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Sample records for digit ratios finger

  1. The Big Finger: the second to fourth digit ratio is a predictor of sporting ability in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S N; Kato, B S; Hunkin, J L; Vivekanandan, S; Spector, T D

    2006-01-01

    Background The second to fourth finger length ratio (2d:4d) is thought to be related to diverse traits including cognitive ability, disease susceptibility, and sexuality. Objective To examine the relationship between 2d:4d and sports ability in women. Methods Hand radiographs from 607 women (mean age 54 years) were used to estimate 2d:4d. Ranking of sports ability was on a scale (1–5). Results The highest achieved level of participation in any sport was significantly negatively associated with 2d:4d (b  =  −4.93, p  =  0.01) as was the relationship between 2d:4d and running level (b  =  −6.81, p  =  0.034). Ability in other sports also showed a negative relationship albeit non‐significant. Conclusions These results suggest that a low 2d:4d ratio is related to increased female sports ability. It can be postulated that this ratio may predict potential sports ability. Understanding the mechanisms underpinning this relationship may give important insights into musculoskeletal fitness, health and disease. PMID:17008344

  2. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

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    Ilaria eBerteletti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense.

  3. Digital finger: beyond phenomenological figures of touch

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    Mika Elo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mika Elo is a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer in visual culture at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture (Aalto-ARTS, Helsinki. His research interests include theory of photographic media, philosophical media theory, and artistic research. He is participating in discussions in these areas in the capacity of curator, visual artist and researcher. He has published articles in Finnish, German, and English among others on Benjamin, Nancy, artistic research and photography theory. His doctoral thesis Valokuvan medium [The Medium of Photography] was published in Finnish in 2005 (Tutkijaliitto, Helsinki. In 2009–2011 he worked in the Figures of Touch research project (figuresoftouch.com, and since 2011 he is the director of Media Aesthetics research group at Aalto-ARTS, Department of Media.Author Biography The article reflects on digitality and interface design in terms of the multiple senses of touch. Touching is presented as a “pathic” sense of being exposed, which implies that touching exceeds the tactile and even the phenomenal world. A particular focus is set on Aristotle's and Husserl's ways of thematizing the sense of touch. In this way, two extremes of the phenomenological thinking of touching are articulated: touching as an indistinct and heterogeneous constituent of sensitivity and touching as the guarantor of immediacy of the sense experience. Referring to Derrida's critical notes concerning haptocentrism, the article attempts to problematize the hand and the finger as phenomenological figures of touch and as holds of haptic realism. The article concludes that insofar as digital interface design aims at haptic realism it conceives of the sense of touch in terms of narcissistic feedback and thus tends to conceal the pathic moment of touching.

  4. Percutaneous Release of Trigger Fingers: Comparing Multiple Digits with Single Digit Involvement

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    Hossein Saremi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate safety and efficacy of percutaneous release of trigger finger in multiple digits involvement in comparison with  single digit involvement.   Method: A number of 100 patients (131 fingers were treated by percutaneous release and divided into two groups: single digit (group A and multiple digits (group B. They were followed up for one year. Success rate, pain, complications and duration of analgesic use were studied and then compared in both groups. Results: All patients in both groups were treated successfully without any recurrence in a one-year follow-up. No complication was observed, but postoperative duration of pain was significantly different between the two groups. Period of painkiller use was also different between the two groups. Conclusion: Percutaneous release is a safe and effective treatment for trigger fingers even if multiple digits are involved. It is also safe in thumb and index finger involvement and diabetic patients.

  5. Digital thermography of the fingers and toes in Raynaud's phenomenon.

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    Lim, Mie Jin; Kwon, Seong Ryul; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Joo, Kowoon; Park, Shin-Goo; Park, Won

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether skin temperature measurement by digital thermography on hands and feet is useful for diagnosis of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP). Fifty-seven patients with RP (primary RP, n = 33; secondary RP, n = 24) and 146 healthy volunteers were recruited. After acclimation to room temperature for 30 min, thermal imaging of palmar aspect of hands and dorsal aspect of feet were taken. Temperature differences between palm (center) and the coolest finger and temperature differences between foot dorsum (center) and first toe significantly differed between patients and controls. The area under curve analysis showed that temperature difference of the coolest finger (cutoff value: 2.2℃) differentiated RP patients from controls (sensitivity/specificity: 67/60%, respectively). Temperature differences of first toe (cutoff value: 3.11℃) also discriminated RP patients (sensitivity/specificity: about 73/66%, respectively). A combination of thermographic assessment of the coolest finger and first toe was highly effective in men (sensitivity/specificity : about 88/60%, respectively) while thermographic assessment of first toe was solely sufficient for women (sensitivity/specificity: about 74/68%, respectively). Thermographic assessment of the coolest finger and first toe is useful for diagnosing RP. In women, thermography of first toe is highly recommended.

  6. The 2D:4D digit ratio as biomarker for substance abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernstrand, A.M.; Van Den Borne, L.; Lensvelt, L.M.H.; Ribbert, L.L.A.; De With, A.C.; Goede, L.X.Y.; Garssen, J.; Verster, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The second (2D, index finger) to fourth (4D, ring finger) digit ratio is a biomarker for prenatal testosterone and estrogen exposure. It has been hypothesized that the developmental origins of health and behavior are modulated by the presence or absence of prenatal sex hormones. Several

  7. Trigger finger

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    ... digit; Trigger finger release; Locked finger; Digital flexor tenosynovitis ... cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  8. A revisit of transthecal digital block and traditional digital block for anesthesia of the finger

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    Mohammad Dehghani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Finger injuries are very common and the majority can be treated under digital block anesthesia. Traditional digital block is one of the most commonly performed blocks by care providers in several medical fields. There is another less known method, transthecal (Pulley block, in which local anesthesia is injected into the flexor tendon sheath.
    METHODS: A randomized clinical trial was performed to compare the transthecal (Pulley and traditional digital block with regard to the length of anesthesia and the need for another anesthetic method (due to insufficient anesthesia as a supplement. We divided 100 patients who needed digital block due to finger injury, into two groups randomly. In each group the patients were anesthetized either by traditional or transthecal digital block. All blocks were performed by the same investigator.
    RESULTS: Mean length of anesthesia was 34.2 minutes in the transthecal digital block method versus 33.8 minutes in the traditional digital block method (P>0.05. A repeated injection or local infiltration as a supplement was necessary only in 5 instances in the traditional digital block method (P<0.05.
    CONCLUSIONS: Regarding fewer injections and reduced amounts of lidocaine, absence of neurovascular bundles damage and comparable length of anesthesia and no need to supplemental anesthesia, transthecal digital block is an appropriate alternative to traditional digital block.
    KEY WORDS: Digital block, transthecal, pulley, finger, flexor tendon sheath.

  9. Selective breeding for a behavioral trait changes digit ratio.

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    Reginia H Y Yan

    Full Text Available The ratio of the length of the second digit (index finger divided by the fourth digit (ring finger tends to be lower in men than in women. This 2D:4D digit ratio is often used as a proxy for prenatal androgen exposure in studies of human health and behavior. For example, 2D:4D ratio is lower (i.e. more "masculinized" in both men and women of greater physical fitness and/or sporting ability. Lab mice have also shown variation in 2D:4D as a function of uterine environment, and mouse digit ratios seem also to correlate with behavioral traits, including daily activity levels. Selective breeding for increased rates of voluntary exercise (wheel running in four lines of mice has caused correlated increases in aerobic exercise capacity, circulating corticosterone level, and predatory aggression. Here, we show that this selection regime has also increased 2D:4D. This apparent "feminization" in mice is opposite to the relationship seen between 2D:4D and physical fitness in human beings. The present results are difficult to reconcile with the notion that 2D:4D is an effective proxy for prenatal androgen exposure; instead, it may more accurately reflect effects of glucocorticoids, or other factors that regulate any of many genes.

  10. 2D:4D finger-length ratios in children and adults with gender identity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallien, M.S.C.; Zucker, K.J.; Steensma, T.D.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research suggests that prenatal testosterone affects the 2D:4D finger ratio in humans, and it has been speculated that prenatal testosterone also affects gender identity differentiation. If both things are true, then one would expect to find an association between the 2D:4D ratio and gender

  11. Digital artery perforator (DAP) flaps: modifications for fingertip and finger stump reconstruction.

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    Mitsunaga, Narushima; Mihara, Makoto; Koshima, Isao; Gonda, Koichi; Takuya, Iida; Kato, Harunosuke; Araki, Jun; Yamamoto, Yushuke; Yuhei, Otaki; Todokoro, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Shoichi; Eri, Uehara; Mundinger, Gerhard S

    2010-08-01

    Various fingertip reconstructions have been reported for situations where microsurgical finger replantation is impossible. One method is the digital artery perforator (DAP) flap. Herein we report 13 DAP flaps for fingertip and finger stump reconstruction following traumatic finger amputations, highlighting modifications to the originally described DAP flap. From October 1998 to December 2007, a total of 13 fingers (11 patients) underwent fingertip and finger stump reconstruction with modified DAP flaps following traumatic finger amputations. We performed six adipocutaneous flaps, three adipose-only flaps, two supercharged flaps and two extended flaps. Flap size ranged from 1.44 to 8 cm(2) (average 3.25 cm(2)). All flaps survived completely with the exception of partial skin necrosis in two cases. One of these cases required debridement and skin grafting. Our initial three cases used donor-site skin grafting. The donor site was closed primarily in the 10 subsequent cases. No patients showed postoperative hypersensitivity of repaired fingertips. Semmes-Weinstein (SW) test result for flaps including a digital nerve branch did not differ from those without (average 4.07 vs. 3.92). Modified DAP flaps allow for preservation of digital length, volume and finger function. They can be raised as adiposal-only flaps or extended flaps and supercharged through perforator-to-perforator anastomoses. The donor defect on the lateral pulp can be closed primarily or by skin grafting. For traumatic fingertip and finger stump reconstructions, DAP flaps deliver consistent aesthetic and functional results. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Closure of digital arteries in high vascular tone states as demonstrated by measurement of systolic blood pressure in the fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krähenbühl, B; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    Finger systolic blood pressure (FSP) was measured indirectly in normal subjects and patients with primary Raynaud phenomenon by applying a thin-walled plastic cuff around the finger and a strain gauge more distally to detect volume changes. Inducing a high vascular tone in one or more fingers...... by direct cooling or intra-arterial noradrenaline infusion caused a marked drop in FSP in the exposed fingers, but not in the non-exposed fingers of the same hand. The fact that the non-exposed fingers retained the normal (arm systolic) pressure level is taken to indicate that palmar arch blood pressure...... also remained normal. In the high vascular tone state, a large transmural pressure difference must apparently be established before the digital arteries are forced open. The lowered opening pressure constitutes a manifestation of the closure phenomenon of the digital arteries described in patients...

  13. Individual Finger Sensibility in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Which Digits to Keep and Which to Eliminate

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    Elfar, John C; Yaseen, Zaneb; Stern, Peter J; Kiefhaber, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sensibility testing plays a role in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). No single physical test has proven to be of critical value in the diagnosis especially when compared to electrodiagnostic studies (EDX). Correlations between individual tests and both symptoms and EDX have been elusive. Notably, previous literature has not documented differences between individual digits when examined with standard diagnostic tests and there is no suggestion that any digit should be systematically excluded from evaluation in CTS. Methods A prospective series of patients with EDX positive, isolated CTS patients were tested immediately preoperatively to evaluate individual digits with static two point discrimination (2PD) and abbreviated Semmes-Weinstein Monofilament (SWMF) tests. Detailed surveys of symptom density in the entire upper extremity were collected in addition to subjective perceptions of the most affected digit. Results Patients favored the middle finger over all others (51%) when asked which was the most affected by CTS. Objective 2PD results of each digit mirrored the subjective data, with higher values for the middle (mean 6.07mm, Pthumb>index>small) but suffered from lack of continuously assessable sensibility. Correlations failed between EDX, symptoms, complaints, monofilament results or 2PD in the index. Positive correlation (P=.002, r=.42, weak) was found between EDX and 2PD of the middle in isolation. Conclusions The middle finger is the most likely to show changes in 2PD in patients with positive EDX findings. Middle finger 2PD is best able to correlate (weakly) with EDX when compared to 2PD of other fingers and SWMF testing. Monfilaments alone are capable of showing the middle as more sensitive but application of this result is hampered by unavailable monofilaments. PMID:21050964

  14. Tool path planning of spiral bevel gear for digital finishing based on finger tool

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    TIAN Feng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper,the digital machining method of the free-form surface is chosen to do the tool track planning for the spiral bevel′s digital finishing.We use the finger milling-cutter,and choose processes as roughing,semi-finishing and finishing.Based on the CC path cross-section.Through the concrete analysis,we got the reasonable processing route,the position of the tool relative to work piece as well as tool pose.We have solved the interference problem between finger tool and arbor,and demonstrate the feasibility of this method through computer simulation and actual operation process.It can help to improve the spiral bevel gear′s manufacturing.

  15. [The application of the 'Biometriclal Dactylography 17.0' program complex for the digital interpretation of the finger dermatoglyphic features].

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    Zvyagin, V N; Rakitin, V A; Fomina, E E

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the development of the computer software for the scale-free interpretation of the finger dermatoglyphic features needed for the objective comprehensive evaluation of their principal characteristics in the digital terms. We have elaborated the program complex making it possible to address the following problems: thr formulation of the database of electronic copies of the finger print and toe print images in the family groups, the display of the finger print and toe print images on the screen, marking the points and lines for automated readout of digital angular and metric information or automated calculation of relative values, the formulation of the database of digital information about the papillary patterns on the fingers and toes in the family triplets (farther + mother + child) and its import into an Excel file.

  16. Infantile digital fibromatosis (inclusion body fibromatosis observed in a baby without finger involvement

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    Avni Kaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 9-day-old male baby was hospitalized after his birth due to some swells under the skin. The hard consistency nodules observed under the skin all over the body of the patient were of different size, and presented lesions, among which the biggest was 1 × 1 cm. No lesions were observed on the fingers. By superficial ultrasonography, multiple isoechoic hypoechoic lesions were observed among the muscle plan. In thoracolumbar magnetic resonance imaging, multiple massif lesions retaining peripheral contrast (the biggest was 1.7 × 1.4 cm large had been observed under the skin muscle plans, between the muscles of the extremities. The biopsy was positive for smooth muscle actin, but negative for desmin, S100, and CD34. These findings were diagnosed as infantile digital fibromatosis (IDF (inclusion body fibromatosis. The case was presented with an objective to illustrate and remind that IDF can be observed in babies without finger involvement.

  17. Second to fourth digit ratio, sex differences and antropometric measuments: their relationship in children.

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    Uludag, Aysegul; Tekin, Murat; Ertekin, Yusuf H; Şahin, Erkan M; Cevizci, Sibel; Cibik, Birol; Oguz, Sevilay; Erbag, Oznur

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of socio-demographic factors and anthropometric measurements on 2/4 digit ratio in the school aged children. This cross-sectional study was completed in primary and secondary schools in the city center of Canakkale, Turkey. The students were seated at a table by the responsible doctor, and were asked to extend the palm of the right and left hand in the schools. Using a Vernier Caliper the 2/4 fingers were measured from the palm twice, and the results were noted together with socio-demographic information. Weight, length, waist and hip measurements were taken while students were behind a folding screen. A total of 1860 students from 5-14 years were included in the study. The right hand 2/4 digit ratio was 0.9765±0.035 and the left hand ratio was 0.9716±0.036 for girls. For the boys the ratios were 0.9688±0.035 for right hand and 0.9653±0.033 for left hand. The digit ratios of girls were significantly higher than boys and the right hand ratio was even greater. The 2/4 digit measurements of both hands of students were positively correlated with each other. In regression model left hand 2/4 ratio is dependent hip circumference, monthly income and gender as adjusted r2 0.051. The right hand 2/4 ratio was dependent gender, monthly income, hip circumference and birthweight as adjusted r2 0.041. The 2/4 digit ratio of school-aged in Turkish children differed based on gender. Digit ratios depend on the hip circumference, gender (girls have higher ratio), birthweight, gestation week and monthly income. Further research, especially the effect of monthly income, is needed.

