR imaging. The Networking and advances in computer technology has made it possible to direct transfer of Images, contours to the treatment planning systems

  16. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiotherapy. Treatment feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, H.G.; Martin, T.; Kolotas, C.; Hey, S.; Schneider, L.; Templin, T.; Zamboglou, N.; Dornoff, W.; Kettner, H.

    1997-01-01

    with 5x18 Gy/week up to 59.4 to 73.8 Gy. - VII. Concurrent paclitaxel and radiation for gliomas of the brain: 100 mg/m 2 paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion weekly for 6 weeks simultaneous with radiotherapy in shrinking field technique with 5x2 Gy/week up to 60 Gy. Results: Our initial experiences with weekly application of paclitaxel as a 3-hour infusion in the dosages we used for simultaneous radiochemotherapy of malignancies in different anatomical sites has shown that this treatment concept is feasible, safe and effective. Conclusions: Whether this combined modality will enhance the response rates or influence survival rates has yet to be confirmed in phase-III studies. (orig.) [de

  17. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy in brain glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jie; Zhang Guifang; Bai Tong; Yin Yong; Fan Tingyong; Wu Chaoxia

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the dosimetry advantages of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)of brain glioma compared with that of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (SD CRT). Methods: Ten patients with brain glioma were enrolled in this study. Three-dimensional conf0rmal and intensity modulated radiotherapy plans were performed for each patient. The dose distributions of target volume and normal tissues, conformal index (CI) and heterogeneous index (HI) were analyzed using the dose-volume histogram (DVH). The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: IMRT plans decrease the maximum dose and volume of brainstem, mean dose of affected side parotid and maximum dose of spinal-cord. The CI for PTV of IMRT was superior to that of SD CRT, the HI for PTV has no statistical significance of the two model plans. Conclusions: IMRT plans can obviously decrease the dose and volume of brainstem. IMRT is a potential method in the treatment of brain glioma, and dose escalation was possible in patients with brain glioma. (authors)

  18. 3-Dimentional radiotherapy versus conventional treatment plans for gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghili M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: The current standard of adjuvant management for gastric cancer after curative resection based on the results of intergroup 0116 is concurrent chemoradiation. Current guidelines for designing these challenging fields still include two-dimensional simulation with simple AP-PA parallel opposed design. However, the implementation of radiotherapy (RT remains a concern. Our objective was to compare three-dimensional (3D techniques to the more commonly used AP-PA technique."n"nMethods: A total of 24 patients with stages II-IV adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation with simple AP-PA technique, using Cobalt-60. Total radiation dose was 50.4Gy. Landmark-based fields were simulated to assess PTV coverage. For each patient, three additional radiotherapy treatment plans were generated using three-dimensional (3D technique. The four treatment plans were then compared for target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues (liver, spinal cord, kidneys using dose volume histogram (DVH analysis."n"nResults: The three-dimensional planning techniques provided 10% superior PTV coverage compared to conventional AP-PA fields (p<0.001. Comparative DVHs for the right kidney, left kidney

  19. Dosimetry audit of radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulski, Wojciech; Chelminski, Krzysztof; Rostkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) various calculation algorithms are used. The accuracy of dose calculations has to be verified. Numerous phantom types, detectors and measurement methodologies are proposed to verify the TPS calculations with dosimetric measurements. A heterogeneous slab phantom has been designed within a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the IAEA. The heterogeneous phantom was developed in the frame of the IAEA CRP. The phantom consists of frame slabs made with polystyrene and exchangeable inhomogeneity slabs equivalent to bone or lung tissue. Special inserts allow to position thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) capsules within the polystyrene slabs below the bone or lung equivalent slabs and also within the lung equivalent material. Additionally, there are inserts that allow to position films or ionisation chamber in the phantom. Ten Polish radiotherapy centres (of 30 in total) were audited during on-site visits. Six different TPSs and five calculation algorithms were examined in the presence of inhomogeneities. Generally, most of the results from TLD were within 5 % tolerance. Differences between doses calculated by TPSs and measured with TLD did not exceed 4 % for bone and polystyrene equivalent materials. Under the lung equivalent material, on the beam axis the differences were lower than 5 %, whereas inside the lung equivalent material, off the beam axis, in some cases they were of around 7 %. The TLD results were confirmed with the ionisation chamber measurements. The comparison results of the calculations and the measurements allow to detect limitations of TPS calculation algorithms. The audits performed with the use of heterogeneous phantom and TLD seem to be an effective tool for detecting the limitations in the TPS performance or beam configuration errors at audited radiotherapy departments. (authors)

  20. Dosimetry audit of radiotherapy treatment planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulski, Wojciech; Chełmiński, Krzysztof; Rostkowska, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    In radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) various calculation algorithms are used. The accuracy of dose calculations has to be verified. Numerous phantom types, detectors and measurement methodologies are proposed to verify the TPS calculations with dosimetric measurements. A heterogeneous slab phantom has been designed within a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) of the IAEA. The heterogeneous phantom was developed in the frame of the IAEA CRP. The phantom consists of frame slabs made with polystyrene and exchangeable inhomogeneity slabs equivalent to bone or lung tissue. Special inserts allow to position thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) capsules within the polystyrene slabs below the bone or lung equivalent slabs and also within the lung equivalent material. Additionally, there are inserts that allow to position films or ionisation chamber in the phantom. Ten Polish radiotherapy centres (of 30 in total) were audited during on-site visits. Six different TPSs and five calculation algorithms were examined in the presence of inhomogeneities. Generally, most of the results from TLD were within 5 % tolerance. Differences between doses calculated by TPSs and measured with TLD did not exceed 4 % for bone and polystyrene equivalent materials. Under the lung equivalent material, on the beam axis the differences were lower than 5 %, whereas inside the lung equivalent material, off the beam axis, in some cases they were of around 7 %. The TLD results were confirmed with the ionisation chamber measurements. The comparison results of the calculations and the measurements allow to detect limitations of TPS calculation algorithms. The audits performed with the use of heterogeneous phantom and TLD seem to be an effective tool for detecting the limitations in the TPS performance or beam configuration errors at audited radiotherapy departments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Simulation and radiation treatment in external radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, E [Mevaterapia Medical Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1996-08-01

    It is well known that in order to obtain a uniform dose in the treated volume as defined in ICRU 50, there should be a 10% maximum difference between maximum and minimum dose values in treatment planning. Clinical target volume (CTV) should be related to external areas of body sections where tumour is located. These areas are important because different radiation beams enter through them. Therefore, verification of the planning target volume (PTV) through the external areas is highly significant. In this work we point out the importance of controlling that PTV is irradiated as planned considering some error sources usually found in radiotherapy practice with equipment that has been intensively used for a long time. Moreover, I think this experience will be helpful for those centers around the world where radiation treatment is carried out with reconditioned units. (author).

  2. Simulation and radiation treatment in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, E.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that in order to obtain a uniform dose in the treated volume as defined in ICRU 50, there should be a 10% maximum difference between maximum and minimum dose values in treatment planning. Clinical target volume (CTV) should be related to external areas of body sections where tumour is located. These areas are important because different radiation beams enter through them. Therefore, verification of the planning target volume (PTV) through the external areas is highly significant. In this work we point out the importance of controlling that PTV is irradiated as planned considering some error sources usually found in radiotherapy practice with equipment that has been intensively used for a long time. Moreover, I think this experience will be helpful for those centers around the world where radiation treatment is carried out with reconditioned units. (author)

  3. Non small cells stage I bronchial cancers: three-dimensional radiotherapy and radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions; Cancers bronchiques non a petites cellules de stade I: radiotherapie tridimensionnelle et radiotherapie en conditions stereotaxiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schipman, B.; Bosset, J.F. [CHU, 25 - Besancon (France); Marchesi, V.; Beckendorf, V.; Desandes, E.; Peiffert, D. [CRLCC Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandaeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Bosset, M. [CHU, 26 - Valence (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a comparison between three-dimensional conformation radiotherapy and robotic irradiation in stereotactic conditions (with CyberKnife) for patients suffering from a bronchial cancer with no small cells of stage I. Acute and late toxicity have been recorded, and the monitoring comprised a clinic examination and a thoracic scanography. The external radiotherapy results in an important local control rate and an acceptable toxicity. Some prospective studies are still needed to compare three-dimensional conformation respiratory-gated radiotherapy and radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions. Short communication

  4. Prospective randomized trail on chrono-chemotherapy + late course three dimensional conformal radio-therapy and conventional chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Feng; Ouyang Jinling; Dong Hongmin; Wu Weili; Chen Haixia; He Zhihui

    2005-01-01

    neck, as cure while 50 Gy/5w for prophylaxis. Results: The CR and PR of the CCR group was 45.5% and 95.5%, while the CR and PR of RCR group was 23.8% and 71.4% respectively. There was significant difference between the two groups in CR and PR (P<0.05). Higher incidence of stomatitis, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and bone marrow suppression was found in the RCR group than in the CCR group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Late-course three dimensional conformal radiotherapy plus chrono- chemotherapy (DDP + 5-FU/CF) is more favorable in the treatment of NPC with milder toxicity and side effects. Long term results will have to wait for further study.(authors)

  5. Doses to organs at cerebral risks: optimization by robotized stereotaxic radiotherapy and automatic segmentation atlas versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondiau, P.Y.; Thariat, J.; Benezery, K.; Herault, J.; Dalmasso, C.; Marcie, S.; Malandain, G.

    2007-01-01

    The stereotaxic radiotherapy robotized by 'Cyberknife fourth generation' allows a dosimetric optimization with a high conformity index on the tumor and radiation doses limited on organs at risk. A cerebral automatic anatomic segmentation atlas of organs at risk are used in routine in three dimensions. This study evaluated the superiority of the stereotaxic radiotherapy in comparison with the three dimensional conformal radiotherapy on the preservation of organs at risk in regard of the delivered dose to tumors justifying an accelerated hypo fractionation and a dose escalation. This automatic segmentation atlas should allow to establish correlations between anatomy and cerebral dosimetry; This atlas allows to underline the dosimetry optimization by stereotaxic radiotherapy robotized for organs at risk. (N.C.)

  6. Radiotherapy treatments using Tsallis entropy statistical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Pérez D; Sotolongo-Grau O; Sotolongo-Costa O; Antoranz J C

    2014-01-01

    Several radiobiological models mimic the biologic effect of one single radiation dose on a living tissue. However, the actual fractionated radiotherapy requires accounting for a new magnitude, i.e., time. Here, we explore the biological consequences posed by the mathematical prolongation of a previous single radiation model to fractionated treatment. The survival fraction is obtained, together with the equivalent physical dose, in terms of a time dependent factor (similar to a repair coefficient) describing the tissue trend to recovering its radioresistance. The model describes how dose fractions add up to obtain the equivalent dose and how the repair coefficient poses a limit to reach an equivalent dose equal to the critical one that would completely annihilate the tumor. On the other hand, the surrounding healthy tissue is a limiting factor to treatment planning. This tissue has its own repair coefficient and thus should limit the equivalent dose of a treatment. Depending on the repair coefficient and the critical dose of each tissue, unexpected results (failure to fully remove the tumor) can be obtained. To illustrate these results and predictions, some realistic example calculations will be performed using parameter values within actual clinical ranges. In conclusion, the model warns about treatment limitations and proposes ways to overcome them

  7. Three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy combined with capecitabine chemotherapy for locally advanced (unresectable) rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yaqun; Tian Ye; Zhang Junning; Wang Bin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the compliance and efficacy of chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced (unresectable) rectal cancer. Methods: Thirty eight patients with locally advanced (T4 or recurred) rectal cancer received three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy (for 46 ∼ 50Gy/5 weeks and was boosted to the tumor 16 ∼ 18Gy/2 weeks, 2Gy/fraction, 5 days/week) in combination with capecitabine 1 650mg · m -2 · d -1 , day 1-14, every 3 weeks. Results: The overall response rate was 57.9%, with CR 5 (13.2%), PR 17(44.7%), SD 10 (26.3%), PD 6 (15.8%), median survival time, the 1-year overall survival rate and the 2-year overall survival rate were 18 months, 64.43%, 18.78%, respectively. The remission rate of pain and improvement rate of performance status were 100% and 52.8%. Treatment-related toxicity mainly showed at diarrhea, neutrocytopenia and hand-foot syndrome, the incidence of grade 3 toxicity were 15.8%, 15.8%, 7.9%, respectively. there were no grade 4 toxicity and treatment-related death. Conclusion: Combination of three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy with capecitabine is active in advanced rectal cancer, It is a well-tolerated regimen. (authors)

  8. Intensity-modulated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Radhe

    1996-01-01

    Optimized intensity-modulated treatments one of the important advances in photon radiotherapy. Intensity modulation provides a greatly increased control over dose distributions. Such control can be maximally exploited to achieve significantly higher levels of conformation to the desired clinical objectives using sophisticated optimization techniques. Safe, rapid and efficient delivery of intensity-modulated treatments has become feasible using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator under computer control. The need for all other field shaping devices such as blocks, wedges and compensators is eliminated. Planning and delivery of intensity-modulated treatments is amenable to automation and development of class solutions for each treatment site and stage which can be implemented not only at major academic centers but on a wide scale. A typical treatment involving as many as 10 fields can be delivered in times shorter than much simpler conventional treatments. The main objective of the course is to give an overview of the current state of the art of planning and delivery methods of intensity-modulated treatments. Specifically, the following topics will be covered using representative optimized plans and treatments: 1. A typical procedure for planning and delivering an intensity-modulated treatment. 2. Quantitative definition of criteria (i.e., the objective function) of optimization of intensity-modulated treatments. Clinical relevance of objectives and the dependence of the quality of optimized intensity-modulated plans upon whether the objectives are stated purely in terms of simple dose or dose-volume criteria or whether they incorporate biological indices. 3. Importance of the lateral transport of radiation in the design of intensity-modulated treatments. Impact on dose homogeneity and the optimum choice of margins. 4. Use of intensity-modulated treatments in escalation of tumor dose for the same or lower normal tissue dose. Fractionation of intensity-modulated treatments

  9. Intensity-modulated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Radhe

    1997-01-01

    Optimized intensity-modulated treatments one of the important advances in photon radiotherapy. Intensity modulation provides a greatly increased control over dose distributions. Such control can be maximally exploited to achieve significantly higher levels of conformation to the desired clinical objectives using sophisticated optimization techniques. Safe, rapid and efficient delivery of intensity-modulated treatments has become feasible using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator under computer control. The need for all other field shaping devices such as blocks, wedges and compensators is eliminated. Planning and delivery of intensity-modulated treatments is amenable to automation and development of class solutions for each treatment site and stage which can be implemented not only at major academic centers but on a wide scale. A typical treatment involving as many as 10 fields can be delivered in times shorter than much simpler conventional treatments. The main objective of the course is to give an overview of the current state of the art of planning and delivery methods of intensity-modulated treatments. Specifically, the following topics will be covered using representative optimized plans and treatments: 1. A typical procedure for planning and delivering an intensity-modulated treatment. 2. Quantitative definition of criteria (i.e., the objective function) of optimization of intensity-modulated treatments. Clinical relevance of objectives and the dependence of the quality of optimized intensity-modulated plans upon whether the objectives are stated purely in terms of simple dose or dose-volume criteria or whether they incorporate biological indices. 3. Importance of the lateral transport of radiation in the design of intensity-modulated treatments. Impact on dose homogeneity and the optimum choice of margins. 4. Use of intensity-modulated treatments in escalation of tumor dose for the same or lower normal tissue dose. Fractionation of intensity-modulated treatments

  10. Radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, A; Frias, Z

    1988-12-01

    Fifty-nine patients with multiple myeloma referred for treatment of painful bony lesions received irradiation to 95 local areas, and 16 of the 59 were irradiated using hemibody techniques. Pain relief was obtained in practically all of the irradiated regions. Most local areas were treated to doses of 3000 cGy in 10 to 15 fractions. Patients with generalized pain due to multiple site involvement were treated with single dose hemibody irradiation, to doses of 600 cGy to the upper hemibody, and of 800 cGy to the lower hemibody. This treatment was well tolerated and side effects minimal. Median survival from diagnosis was 30 months and the survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 80%, 42%, and 12% respectively. Key articles on radiation therapy of multiple myeloma are reviewed and discussed. Since all patients eventually relapse after chemotherapy, the role of radiotherapy using present techniques should be fully evaluated and considered as an alternative in the primary treatment of multiple myeloma.

  11. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  12. Therapeutic effect analysis of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhijun; Cao Yongzhen; Zhang Wenxue; Liang Feng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the treatment effect of non-small cell lung cancer of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and to study the effect of patient survival related factors. Methods: Retrospective analysis was mack for 136 cases of non-small cell lung cancer, all accept 3D-CRT, through the case data collection and long-term follow-up, using the single factor and multiple factor analysis survival time and its influencing factors. Results: The recent curative effects of 136 cases of patients with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy: Complete response (CR) 14.7% (20/136), partial response (PR) 60.3 (82/136), stable disease(SD) 19.9% (27/136), progression disease (PD) 5.1% (7/136), total effective rate is 75% (102/136). One, two, three, five year survival rate is 79.4%, 45.4%, 22.1%, 12.5%. Side effects: Class 1 radiated esophagitis 35 cases, Class 2 radiated esophagitis 16 cases, Class 3 and above radiated esophagitis 0 case. Class I radiated pneumonia 20 cases, Class 2 radiated pneumonia 9 cases, Class 3 radiated pneumonia 0 case. Single factor analysis shows the influence of gender, age, pathology, phase, dose, and first-phase curative effect to the survival time are of a statistical significance, Multiple factor analysis showed KPS score, phase, dose, first-phase curative effect are the survival time independent factors. Conclusion: 3D-CRT for patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma is a safe, effective treatment method, Side effects are relatively low, and the patients survival time is long after radiotherapy. (authors)

  13. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received ≥60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998–2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient’s preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0–4 (T1), 5–8 (T2), and 9–12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy

  14. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Laura [Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Pearson, Erik A. [Techna Institute and the Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Pelizzari, Charles A., E-mail: c-pelizzari@uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  15. Automated radiotherapy treatment plan integrity verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Deshan; Moore, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In our clinic, physicists spend from 15 to 60 min to verify the physical and dosimetric integrity of radiotherapy plans before presentation to radiation oncology physicians for approval. The purpose of this study was to design and implement a framework to automate as many elements of this quality control (QC) step as possible. Methods: A comprehensive computer application was developed to carry out a majority of these verification tasks in the Philips PINNACLE treatment planning system (TPS). This QC tool functions based on both PINNACLE scripting elements and PERL sub-routines. The core of this technique is the method of dynamic scripting, which involves a PERL programming module that is flexible and powerful for treatment plan data handling. Run-time plan data are collected, saved into temporary files, and analyzed against standard values and predefined logical rules. The results were summarized in a hypertext markup language (HTML) report that is displayed to the user. Results: This tool has been in clinical use for over a year. The occurrence frequency of technical problems, which would cause delays and suboptimal plans, has been reduced since clinical implementation. Conclusions: In addition to drastically reducing the set of human-driven logical comparisons, this QC tool also accomplished some tasks that are otherwise either quite laborious or impractical for humans to verify, e.g., identifying conflicts amongst IMRT optimization objectives.

  16. Automated radiotherapy treatment plan integrity verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Deshan; Moore, Kevin L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In our clinic, physicists spend from 15 to 60 min to verify the physical and dosimetric integrity of radiotherapy plans before presentation to radiation oncology physicians for approval. The purpose of this study was to design and implement a framework to automate as many elements of this quality control (QC) step as possible. Methods: A comprehensive computer application was developed to carry out a majority of these verification tasks in the Philips PINNACLE treatment planning system (TPS). This QC tool functions based on both PINNACLE scripting elements and PERL sub-routines. The core of this technique is the method of dynamic scripting, which involves a PERL programming module that is flexible and powerful for treatment plan data handling. Run-time plan data are collected, saved into temporary files, and analyzed against standard values and predefined logical rules. The results were summarized in a hypertext markup language (HTML) report that is displayed to the user. Results: This tool has been in clinical use for over a year. The occurrence frequency of technical problems, which would cause delays and suboptimal plans, has been reduced since clinical implementation. Conclusions: In addition to drastically reducing the set of human-driven logical comparisons, this QC tool also accomplished some tasks that are otherwise either quite laborious or impractical for humans to verify, e.g., identifying conflicts amongst IMRT optimization objectives.

  17. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  18. Radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Hachiya, Kae; Okada, Sunaho; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Although the technical developments of radiotherapy have been remarkable, there are currently few reports on the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as initial treatment in this three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy era. Thus, we retrospectively evaluated the treatment results of radiotherapy for local recurrence of rectal cancer treated with surgery alone as the initial treatment. Thirty-two patients who underwent radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The dose per fraction was 2.0–3.5 Gy. Because the treatment schedule was variable, the biological effective dose (BED) was calculated. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) rates from the completion of radiotherapy were calculated. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year LC rates were 51.5%, 24.5%, 19.6%, 19.6%, and 13.1%, respectively. LC rates were significantly higher for the high BED group (≥75 Gy10) than for the lower BED group (<75 Gy10). All patients who reported pain achieved pain relief. The duration of pain relief was significantly higher for the high BED group than for the lower BED group. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 56.5%, 45.2%, 38.7%, and 23.2%, respectively. There was a trend toward higher OS rates in with higher BED group compared to lower BED group. For patients with unresectable locally recurrent rectal cancer treated with surgery alone, radiotherapy is effective treatment. The prescribed BED should be more than 75 Gy10, if the dose to the organ at risk is within acceptable levels.

  19. Treatment accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Shaleen; Burke, Kevin; Nalder, Colin; Jarrett, Paula; Mubata, Cephas; A'Hern, Roger; Humphreys, Mandy; Bidmead, Margaret; Brada, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the geometric accuracy of the delivery of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for brain tumours using the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) relocatable frame. Accuracy of treatment delivery was measured via portal images acquired with an amorphous silicon based electronic portal imager (EPI). Results were used to assess the existing verification process and to review the current margins used for the expansion of clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV). Patients and methods: Patients were immobilized in a GTC frame. Target volume definition was performed on localization CT and MRI scans and a CTV to PTV margin of 5 mm (based on initial experience) was introduced in 3D. A Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) fiducial system was used for stereotactic coordinate definition. The existing verification process consisted of an intercomparison of the coordinates of the isocentres and anatomy between the localization and verification CT scans. Treatment was delivered with 6 MV photons using four fixed non-coplanar conformal fields using a multi-leaf collimator. Portal imaging verification consisted of the acquisition of orthogonal images centred through the treatment isocentre. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) created from the CT localization scans were used as reference images. Semi-automated matching software was used to quantify set up deviations (displacements and rotations) between reference and portal images. Results: One hundred and twenty six anterior and 123 lateral portal images were available for analysis for set up deviations. For displacements, the total errors in the cranial/caudal direction were shown to have the largest SD's of 1.2 mm, while systematic and random errors reached SD's of 1.0 and 0.7 mm, respectively, in the cranial/caudal direction. The corresponding data for rotational errors (the largest deviation was found in the sagittal plane) was 0.7 deg. SD (total error), 0.5 deg. (systematic) and 0

  20. Parotid gland-sparing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy results in less severe dry mouth in nasopharyngeal cancer patients: A dosimetric and clinical comparison with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, Y.-M.; Shih Rompin; Lin, Y.-S.; Su, W.-F.; Ku, C.-H.; Chang, C.-S.; Shueng, P.-W.; Hwang, J.-M.; Liu, D.-W.; Chao, H.-L.; Lin, H.-Y.; Chang, L.-P.; Shum, W.-Y.; Lin, C.-S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study examined the efficacy of parotid gland sparing of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) compared with conventional radiotherapy for NPC patients. Both the dose given to the parotids and clinical assessment of dry mouth were conducted. Materials and methods: Dry mouth was assessed for 108 patients treated with conventional technique and 72 treated with 3DCRT. Dose analysis was performed in 48 patients of the 3DCRT group. A dose of 70 Gy was given to the midplane in conventional radiotherapy and to 90% isodose volume in 3DCRT. Prognostic factors affecting the severity of dry mouth were analyzed using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE). Results: In the 3DCRT group about 50% of the patients' parotid glands received less than 25 Gy. Parallel analysis of dry mouth shows a significant decrease in the incidence of severe xerostomia after 3DCRT. The proportion of patients without dry mouth was also significantly higher in the 3DCRT group than the conventional group at 1-3 years after completion of radiotherapy. Although 3DCRT delivered a higher dose to the tumor, it spared the parotid gland significantly better than the conventional treatment. Late toxicities were mostly similar between the 2 groups while local control in T4 patients and survival were improved for 3DCRT. Conclusion: Dosimetrically and clinically 3DCRT is better than conventional technique regarding parotid gland protection

  1. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark; Greenberg, Richard; Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis; Kutikov, Alexander; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  2. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. III: graphical simulation and monitoring of treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Marc L.; McShan, Daniel L.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Safe and efficient delivery of radiotherapy using computer-controlled machines requires new procedures to design and verify the actual delivery of these treatments. Graphical simulation and monitoring techniques for treatment delivery have been developed for this purpose. Methods and Materials: A graphics-based simulator of the treatment machine and a set of procedures for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts are used to simulate machine motions, detect collisions, and monitor machine positions during treatment. The treatment delivery simulator is composed of four components: a three-dimensional dynamic model of the treatment machine; a motion simulation and collision detection algorithm, user-interface widgets that mimic the treatment machine's control and readout devices; and an icon-based interface for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts. These components are used in a stand-alone fashion for interactive treatment delivery planning and integrated with a machine control system for treatment implementation and monitoring. Results: A graphics-based treatment delivery simulator and a set of procedures for planning and monitoring computer-controlled treatment delivery have been developed and implemented as part of a comprehensive computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. To date, these techniques have been used to design and help monitor computer-controlled treatments on a radiotherapy machine for more than 200 patients. Examples using these techniques for treatment delivery planning and on-line monitoring of machine motions during therapy are described. Conclusion: A system that provides interactive graphics-based tools for defining the sequence of machine motions, simulating treatment delivery including collision detection, and presenting the therapists with continual visual feedback from the treatment machine has been successfully implemented for routine clinical use as part of an overall system for computer

  3. Associations between nutritional status, weight loss, radiotherapy treatment toxicity and treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Amanda; Kiss, Nicole; Hodgson, Belinda; Crowe, Timothy C; Walsh, Adam D

    2011-02-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to nutritional deterioration which may be compounded by radiotherapy treatment toxicities. This study aimed to determine whether nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy were associated with treatment toxicity and outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Seventy-three gastrointestinal cancer patients receiving curative radiotherapy underwent medical record audits assessing body weight, radiotherapy toxicity, unplanned treatment breaks or hospital admissions and completion of prescribed treatment/s. Nutritional status was assessed in a subset of patients (n = 11) using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment tool. Seventy-five percent of patients lost weight throughout radiotherapy. Weight loss was significantly greater in patients experiencing unplanned radiotherapy breaks (-3.1% vs -1.6%, p nutritional status during radiotherapy (as measured by weight loss) may be associated with poorer short-term treatment outcomes in gastrointestinal cancer patients. Patient numbers were too small to definitively determine the effect of nutritional status at radiotherapy commencement or changes in nutritional status throughout radiotherapy (defined by PG-SGA) on treatment outcomes. Further research is required to investigate this in larger, longer-term studies. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, K.M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2000-01-01

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  5. Automated system for review of radiotherapy treatment sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collado Chamorro, P.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Vazquez Galinanes, A.; Diaz Pascual, V.; Gomez amez, J.; Martinez Sanchez, S.; Ossola Lentati, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    In many modern radiotherapy services begins to leaf treatment implemented in electronic form. In our department has developed an automated reporting system, that check the following parameters: treatment completed correctly, number of sessions and cumulative dose administered. Likewise treatments are verified in the allocated separate unit, and over-writing table parameters.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  7. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  8. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  9. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M., E-mail: stefanic@cae.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Regional de Referencia con Patrones Secundarios para Dosimetria - CNEA, Presbitero Juan Gonzalez y Aragon 15, B1802AYA Ezeiza (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  10. Development of dose audits for complex treatment techniques in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanic, A. M.; Molina, L.; Vallejos, M.; Montano, G.; Zaretzky, A.; Saravi, M.

    2014-08-01

    This work was performed in the frame of a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) with IAEA whose objective was to extend the scope of activities carried out by national TLD-based networks from dosimetry audit for rectangular radiation fields to irregular and small fields relevant to modern radiotherapy. External audit is a crucial element in QA programmes for clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy, therefore a methodology and procedures were developed and were made available for dose measurement of complex radiotherapy parameters used for cancer treatment. There were three audit steps involved in this CRP: TLD based dosimetry for irregular MLC fields for conformal radiotherapy, dosimetry in the presence of heterogeneities and 2D MLC shaped fields relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and applicable to dosimetry for IMRT. In addition, a new development of film-based 2D dosimetry for testing dose distributions in small field geometry was included. The plan for each audit step involved a pilot study and a trial audit run with a few local hospitals. The pilot study focused on conducting and evaluation of the audit procedures with all participants. The trial audit run was the running of the audit procedures by the participants to test them with a few local radiotherapy hospitals. This work intends to provide audits which are much nearer clinical practice than previous audits as they involve significant testing of Tps methods, as well as verifications to determinate whether hospitals can correctly calculate dose delivery in radiation treatments. (author)

  11. Automatization of the radiotherapy treatment at Nuclear Medicine Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjak, O.; Al'Bahra, E.; Kharita, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    NMC Program for Automatization of the radiotherapy treatment at Nuclear Medicine Center. The program NMC written in Delphi 6. This program can be run under Windows XP as single and multi users. Program makes all necessary and required calculations for treatment time for patient who is under radiotherapy treatment in Nuclear Medicine Center by using Co-60 units. Also this program is perform statistical study for patients according to tumor type, Syrian City, sex, and age. Data is stored on disk files and then whenever should be displayed. Statistical data is displayed on the screen or printed in reports. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy by delineations on CT-based simulation in different respiratory phases for the treatment of senile patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weifeng; Yuan, Feng; Wang, Guoping; Lin, Zhiren; Pan, Yanling; Chen, Longhua

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the application of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on computed tomography (CT) simulations in different respiratory phases. A total of 64 patients aged >70 years old with NSCLC were treated by 3D-CRT using CT images in different respiratory phases. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) at the end of inspiration and end of expiration were combined to obtain the total GTV, which was close to the motional range of tumors during respiration, and no additional expansion of the clinical target volume (CTAV) to planning target volume (PTV) (CTAV:PTV) was included during the recording of respiratory movements. Patients were also planned according to the classic 3D-CRT approach. Efficacy, prognostic factors, and side effects were evaluated. Compared with the classic approach, the average PTV was 18.9% lower (median: 17.3%), and the average lung volume receiving a prescribed dose for a tumor was 22.4% lower (median: 20.9%). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 70.6%, 54.9%, and 29.4%, respectively, with an overall tumor response rate of 79.7%. The Karnofsky performance status and N stage were independent prognostic factors, whereas age was not. Without affecting therapeutic effects, CT simulations in different respiratory phases were well-tolerated in elderly patients with NSCLC, could effectively reduce PTV, and could improve the quality of life.

  13. Chondrosarcoma of the larynx: treatment with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dailiana, T.; Thanos, L.; Papathanasiou, M.; Alexopoulou, E.; Papaioannou, G.; Kelekis, D.A.; Nomikos, P.; Kapranos, N.

    2002-01-01

    The case of a 50-year-old man with chondrosarcoma of the larynx treated with radiotherapy is reported. The patient presented with hoarseness and dyspnea. He underwent computed tomography (CT), which demonstrated a soft tissue mass of the larynx. Direct laryngoscopy with biopsy established the diagnosis of chondrosarcoma. Although experience with radiotherapy in these cases has been lacking in the literature, it was considered and eventually used, as radical surgery would result in severe cosmetic and functional impairment. Radiation therapy alone resulted in long-term remission of the tumour for more than 3 years. The patient has been followed up using CT and direct laryngoscopy for early detection of recurrence or metastases. (orig.)

  14. Radiotherapy in the treatment of lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas are sensitive and respond well to relatively low doses of irradiation. Careful staging of Hodgkin's disease patients selects the patients who can be cured with irradiation alone, and the combination of chemotherapy and irradiation may result in cure of complete remission in all types of lymphoma. In non-Hodgkin's disease and late stage Hodgkin's disease, radiotherapy is a very useful modality for palliating bulky disease, and treating bone infliltration or other painful areas

  15. Contribution of radiotherapy to the treatment of malignant tumors, 3. Combined drugs and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niibe, Hideo; Takahashi, Iku; Tamaki, Yoshio (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-09-01

    Effects of cytotoxic agent, hormone, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protector combined with radiation therapy in cancer management were analysed. The results were as follows: 1) An increase in response was seen in 25% or more of tumor nodules given radiotherapy combined with misonidazole, anoxic cell sensitizer, compared with radiotherpy alone. But the drug was also found to be neurotoxic and peripheral neuropathy. 2) Evidence has been given that Amifostine may protect the mucosal damage from radiation when Amifostine prior to irradiation was administrated to patients with tumor in the head and neck or in the pelvis. 3) There were no difference between five year survival of radiotherapy alone and with chemotherapy for patients with stage I Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Chemotherapy following radiotherapy for patients with stage II was more effective treatment method than radiotherapy alone. 4) Radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer was performed to control only primary site. The success rates of local control were over 80%. The near future holds extensive promise for a combination of radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormone therapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protectors. All of these when used in the appropriate circumstances may yield significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio and in the long-tern control of tumors.

  16. Linear programming based on neural networks for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingen Wu; Limin Luo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a neural network model for linear programming that is designed to optimize radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). This kind of neural network can be easily implemented by using a kind of 'neural' electronic system in order to obtain an optimization solution in real time. We first give an introduction to the RTP problem and construct a non-constraint objective function for the neural network model. We adopt a gradient algorithm to minimize the objective function and design the structure of the neural network for RTP. Compared to traditional linear programming methods, this neural network model can reduce the time needed for convergence, the size of problems (i.e., the number of variables to be searched) and the number of extra slack and surplus variables needed. We obtained a set of optimized beam weights that result in a better dose distribution as compared to that obtained using the simplex algorithm under the same initial condition. The example presented in this paper shows that this model is feasible in three-dimensional RTP. (author)

  17. Configuration control based on risk matrix for radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes de Oca Quinnones, Joe; Torres Valle, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of the science and technique breakthroughs in the application of the radiotherapy represents a challenge so that, the appearance of equipment failure or human mistakes that triggers unfavorable consequences for patients, public, or the occupationally exposed workers; it is also diversified forcing to incorporate besides, as part of the efforts, new techniques for the evaluation of risk and the detection of the weak points that can lead to these consequences. In order to evaluate the risks of the radiotherapy practices there is the SEVRRA code, based on the method of Risk Matrix. The system SEVRRA is the most frequently used code in the applications of risk studies in radiotherapy treatment. On the other hand, starting from the development of tools to control the dangerous configurations in nuclear power plants, it has been developed the SECURE code, which in its application variant of Risk Matrix, has gain a comfortable interface man-machine to make risk analyses to the radiotherapy treatment, molding in this way a lot of combinations of scenarios. These capacities outstandingly facilitate the studies and risk optimization applications in these practices. In the system SECURE-Risk Matrix are incorporated graphic and analytical capacities, which make more flexible the analyses and the subsequent documentation of all the results. The paper shows the the application of the proposed system to an integral risk study for the process of radiotherapy treatment with linear accelerator. (Author)

  18. Image-guided radiotherapy in near real time with intensity-modulated radiotherapy megavoltage treatment beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Hsu, Annie; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Luxton, Gary; King, Christopher; Xing, Lei; Solberg, Timothy

    2009-10-01

    To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  19. Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Near Real Time With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Megavoltage Treatment Beam Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Weihua; Hsu, Annie; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Luxton, Gary; King, Christopher; Xing Lei; Solberg, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Methods and Materials: Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Results: Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. Conclusions: This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  20. Navigator channel adaptation to reconstruct three dimensional heart volumes from two dimensional radiotherapy planning data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Angela; Nguyen, Thao-Nguyen; Moseley, Joanne L; Hodgson, David C; Sharpe, Michael B; Brock, Kristy K

    2012-01-01

    Biologically-based models that utilize 3D radiation dosimetry data to estimate the risk of late cardiac effects could have significant utility for planning radiotherapy in young patients. A major challenge arises from having only 2D treatment planning data for patients with long-term follow-up. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of an advanced deformable image registration (DIR) and navigator channels (NC) adaptation technique to reconstruct 3D heart volumes from 2D radiotherapy planning images for Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL) patients. Planning CT images were obtained for 50 HL patients who underwent mediastinal radiotherapy. Twelve image sets (6 male, 6 female) were used to construct a male and a female population heart model, which was registered to 23 HL 'Reference' patients' CT images using a DIR algorithm, MORFEUS. This generated a series of population-to-Reference patient specific 3D deformation maps. The technique was independently tested on 15 additional 'Test' patients by reconstructing their 3D heart volumes using 2D digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR). The technique involved: 1) identifying a matching Reference patient for each Test patient using thorax measurements, 2) placement of six NCs on matching Reference and Test patients' DRRs to capture differences in significant heart curvatures, 3) adapting the population-to-Reference patient-specific deformation maps to generate population-to-Test patient-specific deformation maps using linear and bilinear interpolation methods, 4) applying population-to-Test patient specific deformation to the population model to reconstruct Test-patient specific 3D heart models. The percentage volume overlap between the NC-adapted reconstruction and actual Test patient's true heart volume was calculated using the Dice coefficient. The average Dice coefficient expressed as a percentage between the NC-adapted and actual Test model was 89.4 ± 2.8%. The modified NC adaptation

  1. Clinical research on cancer treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Eriko; Koyama, Kazuyuki; Morita, Kozo

    1993-01-01

    There are two purposes of using combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancers. One is to suppress distant metastasis, especially micrometastasis; the other is to improve localized control. As a trial of the utility of the former, systemic chemotherapy with CDDP and 5 FU was given successively with radiotherapy to treat nasopharyngeal cancer. The survival rate was significantly improved compared with historical control cases. The main reason for this effectiveness was the improvement of localized control. The suppression of distant metastasis is the subject of future research. As a trial of the utility of the latter, a super-selective intraarterial chemotherapy with CBDCA combined with radiotherapy was used to head and neck localized progressive cancers. The control of localized cancer was remarkably effective. This treatment is considered to be especially suitable for locally advanced tongue cancer and cancer of the root of the tongue. (author)

  2. Comparison of Toxicity Between Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Diane C; Hess, Clayton B; Chen, Allen M; Daly, Megan E

    2016-01-01

    The role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in reducing treatment-related toxicity for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains incompletely defined. We compared acute toxicity and oncologic outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with IMRT or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT), with or without elective nodal irradiation (ENI). A single-institution retrospective review was performed evaluating 145 consecutive patients with histologically confirmed stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Sixty-five (44.8%) were treated with 3-DCRT using ENI, 43 (30.0%) with 3-DCRT using involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT), and 37 (25.5%) with IMRT using IFRT. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Comparison of acute toxicities by treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3-DCRT) and extent of nodal irradiation (3-DCRT-IFRT vs. 3-DCRT-ENI) was performed for grade 2 or higher esophagitis or pneumonitis, number of acute hospitalizations, incidence of opioid requirement, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy utilization, and percentage weight loss during treatment. Local control and overall survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. We identified no significant differences in any measures of acute toxicity by treatment technique or extent of nodal irradiation. There was a trend toward lower rates of grade 2 or higher pneumonitis among IMRT patients compared to 3-DCRT patients (5.4% vs. 23.0%; P = .065). Local control and overall survival were similar between cohorts. Acute and subacute toxicities were similar for patients treated with IMRT and with 3-DCRT with or without ENI, with a nonsignificant trend toward a reduction in pneumonitis with IMRT. Larger studies are needed to better define which patients will benefit from IMRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Automatic liver contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dengwang; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    To develop automatic and efficient liver contouring software for planning 3D-CT and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for application in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems.The algorithm comprises three steps for overcoming the challenge of similar intensities between the liver region and its surrounding tissues. First, the total variation model with the L1 norm (TV-L1), which has the characteristic of multi-scale decomposition and an edge-preserving property, is used for removing the surrounding muscles and tissues. Second, an improved level set model that contains both global and local energy functions is utilized to extract liver contour information sequentially. In the global energy function, the local correlation coefficient (LCC) is constructed based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix both of the initial liver region and the background region. The LCC can calculate the correlation of a pixel with the foreground and background regions, respectively. The LCC is combined with intensity distribution models to classify pixels during the evolutionary process of the level set based method. The obtained liver contour is used as the candidate liver region for the following step. In the third step, voxel-based texture characterization is employed for refining the liver region and obtaining the final liver contours.The proposed method was validated based on the planning CT images of a group of 25 patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment planning. These included ten lung cancer patients with normal appearing livers and ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The method was also tested on abdominal 4D-CT images of a group of five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The false positive volume percentage, the false negative volume percentage, and the dice similarity coefficient between liver contours obtained by a developed algorithm and a current standard delineated by the expert group

  4. Three-dimensional intrafractional internal target motions in accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kimiko; Yoshimura, Michio; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Inoue, Minoru; Sasaki, Makoto; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke; Nakata, Manabu; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated three-dimensional intrafractional target motion, divided into respiratory-induced motion and baseline drift, in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Paired fluoroscopic images were acquired simultaneously using orthogonal kV X-ray imaging systems at pre- and post-treatment for 23 patients who underwent APBI with external beam radiotherapy. The internal target motion was calculated from the surgical clips placed around the tumour cavity. The peak-to-peak respiratory-induced motions ranged from 0.6 to 1.5mm in all directions. A systematic baseline drift of 1.5mm towards the posterior direction and a random baseline drift of 0.3mm in the lateral-medial and cranial-caudal directions were observed. The baseline for an outer tumour cavity drifted towards the lateral and posterior directions, and that for an upper tumour cavity drifted towards the cranial direction. Moderate correlations were observed between the posterior baseline drift and the patients' physical characteristics. The posterior margin for intrafractional uncertainties was larger than 5mm in patients with greater fat thickness due to the baseline drift. The magnitude of the intrafractional motion was not uniform according to the direction, patients' physical characteristics, or tumour cavity location due to the baseline drift. Therefore, the intrafractional systematic movement should be properly managed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of bone metastases with palliative radiotherapy: Patients' treatment preferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumacher, Ewa; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hillary; Franssen, Edmee; Chow, Edward; Boer, Gerrit de; Danjoux, Cyril; Hayter, Charles; Barnes, Elizabeth; Andersson, Lourdes

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the proportion of patients undergoing palliative radiotherapy (RT) for bone pain who would like to participate in the decision-making process, and to determine their choice of palliative RT regimen (2000 cGy in five fractions vs. 800 cGy in one fraction) for painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were approached and all patients agreeing to participate provided written informed consent. Patients' decisional preferences were studied using a five-statement preference instrument. A decision board was used to help patients decide their preferred palliative RT regimen. Factors influencing patients' choices were studied using a visual analog scale. Results: A total of 101 patients were enrolled in the study (55 women and 46 men). The preferences for decision-making were as follows: 30 active, 47 collaborative, and 24 passive. Most (55 [76%] of 72) patients favored one fraction of palliative RT (95% confidence interval, 65-86%). Patients were more likely to select the 800 cGy in one fraction because of the convenience of the treatment plan (odds ratio, 1.024; 95% confidence interval, 1.004-1044) but were less likely to choose it because of the chance of bone fracture (odds ratio, 0.973; 95% confidence interval, 0.947-1.000) compared with 2000 cGy in five fractions. Conclusion: Most participating patients preferred to decide either by themselves or with the radiation oncologists which treatment option they preferred. An 800-cGy-in-one-fraction regimen was favored, independent of the treated site. The convenience of the treatment plan and the likelihood of bone fracture were the most important factors influencing patients' choice

  6. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  7. Detention and positioning system for patient Treatment with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso Bernad, Nuria; Tirado Porcar, Miriam; Del Castillo Arres, M. Jose; Broseta Tormos, M. Mercedes; Franch Martinez, Silvia; Suarez Dieguez, Raquel; Roures Ramos, M.Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The first step in what we call in radiotherapy S imulation and Planning o f radiation, is the correct choice of patient position and methods to use for this position is maintained along both the simulation and planning as the radiation treatment. The choice of position is directly linked to the choice of immobilizer to be used. (Author)

  8. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugtenburg, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    The Markov chain method can be used to incorporate measured data in Monte Carlo based radiotherapy treatment planning. This paper shows that convergence to the measured data, within the target precision, is achievable. Relative output factors for blocked fields and oblique beams are shown to compare well with independent measurements according to the same criterion. (orig.)

  9. Intraoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satomura, Kisaku; Inamoto, Shun; Honda, Kazuo; Takahashi, Masaji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-12-01

    Clinical results of intraoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer were reported. One hundred and five cases of gastric cancer were treated by intraoperative radiotherapy. Whatever the stage of the patient was, 3-year survival rate was found to be better in the radiotherapy group than that of the control group (treated surgical resection only). Five year survival rate of the stages III and IV in the radiotherapy group was better than the control group. Unfavorable side effects were observed in 4 cases out of 105 cases. In one case, penetration of postoperative peptic ulcer into the irradiated aortic wall was found by autopsy. Two cases of bile duct stenosis and one case of ileus due to acutely developed peritonitis carcinomatosa were experienced. In conclusion, intraoperative radiotherapy immediately after surgical resection for the treatment of gastric cancer was found to be an effective method. The most effective application of the method appears to be to cases of stage II and III without liver metastasis and peritoneal disseminations (H/sub 0/P/sub 0/, M, A).

  10. Study on the photoneutrons produced in 15 MV medical linear accelerators : Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Oh Nam [Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Oh Nam; Lim, Cheong Hwan [Hanseo Univ., Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) have the ability to provide better dose conformity and sparing of critical normal tissues than three-dimensional radiotherapy(3DCRT). Especially, with the benefit of health insurance in 2011, its use now increasingly in many modern radiotherapy departments. Also the use of linear accelerator with high-energy photon beams over 10 MV is increasing. As is well known, these linacs have the capacity to produce photoneutrons due to photonuclear reactions in materials with a large atomic number such as the target, flattening filters, collimators, and multi-leaf collimators(MLC). MLC-based IMRT treatments increase the monitor units and the probability of production of photoneutrons from photon-induced nuclear reactions. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the dose of photoneutrons produced from 3DCRT and IMRT technique for Rando phantom in cervical cancer. We performed the treatment plans with 3DCRT and IMRT technique using Rando phantom for treatment of cervical cancer. An Rando phantom placed on the couch in the supine position was irradiated using 15 MV photon beams. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters(OSLD) were attached to 4 different locations (abdomen, chest, head and neck, eyes) and from center of field size and measured 5 times each of locations. Measured neutron dose from IMRT technique increased by 9.0, 8.6, 8.8, and 14 times than 3DCRT technique for abdomen, chest, head and neck, and eyes, respectively. When using IMRT with 15 MV photon beams, the photoneutrons contributed a significant portion on out-of-field. It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, it is need to provide the additional safe shielding on a linear accelerator and should therefore reduce the out-of-field dose.