  18. Relationships among musical aptitude, digit ratio and testosterone in men and women.

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    Jeremy C Borniger

    Full Text Available Circulating adult testosterone levels, digit ratio (length of the second finger relative to the fourth finger, and directional asymmetry in digit ratio are considered sexually dimorphic traits in humans. These have been related to spatial abilities in men and women, and because similar brain structures appear to be involved in both spatial and musical abilities, neuroendocrine function may be related to musical as well as spatial cognition. To evaluate relationships among testosterone and musical ability in men and women, saliva samples were collected, testosterone concentrations assessed, and digit ratios calculated using standardized protocols in a sample of university students (N = 61, including both music and non-music majors. Results of Spearman correlations suggest that digit ratio and testosterone levels are statistically related to musical aptitude and performance only within the female sample: A those females with greater self-reported history of exposure to music (p = 0.016 and instrument proficiency (p = 0.040 scored higher on the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation test, B those females with higher left hand digit ratio (and perhaps lower fetal testosterone levels were more highly ranked (p = 0.007 in the orchestra, C female music students exhibited a trend (p = 0.082 towards higher testosterone levels compared to female non-music students, and D female music students with higher rank in the orchestra/band had higher testosterone levels (p = 0.003 than lower ranked students. None of these relationships were significant in the male sample, although a lack of statistical power may be one cause. The effects of testosterone are likely a small part of a poorly understood system of biological and environmental stimuli that contribute to musical aptitude. Hormones may play some role in modulating the phenotype of musical ability, and this may be the case for females more so than males.

  19. Relationships among Musical Aptitude, Digit Ratio and Testosterone in Men and Women

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    Borniger, Jeremy C.; Chaudhry, Adeel; Muehlenbein, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Circulating adult testosterone levels, digit ratio (length of the second finger relative to the fourth finger), and directional asymmetry in digit ratio are considered sexually dimorphic traits in humans. These have been related to spatial abilities in men and women, and because similar brain structures appear to be involved in both spatial and musical abilities, neuroendocrine function may be related to musical as well as spatial cognition. To evaluate relationships among testosterone and musical ability in men and women, saliva samples were collected, testosterone concentrations assessed, and digit ratios calculated using standardized protocols in a sample of university students (N = 61), including both music and non-music majors. Results of Spearman correlations suggest that digit ratio and testosterone levels are statistically related to musical aptitude and performance only within the female sample: A) those females with greater self-reported history of exposure to music (p = 0.016) and instrument proficiency (p = 0.040) scored higher on the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation test, B) those females with higher left hand digit ratio (and perhaps lower fetal testosterone levels) were more highly ranked (p = 0.007) in the orchestra, C) female music students exhibited a trend (p = 0.082) towards higher testosterone levels compared to female non-music students, and D) female music students with higher rank in the orchestra/band had higher testosterone levels (p = 0.003) than lower ranked students. None of these relationships were significant in the male sample, although a lack of statistical power may be one cause. The effects of testosterone are likely a small part of a poorly understood system of biological and environmental stimuli that contribute to musical aptitude. Hormones may play some role in modulating the phenotype of musical ability, and this may be the case for females more so than males. PMID:23520475

  20. Relationships among musical aptitude, digit ratio and testosterone in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Chaudhry, Adeel; Muehlenbein, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Circulating adult testosterone levels, digit ratio (length of the second finger relative to the fourth finger), and directional asymmetry in digit ratio are considered sexually dimorphic traits in humans. These have been related to spatial abilities in men and women, and because similar brain structures appear to be involved in both spatial and musical abilities, neuroendocrine function may be related to musical as well as spatial cognition. To evaluate relationships among testosterone and musical ability in men and women, saliva samples were collected, testosterone concentrations assessed, and digit ratios calculated using standardized protocols in a sample of university students (N = 61), including both music and non-music majors. Results of Spearman correlations suggest that digit ratio and testosterone levels are statistically related to musical aptitude and performance only within the female sample: A) those females with greater self-reported history of exposure to music (p = 0.016) and instrument proficiency (p = 0.040) scored higher on the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation test, B) those females with higher left hand digit ratio (and perhaps lower fetal testosterone levels) were more highly ranked (p = 0.007) in the orchestra, C) female music students exhibited a trend (p = 0.082) towards higher testosterone levels compared to female non-music students, and D) female music students with higher rank in the orchestra/band had higher testosterone levels (p = 0.003) than lower ranked students. None of these relationships were significant in the male sample, although a lack of statistical power may be one cause. The effects of testosterone are likely a small part of a poorly understood system of biological and environmental stimuli that contribute to musical aptitude. Hormones may play some role in modulating the phenotype of musical ability, and this may be the case for females more so than males.

  1. [DECOMPRESSION AND DIVERTING EFFECTS OF VASCULAR ANASTOMOSIS BASED ON DIGITAL ARTERIAL ARCH BRANCH IN REPLANTATION OF FREE FINGER-PULP].

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    Chai, Libing; Liu, Hongxia; Liu, Yuejiao; Lu, Laijin; Cui, Jianli

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the decompression and diverting effects of vascular anastomosis based on the digital arterial arch branch in replantation of free finger-pulp in distal phalanges. A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 12 patients (12 fingers) who underwent free finger-pulp replantation with anastomosis of proper palmar digital artery and the palmar digital artery arch branch in the distal end between December 2004 and March 2015. Of 12 cases, 9 were male and 3 were female, aged 15-39 years with an average of 32 years. The causes of injury included cutting injury in 4 cases, crush injury in 7 cases, and avulsion injury in 1 case. The thumb was involved in 2 cases, index finger in 4 cases, ring finger in 3 cases, middle finger in 1 case, and little finger in 2 cases. The free finger pulp ranged from 1.8 cm x 1.5 cm to 2.8 cmx2.0 cm. The time from injury to operation ranged from 1.5 to 11.0 hours, with an average of 5.7 hours. No arterial arch or proper palmar digital arteriae anastomosis was excluded. Free finger-pulp survived in 11 cases after operation; venous crisis occurred in 1 case at 2 days after operation, and was cured after symptomatic treatment. Nine cases were followed up 6-18 months with an average of 10 months. The finger-pulp had good appearance, clear fingerprint, and soft texture. The two-point discrimination was 3.1-6.0 mm, with an average of 4.6 mm at 6 months after operation. The function of finger flexion and extension was normal. And according to upper extremity functional evaluation standard by hand surgery branch of Chinese Medical Association, the results were excellent in 7 cases, and good in 2 cases. In the replantation of amputated pulp with insufficiency of venous blood outflow, the anastomosis of digital arterial arch branch in the distal end can decompress and shunt arterial blood, adjust blood inflow and outflow, and solve the problems of insufficient quantity of the vein and venous reflux disturbance.

  2. Finger length ratio (2D:4D) in adults with gender identity disorder.

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    Kraemer, Bernd; Noll, Thomas; Delsignore, Aba; Milos, Gabriella; Schnyder, Ulrich; Hepp, Urs

    2009-06-01

    From early childhood, gender identity and the 2nd to 4th finger length ratio (2D:4D) are discriminative characteristics between sexes. Both the human brain and 2D:4D may be influenced by prenatal testosterone levels. This calls for an examination of 2D:4D in patients with gender identity disorder (GID) to study the possible influence of prenatal testosterone on gender identity. Until now, the only study carried out on this issue suggests lower prenatal testosterone levels in right-handed male-to-female GID patients (MtF). We compared 2D:4D of 56 GID patients (39 MtF; 17 female-to-male GID patients, FtM) with data from a control sample of 176 men and 190 women. Bivariate group comparisons showed that right hand 2D:4D in MtF was significantly higher (feminized) than in male controls, but similar to female controls. The comparison of 2D:4D ratios of biological women revealed significantly higher (feminized) values for right hands of right handed FtM. Analysis of variance confirmed significant effects for sex and for gender identity on 2D:4D ratios but not for sexual orientation or for the interaction among variables. Our results indirectly point to the possibility of a weak influence of reduced prenatal testosterone as an etiological factor in the multifactorially influenced development of MtF GID. The development of FtM GID seems even more unlikely to be notably influenced by prenatal testosterone.

  3. Digit ratios, the menstrual cycle and social preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buser, T.

    2012-01-01

    We examine whether social preferences are partially determined by biological factors. We do this by investigating whether digit ratios (2D:4D) and menstrual cycle information are correlated with choices in ultimatum, trust, public good and dictator games. Digit ratios are thought to be a proxy for

  4. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and wearing of wedding rings.

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    Voracek, Martin

    2008-06-01

    Digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker for prenatal androgen levels, and absolute finger length, a marker for pubertal androgen action, were not associated with wearing of wedding rings in a sample of 150 male and 199 female married individuals. This failure to replicate associations previously reported by Manning was true for both men and women, self-reported and spousal ring-wearing behavior, and one's own and spousal 2D:4D or absolute finger lengths. Supplemental findings included sex differences and age effects in the prevalence of wearing wedding rings (more frequent in women and the younger than in men and the older) and a sex bias when ring-wearing behavior within couples was discordant (men more frequently did not wear their wedding ring when their wives did than vice versa). Discussed are implications of the current findings and directions for future research into possible associations of 2D:4D with other aspects of body ornamentation.

  5. Finger length ratio (2D:4D) and dimensions of sexual orientation.

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    Kraemer, Bernd; Noll, Thomas; Delsignore, Aba; Milos, Gabriella; Schnyder, Ulrich; Hepp, Urs

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that both adult sexual orientation and the 2nd to 4th finger length ratio (2D:4D) are influenced by prenatal testosterone levels. Bearing this in mind, 2D:4D has been tested as a proxy measure of the putative prenatal testosterone impact on adult human homosexuality, but the results are inconsistent. To date, most studies in this field of research comprise categorical group comparison of heterosexuals and homosexuals with respect to their 2D:4D. The purpose of our study was to evaluate 2D:4D and the dimensional perspective of sexual orientation in addition to categorical results. We examined a community-based sample of 409 subjects and calculated correlations of 2D:4D and sexual orientation as a continuum ranging from homosexual to heterosexual. We found a significant negative correlation of 2D:4D with homosexual orientation (fantasy, attraction, activity and general score) in women, but not in men. Our results indicate that with higher prenatal testosterone levels in women, the likelihood of homosexual orientation might increase. We hypothesize a continuous neurohormonal sexual differentiation of the brain, most notably for women, that overrides categories and results in varying dimensions of sexual orientation. This hypothesis contrasts with the predominant suggestion of fixed organizational effects of androgens in the brain and a categorical sexual orientation.

  6. Male infants with hypospadias and/or cryptorchidism show a lower 2D/4D digit ratio than normal boys.

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    Abbo, O; Ferdynus, C; Kalfa, N; Huiart, L; Sauvat, F; Harper, L H

    2015-07-01

    In humans the ratio of the index finger to the ring finger is sexually dimorphic, with the mean ratio being larger in women than in men. It has been suggested that this difference is related to prenatal androgen exposure. This has been further demonstrated in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Normal development of the male external genitalia is linked to androgen-mediated events during gestation. We therefore wanted to determine if the 2D:4D digit ratio was normal in boys with cryptorchidism or hypospadias. We prospectively enrolled all prepubertal patients seen in the outpatient clinic for cryptorchidism or hypospadias between September and December 2012. We then compared their 2D:4D digit ratio with two control groups made up of normal boys and normal girls. Interobserver and intraobserver variability was evaluated. We included 57 boys with hypospadias and/or cryptorchidism, 79 boys without genital abnormalities and 25 girls without genital abnormalities. The mean 2D:4D ratio for both hands was significantly different between the three groups, with the digit ratio for boys with genital anomalies being lower than for normal boys and normal girls (pboys with genital abnormalities (cryptorchidism and/or hypospadias) have a lower 2D:4D digit ratio than boys without genital anomalies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. [Repair of skin and soft tissue defects at distal end of finger with serrated flap with digital proper artery and nerve pedicle combined with bilaterally pedicled V-Y advancement flap of the injured finger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shusen; Jin, Wenhu; Wei, Zairong; Sun, Guangfeng; Wang, Bo; Deng, Chengliang; Tang, Xiujun; Zeng, Xueqin; Nie, Kaiyu

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of repair of skin and soft tissue defects at distal end of finger with serrated flap with digital proper artery and nerve pedicle combined with bilaterally pedicled V-Y advancement flap of the injured finger. Thirteen patients with skin and soft tissue defects at distal end of 13 fingers were hospitalized from September 2013 to January 2015. After debridement, the wound area of finger ranged from 1.2 cm × 0.8 cm to 1.8 cm × 1.5 cm. Serrated flap with digital proper artery and nerve pedicle combined with bilaterally pedicled V-Y advancement flap of the injured finger were used to repair the defect. The flaps were interruptedly sutured. The areas of bilaterally pedicled V-Y advancement flap and serrated flap with digital proper artery and nerve pedicle ranged from 0.52 to 1.11 and 2.60 to 5.23 cm(2,) respectively. All flaps of 13 patients survived completely. The patients were followed up for 6 to 24 months. The color and texture of the flaps were good. After reconstruction, the finger tips were in round in shape. The appearance of the fingers was consistent with that of the normal fingers, and joint motility was normal. No hook-nail deformity or knuckle dysfunction was found. Sensation of the flaps was estimated as S4, and the distance of two-point discrimination ranged from 2 to 3 mm. The recovery of the joint motion function of the fingers was excellent. Serrated flap with digital proper artery and nerve pedicle, combined with bilaterally pedicled V-Y advancement flap from the injured finger can repair the skin and soft tissue defects at distal end of finger with reliable blood supply and simple operative technic. It also could avoid the formation of deformity subsequent to a linear scar, and a satisfactory appearance with good function could be obtained.

  8. Digit ratio (2D:4D is associated with breast cancer

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    Patrícia Helena Costa Mendes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Digit ratio (2D:4D has been considered as a proxy biomarker for prenatal hormonal exposure and may represent an individual’s predisposition to breast cancer. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether there is a link between digit ratio and breast cancer in a Brazilian population.Methods: Digital measurements of the lengths of the index and ring fingers of both hands were obtained from women with breast cancer (n = 100 and age-matched controls (n = 100 using a digital Vernier calliper. Mean digit ratios of right hands, left hands, and right minus left hand 2D:4D (DR-L were compared between both groups. Data were analysed by the Student's t-test for unpaired samples, Mann-Whitney test, and Spearman`s correlation with a significance level of 5%.Results: The patients with breast cancer presented significantly higher right and left 2D:4D (both p < 0.001 and higher DR-L (p = 0.032 than controls. Among breast cancer cases, there was a significantly negative correlation between left 2D:4D and age diagnosed with breast cancer (p = 0.018.Conclusion: Digit ratio offers a valid retrospective biomarker of action of prenatal hormones and might be associated with breast cancer risk and age at onset of breast cancer. It suggests that higher exposure or sensitivity to prenatal oestrogen might be associated with a higher risk of breast cancer and with earlier onset of the disease.

  9. Radial Fingering in a Porous Medium Digitation radiale dans un milieu poreux

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    Ni W.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory of immiscible radial displacement in a Hele-Shaw cell is extended to the case of a porous medium contained between two closely-spaced parallel plates, and experiments are described for the displacement of glycerine by paraffin oil in such a system. Data are presented for the number of fingers, the breakthrough time, and the glycerine recovery, for a range of flowrates varying through three orders of magnitude. Good agreement between theory and experiment is observed. La théorie s'appliquant aux déplacements radiaux dans les cellules Hele-Shaw a été étendue à un système qui consiste en une couche mince de milieux poreux encapsulée entre deux plaques en verre. Dans cet article, on examine les déplacements de la glycérine par de l'huile de paraffine. En faisant varier le débit de l'huile de paraffine dans un intervalle de trois ordres de grandeur, on a étudié les variables telles que le nombre de digitations, le temps de percée et le taux de récupération de la glycérine. On a observé un bon accord entre la théorie et les résultats expérimentaux.

  10. Repair and sensory reconstruction of the children's finger pulp defects with perforator pedicled propeller flap in proper digital artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S-M; Wang, A-G; Zhang, Z-Y; Sun, Q-Q; Tao, Y-L; Zhou, M-M; Hao, Y-J

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the clinical effects of adopting perforator pedicled propeller flap in the proper digital artery for treatment and sensory reconstruction of finger pulp defects in children. Perforator pedicled propeller flap of proper digital arteries in thirty-one fingers from twenty-three children patients were selected for repairing the pulp defects on the 2nd to the 5th fingers. All cases were treated from September 2012 to December 2013. To properly reconstruct the pulps' feeling we needed the dorsal branch of the proper digital nerve in the flap to be consistent with the broken end of proper digital nerve in pulps' wound. A free skin graft was carried out with full-thickness skin taken from the medial thigh for flap donor area. We scheduled two post-operation return visits, one in six months and the second visit in twelve months following the operation. Parents' satisfaction with the postoperative appearance of their children's fingers was assessed based on Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire. All operations were performed successfully and all wounds healed in the first period and all flaps survived. During the final follow-up, the shape recovery of flaps and their donor areas were examined and satisfactory results were obtained. All pulps were full and round without any obvious pigmentation or scar contracture. The sensory recovery of pulps was achieved S3+, and the two-point discrimination was 4.5 to 6.0 mm (with 5.1 mm being the average value). Parents' satisfaction with the postoperative results was very promising with twenty-one cases of very satisfied and two cases of satisfied parents. The operation method used in this study demonstrated to be a safe and reliable procedure producing a very good flap blood supply as well as excellent sensory recovery and satisfactory postoperative appearance.

  11. Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Predicts Self-Reported Measures of General Competitiveness, but Not Behavior in Economic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönte, Werner; Procher, Vivien D.; Urbig, Diemo; Voracek, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The ratio of index finger length to ring finger length (2D:4D) is considered to be a putative biomarker of prenatal androgen exposure (PAE), with previous research suggesting that 2D:4D is associated with human behaviors, especially sex-typical behaviors. This study empirically examines the relationship between 2D:4D and individual competitiveness, a behavioral trait that is found to be sexually dimorphic. We employ two related, but distinct, measures of competitiveness, namely behavioral measures obtained from economic experiments and psychometric self-reported measures. Our analyses are based on two independent data sets obtained from surveys and economic experiments with 461 visitors of a shopping mall (Study I) and 617 university students (Study II). The correlation between behavior in the economic experiment and digit ratios of both hands is not statistically significant in either study. In contrast, we find a negative and statistically significant relationship between psychometric self-reported measures of competitiveness and right hand digit ratios (R2D:4D) in both studies. This relationship is especially strong for younger people. Hence, this study provides some robust empirical evidence for a negative association between R2D:4D and self-reported competitiveness. We discuss potential reasons why digit ratio may relate differently to behaviors in specific economics experiments and to self-reported general competitiveness. PMID:29276479

  12. Digit Ratio (2D:4D Predicts Self-Reported Measures of General Competitiveness, but Not Behavior in Economic Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Bönte

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The ratio of index finger length to ring finger length (2D:4D is considered to be a putative biomarker of prenatal androgen exposure (PAE, with previous research suggesting that 2D:4D is associated with human behaviors, especially sex-typical behaviors. This study empirically examines the relationship between 2D:4D and individual competitiveness, a behavioral trait that is found to be sexually dimorphic. We employ two related, but distinct, measures of competitiveness, namely behavioral measures obtained from economic experiments and psychometric self-reported measures. Our analyses are based on two independent data sets obtained from surveys and economic experiments with 461 visitors of a shopping mall (Study I and 617 university students (Study II. The correlation between behavior in the economic experiment and digit ratios of both hands is not statistically significant in either study. In contrast, we find a negative and statistically significant relationship between psychometric self-reported measures of competitiveness and right hand digit ratios (R2D:4D in both studies. This relationship is especially strong for younger people. Hence, this study provides some robust empirical evidence for a negative association between R2D:4D and self-reported competitiveness. We discuss potential reasons why digit ratio may relate differently to behaviors in specific economics experiments and to self-reported general competitiveness.

  13. Biological markers of asexuality: Handedness, birth order, and finger length ratios in self-identified asexual men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Morag A; Brotto, Lori A; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2014-02-01

    Human asexuality is defined as a lack of sexual attraction to anyone or anything and it has been suggested that it may be best conceptualized as a sexual orientation. Non-right-handedness, fraternal birth order, and finger length ratio (2D:4D) are early neurodevelopmental markers associated with sexual orientation. We conducted an Internet study investigating the relationship between self-identification as asexual, handedness, number of older siblings, and self-measured finger-lengths in comparison to individuals of other sexual orientation groups. A total of 325 asexuals (60 men and 265 women; M age, 24.8 years), 690 heterosexuals (190 men and 500 women; M age, 23.5 years), and 268 non-heterosexuals (homosexual and bisexual; 64 men and 204 women; M age, 29.0 years) completed online questionnaires. Asexual men and women were 2.4 and 2.5 times, respectively, more likely to be non-right-handed than their heterosexual counterparts and there were significant differences between sexual orientation groups in number of older brothers and older sisters, and this depended on handedness. Asexual and non-heterosexual men were more likely to be later-born than heterosexual men, and asexual women were more likely to be earlier-born than non-heterosexual women. We found no significant differences between sexual orientation groups on measurements of 2D:4D ratio. This is one of the first studies to test and provide preliminary empirical support for an underlying neurodevelopmental basis to account for the lack of sexual attraction characteristic of asexuality.

  14. A Reduced Model for Salt-Finger Convection in the Small Diffusivity Ratio Limit

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    Jin-Han Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple model of nonlinear salt-finger convection in two dimensions is derived and studied. The model is valid in the limit of a small solute to heat diffusivity ratio and a large density ratio, which is relevant to both oceanographic and astrophysical applications. Two limits distinguished by the magnitude of the Schmidt number are found. For order one Schmidt numbers, appropriate for astrophysical applications, a modified Rayleigh–Bénard system with large-scale damping due to a stabilizing temperature is obtained. For large Schmidt numbers, appropriate for the oceanic setting, the model combines a prognostic equation for the solute field and a diagnostic equation for inertia-free momentum dynamics. Two distinct saturation regimes are identified for the second model: the weakly driven regime is characterized by a large-scale flow associated with a balance between advection and linear instability, while the strongly-driven regime produces multiscale structures, resulting in a balance between energy input through linear instability and energy transfer between scales. For both regimes, we analytically predict and numerically confirm the dependence of the kinetic energy and salinity fluxes on the ratio between solutal and thermal Rayleigh numbers. The spectra and probability density functions are also computed.

  15. DIGIT-PHYSICS: Digits Are Bosons Are Quanta Because (On Average) Quanta and Bosons Are and Always Were Digits!!! DIGITS?: For a Very Long Time Giving Us All The FINGER!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; Newcomb, Simon; Strutt-Rayleigh, John William; Poincare, Henri; Weyl, Hermann; Benford, Frederick; Antonoff, Marvin

    2015-03-01

    DIGIT-PHYSICS: DIGITS?: For a Very Long Time Giving Us All The FINGER!!!: CONTRA Wigner,``On the Unreasonable Effectiveness of Physics in Mathematics!'' A Surprise in Theoretical/Experimental Physics and/or Ostensibly Pure-Mathematics: PHYSICS: Quantum-Mechanics/Statistical-.Mechanics. DIGITS-LAW(S); DIGITS' ostensibly ``pure-mathematics' 1:1-map onto the QUANTUM!!! [Google:''http://www.benfordonline.net/ list/ chronological'']: Newcomb[Am.J.Math.4,39(1881)]-Poincare[Calcul des Probabilité(1912)]-Weyl[Math.Ann., 77, 313(1916)-Benford[J.Am.Phil Soc,78,115 (1938)]-..-Antonoff/Siegel[AMS Joint-Mtg.,San Diego(2002)-abs.# 973-60-124] empirical inter-digit{on-ANY/ALL averageS) = log[base =10] (1 + 1/d) = log[base =10] ([d +1]/d) upon algebraic-inversion is d = 1/[10⌃[ ] -1] 1/[2.303..e⌃[ ] -1] 1/[2.303..e⌃[] -1] 1/[2.303..e⌃[ ω] -1]: Digits Are Bosons Are Quanta Because (On Average) Quanta and Bosons Are and Always Were Digits!!! (Ex: atom energy-levels numbering: 0,...,9) ANY/ALL QUANTUM-physics[Planck(1901)-Einstein(1905)-Bose(1924)-Einstein(1925)-vs.Fermi(1927)-Dirac(1927)-...] is and always was Newcomb(1881) DIGIT-physics!!!

  16. One Screen, Many Fingers: Young Children's Collaborative Literacy Play with Digital Puppetry Apps and Touchscreen Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlwend, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the digital literacy practices that emerge when young children play together with digital apps on touchscreen devices. Children's collaborative composing with a digital puppetry app on a touchscreen--with many hands all busy dragging, resizing, and animating puppet characters, and many voices making sound effects, narrating,…

  17. Accurate Calibration of Empirical Viscous Fingering Models Calage précis de modèles empiriques de digitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayers F. J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the use and calibration of empirical models for viscous fingering. The choice of parameters for the three principal approaches (Koval, Todd and Longstaff, and Fayers methods is outlined. The methods all give similar levels of accuracy when compared with linear experiments, but differ in performance in two-dimensional applications. This arises from differences in the formulation of the total mobility terms. The superiority of the Todd and Longstaff and Fayers methods is demonstrated for two-dimensional and gravity influenced flows by comparison with experiments and high resolution simulation. The use of high resolution simulation to calibrate empirical models in a systematic manner is described. Results from detailed simulation demonstrate the sensitivity of empirical model parameters to viscous to gravity ratio, recovery process (secondary, tertiary or WAG, and geological heterogeneity. It is shown that for large amplitude heterogeneities with short correlation lengths, the accuracy of the empirical models is not satisfactory, but is improved by the addition of a diffusive term. Cet article traite de l'utilisation et du calibrage des modèles empiriques de la digitation visqueuse. Il présente l'ensemble des paramètres intervenant dans les trois principales méthodes employées (Koval, Todd & Longstaff et Fayers. Ces méthodes offrent des degrés de précision comparables à ceux des expériences linéaires, mais leurs performances diffèrent dans les applications bi-dimensionnelles. Ceci est dû aux différences relevées dans la formulation des termes de la mobilité totale. Les auteurs démontrent la supériorité des méthodes Todd & Longstaff et Fayers par rapport aux expériences et à la simulation haute résolution pour les écoulements bi-dimensionnels et par gravité. La simulation haute résolution pour le calibrage systématique des modèles empiriques est décrite. Les résultats d'une simulation détaillée illustrent la

  18. Closure of digital arteries in high vascular tone states as demonstrated by measurement of systolic blood pressure in the fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krähenbühl, B; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    Finger systolic blood pressure (FSP) was measured indirectly in normal subjects and patients with primary Raynaud phenomenon by applying a thin-walled plastic cuff around the finger and a strain gauge more distally to detect volume changes. Inducing a high vascular tone in one or more fingers...

  19. There Is More to Digital Learning than Counting on Your Fingers: Transforming Learning and Teaching with Digital Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Lyudmila; Lazarevic , Bojan; Malloy, Veronica

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores how pedagogy is being influenced by fast developing digital technologies. Results are presented from exploratory research conducted in 2016. The findings are addressed in terms of the transformation of learning and education, including the move from the measured to the engaged classroom. Emerging technology creates a natural…

  20. 2D:4D digit ratio predicts delay of gratification in preschoolers.

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    Sergio Da Silva

    Full Text Available We replicate the Stanford marshmallow experiment with a sample of 141 preschoolers and find a correlation between lack of self-control and 2D:4D digit ratio. Children with low 2D:4D digit ratio are less likely to delay gratification. Low 2D:4D digit ratio may indicate high fetal testosterone. If this hypothesis is true, our finding means high fetal testosterone children are less likely to delay gratification.

  1. No Sexual Dimorphism Detected in Digit Ratios of the Fire Salamander (Salamandra salamandra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogová, Monika; Nelson, Emma; Uhrin, Marcel; Figurová, Mária; Ledecký, Valent; Zyśk, Bartłomiej

    2015-10-01

    It has been proposed that digit ratio may be used as a biomarker of early developmental effects. Specifically, the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) has been linked to the effects of sex hormones and their receptor genes, but other digit ratios have also been investigated. Across taxa, patterns of sexual dimorphism in digit ratios are ambiguous and a scarcity of studies in basal tetrapods makes it difficult to understand how ratios have evolved. Here, we focus on examining sex differences in digit ratios (2D:3D, 2D:4D, and 3D:4D) in a common amphibian, the fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra). We used graphic software to measure soft tissue digit length and digit bone length from X-rays. We found a nonsignificant tendency in males to have a lower 2D:3D than females; however, no sexual differences were detected in the other ratios. We discuss our results in the context of other studies of digit ratios, and how sex determination systems, as well as other factors, might impact patterns of sexual dimorphism, particularly in reptiles and in amphibians. Our findings suggest that caution is needed when using digit ratios as a potential indicator of prenatal hormonal effects in amphibians and highlight the need for more comparative studies to elucidate the evolutionary and genetic mechanisms implicated in sexually dimorphic patterns across taxonomic groups. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Development and implementation of algorithms for automatic and robust measurement of the 2D:4D digit ratio using image data

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    Koch Robert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Early in the 20th century it could be observed that the finger lengths of second (2D and fourth digit (4D represents a sexually dimorphic feature, whereby in general the second digit is longer than the fourth digit for men and vice versa for women. In the early 1980s first studies could show a correlation between the 2D:4D ratio and the concentration of androgens one is exposed to during a short window within the prenatal development phase. Therefore, the 2D:4D digit ratio can serve as an additional marker for certain physiological and psychological traits like fertility, assertiveness, aggressiveness and alcohol addiction. Manual measurements are the established method to retrieve the finger lengths e.g. by using a ruler on printed scans of hands. For higher reliability these extremely time-consuming procedures have to be done multiple times. In this contribution two automated procedures are proposed to reduce the time for measurements whilst maintaining the accuracy. A deviation of maximal 2% from the manual measurement could be achieved for more than 75% of the 22 participants.