  11. Study on the photoneutrons produced in 15 MV medical linear accelerators : Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Oh Nam; Yang, Oh Nam; Lim, Cheong Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) have the ability to provide better dose conformity and sparing of critical normal tissues than three-dimensional radiotherapy(3DCRT). Especially, with the benefit of health insurance in 2011, its use now increasingly in many modern radiotherapy departments. Also the use of linear accelerator with high-energy photon beams over 10 MV is increasing. As is well known, these linacs have the capacity to produce photoneutrons due to photonuclear reactions in materials with a large atomic number such as the target, flattening filters, collimators, and multi-leaf collimators(MLC). MLC-based IMRT treatments increase the monitor units and the probability of production of photoneutrons from photon-induced nuclear reactions. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the dose of photoneutrons produced from 3DCRT and IMRT technique for Rando phantom in cervical cancer. We performed the treatment plans with 3DCRT and IMRT technique using Rando phantom for treatment of cervical cancer. An Rando phantom placed on the couch in the supine position was irradiated using 15 MV photon beams. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters(OSLD) were attached to 4 different locations (abdomen, chest, head and neck, eyes) and from center of field size and measured 5 times each of locations. Measured neutron dose from IMRT technique increased by 9.0, 8.6, 8.8, and 14 times than 3DCRT technique for abdomen, chest, head and neck, and eyes, respectively. When using IMRT with 15 MV photon beams, the photoneutrons contributed a significant portion on out-of-field. It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, it is need to provide the additional safe shielding on a linear accelerator and should therefore reduce the out-of-field dose

  12. Evaluation of isocenter reproducibility in telemedicine of 3D-radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Saeko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Kimura, Kouji; Takada, Yoshiki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Kono, Michio; Soejima, Toshinori; Kodama, Akihisa

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the utility in telemedicine of Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Treatment Planning (tele-3D-RTP) and to examine the accuracy of isocenter reproducibility in its offline trial. CT data of phantoms and patients in the satellite hospital were transferred to our hospital via floppy-disk and 3D-radiotherapy plans were generated by 3D-RTP computer in our hospital. Profile data of CT and treatment beams in the satellite hospital were pre-installed into the computer. Tele-3D-RTPs were performed in 3 phantom plans and 14 clinical plans for 13 patients. Planned isocenters were well reproduced, especially in the immobilized head and neck/brain tumor cases, whose 3D-vector of aberration was 1.96±1.38 (SD) mm. This teletherapy system is well applicable for practical use and can provides cost-reduction through sharing the resources of expensive equipment and radiation oncologists. (author)

  13. Evaluation of isocenter reproducibility in telemedicine of 3D-radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Kimura, Kouji; Takada, Yoshiki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Kono, Michio [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Soejima, Toshinori; Kodama, Akihisa

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the utility in telemedicine of Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Treatment Planning (tele-3D-RTP) and to examine the accuracy of isocenter reproducibility in its offline trial. CT data of phantoms and patients in the satellite hospital were transferred to our hospital via floppy-disk and 3D-radiotherapy plans were generated by 3D-RTP computer in our hospital. Profile data of CT and treatment beams in the satellite hospital were pre-installed into the computer. Tele-3D-RTPs were performed in 3 phantom plans and 14 clinical plans for 13 patients. Planned isocenters were well reproduced, especially in the immobilized head and neck/brain tumor cases, whose 3D-vector of aberration was 1.96{+-}1.38 (SD) mm. This teletherapy system is well applicable for practical use and can provides cost-reduction through sharing the resources of expensive equipment and radiation oncologists. (author)

  14. Three-Dimensional Conformal Simultaneously Integrated Boost Technique for Breast-Conserving Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V.; Maduro, John H.; Korevaar, Erik W.; Hollander, Miranda; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the target coverage and normal tissue dose with the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and the sequential boost technique in breast cancer, and to evaluate the incidence of acute skin toxicity in patients treated with the SIB technique. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with early-stage left-sided breast cancer underwent breast-conserving radiotherapy using the SIB technique. The breast and boost planning target volumes (PTVs) were treated simultaneously (i.e., for each fraction, the breast and boost PTVs received 1.81 Gy and 2.3 Gy, respectively). Three-dimensional conformal beams with wedges were shaped and weighted using forward planning. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk with the SIB technique, 28 x (1.81 + 0.49 Gy), were compared with those for the sequential boost technique, 25 x 2 Gy + 8 x 2 Gy. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated for 90 patients treated with the SIB technique according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: PTV coverage was adequate with both techniques. With SIB, more efficiently shaped boost beams resulted in smaller irradiated volumes. The mean volume receiving ≥107% of the breast dose was reduced by 20%, the mean volume outside the boost PTV receiving ≥95% of the boost dose was reduced by 54%, and the mean heart and lung dose were reduced by 10%. Of the evaluated patients, 32.2% had Grade 2 or worse toxicity. Conclusion: The SIB technique is proposed for standard use in breast-conserving radiotherapy because of its dose-limiting capabilities, easy implementation, reduced number of treatment fractions, and relatively low incidence of acute skin toxicity

  15. Preliminary results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingjie; Wang Luhua; Wang Xin; Feng Qinfu; Zhang Hongxing; Xiao Zefen; Yin Weibo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects and complications of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Between March 1999 and September 2003, 91 NSCLC patients treated with 3DCRT were reviewed at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. This patient cohort consisted of 73 men and 18 women. The median age was 66 years. Radio-therapy was delivered at 2 Gy fraction, 5 fractions per week. The median total dose was 60 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up time of 17 months, the response rate after 3DCRT was 57.1%, with complete remission 11.0% (10/91) and partial remission 46.2%(42/91). The median survival time (MST) was 16 months, with 1- and 2- year overall survivals (OS) of 67.0% and 32.6%, 1- and 2-year local progression free survivals (LPFS) of 82.6% and 53.0%, respectively. The independent adverse prognostic factors by univariate analysis and multivariate analysis was weight loss ≥5%. Grade 2 acute radiation pneumonitis was observed in 2 patients and grade 3 in 4 patients. Late lung injury developed in 1 patient with grade 2, 1 patient with grade 3, respectively. Acute radiation esophagitis was observed in 8 patients with grade 2. Acute grade 2 hematologic toxicity developed in 5 patients. Conclusions: 3DCRT was feasible in the treatment of NSCLC with good immediate tumor response and acceptable normal tissue complication. The total dose may potentially be increased. (authors)

  16. Changes in sexual function after radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, V.; Hay, M.; Rozan, R.; Lagrange, J.L.; N'Guyen, T.; Giraud, B.

    1996-01-01

    The objective was to assess sexual function before and after definitive irradiation for the treatment of cancer of the prostate. The study comprised 67 patients (mean age 68 years) treated in five radiotherapy departments and assessed with repeated questionnaires about their libido, arousal, frequency and quality of intercourse, and sexual satisfaction. Interviews were obtained before radiotherapy and at the end of the first year after treatment. Sixty-three patients were married and 50 had a sexually effective partner. Forty-six patients presented with another pathology or medical treatment capable of inducing sexual dysfunction. Before radiotherapy, 40 patients were sexually active, with good to acceptable intercourse. Between 10 and 24 months after the end of radiotherapy, no disease progression was observed and prostate-specific antigen levels remained high in only two patients. Sexual function was preserved in 67% of patients but only 50% observed no change. The functional prognosis seemed to be related to the initial frequency and quality of intercourse; more than three times per month, the prognosis remained good, under three per month, it was poor. The patient's age was a predictive factor for the frequency of intercourse. (author)

  17. Radiotherapy treatment checking procedures throughout Australasia: results of a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, L.; Kron, T.; Howlett, S.

    1996-01-01

    In July 1995, a questionnaire was forwarded to thirty two physicists overseeing Radiation Oncology Departments and brachytherapy in hospitals throughout Australia and New Zealand. From the thirty seven hospitals reached by this survey, details were gathered on thirty hospitals, including the Newcastle In most radiotherapy centres where treatment planning is performed by radiation therapists, at least some of the treatment sheets and their calculations are double checked by radiotherapy physicists. While 23% checked the treatment sheets of all patients, in the majority of centres physicists were found to check only a minor selection, that is, less than 20% of all treatment sheets. Only in six centres physicists were not involved. 5 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  18. A custom made phantom for dosimetric audit and quality assurance of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radaideh, K.M.; Matalqah, L.M.; Matalqah, L.M.; Tajuddin, A.A.; Luen, F.W.L.; Bauk, S.; Abdel Munem, E.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate check of the actual dose delivered to a patient in radiotherapy can be achieved by using dosimetric measurements. The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate a custom handmade head and neck phantom for evaluation of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) dose planning and delivery. A phantom of head and neck region of a medium built male patient with nasopharyngeal cancer was constructed from Perspex material. Primary and secondary Planning Target Volume (PTV) and twelve Organs at Risk (OAR) were delineated using Treatment Planning System (TPS) guided by computed tomography printout transverse images. One hundred and seven (107) holes distributed among the organs were loaded with Rod-shaped Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF:Mg, Ti TLDs) after common and individual calibration. Head and neck phantom was imaged, planned and irradiated conformally (3D-CRT) by linear accelerator (LINAC Siemens Artiste). The planned predicted doses by TPS at PTV and OAR regions were obtained and compared with the TLD measured doses using the phantom. Repeated TLD measurements were reproducible with a percent standard deviation of < 3.5 %. Moreover, the average of dose discrepancies between TLDs reading and TPS predicted doses were found to be < 5.3 %. The phantom's preliminary results have proved to be a valuable tool for 3D-CRT treatment dose verification. (author)

  19. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Herk, M.; Gilhuijs, K.; Kwa, S.; Lebesque, J.; Muller, S.; De Munck, J.; Touw, A.; Kooy, H.

    1995-01-01

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors have been demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion have been analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large

  20. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Herk, M; Gilhuijs, K; Kwa, S; Lebesque, J; Muller, S; De Munck, J; Touw, A [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kooy, H [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors were demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion were analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large scale.

  1. Pre-Radiotherapy dental evaluation criteria and treatment needs of oral side effects after head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Arriagada, Wilfredo Alejandro; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Carvalho de Andrade, Marco Aurelio; De Andrade Elias, Rogerio; Ajudarte Lopes, Marcio

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to present pre-radiotherapy evaluation criteria and the main needs for treatment of these patients after the radiation therapy. Were revised articles in English, Spanish and Portuguese language between 1995 and 2009 indexed in Pubmed and Scielo. The keywords were oral cancer and radiotherapy, complications in head and neck radiotherapy, oral pre-radiotherapy evaluation.The adverse complications of radiotherapy in head and neck area could be temporary or late. The late effects, such as radiation caries and osteorradionecrosis could be directly associated with the fact that previous dental evaluation was not performed and can severely affect the post-operatory quality of life. The participation of the dentist in the multidisciplinary team and dental evaluation of the patients that will receive radiotherapy in the head and neck area are of vital importance to improve the post-operatory quality of life of these patients

  2. Development of model plans in three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyo, Hongryull; Kim, Gwieon; Keum, Kichang; Chang, Sekyung; Suh, Changok; Lee, Sanghoon

    2002-01-01

    Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning is being used widely for the treatment of patients with brain tumor. However, it takes much time to develop an optimal treatment plan, therefore, it is difficult to apply this technique to all patients. To increase the efficiency of this technique, we need to develop standard radiotherapy plans for each site of the brain. Therefore we developed several 3 dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans (3D plans) for tumors at each site of brain, compared them with each other, and with 2 dimensional radiotherapy plans. Finally model plans for each site of the brain were decided. Imaginary tumors, with sizes commonly observed in the clinic, were designed for each site of the brain and drawn on CT images. The planning target volumes (PTVs) were as follows; temporal tumor-5.7 x 8.2 x 7.6 cm, suprasellar tumor-3 x 4 x 4.1 cm, thalamic tumor-3.1 x 5.9 x 3.7 cm, frontoparietal tumor-5.5 x 7 x 5.5 cm, and occipitoparietal tumor-5 x 5.5 x 5 cm. Plans using parallel opposed 2-portals and/or 3 portals including fronto-vertex and 2 lateral fields were developed manually as the conventional 2D plans, and 3D noncoplanar conformal plans were developed using beam's eye view and the automatic block drawing tool. Total tumor dose was 54 Gy for a suprasellar tumor, 59.4 Gy and 72 Gy for the other tumors. All dose plans (including 2D plans) were calculated using 3D plan software. Developed plans were compared with each other using dose-volume histograms (DVH), normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) and variable dose statistic values (minimum, maximum and mean dose, D5, V83, V85 and V95). Finally a best radiotherapy plan for each site of brain was selected. 1) Temporal tumor; NTCPs and DVHs of the normal tissue of all 3D plans were superior to 2D plans and this trend was more definite when total dose was escalated to 72 Gy (NTCPs of normal brain 2D plans: 27%, 8% → 3D plans: 1%, 1%). Various dose statistic values did not show any

  3. Radiotherapy as a conservative treatment in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfuhl, O.R. von; Miola, U.J.; Campos, J.C.F. de

    1977-01-01

    The review of 545 cases of cancer of the breast, 10% of which were treated by exclusive radiotherapy, emphasized the trend towards conservative treatment, because 29,8% of mastectomized women died within two years from the operation with distant metastases. As it is possible with radiotherapy to cause fibrosis or keep inactive breast tumors up to 5 cm diameter for two years or longer, one must consider irradiation as a good option for young women with small tumors. A combination was used of tangencial radiotherapy up to 5.000 rads to the whole breast with a boost dose two weeks later of 3.000 to 4.000 rads by means of intersticial radiotherapy given only to the palpable tumor. This was fulfilled by the afterloading method according to a system described as geometrization of the breast by parallel plates where holes were drilled for the needles. No recurrence was seen in 4 years in the selected group of 12 patients submitted to the mentioned treatment [pt

  4. Radiotherapy in head and neck: a standard treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini Blasco, A; Torres Lopez, M; Apardian Manougian, R

    1998-01-01

    The present work is an exhaustive revision of the literature regarding the employment of combined treatments of radiochemotherapy in the head and neck neoplasms. The sanitary importance of this group of illnesses starts to become remarkable not only due to their frequency but for the high percentage of patients that present themselves for consultation with an advanced illness where the results of the classic treatments of surgery and radiotherapy are discouraging. These results are poor for the survival as well as in the quality of this. It analyzes the role of the different pharmaceuticals used in patients as well as the fundamentally different associations with radiotherapy: neoadjuvant, adjuvant and concomitant. These results allow to affirm that this treatment form is elected for those patients with advanced tumors of head and neck with a general state that allows to tolerate a bigger toxicity [es

  5. Four-dimensional dose evaluation using deformable image registration in radiotherapy for liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoon Jung, Sang; Min Yoon, Sang; Ho Park, Sung; Cho, Byungchul; Won Park, Jae; Jung, Jinhong; Park, Jin-hong; Hoon Kim, Jong; Do Ahn, Seung [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: In order to evaluate the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion on the dose delivered to the target volume and critical organs during free-breathing radiotherapy, a four-dimensional dose was evaluated using deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for 11 patients who were treated for liver cancer. Internal target volume-based treatment planning and dose calculation (3D dose) were performed using the end-exhalation phase images. The four-dimensional dose (4D dose) was calculated based on DIR of all phase images from 4DCT to the planned image. Dosimetric parameters from the 4D dose, were calculated and compared with those from the 3D dose. Results: There was no significant change of the dosimetric parameters for gross tumor volume (p > 0.05). The increase D{sub mean} and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for liver were by 3.1%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.003) and 2.8%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.008), respectively, and for duodenum, they were decreased by 15.7%{+-} 11.2% (p= 0.003) and 15.1%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for stomach was decreased by 5.3%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 9.7%{+-} 8.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for right kidney was decreased by 11.2%{+-} 16.2% (p= 0.003) and 14.9%{+-} 16.8% (p= 0.005), respectively. For left kidney, D{sub max} and gEUD were decreased by 11.4%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003) and 12.8%{+-} 12.1% (p= 0.005), respectively. The NTCP values for duodenum and stomach were decreased by 8.4%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 17.2%{+-} 13.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. Conclusions: The four-dimensional dose with a more realistic dose calculation accounting for respiratory motion revealed no significant difference in target coverage and potentially significant change in the physical and biological dosimetric parameters in normal organs during free-breathing treatment.

  6. Intensity modulated radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients: Is it better than three dimensional conformal radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Chiacchiararelli, Laura; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Bolzan, Chiara; D’Arienzo, Marco; Bracci, Stefano; Fanelli, Alessandro; Cox, Maria Christina; Valeriani, Maurizio; Osti, Mattia F; Minniti, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Cure rate of early Hodgkin Lymphoma are high and avoidance of late toxicities is of paramount importance. This comparative study aims to assess the normal tissue sparing capability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in terms of dose-volume parameters and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for different organs at risk in supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) patients. Ten HL patients were actually treated with 3D-CRT and all treatments were then re-planned with IMRT. Dose-volume parameters for thyroid, oesophagus, heart, coronary arteries, lung, spinal cord and breast were evaluated. Dose-volume histograms generated by TPS were analyzed to predict the NTCP for the considered organs at risk, according to different endpoints. Regarding dose-volume parameters no statistically significant differences were recorded for heart and origin of coronary arteries. We recorded statistically significant lower V30 with IMRT for oesophagus (6.42 vs 0.33, p = 0.02) and lungs (4.7 vs 0.1 p = 0.014 for the left lung and 2.59 vs 0.1 p = 0.017 for the right lung) and lower V20 for spinal cord (17.8 vs 7.2 p = 0.02). Moreover the maximum dose to the spinal cord was lower with IMRT (30.2 vs 19.9, p <0.001). Higher V10 with IMRT for thyroid (64.8 vs 95, p = 0.0019) and V5 for lungs (30.3 vs 44.8, p = 0.03, for right lung and 28.9 vs 48.1, p = 0.001 for left lung) were found, respectively. Higher V5 and V10 for breasts were found with IMRT (V5: 4.14 vs 20.6, p = 0.018 for left breast and 3.3 vs 17, p = 0.059 for right breast; V10: 2.5 vs 13.6 p = 0.035 for left breast and 1.7 vs 11, p = 0.07 for the right breast.) As for the NTCP, our data point out that IMRT is not always likely to significantly increase the NTCP to OARs. In HL male patients IMRT seems feasible and accurate while for women HL patients IMRT should be used with caution

  7. Protocol updated for the treatment of patients in radiotherapy with implanted cardiac devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Martin, G.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Sotoca Ruiz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment can be safely performed in patients with pacemakers or implanted defibrillators, however, it is very important to ensure that the patient receives the minimum dose possible in your heart device. Is considered essential good coordination with the cardiology service before, during and after radiotherapy treatment for the patient safety. Finally we present a protocol updated to treat these patients in radiotherapy. (Author)

  8. Efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Api, P; Corcione, S; Magnoni, G

    1985-01-01

    A clinical evaluation regarding the efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy in 294 patients with breast cancer is presented. In the author's opinion post-operative radiotherapy is fundamental in the treatment of this tumor. 21 refs.

  9. Quality control in radiotherapy treatment: Radiation induced myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Vicioso, E.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.

    2001-01-01

    Direct injury of the spinal cord has been reported many times, particularly in cases of overexposures with radiotherapy of neoplasm that occurred outside the Central Nervous System. Permanent damage to the spinal cord is the most feared complication of radiation therapy treatments and one of the relatively common causes of litigation for medical malpractice in the context of cancer treatment. We have learned from clinical experience, data from randomized trials and animal experimentation, the dose tolerance as well as the interfraction interval for hyperfractionation regimes. We are still lacking precious clinical information, in particular the dose tolerance in combined modality treatments that represent the vast majority of modern treatments. (author)

  10. Comparison of Heart and Coronary Artery Doses Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kole, Thomas P.; Aghayere, Osarhieme; Kwah, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare heart and coronary artery radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. four-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) treatment plans for patients with distal esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with distal esophageal cancers treated with IMRT from March 2007 to May 2008 were identified. All patients were treated to 50.4 Gy with five-field IMRT plans. Theoretical 3D-CRT plans with four-field beam arrangements were generated. Dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume, heart, right coronary artery, left coronary artery, and other critical normal tissues were compared between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans, and selected parameters were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning showed significant reduction (p < 0.05) in heart dose over 3D-CRT as assessed by average mean dose (22.9 vs. 28.2 Gy) and V30 (24.8% vs. 61.0%). There was also significant sparing of the right coronary artery (average mean dose, 23.8 Gy vs. 35.5 Gy), whereas the left coronary artery showed no significant improvement (mean dose, 11.2 Gy vs. 9.2 Gy), p = 0.11. There was no significant difference in percentage of total lung volume receiving at least 10, 15, or 20 Gy or in the mean lung dose between the planning methods. There were also no significant differences observed for the kidneys, liver, stomach, or spinal cord. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved a significant improvement in target conformity as measured by the conformality index (ratio of total volume receiving 95% of prescription dose to planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose), with the mean conformality index reduced from 1.56 to 1.30 using IMRT. Conclusions: Treatment of patients with distal esophageal cancer using IMRT significantly decreases the exposure of the heart and right coronary artery when compared with 3D

  11. Auto-optimisation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, V.W.C.; Kwong, D.W.L.; Sham, J.S.T.; Mui, A.W.L.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the application of auto-optimisation in the treatment planning of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Twenty-nine NPC patients were planned by both forward planning and auto-optimisation methods. The forward plans, which consisted of three coplanar facial fields, were produced according to the routine planning criteria. The auto-optimised plans, which consisted of 5-15 (median 9) fields, were generated by the planning system after prescribing the dose requirements and the importance weightings of the planning target volume and organs at risk. Plans produced by the two planning methods were compared by the dose volume histogram, tumour control probability (TCP), conformity index and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: The auto-optimised plans reduced the average planner's time by over 35 min. It demonstrated better TCP and conformity index than the forward plans (P=0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Besides, the parotid gland and temporo-mandibular (TM) joint were better spared with the mean dose reduction of 31.8 and 17.7%, respectively. The slight trade off was the mild dose increase in spinal cord and brain stem with their maximum doses remaining within the tolerance limits. Conclusions: The findings demonstrated the potentials of auto-optimisation for improving target dose and parotid sparing in the 3DCRT of NPC with saving of the planner's time

  12. Auto-optimisation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, V.W.C. E-mail: orvinwu@polyu.edu.hk; Kwong, D.W.L.; Sham, J.S.T.; Mui, A.W.L

    2003-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the application of auto-optimisation in the treatment planning of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Twenty-nine NPC patients were planned by both forward planning and auto-optimisation methods. The forward plans, which consisted of three coplanar facial fields, were produced according to the routine planning criteria. The auto-optimised plans, which consisted of 5-15 (median 9) fields, were generated by the planning system after prescribing the dose requirements and the importance weightings of the planning target volume and organs at risk. Plans produced by the two planning methods were compared by the dose volume histogram, tumour control probability (TCP), conformity index and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: The auto-optimised plans reduced the average planner's time by over 35 min. It demonstrated better TCP and conformity index than the forward plans (P=0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Besides, the parotid gland and temporo-mandibular (TM) joint were better spared with the mean dose reduction of 31.8 and 17.7%, respectively. The slight trade off was the mild dose increase in spinal cord and brain stem with their maximum doses remaining within the tolerance limits. Conclusions: The findings demonstrated the potentials of auto-optimisation for improving target dose and parotid sparing in the 3DCRT of NPC with saving of the planner's time.

  13. Registration and planning of radiotherapy and proton therapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bausse, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Within the frame of an update and renewal project, the Orsay Proton Therapy Centre of the Curie Institute (IPCO) renews its software used for the treatment of patients by proton therapy, a radiotherapy technique which uses proton beams. High energies used in these treatments and the precision provided by proton particle characteristics require a more precise patient positioning than conventional radiotherapy: proton therapy requires a precision of about a millimetre. Thus, markers are placed on the skull which are generally well accepted by patients, but are a problem in the case of paediatric treatment, notably for the youngest children whose skull is still growing. The first objective of this research is thus to use only intrinsic information from X-ray images used when positioning the patient. A second objective is to make the new software (TPS Isogray) perfectly compatible with IPCO requirements by maintaining the strengths of the previous TPS (Treatment Planning System) and being prepared to the implementation of a new installation. After a presentation of the context and state of the art in radiotherapy and patient positioning, the author proposes an overview of 2D registration methods, presents a new method for 2x2D registration, and addresses the problem of 3D registration. Then, after a presentation of proton therapy, the author addresses different specific issues and aspects: the compensator (simulation, calculation, and tests), dose calculation, the 'Pencil-Beam' algorithm, tests, and introduced improvements [fr

  14. The value of radiotherapy for the treatment of meningeal melanocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, D.; Karstens, J.H.; Tatagiba, M.; Brandis, A.; Dubben, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Meningeal melanocytoma is described as rare benign lesion with a high risk of recurrence. There are no well-substantiated treatment recommendations in the literature. Only case reports have been published by now. Patients and Methods: In 1997 a patient was irradiated for a recurrent spinal meningeal melanocytoma and 2 years later for brain metastases indicating malignant transformation. This case gave rise to a literature review for therapeutic options. All sufficiently documented cases published since 1972, when the term meningeal melanocytoma was established, were evaluated. Based on published and on original data recurrence and overall survival rates up to 5 years were calculated for three different therapeutic approaches, namely complete tumor resection, incomplete resection with subsequent radiotherapy, and incomplete resection alone. Statistical evaluation was performed using the χ 2 test and Kaplan-Meier-analysis. Results: 53 patients (including our patient) met selection criteria. Complete tumor resection was superior to incomplete resection alone with lower recurrence (4-38% versus 50-92%) and better overall survival rates (86-95% versus 30-58%). After incomplete resection radiotherapy seemed to improve prognosis (recurrence 15-45%; overall survival 91-92%). Between complete resection and incomplete resection plus radiotherapy no significant differences were observed. Conclusions: For meningeal melanocytoma complete resection must be regarded as the best of the modalities compared. After incomplete resection radiotherapy should be considered, although a specific radiotherapeutic regimen cannot be recommended at present. However, for multiple cranial or spinal lesions total cranial irradiation or craniospinal irradiation is indicated. (orig.) [de

  15. Combined modality treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannock, I.F.; Toronto Univ., ON

    1989-01-01

    The present paper discusses some of the methodological issues which can confound the interpretation of clinical trials of combined modality treatment. It reviews some of the larger randomized trials which have evaluated combined modality treatment in cancers of the head and neck, lung, gastrointestinal tract and bladder. It concludes that adequate trials have yet to be performed in many of thses sites, but that at present, evidence for long-term benefit from adjunctivechemotherapy is meagre. Finally, it suggests some possible mechanisms which might heve limited the benefit of chemotherapy when added to radiation treatment. (Author). 87 refs.; 4 figs.; 4 tabs

  16. A comparison of swallowing dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. A systematic review by the Italian Head and Neck Radiotherapy Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursino, Stefano; Morganti, Riccardo; Cristaudo, Agostino; Paiar, Fabiola; D'Angelo, Elisa; Lohr, Frank; Mazzola, Rosario; Merlotti, Anna; Russi, Elvio Grazioso; Musio, Daniela; Alterio, Daniela; Bacigalupo, Almalina

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is one of the most important treatment-related side effects in head and neck cancer (HNC), as it can lead to severe life-threating complications such as aspiration pneumonia and malnutrition. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could reduce swallowing dysfunction by producing a concave dose distribution and reducing doses to the swallowing-related organs at risk (SWOARs). The aim of this study was to review the current literature in order to compare swallowing outcomes between IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). A search was conducted in the PubMed and Embase databases to identify studies on swallowing outcomes, both clinically and/or instrumentally assessed, after 3DCRT and IMRT. Dysphagia-specific quality of life and objective instrumental data are summarized and discussed. A total of 262 papers were retrieved from the searched databases. An additional 23 papers were retrieved by hand-searching the reference lists. Ultimately, 22 papers were identified which discussed swallowing outcomes after 3DCRT and IMRT for HNC. No outcomes from randomized trials were identified. Despite several methodological limitations, reports from the current literature seem to suggest better swallowing outcomes with IMRT compared to 3DCRT. Further improvements are likely to result from the increased use of IMRT plans optimized for SWOAR sparing. (orig.) [de

  17. Clinical considerations of Monte Carlo for electron radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddegon, Bruce; Balogh, Judith; Mackenzie, Robert; Scora, Daryl

    1998-01-01

    Technical requirements for Monte Carlo based electron radiotherapy treatment planning are outlined. The targeted overall accuracy for estimate of the delivered dose is the least restrictive of 5% in dose, 5 mm in isodose position. A system based on EGS4 and capable of achieving this accuracy is described. Experience gained in system design and commissioning is summarized. The key obstacle to widespread clinical use of Monte Carlo is lack of clinically acceptable measurement based methodology for accurate commissioning

  18. Dosimetric inter-institutional comparison in European radiotherapy centres: Results of IAEA supported treatment planning system audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla; Petrovic, Borislava; Grezdo, Joseph; Chelminski, Krzysztof; do Carmo Lopes, Maria; Izewska, Joanna; Van Dyk, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    One of the newer audit modalities operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) involves audits of treatment planning systems (TPS) in radiotherapy. The main focus of the audit is the dosimetry verification of the delivery of a radiation treatment plan for three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy using high energy photon beams. The audit has been carried out in eight European countries - Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Serbia, Slovakia, Poland and Portugal. The corresponding results are presented. The TPS audit reviews the dosimetry, treatment planning and radiotherapy delivery processes using the 'end-to-end' approach, i.e. following the pathway similar to that of the patient, through imaging, treatment planning and dose delivery. The audit is implemented at the national level with IAEA assistance. The national counterparts conduct the TPS audit at local radiotherapy centres through on-site visits. TPS calculated doses are compared with ion chamber measurements performed in an anthropomorphic phantom for eight test cases per algorithm/beam. A set of pre-defined agreement criteria is used to analyse the performance of TPSs. TPS audit was carried out in 60 radiotherapy centres. In total, 190 data sets (combination of algorithm and beam quality) have been collected and reviewed. Dosimetry problems requiring interventions were discovered in about 10% of datasets. In addition, suboptimal beam modelling in TPSs was discovered in a number of cases. The TPS audit project using the IAEA methodology has verified the treatment planning system calculations for 3D conformal radiotherapy in a group of radiotherapy centres in Europe. It contributed to achieving better understanding of the performance of TPSs and helped to resolve issues related to imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning.

  19. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, G.; Renard, A.; Mazeron, J.J.; Valery, C.; Mokhtari, K.

    2001-01-01

    Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of meningiomas. Cerebral meningiomas account for 15-20% of all cerebral tumours. Although seldom malignant, they frequently recur in spite of complete surgery, which remains the cornerstone of the treatment. In order to decrease the probability of local recurrence, radiotherapy has often been recommended in atypical or malignant meningioma as well as in benign meningioma which was incompletely resected. However, this treatment never was the subject of prospective studies, randomized or not. The purpose of this review of the literature was to give a progress report on the results of different published series in the field of methodology as well as in the techniques of radiotherapy. Proposals for a therapeutic choice are made according to this analysis. For grade I or grade II-III meningiomas, limits of gross tumor volume (GTV) include the tumour in place or the residual tumour after surgery; clinical target volume (CTV) limits include gross tumour volume before surgery with a GTV-CTV distance of 1 and 2 cm respectively. Delivered doses are 55 Gy into CTV and 55-60 Gy and 70 Gy into GTV for grade I and grade II-III meningiomas respectively. (authors)

  20. Integration of second cancer risk calculations in a radiotherapy treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, M; Schneider, U

    2014-01-01

    Second cancer risk in patients, in particular in children, who were treated with radiotherapy is an important side effect. It should be minimized by selecting an appropriate treatment plan for the patient. The objectives of this study were to integrate a risk model for radiation induced cancer into a treatment planning system which allows to judge different treatment plans with regard to second cancer induction and to quantify the potential reduction in predicted risk. A model for radiation induced cancer including fractionation effects which is valid for doses in the radiotherapy range was integrated into a treatment planning system. From the three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution the 3D-risk equivalent dose (RED) was calculated on an organ specific basis. In addition to RED further risk coefficients like OED (organ equivalent dose), EAR (excess absolute risk) and LAR (lifetime attributable risk) are computed. A risk model for radiation induced cancer was successfully integrated in a treatment planning system. Several risk coefficients can be viewed and used to obtain critical situations were a plan can be optimised. Risk-volume-histograms and organ specific risks were calculated for different treatment plans and were used in combination with NTCP estimates for plan evaluation. It is concluded that the integration of second cancer risk estimates in a commercial treatment planning system is feasible. It can be used in addition to NTCP modelling for optimising treatment plans which result in the lowest possible second cancer risk for a patient.

  1. Guidelines for the treatment of lung cancer using radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Michael J.; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo; Gadia, Rafael; Motta, Rodrigo [Sociedade Brasileira de Radioterapia (SBR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this guideline is to evaluate the most appropriate radiotherapy technique to treat patients with lung cancer. Description of evidence collection method Through the elaboration of four relevant clinical questions related to the proposed theme, we sought to present the main evidences regarding safety, toxicity and effectiveness of the presented radiotherapy techniques. The study population consisted of male and female patients of all ages with lung cancer, regardless of histological type, staging or presence of comorbidities. For this, a systematic review of the literature was carried out in primary scientific databases (Medline – PubMed; Embase – Elsevier; Lilacs – Bireme; Cochrane Library – Record of Controlled Trials). All articles available through April 31, 2015 were considered. The search terms used in the research were: ((lung cancer) OR (lung carcinoma)) and (IMRT OR intensity modulation OR intensity modulated) and (conventional OR 2D OR two dimensional OR bidimensional OR standard OR conformal OR 3D OR tridimensional OR CRT OR three dimensional). The articles were selected based on critical evaluation using the instruments (scores) proposed by Jadad and Oxford. The references with greater degree of evidence were used. The recommendations were elaborated from discussions held with a drafting group composed of four members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group, which specializes in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was released for public consultation for 15 days, and the suggestions obtained were forwarded to the authors for evaluation and possible insertion in the final text. (author)

  2. Radiotherapy professionals faced with the obligation of treatments safety improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of a major accident in Epinal (2006), followed by one in Toulouse (2007), led the Ministry of Health to mobilize the whole actors in radiotherapy in order to define national measures intended to improve health care security. Compiled in the so-called 'road map', these measures were presented in November 2007, and implemented in the 2009-2013 cancer programme. The French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) undertook a study aiming at assessing the effects of the above-mentioned measures on organization and safety management of radiotherapy facilities, but also on treatment achievement procedures and health professionals. More specifically, IRSN sought to examine the ability of health professionals to take into account new safety demands and to adapt their practices accordingly. With these purposes objectives, a qualitative study using the methods of ergonomics and sociology of organizations was completed in 2009-2010. The results of the study presented in this report show an effective improvement of health care safety along with a variable integration of safety measures depending on radiotherapy facilities and units. In particular, integration depends on 1) the governance mode of the health care facility, more or less conducive to promoting safety, 2) the pre-existence of a safety culture and safety organization, and 3) the facility commitment to health care safety improvement actions. The study also reveals that the implementation of new safety demands and the changes they involve create new constraints, which put pressure on health professionals and may threaten the durability of the improvements made. In order to facilitate the appropriation and implementation by radiotherapy units of the measures meant to improve health care safety, IRSN identifies 6 lines of thought: - strengthen coordination between institutional actors in order to ensure the consistency of the requests addressed to the facilities and limit their

  3. Three-dimensional pre-treatment verification for intensity modulated radiotherapy using the 3DVH™ software; Verificacao tridimensional pre-tratamento de radioterapia de intensidade modulada utilizando o software 3DVH™

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Lais P.; Silveira, Thiago B.; Garcia, Paulo L.; Trindade, Cassia; Santos, Maira R.; Batista, Delano V.S., E-mail: pm.lais@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    The IMRT quality assurance is normally analyzed punctual or bi-dimensionally. One difficult of this procedure is to evaluate the clinical impact of the QA result on treatment. The 3DVHTM software gives a 3D measured dose distribution, providing DVH analysis for organs at risk and target volumes. The aim of this work is to validate and implement the software 3DVH™ for IMRT treatments and to verify advantages over the QA 2D. The software uses two groups of data to generate the dose distribution: one from the treatment planning system and another from the irradiation for traditional QA 2D, measured with MapCHECK (Sun Nuclear) (MC). To validate the software, a small volume ionization chamber was used to check if both calculated 3DVHTM dose and measured dose by the chamber were equivalent. For QA analysis, ten IMRT cases planned in Eclipse 8.6 (Varian) and treated in Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA) were selected. For all cases, verification plans were created and irradiated in MC, and the analysis were made using the gamma index. Among the cases, five DVH comparisons between planned and measured data presented a deviation lower than 4% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the PTV and GTV's coverage. Other cases showed differences larger than 4%, presented in areas where the movements of the MLC leaves were more complex, mostly in the neighborhood of organs at risk. The 3DVH™ software provides several clinical advantages to IMRT QA, generating refined analysis of the cases evaluated, in comparison to conventional QA 2D. (author)

  4. Process evaluation of treatment times in a large radiotherapy department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, R.; Burgess, K.; Stratford, J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/objective: The Department of Health (DH) recognises access to appropriate and timely radiotherapy (RT) services as crucial in improving cancer patient outcomes, especially when facing a predicted increase in cancer diagnosis. There is a lack of ‘real-time’ data regarding daily demand of a linear accelerator, the impact of increasingly complex techniques on treatment times, and whether current scheduling reflects time needed for RT delivery, which would be valuable in highlighting current RT provision. Material/methods: A systematic quantitative process evaluation was undertaken in a large regional cancer centre, including a satellite centre, between January and April 2014. Data collected included treatment room-occupancy time, RT site, RT and verification technique and patient mobility status. Data was analysed descriptively; average room-occupancy times were calculated for RT techniques and compared to historical standardised treatment times within the department. Results: Room-occupancy was recorded for over 1300 fractions, over 50% of which overran their allotted treatment time. In a focused sample of 16 common techniques, 10 overran their allocated timeslots. Verification increased room-occupancy by six minutes (50%) over non-imaging. Treatments for patients requiring mobility assistance took four minutes (29%) longer. Conclusion: The majority of treatments overran their standardised timeslots. Although technique advancement has reduced RT delivery time, room-occupancy has not necessarily decreased. Verification increases room-occupancy and needs to be considered when moving towards adaptive techniques. Mobility affects room-occupancy and will become increasingly significant in an ageing population. This evaluation assesses validity of current treatment times in this department, and can be modified and repeated as necessary. - Highlights: • A process evaluation examined room-occupancy for various radiotherapy techniques. • Appointment lengths

  5. Treatment of Sarcoma Lung Metastases with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D. Lindsay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common site of sarcoma metastasis is the lung. Surgical resection of pulmonary metastases and chemotherapy are treatment options that have been employed, but many patients are poor candidates for these treatments for multiple host or tumor-related reasons. In this group of patients, radiation might provide a less morbid treatment alternative. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in the treatment of metastatic sarcoma to the lung. Methods. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT was used to treat 117 pulmonary metastases in 44 patients. Patients were followed with serial computed tomography imaging of the chest. The primary endpoint was failure of control of a pulmonary lesion as measured by continued growth. Radiation-associated complications were recorded. Results. The majority of patients (84% received a total dose of 50 Gy per metastatic nodule utilizing an image-guided SBRT technique. The median interval follow-up was 14.2 months (range 1.6–98.6 months. Overall survival was 82% at two years and 50% at five years. Of 117 metastatic nodules treated, six nodules showed failure of treatment (95% control rate. Twenty patients (27% developed new metastatic lesions and underwent further SBRT. The side effects of SBRT included transient radiation pneumonitis n=6, cough n=2, rib fracture n=1, chronic pain n=1, dermatitis n=1, and dyspnea n=1. Conclusion. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an effective and safe treatment for the ablation of pulmonary metastasis from sarcoma. Further work is needed to evaluate the optimal role of SBRT relative to surgery or chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic sarcoma.

  6. Electron Density Calibration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Martinez, F.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Celis-Lopez, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, A.

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images are used as basic input data for most modern radiosurgery treatment planning systems (TPS). CT data not only provide anatomic information to delineate target volumes, but also allow the introduction of corrections for tissue inhomogeneities into dose calculations during the treatment planning procedure. These corrections involve the determination of a relationship between tissue electron density (ρe) and their corresponding Hounsfield Units (HU). In this work, an elemental analysis of different commercial tissue equivalent materials using Scanning Electron Microscopy was carried out to characterize their chemical composition. The tissue equivalent materials were chosen to ensure a large range of ρe to be included in the CT scanner calibration. A phantom was designed and constructed with these materials to simulate the size of a human head

  7. Treatment of intractable cancer by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1981-07-01

    Intraoperative irradiation, thermotherapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and neutron brachytherapy were used for locally advanced cancer and value and limitations of these therapies were discussed. Intraoperative irradiation was mainly used for cancers of the gastro-intestinal tract. In stage I gastric cancers, no difference in the five-year survival rates was found between the groups with and without intraoperative irradiation. In gastric cancers of stage II or more, intraoperative irradiation had a favourable effect. Thermotherapy was applied to superficial radio-resistant cancer by the use of a thermal system of microwave- and radio-frequency heating. This treatment induced disappearance of approximately 50% of tumor. For the treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizer, studies of phase I and II with Misonidazole were conducted; from these results, the protocol was made for phase III study of esophagus cancer, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, uterus cancer, and brain cancer. Brachytherapy using /sup 252/Cf was also developed for locally advanced cancer.

  8. Effects of radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochtrop, Thomas Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Palliative irradiation of osteolytic lesions is a considerable component in the treatment for patients with multiple myeloma. In this study, we analyzed the efficacy of irradiation in these patients. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 153 patients with multiple myeloma who were admitted to our department between 1989 and 2013. According to the staging system of Durie and Salmon 116 patients were classified as stage III. 107/153 patients were treated with radiotherapy of at least one and up to 6 bony lesions at different times. In order to evaluate the effect of local radiotherapy on pain relief and bone recalcification a uni- and multivariate analysis was performed using a binary logistic regression model to correct for multiple measurements. Complete information on dose, fractionation and volume of radiotherapy was available from 81 patients treated in 136 target volumes for pain relief, and from 69 patients treated in 108 target volumes for recalcification. Total radiation doses varied between 8 Gy to 50 Gy (median dose 25 Gy in 2.5 Gy fractions, 5 times a week). Results: Radiotherapy resulted in complete local pain relief in 31% and partial local pain relief in 54% of the patients. In the univariate analysis, higher total radiation doses (p = 0.023) and higher age (p = 0.014) at the time of radiotherapy were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of pain relief, whereas no significant association was detected for concurrent systemic treatment, type and stage of myeloma and location of bone lesions. The same variables were independent predictors for pain relief in the multivariate analysis. Recalcification was observed in 48% of irradiated bone lesions. In the uni- and multivariate analysis higher radiation doses were significantly associated (p = 0.048) with an increased likelihood of recalcification. Side effects of radiotherapy were generally mild. Conclusions: Higher total biological radiation doses were associated with better pain

  9. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna, E-mail: anapaulafortuna@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CAISM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Atencao Integrada a Saude da Mulher. Divisao de Radioterapia; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Divisao de Radioterapia

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm{sup 3} had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm{sup 3}. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm{sup 3} should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. Keywords: Rectal volume; Prostate cancer; Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Delayed complications of radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, A.D.; Ahuja, A.T.; Yeung, D.K.; Wong, J.K.T.; Lee, Y.Y.P.; Lam, W.W.M.; Ho, S.S.M.; Yu, S.C.H.; Leung, S.-F.

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy is used to treat a wide variety of head and neck tumours that arise in and around the skull base. The delayed effects of radiation damages a range of structures, including the nervous system, bone, major vessels, mucus membranes, pituitary and salivary glands, as well as increasing the risk of radiation-induced neoplasms. In this review the complications resulting from radiation treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a cancer treated with a high dose of radiation to a fairly large region, are illustrated. Many patients with NPC have a long-term survival, so are at risk of developing delayed radiation effects, and hence may demonstrate a wide range of complications on imaging. Other tumours around the skull base treated with radiotherapy include meningiomas, chordomas, chondrosarcomas, pituitary adenomas, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity tumours. In these cases similar complications may be encountered on imaging, although the severity, incidence and location will vary

  11. Dosimetric Comparison of Three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Radiotherapy and Helical Tomotherapy Partial Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Woong; Kim, Jong Won; Choi, Yun Kyeong; Kim, Jung Soo; Hwang, Jae Woong; Jeong, Kyeong Sik; Choi, Gye Suk

    2008-01-01

    The goal of radiation treatment is to deliver a prescribed radiation dose to the target volume accurately while minimizing dose to normal tissues. In this paper, we comparing the dose distribution between three dimensional conformal radiation radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and helical tomotherapy (TOMO) plan for partial breast cancer. Twenty patients were included in the study, and plans for two techniques were developed for each patient (left breast:10 patients, right breast:10 patients). For each patient 3D-CRT planning was using pinnacle planning system, inverse plan was made using Tomotherapy Hi-Art system and using the same targets and optimization goals. We comparing the Homogeneity index (HI), Conformity index (CI) and sparing of the organs at risk for dose-volume histogram. Whereas the HI, CI of TOMO was significantly better than the other, 3D-CRT was observed to have significantly poorer HI, CI. The percentage ipsilateral non-PTV breast volume that was delivered 50% of the prescribed dose was 3D-CRT (mean: 40.4%), TOMO (mean: 18.3%). The average ipsilateral lung volume percentage receiving 20% of the PD was 3D-CRT (mean: 4.8%), TOMO (mean: 14.2), concerning the average heart volume receiving 20% and 10% of the PD during treatment of left breast cancer 3D-CRT (mean: 1.6%, 3.0%), TOMO (mean: 9.7%, 26.3%) In summary, 3D-CRT and TOMO techniques were found to have acceptable PTV coverage in our study. However, in TOMO, high conformity to the PTV and effective breast tissue sparing was achieved at the expense of considerable dose exposure to the lung and heart.

  12. Transabdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography and electronic portal imaging for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Orecchia, R.; Cattani, F.; Garibaldi, C.; Cambria, R.; Valenti, M.; Ciocca, M.; Zerini, D.; Boboc, G.I.; Vavassori, A.; Ivaldi, G.B.; Kowalczyk, A.; Matei, D.V.; Cobelli, O. de

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of daily B-mode acquisition and targeting ultrasound-based prostate localization (BAT trademark) and to compare it with computed tomography (CT) and electronic portal imaging (EPI) in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten patients were treated with 3-D CRT (72 Gy/30 fractions, 2.4 Gy/fraction, equivalent to 80 Gy/40 fractions, for α/β ratio of 1.5 Gy) and daily BAT-based prostate localization. For the first 5 fractions, CT and EPI were also performed in order to compare organ-motion and set-up error, respectively. Results: 287 BAT-, 50 CT- and 46 EPI-alignments were performed. The average BAT-determined misalignments in latero-lateral, antero-posterior and cranio-caudal directions were -0.9 mm ± 3.3 mm, 1.0 mm ± 4.0 mm and -0.9 mm ± 3.8 mm, respectively. The differences between BAT- and CT-determined organ-motion in latero-lateral, antero-posterior and cranio-caudal directions were 2.7 mm ± 1.9 mm, 3.9 ± 2.8 mm and 3.4 ± 3.0 mm, respectively. Weak correlation was found between BAT- and CT-determined misalignments in antero-posterior direction, while no correlation was observed in latero-lateral and cranio-caudal directions. The correlation was more significant when only data of good image-quality patients were analyzed (8 patients). Conclusion: BAT ensures the relative positions of target are the same during treatment and in treatment plan, however, the reliability of alignment is patient-dependent. The average BAT-determined misalignments were small, confirming the prevalence of random errors in 3-D CRT. Further study is warranted in order to establish the clinical value of BAT. (orig.)