  3. [When doors slam, fingers jam!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, I; Toubal, K; Carnet, C; Rekhroukh, H; Zelmat, B; Debuisson, C; Cahuzac, J-P

    2007-08-01

    Epidemiological analysis in a universitary paediatric emergency unit of children admitted after accidental injuries resulting from fingers crushed in a door. Prospective, descriptive cohort study from September 6th, 2004 to July 1st, 2005 included all children admitted for finger injuries crushed in a non-automatic door. included accidents due to automatic doors, toy's or refrigerator doors, families who refused to participate to the study or families who had left the waiting area before medical examination. Collected data were patient and family characteristics, accident characteristics and its management. Three hundred and forty children affected by 427 digital lesions were included. The mean age was 5.5+/-3.8 years (range 4 months - 15.5 years). Male/female ratio was equal to 1.2: 1. Fifty-eight percent of patients belonged to families composed of 3 or more siblings. Ninety-three per cent of families came to hospital within the first 2 hours after the accident (mean delay 99+/-162 min, median range 54 minutes). Location of the accident was: domestic (62%, at home (64%)), at school (17%). Locations within the home were: the bedroom (33%), bathroom and toilets (21%). An adult was present in 75% of cases and responsible for the trauma in 25% of accidents, another child in 44%. The finger or fingers were trapped on the hinge side in 57% of patients. No specific safeguard devices were used by 94% of families. Among victims, 20% had several crushed digits; left and right hand were injured with an equal frequency. The commonest involved digits were: the middle finger (29%), the ring finger (23%). The nail plate was damaged in 60% of digital lesions, associated with a wound (50%), a distal phalanx fracture (P3) (12%). Six children had a partial or complete amputation of P3, 2 children a lesion of the extensor tendon, 1 child had a rupture of the external lateral ligament. Three percent of children required an admission to the paediatric orthopaedic surgery unit. Post

  4. Second to fourth digit ratio: a predictor of adult lung function

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    I-Nae Park

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sex and sex hormones play a major role in lung physiology. It has been proposed that the ratio of the second to fourth digits (digit ratio is correlated with fetal sex hormones. We therefore hypothesized that digit ratio might help predict lung function. We investigated the relationship between digit ratio and pulmonary function test (PFT fi ndings. A total of 245 South Korean patients (162 male, 83 female aged from 34 to 90 years who were hospitalized for urological surgery were prospectively enrolled. Before administering the PFTs, the lengths of the second and fourth digits of the right hand were measured by a single investigator using a digital Vernier caliper. In males (n = 162, univariate and multivariate analysis using linear regression models showed that digit ratio was a signifi cant predictive factor of forced vital capacity (FVC and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 (FVC: r = 0.156, P = 0.047; FEV1: r = 0.160, P = 0.042. In male ever-smokers (n = 69, lung functions (FVC and FEV1 were correlated with smoking exposure rather than digit ratio. In female never-smokers (n = 83, lung functions (FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio were positively correlated with digit ratio on univariate analysis (FEV1: r = 0.242, P = 0.027; FEV1/FVC ratio: r = 0.245, P = 0.026. Patients with lower digit ratios tend to have decreased lung function. These results suggest that digit ratio is a predictor of airway function.

  5. Closure of digital arteries in high vascular tone states as demonstrated by measurement of systolic blood pressure in the fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krähenbühl, B; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    Finger systolic blood pressure (FSP) was measured indirectly in normal subjects and patients with primary Raynaud phenomenon by applying a thin-walled plastic cuff around the finger and a strain gauge more distally to detect volume changes. Inducing a high vascular tone in one or more fingers...... with vasospastic arterial disease. It implies an underestimation of palmar arch systolic pressure measured indirectly on the fingers. FSP measured under these circumstances may be taken as an estimate of the vascular tone, and can be employed in diagnosis and quantification of vasospastic disorders....

  6. THE RATIO OF SECOND FINGER TO FOURTH FINGER IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER. La proporción entre los dedos índice y anular en los niños y adolescentes que tienen trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Ayraler Taner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The ratio of the index finger (2D to the ring finger (4D is different in males and females. This ratio (2D:4D has been investigated in a variety of diseases, including autism, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the 2D:4D ratio in children and adolescents with obsessive compulsive disorder and to detect any differences in that ratio between participants with obsessive compulsive disorder and a healthy control Material-Methods: The study included 30 children and adolescents diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder between ages 7-17 and 90 age-sex matched controls. After the psychiatric evaluations;  finger lenghts were measured with a digital compass. Main results: Girls with obsessive compulsive disorder had greater 2D:4D ratios in their right and left hands than the control group. Although there was no statistically significant difference, the 2D:4D ratio in the right hand was greater in the obsessive compulsive disorder group than in the control group. Conclusion: With relation to obsessive compulsive disorder, some differences were detected in 2D:4D ratios of patients  with obsessive compulsive disorder and control groups but there were no statistically significant results except for that of girls with obsessive compulsive disorder. Further studies are needed to fully understand the relationship between obsessive compulsive disorder and the 2D:4D ratio. Objetivos: La proporción entre los dedos índice y anular es diferente en las mujeres y en los hombres. Esta proporción ha sido estudiada en varias enfermedades como el trastorno de ansiedad, el trastorno de la concentración y la hiperactividad. El objetivo de este estudio era investigar la proporción entre los dedos de índice y anular en los niños y adolescentes que tienen trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo y determinar si existía alguna diferencia entre los participantes con trastorno

  7. The second-to-fourth digit ratio correlates with the rate of academic performance in medical school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, Marinella; Perciavalle, Valentina; Maci, Tiziana; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Di Corrado, Donatella; Perciavalle, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal androgens have important organizing effects on the development and future behavior of the brain. The second-to-fourth digit length ratio (2D:4D) has been proposed as a marker of these prenatal androgen effects, with a relatively longer fourth finger indicating higher prenatal androgen exposure. 2D:4D has been shown to predict the success of men who play sports and of financial traders. However, to date little is known regarding the effects of prenatal androgens on academic performance, for example, admission to and success in a highly competitive university system such as the state-run Italian medical schools. Here, we report the findings of a study conducted at the University of Catania Medical School, Italy, in which the 2D:4D ratio was sampled in a group of 48 male students. The 2D:4D ratios were found to be correlated with the performance of the students on the admission test to the medical school, their salivary testosterone levels and their aggressiveness; however, no correlation was observed with the mean score on exams during the course of study. Our results suggest that pre and/or postnatal androgens increase performance in situations that require prompt decision-making and the ability to take risks, but do not influence performance when a more analytical and planned approach is called for.

  8. Finger pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  9. Does the index-to-ring finger length ratio (2D:4D) differ in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Results from an international online case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin Kullmann, Jane Alana; Pamphlett, Roger

    2017-08-07

    The ratio of the length of the index finger (2D) to the ring finger (4D) (2D:4D) has been reported to be lower (ie, 2DALS) than non-ALS controls. This has led to suggestions that exposure to increased prenatal testosterone, which also lowers this ratio, could be a risk factor for ALS. In an attempt to test this hypothesis, we examined 2D:4Ds from large numbers of patients with ALS and controls. An online multilingual questionnaire enabling respondents to measure their own index and ring finger lengths. Of the initial 949 respondents, 572 remained for analysis after elimination for inability to straighten fingers, not answering the question, statistical outliers and aged ALS (125 males, 77 females) and 370 non-ALS controls (112 males, 258 females). Unpaired t-tests with 95% CIs were used to assess differences in mean 2D:4Ds. Males had significantly lower mean 2D:4Ds than females, in both ALS and control groups, for both left and right hands. No significant differences were found in 2D:4Ds between ALS and control groups, in either males or females, for either left or right hands. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed no power for 2D:4Ds to predict ALS status in either males or females. 2D:4Ds did not differ between patients with ALS and controls in this study. This was despite the dataset being large enough to confirm the established finding of lower 2D:4Ds in males compared with females. These findings do not support the hypothesis that exposure to increased prenatal testosterone is a risk factor for ALS. A putative lower 2D:4D has been proposed to explain the link between ALS and exercise, but our results indicate that other exercise-related factors are more likely to explain this association. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Radial Fingering in a Water-Wet Porous Medium Digitation radiale dans un milieu poreux mouillable à l'eau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr-El-Din H. A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Radial displacement of a non-wetting fluid (paraffin oil by a wetting fluid (water was studied in a consolidated porous medium for a wide range of flowrates. The effects of injection flowrate on the displacement pattern were observed photographically, and the volumetric oil recovery at the breakthrough condition was measured. The experimental results indicate that the recovery versus flowrate curve can be divided into three main regions: (1 a capillary regionat low flowrates where capillary forces are dominant; (2 a viscous regionat high flowrates where viscous forces are dominant; and (3 an intermediate stabilized regionwhere capillary and viscous forces are of comparable magnitude. The experimental data for the number of fingers are compared with theoretical predictions and the so-called wettability number is calculated. The results are finally compared with previous data for systems of reversed wettability and the differences, which are very significant, are discussed. On a étudié le déplacement radial d'un fluide non mouillant (l'huile de paraffine par un fluide mouillant (l'eau dans un milieu poreux consolidé et pour une large gamme de débit. On a observé photographiquement les effets du débit d'injection sur le modèle de déplacement et mesuré la récupération volumétrique de l'huile en condition de rupture. Les résultats expérimentaux indiquent que l'on peut diviser en trois parties principales la courbe donnant la récupération en fonction du débit : - un domaine capillaire à faible débit où les forces capillaires sont dominantes, - un domaine visqueux à débit élevé où les forces visqueuses sont dominantes, - un domaine intermédiaire stabilisé où les forces capillaires et visqueuses sont de grandeur comparable. On compare les données expérimentales relatives au nombre de digitations avec les prévisions théoriques et on calcule le nombre dit de mouillabilité . Les résultats sont finalement comparés aux

  11. Primary motor cortex neurons during individuated finger and wrist movements: correlation of spike firing rates with the motion of individual digits versus their principal components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan eKirsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The joints of the hand provide 24 mechanical degrees of freedom. Yet 2 to 7 principal components (PCs account for 80 to 95 % of the variance in hand joint motion during tasks that vary from grasping to finger spelling. Such findings have led to the hypothesis that the brain may simplify operation of the hand by preferentially controlling PCs. We tested this hypothesis using data recorded from the primary motor cortex (M1 during individuated finger and wrist movements. Principal component analysis (PCA of the simultaneous position of the 5 digits and the wrist showed relatively consistent kinematic synergies across recording sessions in two monkeys. The first 3 PCs typically accounted for 85% of the variance. Cross-correlations then were calculated between the firing rate of single neurons and the simultaneous flexion/extension motion of each of the 5 digits and the wrist, as well as with each of their 6 PCs. For each neuron, we then compared the maximal absolute value of the cross-correlations (MAXC achieved with the motion of any digit or the wrist to the MAXC achieved with motion along any PC axis. The MAXC with a digit and the MAXC with a PC were themselves highly correlated across neurons. A minority of neurons correlated more strongly with a principal component than with any digit. But for the populations of neurons sampled from each of two subjects, MAXCs with digits were slightly but significantly higher than those with PCs. We therefore reject the hypothesis that M1 neurons preferentially control PCs of hand motion. We cannot exclude the possibility that M1 neurons might control kinematic synergies identified using linear or non-linear methods other than PCA. We consider it more likely, however, that neurons in other centers of the motor system—such as the pontomedullary reticular formation and the spinal gray matter—drive synergies of movement and/or muscles, which M1 neurons act to fractionate in producing individuated finger and

  12. The contributions of Hans-Dieter Rösler: pioneer of digit ratio (2D:4D) research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Dressler, Stefan G; Loibl, Lisa Mariella

    2008-12-01

    Over the past decade, the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative biomarker for the organizational (permanent) effects of prenatal androgens on the human brain, body, and behavior, has received extensive research attention in psychology. This account makes more widely accessible the contributions of the German psychologist, Hans-Dieter Rösler, an early, for a long time unnoticed, predecessor of modern 2D:4D research. In the mid-1950s, Rösler collected a massive sample of hand outline drawings, totalling nearly 7,000 individuals, ranging in age from 1 mo. to 70 yr. With regard to the distal finger-extent pattern, Rösler differentiated radial (longer index than ring finger), ulnar (reversed pattern), and intermediate hand types, which reflect higher (more female-typical), lower (more male-typical), and intermediate 2D:4D, respectively. Here is summarized Rösler's research. In a series of investigations into the hand types, he reported on their anatomical bases, unsuitability for paternity testing, developmental changes, heritability, sex, side, and occupational group differences, and associations with left-handedness, manual dexterity, mental retardation, and clinodactyly. Based on new data from 313 male and 316 female adults, hand type is further shown to be only a weak proxy of actual 2D:4D, leaving 75% of the interindividual variation in 2D:4D unexplained. Notwithstanding these shortcomings of the hand-type method, Rösler's work from the 1950s still has the potential to inform modern 2D:4D research, as it contains a multitude of testable hypotheses not yet picked up by current research.

  13. A reanalysis of five studies on sexual orientation and the relative length of the 2nd and 4th fingers (the 2D:4D ratio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Dennis; Loehlin, John C; Breedlove, S Marc; Lippa, Richard A; Manning, John T; Rahman, Qazi

    2005-06-01

    Five studies have examined the relationship between sexual orientation and the relative lengths of the 2nd and 4th fingers (the 2D:4D ratio). Although differences have commonly been found between heterosexuals and homosexuals, the direction of the difference has not been consistent across studies. The original data from all five studies were reanalyzed in a search for possible explanations of the discrepancies. Because ethnicity is known to affect the 2D:4D ratio, the reanalysis focused on participants who identified themselves as White or Caucasian, the ethnic group that was most numerous in all of the studies. Age differences did not account for the discrepancies. Differences in variability within different groups were minor. One interesting result to emerge from the reanalysis was that the 2D:4D ratios for the homosexual groups were relatively similar across studies. It was the 2D:4D values for the heterosexual participants that varied most, particularly between the USA and the British studies, and these were responsible for many of the discrepancies in the conclusions across studies. The constancy of the 2D:4D ratio for the White homosexuals did not appear to extend to homosexuals of three other ethnicities, and there were also subpopulation differences related to right or left hands.

  14. Finger Based Techniques for Nonvisual Touchscreen Text Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Fakrudeen, Mohammed; Yousef, Sufian; Miraz, Mahdi H.; Hussein, AbdelRahman Hamza

    2017-01-01

    This research proposes Finger Based Technique (FBT) for non-visual touch screen device interaction designed for blind users. Based on the proposed technique, the blind user can access virtual keys based on finger holding positions. Three different models have been proposed. They are Single Digit Finger-Digit Input (FDI), Double Digit FDI for digital text entry, and Finger-Text Input (FTI) for normal text entry. All the proposed models were implemented with voice feedback while enabling touch ...

  15. Water Fingering Into an Oil-Wet Porous Medium Saturated with Oil At Connate Water Saturation Digitation de l'eau dans un milieu poreux mouillable à l'huile saturée en eau connée

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paterson L.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect that connate water has on fingers of water penetrating into an oil-wet porous medium is examined. In this context, the connate water appears to have no influence on the width of fingers, but instead causes the fingers to be more irregular than fingers in similar experiments without connate water. The surface wettability, in contrast, does have a marked effect on finger widths. On examine dans cet article les effets de l'eau connée sur la digitation de l'eau dans un milieu poreux mouillable à l'huile. Dans ce contexte l'eau connée ne semble avoir aucune influence sur la largeur des digitations mais rend ces dernières plutôt plus irrégulières que dans le cas des expériences effectuées en absence d'eau connée. Par contre, la mouillabilité de la surface a un effet important sur la largeur des digitations.

  16. Digit ratios have poor indicator value in a wild bird population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuskanen, S.; Helle, S.; Ahola, M.; Adamczyk, F.C.A.; Möstl, E.; Laaksonen, T.

    2011-01-01

    Early androgen exposure is known to have longlasting effects on phenotype, behaviour and even fitness, but difficulties in measuring the exposure hinders the study of its importance in evolutionary context. Digit ratios have been highlighted as a potential easy-to-measure indicator of early steroid

  17. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and social integration: an effect of prenatal sex hormones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářík, Jaromír; Brañas-Garza, P.; Davidson, M. W.; Haim, D. A.; Carcelli, S.; Fowler, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2017), s. 476-489 ISSN 2050-1242 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22044S Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : social networks * digit ratio * prenatal androgens Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Applied Economics, Econometrics

  18. Low digit ratio (2D:4D) in male suicide victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Bernd; Thiem, Daniela; Bouna-Pyrrou, Polyxeni; Mühle, Christiane; Stoessel, Christina; Betz, Peter; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2016-12-01

    Although women attempt suicides equally or more often than men do, men are more likely to die of suicide than women (sex paradox of suicidal behavior). Furthermore, the male traits of aggression and impulsivity predict suicide completion. Here, we studied the second-to-fourth-finger length ratio (2D:4D), a proxy for prenatal androgen exposure, in 46 suicide corpses and 25 non-suicide corpses. We report significantly lower 2D:4D in male suicide corpses than non-suicide corpses (p = .030, partial η 2  = .147). There was no significant association between 2D:4D and the suicide method. Our findings indicate increased risk of suicide following higher prenatal androgen exposure in males. The results may improve future efforts to predict and prevent suicides.

  19. Phenotypic integration mediated by hormones: associations among digit ratios, body size and testosterone during tadpole development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofeu, Leandro; Brandt, Renata; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2017-08-02

    Developmental associations often explain phenotypic integration. The intersected hormonal regulation of ontogenetic processes fosters predictions of steroid-mediated phenotypic integration among sexually dimorphic traits, a statement defied by associations between classical dimorphism predictors (e.g. body size) and traits that apparently lack sex-specific functions (e.g. ratios between the lengths of Digits II and IV - 2D:4D). Developmental bases of female-biased 2D:4D have been identified, but these remain unclear for taxa presenting male-biased 2D:4D (e.g. anura). Here we propose two alternative hypotheses to investigate evolution of male-biased 2D:4D associated with sexually dimorphic body size using Leptodactylus frogs: I)'hypothesis of sex-specific digit responses' - Digit IV would be reactive to testosterone but exhibit responses in the opposite direction of those observed in female-biased 2D:4D lineages, so that Digit IV turns shorter in males; II) 'hypothesis of identity of the dimorphic digit'- Digit II would be the dimorphic digit. We compiled the following databases using Leptodactylus frogs: 1) adults of two species from natural populations and 2) testosterone-treated L. fuscus at post-metamorphic stage. Studied traits seem monomorphic in L. fuscus; L. podicipinus exhibits male-biased 2D:4D. When present, 2D:4D dimorphism was male-biased and associated with dimorphic body size; sex differences resided on Digit II instead of IV, corroborating our 'hypothesis of identity of the dimorphic digit'. Developmental steroid roles were validated: testosterone-treated L. fuscus frogs were smaller and exhibited masculinized 2D:4D, and Digit II was the digit that responded to testosterone. We propose a model where evolution of sexual dimorphism in 2D:4D first originates from the advent, in a given digit, of increased tissue sensitivity to steroids. Phenotypic integration with other sexually dimorphic traits would then occur through multi-trait hormonal effects

  20. Discounting and Digit Ratio: Low 2D:4D Predicts Patience for a Sample of Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Aycinena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inter-temporal trade-offs are ubiquitous in human decision making. We study the relationship between preferences over such trade-offs and the ratio of the second digit to that of the forth (2D:4D, a marker for pre-natal exposure to sex hormones. Specifically, we study whether 2D:4D affects discounting. Our sample consists of 419 female participants of a Guatemalan conditional cash transfer program who take part in an experiment. Their choices in the convex time budget (CTB experimental task allow us to make inferences regarding their patience (discounting, while controlling for present-biasedness and preference for smoothing consumption (utility curvature. We find that women with lower digit ratios tend to be more patient.

  1. Second-to-fourth digit ratio and impulsivity: a comparison between offenders and nonoffenders.

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    Yaniv Hanoch

    Full Text Available Personality characteristics, particularly impulsive tendencies, have long been conceived as the primary culprit in delinquent behavior. One crucial question to emerge from this line of work is whether impulsivity has a biological basis. To test this possibility, 44 male offenders and 46 nonoffenders completed the Eysenck Impulsivity Questionnaire, and had their 2D∶4D ratio measured. Offenders exhibited smaller right hand digit ratio measurements compared to non-offenders, but higher impulsivity scores. Both impulsivity and 2D∶4D ratio measurements significantly predicted criminality (offenders vs. nonoffenders. Controlling for education level, the 2D∶4D ratio measurements had remained a significant predictor of criminality, while impulsivity scores no longer predicted criminality significantly. Our data, thus, indicates that impulsivity but not 2D∶4D ratio measurements relate to educational attainment. As offenders varied in their number of previous convictions and the nature of their individual crimes, we also tested for differences in 2D∶4D ratio and impulsivity among offenders. Number of previous convictions did not correlate significantly with the 2D∶4D ratio measurements or impulsivity scores. Our study established a link between a biological marker and impulsivity among offenders (and lack thereof among non-offenders, which emphasise the importance of studying the relationship between biological markers, impulsivity and criminal behavior.

  2. Second-to-fourth digit ratio and impulsivity: a comparison between offenders and nonoffenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Gummerum, Michaela; Rolison, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Personality characteristics, particularly impulsive tendencies, have long been conceived as the primary culprit in delinquent behavior. One crucial question to emerge from this line of work is whether impulsivity has a biological basis. To test this possibility, 44 male offenders and 46 nonoffenders completed the Eysenck Impulsivity Questionnaire, and had their 2D∶4D ratio measured. Offenders exhibited smaller right hand digit ratio measurements compared to non-offenders, but higher impulsivity scores. Both impulsivity and 2D∶4D ratio measurements significantly predicted criminality (offenders vs. nonoffenders). Controlling for education level, the 2D∶4D ratio measurements had remained a significant predictor of criminality, while impulsivity scores no longer predicted criminality significantly. Our data, thus, indicates that impulsivity but not 2D∶4D ratio measurements relate to educational attainment. As offenders varied in their number of previous convictions and the nature of their individual crimes, we also tested for differences in 2D∶4D ratio and impulsivity among offenders. Number of previous convictions did not correlate significantly with the 2D∶4D ratio measurements or impulsivity scores. Our study established a link between a biological marker and impulsivity among offenders (and lack thereof among non-offenders), which emphasise the importance of studying the relationship between biological markers, impulsivity and criminal behavior.

  3. Emotional Communication in Finger Braille

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Matsuda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe analyses of the features of emotions (neutral, joy, sadness, and anger expressed by Finger Braille interpreters and subsequently examine the effectiveness of emotional expression and emotional communication between people unskilled in Finger Braille. The goal is to develop a Finger Braille system to teach emotional expression and a system to recognize emotion. The results indicate the following features of emotional expression by interpreters. The durations of the code of joy were significantly shorter than the durations of the other emotions, the durations of the code of sadness were significantly longer, and the finger loads of anger were significantly larger. The features of emotional expression by unskilled subjects were very similar to those of the interpreters, and the coincidence ratio of emotional communication was 75.1%. Therefore, it was confirmed that people unskilled in Finger Braille can express and communicate emotions using this communication medium.

  4. Use of twin dorsal middle phalangeal finger flaps for thumb or index finger reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W; Chen, K J

    2013-05-01

    Amputation or degloving injuries of the thumb or index finger are highly disabling. We describe the use of twin dorsal middle finger flaps harvested from the dorsal aspects of the middle and ring fingers, and based on one palmar proper digital artery, its venae comitantes, and the dorsal branches of the palmar digital nerves of the middle and ring fingers, respectively. These flaps offer advantages when large soft tissue defects of the thumb or index finger are present. In this study, twin dorsal middle finger flaps were used in nine patients (six thumbs, three index fingers). All flaps completely survived. At the mean follow-up of 20 months, the appearance of the reconstructed thumbs or index fingers was acceptable, the length was maintained, and the mean static 2-point discrimination values were 10 mm in the palmar flap and 13 mm in the dorsal flap of the reconstructed digit. All patients were satisfied with the appearance and mobility of the donor fingers. All but one donor finger showed normal finger pulp sensibility, with a static 2-point discrimination between 3 and 6 mm.

  5. Second to fourth digit ratio, handedness and testicular germ cell tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabert, Britton; Graubard, Barry I.; Erickson, Ralph L.; Zhang, Yawei; McGlynn, Katherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Research on early life exposures and testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) risk has focused on a possible perinatal etiology with a well-known hypothesis suggesting that hormonal involvement during fetal life is associated with risk. Second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) and left hand dominance have been proposed as markers of prenatal hormone exposure. Aim To evaluate associations between 2D:4D digit ratio, right minus left 2D:4D (ΔR-L), and left-hand dominance and TGCT in the U.S. Servicemen’s Testicular Tumor Environmental and Endocrine Determinants (STEED) Study. Methods A total of 246 TGCT cases and 236 non-testicular cancer controls participated in the current study, and completed a self-administered questionnaire. Associations between digit ratio, hand dominance and TGCT were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for identified covariates. Results Right 2D:4D was not associated with TGCT [OR for a one-standard deviation (SD) increase in right hand 2D:4D: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.93–1.34]. The results were consistent when evaluating the association based on the left hand. The difference between right and left hand 2D:4D was also not associated with TGCT risk [OR for a one-SD increase in ΔR-L: 1.03, 95% CI: 0.87–1.23]. Compared to men who reported right-hand dominance, ambidexterity [OR (95% CI) = 0.65 (0.30–1.41)] and left-hand dominance [OR (95% CI) = 0.79 (0.44–1.44)] were not associated with risk. Conclusions These results do not support the hypothesis that prenatal hormonal imbalance is associated with TGCT risk. Given the limited sample size, further evaluation of the relationship between TGCT and prenatal hormonal factors using digit ratio, ΔR-L, or left-hand dominance and larger sample size are warranted. PMID:23623693

  6. Age estimation by canines' pulp/tooth ratio in an Iranian population using digital panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Mahdieh; Shadkam, Elaheh; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Dehghani, Mahboobe

    2018-04-01

    Age estimation in adults is an important issue in forensic science. This study aimed to estimate the chronological age of Iranians by means of pulp/tooth area ratio (AR) of canines in digital panoramic radiographs. The sample consisted of panoramic radiographs of 271 male and female subjects aged 16-64 years. The pulp/tooth area ratio (AR) of upper and lower canines was calculated by AutoCAD software. Data were subjected to correlation and regression analysis. There was a significant and inverse correlation between age and pulp/tooth area ratio of upper and lower canines (r=-0.794 for upper canine and r=-0.282 for lower canine; p-value<0.001). Linear regression equations were derived separately for upper, lower and both canines. The mean difference between actual and estimated age using upper canine was 6.07±1.7. The results showed that the pulp/tooth area ratios of canines are a reliable method for age estimation in Iranians. The pulp/tooth area ratio of upper canine was better correlated with chronological age than that of lower canine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and handgrip strength are correlated in women (but not in men) in Hui ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Shen, Dan; Wang, Lu; Niu, Shibo; Bai, Chunyue; Ma, Zhanbing; Huo, Zhenghao

    2017-06-01

    Digit ratio, especially second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) is used as a biomarker of prenatal testosterone exposure and was found associated with physical ability, such as handgrip strength (HGS). Recently, this association has been discussed in several ethnic groups. To investigate correlations between 2D:4D and HGS in Chinese population of Ningxia Hui ethnicity. Here we firstly present the evidence on digit ratio and HGS of 346 college students (119 males and 227 females) by collecting photographs and HGS of both hands at Yinchuan city, in the Ningxia province of China. Females have higher mean values of digit ratio than males; significant variances of 3D:5D (left and right: PHui ethnicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clubbed fingers: the claws we lost?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, A.A.M.; Vermeij-Keers, C.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Gooren, L.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Clubbed digits resemble the human embryonic fingers and toes, which took like the digits of a claw. Clubbed digits, thus, may represent the return of the embryonic claw and may even represent the claws man has lost during evolution, if ontogenesis realty recapitulates phylogenesis. We put forward

  9. Robotic hand and fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  10. The Second to Fourth Digit Ratio in Elite and Non-Elite Greco-Roman Wrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavarz Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A low second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D has been reported to correlate with high performance and athletic potential of an individual in sport. It has been suggested that 2D:4D is a relatively weak predictor of strength and a stronger predictor of efficiency in aerobic exercise. Comparing extreme groups on a continuum of sports performance requiring high power (physical strength output would be helpful to resolve this issue. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to compare the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite Greco-Roman wrestlers (n = 10 taking part in Olympic fitness camps in 2013 with the 2D:4D ratio of non-elite collegiate wrestlers (n = 20, and age-matched sedentary males (n = 40. The 2D:4D ratios of elite wrestlers were lower compared to non-elite athletes (p < 0.01, right hand d = 1.70, left hand d = 1.67 and the control group (p < 0.0001, right hand d = 3.16, left hand d = 2.00. No significant differences were noted among the groups for right - left 2D:4D. We concluded that 2D:4D may discriminate between non-elite and world-class wrestlers. We also suggest that a low 2D:4D ratio could be linked to performance potential in wrestlers. As such, 2D:4D may provide additional information, which is valuable in determining the potential athleticism of an individual, when it is used in conjunction with other measures.

  11. A novel method for contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) evaluation of digital mammography detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldelli, P.; Phelan, N.; Egan, G. [National Cancer Screening Service, Dublin (Ireland)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to test a new, simple method of evaluating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) over the entire image field of a digital detector and to compare different mammography systems. Images were taken under clinical exposure conditions for a range of simulated breast thicknesses using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). At each PMMA thickness, a second image which included an additional 0.2-mm Al sheet was also acquired. Image processing software was used to calculate the CNR in multiple regions of interest (ROI) covering the entire area of the detector in order to obtain a 'CNR image'. Five detector types were evaluated, two CsI-{alpha}Si (GE Healthcare) flat panel systems, one {alpha}Se (Hologic) flat panel system and a two generations of scanning photon counting digital detectors (Sectra). Flat panel detectors exhibit better CNR uniformity compared with the first-generation scanning photon counting detector in terms of mean pixel value variation. However, significant improvement in CNR uniformity was observed for the next-generation scanning detector. The method proposed produces a map of the CNR and a measurement of uniformity throughout the entire image field of the detector. The application of this method enables quality control measurement of individual detectors and a comparison of detectors using different technologies. (orig.)

  12. Measurements of the reflectance, contrast ratio, and scattering properties of digital micromirror devices (DMDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry; Travinsky, Anton; Quijada, Manuel A.; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan D.; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Digital micromirror devices (DMDs) are micro-electro- mechanical systems, originally developed to display images in projector systems. A DMD in the focal plane of an imaging system can be used as a reprogrammable slit mask of a multi-object spectrometer (MOS) by tilting some of the mirrors towards the spectrometer and tilting the rest of the mirrors away, thereby rejecting the unwanted light (due to the background and foreground objects). A DMD-based MOS can generate new, arbitrary slit patterns in seconds, which significantly reduces the overhead time during astronomical observations. Critically, DMD-based slit masks are extremely lightweight, compact and mechanically robust, which makes them attractive for use in space-based telescopes. As part of a larger effort to investigate the use of DMDs in space telescopes (sponsored by a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technologies grant), we characterized the optical performance of Texas Instruments DMDs to determine their suitability for use in multi-object spectrometers. The performance of a DMD-based MOS is significantly affected by its optical throughput (reflectance), contrast ratio (the ability of the DMD to reject unwanted light) and scattering properties (which could lead to crosstalk and reduced signal-to-noise ratio in the spectrometer). We measured and quantified the throughput and contrast ratio of a Texas Instruments DMD in several configurations (which emulate the operation of a typical DMD-based MOS) and investigated the scattering properties of the individual DMD mirrors. In this work we present the results of our analysis, describe the performance of a typical DMD- based MOS and discuss the practical limitations of these instruments (such as maximum density of sources and expected signal-to- noise ratio).