  13. [Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mose, S; Pfitzner, D; Rahn, A; Nierhoff, C; Schiemann, M; Böttcher, H D

    2000-11-01

    Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice in multiple myeloma; but there are no curative options. Therefore, the treatment rationale is characterized by reduction of symptoms and inhibition of complications. Regarding reduction of pain, treatment of (impending) fractures, and spinal cord compression radiation is an important part of palliative treatment. In our retrospective study we report the effect of radiotherapy on reduction of pain, recalcification and the reduction of neurological symptoms and evaluate factors which have an impact on therapeutic outcome. From 1, Jan 1988 to 31, Dec 1998, 42 patients (19 women, 23 men; range of ages 46 to 85 years, median age 64.9 years) with 71 target volumes were irradiated (median dose 36 Gy, 2 to 3 Gy 5 times/week) because of symptomatic disease (67/71: osseous pain, 45/71: fractures/impending fractures, 13/71: spinal cord compression) (Tables 1 and 2). The median time from diagnosis to the first course of radiotherapy was 11.9 months (0.3 to 90 months). At the time of first irradiation, 5 and 37 patients were in tumor Stage II and III (Salmon/Durie), respectively. The median value of the Karnofsky performance was 70% (40 to 90%). During follow-up (at least 6 months) in 85% of target volumes complete and partial pain relief (measured by patients' perception and the use of analgetic medication) was achieved; recurrences were seen in 8.8%. In 26/56 (46.4%) lesions evaluable a recalcification was seen whereas 17.9% showed progressive disease (comparison of radiographs before and after radiation). In 22.3% of all lesions initially with impending fracture (4/18) radiotherapy failed because of fracture after treatment (Tables 3 and 4). Simultaneous chemotherapy and a Karnofsky performance > or = 70 had a significant impact on a positive response to treatment, respectively. Spinal cord compression symptoms were reduced in 7/13 (53.8%) of patients (scaled due to the classification by Findlay 1987). The median survival from

  14. Place of radiotherapy in the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Maalouf, Toufic; George, Jean-Luc; Bey, Pierre; Leclere, Jacques; Luporsi, Elisabeth

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the response of Graves' orbitopathy to irradiation, and to specify the prognostic factors allowing one to better define the indications of orbital radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1977 to 1996, 199 patients received bilateral orbital irradiation delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions and 2 weeks for a progressive Graves' orbitopathy. 195 patients were seen between 1 and 6 months after radiotherapy. The different symptoms were studied and their response to radiation was analyzed. Factors such as age, sex, evolution of thyroid disease, history of symptoms, and previous or combined treatments were analyzed. Results: The results revealed that 50 patients (26%) had a good or excellent response, 98 (50%) had a partial response, 37 (19%) were stable, 10 (5%) had a progression of disease. The signs that best responded to radiotherapy were the infiltration of soft tissues and the corneal involvement. Responses of proptosis or oculomotor disorders were more complete when these signs were not advanced at the time of treatment. Irradiation seemed to have the same efficacy when applied as first-line treatment or after failure of corticosteroids. Neither modality of treatment of hyperthyroidism nor thyroid status at the time of orbital irradiation modified the results. The best results were recorded for early or moderately advanced presentation (p = 0.05). Patients treated within a delay of 7 months after the beginning of the ophthalmopathy had better responses than patients treated later (p = 0.10). Conclusion: Radiation therapy was successful in Graves' orbitopathy by stopping the progression of disease in almost all cases, by improving the comfort of patients, by obtaining objective responses, and by avoiding surgical treatments particularly when signs were moderate

  15. Treatment results of radical radiotherapy in uterine cervix cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Bo Kyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Shin, Seong Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kang, Min Kyu; Ahn, Yong Chan [Samsung Medical center, sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the treatment results, prognostic factors, and complication rates after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with uterine cervix cancer who were treated with curative aim. Of 269 cervix cancer patients treated at the department of radiation oncology, Samsung Medical Center from September 1994 to July 1998, the 106 who were treated with radical radiotherapy were analyzed. The median age was 61 years (range 22 to 89). All patients except 4 with carcinoma in situ (CIS) were given external beam radiotherapy (range 30.6 {approx} 50.4 Gy to whole pelvis) and HDR brachytherapy. The common regimens of HDR brachytherapy were a total dose of 24 {approx} 28 Gy with 6 {approx} 7 fractions to point A at two fractions per week. The median overall treatment time was 55 days (range 44 to 104) in patients given both external beam radiotherapy and HDR brachytherapy. Early response of radiotherapy were evaluated by gynecologic examination and follow-up MRI 1 month after radiotherapy. Treatment responses were complete remission in 72 patients, partial response in 33 and no response in 1. The overall survival (OS) rate of all patients was 82%, and 73%, and the disease free survival (DFS) rate was 72%, and 69%, at 3, and 5 years, respectively. The pelvic control rate (PCR) was 79% at both 3 and 5 years. According to the FIGO stage, 3 and 5 year OS were 100% and 50% in CIS/IA, 100% in 100% in IB, 83% and 69% in IIA, 87% and 80% in IIB, and 62% and 62% in III, respectively. The 3 year OS in 4 patients with stage IVA was 100%. Three-year DFS were 80% in CIS/IA, 88% in IB, 100% in IIA, 64% in IIB, 58% in III, and 75% in IVA. Three-year PCR were 100% in CIS/IA, 94% in IB, 100% in IIA, 84% in IIB, 69% in III, and 50% in IVA. By univariate analysis, FIGO stage and treatment response were significant factors for OS. The significant factors for DFS were age, FIGO stage, treatment response and overall treatment time (OTT). For pelvic control rate

  16. Optimization of rotational radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulovsky, Vladimir; Ringor, Michael; Papiez, Lech

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Rotational therapy treatment planning for rotationally symmetric geometry of tumor and healthy tissue provides an important example of testing various approaches to optimizing dose distributions for therapeutic x-ray irradiations. In this article, dose distribution optimization is formulated as a variational problem. This problem is solved analytically and numerically. Methods and Materials: The classical Lagrange method is used to derive equations and inequalities that give necessary conditions for minimizing the mean-square deviation between the ideal dose distribution and the achievable dose distribution. The solution of the resulting integral equation with Cauchy kernel is used to derive analytical formulas for the minimizing irradiation intensity function. Results: The solutions are evaluated numerically and the graphs of the minimizing intensity functions and the corresponding dose distributions are presented. Conclusions: The optimal solutions obtained using the mean-square criterion lead to significant underdosage in some areas of the tumor volume. Possible solutions to this shortcoming are investigated and medically more appropriate criteria for optimization are proposed for future investigations

  17. Speed and amplitude of lung tumor motion precisely detected in four-dimensional setup and in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Fujita, Katsuhisa R.T.; Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Kato, Norio; Osaka, Yasuhiro; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Onodera, Shunsuke; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Background: To reduce the uncertainty of registration for lung tumors, we have developed a four-dimensional (4D) setup system using a real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Methods and Materials: During treatment planning and daily setup in the treatment room, the trajectory of the internal fiducial marker was recorded for 1 to 2 min at the rate of 30 times per second by the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. To maximize gating efficiency, the patient's position on the treatment couch was adjusted using the 4D setup system with fine on-line remote control of the treatment couch. Results: The trajectory of the marker detected in the 4D setup system was well visualized and used for daily setup. Various degrees of interfractional and intrafractional changes in the absolute amplitude and speed of the internal marker were detected. Readjustments were necessary during each treatment session, prompted by baseline shifting of the tumor position. Conclusion: The 4D setup system was shown to be useful for reducing the uncertainty of tumor motion and for increasing the efficiency of gated irradiation. Considering the interfractional and intrafractional changes in speed and amplitude detected in this study, intercepting radiotherapy is the safe and cost-effective method for 4D radiotherapy using real-time tracking technology

  18. Dosimetry audit simulation of treatment planning system in multicenters radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmuri, S.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Treatment Planning System (TPS) is an important modality that determines radiotherapy outcome. TPS requires input data obtained through commissioning and the potentially error occurred. Error in this stage may result in the systematic error. The aim of this study to verify the TPS dosimetry to know deviation range between calculated and measurement dose. This study used CIRS phantom 002LFC representing the human thorax and simulated all external beam radiotherapy stages. The phantom was scanned using CT Scanner and planned 8 test cases that were similar to those in clinical practice situation were made, tested in four radiotherapy centers. Dose measurement using 0.6 cc ionization chamber. The results of this study showed that generally, deviation of all test cases in four centers was within agreement criteria with average deviation about -0.17±1.59 %, -1.64±1.92 %, 0.34±1.34 % and 0.13±1.81 %. The conclusion of this study was all TPS involved in this study showed good performance. The superposition algorithm showed rather poor performance than either analytic anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and convolution algorithm with average deviation about -1.64±1.92 %, -0.17±1.59 % and -0.27±1.51 % respectively.

  19. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mose, S.; Pfitzner, D.; Rahn, A.; Nierhoff, C.; Schiemann, M.; Boettcher, H.D.

    2000-01-01

    Regarding reduction of pain, treatment of (impending) fractures, and spinal cord compression radiation is an important part of palliative treatment. In our retrospective study we report the effort of radiotherapy on reduction of pain, recalcification and the reduction of neurological symptoms and evaluate factors which have an impact on therapeutic outcome. Patients and Methods: From 1. Jan 1988 to 31. Dec 1998, 42 patients (19 women, 23 men; range of ages 46 to 85 years, median age 64.9 years) with 71 target volumes were irradiated (median dose 36 Gy, 2 to 3 Gy 5 times/week) because of symptomatic disease (67/71: Osseous pain, 45/71: Fraktures/impending fractures, 13/71: Spinal cord compression). The median time from diagnosis to the first course of radiotherapy was 11.9 months (0.3 to 90 months). At the time of first irradiation, 5 and 37 patients were in tumor Stage II and III (Salmon/Durie), respectively. The median value of the Karnofsky performance was 70% (40 to 90%). Results: During follow-up (at least 6 months) in 85% of target volumes complete and partial pain relief was achieved; recurrences were seen in 8.8%. In 26/56 (46.4%) lesions evaluable a recalcification was seen whereas 17.9% showed progressive disease (comparison of radiographs before and after radiation). In 22.3% of all lesions initially with impending fracture (4/18) radiotherapy failed because of fracture after treatment. Simultaneous chemotherapy and a Karnofsky performance ≥70 had a significant impact on a positive response to treatment, respectively. Spinal cord compression symptoms were reduced in 7/13 (53.8%) of patients (scaled due to the classification by Findlay 1987). The median survival from diagnosis for the entire group was 34.9 months (7.5 to 119.3 months), after irradiation 13.1 months (0.2 to 105.3 months). Conclusion: When adequately indicated radiotherapy was shown to be an effective palliative treatment. Taking under consideration that the results are retrospective we

  20. A Retrospective Comparison of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for the Reirradiation of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yazici, Gozde; Yildiz, Ferah; Gurkaynak, Murat; Zorlu, Faruk; Yildiz, Demet; Hosal, Sefik; Gullu, Ibrahim; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed therapeutic outcomes of reirradiation with robotic stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LRNPC) patients and compared those results with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with or without brachytherapy (BRT). Methods and Materials: Treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively in 51 LRNPC patients receiving either robotic SBRT (24 patients) or CRT with or without BRT (27 patients) in our department. CRT was delivered with a 6-MV linear accelerator, and a median total reirradiation dose of 57 Gy in 2 Gy/day was given. Robotic SBRT was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Patients in the SBRT arm received 30 Gy over 5 consecutive days. We calculated actuarial local control and cancer-specific survival rates for the comparison of treatment outcomes in SBRT and CRT arms. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 was used for toxicity evaluation. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months for all patients. Two-year actuarial local control rates were 82% and 80% for SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.6). Two-year cancer-specific survival rates were 64% and 47% for the SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.4). Serious late toxicities (Grade 3 and above) were observed in 21% of patients in the SBRT arm, whereas 48% of patients had serious toxicity in the CRT arm (p = 0.04). Fatal complications occurred in three patients (12.5%) of the SBRT arm, and four patients (14.8%) of the CRT arm (p = 0.8). T stage at recurrence was the only independent predictor for local control and survival. Conclusion: Our robotic SBRT protocol seems to be feasible and less toxic in terms of late effects compared with CRT arm for the reirradiation of LRNPC patients.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for high-grade gliomas: Does IMRT increase the integral dose to normal brain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanto, Ulrich; Frija, Erik K.; Lii, MingFwu J.; Chang, Eric L.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment increases the total integral dose of nontarget tissue relative to the conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) technique for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with 3D-CRT for glioblastoma multiforme were selected for a comparative dosimetric evaluation with IMRT. Original target volumes, organs at risk (OAR), and dose-volume constraints were used for replanning with IMRT. Predicted isodose distributions, cumulative dose-volume histograms of target volumes and OAR, normal tissue integral dose, target coverage, dose conformity, and normal tissue sparing with 3D-CRT and IMRT planning were compared. Statistical analyses were performed to determine differences. Results: In all 20 patients, IMRT maintained equivalent target coverage, improved target conformity (conformity index [CI] 95% 1.52 vs. 1.38, p mean by 19.8% and D max by 10.7%), optic chiasm (D mean by 25.3% and D max by 22.6%), right optic nerve (D mean by 37.3% and D max by 28.5%), and left optic nerve (D mean by 40.6% and D max by 36.7%), p ≤ 0.01. This was achieved without increasing the total nontarget integral dose by greater than 0.5%. Overall, total integral dose was reduced by 7-10% with IMRT, p < 0.001, without significantly increasing the 0.5-5 Gy low-dose volume. Conclusions: These results indicate that IMRT treatment for high-grade gliomas allows for improved target conformity, better critical tissue sparing, and importantly does so without increasing integral dose and the volume of normal tissue exposed to low doses of radiation

  2. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M.

    1992-01-01

    In the past decade the prognosis of patients with locally advanced lung cancer has not been altered significantly. In both small and non-small cell lung cancer cure rates are poor and 5-year survival rate still has not exceeded the 5% borderline. Despite of initially high response rates, a vast majority of patients suffered from tumor progression within 2 years after the start of treatment. Sites of tumor progression are either the primary tumor or the occurrence of distant metastases. Therefore, improvements of both local and systemic tumor control are necessary to increase long-term survival rate in lung cancer. Combined chemo- and radiotherapy may be an appropriate treatment approach to reach these aims. In patients with locally advanced lung cancer combined chemo-radiotherapy aims at overcoming radio- and chemo-therapy resistance as a cause of local treatment failure and at early eradication of distant micrometastases as a cause of systemic treatment failure. (author). 29 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Acute and Late Toxicity in a Randomized Trial of Conventional Versus Hypofractionated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Fowler, Jack; Gomellini, Sara; Arcangeli, Stefano; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Benassi, Marcello; Strigari, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity between hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation schedules in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated (62 Gy in 20 fractions within 5 weeks, 4 fractions/wk) or conventionally fractionated (80 Gy in 40 fractions within 8 weeks) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients had undergone a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation, with radiotherapy starting 2 months after initiation of the total androgen deprivation. Results: The median follow-up was 32 and 35 months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. For the patients developing acute toxicity, no difference between the two fractionation groups was found in either severity or duration of gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Also, no difference was found in the incidence and severity of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity between the two treatment schedules, with a 3-year rate of Grade 2 or greater toxicity of 17% and 16% for the hypofractionation arm and 14% and 11% for the conventional fractionation arm, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity was found only in the conventional fractionation group. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the hypofractionation regimen used in our study is safe, with only a slight, nonsignificant increase in tolerable and temporary acute toxicity compared with the conventional fractionation schedule. The severity and frequency of late complications was equivalent between the two treatment groups.

  4. Compensability index for compensation radiotherapy after treatment interruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putora, Paul Martin; Schmuecking, Michael; Aebersold, Daniel; Plasswilm, Ludwig

    2012-01-01

    The goal of our work was to develop a simple method to evaluate a compensation treatment after unplanned treatment interruptions with respect to their tumour- and normal tissue effect. We developed a software tool in java programming language based on existing recommendations to compensate for treatment interruptions. In order to express and visualize the deviations from the originally planned tumour and normal tissue effects we defined the compensability index. The compensability index represents an evaluation of the suitability of compensatory radiotherapy in a single number based on the number of days used for compensation and the preference of preserving the originally planned tumour effect or not exceeding the originally planned normal tissue effect. An automated tool provides a method for quick evaluation of compensation treatments. The compensability index calculation may serve as a decision support system based on existing and established recommendations

  5. Compensability index for compensation radiotherapy after treatment interruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putora Paul

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of our work was to develop a simple method to evaluate a compensation treatment after unplanned treatment interruptions with respect to their tumour- and normal tissue effect. Methods We developed a software tool in java programming language based on existing recommendations to compensate for treatment interruptions. In order to express and visualize the deviations from the originally planned tumour and normal tissue effects we defined the compensability index. Results The compensability index represents an evaluation of the suitability of compensatory radiotherapy in a single number based on the number of days used for compensation and the preference of preserving the originally planned tumour effect or not exceeding the originally planned normal tissue effect. An automated tool provides a method for quick evaluation of compensation treatments. Conclusions The compensability index calculation may serve as a decision support system based on existing and established recommendations.

  6. Urethral carcinoma in women: results of treatment with primary radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.F.; Wards, P.R.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; McLean, M.; Catton, P.A.; Catton, C.N.; Banerjee, D.

    2000-01-01

    Urethral carcinoma in women is uncommon. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of these tumors. The hospital records of 34 women with primary urethral carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. There were 15 squamous cell carcinomas, 13 transitional cell carcinomas, and six adenocarcinomas. The primary tumor was >4 cm in size in eight patients, involved the proximal urethra in 19 and extended to adjacent organs in 22. Inguinal or iliac lymphadenopathy was present in nine patients. There were eight TNM stage I/II tumors, 11 stage III tumors and 15 stage IV tumors. Radiotherapy was administered only to the primary tumor in 15 patients, and to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes in the remaining 19 patients. Brachytherapy with or without external radiation was used to treat the primary tumor in 20 patients. Tumor recurred in 21 patients. The 7-year actuarial overall and cause-specific survivals were 41 and 45%, respectively. Large primary tumor bulk and treatment with external beam radiation alone (no brachytherapy) were independent adverse prognostic factors for local tumor recurrence. Brachytherapy reduced the risk of local recurrence by a factor of 4.2. The beneficial effect of brachytherapy was most prominently seen in patients with bulky primary disease. Large tumor size was the only independent adverse predictor of overall disease recurrence and death from cancer. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for carcinoma of the female urethra and preserves normal anatomy and function. Brachytherapy improves local tumor control, possibly as a result of the higher radiation dose that can safely be delivered. (author)

  7. Radiotherapy of the neuroaxis for palliative treatment of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, B.; Hueltenschmidt, B.; Sautter-Bihl, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurs in about 5% of solid tumors and may seriously compromise quality of life. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of craniospinal irradiation with and without intrathecal chemotherapy and its efficacy with regard to symptom palliation and survival. Patients and Methods: 16 patients (mean age 46 years; nine breast cancers, five lung cancers, one renal cell cancer, one tumor of unknown primary site) with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurring after a median interval from primary tumor diagnosis of 5 months (0-300 months) received craniospinal irradiation between October 1995 and May 2000. The median total dose was 36 Gy (a 1.6-2.0 Gy). Ten patients were additionally treated with intrathecal methotrexate (15 mg per cycle, 2-8 cycles). Results: Median survival was 12 weeks, 8 weeks after radiotherapy alone, 16 weeks after combined modality treatment. 14 patients died from disease. Eleven patients (68%) experienced regression of their neurological symptoms during or soon after completion of radiotherapy. Seven patients regained their ability to walk, six had pain reduction, three regression of bladder and bowel incontinence. In three patients symptom progression and in two patients no change occurred. Side effects were: Myelosuppression (CTC) Grade I: n=2, Grade II: n=4, Grade III: n=4 patients and Grade IV: n=1. Nine patients had dysphagia, seven mucositis, three suffered from nausea. No late toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Craniospinal radiotherapy is feasible and effective for palliative treatment of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. As far as the small patient number permits any definite conclusions, combined modality treatment seems superior to irradiation alone. (orig.) [de

  8. Integral Dose and Radiation-Induced Secondary Malignancies: Comparison between Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano G. Masciullo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED on the target (BED = 76Gy10. Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05. Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002, secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001. This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged.

  9. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  10. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  11. Evaluation of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment in patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannomiya, Eduardo Kazuo; Medici Filho, Edmundo; Moraes, Luiz Cesar de; Castilho, Julio Cezar de Melo; Furukawa, Souhei

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, 1042 cases where reviewed in School Dentistry - Osaka Univ. Seven hundred and fifteen were male and three hundred and twenty-seven were female. Ora cancer was affected more male than female patients, with mean age of 582 years old. The tongue was the most common anatomic localization of oral cancer. In tongue, the use of external radiotherapy y combined with brachytherapy and brachytherapy isolated presented better results than chemotherapy combined with external radiotherapy. In buccal mucosa, there was not differences in the treatment's results using external radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. In tongue's floor and upper and jaw gingiva the combined treatment with chemotherapy and external radiotherapy presented better results than isolated external radiotherapy. (author)

  12. A Monte Carlo dose calculation tool for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.S.; Pawlicki, T.; Jiang, S.B.; Deng, J.; Lee, M.C.; Koumrian, T.; Luxton, M.; Brain, S.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo user code, MCDOSE, has been developed for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) dose calculations. MCDOSE is designed as a dose calculation module suitable for adaptation to host RTP systems. MCDOSE can be used for both conventional photon/electron beam calculation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. MCDOSE uses a multiple-source model to reconstruct the treatment beam phase space. Based on Monte Carlo simulated or measured beam data acquired during commissioning, source-model parameters are adjusted through an automated procedure. Beam modifiers such as jaws, physical and dynamic wedges, compensators, blocks, electron cut-outs and bolus are simulated by MCDOSE together with a 3D rectilinear patient geometry model built from CT data. Dose distributions calculated using MCDOSE agreed well with those calculated by the EGS4/DOSXYZ code using different beam set-ups and beam modifiers. Heterogeneity correction factors for layered-lung or layered-bone phantoms as calculated by both codes were consistent with measured data to within 1%. The effect of energy cut-offs for particle transport was investigated. Variance reduction techniques were implemented in MCDOSE to achieve a speedup factor of 10-30 compared to DOSXYZ. (author)

  13. Hippocampal sparing radiotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma: impact of treatment margins and treatment technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N Patrik; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Blomstrand, Malin; Kiil-Berthlesen, Anne; Hollensen, Christian; Vogelius, Ivan R; Lannering, Birgitta; Bentzen, Søren M; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    We investigated how varying the treatment margin and applying hippocampal sparing and proton therapy impact the risk of neurocognitive impairment in pediatric medulloblastoma patients compared with current standard 3D conformal radiotherapy. We included 17 pediatric medulloblastoma patients to represent the variability in tumor location relative to the hippocampal region. Treatment plans were generated using 3D conformal radiotherapy, hippocampal sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and spot-scanned proton therapy, using 3 different treatment margins for the conformal tumor boost. Neurocognitive impairment risk was estimated based on dose-response models from pediatric CNS malignancy survivors and compared among different margins and treatment techniques. Mean hippocampal dose and corresponding risk of cognitive impairment were decreased with decreasing treatment margins (P < .05). The largest risk reduction, however, was seen when applying hippocampal sparing proton therapy-the estimated risk of impaired task efficiency (95% confidence interval) was 92% (66%-98%), 81% (51%-95%), and 50% (30%-70%) for 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and proton therapy, respectively, for the smallest boost margin and 98% (78%-100%), 90% (60%-98%), and 70% (39%-90%) if boosting the whole posterior fossa. Also, the distance between the closest point of the planning target volume and the center of the hippocampus can be used to predict mean hippocampal dose for a given treatment technique. We estimate a considerable clinical benefit of hippocampal sparing radiotherapy. In choosing treatment margins, the tradeoff between margin size and risk of neurocognitive impairment quantified here should be considered.

  14. Challenges of radiotherapy: report on the 4D treatment planning workshop 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopf, Antje; Nill, Simeon; Yohannes, Indra; Graeff, Christian; Dowdell, Stephen; Kurz, Christopher; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Biegun, Aleksandra K; Lang, Stephanie; McClelland, Jamie R.; Champion, Benjamin; Fast, Martin; Wölfelschneider, Jens; Gianoli, Chiara; Rucinski, Antoni; Baroni, Guido; Richter, Christian; van de Water, Steven; Grassberger, Clemens; Weber, Damien; Poulsen, Per; Shimizu, Shinichi; Bert, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This report, compiled by experts on the treatment of mobile targets with advanced radiotherapy, summarizes the main conclusions and innovations achieved during the 4D treatment planning workshop 2013. This annual workshop focuses on research aiming to advance 4D radiotherapy treatments, including

  15. Propensity Score-based Comparison of Long-term Outcomes With 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Steven H.; Wang Lu; Myles, Bevan; Thall, Peter F.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Although 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is the worldwide standard for the treatment of esophageal cancer, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose conformality and reduces the radiation exposure to normal tissues. We hypothesized that the dosimetric advantages of IMRT should translate to substantive benefits in clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: An analysis was performed of 676 nonrandomized patients (3D-CRT, n=413; IMRT, n=263) with stage Ib-IVa (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) esophageal cancers treated with chemoradiotherapy at a single institution from 1998-2008. An inverse probability of treatment weighting and inclusion of propensity score (treatment probability) as a covariate were used to compare overall survival time, interval to local failure, and interval to distant metastasis, while accounting for the effects of other clinically relevant covariates. The propensity scores were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results: A fitted multivariate inverse probability weighted-adjusted Cox model showed that the overall survival time was significantly associated with several well-known prognostic factors, along with the treatment modality (IMRT vs 3D-CRT, hazard ratio 0.72, P<.001). Compared with IMRT, 3D-CRT patients had a significantly greater risk of dying (72.6% vs 52.9%, inverse probability of treatment weighting, log-rank test, P<.0001) and of locoregional recurrence (P=.0038). No difference was seen in cancer-specific mortality (Gray's test, P=.86) or distant metastasis (P=.99) between the 2 groups. An increased cumulative incidence of cardiac death was seen in the 3D-CRT group (P=.049), but most deaths were undocumented (5-year estimate, 11.7% in 3D-CRT vs 5.4% in IMRT group, Gray's test, P=.0029). Conclusions: Overall survival, locoregional control, and noncancer-related death were significantly better after IMRT than after 3D-CRT. Although these results need

  16. Dosimetric aspects of breast radiotherapy with three-dimensional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy helical tomotherapy planning modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Yan, Yue, E-mail: yyan5@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ignatowski, Tasha [Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Olson, Anna [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the dosimetric differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans and the three-dimensional (3D) helical plans based on the TomoTherapy system. A total of 15 patients with supine setup were randomly selected from the data base. For patients with lumpectomy planning target volume (PTV), regional lymph nodes were also included as part of the target. For dose sparing, the significant differences between the helical IMRT and helical 3D were only found in the heart and contralateral breast. For the dose to the heart, helical IMRT reduced the maximum point dose by 6.98 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan (p = 0.01). For contralateral breast, the helical IMRT plans significantly reduced the maximum point dose by 5.6 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan. However, compared to the helical 3D plan, the helical IMRT plan increased the volume for lower dose (13.08% increase in V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, p = 0.01). In general, there are no significant differences in dose sparing between helical IMRT and helical 3D plans.

  17. Dosimetric aspects of breast radiotherapy with three-dimensional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy helical tomotherapy planning modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Yan, Yue; Ignatowski, Tasha; Olson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the dosimetric differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans and the three-dimensional (3D) helical plans based on the TomoTherapy system. A total of 15 patients with supine setup were randomly selected from the data base. For patients with lumpectomy planning target volume (PTV), regional lymph nodes were also included as part of the target. For dose sparing, the significant differences between the helical IMRT and helical 3D were only found in the heart and contralateral breast. For the dose to the heart, helical IMRT reduced the maximum point dose by 6.98 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan (p = 0.01). For contralateral breast, the helical IMRT plans significantly reduced the maximum point dose by 5.6 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan. However, compared to the helical 3D plan, the helical IMRT plan increased the volume for lower dose (13.08% increase in V 5 Gy , p = 0.01). In general, there are no significant differences in dose sparing between helical IMRT and helical 3D plans.

  18. Quality of Life and Survival Outcome for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-A Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, F.-M.; Chien, C.-Y.; Tsai, W.-L.; Chen, H.-C.; Hsu, H.-C.; Lui, C.-C.; Huang, T.-L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the changes of quality of life (QoL) and survival outcomes for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Two hundred and three newly diagnosed NPC patients, who were curatively treated by 3D-CRT (n = 93) or IMRT (n = 110) between March 2002 and July 2004, were analyzed. The distributions of clinical stage according to American Joint Committee on Cancer 1997 were I: 15 (7.4%), II: 78 (38.4%), III: 74 (36.5%), and IV: 36 (17.7%). QoL was longitudinally assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires at the five time points: before RT, during RT (36 Gy), and 3 months, 12 months, and 24 months after RT. Results: The 3-year locoregional control, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rates were 84.8%, 76.7%, and 81.7% for the 3D-CRT group, respectively, compared with 84.2%, 82.6%, and 85.4% for the IMRT group (p value > 0.05). A general trend of maximal deterioration in most QoL scales was observed during RT, followed by a gradual recovery thereafter. There was no significant difference in most scales between the two groups at each time point. The exception was that patients treated by IMRT had a both statistically and clinically significant improvement in global QoL, fatigue, taste/smell, dry mouth, and feeling ill at the time point of 3 months after RT. Conclusions: The potential advantage of IMRT over 3D-CRT in treating NPC patients might occur in QoL outcome during the recovery phase of acute toxicity

  19. Ventricular Ganglioneuroblastoma in an Adult and Successful Treatment with Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Akın

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ganglioneuroblastomas (GNBs are rare embryonic neoplasms in the spectrum of neuroblastic tumours and 80% of cases occur in the first decade. In adults, GNBs are usually located in the retroperitoneum, mediastinum and neck but intracranial GNBs are extremely rare. Case Report: A 34-year-old male applied to the Department of Neurology outpatient clinic with a two month history of headache and numbness in his legs. Detailed examinations and cranial CT were performed and showed a mass with a 5 cm diameter running from the third to the fourth ventricle. Referral to a neurosurgeon was performed for partial removal of the tumour, as the histological and immunohistochemical studies defined the diagnosis of GNB. Three months later, when the patient experienced dizziness, an MRI was performed, which showed a 4x3 cm ventricular mass, with hypointense characterisation in T1-weighted and hyperintense characteristics in T2-weighted and flair sequences. Afterwards, fractioned radiotherapy (54 Gy/30 fx was chosen as the appropriate therapy. In the follow-up period, MRI was performed 3 months and 1 year after treatment, and revealed shrinkage of the tumour by at least 50%. Meanwhile the patient’s post-irradiation course was favourable. Conclusion: Data following the use of radiotherapy as treatment for intracranial GNB showing favourable results has been reported.

  20. Adaptive treatment-length optimization in spatiobiologically integrated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdari, Ali; Ghate, Archis; Kim, Minsun

    2018-04-01

    Recent theoretical research on spatiobiologically integrated radiotherapy has focused on optimization models that adapt fluence-maps to the evolution of tumor state, for example, cell densities, as observed in quantitative functional images acquired over the treatment course. We propose an optimization model that adapts the length of the treatment course as well as the fluence-maps to such imaged tumor state. Specifically, after observing the tumor cell densities at the beginning of a session, the treatment planner solves a group of convex optimization problems to determine an optimal number of remaining treatment sessions, and a corresponding optimal fluence-map for each of these sessions. The objective is to minimize the total number of tumor cells remaining (TNTCR) at the end of this proposed treatment course, subject to upper limits on the biologically effective dose delivered to the organs-at-risk. This fluence-map is administered in future sessions until the next image is available, and then the number of sessions and the fluence-map are re-optimized based on the latest cell density information. We demonstrate via computer simulations on five head-and-neck test cases that such adaptive treatment-length and fluence-map planning reduces the TNTCR and increases the biological effect on the tumor while employing shorter treatment courses, as compared to only adapting fluence-maps and using a pre-determined treatment course length based on one-size-fits-all guidelines.

  1. Outcomes of Kimura's disease after radiotherapy or nonradiotherapeutic treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ah Ram; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Jun, Yoon Kyung

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of Kimura's disease and to identify the optimal treatment regimen for Kimura's disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 14 patients with Kimura's disease were treated with radiotherapy (RT) and 9 patients were treated with local excision or systemic steroids. The radiation doses ranged from 20 to 45 Gy. Immunohistochemical studies were performed in 13 cases. Results: At RT completion, a marked response in terms of tumor size was noted in most cases. The median follow-up was 65 months. Local control was obtained in 9 (64.3%) of the 14 in the RT group and in 2 (22.2%) of the 9 in the non-RT group. No secondary malignancies were observed in the RT group. Conclusion: These results supports the finding that RT is more effective against Kimura's disease. Simple or immunohistochemical features did not influence the treatment outcome

  2. Intraoperative radiotherapy in combined treatment of sinonasal malignant tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V. A.; Gribova, O. V.; Vasiljev, R. V.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Shtin, V. I.; Shiianova, A. A.; Surkova, P. V.; Starceva, Zh. A.; Shilova, O. G.

    2017-09-01

    Obvious advantage of IORT (intraoperative radiotherapy) is that the radiation source is delivered directly to the bed of the tumor during surgery, thus avoiding the negative impact on the skin, subcutaneous tissue and reducing the risk of fibrosis. Sinonasal tumors—a convenient object for intraoperative radiotherapy application (surface location, relatively small size tumors, good operational access). The surface location and comparatively small size of neoplasms, good operational access provide an efficient and accurate transfer of the electron beam to the postoperative cavity to increase the irradiation dose in the areas of the most probable recurrence, which makes the tumors of this localization a convenient object for the use of the intraoperative radiation therapy. The treatment was conducted using a mobile compact betatron (MIB-6E), 10-12 Gy single dose. IORT session extends surgery period by 30 min. There were no pathological clinical and laboratory reactions on IORT in the early postoperative period. Carrying out the procedure is possible in various standard operating rooms. It does not require special security measures for the patients and the staff. IORT with the help of electron beam allows avoiding post-radiation reactions and achieving a 5-year—disease-free survival of 66% of the patients. IORT session is possible through a minimal incision during organ preservation surgeries. Evident economic feasibility provides the prospects of applying IORT in the clinical practice.

  3. Treatment results of radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervical esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazunari; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kusumi, Fusako; Takakuwa, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Satoru; Murakami, Masao; Okamoto, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The methods and results of treatment for cancer of the cervical esophagus differ from those for cancer of the thoracic esophagus. Our objective was to retrospectively review the outcome for cervical esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Twenty-seven patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with definitive radiotherapy from 1988 to 2002 were enrolled in the study. Clinical stage (UICC 1997) was stage I in five, II in six, III in 12 and IV in four. Concurrent head and neck malignancy was found in six patients (22%). The mean radiation dose was 66 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil) was performed in 23 patients. The actuarial overall survival rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 55.6%, 37.9% and 37.9%, respectively, with a median survival of 13.9 months. In the patients with stage I, the 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 75% and 75%, respectively. With univariate analysis, only two of the possible prognostic factors were found to actually influence survival: performance status (p<0.01) and tumor length (p<0.01). The survival of patients with cervical esophageal cancer remains poor. It is thought that organ preservation is possible by definitive chemoradiation for early cancer

  4. Early glottic carcinoma: results of treatment by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, R.; Williams, J.; Fisher, R.; Bridger, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to review the results of treating early stages glottic, squamous cell carcinoma by radiotherapy in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney. A retrospective review was carried out of all patients seen in the department from 1967 to 1994, inclusive. To be eligible, patients had to have newly diagnosed cancer and to have been treated with curative intent by radiotherapy alone. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients satisfied the eligibility requirements. The mean follow-up time was 12.2 years (maximum: 28 years). At 5 years the actuarial local control rate was 80% (84% for stage T 1 and 72% for T 2 ). The ultimate local control rate was 96%. The overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 73% and 52%, respectively. The risk of nodal recurrence was much higher after persisting disease or local recurrence. Our results confirm the high cure rates achieved with this modality of treatment and are comparable with those reported in the literature. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty. Ltd

  5. Hippocampal sparing radiotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma: impact of treatment margins and treatment technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, N. Patrik; af Rosenschold, Per Munck; Blomstrand, Malin

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundWe investigated how varying the treatment margin and applying hippocampal sparing and proton therapy impact the risk of neurocognitive impairment in pediatric medulloblastoma patients compared with current standard 3D conformal radiotherapy.MethodsWe included 17 pediatric medulloblastoma...

  6. Specification and acceptance testing of radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in the radiation therapy treatment planning process is essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. The computerized radiotherapy treatment planning systems (RTPSs) are now widely available in industrialized and developing countries and it is of special importance to support hospitals in Member States in developing procedures for acceptance testing, commissioning and QA of their RTPSs. Responding to these needs, a group of experts developed an IAEA publication with such recommendations, which was published in 2004 as IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 430. This report provides a general framework and describes a large number of tests and procedures that should be considered by the users of new RTPSs. However, small hospitals with limited resources or large hospitals with high patient load and limited staff are not always able to perform complete characterization, validation and software testing of algorithms used in RTPSs. Therefore, the IAEA proposed more specific guidelines that provide a step-by-step recommendation for users at hospitals or cancer centres how to implement acceptance and commissioning procedures for newly purchased RTPSs. The current publication was developed in the framework of the Coordinated Research Project on Development of Procedures for Quality Assurance for Dosimetry Calculations in Radiotherapy and uses the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard IEC 62083, Requirements for the Safety of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems as its basis. The report addresses the procedures for specification and acceptance testing of RTPSs to be used by both manufacturers and users at the hospitals. Recommendations are provided for specific tests to be performed at the manufacturing facility known as type tests, and for acceptance tests to be performed at the hospital known as site tests. The purpose of acceptance testing is to demonstrate to the

  7. Treatment portals for elective radiotherapy of the neck: an inventory in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Peter; Dieren, Erik van; Soernsen de Koste, John van; Est, Henry van der; Heijmen, Ben; Levendag, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the variation in and the three-dimensional dosimetric consequences of treatment portals for elective neck irradiation. Materials and methods: Radiation oncologists (n = 16) from all major Head and Neck Co-operative Groups in The Netherlands (n = 11) were asked to delineate treatment portals on a lateral and an anterior simulation film in case of elective neck irradiation for a T3N0 tumour of the supraglottic larynx and a T2N0 tumour of the mobile tongue. In addition, they had to define their target, i.e. which parts of the neck nodal regions they would choose to irradiate electively for these particular tumour sites. Subsequently, treatment portals were compared and evaluated using CT-data and a 3-dimensional (3D) treatment planning system. Results: Significant variations were found in the shapes and sizes of the applied treatment techniques and portals. Also, among radiation oncologists who elected to irradiate the same lymph node regions, a significant variation in the delineated treatment portals was observed. As a consequence, substantial variations in treated volumes and in calculated normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for the parotid- and submandibular glands were observed. Conclusion: For the tumour sites studied there appears to be a lack of standardisation in the areas of the neck to be irradiated electively. The observed differences may have consequences for the ultimate failure rate and particularly with regard to the side effects, e.g. the degree of xerostomia. It is argued that in the near future a more precise three-dimensional definition on CT of the lymph node regions in the neck might allow for a better standardisation of the treatment portals and, in addition, for the development and application of conformal radiotherapy techniques for optimal sparing of the critical normal tissues (e.g. parotid- and submandibular glands) with maximum tumour control probability

  8. Analysis of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Wei Xiong; Liu, Helen H.; Tucker, Susan L.; Hu Chaosu; Mohan, Rodhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 223 patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Treatment-related pneumonitis was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictive factors. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-58 months). The actuarial incidence of Grade ≥3 pneumonitis was 22% at 6 months and 32% at 1 year. By univariate analyses, lung volume, gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and relative V5 through V65, in increments of 5 Gy, were all found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. The mean lung dose and rV5-rV65 were highly correlated (p 42% were 3% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, a number of clinical and dosimetric factors were found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. However, rV5 was the only significant factor associated with this toxicity. Until it is better understood which dose range is most relevant, multiple clinical and dosimetric factors should be considered in treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  9. The role of radiotherapy in the sarcoma uterine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofroni, M.; Iahontova, T.; Rabel, I.; Samet, N.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of a results of radiotherapy application on patients with sarcoma uterus were presented. The investigated patients was divided in to 6 age groups. The radiotherapy is proposed only in the cases of contraindication of surgery intervention or in the cases of the essential extinction of the tumor. The investigation shows that in the cases of the uterine sarcomas extinction forms radiotherapy is low efficient method

  10. Low-dose radiotherapy as treatment for benign lymphoepitelial lesion in HIV-patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Patino, E.; Lopez Vazquez, M.D.; Cascallar Caneda, L.; Antinez Lopez, J.; Victoria Fernandez, C.; Salvador Garrido, N.; Ares Banobre, M.; Porto vazquez, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Standard treatments for benign lymphoepitelial lesion of the parotid gland in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are unsatisfactory. Recently, low-dose radiotherapy has been proposed as a noninvasive treatment option. We describe a case of bilateral benign lymphoepitelial lesion parotid gland in a HIV-positive paint, treated by radiotherapy. Low-dose radiotherapy, appears as a alternative in the treatment for benign lymphoepitelial lesion in HIV-patients, and preliminary evaluations have indicated that this treatment is effective from both the clinical and cosmetic points of view

  11. A customized bolus produced using a 3-dimensional printer for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Wook; Shin, Hun-Joo; Kay, Chul Seung; Son, Seok Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Boluses are used in high-energy radiotherapy in order to overcome the skin sparing effect. In practice though, commonly used flat boluses fail to make a perfect contact with the irregular surface of the patient's skin, resulting in air gaps. Hence, we fabricated a customized bolus using a 3-dimensional (3D) printer and evaluated its feasibility for radiotherapy. We designed two kinds of bolus for production on a 3D printer, one of which was the 3D printed flat bolus for the Blue water phantom and the other was a 3D printed customized bolus for the RANDO phantom. The 3D printed flat bolus was fabricated to verify its physical quality. The resulting 3D printed flat bolus was evaluated by assessing dosimetric parameters such as D1.5 cm, D5 cm, and D10 cm. The 3D printed customized bolus was then fabricated, and its quality and clinical feasibility were evaluated by visual inspection and by assessing dosimetric parameters such as Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90%. The dosimetric parameters of the resulting 3D printed flat bolus showed that it was a useful dose escalating material, equivalent to a commercially available flat bolus. Analysis of the dosimetric parameters of the 3D printed customized bolus demonstrated that it is provided good dose escalation and good contact with the irregular surface of the RANDO phantom. A customized bolus produced using a 3D printer could potentially replace commercially available flat boluses.

  12. Patient costs associated with external beam radiotherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer: the benefits of hypofractionated over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Cheung, Patrick; Tang, Colin I; Quon, Harvey; Morton, Gerard; Nam, Robert; Loblaw, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the out-of-pocket costs for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and calculate the patient-related savings of being treated with a 5-fraction versus a standard 39-fraction approach. Seventy patients accrued to the pHART3 (n = 84) study were analyzed for out-of-pocket patient costs as a result of undergoing treatment. All costs are in Canadian dollars. Using the postal code of the patient's residence, the distance between the hospital and patient home was found using Google Maps. The Canada Revenue Agency automobile allowance rate was then applied to determine the cost per kilometer driven. The average cost of travel from the hospital and pHART3 patient's residence was $246 per person after five trips. In a standard fractionation regimen, pHART3 patients would have incurred an average cost of $1921 after 39 visits. The patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy would have paid an average of $38 in parking while those receiving conventional treatment would have paid $293. The difference in out-of-pocket costs for the patients receiving a standard versus hypofractionated treatment was $1930. Medium term prospective data shows that hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for localized prostate cancer. Compared to standard EBRT, hypofractionated radiotherapy requires significantly fewer visits. Due to the long distance patients may have to travel to the cancer center and the expense of parking, the short course treatment saves each patient an average of $1900. A randomized study of standard versus hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy should be conducted to confirm a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile of the shorter fractionation scheme.

  13. Does Treatment Duration Affect Outcome After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Li Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.; Chen, David Y.T.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The protraction of external beam radiotherapy (RT) time is detrimental in several disease sites. In prostate cancer, the overall treatment time can be considerable, as can the potential for treatment breaks. We evaluated the effect of elapsed treatment time on outcome after RT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and November 2004, 1,796 men with prostate cancer were treated with RT alone. The nontreatment day ratio (NTDR) was defined as the number of nontreatment days divided by the total elapsed days of RT. This ratio was used to account for the relationship between treatment duration and total RT dose. Men were stratified into low risk (n = 789), intermediate risk (n = 798), and high risk (n = 209) using a single-factor model. Results: The 10-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rate was 68% for a NTDR <33% vs. 58% for NTDR ≥33% (p = 0.02; BF was defined as a prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL). In the low-risk group, the 10-year FFBF rate was 82% for NTDR <33% vs. 57% for NTDR ≥33% (p = 0.0019). The NTDR was independently predictive for FFBF (p = 0.03), in addition to T stage (p = 0.005) and initial prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) on multivariate analysis, including Gleason score and radiation dose. The NTDR was not a significant predictor of FFBF when examined in the intermediate-risk group, high-risk group, or all risk groups combined. Conclusions: A proportionally longer treatment duration was identified as an adverse factor in low-risk patients. Treatment breaks resulting in a NTDR of ≥33% (e.g., four or more breaks during a 40-fraction treatment, 5 d/wk) should be avoided

  14. Peroperative radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguier, M.; Schlienger, M.; Houry, S.; Charron, R.