  13. Fingers that change color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanching of the fingers; Fingers - pale; Toes that change color; Toes - pale ... These conditions can cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease. Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small ...

  14. Prenatal Influences on Sexual Orientation: Digit Ratio (2D:4D and Number of Older Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katariina Kangassalo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal androgen levels are suggested to influence sexual orientation in both sexes. The 2D:4D digit ratio has been found to associate with sexual orientation, but published findings have often been contradictory, which may partly be due to the large ethnic diversity between and within studied populations. In men, number of older brothers has been found to correlate positively with homosexuality. This phenomenon has been explained with a maternal immune reaction, which is provoked only by male fetuses and which gets stronger after each pregnancy. Here we assessed the relationship of sexual orientation to 2D:4D ratios and number of older siblings in Finland, where the population is found to be genetically relatively homogeneous. As in many previous studies, heterosexual men had lower 2D:4D than non-heterosexual men, which supports the notion that non-heterosexual men experience higher androgen levels in utero than population norms. Contrary to previous reports, non-heterosexual women had higher 2D:4D than heterosexual women. Non-heterosexual men had more older brothers and older sisters than heterosexual men. The greater number of older sisters in non-heterosexual men indicates that there are other factors that contribute to the higher birth order of homosexual men than the maternal immunization.

  15. Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  16. Copy number ratios determined by two digital polymerase chain reaction systems in genetically modified grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Urquiza, M.; Acatzi Silva, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    Three certified reference materials produced from powdered seeds to measure the copy number ratio sequences of p35S/hmgA in maize containing MON 810 event, p35S/Le1 in soybeans containing GTS 40-3-2 event and DREB1A/acc1 in wheat were produced according to the ISO Guides 34 and 35. In this paper, we report digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) protocols, performance parameters and results of copy number ratio content of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in these materials using two new dPCR systems to detect and quantify molecular deoxyribonucleic acid: the BioMark® (Fluidigm) and the OpenArray® (Life Technologies) systems. These technologies were implemented at the National Institute of Metrology in Mexico (CENAM) and in the Reference Center for GMO Detection from the Ministry of Agriculture (CNRDOGM), respectively. The main advantage of this technique against the more-used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is that it generates an absolute number of target molecules in the sample, without reference to standards or an endogenous control, which is very useful when not much information is available for new developments or there are no standard reference materials in the market as in the wheat case presented, or when it was not possible to test the purity of seeds as in the maize case presented here. Both systems reported enhanced productivity, increased reliability and reduced instrument footprint. In this paper, the performance parameters and uncertainty of measurement obtained with both systems are presented and compared.

  17. The Relationship Between Digit Ratio (2D:4D) and Sexual Orientation in Men from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yin; Zheng, Yong

    2016-04-01

    We examined the relationship between 2D:4D digit ratio and sexual orientation in men from China and analyzed the influences of the components used to assess sexual orientation and the criteria used to classify individuals as homosexual on this relationship. A total of 309 male and 110 female participants took part in a web-based survey. Our results showed that heterosexual men had a significantly lower 2D:4D than heterosexual women and exclusively homosexual men had a significantly higher left 2D:4D than heterosexual men whereas only exclusively homosexual men had a significantly higher right 2D:4D than heterosexual men when sexual orientation was assessed via sexual attraction. The left 2D:4D showed a significant positive correlation with sexual identity, sexual attraction, and sexual behavior, and the right 2D:4D showed a significant positive correlation with sexual attraction. The effect sizes for differences in 2D:4D between homosexual and heterosexual men varied according to criteria used to classify individuals as homosexual and sexual orientation components; the more stringent the criteria (scores closer to the homosexual category), the larger the effect sizes; further, sexual attraction yielded the largest effect size. There were no significant effects of age and latitude on Chinese 2D:4D. This study contributes to the current understanding of the relationship between 2D:4D and male sexual orientation.

  18. Individual finger sensibility in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfar, John C; Yaseen, Zaneb; Stern, Peter J; Kiefhaber, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    Sensibility testing plays a role in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). No single physical examination test has proven to be of critical value in the diagnosis, especially when compared with electrodiagnostic testing (EDX). The purpose of this study was to define which digits are most affected by CTS, both subjectively and with objective sensibility testing. A prospective series of 35 patients (40 hands) with EDX-positive, isolated CTS were evaluated preoperatively using 2 objective sensibility tests: static 2-point discrimination (2PD) and abbreviated Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWMF) testing. Detailed surveys of subjective symptoms were also collected. Patients identified the middle finger as the most symptomatic over all others (51%). Objective 2PD results of each digit mirrored the subjective data, with higher values for the middle finger (mean 6.07 mm, (p thumb > index > small). Correlations failed between EDX, symptoms, and SWMF results or 2PD in the index finger. Positive but weak correlation (p = .002, r = .42) was found between EDX and 2PD only in the middle fingers. The middle finger is the most likely to show changes in 2PD in patients with positive EDX findings for CTS. Middle finger 2PD is best able to correlate with EDX when compared with 2PD of other digits. The SWMF testing also shows the middle digit testing as more sensitive, but this finding may be difficult to use clinically. Diagnostic I. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and circulating testosterone, oestradiol, and progesterone levels across the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gareth; Klimek, Magdalena; Jasienska, Grazyna; Marcinkowska, Urszula M

    2018-02-01

    Digit ratio (2D:4D) is used by researchers as an indicator of prenatal sex hormone exposure. Two previous studies have examined associations between 2D:4D and circulating sex steroid concentrations across the menstrual cycle in adult females. One reported that digit ratio correlated positively with oestradiol levels, whereas the other found no such effect; neither observed significant associations with progesterone. To examine associations between 2D:4D, as well as asymmetry (i.e. right minus left 2D:4D), and circulating sex steroids across the menstrual cycle. Correlational. 32 naturally cycling adult females from rural southern Poland. Salivary oestradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and testosterone to oestradiol ratio (T:O) measured during the follicular, peri-ovulatory, and luteal phases. Average levels across the cycle were also examined. Asymmetry in digit ratio correlated positively with oestradiol at each phase, as well as with average levels across the cycle. Each association, other than that relating to average levels, remained statistically significant after a range of covariates had been controlled for. No other significant correlations were observed between digit ratio variables and circulating hormone levels. Our results might suggest that low exposure to androgens and/or high exposure to oestrogens during gestation is a predictor of high oestradiol levels in naturally cycling females of reproductive age. However, considering that it was asymmetry in digit ratio, and not either right or left 2D:4D, that was a significant predictor, it is also possible that these effects reflect more general associations between bilateral asymmetry and circulating oestradiol levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Digit ratio (2D:4D) in homosexual and heterosexual men from Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Manning, John T; Ponocny, Ivo

    2005-06-01

    Neurohormonal theories of sexual orientation emphasize the organizational effects of testosterone on the developing brain. A recent suggestion, that the ratio of the length of the 2nd and 4th digits (2D:4D) is negatively correlated with prenatal testosterone, has led to a number of studies of 2D:4D in homosexual and heterosexual men and women. The results have been mixed. In comparison to heterosexual men, mean 2D:4D in gay men has been reported to be hypermasculinized (lower 2D:4D), hypomasculinized (higher 2D:4D), or to show no significant difference. Here, we report mean 2D:4D in Austrian homosexual and heterosexual men. We found no significant difference between means for homosexual and heterosexual 2D:4D, with values for both falling between 0.96 to 0.97. There are now 6 reports of 2D:4D in heterosexual and homosexual men. Considering Caucasian men, the studies from the United States show low heterosexual mean 2D:4D, and homosexual mean 2D:4D is higher or similar to that of heterosexuals. The European studies show high heterosexual mean 2D:4D, and comparisons with homosexuals reveal the latter to have lower or similar mean 2D:4D to that of heterosexuals. We discuss these results in relation to the suggestion that mean 2D:4D in heterosexual men differs across populations but mean 2D:4D in homosexuals shows less geographical variation (the "uniform mean hypothesis"). It is concluded that more data are required to clarify whether or not there is a 2D:4D effect for sexual orientation in men.

  1. Age estimation using pulp/tooth area ratio in maxillary canines-A digital image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Manjushree; Devi, Yashoda B K; Rakesh, N; Juneja, Saurabh

    2014-09-01

    Determination of age of a subject is one of the most important aspects of medico-legal cases and anthropological research. Radiographs can be used to indirectly measure the rate of secondary dentine deposition which is depicted by reduction in the pulp area. In this study, 200 patients of Karnataka aged between 18-72 years were selected for the study. Panoramic radiographs were made and indirectly digitized. Radiographic images of maxillary canines (RIC) were processed using a computer-aided drafting program (ImageJ). The variables pulp/root length (p), pulp/tooth length (r), pulp/root width at enamel-cementum junction (ECJ) level (a), pulp/root width at mid-root level (c), pulp/root width at midpoint level between ECJ level and mid-root level (b) and pulp/tooth area ratio (AR) were recorded. All the morphological variables including gender were statistically analyzed to derive regression equation for estimation of age. It was observed that 2 variables 'AR' and 'b' contributed significantly to the fit and were included in the regression model, yielding the formula: Age = 87.305-480.455(AR)+48.108(b). Statistical analysis indicated that the regression equation with selected variables explained 96% of total variance with the median of the residuals of 0.1614 years and standard error of estimate of 3.0186 years. There is significant correlation between age and morphological variables 'AR' and 'b' and the derived population specific regression equation can be potentially used for estimation of chronological age of individuals of Karnataka origin.

  2. Digit ratio (2D:4D) and physical fitness (Eurofit test battery) in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranson, R; Stratton, G; Taylor, S R

    2015-05-01

    The relative lengths of the index finger to the ring finger (2D:4D) is sexually dimorphic and is thought to be a correlate of prenatal sex steroids (low 2D:4D=high prenatal testosterone and low prenatal oestrogen). In adults there have been reports that low 2D:4D is consistently associated with high sports performance. To investigate correlations between 2D:4D and fitness levels in children. Right 2D:4D and body size were measured, in addition to flexibility, speed, endurance and strength (Eurofit tests). 922 boys and 835 girls (mean ages (years): 10.8 ± 1.01 and 10.07 ± 1.00 respectively). height, mass, BMI, triceps and subscapular skinfolds, 20 m shuttle run, sit and reach, standing broad jump, hand grip strength, 10 × 5m sprint, and the sit and reach test. Boys significantly outperformed the girls in the 10 × 5m sprints, the 20 m shuttle run, standing broad jump, and hand grip strength. In boys but not girls, 2D:4D was significantly negatively correlated with scores in all these tests except the standing broad jump. In girls but not boys, 2D:4D was significantly positively correlated to stature, mass, BMI and waist circumference. It is suggested that high prenatal testosterone and low prenatal oestrogen (low 2D:4D) is implicated in high sprinting speed, endurance and hand grip strength in boys. In girls low prenatal testosterone and high prenatal oestrogen is associated with large body size. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sex-different abnormalities in the right second to fourth digit ratio in Japanese individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuya, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Yuko; Inohara, Keisuke; Matsumura, Yukiko; Fujioka, Toru; Wada, Yuji; Kosaka, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is higher in men than in women. The extreme male brain theory proposes that excessive prenatal testosterone activity could be a risk factor for ASDs. However, it is unclear whether prenatal sex hormone activity is a risk factor for women. The ratio of the length of the second to fourth digits (2D:4D) is considered to be a biomarker of the prenatal ratio of testosterone to estrogen. Therefore, this study compared the 2D:4D ratios of women with and without ASDs to determine if prenatal sex hormone activity could be a risk factor for ASDs in women. The study included 35 Japanese men with ASDs, 17 Japanese women with ASDs, 59 typically developed (TD) Japanese men, and 57 TD Japanese women. We measured digit lengths and compared the 2D:4D ratios among the four groups. We also examined the relationship between the 2D:4D ratio and the autism-spectrum quotient score of each group. In our cohort, men with ASDs tended to have lower right-hand 2D:4D ratios relative to TD men. In contrast, the right 2D:4D ratios in women with ASDs were higher compared to those of TD women. No significant correlations were found between the 2D:4D ratios and the autism-spectrum quotient scores in any group. The higher right 2D:4D ratios in women could not be explained by age or full-scale intelligent quotients. This group difference was not found for the left 2D:4D or right-left 2D:4D ratios. We found a reverse direction of abnormality in the right 2D:4D ratio for men and women with ASDs. It has been posited that high prenatal testosterone levels lead to a lower 2D:4D ratio. However, a recent animal study showed that testosterone injection to dam leads to a higher right 2D:4D ratio especially for female offspring, which might be mediated by abnormal adipose accumulation in the fingertip. Therefore, the present findings suggest that high prenatal testosterone could be a risk factor both for Japanese men and women with ASDs, elucidating one

  4. Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Ratio Is Improved When Using a Digital, Nonmydriatic Fundus Camera Onsite in a Diabetes Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Roser

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of onsite screening with a nonmydriatic, digital fundus camera for diabetic retinopathy (DR at a diabetes outpatient clinic. Research Design and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 502 patients, 112 with type 1 and 390 with type 2 diabetes. Patients attended screenings for microvascular complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN, diabetic polyneuropathy (DP, and DR. Single-field retinal imaging with a digital, nonmydriatic fundus camera was used to assess DR. Prevalence and incidence of microvascular complications were analyzed and the ratio of newly diagnosed to preexisting complications for all entities was calculated in order to differentiate natural progress from missed DRs. Results. For both types of diabetes, prevalence of DR was 25.0% (n=126 and incidence 6.4% (n=32 (T1DM versus T2DM: prevalence: 35.7% versus 22.1%, incidence 5.4% versus 6.7%. 25.4% of all DRs were newly diagnosed. Furthermore, the ratio of newly diagnosed to preexisting DR was higher than those for DN (p=0.12 and DP (p=0.03 representing at least 13 patients with missed DR. Conclusions. The results indicate that implementing nonmydriatic, digital fundus imaging in a diabetes outpatient clinic can contribute to improved early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Mesiodistal Crown Width Digital Ratio for Kerala Population: A Cross-sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sashi Bhushan Ekka

    2014-01-01

    of the sample had anterior ratio in 1SD and 3.8% in 2SD. 94.4% were in 1SD and 2.5% in 2SD for overall ratio. Conclusion: Although the means were nearly identical with those of Bolton′s study, ranges and SDs were significantly larger. This study indicates that the Bolton′s analysis can also be used on Indian or at least Kerala population but with increased standard deviation.

  6. DIGITAL BLOOD-FLOW IN COOLED AND CONTRALATERAL FINGER IN PATIENTS WITH RAYNAUD PHENOMENON - COMPARATIVE MEASUREMENTS BETWEEN PHOTOELECTRICAL PLETHYSMOGRAPHY AND LASER DOPPLER FLOWMETRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SUICHIES, HE; AARNOUDSE, JG; WOUDA, AA; JENTINK, HW; DEMUL, FFM; GREVE, J

    The effects of cooling of a hand on lateral and contralateral digital skin blood flow were investigated in 18 patients with primary or secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. The aim of the study was to compare photoelectrical plethsmography (PhEP) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). PhEP and LDF were used

  7. Social communication and emotion difficulties and second to fourth digit ratio in a large community-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barona, Manuela; Kothari, Radha; Skuse, David; Micali, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Recent research investigating the extreme male brain theory of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has drawn attention to the possibility that autistic type social difficulties may be associated with high prenatal testosterone exposure. This study aims to investigate the association between social communication and emotion recognition difficulties and second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) and circulating maternal testosterone during pregnancy in a large community-based cohort: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A secondary aim is to investigate possible gender differences in the associations. Data on social communication (Social and Communication Disorders Checklist, N = 7165), emotion recognition (emotional triangles, N = 5844 and diagnostics analysis of non-verbal accuracy, N = 7488) and 2D:4D (second to fourth digit ratio, N = 7159) were collected in childhood and early adolescence from questionnaires and face-to-face assessments. Complete data was available on 3515 children. Maternal circulating testosterone during pregnancy was available in a subsample of 89 children. Males had lower 2D:4D ratios than females [t (3513) = -9.775, p communication and emotion recognition, and the lowest 10 % of 2D:4D ratios. A significant association was found between maternal circulating testosterone and left hand 2D:4D [OR = 1.65, 95 % CI 1.1-2.4, p communication difficulties were not confirmed. A novel association between an extreme measure of 2D:4D in males suggests threshold effects and warrants replication.