    1987-01-01

    7 patients presenting with unresected (6 cases) or resected (1 case) cancer of the pancreas were treated peroperatively by radiotherapy. Tumors were treated with 15 to 20 Gy delivered by a particle accelerator. There were no post-operative complications. Three patients who were experiencing pain before radiotherapy no longer had pain after radiotherapy and this effect was maintained. Five patients died during the follow-up period after 5 to 10 months. Two patients are still alive after 4 and 9 months follow-up. This experience with peroperative radiotherapy should be continued [fr

  15. FXG dosimeter response for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using different evaluation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavinato, Christianne C.; Campos, Leticia L.; Souza, Benedito H.; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Daros, Kellen A.C.; Medeiros, Regina B.; Giordani, Adelmo J.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to compare the dose-response of the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter developed at IPEN using 270 Bloom gelatin from porcine skin made in Brazil evaluated using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the dosimetric response evaluated using the optical absorption (OA) spectrophotometry technique, in order to verify the possibility of quality assurance (QA) and reproducibility of FXG dosimeter to be carried out routinely using the OA technique for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) application using a 6 MV photons linear accelerator. The response in function of the absorbed dose of FXG dosimeter developed at IPEN presents linear behavior in clinical interest dose range when irradiated with Co-60 gamma radiation and 6 MV photons and evaluated using the MRI and OA techniques. The results indicate that the optical technique can be used for QA of FXG dosemeter when used in the possible application in QA of 3DCRT. (author)

  16. FXG dosimeter response for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using different evaluation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavinato, Christianne C.; Campos, Leticia L., E-mail: ccavinato@ipen.b, E-mail: lcrodri@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza, Benedito H.; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Daros, Kellen A.C.; Medeiros, Regina B., E-mail: bhsouza@unifesp.b, E-mail: daros.kellen@unifesp.b, E-mail: rbitel-li.ddi@epm.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Giordani, Adelmo J. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2011-07-01

    This work aims to compare the dose-response of the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter developed at IPEN using 270 Bloom gelatin from porcine skin made in Brazil evaluated using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the dosimetric response evaluated using the optical absorption (OA) spectrophotometry technique, in order to verify the possibility of quality assurance (QA) and reproducibility of FXG dosimeter to be carried out routinely using the OA technique for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) application using a 6 MV photons linear accelerator. The response in function of the absorbed dose of FXG dosimeter developed at IPEN presents linear behavior in clinical interest dose range when irradiated with Co-60 gamma radiation and 6 MV photons and evaluated using the MRI and OA techniques. The results indicate that the optical technique can be used for QA of FXG dosemeter when used in the possible application in QA of 3DCRT. (author)

  17. Prognostic factors in the treatment of locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with radiotherapy and arterial infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Jin, Y.; Zhang, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Prognostic factors in the treatment of local advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with radiotherapy, transcatheter arterial embolization and arterial infusion. The treatment effects of radiotherapy and combination modality therapy for the local advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were retrospectively reviewed. Three hundred and fifty-six patients of HCC (187 recurrent cases after surgical resection) were treated by: radiotherapy only ; bi-therapeutic method: hepatic artery ligation (HAL) and/or hepatic artery embolization (HAE) plus radiotherapy; and tri-therapeutic method (bi-therapeutic method plus hepatic artery infusion) from 1975 to 1996. Kaplan-Meier method has been used to evaluate the survival rates. There were no significant differences among these three treatment groups in the symptom relied rate, but the mean relief time period was much shorter in radiotherapy alone group (2.5 vs 44 months, P 0.05). There were evident differences in five-year survivals among these three treatment groups: 0 % for radiotherapy alone, 22.8 % for bi-therapeutic method and 38.8 % for tri-therapeutic method (P < 0.01). The prognosis was influenced by Okuda classification. Non-resectable local advanced HCC can be treated by the combination modality therapy, including radiotherapy, with a quite high cure rate. Radiotherapy alone can relief the symptoms. (authors)

  18. Considerations of MCNP Monte Carlo code to be used as a radiotherapy treatment planning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, B; Miro, R; Gallardo, S; Verdu, G; Santos, A

    2005-01-01

    The present work has simulated the photon and electron transport in a Theratron 780® (MDS Nordion)60Co radiotherapy unit, using the Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle). This project explains mainly the different methodologies carried out to speedup calculations in order to apply this code efficiently in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  19. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy in radical treatment of frail patients with deeply invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellin, G.; Mussari, S.; Graffer, U.; Caffo, O.; Valduga, F.; Tomio, L.; Luciani, L. [S. Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy)

    2004-11-01

    The radical treatment of deeply invasive bladder cancer with full dose radiotherapy and concomitant 5- fluorouracil continuous infusion is feasible even in frail patients, with an acceptable toxicity and a response rate comparable to that obtained using radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin. Many patients can retain a functioning bladder. (author)

  20. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  1. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons

  2. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment of gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knab, Brian; Rash, Carla; Farrey, Karl; Jani, Ashesh B.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral role in the treatment of gastric cancer in the postsurgery setting, the inoperable/palliative setting, and, as in the case of the current report, in the setting of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Typically, anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) or 3-field techniques are used. In this report, we explore the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment in a patient whose care was transferred to our institution after 3-field radiotherapy (RT) was given to a dose of 30 Gy at an outside institution. If the 3-field plan were continued to 50 Gy, the volume of irradiated liver receiving greater than 30 Gy would have been unacceptably high. To deliver the final 20 Gy, an opposed parallel AP/PA plan and an IMRT plan were compared to the initial 3-field technique for coverage of the target volume as well as dose to the kidneys, liver, small bowel, and spinal cord. Comparison of the 3 treatment techniques to deliver the final 20 Gy revealed reduced median and maximum dose to the whole kidney with the IMRT plan. For this 20-Gy boost, the volume of irradiated liver was lower for both the IMRT plan and the AP/PA plan vs. the 3-field plan. Comparing the IMRT boost plan to the AP/PA boost-dose range ( 10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan. The IMRT boost plan also irradiated a smaller volume of the small bowel compared to both the 3-field plan and the AP/PA plan, and also delivered lower dose to the spinal cord in comparison to the AP/PA plan. Comparison of the composite plans revealed reduced dose to the whole kidney using IMRT. The V20 for the whole kidney volume for the composite IMRT plan was 30% compared to approximately 60% for the composite AP/PA plan. Overall, the dose to the liver receiving greater than 30 Gy was lower for the composite IMRT plan and was well below acceptable limits. In conclusion, our study suggests a dosimetric benefit of IMRT over conventional planning, and suggests an important role for

  3. Pelvic Ewing sarcomas. Three-dimensional conformal vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounessi, F.S.; Lehrich, P.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Willich, N. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). RiSK - Registry for the Evaluation of Late Side Effects after Radiotherapy in Childhood and Adolescence; Boelling, T. [Center for Radiation Oncology, Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The goal of the present work was to assess the potential advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in pelvic Ewing's sarcoma. A total of 8 patients with Ewing sarcoma of the pelvis undergoing radiotherapy were analyzed. Plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT were calculated for each patient. Dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV), conformity and homogeneity indices, as well as further parameters were evaluated. Results The average dose coverage values for PTV were comparable in 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. Both techniques had a PTV coverage of V{sub 95} > 98 % in all patients. Whereas the IMRT plans achieved a higher conformity index compared to the 3D-CRT plans (conformity index 0.79 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.19, p = 0.012), the dose distribution across the target volumes was less homogeneous with IMRT planning than with 3D-CRT planning. This difference was statistically significant (homogeneity index 0.11 {+-} 0.03 vs. 0.07 {+-} 0.0, p = 0.035). For the bowel, D{sub mean} and D{sub 1%}, as well as V{sub 2} to V{sub 60} were reduced in IMRT plans. For the bladder and the rectum, there was no significant difference in D{sub mean}. However, the percentages of volumes receiving at least doses of 30, 40, 45, and 50 Gy (V{sub 30} to V{sub 50}) were lower for the rectum in IMRT plans. The volume of normal tissue receiving at least 2 Gy (V{sub 2}) was significantly higher in IMRT plans compared with 3D-CRT, whereas at high dose levels (V{sub 30}) it was significantly lower. Compared to 3D-CRT, IMRT showed significantly better results regarding dose conformity (p = 0.012) and bowel sparing at dose levels above 30 Gy (p = 0.012). Thus, dose escalation in the radiotherapy of pelvic Ewing's sarcoma can be more easily achieved using IMRT. (orig.)

  4. Radiotherapy for the treatment of primary vaginal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Rajiv; Tam, Tiffany; Dahrouge, Simon; E, Choan

    2005-01-01

    Disease control rates and toxicity were evaluated among 28 primary vaginal cancer patients treated with curative intent using radiotherapy. At 5 years, the majority (60%) of patients were disease-free and local control was 73% when a combination of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy were used. Serious late toxicity was seen in 11% of patients

  5. A comparison of swallowing dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. A systematic review by the Italian Head and Neck Radiotherapy Study Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ursino, Stefano; Morganti, Riccardo; Cristaudo, Agostino; Paiar, Fabiola [University Hospital S. Chiara, Radiation Oncology, Pisa (Italy); D' Angelo, Elisa; Lohr, Frank [University Hospital, Radiation Oncology, Modena (Italy); Mazzola, Rosario [Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Cancer Care Center, Radiation Oncology, Negrar-Verona (Italy); Merlotti, Anna; Russi, Elvio Grazioso [S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Radiation Oncology, Cuneo (Italy); Musio, Daniela [University Hospital La Sapienza, Radiation Oncology, Roma (Italy); Alterio, Daniela [European Institute of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, Advanced Radiotherapy Center, Milan (Italy); Bacigalupo, Almalina [AOU IRCCS San Martino - IST National Cancer Research Institute and University, Radiation Oncology, Genoa (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    Dysphagia is one of the most important treatment-related side effects in head and neck cancer (HNC), as it can lead to severe life-threating complications such as aspiration pneumonia and malnutrition. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could reduce swallowing dysfunction by producing a concave dose distribution and reducing doses to the swallowing-related organs at risk (SWOARs). The aim of this study was to review the current literature in order to compare swallowing outcomes between IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). A search was conducted in the PubMed and Embase databases to identify studies on swallowing outcomes, both clinically and/or instrumentally assessed, after 3DCRT and IMRT. Dysphagia-specific quality of life and objective instrumental data are summarized and discussed. A total of 262 papers were retrieved from the searched databases. An additional 23 papers were retrieved by hand-searching the reference lists. Ultimately, 22 papers were identified which discussed swallowing outcomes after 3DCRT and IMRT for HNC. No outcomes from randomized trials were identified. Despite several methodological limitations, reports from the current literature seem to suggest better swallowing outcomes with IMRT compared to 3DCRT. Further improvements are likely to result from the increased use of IMRT plans optimized for SWOAR sparing. (orig.) [German] Dysphagie ist eine der wichtigsten Nebenwirkungen bei der Behandlung von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren (HNC), da sie zu lebensbedrohlichen Komplikationen wie Aspirationspneumonien und Mangelernaehrung fuehren kann. Durch Erzeugung konkaver Dosisverteilungen und durch die Reduzierung der Dosis an schluckrelevanten Strukturen (SWOAR) kann die IMRT Schluckstoerungen moeglicherweise vermindern. Ziel dieser Studie war es, die gegenwaertige Literaturlage hinsichtlich der Schluckfunktion nach IMRT und konformaler dreidimensionaler Strahlentherapie (3DCRT) systematisch zu ueberpruefen. Studien, die die

  6. Three-dimensional teletherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panthaleon van Eck, R.B. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with physical/mathematical backgrounds of computerized teletherapy treatment planning. The subjects discussed in this thesis can be subdivided into three main categories: a) Three-dimensional treatment planning. A method is evaluated which can be used for the purpose of simulation and optimization of dose distributions in three dimensions. b) The use of Computed Tomography. The use of patient information obtained from Computed Tomography for the purpose of dose computations is evaluated. c) Dose computational models for photon- and electron beams. Models are evaluated which provide information regarding the way in which the radiation dose is distributed in the patient (viz. is absorbed and/or dispersed). (Auth.)

  7. Planejamento tridimensional para radioterapia de tumores de esôfago: comparação de técnicas de tratamento e análise de probabilidade de complicações Three-dimensional radiotherapy planning system for esophageal tumors: comparison of treatment techniques and analysis of probability of complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitágoras Báskara Justino

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Para comparar diversas técnicas de irradiação para o câncer de esôfago, foi utilizado sistema de planejamento tridimensional. Em um paciente com carcinoma espinocelular de esôfago médio, foram estudadas as seguintes técnicas de tratamento: dois campos ântero-posteriores e dois campos látero-laterais paralelos e opostos, três campos em "Y" e em "T" e quatro campos em "X". Foram obtidos os histogramas dose-volume, considerando como órgãos de risco medula espinhal e pulmões. Os resultados foram analisados de acordo com as recomendações da Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP e Tumor Control Probability (TCP. Quanto às doses de irradiação em pulmão, a melhor opção foi a técnica em dois campos ântero-posteriores paralelos e opostos. A medula foi mais poupada quando se utilizaram campos látero-laterais. Sugerimos a combinação de pelo menos duas técnicas de tratamento: ântero-posterior e as técnicas com campos em "Y", "T" ou látero-laterais, para o balanceamento das doses em pulmões e medula espinhal. Ou, ainda, a utilização de técnicas de três campos durante todo o tratamento.Radiotherapy techniques for esophageal cancer were compared using a three-dimensional planning system. We studied the following treatment techniques used for a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the middle third of the esophagus: two antero-posterior and two latero-lateral parallel opposed fields, three fields ("Y" and "T", and four fields ("X". Dose-volume histograms were obtained considering spinal cord and lungs as organs at risk. Analysis was performed comparing doses in these organs as recommended by the Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP and Tumor Control Probability (TCP. When only the lungs were considered the best technique was two antero-posterior parallel opposed fields. The spinal cord was best protected using latero-lateral fields. We suggest the combination of at least two treatment techniques: antero

  8. A record and verify system for radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koens, M.L.; Vroome, H. de

    1984-01-01

    The Record and Verify system developed for the radiotherapy department of the Leiden University Hospital is described. The system has been in use since 1980 and will now be installed in at least four of the Dutch University Hospitals. The system provides the radiographer with a powerful tool for checking the set-up of the linear accelerator preceeding the irradiation of a field. After the irradiation of a field the machine settings are registered in the computer system together with the newly calculated cumulative dose. These registrations are used by the system to produce a daily report which provides the management of the department with insight into the established differences between treatment and treatment planning. Buying a record and verify system from the manufacturer of the linear accelerator is not an optimal solution especially for a department with more than one accelerator from different manufacturers. Integration in a Hospital Information System (HIS) has important advantages over the development of a dedicated departmental system. (author)

  9. Comparison of DVH data from multiple radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M A; Kearvell, R; Hooton, B; Spry, N A; Bydder, S A; Joseph, D J; Haworth, A; Hug, B

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the variation of dose-volume histogram (DVH) data sourced from multiple radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs). Treatment plan exports were obtained from 33 Australian and New Zealand centres during a dosimetry study. Plan information, including DVH data, was exported from the TPS at each centre and reviewed in a digital review system (SWAN). The review system was then used to produce an independent calculation of DVH information for each delineated structure. The relationships between DVHs extracted from each TPS and independently calculated were examined, particularly in terms of the influence of CT scan slice and pixel widths, the resolution of dose calculation grids and the TPS manufacturer. Calculation of total volume and DVH data was consistent between SWAN and each TPS, with the small discrepancies found tending to increase with decreasing structure size. This was significantly influenced by the TPS model used to derive the data. For target structures covered with relatively uniform dose distributions, there was a significant difference between the minimum dose in each TPS-exported DVH and that calculated independently. (note)

  10. Chemotherapy as an adjuvant to Radiotherapy in treatment of Retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. A potentially curable cancer, its treatment has improved significantly over the last few decades. Various studies show that while enucleation remains the standard of care for advanced intraocular tumours, conservative modalities that can result in globe salvage and preservation of useful vision are being increasingly employed. Such modalities include systemic chemotherapy, focal consolidation with transpupillary thermo therapy, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy, plaque brachytherapy, and delivery of local chemotherapy using subconjunctival, sub-tenon, or intra-arterial routes. When used alone or in combination, these treatment modalities can help in avoidance of external beam radiotherapy or enucleation, thus reducing the potential for long-term side effects, while salvaging useful vision. Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role in selected patients with intraocular retinoblastoma. Local injections of chemotherapeutic agents via the sub-tenon or sub-conjunctival route have been used with varying degrees of success, usually as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy. Intra-arterial ophthalmic artery delivery of melphalan has shown promising results.

  11. The value of radiotherapy in breast-conserving treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Breast conserving treatment owes its legitimacy to the ability of radiotherapy (RT), in conjunction with limited surgery, to provide local control equivalent to that associated with total mastectomy. This paper will be concerned exclusively with the treatment of the breast, since indications for RT of lymph node areas are independent of the type of breast surgery employed. Randomized trials have enabled quantitation of the effect of reduction in recurrence risk compared to surgery alone. Even though local recurrence is a predictor of metastatic disease, its prevention by breast RT has not yet been shown to improve survival. Thus the main benefits of breast RT relate to preventing the consequences of local failure, namely breast loss. With modern RT techniques, cosmetic results should be satisfactory in 90% of preserved breast. The main clinical research areas concern the optimal sequencing of surgery, RT and chemotherapy, the improvement of local control in high-risk patients, the extension of breast conservation to more advanced cases by the use of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and RT, the identification of early-stage patients who could be treated with wide excision alone, and the value of RT in ductal in situ carcinomas. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.

    1989-01-01

    A major aim of radiation therapy is to deliver sufficient dose to the tumour volume to kill the cancer cells while sparing the nearby health organs to prevent complications. With the introduction of devices such as CT and MR scanners, radiation therapy treatment planners have access to full three-dimensional anatomical information to define, simulate, and evaluate treatments. There are a limited number of prototype software systems that allow 3D treatment planning currently in use. In addition, there are more advanced tools under development or still in the planning stages. They require sophisticated graphics and computation equipment, complex physical and mathematical algorithms, and new radiation treatment machines that deliver dose very precisely under computer control. Components of these systems include programs for the identification and delineation of the anatomy and tumour, the definition of radiation beams, the calculation of dose distribution patterns, the display of dose on 2D images and as three dimensional surfaces, and the generation of computer images to verify proper patient positioning in treatment. Some of these functions can be performed more quickly and accurately if artificial intelligence or expert systems techniques are employed. 28 refs., figs

  13. Radiotherapy of the neuroaxis for palliative treatment of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, B.; Hueltenschmidt, B.; Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin

    2001-04-01

    Background: Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurs in about 5% of solid tumors and may seriously compromise quality of life. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of craniospinal irradiation with and without intrathecal chemotherapy and its efficacy with regard to symptom palliation and survival. Patients and Methods: 16 patients (mean age 46 years; nine breast cancers, five lung cancers, one renal cell cancer, one tumor of unknown primary site) with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurring after a median interval from primary tumor diagnosis of 5 months (0-300 months) received craniospinal irradiation between October 1995 and May 2000. The median total dose was 36 Gy (a 1.6-2.0 Gy). Ten patients were additionally treated with intrathecal methotrexate (15 mg per cycle, 2-8 cycles). Results: Median survival was 12 weeks, 8 weeks after radiotherapy alone, 16 weeks after combined modality treatment. 14 patients died from disease. Eleven patients (68%) experienced regression of their neurological symptoms during or soon after completion of radiotherapy. Seven patients regained their ability to walk, six had pain reduction, three regression of bladder and bowel incontinence. In three patients symptom progression and in two patients no change occurred. Side effects were: Myelosuppression (CTC) Grade I: n=2, Grade II: n=4, Grade III: n=4 patients and Grade IV: n=1. Nine patients had dysphagia, seven mucositis, three suffered from nausea. No late toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Craniospinal radiotherapy is feasible and effective for palliative treatment of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. As far as the small patient number permits any definite conclusions, combined modality treatment seems superior to irradiation alone. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Eine Leptomeningeosis carcinomatosa, die bei ca. 5% aller soliden Tumoren auftritt, kann die Lebensqualitaet erheblich beeintraechtigen. Ziel der Studie war es, Machbarkeit und Effektivitaet einer

  14. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) techniques used in breast cancer treatment to reduce cardiac exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Esther; Hendry, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment has been shown to reduce local recurrence and improve survival rates. However, there is a concern that breast radiotherapy can cause an increase in cardiac mortality, particularly in patients being treated for left-sided breast cancer. This review aims to investigate how cardiac exposure is minimised in breast radiotherapy and determine an optimal method for reducing cardiac dose, using literature from ScienceDirect, Medline and CINAHL. IMRT and breathing-adapted radiotherapy both reduce cardiac exposure but IMRT also increases the irradiated volume at low dose. Several issues were reported with regards to the clinical implementation of these techniques. It is suggested that inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy, is the preferred solution to minimising cardiac exposure but more research is warranted to confirm this. Long-term follow-up is required to determine dose–response relationships. Research needs to focus on breast cancer treatment as a whole in order to effectively reduce cardiac mortality.

  15. TU-FG-BRB-05: A 3 Dimensional Prompt Gamma Imaging System for Range Verification in Proton Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draeger, E; Chen, H; Polf, J [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Mackin, D; Beddar, S [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Avery, S [University of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Peterson, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the initial developments of a clinical 3-dimensional (3D) prompt gamma (PG) imaging system for proton radiotherapy range verification. Methods: The new imaging system under development consists of a prototype Compton camera to measure PG emission during proton beam irradiation and software to reconstruct, display, and analyze 3D images of the PG emission. For initial test of the system, PGs were measured with a prototype CC during a 200 cGy dose delivery with clinical proton pencil beams (ranging from 100 MeV – 200 MeV) to a water phantom. Measurements were also carried out with the CC placed 15 cm from the phantom for a full range 150 MeV pencil beam and with its range shifted by 2 mm. Reconstructed images of the PG emission were displayed by the clinical PG imaging software and compared to the dose distributions of the proton beams calculated by a commercial treatment planning system. Results: Measurements made with the new PG imaging system showed that a 3D image could be reconstructed from PGs measured during the delivery of 200 cGy of dose, and that shifts in the Bragg peak range of as little as 2 mm could be detected. Conclusion: Initial tests of a new PG imaging system show its potential to provide 3D imaging and range verification for proton radiotherapy. Based on these results, we have begun work to improve the system with the goal that images can be produced from delivery of as little as 20 cGy so that the system could be used for in-vivo proton beam range verification on a daily basis.

  16. MR vs CT imaging: low rectal cancer tumour delineation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, B D P

    2009-06-01

    Modern three-dimentional radiotherapy is based upon CT. For rectal cancer, this relies upon target definition on CT, which is not the optimal imaging modality. The major limitation of CT is its low inherent contrast resolution. Targets defined by MRI could facilitate smaller, more accurate, tumour volumes than CT. Our study reviewed imaging and planning data for 10 patients with locally advanced low rectal cancer (defined as < 6 cm from the anal verge on digital examination). Tumour volume and location were compared for sagittal pre-treatment MRI and planning CT. CT consistently overestimated all tumour radiological parameters. Estimates of tumour volume, tumour length and height of proximal tumour from the anal verge were larger on planning CT than on MRI (p < 0.05). Tumour volumes defined on MRI are smaller, shorter and more distal from the anal sphincter than CT-based volumes. For radiotherapy planning, this may result in smaller treatment volumes, which could lead to a reduction in dose to organs at risk and facilitate dose escalation.

  17. The therapeutic effect of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy combined with conventional radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Feng; Lu Zhonghong; Yao Zhijun; Cao Yongzhen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 78 patients with NPC was treated by radiation schedule in two phases. In the first phase, nasopharyngeal lesions and metastases of all patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) with a fraction of 2-5 Gy daily, 5 day per weeks, total dose 30 Gy. The second phase T1N0 or parts of T2N0 patients were done by Conventional radiotherapy with total dose 55 Gy on two small lateral opposing fields + with total dose 50 Gy on neck on tangential field,adding a 3 cm block. Patients with lymph node metastasis were given 55 Gy on the dacio-neck field (After 40 Gy, two small lateral opposing fields were used to boost the primary tumor while the spinal cord shielded) + with total dose 55 Gy on lower neck on tangential field. The upper bound of designed therapeutic field was set to connect with lower bound of main therapeutic field. Results: Three months after treatment,the rate of CR, PR, SD, PD were 38.5%, 55.1%, 5.1%, 1.3%, Total effective rate (CR+PR) were 93.6%. The 1-year, 2-year, 3-year and 5-year local-regional control rates were 92.3%, 88.5%, 78.2%, 70.5%.The 1-year, 2-year , 3-year and 5-year overall survival rate were 96.2%, 89.7%, 83.3%, 71.8%. Appearing early radiation response is well tolerated and no obviously mouth difficulties and cranial nerve damage observed. Conclusion: Clinical result of early-course three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is good. (authors)

  18. "SABER": A new software tool for radiotherapy treatment plan evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Joiner, Michael C; Orton, Colin G; Burmeister, Jay

    2010-11-01

    Both spatial and biological information are necessary in order to perform true optimization of a treatment plan and for predicting clinical outcome. The goal of this work is to develop an enhanced treatment plan evaluation tool which incorporates biological parameters and retains spatial dose information. A software system is developed which provides biological plan evaluation with a novel combination of features. It incorporates hyper-radiosensitivity using the induced-repair model and applies the new concept of dose convolution filter (DCF) to simulate dose wash-out effects due to cell migration, bystander effect, and/or tissue motion during treatment. Further, the concept of spatial DVH (sDVH) is introduced to evaluate and potentially optimize the spatial dose distribution in the target volume. Finally, generalized equivalent uniform dose is derived from both the physical dose distribution (gEUD) and the distribution of equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (gEUD2) and the software provides three separate models for calculation of tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and probability of uncomplicated tumor control (P+). TCP, NTCP, and P+ are provided as a function of prescribed dose and multivariable TCP, NTCP, and P+ plots are provided to illustrate the dependence on individual parameters used to calculate these quantities. Ten plans from two clinical treatment sites are selected to test the three calculation models provided by this software. By retaining both spatial and biological information about the dose distribution, the software is able to distinguish features of radiotherapy treatment plans not discernible using commercial systems. Plans that have similar DVHs may have different spatial and biological characteristics and the application of novel tools such as sDVH and DCF within the software may substantially change the apparent plan quality or predicted plan metrics such as TCP and NTCP. For the cases examined

  19. Evidence-based review of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: An ASTRO outcomes initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, David E.; Emami, Bahman; Mauch, Peter M.; Konski, Andre A.; Tao, May L.; Ng, Andrea K.; Klein, Eric A.; Mohideen, Najeeb; Hurwitz, Mark D.; Fraas, Bendick A.; Roach, Mack; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the evidence to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer; provide a clear presentation of the key clinical outcome questions related to the use of 3D-CRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer that may be answered by a formal literature review; and provide concise information on whether 3D-CRT improves the clinical outcomes in the treatment of localized prostate cancer compared with conventional RT. Methods and Materials: We performed a systematic review of the literature through a structured process developed by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's Outcomes Committee that involved the creation of a multidisciplinary task force, development of clinical outcome questions, a formal literature review and data abstraction, data review, and outside peer review. Results: Seven key clinical questions were identified. The results and task force conclusions of the literature review for each question are reported. Conclusion: The technological goals of reducing morbidity with 3D-CRT have been achieved. Randomized trials and follow-up of completed trials remain necessary to address these clinical outcomes specifically with regard to patient subsets and the use of hormonal therapy

  20. Role of radiotherapy in the complex treatment for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, A S; Datsenko, V S [Tsentral' nyj Inst. Usovershenstvovaniya Vrachej, Moscow (USSR)

    1978-01-01

    Preoperational irradiation of a primary focus and all the areas of regional metastatic spreading turned out to be most effective in the case of mammary gland cancer complex treating. Postoperational radiotherapy is a less effective version of radiotherapy justified in the case of metastatic affection of lymph nodes and deliberate disturbance of ablastics during the operation. Time interval between the ending of preoperational radiotherapy and the operation must not exceed 3 weeks, as, otherwise, the biological potential of undamaged cancer cells is recovered and the hazard of appearing remote metastases increases. Additional courses of chemotherapy in the case of multiple of lymphogenic metastases improe prognosis for patients with mammary gland cancer.

  1. Relative significance of surgery and radiotherapy in treatment of brain metastases of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junkoh; Ohtsuka, Sinichi; Yamasaki, Toshiki; Gi, Hidefuku; Ha, Young-Soo; Handa, Hajime

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and sixteen cases of brain metastases of lung cancer were retrospectively analysed with special reference to the relative significance of surgery and radiotherapy. The median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastases was 1.2 months in 27 cases without treatment, 2.5 months in 51 cases treated by surgery alone, 4.2 months in 31 cases treated by radiotherapy alone and 6.5 months in 7 cases treated by surgery and radiotherapy. The survival rate in patients treated by radiotherapy was significantly better than in those not treated by radiotherapy. However, the effect of surgery was not significant in prolongation of survival time. On the other hand, the rate of improvement in neurological symptoms assessed at one month after the initiation of treatment was 80.9% in 47 cases treated by surgery and 19.4 % in 31 cases treated by radiotherapy. The result suggested that surgery is superior to radiotherapy in alleviating neurological symptoms. It is important to understand the nature of effect of each treatment. A better result will be anticipated by proper selection or combination of these treatments. (author)

  2. Assessment of three-dimensional set-up errors in conventional head and neck radiotherapy using electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Chopra, Supriya; Kadam, Avinash; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Devi, P Reena; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Dinshaw, Ketayun Ardeshir

    2007-01-01

    Set-up errors are an inherent part of radiation treatment process. Coverage of target volume is a direct function of set-up margins, which should be optimized to prevent inadvertent irradiation of adjacent normal tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) set-up errors and propose optimum margins for target volume coverage in head and neck radiotherapy. The dataset consisted of 93 pairs of orthogonal simulator and corresponding portal images on which 558 point positions were measured to calculate translational displacement in 25 patients undergoing conventional head and neck radiotherapy with antero-lateral wedge pair technique. Mean displacements, population systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors and 3D vector of displacement was calculated. Set-up margins were calculated using published margin recipes. The mean displacement in antero-posterior (AP), medio-lateral (ML) and supero-inferior (SI) direction was -0.25 mm (-6.50 to +7.70 mm), -0.48 mm (-5.50 to +7.80 mm) and +0.45 mm (-7.30 to +7.40 mm) respectively. Ninety three percent of the displacements were within 5 mm in all three cardinal directions. Population systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) were 0.96, 0.98 and 1.20 mm and 1.94, 1.97 and 2.48 mm in AP, ML and SI direction respectively. The mean 3D vector of displacement was 3.84 cm. Using van Herk's formula, the clinical target volume to planning target volume margins were 3.76, 3.83 and 4.74 mm in AP, ML and SI direction respectively. The present study report compares well with published set-up error data relevant to head and neck radiotherapy practice. The set-up margins were <5 mm in all directions. Caution is warranted against adopting generic margin recipes as different margin generating recipes lead to a different probability of target volume coverage

  3. Multimodal treatment combining chemotherapy, hyperthermia and radiotherapy for ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Kei

    1992-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of heat in the treatment of cancer. Theoretically cells are the most sensitive to ionizing radiation at mitosis, whereas the cycle phase that is the most resistant to ionizing radiation namely late in the DNA. Synthetic phase (late S) is the most sensitive to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia has been reported to enhance the cytocidal effects of several active chemotherapeutic agents. When thermal potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents against malignant cells is contemplated, normal tissues have a relatively high ambient blood flow which increases in response to thermal stress, thereby dissipating heat, compared to tumors. Tumors, with relatively poor blood flow and a responsive neovasculature, are in capable of augmenting flow and acting as a heat reservoir. This is the phenomenon of a heat reservoir which is one factor to enhance the cytocidal effects of several active anticancer agents for enhancing the uptake in tumor. The importance is in the adjuvant chemotherapy treated for post operative, advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer. Heating enhances the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Thirty patients with ovarian cancer were subjected to the multidisciplinary treatment with combination of hyperthermochemotherapy and radiation. The 30 patients consisted of 18 with endometrioid adenocarcinoma and 7 with serious post operative or recurrent status. Two types of equipments with rediofrequencies of 70 MHz (BSD-1000) or 434 MHZ (TAG MED·HS 434) were used for hyperthermia. Chemotherapeutic agents such as adriamycin, cis DDP, cyclophosphamide and etoposide were injected intravenously. Arterial infusion with reservoir was very effective in advanced stage of ovarian cancer. No severe or fatal side effects were observed. Hyperthermochemotherapy is useful and effective for the postoperative management or the treatment of recurrent cancer of the ovary. (J.P.N.)

  4. [Bladder-conserving treatment for bladder cancer: potential of and developments in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Pieters, Bradley R; Koning, Caro C E

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is surgical removal of the bladder and construction of a neobladder. Recently, important improvements have been made in the potential for bladder-conserving treatment using radiotherapy. External beam radiotherapy has undergone technological improvements, as a result of which it is possible to radiate the tumour more precisely while decreasing radiation to healthy tissue. Radiochemotherapy improves local recurrence-free and overall survival compared with radiotherapy alone. The results of this combined treatment are comparable with those of surgery. Additionally, Dutch radiotherapy departments have collected data in a national database of 1040 selected patients with confined bladder cancer. These patients were treated with external beam radiation, limited surgery and brachytherapy. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 75%. Bladder conserving treatment options for muscle-invasive bladder cancer should be discussed during the multidisciplinary meeting.

  5. The situation of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion of gynecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.; Gerbaulet, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors explain the role and possibilities of radiotherapy in the treatment of lymph node invasion in gynecological cancers as uterine cervix carcinoma, uterus carcinoma, ovary carcinoma and vulva carcinoma

  6. Quality indicators for prostate radiotherapy: are patients disadvantaged by receiving treatment in a 'generalist' centre?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Amanda R; Roos, Daniel E; Kim, Laurence

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective review was to evaluate concordance with evidence-based quality indicator guidelines for prostate cancer patients treated radically in a 'generalist' (as distinct from 'sub-specialist') centre. We were concerned that the quality of treatment may be lower in a generalist centre. If so, the findings could have relevance for many radiotherapy departments that treat prostate cancer. Two hundred fifteen consecutive patients received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy between 1.10.11 and 30.9.12. Treatment was deemed to be in line with evidence-based guidelines if the dose was: (i) 73.8-81 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction for EBRT alone (eviQ guidelines); (ii) 40-50 Gy (EBRT) for EBRT plus high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines); and (iii) 145 Gy for low dose rate (LDR) I-125 monotherapy (NCCN). Additionally, EBRT beam energy should be ≥6 MV using three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and high-risk patients should receive neo-adjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) (eviQ/NCCN). Treatment of pelvic nodes was also assessed. One hundred four high-risk, 84 intermediate-risk and 27 low-risk patients (NCCN criteria) were managed by eight of nine radiation oncologists. Concordance with guideline doses was confirmed in: (i) 125 of 136 patients (92%) treated with EBRT alone; (ii) 32 of 34 patients (94%) treated with EBRT + HDR BRT boost; and (iii) 45 of 45 patients (100%) treated with LDR BRT alone. All EBRT patients were treated with ≥6 MV beams using 3D-CRT (78%) or IMRT (22%). 84%, 21% and 0% of high-risk, intermediate-risk and low-risk patients received ADT, respectively. Overall treatment modality choice (including ADT use and duration where assessable) was concordant with guidelines for 176/207 (85%) of patients. The vast majority of patients were treated concordant with evidence-based guidelines suggesting that

  7. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, C.; Theodorou, M.; Poullos, N.; Astner, S.T.; Geinitz, H.; Molls, M.; Stalla, G.K.; Meyer, B.; Nieder, C.; Tromsoe Univ.; Grosu, A.L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of residual or recurrent pituitary adenomas. Patients and methods: We report on 37 consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas treated with FSRT at our department. All patients had previously undergone surgery. Twenty-nine patients had nonfunctioning, 8 had hormone-producing adenoma. The mean total dose delivered by a linear accelerator was 49.4 Gy (range 45-52.2 Gy), 5 x 1.8 Gy weekly. The mean PTV was 22.8 ccm (range 2.0-78.3 ccm). Evaluation included serial imaging tests, endocrinologic and ophthalmologic examination. Results: Tumor control was 91.9 % for a median follow-up time of 57 months (range 2-111 months). Before FSRT partial hypopituitarism was present in 41 % of patients, while 35 % had anterior panhypopituitarism. After FSRT pituitary function remained normal in 22 %, 43 % had partial pituitary dysfunction, and 35 % had anterior panhypopituitarism. Visual acuity was stable in 76 % of patients, improved in 19 %, and deteriorated in 5 %. Visual fields remained stable in 35 patients (95 %), improved in one and worsened in 1 patient (2.7 %). Conclusion: FSRT is an effective and safe treatment for recurrent or residual pituitary adenoma. Good local tumor control and preservation of adjacent structures can be reached, even for large tumors. (orig.)

  8. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, C.; Theodorou, M.; Poullos, N.; Astner, S.T.; Geinitz, H.; Molls, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Stalla, G.K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Muenchen (Germany). Klinische Neuroendokrinologie; Meyer, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Medicine; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Grosu, A.L [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in the management of residual or recurrent pituitary adenomas. Patients and methods: We report on 37 consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas treated with FSRT at our department. All patients had previously undergone surgery. Twenty-nine patients had nonfunctioning, 8 had hormone-producing adenoma. The mean total dose delivered by a linear accelerator was 49.4 Gy (range 45-52.2 Gy), 5 x 1.8 Gy weekly. The mean PTV was 22.8 ccm (range 2.0-78.3 ccm). Evaluation included serial imaging tests, endocrinologic and ophthalmologic examination. Results: Tumor control was 91.9 % for a median follow-up time of 57 months (range 2-111 months). Before FSRT partial hypopituitarism was present in 41 % of patients, while 35 % had anterior panhypopituitarism. After FSRT pituitary function remained normal in 22 %, 43 % had partial pituitary dysfunction, and 35 % had anterior panhypopituitarism. Visual acuity was stable in 76 % of patients, improved in 19 %, and deteriorated in 5 %. Visual fields remained stable in 35 patients (95 %), improved in one and worsened in 1 patient (2.7 %). Conclusion: FSRT is an effective and safe treatment for recurrent or residual pituitary adenoma. Good local tumor control and preservation of adjacent structures can be reached, even for large tumors. (orig.)

  9. A customized bolus produced using a 3-dimensional printer for radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Wook Kim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Boluses are used in high-energy radiotherapy in order to overcome the skin sparing effect. In practice though, commonly used flat boluses fail to make a perfect contact with the irregular surface of the patient's skin, resulting in air gaps. Hence, we fabricated a customized bolus using a 3-dimensional (3D printer and evaluated its feasibility for radiotherapy. METHODS: We designed two kinds of bolus for production on a 3D printer, one of which was the 3D printed flat bolus for the Blue water phantom and the other was a 3D printed customized bolus for the RANDO phantom. The 3D printed flat bolus was fabricated to verify its physical quality. The resulting 3D printed flat bolus was evaluated by assessing dosimetric parameters such as D1.5 cm, D5 cm, and D10 cm. The 3D printed customized bolus was then fabricated, and its quality and clinical feasibility were evaluated by visual inspection and by assessing dosimetric parameters such as Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D90%, and V90%. RESULTS: The dosimetric parameters of the resulting 3D printed flat bolus showed that it was a useful dose escalating material, equivalent to a commercially available flat bolus. Analysis of the dosimetric parameters of the 3D printed customized bolus demonstrated that it is provided good dose escalation and good contact with the irregular surface of the RANDO phantom. CONCLUSIONS: A customized bolus produced using a 3D printer could potentially replace commercially available flat boluses.

  10. Hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for medically inoperable early stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Ho; Wu, Hong Gyun; KIm, Hak Jae; Park, Charn Il; Lee, Se Hoon; Kim, Dong Wan; Heo, Dae Seong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seou (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes of hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) with three-dimensional conformal technique for medically inoperable patients with early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate prognostic factors. We performed a retrospective review of 26 patients who underwent HFRT for early stage NSCLC between September 2005 and August 2011. Only clinical stage T1-3N0 was included. The median RT dose was 70 Gy (range, 60 to 72 Gy) and the median biologically equivalent dose (BED) was 94.5 Gy (range, 78.0 to 100.8 Gy). In 84.6% of patients, 4 Gy per fraction was used. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin was given to 2 of 26 patients. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 21 months (range, 13 to 49 months). The overall response rate was 53.9%, and the initial local control rate was 100%. The median survival duration was 27.8 months. Rates of 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), local control (LC), and locoregional-free survival (LRFS) were 54.3%, 61.1%, 74.6%, and 61.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that BED (>90 vs. {<=}90 Gy) was an independent prognostic factor influencing PFS, LC, and LRFS. Severe toxicities over grade 3 were not observed. Radical HFRT can yield satisfactory disease control with acceptable rates of toxicities in medically inoperable patients with early stage NSCLC. HFRT is a viable alternative for clinics and patients ineligible for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. BED over 90 Gy and 4 Gy per fraction might be appropriate for HFRT.

  11. Setup error in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Jinsheng; Zhang Weijian; Chen Jinmei; Cai Chuanshu; Ke Chunlin; Chen Xiuying; Wu Bing; Guo Feibao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the setup errors in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for thoracic esophageal carcinoma using electronic portal imaging device(EPID) and calculate the margins from CTV to PTV. Methods: Forty-one patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma who received 3DCRT were continuously enrolled into this study. The anterior and lateral electronic portal images (EPI) were aquired by EPID once a week. The setup errors were obtained through comparing the difference between EPI and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR). Then the setup margins from CTV to PTV were calculated. By using self paired design, 22 patients received definitive radiotherapy with different margins. Group A: the margins were 10 mm in all the three axes; Group B: the margins were aquired in this study. The difference were compared by Paired t-test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: The margins from CTV to PTV in x, y and z axes were 8.72 mm, 10.50 mm and 5.62 mm, respectively. Between the group A and group B, the difference of the maximum dose of the spinal cord was significant(4638.7 cGy ± 1449.6 cGy vs. 4310.2 cGy ± 1528.7 cGy; t=5.48, P=0.000), and the difference of NTCP for the spinal cord was also significant (4.82% ± 5.99% vs. 3.64% ± 4.70%; Z=-2.70, P=0.007). Conclusions: For patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma who receive 3DCRT in author's department, the margins from CTV to PTV in x, y and z axes were 8.72 mm, 10.50 mm and 5.62 mm, respectively. The spinal cord could be better protected by using these setup margins than using 10 mm in each axis. (authors)

  12. Occurrence and treatment of radiation injuries following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao

    1978-01-01

    General side effects recognized in digestive organ and hematopoietic organ during radiotherapy were described, and curative medicines for them were mentioned. Countermeasures for dermatitis, reactions of oral, pharyngeal or espophageal mucosae, radiation pneumonitis, radiation enteritis, urinary tract injuries which appeared during radiotherapy were described, and curative medicines for them were mentioned. Skin ulcer, ulcers in oral cavity, and larynx, edema in larynx and lower larynx, bone necrosis, necrosis of thyroid cartilage, injuries of eyeball, radiation damage in lung, delayed injuries following radiotherapy for uterine cancer, nervous system disorder, and lymphatic system disorder were mentioned as main delayed local injuries, and countermeasures for them were described. Lastly, a mental attitude for radiotherapy was described. (Serizawa, K.)

  13. Intolerable toxicity of simultaneous 5-fluorouracil-radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastrointestinal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higi, M.; Arndt, D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitt, G.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous application of 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy is generally accepted in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumours. However, in 10 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal tumours we oberseved intolerable toxicity during this combined treatment regimen. Because of gastrointestinal and haematological toxicity the combined modality was interrupted in all patients. Given sequentially, this regimen was tolerated. Our experience indicates that an intolerable high rate of toxicity has to be taken into consideration in case of the simultaneous combination of 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  14. The role of radiotherapy in the local treatment of a straightaway metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, D.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is diagnosed when it is already metastatic in about 6 per cent of cases. The author discusses comparative studies which showed that a surgical treatment of the primitive tumour resulted in a global survival benefit for the patients. As the role of radiotherapy in such a situation, either alone or with surgery, is not well documented, he intends to discuss the interest of radiotherapy within the frame of the local treatment of a straightaway metastatic breast cancer. Short communication

  15. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermund, H.; Rappaport, I.; Nethery, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    Before radiotherapy can be initiated, the patient must be examined thoroughly according to specific protocol to determine the extent of the tumor. Surgical resection accompanied by radiotherapy may be necessary in instances of persistent carcinoma. The radiation response of the tumor must be evaluated, and the optimal tumor dose must be determined to ensure maximum destruction of the tumor and minimum damage to normal tissues. Follow-up examinations should emphasize good oral hygiene to prevent further disease. (U.S.)