  8. Can digit ratio (2D:4D) studies be helpful in explaining the aetiology of idiopathic gynecomastia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Antoszewski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Aetiology of idiopathic form of gynecomastia is unknown and it has not been established if it is related to factors present at the prenatal period or if it is caused by yet unidentified environmental conditions. The aim of this study is to compare digit ratio (2D:4D) in men with idiopathic gynecomastia and unaffected male and female controls from the general population. The study involved 250 subjects (50 men with idiopathic gynecomastia, 100 control men and 100 control women). Eight measurements were taken: body height, waist and hip circumferences, II and IV digits' lengths (right and left), and body weight, and 4 indices were calculated: BMI, WHR, and 2D:4D for the right and left hand. 2D:4D in men with gynecomastia ([median (I-III quartiles)]: 1.03 (1.01-1.04) for right hand and 1.03 (1.01-1.03) for left hand) was significantly different than the ratio in control men [0.97 (0.95-0.99)] for right and left hand) (pgynecomastia were characterized with higher values of the following variables: weight, waist and hip circumferences, BMI and WHR. Their body height was significantly greater than in women (pgynecomastia and justify introducing the new group: "gynecomastia related to the prenatal sex hormones disturbances". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of compression, digital noise reduction and directionality on envelope difference index, log-likelihood ratio and perceived quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnaraj Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of the envelope difference index (EDI and log-likelihood ratio (LLR to quantify the independent and interactive effects of wide dynamic range compression, digital noise reduction and directionality, and to carry out selfrated quality measures. A recorded sentence embedded in speech spectrum noise at +5 dB signal to noise ratio was presented to a four channel digital hearing aid and the output was recorded with different combinations of algorithms at 30, 45 and 70 dB HL levels of presentation through a 2 cc coupler. EDI and LLR were obtained in comparison with the original signal using MATLAB software. In addition, thirty participants with normal hearing sensitivity rated the output on the loudness and clarity parameters of quality. The results revealed that the temporal changes happening at the output is independent of the number of algorithms activated together in a hearing aid. However, at a higher level of presentation, temporal cues are better preserved if all of these algorithms are deactivated. The spectral components speech tend to get affected by the presentation level. The results also indicate the importance of quality rating as this helps in considering whether the spectral and/or temporal deviations created in the hearing aid are desirable or not.

  10. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION Stenosing tenosynovitis is a condition commonly known as “trigger finger.” It is sometimes also called “trigger thumb.” The tendons that bend the fingers glide easily with ...

  11. Your fate is in your hands? Handedness, digit ratio (2D:4D), and selection to a national talent development system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph; Kungl, Ann-Marie; Pabst, Jan; Strauß, Bernd; Büsch, Dirk; Schorer, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade a small evidence base has highlighted the potential importance of seemingly innocuous variables related to one's hands, such as hand dominance and the relative length of the second and fourth digits (2D:4D ratio), to success in sport. This study compared 2D:4D digit ratio and handedness among handball players selected to advance in a national talent development system with those not selected. Participants included 480 youth handball players (240 females and 240 males) being considered as part of the talent selection programme for the German Youth National team. Hand dominance and digit ratio were compared to age-matched control data using standard t-tests. There was a greater proportion of left-handers compared to the normal population in males but not in females. There was also a lower digit ratio in both females and males. However, there were no differences between those selected for the next stage of talent development and those not selected on either handedness or digit ratio. These results add support for general effects for both digit ratio and handedness in elite handball; however, these factors seem inadequate to explain talent selection decisions at this level.

  12. Speed invariance of independent control of finger movements in pianists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soechting, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Independent control of finger movements characterizes skilled motor behaviors such as tool use and musical performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effect of movement frequency (tempo) on individuated finger movements in piano playing. Joint motion at the digits was recorded while 5 expert pianists were playing 30 excerpts from musical pieces with different fingering and key locations either at a predetermined normal tempo or as fast as possible. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm determined three distinct patterns of finger movement coordination for a keypress with each of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers at each of the two tempi. The finger kinematics of each coordination pattern was overall similar across the tempi. Tone sequences assigned into each cluster were also similar for both tempi. A linear regression analysis determined no apparent difference in the amount of movement covariation between the striking and nonstriking fingers at both metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal joints across the two tempi, which indicated no effect of tempo on independent finger movements in piano playing. In addition, the standard deviation of interkeystroke interval across strokes did not differ between the two tempi, indicating maintenance of rhythmic accuracy of keystrokes. Strong temporal constraints on finger movements during piano playing may underlie the maintained independent control of fingers over a wider range of tempi, a feature being likely to be specific to skilled pianists. PMID:22815403

  13. Biotipos homeopáticos y oclusión en niños con hábito de succión digital Homeopathic biotypes and occlusion in children with finger-sucking habit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuba Gardón Delgado

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available El estudio de las anomalías de la oclusión es de suma importancia en la práctica ortodóncica, y la biotipología homeopática constituye una base para el análisis e interpretación de los factores que intervienen en la etiología y patogenia de las anomalías dentofaciales, incluida la presencia de hábitos perjudiciales como la succión digital. Este trabajo descriptivo de corte transversal se propuso relacionar los principales biotipos homeopáticos con la oclusión en 55 niños de los círculos infantiles pertenecientes a las áreas de salud que atiende la Facultad de Estomatología de Ciudad de La Habana, en las edades comprendidas entre 2 y 5 años, de ambos sexos y que practicaban el hábito de succión digital. A través del examen clínico facial y de la confección de la historia clínica homeopática, se realizó la clasificación biotipológica y se determinaron las características intraorales de cada niño. El análisis de los resultados reveló una correspondencia de la oclusión con los biotipos homeopáticos.The study of occlusion abnormalities is very important in the orthodontic practice, and the homeopathic biotypology is the basis for the analysis and interpretation of the factors taking part in the etiology and pathogeny of the dentofacial abnormalities, including the presence of detrimental habits, such as finger sucking . This descriptive cross-sectional study was aimed at relating the main homeopathic biotypes to occlusion in 55 children aged 2-5 of both sexes from the day care centres corresponding to the health areas that received dental care at the Faculty of Stomatology of Havana City. All these children used to suck their fingers. By the clinicofacial examination and by the making of the homeopathic medical history, it was possible to obtain the biotypological classification, and to determine the intraoral characteristics of every child. The analysis of the results revealed a correspondance of occlusion with the

  14. Fully iterative scatter corrected digital breast tomosynthesis using GPU-based fast Monte Carlo simulation and composition ratio update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyungsang; Ye, Jong Chul, E-mail: jong.ye@kaist.ac.kr [Bio Imaging and Signal Processing Laboratory, Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, KAIST 291, Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Taewon; Cho, Seungryong [Medical Imaging and Radiotherapeutics Laboratory, Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST 291, Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Younghun; Lee, Jongha; Jang, Kwang Eun [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130, Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do, 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jaegu; Choi, Young Wook [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), 111, Hanggaul-ro, Sangnok-gu, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do, 426-170 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee; Shin, Hee Jung; Cha, Joo Hee [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro, 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), scatter correction is highly desirable, as it improves image quality at low doses. Because the DBT detector panel is typically stationary during the source rotation, antiscatter grids are not generally compatible with DBT; thus, a software-based scatter correction is required. This work proposes a fully iterative scatter correction method that uses a novel fast Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) with a tissue-composition ratio estimation technique for DBT imaging. Methods: To apply MCS to scatter estimation, the material composition in each voxel should be known. To overcome the lack of prior accurate knowledge of tissue composition for DBT, a tissue-composition ratio is estimated based on the observation that the breast tissues are principally composed of adipose and glandular tissues. Using this approximation, the composition ratio can be estimated from the reconstructed attenuation coefficients, and the scatter distribution can then be estimated by MCS using the composition ratio. The scatter estimation and image reconstruction procedures can be performed iteratively until an acceptable accuracy is achieved. For practical use, (i) the authors have implemented a fast MCS using a graphics processing unit (GPU), (ii) the MCS is simplified to transport only x-rays in the energy range of 10–50 keV, modeling Rayleigh and Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect using the tissue-composition ratio of adipose and glandular tissues, and (iii) downsampling is used because the scatter distribution varies rather smoothly. Results: The authors have demonstrated that the proposed method can accurately estimate the scatter distribution, and that the contrast-to-noise ratio of the final reconstructed image is significantly improved. The authors validated the performance of the MCS by changing the tissue thickness, composition ratio, and x-ray energy. The authors confirmed that the tissue-composition ratio estimation was quite

  15. Effects of non-surgical factors on digital replantation survival rate: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z; Guo, F; Qi, J; Xiang, W; Zhang, J

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors affecting survival rate of digital replantation by a meta-analysis. A computer retrieval of MEDLINE, OVID, EMBASE, and CNKI databases was conducted to identify citations for digital replantation with digit or finger or thumb or digital or fingertip and replantation as keywords. RevMan 5.2 software was used to calculate the pooled odds ratios. In total, there were 4678 amputated digits in 2641 patients. Gender and ischemia time had no significant influence on the survival rate of amputation replantation (P > 0.05). Age, injured hand, injury type, zone, and the method of preservation the amputated digit significantly influence the survival rate of digital replantation (P < 0.05). Children, right hand, crush, or avulsion and little finger are the risk factors that adversely affect the outcome. Level 5*. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  17. Trend of digital camera and interchangeable zoom lenses with high ratio based on patent application over the past 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensui, Takayuki

    2012-10-01

    Although digitalization has tripled consumer-class camera market scale, extreme reductions in prices of fixed-lens cameras has reduced profitability. As a result, a number of manufacturers have entered the market of the System DSC i.e. digital still camera with interchangeable lens, where large profit margins are possible, and many high ratio zoom lenses with image stabilization functions have been released. Quiet actuators are another indispensable component. Design with which there is little degradation in performance due to all types of errors is preferred for good balance in terms of size, lens performance, and the rate of quality to sub-standard products. Decentering, such as that caused by tilting, sensitivity of moving groups is especially important. In addition, image stabilization mechanisms actively shift lens groups. Development of high ratio zoom lenses with vibration reduction mechanism is confronted by the challenge of reduced performance due to decentering, making control over decentering sensitivity between lens groups everything. While there are a number of ways to align lenses (axial alignment), shock resistance and ability to stand up to environmental conditions must also be considered. Naturally, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to make lenses smaller and achieve a low decentering sensitivity at the same time. 4-group zoom construction is beneficial in making lenses smaller, but decentering sensitivity is greater. 5-group zoom configuration makes smaller lenses more difficult, but it enables lower decentering sensitivities. At Nikon, the most advantageous construction is selected for each lens based on specifications. The AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II and AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR are excellent examples of this.

  18. Digitized hand-wrist radiographs: comparison of subjective and software-derived image quality at various compression ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Layne K; Scarfe, William C; Naylor, Rachel H; Scheetz, James P; Silveira, Anibal; Gillespie, Kevin R

    2007-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the effect of JPEG 2000 compression of hand-wrist radiographs on observer image quality qualitative assessment and to compare with a software-derived quantitative image quality index. Fifteen hand-wrist radiographs were digitized and saved as TIFF and JPEG 2000 images at 4 levels of compression (20:1, 40:1, 60:1, and 80:1). The images, including rereads, were viewed by 13 orthodontic residents who determined the image quality rating on a scale of 1 to 5. A quantitative analysis was also performed by using a readily available software based on the human visual system (Image Quality Measure Computer Program, version 6.2, Mitre, Bedford, Mass). ANOVA was used to determine the optimal compression level (P quality. When we used quantitative indexes, the JPEG 2000 images had lower quality at all compression ratios compared with the original TIFF images. There was excellent correlation (R2 >0.92) between qualitative and quantitative indexes. Image Quality Measure indexes are more sensitive than subjective image quality assessments in quantifying image degradation with compression. There is potential for this software-based quantitative method in determining the optimal compression ratio for any image without the use of subjective raters.

  19. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Kenji; Murakami, Chikako; Fujioka, Masaki

    2012-10-08

    Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  20. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashida Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. Case presentation A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  1. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); hide

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  2. Value of digit ratio 2D:4D, a biomarker of prenatal hormone exposure, is stable across the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Magdalena; Marcinkowska, Urszula M; Jasienska, Grazyna

    2017-07-01

    Digit ratio (2D:4D) is used as a marker of prenatal hormone exposure and, consequently, as a predictor of many characteristics throughout a woman's lifespan. A previous study has suggested that values of 2D:4D vary across menstrual cycles and further questioned the reliability of a single measurement of 2D:4D among cycling women, while another study failed to confirm these results. However, these studies estimated the timing of cycle phases based on a date of menstruation reported by participants and also had small sample sizes. For our study, we evaluated potential changes in 2D:4D values across a menstrual cycle in a group of women among whom the phases of the menstrual cycle were determined by hormonal (luteinizing hormone based) ovulation tests. We studied 32 naturally cycling women aged 22-37 from rural Poland. Lengths of second and fourth digits were measured based on scans of both hands taken three times (i.e. in the follicular phase, peri-ovulatory phase and luteal phase of the cycle) for each participant. No differences in 2D:4D value across the menstrual cycle were detected either when right-hand, left-hand, and mean 2D:4D for both hands were analysed, nor when difference in the 2D:4D value between hands (D left-right ) was evaluated. We documented that 2D:4D is independent of the phase of the menstrual cycle and these findings suggest that among naturally cycling women, a value of 2D:4D can be reliably obtained from measurements taken during any day of the menstrual cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Validation of digit-length ratio (2D:4D) assessments on the basis of DXA-derived hand scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romann, Michael; Fuchslocher, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The second-to-fourth digit-length ratio (2D:4D) may be a correlate of prenatal sex steroids, and it has been linked to sporting prowess. The aim of the study was to validate dual-energy X-ray-absorptiometry (DXA) as a technique to assess 2D:4D in soccer players under 15 years of age (U-15). Paired X-ray and DXA scans of the left hands of 63 male U-15 elite soccer players (age: 14.0 ± 0.3 years) were performed, and 2D:4D was then compared between the two techniques. The 2D:4D measurements were performed twice by two blinded raters. Intrarater and interrater reliability, as well as agreement between the X-ray and the DXA assessments, were tested. Intrarater reliabilities of both raters using X-ray with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of 0.97 and 0.90 were excellent. Using DXA, the ICCs were 0.90 and 0.91 thus also showing excellent reliability. Interrater reliabilities were excellent using both the X-ray (ICC of 0.94) and the DXA (ICC of 0.90), assessments respectively. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that the 2D:4D ratios of the two raters did not differ significantly between the X-ray and the DXA assessments. The standard errors of estimate were 0.01 for both techniques. The 95% limits of agreement of ±0.018 (±2.0%) and ±0.023 (±2.6%), respectively, were within the acceptable tolerance of 5%, and showed very good agreement. DXA offered a replicable technique for assessing 2D:4D in youth soccer players. Therefore, the DXA technique seems to be an alternative method for evaluating 2D:4D in youth sports

  4. Lack of association between digit ratio (2D:4D) and assertiveness: replication in a large sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Findings regarding within-sex associations of digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative pointer to long-lasting effects of prenatal androgen action, and sexually differentiated personality traits have generally been inconsistent or unreplicable, suggesting that effects in this domain, if any, are likely small. In contrast to evidence from Wilson's important 1983 study, a forerunner of modern 2D:4D research, two recent studies in 2005 and 2008 by Freeman, et al. and Hampson, et al. showed assertiveness, a presumably male-typed personality trait, was not associated with 2D:4D; however, these studies were clearly statistically underpowered. Hence this study examined this question anew, based on a large sample of 491 men and 627 women. Assertiveness was only modestly sexually differentiated, favoring men, and a positive correlate of age and education and a negative correlate of weight and Body Mass Index among women, but not men. Replicating the two prior studies, 2D:4D was throughout unrelated to assertiveness scores. This null finding was preserved with controls for correlates of assertiveness, also in nonparametric analysis and with tests for curvilinear relations. Discussed are implications of this specific null finding, now replicated in a large sample, for studies of 2D:4D and personality in general and novel research approaches to proceed in this field.