  16. 71: Three dimensional radiation treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, J.A.; Wong, J.W.; Harms, W.B.; Drzymala, R.E.; Emami, B.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype 3-dimensional (3-D) radiation treatment planning (RTP) system has been developed and is in use. The system features a real-time display device and an array processor for computer intensive computations. The dose distribution can be displayed as 2-D isodose distributions superimposed on 2-D gray scale images of the patient's anatomy for any arbitrary plane and as a display of isodose surfaces in 3-D. In addition, dose-volume histograms can be generated. 7 refs.; 2 figs

  17. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of meningiomas; Role de la radiotherapie dans le traitement des meningiomes cerebraux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, G. [Centre de protontherapie, 91 - Orsay (France); Renard, A.; Mazeron, J.J. [Groupe Hospitalier la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Radiotherapie, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France); Valery, C. [Groupe Hospitalier la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Neurochirurgie, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France); Mokhtari, K. [Groupe Hospitalier la Pitie-Salpetriere, Lab. de Neuropathologie Raymond-Escourolle, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-06-01

    Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of meningiomas. Cerebral meningiomas account for 15-20% of all cerebral tumours. Although seldom malignant, they frequently recur in spite of complete surgery, which remains the cornerstone of the treatment. In order to decrease the probability of local recurrence, radiotherapy has often been recommended in atypical or malignant meningioma as well as in benign meningioma which was incompletely resected. However, this treatment never was the subject of prospective studies, randomized or not. The purpose of this review of the literature was to give a progress report on the results of different published series in the field of methodology as well as in the techniques of radiotherapy. Proposals for a therapeutic choice are made according to this analysis. For grade I or grade II-III meningiomas, limits of gross tumor volume (GTV) include the tumour in place or the residual tumour after surgery; clinical target volume (CTV) limits include gross tumour volume before surgery with a GTV-CTV distance of 1 and 2 cm respectively. Delivered doses are 55 Gy into CTV and 55-60 Gy and 70 Gy into GTV for grade I and grade II-III meningiomas respectively. (authors)

  18. Patterns of initial treatment failure of esophageal cancer following radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Nakajima, Kotaro [Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohara, Kiyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Irie, Toshiyuki; Itai, Yuji

    1999-11-01

    Sixty patients with stage I-III esophageal squamous cell cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy (RT) were analyzed for patterns of treatment failure. Patients were treated by external RT alone (n=45) or in combination with intraluminal RT (N=15) when suitable, with prescribed total doses ranging from 59.4 to 104.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and/or 5-fluorouracil was administered to 19 patients. The two-year actuarial survival rate and two year disease-free survival rate were 29.5% and 18.3%, respectively. Two-year failure rates were 66.5%, 36.9%, and 3.8%, for the esophagus, lymph nodes, and other sites, respectively. Two-year esophageal failure rates for patients with T1-2 (n=8), T3 (n=30), and T4 disease (n=22) were 14.3%, 64.7%, and 87.9%, respectively (p<0.05). A multivariate analysis of esophageal failure with descriptive variables of T classification, tumor length, and performance of intraluminal RT revealed that only T classification was an independent factor (p=0.021). Two-year lymph node failure rates were 24.8% and 33.6% for patients with N0 (n=36) and N1 disease (n=24), respectively (p=0.0035). Lymph node failure in N0 patients was found exclusively outside the treatment field. These results suggest that inclusion of potential lymph node metastases in the radiation field could lessen the lymph node failure rate in T1-3N0M0 patients. (author)

  19. A semiautomatic tool for prostate segmentation in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Jörn; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Tømmerås, Veronika Kristine; Marienhagen, Kirsten; Godtliebsen, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Delineation of the target volume is a time-consuming task in radiotherapy treatment planning, yet essential for a successful treatment of cancers such as prostate cancer. To facilitate the delineation procedure, the paper proposes an intuitive approach for 3D modeling of the prostate by slice-wise best fitting ellipses. The proposed estimate is initialized by the definition of a few control points in a new patient. The method is not restricted to particular image modalities but assumes a smooth shape with elliptic cross sections of the object. A training data set of 23 patients was used to calculate a prior shape model. The mean shape model was evaluated based on the manual contour of 10 test patients. The patient records of training and test data are based on axial T1-weighted 3D fast-field echo (FFE) sequences. The manual contours were considered as the reference model. Volume overlap (Vo), accuracy (Ac) (both ratio, range 0-1, optimal value 1) and Hausdorff distance (HD) (mm, optimal value 0) were calculated as evaluation parameters. The median and median absolute deviation (MAD) between manual delineation and deformed mean best fitting ellipses (MBFE) was Vo (0.9 ± 0.02), Ac (0.81 ± 0.03) and HD (4.05 ± 1.3)mm and between manual delineation and best fitting ellipses (BFE) was Vo (0.96 ± 0.01), Ac (0.92 ± 0.01) and HD (1.6 ± 0.27)mm. Additional results show a moderate improvement of the MBFE results after Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) method. The results emphasize the potential of the proposed method of modeling the prostate by best fitting ellipses. It shows the robustness and reproducibility of the model. A small sample test on 8 patients suggest possible time saving using the model

  20. Dosimetric comparison of different treatment modalities for stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Ming; Lai, Yuan-Chun; Jeng, Chien-Chung; Tseng, Chia-Ying

    2017-09-16

    The modalities for performing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) on the brain include the cone-based linear accelerator (linac), the flattening filter-free (FFF) volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) linac, and tomotherapy. In this study, the cone-based linac, FFF-VMAT linac, and tomotherapy modalities were evaluated by measuring the differences in doses delivered during brain SRT and experimentally assessing the accuracy of the output radiation doses through clinical measurements. We employed a homemade acrylic dosimetry phantom representing the head, within which a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and radiochromic EBT3 film were installed. Using the conformity/gradient index (CGI) and Paddick methods, the quality of the doses delivered by the various SRT modalities was evaluated. The quality indicators included the uniformity, conformity, and gradient indices. TLDs and EBT3 films were used to experimentally assess the accuracy of the SRT dose output. The dose homogeneity indices of all the treatment modalities were lower than 1.25. The cone-based linac had the best conformity for all tumors, regardless of the tumor location and size, followed by the FFF-VMAT linac; tomography was the worst-performing treatment modality in this regard. The cone-based linac had the best gradient, regardless of the tumor location and size, whereas the FFF-VMAT linac had a better gradient than tomotherapy for a large tumor diameter (28 mm). The TLD and EBT3 measurements of the dose at the center of tumors indicated that the average difference between the measurements and the calculated dose was generally less than 4%. When the 3% 3-mm gamma passing rate metric was used, the average passing rates of all three treatment modalities exceeded 98%. Regarding the dose, the cone-based linac had the best conformity and steepest dose gradient for tumors of different sizes and distances from the brainstem. The results of this study suggest that SRT should be performed using the cone

  1. Radiotherapy for esthesioneuroblastoma: is elective nodal irradiation warranted in the multimodality treatment approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, O Kyu; Lee, Sang-wook; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Sung Bae; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Chang Jin; Jo, Kyung Ja; Choi, Eun Kyung; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do

    2011-02-01

    The role of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in radiotherapy for esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) has not been clearly defined. We analyzed treatment outcomes of patients with ENB and the frequency of cervical nodal failure in the absence of ENI. Between August 1996 and December 2007, we consulted with 19 patients with ENB regarding radiotherapy. Initial treatment consisted of surgery alone in 2 patients; surgery and postoperative radiotherapy in 4; surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy in 1; surgery, postoperative radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in 3; and chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy in 5. Five patients did not receive planned radiotherapy because of disease progression. Including 2 patients who received salvage radiotherapy, 14 patients were treated with radiotherapy. Elective nodal irradiation was performed in 4 patients with high-risk factors, including 3 with cervical lymph node metastasis at presentation. Fourteen patients were analyzable, with a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 7-64 months). The overall 3-year survival rate was 73.4%. Local failure occurred in 3 patients (21.4%), regional cervical failure in 3 (21.4%), and distant failure in 2 (14.3%). No cervical nodal failure occurred in patients treated with combined systemic chemotherapy regardless of ENI. Three cervical failures occurred in the 4 patients treated with ENI or neck dissection (75%), none of whom received systemic chemotherapy. ENI during radiotherapy for ENB seems to play a limited role in preventing cervical nodal failure. Omitting ENI may be an option if patients are treated with a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiotherapy for Esthesioneuroblastoma: Is Elective Nodal Irradiation Warranted in the Multimodality Treatment Approach?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, O Kyu; Lee, Sang-wook; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Sung Bae; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Chang Jin; Jo, Kyung Ja; Choi, Eun Kyung; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The role of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in radiotherapy for esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) has not been clearly defined. We analyzed treatment outcomes of patients with ENB and the frequency of cervical nodal failure in the absence of ENI. Methods and Materials: Between August 1996 and December 2007, we consulted with 19 patients with ENB regarding radiotherapy. Initial treatment consisted of surgery alone in 2 patients; surgery and postoperative radiotherapy in 4; surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy in 1; surgery, postoperative radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in 3; and chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy in 5. Five patients did not receive planned radiotherapy because of disease progression. Including 2 patients who received salvage radiotherapy, 14 patients were treated with radiotherapy. Elective nodal irradiation was performed in 4 patients with high-risk factors, including 3 with cervical lymph node metastasis at presentation. Results: Fourteen patients were analyzable, with a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 7-64 months). The overall 3-year survival rate was 73.4%. Local failure occurred in 3 patients (21.4%), regional cervical failure in 3 (21.4%), and distant failure in 2 (14.3%). No cervical nodal failure occurred in patients treated with combined systemic chemotherapy regardless of ENI. Three cervical failures occurred in the 4 patients treated with ENI or neck dissection (75%), none of whom received systemic chemotherapy. Conclusions: ENI during radiotherapy for ENB seems to play a limited role in preventing cervical nodal failure. Omitting ENI may be an option if patients are treated with a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  3. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral breast irradiation using a mono iso-center technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Basu, Saumen; Bhuiyan, Md Anisuzzaman; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Haque, Kh Anamul; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Un Nabi, Md Rashid; Das, K. J. Maria

    2017-06-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the synchronous bilateral breast irradiation radiotherapy technique using a single isocenter. Materials and Methods: Six patients of synchronous bilateral breast were treated with single isocenter technique from February 2011 to June 2016. All the patients underwent a CT-simulation using appropriate positioning device. Target volumes and critical structures like heart, lung, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated slice by slice in the CT data. An isocenter was placed above the sternum on the skin and both medial tangential and lateral tangential of the breast / chest wall were created using asymmetrical jaws to avoid the beam divergence through the lung and heart. The field weighting were adjusted manually to obtain a homogenous dose distribution. The planning objectives were to deliver uniform doses around the target and keep the doses to the organ at risk within the permissible limit. The beam energy of 6 MV or combination of 6 MV and 15 MV photons were used in the tangential fields according to the tangential separation. Boluses were used for all the mastectomy patients to increase the doses on the chest wall. In addition to that enhanced dynamic wedge and field in field technique were also used to obtain a homogenous distribution around the target volume and reduce the hot spots. The isocenter was just kept on the skin, such that the beam junctions will be overlapped only on the air just above the sternum. Acute toxicity during the treatment and late toxicity were recorded during the patient's follow-up. Results: During the radiotherapy treatment follow-up there were no acute skin reactions in the field junctions, but one patient had grade 1 esophagitis and two patients had grade 2 skin reactions in the chest wall. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months (range: 8 - 49 months), no patients had a local recurrence, but one patients with triple negative disease had a distant metastases in brain and died

  4. Value of radiotherapy in the treatment of metastases of the hypernephroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostel, F.; Kuhne-Velte, H.J.; Woellgens, P.

    1983-01-01

    52 own cases are retrospectively evaluated in order to investigate the importance of radiotherapy for the treatment of the metastazing hypernephroma. The treatment is above all indicated in case of painful osseous metastases, but the success is retarded and often appears only after a focal dose of more than 30 Gy. Furthermore, radiotherapy of brain metastases and lymph node metastases within the mediastinum is often successful, whereas the irradiation of pulmonary metastases has to be judged less favorably. In most of all cases, surgical interventions are not an alternative, but a complementary treatment to radiotherapy. In default of promising systemic therapy methods, radiotherapy of metastases of the hypernephroma are a possibility to achieve a real palliative effect. (orig.) [de

  5. Clinical profile and response to treatment of patients with pituitary adenomas submitted to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Paulo Lazaro de; Freire, Geison Moreira; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Segreto, Roberto Araujo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Abucham Filho, Julio Zaki

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the clinical profile of patients with pituitary adenoma and their response to radiotherapy. Material and method: retrospective study with 22 patients with diagnosis of pituitary adenoma which were submitted to radiotherapy between March 2004 and December 2008. Patients' characteristics such as gender, age, clinical presentation, surgical approach, immunohistochemistry profile, dose of radiation and the response to therapy were analyzed using hormonal dosages and imaging exams. Results: the median age was 51 years and equally distributed in both genders. The tumors were divided according to the Hardy's classification: 27.5% had grade II, 27.5% had grade III and 45% had grade IV. The main symptoms presented by patients at diagnosis were visual impairment in 77% of cases, headache in 68%, amenorrhea and acromegaly in 27% and galactorrhoea in 4.5%. Transphenoidal surgery was performed in 21 patients and only 1 patient was submitted to transcranial approach; 91% of cases had partial resection. Concerning to immunohistochemistry, the expression of ACTH was the most frequent, being present in 41% of cases. The patients were treated in megavoltage equipment mostly with 6 MV linear accelerator. The total radiation dose was 45 Gy in 68% of patients and a dose of 50.4 Gy in 13% of cases. Three-dimensional planning was used in 20 patients. The median follow-up was 41 months. Laboratory and imaging improvement were observed in 73% of patients, stability in 22.5%, and worsening in 4.5%. Conclusion: the results show good rates of response and control of pituitary adenomas by radiation in the first four years after treatment. Considering it has a slow response to treatment, there is a high chance of improvement in results later during the follow-up. (author)

  6. Selection and determination of beam weights based on genetic algorithms for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingen Wu; Zunliang Wang

    2000-01-01

    A genetic algorithm has been used to optimize the selection of beam weights for external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. A fitness function is defined, which includes a difference function to achieve a least-square fit to doses at preselected points in a planning target volume, and a penalty item to constrain the maximum allowable doses delivered to critical organs. Adjustment between the dose uniformity within the target volume and the dose constraint to the critical structures can be achieved by varying the beam weight variables in the fitness function. A floating-point encoding schema and several operators, like uniform crossover, arithmetical crossover, geometrical crossover, Gaussian mutation and uniform mutation, have been used to evolve the population. Three different cases were used to verify the correctness of the algorithm and quality assessment based on dose-volume histograms and three-dimensional dose distributions were given. The results indicate that the genetic algorithm presented here has considerable potential. (author)

  7. Influence of preventive dental treatment on mutans streptococci counts in patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Buzati Meca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of chlorhexidine gluconate, sodium fluoride and sodium iodine on mutans streptococci counts in saliva of irradiated patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five patients were separated into three experimental groups and received chlorhexidine (0.12%, sodium fluoride (0.5% or sodium iodine (2%, which were used daily during radiotherapy and for 6 months after the conclusion of the treatment. In addition, a fourth group, composed by 15 additional oncologic patients, who did not receive the mouthwash or initial dental treatment, constituted the control group. Clinical evaluations were performed in the first visit to dental clinic, after initial dental treatment, immediately before radiotherapy, after radiotherapy and 30, 60, 90 days and 6 months after the conclusion of radiotherapy. After clinical examinations, samples of saliva were inoculated on SB20 selective agar and incubated under anaerobiosis, at 37ºC for 48 h. Total mutans streptococci counts were also evaluated by using real-time PCR, through TaqMan system, with specific primers and probes for S. mutans and S. sobrinus. RESULTS: All preventive protocols were able to reduce significantly mutans streptococci counts, but chlorhexidine gluconate was the most effective, and induced a significant amelioration of radiotherapy side effects, such as mucositis and candidosis. CONCLUSION: These results highlights the importance of the initial dental treatment for patients who will be subjected to radiotherapy for head and neck cancer treatment.

  8. Partially wedged beams improve radiotherapy treatment of urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig Paul; Hafslund, Rune; Gustafsson, Anders; Smaaland, Rune; Dahl, Olav

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Partially wedged beams (PWBs) having wedge in one part of the field only, can be shaped using dynamic jaw intensity modulation. The possible clinical benefit of PWBs was tested in treatment plans for muscle-infiltrating bladder cancer. Material and methods: Three-dimensional treatment plans for 25 bladder cancer patients were analyzed. The originally prescribed standard conformal four-field box technique, which includes the use of lateral ordinary wedge beams, was compared to a modified conformal treatment using customized lateral PWBs. In these modified treatment plans, only the anterior parts of the two lateral beams had a wedge. To analyze the potential clinical benefit of treatment with PWBs, treatment plans were scored and compared using both physical parameters and biological dose response models. One tumour control probability model and two normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were applied. Different parameters for normal tissue radiation tolerance presented in the literature were used. Results: By PWBs the dose homogeneity throughout the target volume was improved for all patients, reducing the average relative standard deviation of the target dose distribution from 2.3 to 1.8%. A consistent reduction in the maximum doses to surrounding normal tissue volumes was also found. The most notable improvement was demonstrated in the rectum where the volume receiving more than the prescribed tumour dose was halved. Treatment with PWBs would permit a target dose escalation of 2-6 Gy in several of the patients analyzed, without increasing the overall risk for complications. The number of patients suitable for dose escalation ranged from 3 to 15, depending on whether support from all or only one of the five applied NTCP model/parameter combinations were required in each case to recommend dose escalation. Conclusion: PWBs represent a simple dose conformation tool that may allow radiation dose escalation in the treatment of muscle

  9. Effect of 3D radiotherapy planning compared to 2D planning within a conventional treatment schedule of advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraube, P.; Spahn, U.; Oetzel, D.; Wannenmacher, M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The effect of 3D radiotherapy planning (3D RTP) in comparison to 2D radiotherapy planning (2D RTP) was evaluated in a usually practiced treatment schedule (starting by v./d. opposing portals, continued with computer-planned portals) for non-small-cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: In 20 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer the computer-planned part of the treatment schedule was calculated 2- and 3-dimensionally. Target volume were the primary tumor, the involved and the electively irradiated mediastinal lymph nodes. The results of the 2D RTP were recalculated 3-dimensionally and the mean doses to target volume and organs at risk were defined. Further, the normal tissue complications were calculated. Results: Under the prerequisite of 44 Gy maximally allowed to the spinal cord and a dose to the reference point of 50 Gy a small, but significant advantage with 2.1 Gy to the target (p=0.004) and a reduction of 3.6 Gy to the heart (p=0.05) was achievable for 3D RTP. The dose to the lungs did not differ significantly (19.7 Gy for 2D RTP, 20.3 Gy for 3D RTP). The dose to the heart was not estimated critical by NTCP (normal tissue complication probability). The NTCP for the ipsilateral lung was 16.1 and 18.7% for 2D RTP and 3D RTP, respectively. Regarding the simulator-planned ap/pa fields at the start of the radiotherapy the advantage of 3D RTP was further reduced but remained significant. Favorable with respect to the mean lung dose and the NTCP (18.7% NTCP ipsilateral lung for early onset of 3D planned radiotherapy vs 31.7% for late onset of 3D planned radiotherapy) but not significantly measurable is the early start of the treatment by computerized RTP. Conclusion: The main advantage of 3D RTP in treatment of advanced lung cancer is the better coverage of the target volume. A reduction of the mean lung dose cannot be expected. A dose escalation by 3D RTP to target volumes as described here seems not to be possible because of

  10. Sexual Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Putten, Wim van; Incrocci, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide information about sexual function (SF) after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer while taking important factors into account that influence SF. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a total of 268 patients from a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy agreed to participate in an additional part of the trial that evaluated SF. Results: At baseline 28% of patients had erectile dysfunction (ED). After 1 year, 27% of the pretreatment potent patients had developed ED. After 2 years this percentage had increased to 36%. After 3 years it almost stabilized at 38%. Satisfaction with sexual life was significantly correlated with ED. After 2 years one third of the pre-treatment potent patients still had considerable to very much sexual desire and found sex (very) important. No significant differences were found between the two dose-arms. Potency aids were used on a regular base by 14% of the patients. Conclusion: By taking adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), HT during follow-up and potency aids into account, we found a lower percentage of ED after 3D-CRT than reported in previous prospective studies. A large group of patients still had sexual desire, considered sex important and 14% used potency aids after 3D-CRT

  11. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna Poli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation ( p = 0.037. A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction ( p = 0.045. Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation.

  12. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Santam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Oinam, Arun Singh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm 3 ), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  13. Design and Shielding of Radiotherapy Treatment Facilities; IPEM Report 75, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Patrick; Eaton, David

    2017-07-01

    Design and Shielding of Radiotherapy Treatment Facilities provides readers with a single point of reference for protection advice to the construction and modification of radiotherapy facilities. The book assembles a faculty of national and international experts on all modalities including megavoltage and kilovoltage photons, brachytherapy and high-energy particles, and on conventional and Monte Carlo shielding calculations. This book is a comprehensive reference for qualified experts and radiation-shielding designers in radiation physics and also useful to anyone involved in the design of radiotherapy facilities.

  14. Combination of radiotherapy and selective chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced ovarian carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, R.; Brachetti, A.; Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar

    1982-01-01

    A report is given on 160 patients suffering from ovarian carcinomas the stages which were exactly determined by TNM classification. 32 patients had tumors of the stages T1-T3, 128 patients had tumors of the stage T4. All T3 subgroups showed favorable results after radical surgery and a postoperative combination of radiotherapy and selective cytostatic chemotherapy. The therapy plans including radiotherapy had more advantages than those without radiotherapy. Furthermore, the cytostatic treatment was more successful after a chemotherapy resistance test than after blind administration of cytostatic drugs. (orig.) [de

  15. Radiotherapy effect in conservation treatment for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachini, V.; Ferreri, A.J.M.; Farante, G.; Agresti, R.; Galimberti, V.; Zurrida, S.; Veronesi, P.

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) in conservative treatment for breast cancer (CT-BC) has been proven to be determinant for the local control of the disease. Radiation therapy was described by several authors as the most important factor affecting the cosmetic results of this treatment. Technical progress in RT, use of filters and wedges and an increased knowledge of the influence of fraction size total dose and irradiated volume on breast tissues contributed to avoid major radiotherapeutic side effects in the CT-BC. Cosmetic outcome from 2 groups of patients (pts) with breast cancer in stage T 1-2(T> = 2,5 cm) N 0-1 M o0 of the prospective trial Milan III were compared. Both groups pts (n=89) were treated with quadrantectomyand axillary dissection. 49 pts received complementary RT with a dose of 50 Gy over 5 weeks with a daily fraction of 2 Gy and a further boost of 10 Gy (10 MeV electrons) on the scar. Remaining 40 pts did not receive RT. Cosmetic results were subjectively and objectively (asymmetry index) evaluated. No significant cosmetic differences were observed between the 2 study groups. A good or excellent symmetry was observed in 59% of irradiated pts and 64% of non irradiated pts. Negative results were observed in 4% and 2% respectively. Subjective ovulation showed similar results, with a good or excellent symmetry in 57% of irradiated pts and 72.5% of non irradiated pts. Poor results were observed in 16.3% and 27.5% respectively. Telangiectasia were observed in 4% of irradiated pts, while hypertrophied scars were only noted in non irradiated pts (15%). No acute side effects of RT, as erythema or ulceration of breast skin, were recorded. In our experience, the standard dose of 50 Gy administered by two opposite tangential fields plus a 10 Gy boost did not affect the cosmetic results of CT.BC, whereas it provided a better local control of disease. The possibility to avoid RT in selected group of pts should be justified by the discomfort of this treatment for the pt, cost

  16. Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer Using Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil Before and After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil: A Multicenter Study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Trevor; Joon, Daryl Lim; Willis, David; Jayamoham, Jayasingham; Spry, Nigel; Harvey, Jennifer; Di Iulio, Juliana; Milner, Alvin; Mann, G. Bruce; Michael, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The INT0116 study has established postoperative chemoradiotherapy as the standard of care for completely resected gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the optimal chemoradiation regimen remains to be defined. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate an alternative chemoradiation regimen that combines more current systemic treatment with modern techniques of radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach who had undergone an R0 resection were eligible. Adjuvant therapy consisted of one cycle of epirubicin, cisplatin, and 5-FU (ECF), followed by radiotherapy with concurrent infusional 5-FU, and then two additional cycles of ECF. Radiotherapy was delivered using precisely defined, multiple-field, three-dimensional conformal techniques. Results: A total of 54 assessable patients were enrolled from 19 institutions. The proportion of patients commencing Cycles 1, 2, and 3 of ECF chemotherapy were 100%, 81%, and 67% respectively. In all, 94% of patients who received radiotherapy completed treatment as planned. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 66% of patients with 7.4% developing febrile neutropenia. Most neutropenic episodes (83%) occurred in the post-radiotherapy period during cycles 2 and 3 of ECF. Grade 3/4 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 28% of patients. In all, 35% of radiotherapy treatment plans contained protocol deviations that were satisfactorily amended before commencement of treatment. At median follow-up of 36 months, the 3-year overall survival rate was estimated at 61.6%. Conclusions: This adjuvant regimen using ECF before and after three-dimensional conformal chemoradiation is feasible and can be safely delivered in a cooperative group setting. A regimen similar to this is currently being compared with the INT0116 regimen in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, randomized Phase III trial.

  17. Outcome of four-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy for centrally located lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuyttens, Joost J.; Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Praag, John; Aluwini, Shafak; Klaveren, Rob J. van; Verhoef, Cornelis; Pattynama, Peter M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess local control, overall survival, and toxicity of four-dimensional, risk-adapted stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered while tracking respiratory motion in patients with primary and metastatic lung cancer located in the central chest. Methods: Fifty-eight central lesions of 56 patients (39 with primary, 17 with metastatic tumors) were treated. Fifteen tumors located near the esophagus were treated with 6 fractions of 8 Gy. Other tumors were treated according to the following dose escalation scheme: 5 fractions of 9 Gy (n = 6), then 5 fractions of 10 Gy (n = 15), and finally 5 fractions of 12 Gy (n = 22). Results: Dose constraints for critical structures were generally achieved; in 21 patients the coverage of the PTV was reduced below 95% to protect adjacent organs at risk. At a median follow-up of 23 months, the actuarial 2-years local tumor control was 85% for tumors treated with a BED >100 Gy compared to 60% for tumors treated with a BED ⩽100 Gy. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 1–2 esophagitis was observed in 11% of patients. Conclusion: SBRT of central lung lesions can be safely delivered, with promising early tumor control in patients many of whom have severe comorbid conditions.

  18. Comparison of metastatic disease after local tumour treatment with radiotherapy or surgery in various tumour models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiter, J. de; Cramer, S.J.; Lelieveld, P.; Putten, L.M. van

    1982-01-01

    Spontaneous metastases in lymph nodes and/or the lung were obtained after tumour cell inoculation of four mouse tumours and one rat tumour into the foot-pads of syngeneic animals or their F 1 hybrids. Following local radiotherapy with doses of 45-80 Gy, significantly more mice died with metastases than following local amputation of the tumour-bearing foot when the 2661 carcinoma was involved. No significant difference was observed after these treatments for the other tumours. The enhancement of metastatic growth after local radiotherapy in the 2661 carcinoma seems not to be due to incomplete killing of tumour cells in the foot. The presence of irradiated normal structures and tumour tissue after radiotherapy promoted the outgrowth of 2661 carcinoma cells which were outside the radiation field at the time of treatment. Evidently, even under similar experimental conditions, radiotherapy may enhance the growth of metastases from some tumours and not from others. (author)

  19. Multi-dimensional dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiotherapy for uveal melanoma using radiochromic EBT film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturtewagen, E.; Fuss, M.; Georg, D.; Paelinck, L.; Wagter, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Since 1997, linac based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanoma has been continuously developed at the Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University Vienna. The aim of the present study was (i) to test a new type of radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT) for dosimetric verification of class solutions for these treatments and (ii) to verify treatment plan acceptance criteria, which are based on gamma values statisitcs. An EPSON Expression 1680 Pro flat bed scanner was utilized for film reading. To establish a calibration curve, films were cut in squares of 2 x 2 cm 2 , positioned at 5 cm depth in a solid water phantom and were irradiated with different dose levels (0.5 and 5 Gy) in a 5 x 5 cm 2 field at 6 MV. A previously developed solid phantom (polystyrene) was used with overall dimensions corresponding to an average human head. EBT films were placed at four different depths (10, 20, 25 and 30 mm) and all films were irradiated simultaneously. Four different treatment plans were verified that resemble typical clinical situations. These plans differed in irradiation technique (conformal mMLC or circular arc SRT) and in tumour size (PTV of 1 or 2.5 cm 3 ). In-house developed software was applied to calculate gamma (γ) index values and to perform several statistical operations (e.g. γ-area histograms). At depths of 10 mm γ 1% (γ-value where 1% of the points have an equal or higher value in the region of interest) were between 1-3 and maximum γ > 1 (% of γ-values > 1 in the region of interest) areas were almost 30%. At larger depths, i.e. more close to the isocenter, γ 1% was > 1 areas were mostly < 5%. Average γ values were about 0.5. Besides the compromised accuracy in the buildup region, previously defined IMRT acceptance criteria [Stock et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 50 (2005) 399-411] could be applied as well to SRT. Radiochromic EBT films, in combination with a flat-bed scanner, were found to be an ideal multidimensional dosimetric tool for treatment

  20. Radiotherapy - an effective treatment for vaginal verrucous carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinecke, L.; Thornley, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Vaginal carcinoma makes up 1%-2% of all gynaecological tumours. Verrucous carcinoma of the vagina is even more rare -only 16 cases are reported in the scientific literature. A case of a complete regression after 60 Gy fractionated radiotherapy by a tumour 12 cm 3 in size is reported. Most authors are of the opinion that radiotherapy causes anaplastic transformation of verrucous carcinoma. The minority view, that anaplastic transformation does not occur, is correct and is supported by our clinical and radiological data. The conflicting literature on vaginal verrucous carcinoma (VVC) is reviewed with reference to verrucous carcinoma at other sites. (Author)

  1. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D{sub clin} − D{sub pred}. The mean (〈δD{sub r}〉), standard deviation (σ{sub δD{sub r}}), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r{sub PTV}) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r{sub PTV} ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The

  2. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D clin − D pred . The mean (〈δD r 〉), standard deviation (σ δD r ), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r PTV ) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r PTV ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The average prediction error was less

  3. Investigation of dose modifications related to dental cares in an ORL radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Conto, C.; Gschwind, R.; Makovicka, L.; De Conto, C.; Martin, E.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the investigation of the influence of dental implants on the dose received during an ORL radiotherapy treatment in order to optimize both the dosimetric planning and the patient radioprotection. They report experimental measurements performed on a phantom representing a lower jaw in irradiation conventional conditions. Then, they report the Monte Carlo simulation of the dose distribution in the phantom using the BEAMnrc code designed for radiotherapy

  4. Surgery or radiotherapy for the treatment of bone hydatid disease: a retrospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengru Xie

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: This retrospective case series describes, for the first time, the clinical outcomes in a series of patients treated with radiotherapy for bone hydatid disease. Although no direct comparison between the treatment groups could be made due to methodological limitations of the study design, this study indicates that well-designed prospective randomized controlled clinical trials assessing radiotherapy may be warranted in patients with inoperable hydatid disease of the bones.

  5. Treatment by stereotactic radiotherapy of tumoral injuries after implant placement: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meingan, P.; Rio, E.; Labbe-Devilliers, C.; Geffroy, D.; Ricaud-Couprie, M.; Doutriaux-Dumoulin, I.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the interest and the place of stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of primitive or secondary tumoral injuries of the liver. To describe the technique of implants placement. Conclusion: the liver stereotactic radiotherapy, after implant placement, seems to be an alternative or complementary therapy to the radiofrequency for patients refused for surgery, with moderated side effects and a noticeable survival. Complementary studies, especially associated to radiofrequency must be considered. (N.C.)

  6. Veliparib in combination with radiotherapy for the treatment of MGMT unmethylated glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jue, Toni Rose; Nozue, Kyoko; Lester, Ashleigh J.; Joshi, Swapna; Schroder, Lisette B. W.; Whittaker, Shane P.; Nixdorf, Sheri; Rapkins, Robert W.; Khasraw, Mustafa; McDonald, Kerrie L.

    2017-01-01

    Background The O 6 -methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) gene is frequently unmethylated in patients with glioblastoma (GBM), rendering them non-responsive to the standard treatment regime of surgery followed by concurrent radiotherapy (RT) and temozolomide. Here, we investigate the efficacy of adding a PARP inhibitor, veliparib, to radiotherapy to treat MGMT unmethylated GBM. Methods The inhibition of PARP with veliparib (ABT-888), a potent and orally bioavailable inhibitor in combination ...

  7. Special set-up and treatment techniques for the radiotherapy of pediatric malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.; Donaldson, S.S.; Bagshaw, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The prevention of serious and long term complications of treatment have become as important a consideration in the therapy of children with malignant disease as the goal of tumor control. This balance requires meticulous treatment planning and attention to the treatment preparation and immobilization techniques when radiotherapy is administered to children. Accurate localization of tumor volume and daily reproducibility is essential for delivering precise irradiation. Four special set-up and treatment techniques which have a specific usefulness in radiotherapy for pediatric malignancies are defined and illustrated with the aid of clinical cases. They include the three point set-up, the split beam technique, the isocentric technique, and the strinking field technique

  8. Medical images fusion for application in treatment planning systems in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros, Renato Assenci

    2006-01-01

    Software for medical images fusion was developed for utilization in CAT3D radiotherapy and MNPS radiosurgery treatment planning systems. A mutual information maximization methodology was used to make the image registration of different modalities by measure of the statistical dependence between the voxels pairs. The alignment by references points makes an initial approximation to the non linear optimization process by downhill simplex method for estimation of the joint histogram. The coordinates transformation function use a trilinear interpolation and search for the global maximum value in a 6 dimensional space, with 3 degree of freedom for translation and 3 degree of freedom for rotation, by making use of the rigid body model. This method was evaluated with CT, MR and PET images from Vanderbilt University database to verify its accuracy by comparison of transformation coordinates of each images fusion with gold-standard values. The median of images alignment error values was 1.6 mm for CT-MR fusion and 3.5 mm for PET-MR fusion, with gold-standard accuracy estimated as 0.4 mm for CT-MR fusion and 1.7 mm for PET-MR fusion. The maximum error values were 5.3 mm for CT-MR fusion and 7.4 mm for PET-MR fusion, and 99.1% of alignment errors were images subvoxels values. The mean computing time was 24 s. The software was successfully finished and implemented in 59 radiotherapy routine services, of which 42 are in Brazil and 17 are in Latin America. This method does not have limitation about different resolutions from images, pixels sizes and slice thickness. Besides, the alignment may be accomplished by axial, coronal or sagittal images. (author)

  9. Tumor and normal structures volume localization and quantitation in 3D radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, R.; Andreucci, L.

    1995-01-01

    Improvements in imaging technology have significantly enhanced the ability of the radiation oncologist to stage and to evaluate the response of tumor during and after treatment. Over the last few year, in fact, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging radiolabelled monoclonal tumor antibodies have allowed tumor definition and evaluation. Concerning the above mentioned techniques accurate methods for the integration of morphological (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT, MRS) information can be very useful for volumes definition. In fact three-dimensional treatment planning depends heavily on volume displays and calculation based on volumes to convey information to the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. The accuracy and reproducibility of the methods for creating these volumes are fundamental limitations of current treatment planning systems. Slice by slice manual contouring, which is extremely labor-intensive, and automatic edge detection, which has a high failure rate and requires human intervention are representative of the current standard of practice. The aim of our work is both to develop methods of image data integration and automatic segmentation, and to make the treatment planning system able to combine these multiple information in unified data set in order to get a better tumor volume definition and dose distribution calculation. Then the possibility of using morphological and functional images and other information coming from MR spectroscopy and electronic or confocal microscopy can allow the development into the treatment planning system of biological calculation models for evaluating tumor and normal tissue control probabilities (TCP, NTCP). The definitive use of these models into the 3-D treatment plannings will offer a considerable improvement in the biological efficacy of radiotherapy and it will constitute the object

  10. X-ray volumetric imaging in image-guided radiotherapy: The new standard in on-treatment imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBain, Catherine A.; Henry, Ann M.; Sykes, Jonathan; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Moore, Christopher M.; Davies, Julie; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Porritt, Bridget; Williams, Peter; Khoo, Vincent S.; Price, Pat

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray volumetric imaging (XVI) for the first time allows for the on-treatment acquisition of three-dimensional (3D) kV cone beam computed tomography (CT) images. Clinical imaging using the Synergy System (Elekta, Crawley, UK) commenced in July 2003. This study evaluated image quality and dose delivered and assessed clinical utility for treatment verification at a range of anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Single XVIs were acquired from 30 patients undergoing radiotherapy for tumors at 10 different anatomic sites. Patients were imaged in their setup position. Radiation doses received were measured using TLDs on the skin surface. The utility of XVI in verifying target volume coverage was qualitatively assessed by experienced clinicians. Results: X-ray volumetric imaging acquisition was completed in the treatment position at all anatomic sites. At sites where a full gantry rotation was not possible, XVIs were reconstructed from projection images acquired from partial rotations. Soft-tissue definition of organ boundaries allowed direct assessment of 3D target volume coverage at all sites. Individual image quality depended on both imaging parameters and patient characteristics. Radiation dose ranged from 0.003 Gy in the head to 0.03 Gy in the pelvis. Conclusions: On-treatment XVI provided 3D verification images with soft-tissue definition at all anatomic sites at acceptably low radiation doses. This technology sets a new standard in treatment verification and will facilitate novel adaptive radiotherapy techniques

  11. Dosimetric comparison of standard bi-dimensional radiotherapy, mono-isocentric three-dimensional and arc-therapy for a bilateral breast cancer case with ganglionary attack; Comparaison dosimetrique pour un cas de cancer du sein bilateral avec atteinte ganglionnaire de la radiotherapie bidimensionnelle standard, la radiotherapie tridimensionnelle mono-isocentrique et l'arctherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, A. [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France); Bodez, V.; Alric, K.; Chastel, D.; Mege, A. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, Avignon (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a study which aimed at determining the optimal radiotherapy technique for a patient operated from a bilateral breast cancer with ganglionary attack and peculiar thoracic conformation. A dosimetric study has been performed. Target volumes and lung and heart coverages have been compared for three techniques: bi-dimensional and three-dimensional radiotherapy, and arc-therapy. It appears that arc-therapy would allow a dosimetric and therapeutic duration gain without improving the target volume coverage while increasing doses delivered to organs at risk. Short communication

  12. The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy - induced xerostomia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Rhodus, Nelson; Rosenthal, David; Murphy, Barbara; Rasch, Coen; Sonis, Stephen; Scarantino, Charles; Brizel, David

    2003-01-01

    Efforts to reduce the severity of postradiotherapy xerostomia include the use of salivary substitutes to gain symptomatic relief, salivary gland stimulants, agents delivered to protect the glands during radiotherapy (RT), and physical means to partially spare the major salivary glands from RT while

  13. The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy induced nausea and vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zyl, A.J.

    1992-11-01

    Nausea and vomiting are side-effects that are associated with chemo- and radiotherapy. A single-blind study to compare the efficacy and safety of intravenous granisetron (G) with metoclopramide (M) plus dexamethasone (D) in the prophylaxis and control of nausea and emesis in patients undergoing hemi-body irradiation (HBI) was performed. G (3 mg) or M (20 mg) plus D (12 mg) were given intravenously, thirty minutes prior to the start of radiotherapy. Patients were monitored for nausea, vomiting and side-effects. Thirty-five patients were treated, 28 men and 7 women. A total of 21 (60%) patients did not vomit during the first 24 hours after the start of radiotherapy. Both G and M plus D offer safe and effective anti-emetic regimes for the prophylaxis and control of radiotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. However, granisetron was found to be more effective than metoclopramide plus dexamethasone in preventing nausea and vomiting. 101 refs., 40 tabs., 8 figs

  14. Radiotherapy treatment results of bladder cancer: study of 458 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vara Santos, J.; Torre Tomas, A. de la; Romero Fernandez, J.; Regueiro Otero, C.; Clavo Varas, B.; Magallan Sebastian, R.; Valcarcel Sancho, F.; Polo Tolosana, E.; Aragon de la Cruz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1964 to 1990, 458 patients diagnosed of bladder cancer have been treated with radical radiotherapy in our department. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial survival rates were 37% and 27% respectively. The 5-years and 10-years actuarial local control rates, evaluated in 404 patients, were 41% and 38%. In regard to survival, T stage (p=0.013), advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p>0.0001), and squamous differentiation (p<0.0001), reached statistical significance as adverse prognostic factors. In 248 patients, with invasive transitional carcinoma, radical radiotherapy alone was used. In this group of patients, T stage (p=0.006) and advanced intravesical extension or multicentrity (p=0.0002) were adverse prognostic factors for survival. Our results suggest that radical radiotherapy must be considered and alternative to surgery in management of bladder cancer. On the basis of prognostic factors evidenced in this series a subgroup of patients with low probability of survival when treated with exclusive radiotherapy are defined. This patients must be included in clinical research protocols. (Author) 44 refs

  15. Survey of potential improvements during the course of the radiotherapy treatment. A patient questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momm, Felix; Jooss, David; Adebahr, Sonja; Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Heinemann, Felix; Kirste, Simon; Messmer, Marc-Benjamin; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Xander, Carola J.; Becker, Gerhild

    2011-01-01

    In the context of quality assurance, increasing demands are placed on the whole radiotherapy treatment process. The patients directly concerned generally do not realize most aspects of the quality assurance program (e.g., additional safety checks) during their daily therapy. It was the aim of this study to systematically ask patients about potential improvements during the course of radiotherapy treatment from their own perspective. In the defined time span (1 month), 624 radiotherapy patients (600 questionnaires were returned, 96.2%) were interviewed using a questionnaire newly developed to inquire about several aspects of their treatment. Furthermore, they were asked for their specific needs and suggestions for improvements that could be made during the course of radiotherapy treatment. Overall, the patients were satisfied with the course of their radiotherapy treatment and with patient care. As an example, about 90% agreed with the statement: ''My first contact with the radiation oncology unit proceeded with kindness and competence so that I was given the impression that I will be well cared for in this clinic.'' Considering the organization of the course of radiotherapy, a large majority of patients attached great value to set appointments for the therapy fractions. A main point of criticism was waiting times or delays caused by servicing or machine failures. Small, low cost improvements as music in the therapy room were considered as important as expensive measures (e.g., daylight in the therapy room). The patients emphasized the importance of staff friendliness. The situation of radiotherapy patients was, in general, satisfactory. Future improvements can be mainly expected from smooth organisation of both planning and treatment which can be achieved by electronic scheduling systems. Many results of the survey could be easily implemented in daily practice. In matters of organization radiation oncology with its complex procedures can be used as a model for

  16. Dosimetry analysis on radiation-induced acute esophagitis after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZZhu Shuchai; Cui Yanli; Li Juan; Liu Zhikun; Shen Wenbin; Su Jingwei; Wang Yuxiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the related factors with radiation-induced esophagitis after threedimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in order to explore the predictors for optimizing the treatment planning of NSCLC. Methods: From Aug 2000 to Dec 2004, 104 NSCLC patients received radiotherapy and were eligible for this study, 45 cases squamous cell carcinoma, 20 cases adenocarcinoma, 33 cases carrying with cancer cells by test and 6 case with no definitive pathologic feature.46 patients were treated with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), the other 58 patients conventional radiotherapy (CRT) before later-course 3DCRT. All the patients received the prescribed dose between 60-78 Gy and the median dose 66 Gy. The correlation of the variables were evaluated by Spearman relationship analysis. The morbidity of radiation-induced esophagitis was analyzed by X 2 test. The multivariate effect on radiation-induced esophagitis was statistically processed by Logistic regression model. Results: In 104 patients, the morbidity of radiation- induced esophagitis was 46.2%, including 32 cases at grade 1, 15 cases at grade 2, 1 case at grade 3. Univariate analysis showed the maximal and mean dose of esophagus, the volume of esophagus irradiated, the values of V 40 , V 45 , V 50 , V 55 , V 60 , LETT 45 , LETT 50 , LETT 55 , LETT 60 for the esophagus were correlated with radiation-induced esophagitis. Logistic regression model showed that the maximum dose received by the esophagus was the independent factor of ≥ 2 grade radiation-induced esophagitis. Conclusions: The maxmal dose of esophagus received might be the important factor of radiation-induced esophagitis. (authors)

  17. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy; Estimacion del dano en organos inducido por neutrones en radioterapia conformada en 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calzada de la Cruz 118 sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Uribe, M. del R., E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Instituto Tecnico Superior de Radiologia, Calle Leon No. 129, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm{sup 3} was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  18. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  19. Poster - 21: Verification of Monitor Unit Calculations for Breast Field-In-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosztyla, Robert; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Schinkel, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the source of systematic monitor unit (MU) calculation discrepancies between RadCalc and Eclipse treatment planning software for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy field-in-field breast treatments. Methods: Data were reviewed for 28 patients treated with a field-in-field breast technique with MU calculations from RadCalc that were larger than MU calculations from Eclipse for at least one field. The distance of the calculation point from the jaws was measured in each field’s beam’s-eye-view and compared with the percentage difference in MU (%ΔMU) between RadCalc and Eclipse. 10×10, 17×13 and 20×20 cm 2 beam profiles were measured using the Profiler 2 diode array for 6-MV photon beams and compared with profiles calculated with Eclipse and RadCalc using a gamma analysis (3%, 3 mm). Results: The mean %ΔMU was 1.3%±0.3%. There was a statistically-significant correlation between %ΔMU and the distance of the calculation point from the Y jaw (r=−0.43, p<0.001). RadCalc profiles differed from measured profiles, especially near the jaws. The gamma pass rate for 6-MV fields of 17×13 cm 2 field size was 95%±1% for Eclipse-generated profiles and 53%±20% for RadCalc-generated profiles (p=0.01). Conclusions: Calculations using RadCalc for field-in-field breast plans resulted in MUs that were larger than expected from previous clinical experience with wedged plans with calculation points far from the jaws due to the position of the calculation point near the jaws in the beam’s-eye-view of each field.

  20. Poster - 21: Verification of Monitor Unit Calculations for Breast Field-In-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosztyla, Robert; Pierce, Greg; Ploquin, Nicolas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Schinkel, Colleen [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the source of systematic monitor unit (MU) calculation discrepancies between RadCalc and Eclipse treatment planning software for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy field-in-field breast treatments. Methods: Data were reviewed for 28 patients treated with a field-in-field breast technique with MU calculations from RadCalc that were larger than MU calculations from Eclipse for at least one field. The distance of the calculation point from the jaws was measured in each field’s beam’s-eye-view and compared with the percentage difference in MU (%ΔMU) between RadCalc and Eclipse. 10×10, 17×13 and 20×20 cm{sup 2} beam profiles were measured using the Profiler 2 diode array for 6-MV photon beams and compared with profiles calculated with Eclipse and RadCalc using a gamma analysis (3%, 3 mm). Results: The mean %ΔMU was 1.3%±0.3%. There was a statistically-significant correlation between %ΔMU and the distance of the calculation point from the Y jaw (r=−0.43, p<0.001). RadCalc profiles differed from measured profiles, especially near the jaws. The gamma pass rate for 6-MV fields of 17×13 cm{sup 2} field size was 95%±1% for Eclipse-generated profiles and 53%±20% for RadCalc-generated profiles (p=0.01). Conclusions: Calculations using RadCalc for field-in-field breast plans resulted in MUs that were larger than expected from previous clinical experience with wedged plans with calculation points far from the jaws due to the position of the calculation point near the jaws in the beam’s-eye-view of each field.

  1. Combination of Transarterial Chemoembolization and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Inferior Vena Cava Tumor Thrombus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Ja Eun; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lim, Young-Suk

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and inferior vena cava tumor thrombus (IVCTT). Methods and Materials: A total of 42 consecutive patients who underwent TACE and CRT (TACE+CRT group) for the treatment of HCC with IVCTT were prospectively enrolled from July 2004 to October 2006. As historical controls, 29 HCC patients with IVCTT who received TACE alone (TACE group) between July 2003 and June 2004 were included. CRT was designed to target only the IVCTT and to deliver a median total dose of 45 Gy (range, 28-50 Gy). Results: Most baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar (p > 0.05). The response and progression-free rates of IVCTT were significantly higher in the TACE+CRT group than in the TACE group (42.9% and 71.4% vs. 13.8% and 37.9%, respectively; p < 0.01 for both rates). Overall, patient survival was significantly higher in the TACE+CRT group than in the TACE group (p < 0.01), with a median survival time of 11.7 months and 4.7 months, respectively. Treatment with TACE+CRT (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-0.71), progression of IVCTT (HR = 4.05; 95% CI, 2.00-8.21), Child-Pugh class B (HR = 3.44; 95% CI, 1.79-6.61), and portal vein invasion (HR = 2.31; 95% CI, 1.19-4.50) were identified as independent predictors of mortality by multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The combination of TACE and CRT is more effective in the control of IVCTT associated with HCC and improves patient survival compared with TACE alone.

  2. The NUKDOS software for treatment planning in molecular radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kletting, Peter; Schimmel, Sebastian [Univ. Ulm (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Haenscheid, Heribert; Fernandez, Maria; Lassmann, Michael [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Luster, Markus [Univ. Marburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Nosske, Dietmar [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Fachbereich Strahlenschutz und Gesundheit, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg Univ., Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was the development of a software tool for treatment planning prior to molecular radiotherapy, which comprises all functionality to objectively determine the activity to administer and the pertaining absorbed doses (including the corresponding error) based on a series of gamma camera images and one SPECT/CT or probe data. NUKDOS was developed in MATLAB. The workflow is based on the MIRD formalism For determination of the tissue or organ pharmacokinetics, gamma camera images as well as probe, urine, serum and blood activity data can be processed. To estimate the time-integrated activity coefficients (TIAC), sums of exponentials are fitted to the time activity data and integrated analytically. To obtain the TIAC on the voxel level, the voxel activity distribution from the quantitative 3D SPECT/CT (or PET/CT) is used for scaling and weighting the TIAC derived from the 2D organ data. The voxel S-values are automatically calculated based on the voxel-size of the image and the therapeutic nuclide ({sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I or {sup 177}Lu). The absorbed dose coefficients are computed by convolution of the voxel TIAC and the voxel S-values. The activity to administer and the pertaining absorbed doses are determined by entering the absorbed dose for the organ at risk. The overall error of the calculated absorbed doses is determined by Gaussian error propagation. NUKDOS was tested for the operation systems Windows {sup registered} 7 (64 Bit) and 8 (64 Bit). The results of each working step were compared to commercially available (SAAMII, OLINDA/EXM) and in-house (UlmDOS) software. The application of the software is demonstrated using examples form peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) and from radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. For the example from PRRT, the calculated activity to administer differed by 4% comparing NUKDOS and the final result using UlmDos, SAAMII and OLINDA/EXM sequentially. The absorbed dose for the spleen and tumour

  3. [Novel irradiation techniques in the treatment of solid tumours. Radiotherapy for metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Arpád; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2014-02-23

    Novel developments in percutaneous radiotherapy, such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography, adaptive radiation planning, intensity modulation radiotherapy and intensity modulated arc therapy (RapidArc), as well as the newer generation of image control (cone-beam computed tomography) and image guided radiotherapy ensure increased dosages of planning target volume and clinical target volume of solid tumours without damaging surrounding tissues and providing maximal protection. By raising the dosages of planned target volume and clinical target volume, these novel technical developments have created new indications in the treatment of solid tumours. With the aid of the cone-beam computed tomography and image guided radiotherapy the organ metastasis (lung, liver, spinal cord) and the primary tumour can be treated safety and effectively. Hypofractionation, dose escalation and the use of stereotactic devices can probably decrease radiation damage. The authors review the most common forms of evidence-based fractionation schemes used in irradiation therapy.

  4. Toshiba's advanced technologies contributing to heavy-ion radiotherapy for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iikura, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Toshiba has been focusing effects on cancer treatment in the healthcare field, which is likely to continue to expand in the future. Our objective is to offer healthcare processes from early detection by means of regular cancer examinations, through to precise diagnosis, treatment ensuring the quality of life (QOL) appropriate to individual patients, and aftercare. In particular, we are promoting the development of heavy-ion radiotherapy systems incorporating our range of technologies for particle accelerators, irradiation devices, superconducting magnets, and information processing and networks. By offering heathcare processes with advanced heavy-ion radiotherapy systems as a core, our approach is expected to contribute to high-quality cancer treatment. (author)

  5. Combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagiri, S.; Gupta, B.D.; Dutta, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    In locally advanced oral cancer, the main modalities of treatment, e.g. surgery and radiotherapy, most often fail to control the disease when used singly. A combination policy of surgery and radiotherapy achieves adequate control of the disease. In order to improve the results in advanced oral cancer, chemotherapy given prior to and during radiation treatment and judicious combination of surgery offer the best possible approach in the management. The experience in the combination policy in the treatment of oral cancer in Northern India is dealt with. (auth.)

  6. IMRT, IGRT, SBRT - Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, JL

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 4 years, IMRT, IGRT, SBRT: Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy has become a standard reference in the field. During this time, however, significant progress in high-precision technologies for the planning and delivery of radiotherapy in cancer treatment has called for a second edition to include these new developments. Thoroughly updated and extended, this new edition offers a comprehensive guide and overview of these new technologies and the many clinical treatment programs that bring them into practical use. Advances in intensity-modulated radiothera

  7. Dosimetric and clinical results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaokang; Ma Jun; Chen Longhua; Xia Yunfei; Shi Yusheng

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and clinical results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: A total of 86 patients with locally recurrent NPC were retreated with 3D CRT. The median prescribed dose was 68 Gy with 2 Gy per fractionation. Dosimetric quality was evaluated with dose distribution in planning target volume (PTV) and specified organs at risk (OAR), dose conformity index (CI) and dose homogeneity index (HI). The actuarial rate of local failure-free (LFF), overall survival (OS) and major late toxicities (MLT) were estimated with Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis for prognosis was performed using the Cox regression proportional hazards model. Results: The mean dose to PTV averaged 66.8 Gy, and the dose to specified OAR was acceptable. The average value of CI and HI was 0.59 and 9.1%. The 5-year actuarial rate of LFF and OS was 71 and 40%, respectively. The 5-year actuarial incidence of MLT≥Grade 3 and ≥Grade 4 were 100 and 49%, respectively. The major prognostic factors were T stage and the size of gross tumor volume (GTV). Advanced T stage and large GTV volume were associated with poor LFF and OS and high risk of MLT. Conclusion: The dosimetric quality of 3D CRT for locally recurrent NPC is generally excellent. A relatively high local control was achieved with this technique. However, the incidence of late toxicities were not found to decrease as originally expected. Early diagnosis of the recurrence and reasonable definition of the target volume are crucial to achieve a better outcome

  8. Radiotherapy for cancer treatment: A growing priority for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo Evans, Rogelio

    2001-01-01

    , there was a deplorable accident with one of the cobalt units. In 1996, 115 patients were seriously over-irradiated. This sad event made cancer a very important political and medical issue in Costa Rica. As a consequence of this accident, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) made a comprehensive assessment that revealed deficiencies in quality assurance practices. The assessment also established that a) the radiotherapy equipment had exceeded its useful life, estimated at 15 years; b) the country lacked adequate treatment standards; c) there was a shortage of trained personnel; and d) some brachytherapy equipment had expired 10 years previously. Because of this situation, the Costa Rican Institute Against Cancer (known by the acronym ICCC in Spanish) was created in 1998. Its mission is to support and promote cancer prevention and control. An important fact is that the legislation creating the ICCC states as a priority the construction of a specialized hospital. Planning for the new facility was based on the estimated 7,000 new cancer cases every year in Costa Rica, of which 40% (2,800 patients) involve radio-sensitive tumors Of these, about 30% (840 patients) must receive linear accelerator therapy. Given that each linear accelerator may treat 400 patients a year, and taking into consideration that the construction of a specialized hospital must be through public contract (a very complicated and slow process in Costa Rica), the Costa Rican Social Security Fund (Spanish acronym CCSS) decided to purchase three new cobalt units (THERATON 780-E Model 2000), new brachytherapy equipment, two linear accelerators, and X-ray equipment for superficial therapy. Likewise, an early detection program was implemented for cancer of the uterine cervix, which now covers 96% of its target population. A pilot plan for breast cancer detection was started. There are also plans to implement a nationwide gastric cancer detection program, currently sponsored by the Japanese Government

  9. Situation of radiotherapy in 2010 - context and methods, data for 2003/2010, synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    Illustrated by data tables and figures, this report first gives an overview of the status and situation of European and French radiotherapy centres, and of care activity authorizations regarding external radiotherapy. It gives an overview of equipment used for treatments and for treatment preparation and delivery, and of the different treatment techniques (three dimensional conformational, intensity-modulated conformational, stereotactic, whole body radiotherapy, proton-therapy). It comments the activity of radiotherapy centres: patients (age, sessions, and treated pathologies), comments data regarding medical and paramedical personnel involved in radiotherapy, and financial data regarding radiotherapy in 2009

  10. Radiotherapy for Adult Medulloblastoma: Evaluation of Helical Tomotherapy, Volumetric Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy, and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and the Results of Helical Tomotherapy Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zong-wen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. All adult medulloblastoma (AMB patients should be treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI postoperatively. Because of the long irradiation range, multiple radiation fields must be designed for conventional radiotherapy technology. CSI can be completed in only one session with helical tomotherapy (HT. We evaluated the dose of HT, volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT, and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT of AMB and the results of 5 cases of AMB treated with HT. Methods. Complete craniospinal and posterior cranial fossa irradiation with HT, VMAT, and 3D-CRT and dose evaluation were performed. And results of 5 cases of AMB treated with HT were evaluated. Results. A large volume of tissue was exposed to low dose radiation in the organs at risk (OAR, while a small volume was exposed to high dose radiation with HT. The conformity and uniformity of the targets were good with HT and VMAT, and the volume of targets exposed to high dose with VMAT was larger than that of HT. The uniformity of 3D-CRT was also good, but the dose conformity was poor. The main toxicity was hematologic toxicity, without 4th-degree bone marrow suppression. There was 3rd-degree inhibition in the white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets. The three female patients suffered menstrual disorders during the course of radiation. Two female patients with heavy menstruation suffered 3rd-degree anemia inhibition, and 2 patients suffered amenorrhea after radiotherapy. Although menstrual cycle was normal, the third patient was not pregnant. Conclusion. CSI with HT is convenient for clinical practice, and the side effects are mild. With good conformity and uniformity, VMAT can also be used for selection in CSI. For poor conformity, 3D-CRT should not be the priority selection for CSI. In female patients, the ovaries should be protected.

  11. Medullary breast carcinoma: The role of radiotherapy as primary treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourquet, A.; Vilcoq, J.R.; Zafrani, B.; Schlienger, P.; Campana, F.; Jullien, D.

    1987-01-01

    The results are reported of a selected series of 41 patients with medullary carcinoma of the breast, treated with primary radiotherapy with (24 patients) or without (17 patients) adjuvant chemotherapy. Complete responses to radiotherapy occurred with moderate doses (67% of the patients had a complete response after a dose of 55-60 Gy) and were increased by the addition of an irradiation boost. The 6-year actuarial free of local recurrence survival, metastase-free survival and survival rates were 86, 83, and 83%, respectively. The 6-year actuarial probability of living with breast preserved was 72%. Recurrences and survivals were not influenced by the tumor size or clinical axillary node status. Adjuvant chemotherapy had no effect on the rate of recurrence or survival. 14 refs.; 3 tabs

  12. A federal audit of the Belgian radiotherapy departments in breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houtte, Paul van; Bourgois, Nicolas; Renard, Francoise; Huget, Philippe; D'hoore, William; Scalliet, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Belgian Federal College of Radiotherapy carried out an external audit of breast cancer patient documentation in the 26 Belgian radiotherapy centres. The objective was to assess compliance with the recommendations regarding minimal requirements for documentation of radiotherapy prescription and administration. All centres volunteered to take part in this audit. Methods: Two experienced radiation oncologists site-visited the departments over a 6 month period (Sept. 2003-Feb. 2004), with a list of items to be verified, including details on the surgery, the pathological report, details on systemic treatments, details on the radiotherapy prescription (and consistency with therapeutic guidelines) and delay surgery/radiotherapy. Findings: Three hundred and eighty-nine patients files were reviewed, for a total of 399 breast cancers (10 patients with bilateral cancer). Mean age was 57.8 y (range 29-96). Breast conservative surgery (BCS) was used in 71%; radical mastectomy in 29%. A complete pathological report was present in all files but 2 (99.5% conformity). 5.2% were treated for DCIS, 61.6% for pT1, 28.2% for pT2 and 5% for pT3-4. Data regarding resection margins were specified to be free in 76.2%, tangential in 12% (within 2 mm) and positive for DCIS in 3.8% or invasive cancer in 1.5% (no information, on margins in 6.5%). The pT stage was always specified, and consistent with the macroscopic and microscopic findings. Hormonal receptors were routinely assessed (94.7%), as well as Her2neu (87.4%). Axillary surgery was carried out in 92%, either by sentinel node biopsy or by complete clearance, in which case the median number of nodes analysed was 12 for all centres together (7-17). All radiotherapy prescriptions were in line with evidence-based standards of therapy (i.e., irradiation of breast after BCS or after mamectomy (in case of pN+), but one. The mean delay between surgery and radiotherapy was 5.5 weeks (SD 11days). Conclusion: There was a high

  13. Pinnacle Scripts: Clearing automated treatment in external radiotherapy after unscheduled interruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jover Perez, C. I.; Alaman Sanchez, C.; Osorio Ceballos, J. L.; Real Nunez, R. del; Almansa Lopez, J.

    2013-01-01

    The stops not foreseen during the usual course of radiotherapy treatment affect the quality of the same. The calculation of dosage compensation is the tool that have physicists and radiation therapists in order to mitigate the effect of these disruptions and achieve an effective treatment. (Author)

  14. Dosimetric effect of images of double field exposure and positioning in radiotherapy of breast treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Luna, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Martin Martin, G.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Caballero Perea, B.; Ludena Martinez, B.; Prados Losa, R.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to quantify the increased dose in white volume and the organ at risk in breast radiotherapy treatment, derived from portals of double-exposure images scheduled for treatment, evaluate dose reduction by passing images of single exposure and consider whether it would be wise to consider this doses in the planning process. (Author)

  15. Class solution to decrease rectal dose in prostate radiotherapy treatments 3D-CRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres Rodriguez, C.; Tortosa Oliver, R.; Alonso Hernandez, D.; Mari Palacios, A.; Castillo Belmonte, A. del

    2011-01-01

    This paper contains a method developed in our center with conventional 3D radiotherapy techniques to increase the dose conformation around the target volume in prostate cancer treatments significantly reduced the doses to the rectum. To evaluate the goodness of the method, the results are compared with two classical techniques of treatment.

  16. Radiotherapy treatment of keloid scars with a kilovoltage X-ray parallel pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, David J.; Barber, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Leila; Mark Simpson, G.; Collis, Christopher H.

    2012-01-01

    An established treatment for keloids is surgery and radiotherapy, using a single applied field. However, earlobe keloids lend themselves to a parallel opposed pair approach. Delivery with a superficial X-ray unit is practicable and improves homogeneity within the treatment volume. It has been implemented in this centre since 2007.

  17. On-Line Use of Three-Dimensional Marker Trajectory Estimation From Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Projections for Precise Setup in Radiotherapy for Targets With Respiratory Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worm, Esben S.; Høyer, Morten; Fledelius, Walther; Nielsen, Jens E.; Larsen, Lars P.; Poulsen, Per R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate accurate and objective on-line patient setup based on a novel semiautomatic technique in which three-dimensional marker trajectories were estimated from two-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections. Methods and Materials: Seven treatment courses of stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors were delivered in 21 fractions in total to 6 patients by a linear accelerator. Each patient had two to three gold markers implanted close to the tumors. Before treatment, a CBCT scan with approximately 675 two-dimensional projections was acquired during a full gantry rotation. The marker positions were segmented in each projection. From this, the three-dimensional marker trajectories were estimated using a probability based method. The required couch shifts for patient setup were calculated from the mean marker positions along the trajectories. A motion phantom moving with known tumor trajectories was used to examine the accuracy of the method. Trajectory-based setup was retrospectively used off-line for the first five treatment courses (15 fractions) and on-line for the last two treatment courses (6 fractions). Automatic marker segmentation was compared with manual segmentation. The trajectory-based setup was compared with setup based on conventional CBCT guidance on the markers (first 15 fractions). Results: Phantom measurements showed that trajectory-based estimation of the mean marker position was accurate within 0.3 mm. The on-line trajectory-based patient setup was performed within approximately 5 minutes. The automatic marker segmentation agreed with manual segmentation within 0.36 ± 0.50 pixels (mean ± SD; pixel size, 0.26 mm in isocenter). The accuracy of conventional volumetric CBCT guidance was compromised by motion smearing (≤21 mm) that induced an absolute three-dimensional setup error of 1.6 ± 0.9 mm (maximum, 3.2) relative to trajectory-based setup. Conclusions: The first on-line clinical use of

  18. Role of postoperative radiotherapy in the treatment of Merkel tumours: experience at the Henri Mondor Hospital on 21 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calitchi, E.; Pan, Q.; Diana, C.; Belkacemi, Y.; Lagrange, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    As Merkel tumour treatment modalities are still a matter of discussion, the authors report the experience gained on 21 patients in the radiotherapy department of the Henri Mondor Hospital between 1990 and 2005. The treatment always comprised a surgical exeresis followed by radiotherapy. The authors analyse the obtained results which confirm the interest of postoperative radiotherapy. The detailed analysis of modalities (radiation type, total dose, irradiation volume) allows an optimal irradiation scheme to be proposed. Short communication

  19. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET in definition of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Wenli; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging modality, which can give some biological information of tumor. PET is more and more important in the definition of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning. Depending on its sensitivity and specificity, 18 F-fluorideoxyglucose 18 F-FDG PET has been shown to influence the selection of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancers, for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas or for esophageal tumors. On the other hand, for tumors such as rectal carcinomas, convincing data on the value of 18 F-FDG PET for target volume selection are still lacking. However, the application of 18 F-FDG PET in many aspects of radiotherapy is still controversy. Further researches in its clinical application are still needed to investigate whether 18 F-FDG PET for treatment planning should be routine because of the lack of prospective studies. (authors)

  20. Treatment of knee diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis under the arthroscopy with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Wei; Huang Xunwu; Guan Changyong; Yu Fangyuan; Zhang Bo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate arthroscopy plus radiotherapy in the treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee. Methods: A total of 10 cases of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee were treated under the arthroscopy combined with postoperative radiotherapy. These patients were followed up for 12-36 months, and were evaluated as to the effect of treatment. Results: According to the Lysholm criteria, the score was (53.5 ± 11.6) and(85.7 ± 10.7) respectively before surgery and at the last followup. Conclusion: Arthroscopical synovectomy with a combined application of postoperative radiotherapy is an effective treatment for diffuse pigmented vilionoclular synovitis of the knee. (authors)

  1. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Bong Kyung; Kang, Min Kyul; Kim, Jae Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Young; Choi, Gyu Seog; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Soo Yeun [Kyungpook National University Chilgok Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) for preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), by comparing with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Patients who were treated with PCRT for LARC from 2015 January to 2016 December were retrospectively enrolled. Total doses of 45 Gy to 50.4 Gy with 3D-CRT or SIB-IMRT were administered concomitantly with 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin or capecitabine. Surgery was performed 8 weeks after PCRT. Between PCRT and surgery, one cycle of additional chemotherapy was administered. Pathologic tumor responses were compared between SIB-IMRT and 3D-CRT groups. Acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, hematologic, and skin toxicities were compared between the two groups based on the RTOG toxicity criteria. SIB-IMRT was used in 53 patients, and 3D-CRT in 41 patients. After PCRT, no significant differences were noted in tumor responses, pathologic complete response (9% vs. 7%; p = 1.000), pathologic tumor regression Grade 3 or higher (85% vs. 71%; p = 0.096), and R0 resection (87% vs. 85%; p = 0.843). Grade 2 genitourinary toxicities were significantly lesser in the SIB-IMRT group (8% vs. 24%; p = 0.023), but gastrointestinal toxicities were not different across the two groups. SIB-IMRT showed lower GU toxicity and similar tumor responses when compared with 3D-CRT in PCRT for LARC.

  2. Treatment outcome of localized prostate cancer by 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a customized rectal balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Hong, Sung Joon; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Chang Geol; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk; Suh, Chang Ok; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We aimed to analyze the treatment outcome and long-term toxicity of 70 Gy hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer using a customized rectal balloon. We reviewed medical records of 86 prostate cancer patients who received curative radiotherapy between January 2004 and December 2011 at our institution. Patients were designated as low (12.8%), intermediate (20.9%), or high risk (66.3%). Thirty patients received a total dose of 70 Gy in 28 fractions over 5 weeks via IMRT (the Hypo-IMRT group); 56 received 70.2 Gy in 39 fractions over 7 weeks via 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (the CF-3DRT group, which served as a reference for comparison). A customized rectal balloon was placed in Hypo-IMRT group throughout the entire radiotherapy course. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered to 47 patients (Hypo-IMRT group, 17; CF-3DRT group, 30). Late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up period was 74.4 months (range, 18.8 to 125.9 months). The 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival rates for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 100%, 100%, and 88.5%, respectively, for the Hypo-IMRT group and 80%, 77.8%, and 63.6%, respectively, for the CF-3DRT group (p < 0.046). No patient presented with acute or late GU toxicity > or =grade 3. Late grade 3 GI toxicity occurred in 2 patients (3.6%) in the CF-3DRT group and 1 patient (3.3%) in the Hypo-IMRT group. Hypo-IMRT with a customized rectal balloon resulted in excellent biochemical control rates with minimal toxicity in localized prostate cancer patients.

  3. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-09-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12 C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code is in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. To this end 48 patients have been successfully planned and treated. (orig.)

  4. Treatment planning for heavy-ion radiotherapy: physical beam model and dose optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, M.; Jäkel, O.; Haberer, T.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.; Weber, U.

    2000-11-01

    We describe a novel code system, TRiP, dedicated to the planning of radiotherapy with energetic ions, in particular 12C. The software is designed to cooperate with three-dimensional active dose shaping devices like the GSI raster scan system. This unique beam delivery system allows us to select any combination from a list of 253 individual beam energies, 7 different beam spot sizes and 15 intensity levels. The software includes a beam model adapted to and verified for carbon ions. Inverse planning techniques are implemented in order to obtain a uniform target dose distribution from clinical input data, i.e. CT images and patient contours. This implies the automatic generation of intensity modulated fields of heavy ions with as many as 40 000 raster points, where each point corresponds to a specific beam position, energy and particle fluence. This set of data is directly passed to the beam delivery and control system. The treatment planning code has been in clinical use since the start of the GSI pilot project in December 1997. Forty-eight patients have been successfully planned and treated.

  5. Impact of radiation dose on achieving nadir PSA levels after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Leibel, Steven A.; Kelson, Suzanne; Fuks, Zvi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Several reports have documented the prognostic value of a post-irradiation nadir PSA of ≤1 ng/ml in prostatic cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine which pre-treatment and treatment-related variables impact upon achieving such nadir levels. Materials and Methods: Between January 1987 and June 1995, 740 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). 214 (29%) patients were treated with neo-adjuvant androgen ablation prior to therapy and were excluded from this analysis. Among the 526 evaluable patients, the clinical stage were as follows: T 1 C=128 (24%); T 2 A=76 (14%); T 2 B=116 (22%); T 2 C=99 (19%) and T 3 =107 (21%). The prescription dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was 64.8-68.4 Gy in 87 patients (17%); 70.2 Gy in 191 (36%); 75.6 Gy in 209 (40%) and 81 Gy in 39 (7%). The median pre-treatment PSA value was 11.2 ng/ml (range 0.3-114). The median follow-up was 20 months (range: 6-76 months). Results: 242 patients (46%) had PSA levels which declined to ≤1.0 ng/ml. The median time to a nadir level of ≤1.0 was 15.6 months (range: 1-43 months) from completion of 3D-CRT. 154 (29%) patients continued to show declining PSA levels within the first 2 years after therapy, and 130 patients (25%) failed to nadir at PSA levels of ≤1.0 ng/ml. Among patients with nadir PSA levels ≤1, the 3 year PSA relapse-free survival was 91% compared to 29% for patients with nadir PSA levels >1 ng/ml (p<0.0001). A Cox-regression analysis demonstrated that nadir PSA ≤1 was the strongest predictor of PSA relapse-free survival (p<0.001) followed by Gleason score ≤ 6 (p<0.001) and stage< T3 (p=0.004). Among patients who received doses of ≥75.6 Gy, the likelihood of achieving PSA nadir levels ≤1.0 at 24 and 36 months was 86% and 93%, respectively, compared to 74 and 80%, respectively, among those who received lower doses (p<0.001). Doses of ≥75.6 Gy was the strongest

  6. Results of different modes conformal radiotherapy in treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovs'ka, L.M.; Yivankova, V.S.; Khrulenko, T.V.; Skomorokhova, T.V.; Gorelyina, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Development of techniques for cytotoxic treatment applying different modes of conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy and high-energy (high dose rate - HDR) is one of the promising areas of optimization and efficiency of conservative treatment of patients with regional forms of cervical cancer. At Radiation Oncology Department, National Cancer Institute, 89 patients with stage 2b-3b cervical cancer, aged 29 to 70, underwent examination and combined radiotherapy course. The patients were divided into 2 main groups (56 patients) depending on the mode of developed conformal radiation therapy, and a control group made up by 33 patients (classic, default conformal radiotherapy). Results. Along with external beam radiotherapy, the patients of Group 2 were provided with conformal radiotherapy carried out by means of the linear accelerator of electrons in the mode of enhanced multi fractionation of irradiation dose applied to the small pelvis area (tumor and lymph efflux channels) with the single tumor dose 1.3 Gy twice per day once 4-6 hours up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy applied to the small pelvis lymph nodes. The patients of Group 1 and the ones of the control group underwent conformal radiotherapy in the mode of standard fractionation applied to the small pelvis area with the single tumor dose of 1.8 Gy up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy. Conformal radiotherapy was carried out for the patients of Group 1 associated with chemoradiomodifiers (tegafur, cisplatin). At the stage 2 of combined radiotherapy course, all patients underwent HDR brachytherapy via Co60 source in the mode of the single tumor dose of 5 Gy at point A up to the total radiation dose of 35-40 Gy. Therefore, employing accelerated mode of multifractiation in conformal radiotherapy of patients with regional cervical cancer makes it possible to enhance canrcinocidal irradiation doses applied to a tumor, and an interval between radiotherapy fractions provides conditions for initiation of

  7. The effectiveness of external beam radiotherapy for acromegaly is not affected by previous pituitary ablative treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, P.I.; Joplin, G.F.; Speirs, C.J.; Morrison, R.; Aber, V.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-three acromegalic patients were treated with radiotherapy and followed up for at least 3 years (mean 6 years, range 3 to 12). Seventeen had not had previous pituitary ablative therapy and 16 had. The mean GH level for these two groups before radiotherapy was comparable at 98 and 119 mlU/l. The observed frequency of reaching <10 mlU/L was 53% and 75% of patients in the two groups, respectively, the mean observed falls in growth hormone level were 81 and 85% of the initial level, and the calculated exponential decline rate of GH level was 72 and 52% per fyear. Considering all 35 patients, requirement for pituitary hormone replacement therapy increased from 15 patients before radiotherapy to 20 after radiotherapy, being mostly those who had had prior ablative therapies. There were no complications attributable to the radiotherapy treatment. It appears that radiotherapy is equally efficacious whether a prior unsuccessful ablative procedure had been used or not. (author)

  8. The effectiveness of external beam radiotherapy for acromegaly is not affected by previous pituitary ablative treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, P.I.; Joplin, G.F. (Department of Medicine, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Speirs, C.J. (Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Morrison, R. (Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Aber, V. (Department of Medical Physics, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-three acromegalic patients were treated with radiotherapy and followed up for at least 3 years (mean 6 years, range 3 to 12). Seventeen had not had previous pituitary ablative therapy and 16 had. The mean GH level for these two groups before radiotherapy was comparable at 98 and 119 mlU/l. The observed frequency of reaching <10 mlU/L was 53% and 75% of patients in the two groups, respectively, the mean observed falls in growth hormone level were 81 and 85% of the initial level, and the calculated exponential decline rate of GH level was 72 and 52% per fyear. Considering all 35 patients, requirement for pituitary hormone replacement therapy increased from 15 patients before radiotherapy to 20 after radiotherapy, being mostly those who had had prior ablative therapies. There were no complications attributable to the radiotherapy treatment. It appears that radiotherapy is equally efficacious whether a prior unsuccessful ablative procedure had been used or not. (author).

  9. Uterine cervix cancer treatment in IIB, IIIA and IIIB stages with external radiotherapy versus external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose. ION SOLCA. Years 1998-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Doris; Falquez, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    We realized study of retrospective accomplished in course of years 1998-2000, reviewing clinical charts of statistical department of ION SOLCA. We reviewed 544 cases in 1998, 603 patients in 1999, and 630 cases in 2000. In the radiotherapy service, 133 patients received treatment with external radiotherapy between February 1998 to February 1999 in IIB, IIIA, IIIB stages and only 80 patients were treated with external radiotherapy and scintiscanning of low dose rate in the same stages between March 1999 to March 2000. (The author)

  10. Combined modality treatment including intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveit, Kjell Maque; Wiig, Johan N.; Olsen, Dag Rune; Storaas, Andreas; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    1997-01-01

    Background: Treatment of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer usually has a high local recurrence rate and poor survival. Promising results have been reported by combined external radiotherapy, extensive surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced rectal cancers fixed to the pelvic wall or locally recurrent rectal cancers underwent preoperative external radiotherapy with 46-50 Gy. Six to 8 weeks later radical pelvic surgery was attempted, and was combined with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (15-20 Gy) in 66 patients. The patients were followed closely to evaluate complication rate, local and distant recurrence rate and survival. Results: Surgery with no macroscopic tumour remaining was obtained in 65% of the patients with no postoperative deaths. Pelvic infection was the major complication (21%). Although the observation time is short (3-60 months), the local recurrence rate seems low (22%) and survival seems promising (about 60% at 4 years) in patients with complete tumour resection, in contrast to patients with residual tumour (none living at 4 years). Conclusions: The combined modality treatment with preoperative external radiotherapy and extensive pelvic surgery with IORT is sufficiently promising to start a randomized trial on the clinical value of IORT as a boost treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to this disease

  11. Treatment results of radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cheek mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Kazuko; Furukawa, Souhei; Fuchihata, Hajime; Fujita, Masahiro; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Inoue, Toshihiko.

    1992-01-01

    The results of radiotherapeutic treatment in 71 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cheek mucosa were reviewed. The actuarial 5-year local control rate was 100% for T1 (8 patients), 62% for T2 (43), 65% for T3 (17) and 0% for T4 (3). The patients were divided into four groups according to treatment modality; group 1 was treated by radiotherapy alone (R), group 2 by radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy of BLM or PEP (R + C), group 3 by external radiotherapy followed by surgery (R + S) and group 4 by a combination of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery (R + C + S). The 5-year local control rate was 44% for R (11 patients), 61% for R + C (39), 63% for R+ S (6) and 80% for R + C + S (15). Nine of 14 cases or 64% of the surgical specimens in the R + C + S group showed no tumor cells microscopically, a rate comparable with the 5-year local control rate of the R + C group. Including the results of secondary treatment by surgery for recurrent cases, the ultimate local control rate was 83% in both the R and R + C groups. The local control rate was 88% for carcinoma located in the anterior half of the cheek and 53% for that in the posterior cheek. The results suggested that tumors extending to the bucco-alveolar sulci would be more difficult to control by radiotherapy alone, with or without chemotherapy. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound in the early assessment of response to concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Lijing; Ru, Tong; Wang, Huanhuan; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-09-01

    Background Three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound (3D-PDU) imaging has been widely applied to the differentiation of benign and malignant cervical lesions; however, its potential value for predicting response to chemo-radiotherapy has not been fully explored. Purpose To investigate the feasibility of 3D-PDU imaging in predicting treatment response in patients receiving concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) for advanced cervical cancer. Material and Methods Fifty-two patients with advanced cervical cancer who received CCRT underwent 3D-PDU examinations at four timepoints: pre-therapy (baseline), 1 week and 2 weeks during, as well as immediately post CCRT. Final tumor response was determined by change in tumor size using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cervical tumor volumes and vascular indices were calculated and compared with the clinical outcome. Results Of the 52 patients, 32 patients who completed all four examinations were included in the analyses: 21 were classified as complete response (CR) and 11 as partial response (PR). During the treatment, the CR group showed that 3D vascular indices (VI and VFI) significantly increased at 1 week ( P = 0.028, P = 0.017, respectively) then decreased at 2 weeks and obviously decreased at therapy completion (both P  0.05). Conclusion Prospective longitudinal 3D-PDU imaging may have potentials in monitoring early therapeutic response to CCRT in patients with cervical cancer.

  13. Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Koh, Dong Wook; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Chang-Min

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) influences hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) exacerbation in patients with HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Of the 48 HCC patients with HBV who underwent 3D-CRT to the liver, 16 underwent lamivudine therapy before and during 3D-CRT (Group 1) and 32 did not receive antiviral therapy before 3D-CRT (Group 2). To analyze spontaneous HBV reactivation, we included a control group of 43 HCC patients who did not receive any specific treatment for HCC or CHB. Results: The cumulative rate of radiation-induced liver disease for Groups 1 and 2 was 12.5% (2 of 16) and 21.8% (7 of 32), respectively (p > 0.05). The cumulative rate of HBV reactivation was significantly greater in Group 2 (21.8%, 7 of 32) than in Group 1 (0%, 0/16) or the control group (2.3%, 1 of 43; p 0.05 each). The CHB exacerbations in the 4 Group 2 patients had radiation-induced liver disease features but were differentiated by serum HBV DNA changes. Two of these patients required antiviral therapy and effectively recovered with lamivudine therapy. Conclusions: In patients with HBV-related HCC undergoing 3D-CRT, HBV reactivation and consequent CHB exacerbation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of radiation-induced liver disease, and antiviral therapy might be considered for the prevention of liver function deterioration after RT

  14. Treatment of primary brain lymphoma without immune deficiency, The importance of chemotherapy before radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keihani M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find a more efficacious treatment for patients with primary central nervous system Lymphoma using chemotherapy. The objective was to determine the optimal time for radiotherapy treatment in relation to chemotherapy. Retrospective evaluation in patients with brain lymphoma was conducted from 1992 to 1998. Twenty-three patients were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups based on the timing of radiotherapy in relation to the chemotherapy. The first group of patients (n=13 initially received radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy. Five of these patients receied classic CHOP (cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicine, Vincistine and Prednisone, six patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2 and Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and two patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2, Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine (600 Megs/M2 every 2 to 3 weeks. The second group of patients (Group II, n=10 received the followeing treatment regimen: a course of BCNU 120 Megs/M2 with Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2, Mesna and Etoposide 120 Megs/M2 on the first day of treatment (course A. Two weeks later, treatment was continued with a course of Cis-platin 35 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 600 Megs/M2 (course B. The treatment was continued 14 days later with a course of Mitoxantron 12 Megs/M2, Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2 puls Mesna (course C. After the fourth week of chemotherapy, these patients received radiotherapy to the brain (5000 RADS in 4 weeks. During radiotherapy and at the beginning of course chemotherapy, intrathecal therapy with Methorexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemothotrexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemotherapy treatment was repeated to a total of 3 times. After complete clearance of the tumor determined by MRI and absence of tumor cells in the spinal fluid, the chemotherapeutic regimen was repeated one last time. The

  15. Commissioning and quality assurances of the CMS XIO radiotherapy treatment planning system for external beam photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidhar, K.R.; Anurupa; Soubhagya; Sudhakar; Shiva; Krishnam Raju, A.; Narayana Murthy, P.

    2008-01-01

    The commissioning of XIO treatment planning system (TPS) was carried out by Computerized Medical Devices, USA for Siemens and Elekta linear accelerators. The Commissioning and quality assurance of the CMS XIO radiotherapy treatment planning system involves many steps, beginning from beam data acquisition and entry into the computerized TPS, through patient data acquisition, to treatment plan generation and the final transfer of data to the treatment machine and quality assurance of TPS

  16. Application of hyperglycemia induction in combination with radiotherapy for rectal cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimker, V.M.; Goldobenko, G.V.; Ozhiganov, E.L.; Ajtakova, T.I.; Dyuskaliev, Zh.D.

    1986-01-01

    A treatment modality employing radiotherapy wih subsequent hyperglycemia induction was evolved in experiments on mice and then clinically tested in 32 cases of inoperable locally - extensive primary and recurrent cancer of the rectum. A 50% regression of tumor was registered in 14 (43.0%) out of 32 patients treated with radiotherapy in combination with hyperglycemia. Similar degree of regression was observed only in 6 (15.0%) out of 40 patientswo received who received the same radiation treatment unaccompanied by hyperglycemia. The difference was statistically significant. No untoward side-effects developed. The results are encouraging and seem to open up new vistas of clinical research

  17. Capillary haemangioma involving the middle and external ear: radiotherapy as a treatment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavamani, S.P.; Ram, T.S.; Viswanathan, P.N.; Viswanathan, F.R.; Surendrababu, N.R.S.; Thomas, M.

    2007-01-01

    Capillary haemangiomas rarely occur in the auditory canal and have mainly been managed with surgical excision or kept on close follow up for development of symptoms. Radiotherapy, as a treatment method, has not been reported previously in the published work. We describe a study of a capillary haemangioma in the auditory canal of a 26-year-old woman who presented with bleeding. She was treated with radiotherapy, after the lesion was found to be unsuitable for surgery and embolization. The patient remains well 5 years after completion of treatment

  18. Cryotherapy and radiotherapy combination in extensive and recurrent types of head and neck skin cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustynskij, I.N.; Paches, A.I.; Tkachev, S.I.; Tabolinovskaya, T.D.; Alieva, S.B.; Yagubov, A.S.; Slanina, S.V.; Bazhutova, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The method of infiltrative skin cancer treatment based on different variants of radiotherapy and cryotherapy combination is described. During the period of 1988-2006 the Department of head and neck neoplasms of N. N. Blohin Russian Cancer Research Center provided radiation and cryogenic treatment of 94 patients with locally advanced head and neck epidermoid and basal cell cancer. For this purpose before every radiotherapy session the tumor was exposed to cryo cooling till freezing temperature (-5 degrees C). The total involution of tumors was observed at 91 patients. Residual tumors were removed surgically. The follow-up showed good functional and aesthetic results, retention of local tissues.

  19. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  20. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma; Wertigkeit der Radiotherapie in der Behandlung des multiplen Myeloms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mose, S.; Pfitzner, D.; Rahn, A.; Nierhoff, C.; Schiemann, M.; Boettcher, H.D. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin

    2000-11-01

    Regarding reduction of pain, treatment of (impending) fractures, and spinal cord compression radiation is an important part of palliative treatment. In our retrospective study we report the effort of radiotherapy on reduction of pain, recalcification and the reduction of neurological symptoms and evaluate factors which have an impact on therapeutic outcome. Patients and Methods: From 1. Jan 1988 to 31. Dec 1998, 42 patients (19 women, 23 men; range of ages 46 to 85 years, median age 64.9 years) with 71 target volumes were irradiated (median dose 36 Gy, 2 to 3 Gy 5 times/week) because of symptomatic disease (67/71: Osseous pain, 45/71: Fraktures/impending fractures, 13/71: Spinal cord compression). The median time from diagnosis to the first course of radiotherapy was 11.9 months (0.3 to 90 months). At the time of first irradiation, 5 and 37 patients were in tumor Stage II and III (Salmon/Durie), respectively. The median value of the Karnofsky performance was 70% (40 to 90%). Results: During follow-up (at least 6 months) in 85% of target volumes complete and partial pain relief was achieved; recurrences were seen in 8.8%. In 26/56 (46.4%) lesions evaluable a recalcification was seen whereas 17.9% showed progressive disease (comparison of radiographs before and after radiation). In 22.3% of all lesions initially with impending fracture (4/18) radiotherapy failed because of fracture after treatment. Simultaneous chemotherapy and a Karnofsky performance {>=}70 had a significant impact on a positive response to treatment, respectively. Spinal cord compression symptoms were reduced in 7/13 (53.8%) of patients (scaled due to the classification by Findlay 1987). The median survival from diagnosis for the entire group was 34.9 months (7.5 to 119.3 months), after irradiation 13.1 months (0.2 to 105.3 months). Conclusion: When adequately indicated radiotherapy was shown to be an effective palliative treatment. Taking under consideration that the results are retrospective we

  1. Comfort as a determiner of treatment position in radiotherapy of the male pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.; Davison, A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A comfortable treatment position in radiotherapy may promote patient stability and contribute to the best possible patient experience. Patients receiving radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer lie supine or prone, but little evaluation has been made of the comfort of these positions. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the comfort of the prone and supine positions and to assess any influence of feelings of anxiety. Methods: Self-reported comfort and anxiety levels were measured using visual analogue scales in the first and last weeks of treatment for patients receiving radical prostatic radiotherapy. The subjects were from two hospitals, 23 routinely treated lying prone and 21 routinely treated lying supine. Six subjects from each group were interviewed in the first week of treatment. Results: Comfort levels were high and no significant difference was found between treatment positions or between the first and last weeks of treatment. Anxiety levels were low with no significant variation according to position or week of treatment. Little correlation was seen between reported anxiety and comfort levels. Interview data supported the quantitative findings. Supine subjects indicated the need for lateral elbow support to improve feelings of stability. Conclusions: For radiotherapy of male patients without pain or other complicating factors, selection between the prone and supine positions may be made without considering comfort. Supine patients should be provided with lateral elbow support. Further research is indicated into the comfort of these positions for females and the phenomenon of low reported anxiety in male cancer patients

  2. Knowledge-light adaptation approaches in case-based reasoning for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Sanja; Khussainova, Gulmira; Jagannathan, Rupa

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatment planning aims at delivering a sufficient radiation dose to cancerous tumour cells while sparing healthy organs in the tumour-surrounding area. It is a time-consuming trial-and-error process that requires the expertise of a group of medical experts including oncologists and medical physicists and can take from 2 to 3h to a few days. Our objective is to improve the performance of our previously built case-based reasoning (CBR) system for brain tumour radiotherapy treatment planning. In this system, a treatment plan for a new patient is retrieved from a case base containing patient cases treated in the past and their treatment plans. However, this system does not perform any adaptation, which is needed to account for any difference between the new and retrieved cases. Generally, the adaptation phase is considered to be intrinsically knowledge-intensive and domain-dependent. Therefore, an adaptation often requires a large amount of domain-specific knowledge, which can be difficult to acquire and often is not readily available. In this study, we investigate approaches to adaptation that do not require much domain knowledge, referred to as knowledge-light adaptation. We developed two adaptation approaches: adaptation based on machine-learning tools and adaptation-guided retrieval. They were used to adapt the beam number and beam angles suggested in the retrieved case. Two machine-learning tools, neural networks and naive Bayes classifier, were used in the adaptation to learn how the difference in attribute values between the retrieved and new cases affects the output of these two cases. The adaptation-guided retrieval takes into consideration not only the similarity between the new and retrieved cases, but also how to adapt the retrieved case. The research was carried out in collaboration with medical physicists at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. All experiments were performed using real-world brain cancer

  3. The value of radiotherapy in the treatment of aged-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarzycka, M.; Ziolkowska, E.; Slonina, A.

    2007-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in patients older then 65 years. There are two forms of AMD: exudative wet and nonexudative dry. Most of the lesions are not amenable to laser therapy because of their vicinity to the fovea. Earlier studies suggested that radiotherapy may inhibit further loss of visual acuity but following studies rendered contradictory results. In recent years, treatment of benign disease has again attracted the interest of the radiation oncology community in the Western part of the world. Radiotherapy has been given successfully to patients suffering from a wide variety diseases and AMD is one of them. The present article extensively reviews the clinical studies to define the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of AMD. (authors)

  4. Early versus delayed postoperative radiotherapy for treatment of low-grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, J Manuel; Venteicher, Andrew S; Patil, Chirag G

    2015-01-01

    Background In most people with low-grade gliomas (LGG), the primary treatment regimen remains a combination of surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy. However, the optimal timing of radiotherapy is controversial. It is unclear whether to use radiotherapy in the early postoperative period, or whether radiotherapy should be delayed until tumour progression occurs. Objectives To assess the effects of early postoperative radiotherapy versus radiotherapy delayed until tumour progression for low-grade intracranial gliomas in people who had initial biopsy or surgical resection. Search methods We searched up to September 2014 the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 8, 2014), MEDLINE (1948 to Aug week 3, 2014), and EMBASE (1980 to Aug week 3, 2014) to identify trials for inclusion in this Cochrane review. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared early versus delayed radiotherapy following biopsy or surgical resection for the treatment of people with newly diagnosed intracranial LGG (astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, mixed oligoastrocytoma, astroblastoma, xanthoastrocytoma, or ganglioglioma). Radiotherapy may include conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with linear accelerator or cobalt-60 sources, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and risk of bias, and extracted study data. We resolved any differences between review authors by discussion. Adverse effects were also extracted from the study report. We performed meta-analyses using a random-effects model with inverse variance weighting. Main results We included one large, multi-institutional, prospective RCT, involving 311 participants; the risk of bias in this study was unclear. This study found that early postoperative radiotherapy is associated with an increase in time to

  5. Objective assessment of dermatitis following post-operative radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Kuriyama, Keiko; Yoshida, Mineo; Yamazaki, Hideya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Fujita, Yuka; Masuda, Norikazu

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate radiation dermatitis objectively in patients with breast cancer who had undergone post-operative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Skin color (L * , a * , and b * values) and moisture analyses were performed for both breasts (before, after, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy) to examine irradiated and non-irradiated skin divided into four quadrants in 118 patients. These patients underwent breast conservative surgery followed by 50 Gy/25 fractions (median) of radiotherapy with or without boost irradiation (10 Gy/5 fractions). L * , a * , and moisture values were changed by irradiation and maximized at completion or 1 month after radiotherapy. One year after radiotherapy, the skin color had returned to the range observed prior to radiotherapy. However, moisture did not return to previous values even 1 year after treatment. The lateral upper side (quadrant C) showed greater changes than other quadrants in the L * value (darker) at the end of radiotherapy. The Common Toxicity Criteria version 3 scores were found to correlate well with a * and L * values at the completion and 1 month after radiotherapy. Boost radiotherapy intensified reddish and darker color changes at the completion of radiotherapy, while chemotherapy did not intensify the skin reaction caused by radiotherapy. Moisture impairment as a result of irradiation lasts longer than color alterations. Objective assessments are useful for analyzing radiation dermatitis. (orig.)

  6. Olfactory neuroblastoma: the long-term outcome and late toxicity of multimodal therapy including radiotherapy based on treatment planning using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takashi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Koichi; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Homma, Akihiro; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare tumor originating from olfactory epithelium. Here we retrospectively analyzed the long-term treatment outcomes and toxicity of radiotherapy for ONB patients for whom computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional treatment planning was conducted to reappraise the role of radiotherapy in the light of recent advanced technology and chemotherapy. Seventeen patients with ONB treated between July 1992 and June 2013 were included. Three patients were Kadish stage B and 14 were stage C. All patients were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery or chemotherapy. The radiation dose was distributed from 50 Gy to 66 Gy except for one patient who received 40 Gy preoperatively. The median follow-up time was 95 months (range 8–173 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were estimated at 88% and 74%, respectively. Five patients with stage C disease had recurrence with the median time to recurrence of 59 months (range 7–115 months). Late adverse events equal to or above Grade 2 in CTCAE v4.03 were observed in three patients. Multimodal therapy including radiotherapy with precise treatment planning based on CT simulation achieved an excellent local control rate with acceptable toxicity and reasonable overall survival for patients with ONB

  7. To improve the safety of treatments in radiotherapy by developing a safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Following the radiotherapy accidents between 2004 and 2006, the I.R.S.N. deemed necessary to lead a study on the safety of treatments in radiotherapy and on the use and the adaptation to the medical domain of safety analysis approach developed for the nuclear installations. Of this study, six mains lines of investigation appear: Endow the radiotherapy services with real referential of safety, reinforce the robustness of the organization of radiotherapy services, improve the safety of the equipment and software at the design and operating stages, improve the management of the expertise and reinforce the operating feed back on incidents and accidents. The main learning from this study is the benefit that could be gained by fitting the safety analysis concepts and methods to the specificities of radiotherapy considering the organization of it collective work, the cooperation between actors stemming from different jobs as well as the interactions between actors and technical systems in the process of the treatments, when they are put into service and during their periodic checks. (author)

  8. The situation of radiotherapy in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    Published within the frame of the French 2009-2013 cancer plan, this report proposes an analysis of the situation of radiotherapy in France. More particularly, it analyses the French offer in terms of radiotherapy treatments and the French position in Europe. A second part analyses equipment (accelerators and other equipment) and techniques aimed at radiotherapy treatment preparation and delivery. The following techniques are addressed: three-dimensional conformational, intensity modulation, intracranial and extracranial stereotactic, image-guided, total body irradiation, hadron-therapy, and peri-operative radiotherapy. The last parts analyse the activity of radiotherapy centres in terms of treated patients, of patient age structure, of sessions and preparations, and of treated pathologies, the medical and paramedical personnel in charge of radiotherapy, and financial and cost aspects

  9. The treatment Results of Radiotherapy for nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong Chul; Sohn, Seung Chang; Suh, Hyun Suk; Jaun, Woo Ki; Kim, Dong Soon; Sohn, Kwang Hyun

    1986-01-01

    From Nov. 1983 through Jan. 1986, 43 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated by radiation therapy at Inje Medical College Paik Hospital. 38 patients were available for the analysis of this study. 33 patients received definite irradiation with curative intent, while 5 patients received postoperative irradiation. Chemotherapy was added in 12 patients before, during and after radio-therapy. 28 patients were squamous cell carcinoma and 10 patients were adenocarcinoma. There were 29 men and 9 women (median age, 58 years; range 34 to 74 years). Stage I was 1 patient, Stage 11, 7 patient, and Stage 111, 30 patients. Among 33 patients who received radiotherapy with curative intent, follow up radiological study revealed complete response in 12 patients (36%), partial response, in 9 patients (27%), and minimal response, in 5 patients (15%), while 7 patients (21%) were nonresponders. Median survival for all patients was 6.9 months; squamous cell carcinoma, 7.3 months, adenocarcinoma, 5.9 months. Responders survived median 7 months, while nonresponders survived median 1.9 months. Improved complete response rate and survival were shown in high radiation dose group. As prognostic factors, age, initial performance status, sex, histology and tumor location were evaluated

  10. Error prevention in radiotherapy treatments using a record and verify system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete Campos, S.; Hernandez Vitoria, A.; Canellas Anoz, M.; Millan Cebrian, E.; Garcia Romero, A.

    2001-01-01

    Computerized record-and-verify systems (RVS) are being used increasingly to improve the precision of radiotherapy treatments. With the introduction of new treatment devices, such as multileaf or asymmetric collimators and virtual wedges, the responsibility to ensure correct treatment has increased. The purpose of this paper is to present the method that we are following to prevent some potential radiotherapy errors and to point out some errors that can be easily detected using a RVS, through a check of the daily recorded treatment information. We conclude that a RVS prevents the occurrence of many errors, when the settings of the treatment machine do not match the intended parameters within some maximal authorized deviation, and allows to detect easily other potential errors related with a incorrect selection of the treatment patient data. A quality assurance program, including a check of all beam data and a weekly control of the manual and electronic chart, has helped reduce errors. (author)

  11. Three-dimensional printer-generated patient-specific phantom for artificial in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamomae, Takeshi; Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Nakaya, Takayoshi; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Aoyama, Takahiro; Oguchi, Hiroshi; Komori, Masataka; Kawamura, Mariko; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Monzen, Hajime; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Naganawa, Shinji

    2017-12-01

    Pretreatment intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance is performed using simple rectangular or cylindrical phantoms; thus, the dosimetric errors caused by complex patient-specific anatomy are absent in the evaluation objects. In this study, we construct a system for generating patient-specific three-dimensional (3D)-printed phantoms for radiotherapy dosimetry. An anthropomorphic head phantom containing the bone and hollow of the paranasal sinus is scanned by computed tomography (CT). Based on surface rendering data, a patient-specific phantom is formed using a fused-deposition-modeling-based 3D printer, with a polylactic acid filament as the printing material. Radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters can be inserted in the 3D-printed phantom. The phantom shape, CT value, and absorbed doses are compared between the actual and 3D-printed phantoms. The shape difference between the actual and printed phantoms is less than 1 mm except in the bottom surface region. The average CT value of the infill region in the 3D-printed phantom is -6 ± 18 Hounsfield units (HU) and that of the vertical shell region is 126 ± 18 HU. When the same plans were irradiated, the dose differences were generally less than 2%. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the 3D-printed phantom for artificial in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An analysis of respiratory induced kidney motion on four-dimensional computed tomography and its implications for stereotactic kidney radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Pham, Daniel; Gill, Suki; Bressel, Mathias; Dang, Kim; Devereux, Thomas; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment modality for primary renal cell carcinoma. To account for respiratory-induced target motion, an internal target volume (ITV) concept is often used in treatment planning of SABR. The purpose of this study is to assess patterns of kidney motion and investigate potential surrogates of kidney displacement with the view of ITV verification during treatment. Datasets from 71 consecutive patients with free breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) planning scans were included in this study. The displacement of the left and right hemi-diaphragm, liver dome and abdominal wall were measured and tested for correlation with the displacement of the both kidneys and patient breathing frequency. Nine patients were excluded due to severe banding artifact. Of 62 evaluable patients, the median age was 68 years, with 41 male patients and 21 female patients. The mean (range) of the maximum, minimum and average breathing frequency throughout the 4DCTs were 20.1 (11–38), 15.1 (9–24) and 17.3 (9–27.5) breaths per minute, respectively. The mean (interquartile range) displacement of the left and right kidneys was 0.74 cm (0.45-0.98 cm) and 0.75 cm (0.49-0.97) respectively. The amplitude of liver-dome motion was correlated with right kidney displacement (r=0.52, p<0.001), but not with left kidney displacement (p=0.796). There was a statistically significant correlation between the magnitude of right kidney displacement and that of abdominal displacement (r=0.36, p=0.004), but not the left kidney (r=0.24, p=0.056). Hemi-diaphragm displacements were correlated with kidney displacements respectively, with a weaker correlation for the left kidney/left diaphragm (r=0.45, [95% CI 0.22 to 0.63], p=<0.001) than for the right kidney/right diaphragm (r=0.57, [95% CI 0.37 to 0.72], p=<0.001). For the majority of patients, maximal left and right kidney displacement is subcentimeter in magnitude. The magnitude of

  13. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 ± 0.80 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 ± 1.22 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy

  14. Feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to improve lung sparing in treatment planning for distal esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Anurag; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Liu, H. Helen; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Wang Xiaochun; Murshed, Hasan; Bonnen, Mark D.; Garg, Amit K.; Stevens, Craig W.; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melinda D.; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be used to reduce doses to normal lung than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in treating distal esophageal malignancies. Patients and methods: Ten patient cases with cancer of the distal esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. IMRT plans using four, seven, and nine beams (4B, 7B, and 9B) were developed for each patient and compared with the 3DCRT plan used clinically. IMRT and 3DCRT plans were evaluated with respect to PTV coverage and dose-volumes to irradiated normal structures, with statistical comparison made between the two types of plans using the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Results: IMRT plans (4B, 7B, 9B) reduced total lung volume treated above 10 Gy (V 1 ), 20 Gy (V 2 ), mean lung dose (MLD), biological effective volume (V eff ), and lung integral dose (P 1 , 5% for V 2 , and 2.5 Gy for MLD. IMRT improved the PTV heterogeneity (P<0.05), yet conformity was better with 7B-9B IMRT plans. No clinically meaningful differences were observed with respect to the irradiated volumes of spinal cord, heart, liver, or total body integral doses. Conclusions: Dose-volume of exposed normal lung can be reduced with IMRT, though clinical investigations are warranted to assess IMRT treatment outcome of esophagus cancers

  15. Refinement of the basic treatment equivalent model to reflect radiotherapy treatment throughput using Australasian data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, G.; Gebski, V.; Sydney University, NSW; Lunn, A.D.; Open University, Milton Keynes,; Oxford University, Oxford,; Lunn, M.; Oxford University, Oxford,

    1999-01-01

    The present study aims to develop a more sensitive basic treatment equivalent (BTE) model that still measures linear accelerator throughput and considers some of the shortcomings of the previous model. All radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand were invited to participate. Departments were asked to time with a stopwatch all episodes of radiotherapy treatment over a 4-week period. Data collected for each treatment fraction included treatment intent, tumour site, patient age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, number of fields used, number of wedges used, number of junctions, number of shielding blocks used, whether the treatment was the first fraction, the use of general anaesthesia and whether port films or electronic portal imaging was used. Twenty-six departments of radiation oncology (70%) participated in this trial. A total of 7929 fractions of treatment, administered to 2424 patients, were timed. The factors found to most significantly impact on treatment duration on multivariate analysis were the type of fraction (first fraction was longer than subsequent fractions), type of beam (electrons were quicker than photons, which were quicker than mixed), number of fields, number of shields, number of junctions, number of port films and performance status (ECOG 2). The age of the patient, number of compensators and the sex of the patient were not significant. The relationships between factors were assessed, and models of measuring linear accelerator throughput which consider complexity corrections were derived. It is possible to show that linear accelerator throughput is poorly measured by just considering numbers of patients or fields treated per unit time; and that other factors that impact on treatment duration must be considered. A more sensitive model of patient throughput is suggested; but even when a large number of factors are considered, some insensitivity still remains in the model. Copyright (1999) Blackwell

  16. Treatment of unicentric and multicentric Castleman disease and the role of radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronowski, G M; Ha, C S; Wilder, R B; Cabanillas, F; Manning, J; Cox, J D

    2001-08-01

    Although surgery is considered standard therapy for unicentric Castleman disease, favorable responses to radiotherapy also have been documented. The authors undertook this study to analyze the clinical factors, treatment approaches, and outcomes of patients with unicentric or multicentric Castleman disease, and to report the outcomes of patients with unicentric Castleman disease treated with radiotherapy. The authors reviewed the medical records of 22 patients who had received a histologic diagnosis of Castleman disease at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1988 and 1999. One patient with a concurrent histopathologic diagnosis of nonsecretory multiple myeloma was excluded from the study. In all patients, the diagnosis of Castleman disease was based on the results of lymph node biopsies. Disease was categorized as being either unicentric or multicentric and further subdivided into hyaline vascular, plasma cell, or mixed variant histologic types. Clinical variables and outcomes were analyzed according to treatment, which consisted of surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. Records from 21 patients were analyzed: 12 had unicentric disease, and 9 had multicentric disease. The mean follow-up time for the entire series was 51 months (median, 40 months). Four patients with unicentric disease were treated with radiotherapy alone: 2 remain alive and symptom free, 2 died of causes unrelated to Castleman disease and had no evidence of disease at last follow-up. Eight patients with unicentric disease were treated with complete or partial surgical resection, and all are alive and asymptomatic. All nine patients with multicentric disease were treated with combination chemotherapy: five are alive with no evidence of disease, and four are alive with progressive disease. Surgery results in excellent rates of cure in patients with unicentric Castleman disease; radiotherapy can also achieve clinical response and cure in selected patients. Multicentric

  17. Clinical treatment planning for stereotactic radiotherapy, evaluation by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairn, T.; Aland, T.; Kenny, J.; Knight, R.T.; Crowe, S.B.; Langton, C.M.; Franich, R.D.; Johnston, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This study uses re-evaluates the doses delivered by a series of clinical stereotactic radiotherapy treatments, to test the accuracy of treatment planning predictions for very small radiation fields. Stereotactic radiotherapy treatment plans for meningiomas near the petrous temporal bone and the foramen magnum (incorp rating fields smaller than I c m2) were examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Important differences between treatment planning predictions and Monte Carlo calculations of doses delivered to stereotactic radiotherapy patients are apparent. For example, in one case the Monte Carlo calculation shows that the delivery a planned meningioma treatment would spare the patient's critical structures (eyes, brainstem) more effectively than the treatment plan predicted, and therefore suggests that this patient could safely receive an increased dose to their tumour. Monte Carlo simulations can be used to test the dose predictions made by a conventional treatment planning system, for dosimetrically challenging small fields, and can thereby suggest valuable modifications to clinical treatment plans. This research was funded by the Wesley Research Institute, Australia. The authors wish to thank Andrew Fielding and David Schlect for valuable discussions of aspects of this work. The authors are also grateful to Muhammad Kakakhel, for assisting with the design and calibration of our linear accelerator model, and to the stereotactic radiation therapy team at Premion, who designed the treatment plans. Computational resources and services used in this work were provided by the HPC and Research Support Unit, QUT, Brisbane, Australia. (author)

  18. Target volume definition with 18F-FDG PET-CT in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, K. J.; Hanna, G. G.; Hounsell, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using 18F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTF) purposes, and in particular for defining target volumes. This is a rapidly evolving subject and this review describes the background to this application of PET imaging and discusses the issues involved. (authors)

  19. Segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy as treatment of stage II breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Chiminazzo Junior, H.; Schlupp, W.R.; Cunha, L.S.M. da

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of operable breast cancer with segmental mastectomy and radiotherapy has been described since decade 30. Many recent prospective and retrospective studies have shown the efficacy of this conservative management, particularly in stage I. There are still doubts in its use in stage II. (Author) [pt

  20. Durable treatment response of relapsing CNS plasmacytoma using intrathecal chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and Daratumumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassadi, Ezzat; Murphy, Maurice; Hacking, Dayle; Farrell, Michael

    2018-04-01

    CNS myelomatous involvement is a rare complication of multiple myeloma with dismal outcome. This disease's optimal treatment is unclear. Combined approach of systemic therapy, radiotherapy, and intrathecal injections chemotherapy should be considered and autologous stem cell transplant consolidation is offered to eligible patients. The role of Daratumumab in this disease deserves further evaluation.

  1. Paediatric Photon and Proton Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Based on Advanced Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.

    The overall cure-rates for young cancer patients are continuously increasing and about 80% of the children diagnosed with cancer today will survive for more than five years. However, the cancer treatment, usually a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is aggressive. Apart from a...

  2. The role of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjamaegi, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective analyses was performed in a series of patients with advanced cervix cancer. The aim of this analyses was to evaluate the efficiency of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for advanced cervix cancer. For the patients with advanced stages, active multidisciplinary treatment is necessary for local control and suppression of distant metastases

  3. Study and establishment of a computer program for radiotherapy treatment planning development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djennaoui, N.

    1987-02-01

    The modern radiotherapy requires the use of computers. In addition to their accuracy, computers involve an appreciable saving of time in the calculation of isodoses, permitting us to change several times a technique in order to choose the best dose distribution for each case of tumor. The aim of this work was to set a computer program calculating a suitable dose distribution for a given treatment. The algorithm of calculation of the depth dose used in our program permits us to calculate the dose distribution for all photon energies used in radiotherapy, whatever are the energy and modification of the field by the use of wedge filters or bolus [fr

  4. Surgical treatment of radiation injuries after radiotherapy for uterine carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochrane, J P.S.; Yarnold, J R; Slack, W W [Middlesex Hospital, London (UK)

    1981-01-01

    The outcome of serious radiation injuries to the pelvic viscera in 400 patients treated by radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterus between January 1974 and December 1978 has been reviewed. Twenty-eight instances of serious radiation damage have been found, 13 of predominantly small bowel damage, 11 of predominantly large bowel damage and 4 of bladder damage. Many patients had involvement at multiple sites. Fourteen patients have died, and 9 survivors have artificial abdominal stomas. Leaking anastomoses and progressive sepsis were major problems in the postoperative period and could be related either to inadequate resection of irradiated bowel or to damage to other organs at operation. The possibilities of earlier diagnosis and better surgical procedures are discussed.

  5. EPR dosimetry for actual and suspected overexposures during radiotherapy treatments in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trompier, F.; Sadlo, J.; Michalik, J.; Stachowicz, W.; Mazal, A.; Clairand, I.; Rostkowska, J.; Bulski, W.; Kulakowski, A.; Sluszniak, J.; Gozdz, S.; Wojcik, A.

    2007-01-01

    EPR dosimetry on bone samples was recently used for actual and suspected overexposures during radiotherapy treatments performed in Poland. In 2001 five breast-cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy in the Bialystok Oncology Center, Poland, were overexposed. The overexposure was due to a defective safety interlock and an obsolete safety system of the linear accelerator. For the three most exposed patients, pieces of rib bones removed during surgical reconstruction of the chest wall and skin transplantation allowed an estimation of the accident doses by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. The doses delivered during the accident were as high as 60-80 Gy. In 2005, a patient treated in Kielce Holy Cross Cancer Center exhibited similar deep necroses of the chest wall but 6 years following a 'standard upper mantel fields' radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. In order to investigate the possible late effect of an overexposure as necrosis origin, the delivered dose was afterward estimated by EPR dosimetry performed on a rib sample

  6. Modern possibilities of radiotherapy in the complex and single treatment of panaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolipiliev, V.; Momchev, M.

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported of the treatment of 282 patients with different forms of panaris: 39 per cent received radiotherapy alone, in the remaining radiotherapy was combined with surgical management, antibiotics and local treatment. Two different radiotherapy schemes were attempted: 49% of the patients received rather high single (50-80 rad) and total (300-600 rad) doses in the local site at a regimen of superficial (100 kV, 4 mm Al) or deep (180-200 kV, 0.5-1 mm Cu) roentgentherapy, with size of field 4/4 cm or 4/6 cm and 30-40 cm distance. In the remaining 51% of patients radiotherapy was characterized by dynamic fractionation and longer duration of procedures with significantly lower single (30-40 rad) and total (160-320 rad) doses. In recent years the second scheme has been preferred and has gain wide acceptance. Irradiation dose and rate invariably conformed to the type of inflammatory process. Patients with panaritium paronychium and panaritium subcutaneum admitted for treatment in the first few days of development of the digital infection required only several procedures on alternate days to achieve complete cure in a week. In the event of pus collection, 1 or 2 irradiation procedures accelerated abscess formation; this was followed by surgical intervention with postoperative radiotherapy to hasten the granulation process. Treatment of bone-and-joint forms of panaris was complex with initially higher single doses, followed by lower ones, applied up to twice weekly. The following advantages of the method are pointed out: shortening of treatment, respectively of the disability period; easy to perform, painless and practically innocuous manipulation. Complete cure could not be achieved only in advanced, torpid cases. (A.B.)

  7. Nasopharynx carcinoma treatment: from the conventional radiotherapy to the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation; Traitement du carcinome du nasopharynx: de la radiotherapie conventionnelle a la radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokaouim, K.; Grehange, G.; Truc, G.; Peingnaux, K.; Martin, E.; Zanetta, S.; Bruchon, Y.; Bonnetain, F.; Maingon, P. [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2009-10-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the impact of factors linked to the radiotherapy realisation on the local and locoregional control, the global survival, the survival without disease of patients suffering of naso-pharynx carcinoma. Conclusion: the patients suffering of a nasopharynx carcinoma treated by irradiation associated to chemotherapy have an improved global survival and an improved survival without disease. The conformal radiotherapy with or without modulated intensity reduce the risk of serous otitis, trismus and xerostomia at long term. It seems necessary to realize multi centric studies with a longer period of follow up before asserting the advantages of the I.M.R.T. in comparison to the classical and conformal technique in the treatment of naso-pharynx carcinomas. (N.C.)

  8. Audit of radiation dose delivered in time-resolved four-dimensional computed tomography in a radiotherapy department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Patricia; Calllahan, Jason; Cramb, Jim; Budd, Ray

    2015-01-01

    To review the dose delivered to patients in time-resolved computed tomography (4D CT) used for radiotherapy treatment planning. 4D CT is used at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre since July 2007 for radiotherapy treatment planning using a Philips Brilliance Wide Bore CT scanner (16 slice, helical 4D CT acquisition). All scans are performed at 140 kVp and reconstructed in 10 datasets for different phases of the breathing cycle. Dose records were analysed retrospectively for 387 patients who underwent 4D CT procedures between 2007 and 2013. A total of 444 4D CT scans were acquired with the majority of them (342) being for lung cancer radiotherapy. Volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) as recorded over this period was fairly constant at approximately 20 mGy for adults. The CTDI for 4D CT for lung cancers of 19.6 ± 9.3 mGy (n = 168, mean ± 1SD) was found to be 63% higher than CTDIs for conventional CT scans for lung patients that were acquired in the same period (CTDIvol 12 ± 4 mGy, sample of n = 25). CTDI and dose length product (DLP) increased with increasing field of view; however, no significant difference between DLPs for different indications (breast, kidney, liver and lung) could be found. Breathing parameters such as breathing rate or pattern did not affect dose. 4D CT scans can be acquired for radiotherapy treatment planning with a dose less than twice the one required for conventional CT scanning.

  9. Effects of Radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma: a retrospective analysis of a Single Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuschek, Christiane; Ochtrop, Thomas A; Bölke, Edwin; Ganswindt, Ute; Fenk, Roland; Gripp, Stephan; Kröpil, Patric; Gerber, Peter Arne; Kammers, Kai; Hamilton, Jackson; Orth, Klaus; Budach, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Palliative irradiation of osteolytic lesions is a considerable component in the treatment for patients with multiple myeloma. In this study, we analyzed the efficacy of irradiation in these patients. We retrospectively analyzed 153 patients with multiple myeloma who were admitted to our department between 1989 and 2013. According to the staging system of Durie & Salmon 116 patients were classified as stage III. 107/153 patients were treated with radiotherapy of at least one and up to 6 bony lesions at different times. In order to evaluate the effect of local radiotherapy on pain relief and bone recalcification a uni- and multivariate analysis was performed using a binary logistic regression model to correct for multiple measurements. Complete information on dose, fractionation and volume of radiotherapy was available from 81 patients treated in 136 target volumes for pain relief, and from 69 patients treated in 108 target volumes for recalcification. Total radiation doses varied between 8 Gy to 50 Gy (median dose 25 Gy in 2.5 Gy fractions, 5 times a week). Radiotherapy resulted in complete local pain relief in 31% and partial local pain relief in 54% of the patients. In the univariate analysis, higher total radiation doses (p = 0.023) and higher age (p = 0.014) at the time of radiotherapy were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of pain relief, whereas no significant association was detected for concurrent systemic treatment, type and stage of myeloma and location of bone lesions. The same variables were independent predictors for pain relief in the multivariate analysis. Recalcification was observed in 48% of irradiated bone lesions. In the uni- and multivariate analysis higher radiation doses were significantly associated (p = 0.048) with an increased likelihood of recalcification. Side effects of radiotherapy were generally mild. Higher total biological radiation doses were associated with better pain relief and recalcification in this

  10. Radiation Planning Assistant - A Streamlined, Fully Automated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Laurence E.; Kisling, Kelly; McCarroll, Rachel; Zhang, Lifei; Yang, Jinzhong; Simonds, Hannah; du Toit, Monique; Trauernicht, Chris; Burger, Hester; Parkes, Jeannette; Mejia, Mike; Bojador, Maureen; Balter, Peter; Branco, Daniela; Steinmann, Angela; Baltz, Garrett; Gay, Skylar; Anderson, Brian; Cardenas, Carlos; Jhingran, Anuja; Shaitelman, Simona; Bogler, Oliver; Schmeller, Kathleen; Followill, David; Howell, Rebecca; Nelson, Christopher; Peterson, Christine; Beadle, Beth

    2018-01-01

    The Radiation Planning Assistant (RPA) is a system developed for the fully automated creation of radiotherapy treatment plans, including volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for patients with head/neck cancer and 4-field box plans for patients with cervical cancer. It is a combination of specially developed in-house software that uses an application programming interface to communicate with a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. It also interfaces with a commercial secondary dose verification software. The necessary inputs to the system are a Treatment Plan Order, approved by the radiation oncologist, and a simulation computed tomography (CT) image, approved by the radiographer. The RPA then generates a complete radiotherapy treatment plan. For the cervical cancer treatment plans, no additional user intervention is necessary until the plan is complete. For head/neck treatment plans, after the normal tissue and some of the target structures are automatically delineated on the CT image, the radiation oncologist must review the contours, making edits if necessary. They also delineate the gross tumor volume. The RPA then completes the treatment planning process, creating a VMAT plan. Finally, the completed plan must be reviewed by qualified clinical staff. PMID:29708544

  11. Effect of IMRT and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on oral Candida colonization: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Shanthi Kamath

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Although candidiasis is seen regardless of the type of radiation therapy used, the oral environment is more stable after intensity-modulated radiation therapy as and when compared to 3D CRT. Salivary substitutes and good oral hygiene before, during, and after radiotherapy could be used to increase oral clearance and to decrease the chance of candidiasis.

  12. Evaluation of cost functions for gray value matching of two-dimensional images in radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Niels; Ploeger, Lennert S.; van Herk, Marcel

    2003-01-01

    In external beam radiotherapy, portal imaging is applied for verification of the patient setup. Current automatic methods for portal image registration, which are often based on segmentation of anatomical structures, are especially successful for images of the pelvic region. For portal images of

  13. Treatment of lymphatic nodes metastasis in advanced cancer with interventional chemotherapy combined radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Shian; Guo Weijian; Wu Guohua; Lin Qing; Jiang Mawei; Yao Yuan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects of treatment with interventional chemotherapy combined radiotherapy for lymphatic nodes metastasis in advanced cancer. Methods: Treated with interventional chemotherapy for 27 cases of lymphatic rode metastasis once a month with average 2-3 times totally. Simultaneously treated with linear accelerator radiotherapy with average dose of 40-50 Gy/20-25 times/4-5 weeks. Results: To evaluate the clinical effects after finished the whole treatment program two months later. CR + PR reached 77.8% (24/27). All patients showed tolerance to accept the treatment. Conclusion: Treatment for lymphatic node metastasis in advanced cancer with interventional chemotherapy combined radiation therapy seems to be a valuable way

  14. The Impact of Colleague Peer Review on the Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Process in the Radical Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, K P; McAleese, J; Crockett, C; Harney, J; Eakin, R L; Young, V A L; Dunn, M A; Johnston, R E; Hanna, G G

    2015-09-01

    Modern radiotherapy uses techniques to reliably identify tumour and reduce target volume margins. However, this can potentially lead to an increased risk of geographic miss. One source of error is the accuracy of target volume delineation (TVD). Colleague peer review (CPR) of all curative-intent lung cancer plans has been mandatory in our institution since May 2013. At least two clinical oncologists review plans, checking treatment paradigm, TVD, prescription dose tumour and critical organ tolerances. We report the impact of CPR in our institution. Radiotherapy treatment plans of all patients receiving radical radiotherapy were presented at weekly CPR meetings after their target volumes were reviewed and signed off by the treating consultant. All cases and any resultant change to TVD (including organs at risk) or treatment intent were recorded in our prospective CPR database. The impact of CPR over a 13 month period from May 2013 to June 2014 is reported. One hundred and twenty-two patients (63% non-small cell lung carcinoma, 17% small cell lung carcinoma and 20% 'clinical diagnosis') were analysed. On average, 3.2 cases were discussed per meeting (range 1-8). CPR resulted in a change in treatment paradigm in 3% (one patient proceeded to induction chemotherapy, two patients had high-dose palliative radiotherapy). Twenty-one (17%) had a change in TVD and one (1%) patient had a change in dose prescription. In total, 6% of patients had plan adjustment after review of dose volume histogram. The introduction of CPR in our centre has resulted in a change in a component of the treatment plan for 27% of patients receiving curative-intent lung radiotherapy. We recommend CPR as a mandatory quality assurance step in the planning process of all radical lung plans. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Automatic detection of patient identification and positioning errors in radiotherapy treatment using 3D setup images

    OpenAIRE

    Jani, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    The success of modern radiotherapy treatment depends on the correct alignment of the radiation beams with the target region in the patient. In the conventional paradigm of image-guided radiation therapy, 2D or 3D setup images are taken immediately prior to treatment and are used by radiation therapy technologists to localize the patient to the same position as defined from the reference planning CT dataset. However, numerous reports in the literature have described errors during this step, wh...

  16. Dosimetric verification of radiotherapy treatment planning systems in Serbia: national audit

    OpenAIRE

    Rutonjski Laza; Petrović Borislava; Baucal Milutin; Teodorović Milan; Čudić Ozren; Gershkevitsh Eduard; Izewska Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Independent external audits play an important role in quality assurance programme in radiation oncology. The audit supported by the IAEA in Serbia was designed to review the whole chain of activities in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) workflow, from patient data acquisition to treatment planning and dose delivery. The audit was based on the IAEA recommendations and focused on dosimetry part of the treatment planning and delivery processes. Methods The audit was conducte...

  17. The combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of malignant tumours: indications and dangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelink, H.; Somers, R.

    1980-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy has improved the results of treatment of certain malignant tumours. However, during both experimental investigations and clinical treatment, a number of severe side effects have been observed, during as well as some time after the administration, especially with use of actinomycin and adriamycin. Also the possibility exists that more secondary tumours are induced as the consequence of combination therapy. (Auth.)

  18. Local Recurrences After Conservative Treatment of Ductal Carcinoma-In-Situ of the Breast Without Radiotherapy: The Effect of Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten van der Velden, A.P.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Koot, V.C.M.; Hennipman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The main goal in treatment of ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) of the breast is to prevent local recurrences. Radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery has been shown to decrease the recurrence rate, although whether all patients should be treated with radiotherapy remains a topic

  19. Internal hemipelvectomy with intraoperative and external beam radiotherapy in the limb-sparing treatment of a pelvic girdle chondrosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, HJ; Szabo, BG

    The case of a patient with an extensive pelvic girdle chondrosarcoma treated with internal hemipelvectomy and intraoperative radiotherapy, followed by adjuvant high-dose external beam radiotherapy, with a successful attempt in achieving long-term local tumor control and limb-sparing treatment is

  20. A novel four-dimensional radiotherapy planning strategy from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Cohen, Patrice; Xie, Huchen; Low, Daniel; Li, Diana; Rimner, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) planning from a tumor-tracking beam's eye view (ttBEV) with reliable gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation, realistic normal tissue representation, high planning accuracy and low clinical workload, we propose and validate a novel 4D conformal planning strategy based on a synthesized 3.5D computed tomographic (3.5DCT) image with a motion-compensated tumor. To recreate patient anatomy from a ttBEV in the moving tumor coordinate system for 4DRT planning (or 4D planning), the centers of delineated GTVs in all phase CT images of 4DCT were aligned, and then the aligned CTs were averaged to produce a new 3.5DCT image. This GTV-motion-compensated CT contains a motionless target (with motion artifacts minimized) and motion-blurred normal tissues (with a realistic temporal density average). Semi-automatic threshold-based segmentation of the tumor, lung and body was applied, while manual delineation was used for other organs at risk (OARs). To validate this 3.5DCT-based 4D planning strategy, five patients with peripheral lung lesions of small size (tumor and a minor beam aperture and weighting adjustment to maintain plan conformality. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the 4DCT plan was created with two methods: one is an integrated DVH (iDVH4D), which is defined as the temporal average of all 3D-phase-plan DVHs, and the other (DVH4D) is based on the dose distribution in a reference phase CT image by dose warping from all phase plans using the displacement vector field (DVF) from a free-form deformable image registration (DIR). The DVH3.5D (for the 3.5DCT plan) was compared with both iDVH4D and DVH4D. To quantify the DVH difference between the 3.5DCT plan and the 4DCT plan, two methods were used: relative difference (%) of the areas underneath the DVH curves and the volumes receiving more than 20% (V20) and 50% (V50) of prescribed dose of these 4D plans. The volume of the delineated GTV from different phase

  1. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of resectable desmoid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goy, Barry W.; Lee, Steve P.; Eilber, Frederick; Dorey, Fred; Eckardt, Jeffrey; Fu, Y.-S.; Juillard, Guy J.F.; Selch, Michael T.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Desmoid tumors have a high propensity for local recurrence with surgical resection. There are many reports describing good responses of desmoid tumors to irradiation, but none have clearly proven the indications for adjuvant radiotherapy in treating resectable desmoid tumors. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 61 patients with resectable desmoid tumors who were treated at our institution from 1965 to 1992. Fifty-six patients had unifocal disease, of which 34 had positive surgical margins. Forty-five were treated with surgery alone, while 11 received surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 6 years. Local control was measured from the last day of treatment, and all cases were reviewed by our Department of Pathology. Results: Univariate analysis of 56 patients with unifocal disease revealed that female gender (p=0.025) and positive margins (p=0.032) predicted for local recurrence. Multivariate analysis revealed that only positive margins (p=0.003) independently predicted for local recurrence. Only 3 of 22 patients had local recurrences with clear margins, with a 6 year actuarial local control of 85%. We analyzed 34 patients with positive margins by univariate analysis, and only adjuvant radiotherapy predicted for improved local control (p=0.031). Multivariate analysis of these 34 patients revealed that adjuvant radiotherapy independently predicted for local control (p=0.012), and patients with recurrent disease had a slightly higher risk of local recurrence (p=0.083). The 6 year actuarial local control determined by Kaplan-Meier for patients with unifocal disease and positive margins was 32%(±12%) with surgery alone, and 78%(±14%) with surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy (p=0.019). None of the patients who received radiotherapy for unifocal disease developed serious complications, or a secondary malignancy. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated in the treatment of patients with resectable

  2. The Comparison 2D and 3D Treatment Planning in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy with Emphasis on Dose Homogeneity and Lung Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Falahatpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast conserving radiotherapy is one of the most common procedures performed in any radiation oncology department. A tangential parallel-opposed pair is usually used for this purpose. This technique is performed using 2D or 3D treatment planning systems. The aim of this study was to compare 2D treatment planning with 3D treatment planning in tangential irradiation in breast conserving radiotherapy. In this comparison, homogeneity of isodoses in the breast volume and lung dose were considered. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery were included in this study. The patients were CT scanned. Two-dimensional treatment planning with the Alfard 2D TPS was performed for each patient using a single central CT slice. The data used on the Alfard 2D TPS was imported into the Eclipse 3D TPS, on which 3D treatment planning was performed. Cobalt-60 beams were used in all plans. Results: Comparing 2D and 3D treatment planning, homogeneity of isodoses was improved in 3D treatment planning (p30Gy was increased in 3D treatment planning (p< 0.01. Discussion and Conclusion: 3D treatment planning is a more suitable option for patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery because of improved dose homogeneity in 3D treatment planning. The results of the treatment can be improved with reduced recurrence probability and skin problems.

  3. SU-E-T-63: Carotid Sparing Tomohelical Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for T1N0 Glottic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, C; Ju, S; Ahn, Y; Oh, D; Noh, J; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Choi, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric benefit and treatment efficiency of carotid-sparing TomoHelical (TH) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for early glottic cancer. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed for 10 patients with early-stage (T1N0M0) glottic squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), carotid artery (CA), and spinal cord (SP) were delineated for each CT data set. Two-field 3DCRT (2F-3DCRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (3F-IMRT), TomoHelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TH-3DCRT plans were generated, with a total prescribed dose of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV for each patient. In order to evaluate plan quality, dosimetric characteristics were compared in terms of the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for the PTV, V35, V50, and V63 for the CAs and in terms of the maximum dose for the SP. Additionally, treatment planning and delivery times were compared to evaluate treatment efficiency. Results: The CIs for 3F-IMRT (0.650±0.05), TH-IMRT (0.643±0.03), and TH-3DCRT (0.631±0.03) were much better than that for 2F-3DCRT (0.318±0.03). The HIs for TH-IMRT (1.053±0.01) and TH-3DCRT (1.055±0.01) were slightly better than those for 2F-3DCRT (1.062±0.01) and 3F-IMRT (1.091±0.007). 2F-3DCRT showed poor CA sparing in terms of the V35, V50, and V63 compared to 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant dose difference between 3F-IMRT, TH-IMRT, and TH-3DCRT (p>0.05). The maximum dose to the SP with all plans was below 45 Gy. The treatment planning times for 2F-3DCRT (5.9±0.66 min) and TH-3DCRT (7.32±0.94 min) were much lower than those for 3F-IMRT (45.51±2.76 min) and TH-IMRT (35.58±4.41 min), whereas the delivery times with all plans was below 3 minutes. Conclusion: TH-3DCRT showed excellent carotid sparing capability, comparable to that with TH-IMRT, with high treatment efficiency and short planning and

  4. Lymph Node Failure Pattern and Treatment Results of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Heui Kwan; Kim, Soo Geon

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the failure pattern of the celiac axis, gastric lymph node, and treatment outcome in the upper and mid-esophageal region of cancer patients treated by definitive radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The study constituted the evaluation 108 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 1986 to December 2006. In total, 82 patients treated by planned radiotherapy, except when treating the celiac axis and gastric lymph node for treatment volume, were analysed retrospectively. The study population consisted of 78 men and 2 women (mean age of 63.2 years). In addition, 51 patients received radiotherapy alone, whereas 31 patients received a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The primary cancer sites were located in the upper portion (17 patients), and mid portion (65 patients), respectively. Further, the patients were in various clinical stages including T1N0-1M0 (7 patients), T2N0-1M0 (18 patients), T3N0-1M0 (44 patients) and T4N0-1M0 (13 patients). The mean follow up period was 15 months. Results: The various treatment outcomes included complete response (48 patients), partial response (31 patients) and no response (3 patients). The failure patterns of the lymph node were comprised of the regional lymph node (23 patients) and the distance lymph node which included celiac axis and gastric lymph node (13 patients). However, metastasis was not observed in the regional and distant lymph node in 10 patients, whereas 36 patients were not evaluated. Furthermore, of the 13 patients who developed celiac axis and gastric lymph node metastases, 3 were in stage T1N0-1M0 and 10 were in stage T2-4N0-1M0. A complete response appeared in 12 patients, whereas a partial response appeared in 1 patient. The mean survival time of the

  5. Dosimetric Feasibility of Hypofractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Neoadjuvant Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Adams, Judith C; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Alexander, Brian M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor and normal tissue dosimetry of a 5 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) x 5 fraction proton radiotherapy schedule, before initiating a clinical trial of neoadjuvant, short-course proton radiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: The first 9 pancreatic cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (1.8 Gy x 28) at the Massachusetts General Hospital had treatment plans generated using a 5 CGE x 5 fraction proton regimen. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant. Plans were optimized for target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Hypofractionated proton and conventionally fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans both provided acceptable target volume coverage and dose homogeneity. Improved dose conformality provided by the hypofractionated proton regimen resulted in significant sparing of kidneys, liver, and small bowel, evidenced by significant reductions in the mean doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, to these structures. Kidney and liver sparing was most evident in low-dose regions (≤20% prescribed dose for both kidneys and ≤60% prescribed dose for liver). Improvements in small-bowel dosimetry were observed in high- and low-dose regions. Mean stomach and duodenum doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, were similar for the two techniques. Conclusions: A proton radiotherapy schedule consisting of 5 fractions of 5 CGE as part of neoadjuvant therapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas seems dosimetrically feasible, providing excellent target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue sparing. Hypofractionated proton radiotherapy in this setting merits Phase I clinical trial investigation

  6. Three-dimensional photon radiotherapy planning for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esik, O.; Schlegel, W.; Doll, J.; Nemeth, G.; Lorenz, W.J.; Weil Emil Korhaz-Rendeloeintezet, Budapest; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions have been computed for high-energy photon radiation therapy of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers, using a coaxial pair of opposing lateral beams in fixed positions. Treatment plans obtained under various conditions of irradiation are analyzed and compared for a cobalt-60 gamma unit (GAMMATRON S80, Siemens), photon beams from a 6 MV (CLINAC 1800, VARIAN), an 8 MV (SATURNE, CGR) and a 15 MV (MEVATRON 77, Siemens) linear accelerator. Using open fields a somewhat non-uniform and partly insufficient dose in target volume of interest is obtained with all treatment units if sufficient protection of the spinal cord is provided. The X-ray plans are somewhat superior to the cobalt-60 ones. Depending on the quantum energy and wedge isodose angle, wedging only slightly improves or sometimes moderately decreases the homogeneity of the dose in the target volume. According to these small and/or controversial effects of wedges their application seems unnecessary and/or non-convenient. Simulations show that extreme care is needed in positioning the isocentre: An accuracy of ±3 mm is required in the median sagittal plane. (orig.)

  7. Definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Correlation between treatment patterns and recurrence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Naoyuki; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes and optimal practice patterns of definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Between 1993 and 2012, 49 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer in three hospitals. Of these, 15 patients (31%) had clinically positive regional lymph node metastasis. A total of 34 patients (70%) received external beam radiotherapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary), and 8 (16%) (with small superficial Stage I tumors) were treated with local radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 1–169 months). The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and loco-regional control (LRC) rates were 83%, 59% and 71%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the histological type (P = 0.044) was significant risk factors for LRC. In Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I cases, 3 of 8 patients (38%) who did not undergo prophylactic lymph node irradiation had lymph node recurrence, compared with 2 of 12 patients (17%) who underwent prophylactic pelvic irradiation. For Stage III–IV tumors, the local recurrence rate was 50% and the lymph node recurrence rate was 40%. Patients with FIGO Stage I/II or clinical Stage N1 had a higher recurrence rate with treatment using a single modality compared with the recurrence rate using combined modalities. In conclusion, our treatment outcomes for vaginal cancer were acceptable, but external beam radiotherapy with brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary) was needed regardless of FIGO stage. Improvement of treatment outcomes in cases of FIGO Stage III or IV remains a significant challenge. (author)

  8. Localized field conformation radiotherapy combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaizu, Toshihide; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    To improve the quality of life (QOL) of the patients with prostate cancer, we limit the radiotherapy target volume to the prostate and seminal vesicles while using endocrine therapy towards the disease outside the target volume. Radiotherapy technique was rotation conformation technique with computer-controlled multileaf collimators to the total doses of up to 66-70 Gy. Among 145 evaluable cases with the median age of 74, overall and cause-specific 5-year survival rates were 59.3% and 84.1%, respectively, and the relative survival rate of the Stage A-C cases was 100%. The two thirds (33/50) of the deaths were not of prostate cancer. The rate of severe complication was 1.4%. As for QOL, the rate of impotence was 90%, however, the patients' overall satisfaction towards the treatment was 90%. From this analysis, this combined treatment seems beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy in fascial fibromatosis: a case series, literature review and considerations for treatment of early-stage disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenfell, Solveig; Borg, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Palmar and plantar fascial fibromatoses are benign hyperproliferative disorders of the deep fascia of the palm and sole. This study seeks to examine the role of radiotherapy in the management of fascial fibromatosis. Six consecutive cases of early-stage fascial fibromatosis treated with radiotherapy at the Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre between July 2008 and May 2011 were analysed. The results of the case series were compared with a systematic review of the literature. All six cases regressed or showed a reduction of symptoms following radiotherapy. Treatment was well tolerated with minor toxicities. Median follow-up for the case series was 38.5 months. The systematic review identified seven studies describing the use of radiotherapy as primary treatment for fascial fibromatosis between 1946 and 2013. The literature indicates that radiotherapy can prevent disease progression and improve symptoms for early-stage disease, with low likelihood of significant toxicities. Early results from our case series are consistent with the literature, showing that radiotherapy can provide an effective management option for patients with early-stage fascial fibromatosis, and justify consideration of radiotherapy as a primary treatment for early-stage disease.

  10. A project proposal for implementing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for treatment of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napoles Morales, Misleidy; Garcia Yip, Fernando; Rodriguez Machado, Jorge; Yanes Lopez, Yaima; Pomares Gomez, Yenes; Mena, Yailen

    2009-01-01

    Malignant tumors located in the structures of the head and neck, excluding the skull and its contents, constitute 10% of all cancers, remains the most frequent locations, which correspond to the oral cavity between 40 to 60%. Diagnosed between 60 to 80% in early stages and a 15 to 30% in more advanced forms of the disease. Radiotherapy and surgery are the essential therapeutic tools in the treatment of these tumors planning processes and administration of radiotherapy treatments currently in a situation of rapid and radical change. Since the beginning of radiotherapy to this day the greatest advances in treatment have been linked to a better definition of the tumor irradiation thus get a reduced dose in healthy tissue. The use of radiation, can be severe sequelae affecting quality of life of the patient, organs at risk receiving high dose and advanced technique of IMRT treatment planning and allows treatments shaped fields, especially when the target of radiation is irregular, with fewer side effects by limiting the dose in the tumor tissues and organs at risk and to allow us to increase the doses in the tumor. So we decided to develop a protocol for the implementation of IMRT, taking into account that we have the appropriate equipment, trained staff to develop this technique. (Author)

  11. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Montserrat; Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  12. Protocol updated for the treatment of patients in radiotherapy with implanted cardiac devices; Protocolo actualizado para el tratamiento de pacientes en radioterapia con dispositivos cardiacos implantados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Martin, G.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, C.; Lopez Fernandez, A.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Sotoca Ruiz, A.

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy treatment can be safely performed in patients with pacemakers or implanted defibrillators, however, it is very important to ensure that the patient receives the minimum dose possible in your heart device. Is considered essential good coordination with the cardiology service before, during and after radiotherapy treatment for the patient safety. Finally we present a protocol updated to treat these patients in radiotherapy. (Author)

  13. A comparison of the results of radiotherapy and surgical treatment of tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuki, Hirokazu; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hiromu; Takegawa, Yoshihiro; Kashihara, Kenichi

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the results of tongue cancer treatments retrospectively in order to compare the outcomes of radiotherapy and surgery among patients presenting with early-stage tongue cancer. One-hundred and forty-three patients who underwent radical treatment of tongue cancer between 1976 and 1996 were classified into six treatment groups in order to compare the 5-year survival rate, 5-year local control and lymph node metastasis between the groups. Furthermore, prognostic factors were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. The 5-year survival rate for the entire subject population was 71%, and that for patients diagnosed as having stage I, II, III and IV tumors was 85%, 80%, 76% and 53%, respectively. The 5-year survival rate of patients who underwent surgical treatment alone for early-stage tongue cancer was higher than that of patients who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone (100% and 70%, respectively). The 5-year local control rate did not differ significantly between patients who underwent surgical treatment alone for early-stage cancer and those who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone (87% and 86%, respectively). Furthermore, the survival rate did not differ significantly between patients presenting with cervical lymph node metastasis upon initial examination and those who developed cervical lymph node metastasis later (62% and 69%, respectively). The results of a univariate analysis showed that prognosis was significantly better for women and N0 patients, and the results of a multivariate analysis confirmed that prognosis was significantly better for patients under 60 years of age, women, and N0 patients. The survival rate of patients treated for early-stage tongue cancer was slightly higher for those who underwent surgical treatment alone compared with those who underwent interstitial radiotherapy alone. However, local control was comparable between these two groups of patients. (author)

  14. Put yourself in their shoes … the vulnerability of children and their families when attending for radiotherapy treatment: The role of the specialist paediatric radiotherapy radiographer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodman, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Childhood cancer is rare; only 1 in 600 children under the age of 15 years develop a cancer. The treatment of childhood cancers is usually a multimodality approach and can involve surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is used in the management of tumours of the central nervous system, solid tumours, leukaemia's and Hodgkin's Lymphoma in the paediatric setting. Paediatric patients make up just 1% of the workload in radiotherapy departments, therefore they tend to be very adult orientated environments and treating children can be complex and challenging for staff. As healthcare professionals we must acknowledge the vulnerability of children and their families when they are coming for radiotherapy treatment. The role of the specialist paediatric radiographer has evolved to work alongside the children and their families to alleviate some of the families and staff anxieties, acting as an advocate, a key point of contact and resource. The very nature of radiotherapy treatment means parents will be separated from their children whilst the treatment is delivered. As radiographers we must ensure we put ourselves in their shoes and acknowledge how difficult this is for children and their parents. The key to every interaction with families is excellent communication and this is not just between professionals, the children and families but also between colleagues to ensure care is co-ordinated. Radiographers working with paediatric patients must have refined communication skills, be able to build rapports, offer support and comfort to children and their parents to ensure they receive the best possible care that is tailored to the individual families holistic needs. The specialist paediatric radiotherapy radiographer is in a unique position to deliver this expert care and support

  15. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of resectable desmoid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goy, Barry W.; Lee, Steve P.; Eilber, Frederick; Dorey, Fred; Eckardt, Jeffrey; Fu, Yao-Shi; Juillard, Guy J. F.; Selch, Michael T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Desmoid tumors have a high propensity for local recurrence with surgical resection. There are many reports describing good responses of desmoid tumors to irradiation, but none have clearly established the indications for adjuvant radiotherapy in treating resectable desmoid tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 61 patients with resectable desmoid tumor(s) who were treated at our institution from 1965 to February of 1992. Five patients had multifocal disease and are analyzed separately. Fifty-six patients had unifocal disease, of which 34 had positive surgical margins. Forty-five of the 56 patients with unifocal disease were treated with surgery alone, while 11 were treated with surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 6 years. Local control was measured from the last day of treatment, and all cases were reviewed by our Department of Pathology. Results: Multivariate analysis of the 56 patients with unifocal disease revealed that positive margins independently predicted for local recurrence (p ≤ 0.01). Only 3 of 22 patients with clear margins experienced a local recurrence, with a 6-year actuarial local control of 85%. Multivariate analysis of the 34 patients with positive margins revealed that adjuvant radiotherapy independently predicted for improved local control (p 0.01), and patients with recurrent disease had a slightly higher risk of local recurrence (p = 0.08). The 6-year actuarial local control determined by Kaplan-Meier for patients with unifocal disease and positive margins was 32% (±12%) with surgery alone, and 78% (±14%) with surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Subgroup analysis of the patients with positive margins and recurrent disease revealed that those treated with surgery alone had a 6-year actuarial local control of 0% vs. 80% for those treated with surgery plus radiotherapy (p ≤ 0.01). Patients with positive margins and primary disease had a trend towards improved local

  16. Image guided radiotherapy: equipment specifications and performance - an analysis of the dosimetric consequences of anatomic variations during head-and-neck radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguet, Maud

    2009-01-01

    Anatomic variations during head-and-neck radiotherapy treatment may compromise the delivery of the planned dose distribution, particularly in the case of IMRT treatments. The aim of this thesis was to establish 'dosimetric indicators' to identify patients who delivered dose deviates from the planned dose, to allow an eventual re-optimisation of the patient's dosimetry, if necessary, during the course of their radiotherapy treatment. These anatomic variations were monitored by regular acquisition of 3D patient images using an onboard imaging system, for which a rigorous quality control program was implemented. The patient dose distribution analysis and comparison was performed using a modified gamma index technique which was named gammaLSC3D. This improved gamma index technique quantified and identified the location of changes in the dose distribution in a stack of 2D images, with particular reference to the target volume (PTV) or organs at risk (parotids). The changes observed in the dose distribution for the PTV or parotids were then analysed and presented in the form of gamma-volume histograms in order to facilitate the follow up of dosimetric changes during the radiotherapy treatment. This analysis method has been automated, and is applicable in clinical routine to follow dose variations during head and neck radiotherapy treatment. (author) [fr

  17. Present and Future Developments in Radiotherapy Treatment Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer

    1995-04-01

    Technical advances in the design of medical accelerators are making possible the exploration of new treatment techniques. Technology currently available to the radiation oncologist allows the use of internal and dynamic wedges. Multileaf collimators can be used for static treatment ports, and dynamic field shaping and beam modulation using multileaf collimators has been shown to be feasible. Computer interfaces are necessary to transfer the complex treatment sequences that are possible with these devices. Such network interfaces also provide for more efficient conventional treatments. New machines such as X-band linear accelerators and advanced proton accelerators are being developed for applications such as boron neutron capture therapy and proton conformal therapy.

  18. Androgenic suppression combined with radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasse, André D; Sasse, Elisa; Carvalho, Albertina M; Macedo, Ligia T

    2012-01-01

    Locally advanced prostate cancer is often associated with elevated recurrence rates. Despite the modest response observed, external-beam radiotherapy has been the preferred treatment for this condition. More recent evidence from randomised trials has demonstrated clinical benefit with the combined use of androgen suppression in such cases. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare the combination of distinct hormone therapy modalities versus radiotherapy alone for overall survival, disease-free survival and toxicity. Databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, Cochrane databases and ClinicalTrials.gov) were scanned for randomised clinical trials involving radiotherapy with or without androgen suppression in local prostate cancer. The search strategy included articles published until October 2011. The studies were examined and the data of interest were plotted for meta-analysis. Survival outcomes were reported as a hazard ratio with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Data from ten trials published from 1988 to 2011 were included, comprising 6555 patients. There was a statistically significant advantage to the use of androgen suppression, in terms of both overall survival and disease free survival, when compared to radiotherapy alone. The use of long-term goserelin (up to three years) was the strategy providing the higher magnitude of clinical benefit. In contrast to goserelin, there were no trials evaluating the use of other luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogues as monotherapy. Complete hormonal blockade was not shown to be superior to goserelin monotherapy. Based on the findings of this systematic review, the evidence supports the use of androgen suppression with goserelin monotherapy as the standard treatment for patients with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy, which are at high risk of recurrence or metastases

  19. Results of radiotherapy and vitamin E in the treatment of peyronie's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Cristine I.; Njo, K. Hian; Karim, Abdul B. M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis of 38 patients with Peyronie's disease treated with primary radiotherapy in the period of 1975-1993. Methods and Materials: Important complaints were curvature of the penis during erection for 92% of the patients, painful erection for 68%, and problems with sexual intercourse for 37.5%. Average size of all indurated plaques was 2.5 cm. The average pretreatment duration of symptoms was 9.5 months. All 38 patients were irradiated with orthovoltage radiotherapy (200 and 250 kV photons) with a total dose of 9 Gy in 5 alternating days (regimen A). Because of minimal response, 16 patients were irradiated again with another 9 Gy in 5 days and finally received 18 Gy (regimen B). Results: With regimen A, a satisfying improvement was achieved for the majority of the patients: 65% experienced less penile pain during erection, 40% reported less curvature of the penis, and 47% experienced an improvement of their sex life. With the higher dose of regimen B there was an additional improvement for a minority of the patients: 25% reported less pain during erection, 21% had less curvature, and 29% experienced an improved sex life. With regimen A, pain improvement was statistically significantly superior when compared to regimen B. For all other improvements (curvature, sexual intercourse, and induration) no dose-response relation could be demonstrated between regimen A and the higher dose regimen B. No patient experienced any radiation-induced morbidity. After evaluating regimen A and regimen B, the overall result was that 76% experienced less pain, 60% reported an improved sex life, and 48% had a diminished curvature during erection. Conclusion: From this analysis it can be concluded that the distressing symptoms of Peyronie's disease can be treated successfully with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy proves to be a safe, noninvasive treatment method without causing morbidity. Low-dose radiotherapy with only a few fractions is recommended for an effective

  20. The evolution of rectal and urinary toxicity and immune response in prostate cancer patients treated with two three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vránová, J.; Vinakurau, S.; Richter, J.; Starec, M.; Fišerová, Anna; Rosina, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 6 (2011), s. 1-13 ISSN 1748-717X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200620 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) * gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity * prostate cancer Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.321, year: 2011

  1. Mid-ventilation CT scan construction from four-dimensional respiration-correlated CT scans for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthaus, Jochem W. H.; Schneider, Christoph; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; van Herk, Marcel; Belderbos, José S. A.; Rossi, Maddalena M. G.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Damen, Eugène M. F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Four-dimensional (4D) respiration-correlated imaging techniques can be used to obtain (respiration) artifact-free computed tomography (CT) images of the thorax. Current radiotherapy planning systems, however, do not accommodate 4D-CT data. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple,

  2. Normalization of serum testosterone levels in patients treated with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Fuks, Zvi; Lee, Henry J.; Natale, Linda; Leibel, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the expected time to serum testosterone normalization after short-course neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NAAD) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer and to identify pretreatment predictors that correlated with the time to testosterone normalization. Methods: Between 1993 and 1999, 88 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with NAAD and external beam radiotherapy, were prospectively monitored after treatment with sequential testosterone levels. NAAD was administered before and during the entire course of radiotherapy and discontinued at the end of treatment. The median duration of NAAD was 6 months. The actuarial rate of serum testosterone normalization from the end of treatment was evaluated, and the presence or absence of androgen deprivation-related symptoms was correlated with serum testosterone levels. Symptoms assessed included weight gain, loss of libido, breast tenderness, breast enlargement, hot flashes, and fatigue. Results: Serum testosterone levels returned to the normal range in 57 (65%) of the 88 patients and failed to normalize in 31 patients (35%). The median time to normalization was 18.3 months. The actuarial rate of normalization at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months was 10%, 26%, 38%, and 59%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, a pretreatment testosterone level in the lower range of normal was the only variable that predicted for delayed testosterone normalization after NAAD (p=0.00047). Among 45 patients with information concerning androgen deprivation-related symptoms recorded 1 year after cessation of NAAD, 24 (53%) had normalized testosterone levels, but in 21 patients (47%), the levels had not yet returned to normal. At 1 year, only 1 (4%) of 24 patients whose testosterone level had returned to normal experienced NAAD-related symptoms compared with 14 (67%) of 21 patients who did not have normal testosterone levels (p<0.001). Conclusion: Testosterone

  3. WE-FG-201-03: Lean Innovation Transforming Global Access to Best Practice Radiotherapy Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feain, I. [The University of Sydney (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Many low- and middle-income countries lack the resources and services to manage cancer, from screening and diagnosis to radiation therapy planning, treatment and quality assurance. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the needed services are enormous, and include severe shortages in equipment and trained staff. In this symposium, we will describe examples of technology and scientific research that have the potential to impact all these areas. These include: (1) the development of high-quality/low-cost colposcopes for cervical cancer screening, (2) the application of automated radiotherapy treatment planning to reduce staffing shortages, (3) the development of a novel radiotherapy treatment unit, and (4) utilizing a cloud-based infrastructure to facilitate collaboration and QA. Learning Objectives: Understand some of the issues in cancer care in low- resource environments, including shortages in staff and equipment, and inadequate physical infrastructure for advanced radiotherapy. Understand the challenges in developing and deploying diagnostic and treatment devices and services for low-resource environments. Understand some of the emerging technological solutions for cancer management in LMICs. NCI; L. Court, NIH, Varian, Elekta; I. Feain, Ilana Feain is founder and CTO of Nano-X Pty Ltd.

  4. WE-FG-201-03: Lean Innovation Transforming Global Access to Best Practice Radiotherapy Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feain, I.

    2016-01-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries lack the resources and services to manage cancer, from screening and diagnosis to radiation therapy planning, treatment and quality assurance. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the needed services are enormous, and include severe shortages in equipment and trained staff. In this symposium, we will describe examples of technology and scientific research that have the potential to impact all these areas. These include: (1) the development of high-quality/low-cost colposcopes for cervical cancer screening, (2) the application of automated radiotherapy treatment planning to reduce staffing shortages, (3) the development of a novel radiotherapy treatment unit, and (4) utilizing a cloud-based infrastructure to facilitate collaboration and QA. Learning Objectives: Understand some of the issues in cancer care in low- resource environments, including shortages in staff and equipment, and inadequate physical infrastructure for advanced radiotherapy. Understand the challenges in developing and deploying diagnostic and treatment devices and services for low-resource environments. Understand some of the emerging technological solutions for cancer management in LMICs. NCI; L. Court, NIH, Varian, Elekta; I. Feain, Ilana Feain is founder and CTO of Nano-X Pty Ltd

  5. Prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Ieda Lessa de Souza; Camargo, Teresa Caldas

    2007-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis have still not been fully defined. The current study thus involved a literature search aimed at identifying preventive and therapeutic measures in relation to oral mucositis in patients submitted to radiotherapy, analyzing the level of evidence in the selected studies, identifying which indications for prevention and treatment in the literature pertain to the field of nursing, and critically analyzing the results and their implications for nursing care. This was a systematic literature survey without a meta analysis, consulting the following databases: BIREME, Medline, CancerLit, Scirus, CAPES, Free medical journal, High wire press, SCIELO, and Medscape, from 2000 to 2005. According to observations, nursing care was capable of improving patient's quality of life, promoting education of patients, implementing and supervising oral care programs, and providing guidance on hygiene, prevention, and treatment of oral mucositis, including pain management. However, no Brazilian nursing publications were found on the subject. Research and publications focusing on nursing experience in the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-related oral mucositis and the implications for patients and nurses are important to provide evidence-based nursing guidelines. (author)

  6. Radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of maxillary sinus. Requirements for conservative treatment strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Komiyama, Takafumi; Marino, Kan; Kuriyama, Kengo; Tanaka, Shiho; Araki, Tsutomu; Sano, Naoki

    2004-01-01

    We reviewed the records of 45 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of maxillary sinus who underwent radiotherapy and intra-arterial chemotherapy with or without maxillectomy. Of 45 patients, 10 patients (stage II:III:IV A=1:5:4) were operated with radical radiotherapy without maxillectomy and had no local failure for more than 1 year (conservative and no local failure group), and 9 patients (stage III:IV A=3:6) were performed with partial or total maxillectomy after pre-operative radiotherapy and had no malignant cells in the operated specimen (group B). Complete response on radiological images was shown in 70% of patients in group A, and 67% of patients in group B. In group A, local recurrence was found in 1 of 10 patients in group A and 1 of 9 patients in group B during a further follow-up period. Five-year overall survival rate was 53% and 67% in group A and B, respectively. Five-year cause-specific survival rate was 89% and 67% in group A and B, respectively. Maxillary conservative treatment is appropriate in cases showing good response on radiological images after radiotherapy combined with concurrent intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. (author)

  7. Use of radiotherapy in the primary treatment of cancer in South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, C.; Chapman, P.; Priest, K.; Roder, D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies point to a lower use of radiotherapy by Australian cancer patients in lower socioeconomic areas and in country regions that are some distance from urban treatment centres. These were cross-sectional studies with the potential for error from changes in place of residence. We used a cohort design to avoid such error. South Australian patients diagnosed in 1990-1994 were followed until the date of censoring of 31 December 1999 using data from the State Cancer Registry. The percentage found to have had megavoltage therapy in the first 12 months following diagnosis varied by leading primary incidence site from 44% for the prostate to 40% for female breast, 38% for lung, 17% for rectum, 3% for colon and 2% for skin (melanoma). Multivariate analysis indicated that determinants of not receiving megavoltage therapy in the first 12 months were older age, female sex, residence in a country region and country of birth. Melanoma data revealed earlier stages for women than men. If this difference by sex applies to other cancers, it might explain the lower exposure of women to radiotherapy. Fewer older patients received radiotherapy, consistent with trends observed in hospital-based cancer-registry data. The influence on this finding of differences in stage and co morbidity requires additional study. While earlier findings of a lower exposure of country residents to radiotherapy were confirmed, the difference was comparatively small in this study. Variations in exposure by socioeconomic status of residential area were not observed. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Treatment Result of Postoperative Radiotherapy of Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Charn Il; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Lee, Hyo Pyo; Shin, Myon Woo; Kim, Jung Soo

    1985-01-01

    The early carcinoma of the uterine cervix may be treated by either radical surgery or radical radiotherapy according to the patient characteristics, and the survival is high with either treatment. But, because of the size of the lesion, metastasis to lymph nodes, and vascular space invasion by tumor have all been shown to influence recurrence and survival, postoperative radiotherapy may be considered as their histopathologic finding after radical surgery. However, there are still debates on the increasing survival rates with postoperative radiotherapy. Two hundreds and three patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy from February 1979 to September 1982 in the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University were analyzed and following results were obtained. 3-year actuarial survival rate and 3-year disease free survival rate were 83.4% and 73.4% respectively and 3-year actuarial survival rates by stages were 90.7% for I B, 69.6% for II A, and 85.2% for II b. The overall acute complication rate was 57.6%; tolerable cases was 50.2% and severe cases was 7.4%, Late complication rate was 7.9% and the major late complication were intestinal obstruction, aggravated urinary symptom, radiation cystitis in ORDER of frequency

  9. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooijen, D.; Van de Kamer, J.; Hulshof, M.; Koning, C.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V{sub 45}Gy and V{sub 55}Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V{sub 25}Gy and V{sub 40}Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V{sub 40}Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V{sub 45}Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V{sub 55}Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  10. Improving bladder cancer treatment with radiotherapy using separate intensity modulated radiotherapy plans for boost and elective fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rooijen, D.; Van de Kamer, J.; Hulshof, M.; Koning, C.; Bel, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent IMRT can decrease the dose to the organs at risk in bladder cancer treatment compared with conformal treatment while making separate treatment plans for the elective field and the boost. Special attention is paid to sparing small intestines. Twenty patients who were treated with the field-in-field technique (FiF) were re-planned with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using five and seven beams, respectively. Separate treatment plans were made for the elective field (including the pelvic lymph nodes) and the boost, which enables position correction for bone and tumour separately. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the elective field and 55 or 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). For bladder and rectum, V 45 Gy and V 55 Gy were compared, and for small intestines, V 25 Gy and V 40 Gy. The dose distribution with IMRT conformed better to the shape of the target. There was no significant difference between the techniques in dose to the healthy bladder. The median V 40 Gy of the small intestines decreased from 114 to 66 cc (P = 0.001) with five beam IMRT, and to 55 cc (P = 0.001) with seven beam IMRT compared with FiF. V 45 Gy for rectum decreased from 34.2% to 17.5% (P = 0.004) for both five and seven beam plans, while V 55 Gy for rectum remained the same. With IMRT, a statistically significant dose decrease to the small intestines can be achieved while covering both tumour and elective PTV adequately.

  11. Results of induction chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and concurrent weekly paclitaxel for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weihua; Bao Yong; Chen Ming; Zhang Li; Xu Guangchuan; Li Kaixin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plus concurrent weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with stage III NSCLC in favorable conditions were treated with 2 to 4 cycles of carboplatin (AUC=5-6, d1) combined with paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 , d1), then followed by weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent 3DCRT within 34 weeks. The prescription dose of radiotherapy was given as high as possible while total lung V 20 ≤31% and total dose of the spinal cord ≤50 Gy. Results: ICT was well tolerated. During the concurrent chemoradiotherapy,the treatment of 4 patients was ended ahead of the schedule because of severe pulmonary and cardiac toxicities; the treatment of 2 patients was delayed for 7 and 12 days because of fatigue. Leucopenia(33/56) was in grade 1-2 except 1 patient in grade 3. Lymphocytopenia was severe (54/56,42 in grade 3). Three patients developed grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis, and 3 developed grade 3-4 radiation-induced pneumonitis. There was one patients each who developed grade 2,3, and 4 late esophageal damage, respectively. Nine developed grade 2 pulmonary fibrosis. The overall response rate was 69.7%. The 1-year overall survival rate was 72.3%. The 1-year local progression-free survival rate was 62.7%. Conclusions: The schedule of ICT followed by weekly paclitaxel and concurrent 3DCRT can be well tolerated by most of the favorable patients with stage III NSCLC, and the toxicity is tolerable. Results of this study are encouraging, though long-term results should be followed up. (authors)

  12. Dosimetric Effects Of Different Treatment Tables During Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murkovic, M.; Grego, T.; Bibic, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to measure the effect of mega-voltage photon beam attenuation when treating patients through carbon fibre treatment table with and without the carbon laminate base plate on it. We also examined the ability of XiO treatment planning system in modelling this effect. Direct attenuation measurements were made for two treatment tables, Siemens TxT 550 treatment table with TT-A table top and Elekta Precise table with iBEAM evo table top. On both treatment tables we used Orfit Base Plate (32301). Measurements were taken for two photon energies (6 MV and 18 MV), at two different field sizes (5 x 5 cm 2 and 10 x 10 cm 2 ) and different gantry angles in 50 intervals using stationary water phantom and Farmer type ionization chamber. These values were compared to values calculated in XiO. In order to account for the effect of table and base plate during treatment planning in XiO, customized table and base plate templates were develop in Focal planning system. To construct these customized templates, table and base plate contours as well as respective relative electron density's to water were obtained on CT scanner. The largest attenuation effect was seen for oblique treatment angles using low energy and small field sizes, 6.6 percent for the Elekta table top and 8.4 percent for Siemens table top. In this paper we show that customized table and base plate templates introduced in the patient treatment plan can accurately model the attenuation due to their presence to within 0.3 percent. Since dose modifications due to such carbon fiber accessories can be significant, it can be concluded that introduction of customized table and base plate templates into TPS brings an important improvement to patient treatment planning, and should be included in dose calculations whenever possible. (author).

  13. Metastatic breast cancer in the eye and orbit, use three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Our first experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Pablos, Tamara; Caceres Toledo, Maria

    2009-01-01

    The eye and orbit metastases are a significant clinical problem, both by the inability and the deterioration in the quality of life that occur. The most common malignant tumors in the eye and orbit is metastasis. Cancer breast cancer is the most common tumor metastatic to the eye and orbit in a 40% and 50% of cases according to different series. With the introduction of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in our hospital from In 2007 we were able to treat patients with cancer different regions with the technique (2D) was impossible because caused irreparable damage to surrounding healthy tissue in this way thanks to potential of 3D technology to shape the planning volume will ensure greater protection for critical organs. (Author)

  14. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in cancer treatment during pregnancy: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuenemann Junior, Eduardo; Urban, Cicero de Andrade; Lima, Rubens Silveira de; Rabinovich, Iris; Spautz, Cleverton C.

    2007-01-01

    The coexistence of pregnancy and cancer is a challenging situation for the physician. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are often necessary, depending on the type and stage of cancer at diagnosis. When applying such treatment, several key points concerning the health of the fetus must be carefully monitored. Meanwhile, if the appropriate treatment is delayed until postpartum, the mother's life may be at risk. Historically, the mother's health was placed above that of the fetus. This concept has changed, and harmonization of maternal and fetal health is now considered ideal. Numerous reports have shown the safe use of chemotherapy especially during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. In 2004 our department treated seven cases of simultaneous cancer and pregnancy, leading us to review the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy during pregnancy and the repercussions on neonatal outcome. (author)

  15. Implementation of dosimetric quality control on IMRT and VMAT treatments in radiotherapy using diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, A.; Garcia, B.; Ramirez, J.; Marquina, J.

    2014-08-01

    To implement quality control of IMRT and VMAT treatments Rapid Arc radiotherapy using diode array. Were tested 90 patients with IMRT and VMAT Rapid Arc, comparing the planned dose to the dose administered, used the Map-Check-2 and Arc-Check of Sun Nuclear, they using the gamma factor for calculating and using comparison parameters 3% / 3m m. The statistic shows that the quality controls of the 90 patients analyzed, presented a percentage of diodes that pass the test between 96,7% and 100,0% of the irradiated diodes. Implemented in Clinical ALIADA Oncologia Integral, the method for quality control of IMRT and VMAT treatments Rapid Arc radiotherapy using diode array. (Author)

  16. Fractionated stereotaxic radiotherapy in the treatment of the retinoblastoma: preliminary results; Radiotherapie stereotaxique fractionnee dans le traitement du retinoblastome: resultats preliminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pica, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Service de Radiotherapie, Lausanne (Switzerland); Moeckli, R.; Do, H. [Institut de Radiophysique Appliquee, Lausanne (Switzerland); Balmer, A.; Munier, F. [Hopital ophtalmique Jules-Gonin, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chollet Rivier, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Service d' Anesthesie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2006-11-15

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact in term of morbidity at short and long term and the response to the fractionated stereotaxic radiotherapy with a micro multi slides collimator in the treatment of the retinoblastoma. (N.C.)

  17. Value of radiotherapy in the treatment ovarium cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, J.R.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    Thirty-one cases ovarium cancer are studied in different clinical stages and different histological kinds, which were submited to a radiotherapic treatment by the 'moving trip' and 'open field' techniques [pt

  18. Comparison of Optimised Treatment Plans for Radiosurgery and Conformal Radiotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kulik, C

    2001-01-01

    ..., it is interesting to compare the different techniques to evaluate their effectiveness, This comparison involves 8 clinical cases, For each treatment modality, we compare indexes defined in the international...

  19. Treatment interruptions: Statistics, causes and management in service radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrando Sanchez, A.; Milanes Gaillet, A. I.; Eugui Martinez, R.; Crespo Diaz, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the clinical maximum administer the prescribed dose at a given time, treatment interruptions are unavoidable in practice. In tumors quickly reproduce no evidence that the prolongation thereof entails loss of tumor control. It has tracked two of these conditions: squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) and lung cancer (NSCLC) over 2011 and 2012 to evaluate both the number of stops treatment as the reason for them and its management. (Author)

  20. Quality of life in locally advanced prostate cancer patients who underwent hormonal treatment combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Hirofumi; Naito, Seiji; Fukui, Iwao; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Matsuoka, Naoki; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the feasibility of quality of life (QOL) research and to evaluate the QOL prospectively in locally advanced prostate cancer patients treated with hormonal treatment combined with radiotherapy. The treatment schedule was that patients with decreasing prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels below 10 ng/ml after receiving 6 months of neoadjuvant hormonal treatment were randomly divided into two groups; one group was the continuous hormonal treatment group and the other was the intermittent hormonal treatment group. Both groups received a total dose of 72 Gy external beam radiotherapy with concomitant hormonal treatment followed by 6 months of adjuvant hormonal treatment following radiotherapy. At 14 months, patients either underwent continuous or intermittent hormonal treatment according to the random allocation. QOL was assessed at baseline, and at 6, 8, 14, and 20 months after treatment using functional assessment of cancer treatment-general (FACT-G), P with the other 3 items comprising bother of urination, bother of bowel movement, and bother of sexual activity. Between January 2000 and June 2003, a total of 188 patients were enrolled in this study. The rate of collection of baseline QOL sheets was 98.0%. The rate of answer to questions of QOL sheets was 99.0%. At baseline, the average score of FACT-G, P was 120.7 and the maximum score was more than twice the minimum score. Dysfunction of urination and bowel movement was correlated with the bother of urination and bowel movement, respectively. On the other hand, dysfunction of sexual activity was not correlated with the bother of sexual activity. In June 2003, all of the QOL sheets at baseline, and at 6, 8, and 14 months were completely collected from a total of 72 patients. Although QOL at 8 months was significantly affected compared with QOL at baseline and at 6 months, QOL at 14 months was significantly improved compared with that at 8 months and there was no significant

  1. Characterization of a dose verification system dedicated to radiotherapy treatments based on a silicon detector multi-strips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocca, A.; Cortes Giraldo, M. A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Espino, J. M.; Aranas, R.; Abou Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Quesada, J. M.; Vega-Leal, A. P.; Perez Neto, F. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the characterization of a silicon detector multi-strips (SSSSD: Single Sided Silicon Strip Detector), developed by the company Micron Semiconductors Ltd. for use as a verification system for radiotherapy treatments.

  2. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O.; Andratschke, N.; Alheit, H.; Holy, R.; Moustakis, C.; Nestle, U.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [de

  3. Efficacy of bio-effect dose and overall treatment time in radiotherapy of carcinoma of cervix: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umbarkar, Rahul B.; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, K.K.; Shrivastava, Rajeev; Sarje, Mukund; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2008-01-01

    To study the response of tumour and early rectal complications in patients of cervical cancer who underwent radiotherapy on the basis of biological effective dose (BED) and overall treatment time (OTT)

  4. A semi-analytical radiobiological model may assist treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 23 (2007), s. 6813-6830 ISSN 0031-9155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : Bragg peak * light ions * hadron * hadron radiotherapy * biological effectiveness * treatment planning Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 2.528, year: 2007

  5. The Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Gastric Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Taek-Keun; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Kim, Yong-Hyeob; Yoon, Mee Sun; Song, Ju-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Chung, Woong-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess radiotherapy for patients with early stage gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma with respect to survival, treatment response, and complications. Materials and Methods Enrolled into this study were 48 patients diagnosed with gastric MALT lymphoma from January 2000 to September 2012. Forty-one patients had low grade and seven had mixed component with high grade. Helicobacter pylori eradication was performed in 33 patients. Thirty-four patients received rad...

  6. Radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma of the pleura, with special reference to its use in palliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.R.; Tan, L.; Ball, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Most patients presenting with malignant mesothelioma of the pleura (MMP) are only suitable for palliative treatment. Radiotherapy has not been shown in improve survival in patients with this disease, but is of use in the palliation of symptoms. In this retrospective review of 111 patients with MMP referred to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, the palliative effect of radiotherapy was analysed. More than half of the patients whose response could be assessed had some symptomatic relief from the radiotherapy treatment. No dose-response relationship could be found. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  7. Radiotherapy in desmoid tumors. Treatment response, local control, and analysis of local failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santti, Kirsi; Beule, Annette; Tuomikoski, Laura; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Anna-Stina; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tarkkanen, Maija; Blomqvist, Carl [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki (Finland); Roenty, Mikko [HUSLAB and University of Helsinki, Department of Pathology, Helsinki (Finland); Ihalainen, Hanna [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare soft tissue tumors which frequently recur after surgery. Desmoid tumors arise from musculoaponeurotic tissue in the extremities, head and neck, abdominal wall, or intra-abdominally. Our aim was to examine the outcome of radiotherapy of desmoid tumors in a single institution series. We evaluated 41 patients with desmoid tumors treated with 49 radiotherapies between 1987 and 2012. Radiologic images for response evaluation were reassessed and responses to treatment registered according to RECIST criteria 1.1. For patients with local failures radiation dose distribution was determined in each local failure volume using image co-registration. Recurrences were classified as in-target, marginal, or out-of-target. Prognostic factors for radiotherapy treatment failure were evaluated. Radiotherapy doses varied from 20-63 Gy (median 50 Gy) with a median fraction size of 2 Gy. The objective response rate to definitive radiotherapy was 55% (12/22 patients). Median time to response was 14 months. A statistically significant dose-response relation for definitive and postoperative radiotherapy was observed both in univariate (p-value 0.002) and in multivariate analysis (p-value 0.02) adjusted for potential confounding factors. Surgery before radiotherapy or surgical margin had no significant effect on time to progression. Nine of 11 (82%) local failures were classified as marginal and two of 11 (18%) in-target. None of the recurrences occurred totally out-of-target. Radiotherapy is a valuable option for treating desmoid tumors. Radiotherapy dose appears to be significantly associated to local control. (orig.) [German] Desmoide (aggressive Fibromatosen) sind seltene Weichteiltumore der muskulaeren Membranen von Kopf, Hals, Extremitaeten und Bauchwand. Ziel war es, die Wirksamkeit der Strahlentherapie bei aggressiver Fibromatose an einer einzelnen Klinik zu untersuchen. Ausgewertet wurden 41 Patienten mit aggressiver Fibromatose, die

  8. Can field-in-field technique replace wedge filter in radiotherapy treatment planning: a comparative analysis in various treatment sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, R.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to show whether field-in-field (FIF) technique can be used to replace wedge filter in radiation treatment planning. The study was performed in cases where wedges are commonly used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Thirty patients with different malignancies who received radiotherapy were studied. This includes patients with malignancies of brain, head and neck, breast, upper and lower abdomen. All the patients underwent computed tomography scanning and the datasets were transferred to the treatment planning system. Initially, wedge based planning was performed to achieve the best possible dose distribution inside the target volume with multileaf collimators (Plan1). Wedges were removed from a copy of the same plan and FIF plan was generated (Plan2). The two plans were then evaluated and compared for mean dose, maximum dose, median dose, doses to 2% (D 2 ) and 98% (D 9 8) of the target volume, volume receiving greater than 107% of the prescribed dose (V>107%), volume receiving less than 95% of the prescribed dose (V 2 , V>107% and CI for more of the sites with statistically significant reduction in monitor units. FIF results in better dose distribution in terms of homogeneity in most of the sites. It is feasible to replace wedge filter with FIF in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma: analysis of eye movement during treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Felipe Marques Lucas de; Gonçalves, Odair Dias; Cardoso, Simone Coutinho, E-mail: felipemlucas@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Batista, Delano V.S. [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to analyze the eye’s movement during radiotherapy treatment for choroidal melanoma, as well as the methodology used in the repositioning of the patient between treatments sessions. For this purpose, the procedures used by the hospital staff were analyzed on site and videos were recorded during the treatments. The methodology for the fixation of the eye is correct in its objective. However, the repositioning needs improvements in its reproducibility. It is recommended the study to fix the eye by the healthy eye and the feasibility study for the development of a software that assists in patient repositioning. (author)

  10. Stereotactic radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma: analysis of eye movement during treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Felipe Marques Lucas de; Gonçalves, Odair Dias; Cardoso, Simone Coutinho; Batista, Delano V.S.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the eye’s movement during radiotherapy treatment for choroidal melanoma, as well as the methodology used in the repositioning of the patient between treatments sessions. For this purpose, the procedures used by the hospital staff were analyzed on site and videos were recorded during the treatments. The methodology for the fixation of the eye is correct in its objective. However, the repositioning needs improvements in its reproducibility. It is recommended the study to fix the eye by the healthy eye and the feasibility study for the development of a software that assists in patient repositioning. (author)

  11. The effect of interruptions and prolonged treatment time in radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, Dora L.W.; Sham, Jonathan S.T.; Chua, Daniel T.T.; Choy, Damon T.K.; Au, Gordon K.H.; Wu, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of interruptions and prolonged overall treatment time in radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma and the significance of timing of interruption was investigated. Methods and Materials: Treatment records of 229 patients treated with continuous course (CC) and 567 patients treated with split course (SC) radiotherapy for nonmetastatic NPC were reviewed. Overall treatment time without inclusion of time for boost was calculated. Treatment that extended 1 week beyond scheduled time was considered prolonged. Outcome in patients who completed treatment 'per schedule' were compared with those who had 'prolonged' treatment. Because of known patient selection bias between CC and SC, patients on the two schedules were analyzed separately. Multivariate analysis was performed for patients on SC. Total number of days of interruption, age, sex, T and N stage, and the use of boost were tested for the whole SC group. Analysis on the effect of timing of interruption was performed in a subgroup of 223 patients on SC who had a single unplanned interruption. Timing of interruption, either before or after the fourth week for the unplanned interruption, was tested in addition to the other variables in multivariate analysis for this subgroup of SC. Results: Twenty-seven (11.8%) patients on CC and 96 (16.9%) patients on SC had prolonged treatment. Patients on SC who had prolonged treatment had significantly poorer loco-regional control rate and disease free survival when compared with those who completed radiotherapy per schedule (p = 0.0063 and 0.001, respectively, with adjustment for stage). For CC, the effect of prolonged treatment on outcome was not significant. The small number of events for patients on CC probably account for the insignificant finding. The number of days of interruption was confirmed as prognostic factor, independent of T and N stages, for loco-regional control and disease-free survival in multivariate analysis for SC. The hazard rate for loco

  12. An overview of head and neck treatment at the KNH radiotherapy, Nairobi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucheusi, L.

    2006-01-01

    It is known from several studies that precise radical radiotherapy leads to better local control thus increasing overall survival of patients suffering from Head and Neck malignancies if diagnosed early enough. The wide gap in the techniques and equipment used between the developed and the developing world are a source of concern especially in Sub Saharan africa which hardly boasts of even a single linear accelerator. in this presentation, common Head and Neck condition treatment is examined as it is done at the Kenyatta National Hospital. The treatment techniques used the planning process/innovations improvisations-adopted by radiographers at the institution to achieve the prescribed treatment

  13. The role of radiotherapy in breast conserving treatment; Uloha radioterapie pri prsnik zachovavajucej liecbe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardiak, J.; Mego, M.; Palacka, P.; Rajec, J.; Liskova, S.; Chovanec, M. [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-07-01

    This book offers chapters on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. The text is intended for physicians preparing for Clinical Oncology attestation. The attention is mostly paid to systemic treatment. The chapters dealing with the diagnosis, surgical treatment and radiotherapy are focused only on the aspects which are necessary for medical oncologist [Slovak] Kniha predklada kapitoly z diagnostiky a liecby karcinomu prsnika. Text je urceny pre lekarov pripravujucich sa na atestaciu z klinickej onkologie. Vacsia pozornost bola venovana systemovej liecbe. Kapitoly zaoberajuce sa diagnostikou, chirurgickou liecbou a radioterapiou su zamerane iba na tie aspekty uvedenych kapitol, ktore su potrebne pre pracu klinickeho onkologa.

  14. Stereotactic radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma: analysis of eye movement during treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, F. M. L.; Gonçalves, O. D.; Batista, D. V. S.; Cardoso, S. C.

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to analyse the eye’s movement during radiotherapy treatment for choroidal melanoma, as well as the methodology used in the repositioning of the patient between treatments sessions. For this purpose, the procedures used by the hospital staff were analysed on site and videos were recorded during the treatments. The methodology for the fixation of the eye is correct in its objective. However, the repositioning needs improvements in its reproducibility. It is recommended the study to fix the eye by the healthy eye and the feasibility study for the development of a software that assists in patient repositioning.

  15. Experience of the Casablanca radiotherapy-oncology centre on radiotherapy in the treatment of the adult Hodgkin lymphoma; Experience du centre de radiotherapie-oncologie de Casablanca sur la radiotherapie dans le traitement du lymphome de Hodgkin de l'adulte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchbika, Z.; Benchakroun, N.; Sellai, N.; Jouhadi, H.; Tawfiq, N.; Sahraoui, S.; Benider, A. [Service radiotherapie-oncologie, CHU Ibn-Rochd, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of the local control, global survival and survival without recurrence, and also late complications, based on retrospective study over 8 years of 169 cases Hodgkin lymphoma in patients older than 18 (average age of 34) and who had been submitted to radiotherapy. Survival has been computed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. The authors notice that the recurrence rate is slightly higher than in the literature. During the considered period, radiotherapy was two-dimensional with higher doses than those corresponding to current standards. The improvement of radiotherapy techniques and the decrease of doses within the standards should improve the therapeutic results. Short communication

  16. Treatment outcome after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Ja; Park, Kyung Ran [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes of adjuvant radiotherapy using vaginal brachytherapy (VB) with a lower dose per fraction and/or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following surgery for patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma. The subjects were 43 patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery between March 2000 and April 2014. Of these, 25 received postoperative VB alone, while 18 received postoperative EBRT to the whole pelvis; 3 of these were treated with EBRT plus VB. The median EBRT dose was 50.0 Gy (45.0–50.4 Gy) and the VB dose was 24 Gy in 6 fractions. Tumor dose was prescribed at a depth of 5 mm from the cylinder surface and delivered twice per week. The median follow-up period for all patients was 57 months (range, 9 to 188 months). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 92.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed according to risk factors and stage IB, grade 3 and lymphovascular invasion were observed more frequently in the EBRT group. Five-year DFS for EBRT and VB alone were 88.1% and 96.0%, respectively (p = 0.42), and 5-year OS for EBRT and VB alone were 94.4% and 96%, respectively (p = 0.38). There was no locoregional recurrence in any patient. Two patients who received EBRT and 1 patient who received VB alone developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients who received EBRT had severe complications, one each of grade 3 gastrointestinal complication and pelvic bone insufficiency fracture. Adjuvant radiotherapy achieved high DFS and OS with acceptable toxicity in stage I endometrial cancer. VB (with a lower dose per fraction) may be a viable option for selected patients with early-stage endometrial cancer following surgery.

  17. A new methodological approach for PET implementation in radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Elena; Ferretti, Alice; Capirci, Carlo; Grassetto, Gaia; Gava, Marcello; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Virdis, Graziella; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Massaro, Arianna; Rubello, Domenico; Nibale, Otello

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, a new methodological approach to using PET information in radiotherapy treatment planning has been discussed. Computed tomography (CT) represents the primary modality to plan personalized radiation treatment, because it provides the basic electron density map for correct dose calculation. If PET scanning is also performed it is typically coregistered with the CT study. This operation can be executed automatically by a hybrid PET/CT scanner or, if the PET and CT imaging sets have been acquired through different equipment, by a dedicated module of the radiotherapy treatment planning system. Both approaches have some disadvantages: in the first case, the bore of a PET/CT system generally used in clinical practice often does not allow the use of certain bulky devices for patient immobilization in radiotherapy, whereas in the second case the result could be affected by limitations in window/level visualization of two different image modalities, and the displayed PET volumes can appear not to be related to the actual uptake into the patient. To overcome these problems, at our centre a specific procedure has been studied and tested in 30 patients, allowing good results of precision in the target contouring to be obtained. The process consists of segmentation of the biological target volume by a dedicated PET/CT console and its export to a dedicated radiotherapy system, where an image registration between the CT images acquired by the PET/CT scanner and a large-bore CT is performed. The planning target volume is contoured only on the large-bore CT and is used for virtual simulation, to individuate permanent skin markers on the patient.

  18. Optimal radiation port arrangements for hepatic tumor using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ik Jae; Seong, Jin Sil; Shim, Su Jung; Jeong, Kyoung Keun [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwang Hwan [Sunchunhyang Univ., Buchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal beam arrangements for hepatic tumors, according to the location of the hepatic tumor and its relationship to Organs At Risk (OARs). The virtual gross tumor volumes were divided into four groups according to the Couinaud's classification. Several plans were made for each virtual target, and these plans were compared for the Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities (NTCP). For group I, NTCP improved as the number of the beam ports increased. However, plans with more than 5 ports had little advantage. For group II, plans with the beam directions from the anterior side showed better results. Group III contained many OARs near the target, which placed restrictions on the beam-directions. Multi-directional plans yielded a higher dose to the OARs than a simple two-port plan using right anterior oblique and posterior beam (RAO/PA). For group IV, a simple RAO/PA port plan was adequate for protection of remaining liver. NTCP can significantly vary between radiotherapy plans when the location of the tumor and its neighboring OARs are taken into consideration. The results in this study of optimal beam arrangements could be a useful set of guidelines for radiotherapy of hepatic tumors.

  19. A microcomputer system for prescription, calculation, verification and recording of radiotherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, D.; Smith, C.W.; Belcher, R.A.; Harding, T.; Sutherland, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a microcomputer system for the reduction of mistakes in radiotherapy is described. The system covers prescription entry, prescription and treatment calculations, and verification and recording of the treatment set-up. A telecobalt unit was interfaced to the system and in the first 12 months 400 patients have been prescribed and 5000 treatment fields verified. The prescription is entered by the medical officer using an interactive program and this prescription provides the reference for verifying the treatment set-up. The program allows amendments to the prescription to be made easily during the treatment course. The treatment parameters verified are field size, wedge and treatment time. The system uses bar-codes for patient and field identification. A reduction in the number of mistakes has been achieved and future developments are discussed. (author)

  20. Evaluation and scoring of radiotherapy treatment plans using an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willoughby, Twyla R.; Starkschall, George; Janjan, Nora A.; Rosen, Isaac I.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of using an artificial neural network to predict the clinical evaluation of radiotherapy treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Approximately 150 treatment plans were developed for 16 patients who received external-beam radiotherapy for soft-tissue sarcomas of the lower extremity. Plans were assigned a figure of merit by a radiation oncologist using a five-point rating scale. Plan scoring was performed by a single physician to ensure consistency in rating. Dose-volume information extracted from a training set of 511 treatment plans on 14 patients was correlated to the physician-generated figure of merit using an artificial neural network. The neural network was tested with a test set of 19 treatment plans on two patients whose plans were not used in the training of the neural net. Results: Physician scoring of treatment plans was consistent to within one point on the rating scale 88% of the time. The neural net reproduced the physician scores in the training set to within one point approximately 90% of the time. It reproduced the physician scores in the test set to within one point approximately 83% of the time. Conclusions: An artificial neural network can be trained to generate a score for a treatment plan that can be correlated to a clinically-based figure of merit. The accuracy of the neural net in scoring plans compares well with the reproducibility of the clinical scoring. The system of radiotherapy treatment plan evaluation using an artificial neural network demonstrates promise as a method for generating a clinically relevant figure of merit

  1. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    CT (CBCT) can be used for MRI-only image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and for verifying the correctness of the corresponding pCT. Material and methods. Six patients receiving palliative cranial RT were included in the study. Each patient had three-dimensional (3D) T1W MRI, a CBCT and a CT for reference...

  2. Feasibility of preference-driven radiotherapy dose treatment planning to support shared decision making in anal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønde, Heidi S; Wee, Leonard; Pløen, John

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: Chemo-radiotherapy is an established primary curative treatment for anal cancer, but clinically equal rationale for different target doses exists. If joint preferences (physician and patient) are used to determine acceptable tradeoffs in radiotherapy treatment planning, multipl...... that preference-informed dose planning is feasible for clinical studies utilizing shared decision making....... dose plans must be simultaneously explored. We quantified the degree to which different toxicity priorities might be incorporated into treatment plan selection, to elucidate the feasible decision space for shared decision making in anal cancer radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective plans.......7%-points; (0.3; 30.6); p decision space available in anal cancer radiotherapy to incorporate preferences, although tradeoffs are highly patient-dependent. This study demonstrates...

  3. Optimization in radiotherapy treatment planning thanks to a fast dose calculation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mingchao

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the radiotherapy treatments planning issue which need a fast and reliable treatment planning system (TPS). The TPS is composed of a dose calculation algorithm and an optimization method. The objective is to design a plan to deliver the dose to the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy and sensitive tissues. The treatment planning aims to determine the best suited radiation parameters for each patient's treatment. In this thesis, the parameters of treatment with IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy) are the beam angle and the beam intensity. The objective function is multi-criteria with linear constraints. The main objective of this thesis is to demonstrate the feasibility of a treatment planning optimization method based on a fast dose-calculation technique developed by (Blanpain, 2009). This technique proposes to compute the dose by segmenting the patient's phantom into homogeneous meshes. The dose computation is divided into two steps. The first step impacts the meshes: projections and weights are set according to physical and geometrical criteria. The second step impacts the voxels: the dose is computed by evaluating the functions previously associated to their mesh. A reformulation of this technique makes possible to solve the optimization problem by the gradient descent algorithm. The main advantage of this method is that the beam angle parameters could be optimized continuously in 3 dimensions. The obtained results in this thesis offer many opportunities in the field of radiotherapy treatment planning optimization. (author) [fr

  4. Advantages of three-dimensional treatment planning in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalla, E.M.; ELSAyed, A.A.; ElGantiry, M.; ElTahher, Z.

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of three-dimensional (3-D) treatment planning in-patients maxilla, breast, bladder, and lung tumors to explore its potential therapeutic advantage over the traditional dimensional (2-D) approach in these diseases. Conventional two-dimensional (2-D) treatment planning was compared to three-dimensional (3-D) treatment planning. In five selected disease sites, plans calculated with both types of treatment planning were compared. The (3-D) treatment planning system used in this work TMS version 5.1 B from helax AB is based on a monte Carlo-based pencil beam model. The other treatment planning system (2-D 0, introduced in this study was the multi data treatment planning system version 2.35. For the volumes of interest; quality of dose distribution concerning homogeneity in the target volume and the isodose distribution in organs at risk, was discussed. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons between the two planning systems were made using dose volume histograms (DVH's) . For comparisons of dose distributions in real-patient cases, differences ranged from 0.8% to 6.4% for 6 MV, while in case of 18 MV photon, it ranged from 1,8% to 6.5% and was within -+3 standard deviations for the dose between the two planning systems.Dose volume histogram (DVH) shows volume reduction of the radiation-related organs at risk 3-D planning

  5. Potency following high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and the impact of prior major urologic surgical procedures in patients treated for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinn, Daniel M.; Holland, John; Crownover, Richard L.; Roach, Mack

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) on potency in patients treated for clinically localized prostate cancer and to identify factors that might predict the outcome of sexual function following treatment. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients treated with 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer at UCSF between 1991-1993 were included in this retrospective analysis. Patient responses were obtained from a mailed questionnaire, telephone interviews, or departmental records. Median follow-up was 21 months. Results: Sixty patients reported having sexual function prior to 3DCRT, including 47 who were fully potent and 13 who were marginally potent. Of the remaining 64 patients, 45 were impotent, 7 were on hormones, 1 was status-postorchiectomy, and 11 were not evaluable. Following 3DCRT, 37 of 60 patients (62%) retained sexual function sufficient for intercourse. Of those with sexual function before irradiation, 33 of 47 (70%) of patients fully potent and 4 of 13 (31%) of patients marginally potent maintained function sufficient for intercourse (p < 0.01). Potency was retained in 6 of 15 (40%) patients with a history of a major urologic surgical procedure (MUSP) and in 31 of 45 (69%) with no history of a MUSP (p < 0.04). Transurethral resection of the prostate was the MUSP in eight of these patients, with four (50%) maintaining sexual function. Conclusions: Patients who receive definitive 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer appear to maintain potency similar to patients treated with conventional radiotherapy. However, patients who are marginally potent at presentation or who have a history of a MUSP appear to be at increased risk of impotence following 3DCRT

  6. Urgent embolization for the treatment of serious epistaxis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jun; Ni Caifang; Liu Yizhi; Jing Yonghai; Zhu Xiaoli; Zou Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical effect and safety of urgent embolization with arterial catheterization in the treatment of serious epistaxis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after <