  5. Influence of scatter reduction on lesion signal-to-noise ratio and lesion detection in digital chest radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzel, Ulrich; Pralow, Thomas; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Prokop, Mathias

    1998-07-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of an additional antiscatter grid on the detail signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the visual detail detectability with a digital chest radiography system. An anthropomorphic chest phantom with different types of superimposed lesions was used to obtain four series of images simulating slim and thick patients, both with and without an additional grid. The exposure to the phantom was identical for the grid and non- grid situations. Difference images were then produced by subtracting an 'empty' thorax image (without superimposed lesions) from each image of the series. The difference images were used to measure detail contrast and detail SNR in different areas of the chest. Although the grid generally improved the lesion contrast, an improvement in lesion SNR was only obtained for some lesions in the obscured regions. In the lung area the lesion SNR was lower with the grid. ROC analysis showed only minor differences between grid and non-grid images in the visual detectability of the lesions; detectability was significantly higher, however, in the difference images compared to the original chest images. The results indicate that the use of the additional antiscatter grid is not necessary if the image contrast is restored by suitable image processing. Methods which reduce or eliminate the overlying anatomical structures in chest images lead to a significantly higher lesion detectability.

  6. Temperature characterization of a radiating gas layer using digital-single-lens-reflex-camera-based two-color ratio pyrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Sneh; Krishna, Yedhu; Jagadeesh, Gopalan

    2017-10-20

    The two-color ratio pyrometry technique using a digital single-lens reflex camera has been used to measure the time-averaged and path-integrated temperature distribution in the radiating shock layer in a high-enthalpy flow. A 70 mm diameter cylindrical body with a 70 mm long spike was placed in a hypersonic shock tunnel, and the region behind the shock layer was investigated. The systematic error due to contributions from line emissions was corrected by monitoring the emission spectrum from this region using a spectrometer. The relative contributions due to line emissions on R, G, and B channels of the camera were 7.4%, 2.2%, and 0.4%, respectively. The temperature contours obtained clearly distinguished regions of highest temperature. The maximum absolute temperature obtained in the experiment was ∼2920  K±55  K, which was 20% lower than the stagnation temperature. This lower value is expected due to line-of-sight integration, time averaging, and losses in the flow. Strategies to overcome these limitations are also suggested in the paper.

  7. Mixing methods, tasting fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Anna; Mol, Annemarie; Satalkar, Priya

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an ethnographic experiment. Four finger eating experts and three novices sat down for a hot meal and ate with their hands. Drawing on the technique of playing with the familiar and the strange, our aim was not to explain our responses, but to articulate them. As we seek...... words to do so, we are compelled to stretch the verb "to taste." Tasting, or so our ethnographic experiment suggests, need not be understood as an activity confined to the tongue. Instead, if given a chance, it may viscously spread out to the fingers and come to include appreciative reactions otherwise...

  8. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  9. A Finger Exoskeleton Robot for Finger Movement Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Heng Hsu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a finger exoskeleton robot has been designed and presented. The prototype device was designed to be worn on the dorsal side of the hand to assist in the movement and rehabilitation of the fingers. The finger exoskeleton is 3D-printed to be low-cost and has a transmission mechanism consisting of rigid serial links which is actuated by a stepper motor. The actuation of the robotic finger is by a sliding motion and mimics the movement of the human finger. To make it possible for the patient to use the rehabilitation device anywhere and anytime, an Arduino™ control board and a speech recognition board were used to allow voice control. As the robotic finger follows the patients voice commands the actual motion is analyzed by Tracker image analysis software. The finger exoskeleton is designed to flex and extend the fingers, and has a rotation range of motion (ROM of 44.2°.

  10. The left hand second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D is not related to any physical fitness component in adolescent girls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten W Peeters

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D, a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with fitness and sports performance, although results are not univocal. Most studies however focus on a single aspect of physical fitness or one sports discipline. METHODS: In this study the 2D:4D ratio of 178 adolescent girls (age 13.5-18 y was measured on X-rays of the left hand. The relation between 2D:4D digit ratio and multiple aspects of physical fitness (balance, speed of limb movement, flexibility, explosive strength, static strength, trunk strength, functional strength, running speed/agility, and endurance was studied by correlation analyses and stepwise multiple regression. For comparison the relation between these physical fitness components and a selected number of objectively measured anthropometric traits (stature, mass, BMI, somatotype components and the Bayer & Bailey androgyny index are presented alongside the results of 2D:4D digit ratio. RESULTS: Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio (0.925±0.019 was not significantly correlated with any of the physical fitness components nor any of the anthropometric variables included in the present study. 2D:4D did not enter the multiple stepwise regression for any of the physical fitness components in which other anthropometric traits explained between 9.2% (flexibility and 33.9% (static strength of variance. CONCLUSION: Unlike other anthropometric traits the 2D:4D digit ratio does not seem to be related to any physical fitness component in adolescent girls and therefore most likely should not be considered in talent detection programs for sporting ability in girls.

  11. Mixing methods, tasting fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Anna; Mol, Annemarie; Satalkar, Priya

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an ethnographic experiment. Four finger eating experts and three novices sat down for a hot meal and ate with their hands. Drawing on the technique of playing with the familiar and the strange, our aim was not to explain our responses, but to articulate them. As we seek wo...

  12. Uniphasic Blanching of the Fingers, Abnormal Capillaroscopy in Nonsymptomatic Digits, and Autoantibodies: Expanding Options to Increase the Level of Suspicion of Connective Tissue Diseases beyond the Classification of Raynaud's Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtierotti, Roberta; Orenti, Annalisa; Schioppo, Tommaso; Marfia, Giovanni; Campanella, Rolando; Mastaglio, Claudio; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Boracchi, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), the role of medical history, capillaroscopy, and autoantibodies in order to provide an early diagnosis of connective tissue disease (CTD) were examined. 115 consecutive adults with uni-, bi-, or triphasic colour changes of the fingers were studied. RP was bilateral in 92.7% of patients. The middle finger was significantly more affected. A lack of association between fingers affected by RP and fingers with capillary abnormalities was observed OR = 0.75 (0.34–1.66). RP with the cyanotic phase had a higher risk at capillaroscopy to have hemorrhages OR = 4.46 (1.50–13.30) and giant capillaries OR = 24.85 (1.48–417.44). The thumb and triphasic involvement have an OR of 1.477 and 1.845, respectively. RP secondary to systemic sclerosis (SSc) had greater value of VAS pain (p = 0.011). The presence of anti-centromere antibodies was significantly associated with a higher risk of SSc (p < 0.001). 44.3% of subjects had uniphasic blanching of the fingers, and among these, 27% was diagnosed as having an overt or suspected CTD. Markers of a potential development of CTDs include severe RP symptoms, positive autoantibodies, and capillary abnormalities. These data support the proposal to not discharge patients with uniphasic blanching of the fingers to avoid missing the opportunity of an early diagnosis. PMID:26075287

  13. Uniphasic Blanching of the Fingers, Abnormal Capillaroscopy in Nonsymptomatic Digits, and Autoantibodies: Expanding Options to Increase the Level of Suspicion of Connective Tissue Diseases beyond the Classification of Raynaud’s Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ingegnoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP, the role of medical history, capillaroscopy, and autoantibodies in order to provide an early diagnosis of connective tissue disease (CTD were examined. 115 consecutive adults with uni-, bi-, or triphasic colour changes of the fingers were studied. RP was bilateral in 92.7% of patients. The middle finger was significantly more affected. A lack of association between fingers affected by RP and fingers with capillary abnormalities was observed OR=0.75 (0.34–1.66. RP with the cyanotic phase had a higher risk at capillaroscopy to have hemorrhages OR=4.46 (1.50–13.30 and giant capillaries OR=24.85 (1.48–417.44. The thumb and triphasic involvement have an OR of 1.477 and 1.845, respectively. RP secondary to systemic sclerosis (SSc had greater value of VAS pain (p=0.011. The presence of anti-centromere antibodies was significantly associated with a higher risk of SSc (p<0.001. 44.3% of subjects had uniphasic blanching of the fingers, and among these, 27% was diagnosed as having an overt or suspected CTD. Markers of a potential development of CTDs include severe RP symptoms, positive autoantibodies, and capillary abnormalities. These data support the proposal to not discharge patients with uniphasic blanching of the fingers to avoid missing the opportunity of an early diagnosis.

  14. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-12-29

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  15. Palm to finger ulnar sensory nerve conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Davidowich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  16. Digit ratio (2D:4D) as an indicator of body size, testosterone concentration and number of children in human males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Magdalena; Galbarczyk, Andrzej; Nenko, Ilona; Alvarado, Louis Calistro; Jasienska, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    The 2nd to 4th digit ratio (2D:4D) is thought to reflect exposure to androgens during foetal development. This study examined the relationship between low (more masculine) and high (more feminine) 2D:4D and body size at different stages of the life course, adult testosterone levels and number of children among males. Five hundred and fifty-eight men from rural Poland at the Mogielica Human Ecology Study Site participated in this study. Life history data and anthropometric measurements were collected. Salivary morning and evening testosterone levels among 110 men from the same population were measured. Low 2D:4D was related to higher birth weight (p = 0.04), higher birth length (p = 0.01), higher body mass during childhood and adolescence (p = 0.01), higher BMI (borderline significance, p = 0.06), higher number of children among fathers (p = 0.04) and higher testosterone levels during adulthood (p = 0.04). This study shows, for the first time in a single population, that digit ratio is related to sub-adult body size at different stages of the life course, adult testosterone levels and number of children. The observed results suggest that digit ratio might be a valuable predictor of male body size and reproductive characteristics.

  17. Robotic Finger Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  18. Digit ratio (2D:4D) in individuals with intellectual disability: investigating the role of testosterone in the establishment of cerebral lateralisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ypsilanti, Antonia; Ganou, Maria; Koidou, Irene; Grouios, George

    2008-11-01

    It has been proposed that the ratio of the second to fourth digits (2D:4D) may be a proxy of prenatal androgen exposure, such that low 2D:4D ratio is associated with high prenatal androgen exposure. The aim of the present study was to measure the 2D:4D ratio in 100 right- and non-right-handed individuals with intellectual disability of unknown idiopathic origin and compare them to a control group of 85 typically developing individuals. We also sought to determine whether sexually dimorphic traits, such as 2D:4D ratio, tend to be more pronounced on the right hand of these groups than on the left. Our results indicated that males had lower 2D:4D ratios than females in both groups, and individuals with intellectual disability had higher ratios only in their right hand compared to typically developing individuals. Further, right-handed individuals had lower ratios in both hands compared to non-right-handed individuals. Our results are discussed in relation to the "Geschwind-Behan-Galaburda theory of cerebral lateralisation" and Witelson's callosal hypothesis that differential levels of prenatal testosterone exposure will cause atypical cerebral laterality in individuals with intellectual disability, and the suggestion that this atypicality will become evident in the 2D:4D ratio (Manning, Scutt, Wilson, & Lewis-Jones, 1998).

  19. Experience of Percutaneous Trigger Finger Release under Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    95. 5. Carrozzella J, Stern PJ, Von Kuster LC. Transection of radial digital nerve of the thumb during trigger release. J Hand Surg. Am 1989;14:198‑200. 6. Lorthioir J Jr. Surgical treatment of trigger‑finger by a subcutaneous method. J Bone Joint ...

  20. Hidradenocarcinoma of the finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazerali, Rahim S; Tan, Cynthia; Fung, Maxwell A; Chen, Steven L; Wong, Michael S

    2013-04-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare adnexal neoplasm representing the malignant counterpart of hidradenoma derived from eccrine sweat glands. Misdiagnosis of this disease is common due to the wide variety of histological patterns and rarity of this malignancy. We report an 87-year-old man presenting with a rare case of biopsy-proven hidradenocarcinoma of the finger. There is no standard care of treatment of hidradenocarcinoma, especially of those tumors in rare locations such as the fingers, given its rarity, variable tumor behavior and histology. Although limited treatment strategies exist, detailed data including TNM, location, histologic type and grade, and patient age should be gathered for optimal treatment strategy. The literature supports a 3-fold approach to these malignancies involving margin-free resection, sentinel lymph node biopsy to evaluate possible metastasis, and long-term follow-up given high risk of recurrence. Our treatment strategy involved a 4-fold, multidisciplinary approach involving reconstruction to optimize tumor-free remission and hand function.

  1. Adjustment to finger amputation and silicone finger prosthesis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj; Maver, Tomaz

    2018-01-11

    Finger amputations are the most common amputations of upper limbs. They influence hand function, general functioning and quality of life. One of the possibilities for rehabilitation after finger amputation is fitting a silicone finger prosthesis. We wanted to evaluate the adjustment to amputation and prosthesis use in patients after finger amputation. We included 42 patients with partial or complete single or multiple finger amputation of one hand who visited the outpatient clinic for prosthetics and orthotics at our institute and received a silicone prosthesis. We assessed their adjustment to amputation and prosthesis with the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES). Most of the patients (28, 67%) had a single finger amputated. The average scores on all TAPES subscales (except adjustment to limitation) were above 50% of the maximum possible score. On average, the scores were the highest on the general adjustment and satisfaction with the prosthesis subscales. Silicone prostheses for finger amputation of upper limb play an important role in the process of adaptation to amputation. They offer aesthetically satisfying results and alleviate social interactions, which influences overall quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Silicone prostheses for finger amputation of upper limb offer an aesthetically satisfying result and alleviate problems with social interactions. Their influence on hand function is not optimal, but the prosthesis improves the amputee's quality of life.

  2. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  3. Dual-energy digital mammography: calibration and inverse-mapping techniques to estimate calcification thickness and glandular-tissue ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappadath, S Cheenu; Shaw, Chris C

    2003-06-01

    Breast cancer may manifest as microcalcifications in x-ray mammography. Small microcalcifications, essential to the early detection of breast cancer, are often obscured by overlapping tissue structures. Dual-energy imaging, where separate low- and high-energy images are acquired and synthesized to cancel the tissue structures, may improve the ability to detect and visualize microcalcifications. Transmission measurements at two different kVp values were made on breast-tissue-equivalent materials under narrow-beam geometry using an indirect flat-panel mammographic imager. The imaging scenario consisted of variable aluminum thickness (to simulate calcifications) and variable glandular ratio (defined as the ratio of the glandular-tissue thickness to the total tissue thickness) for a fixed total tissue thickness--the clinical situation of microcalcification imaging with varying tissue composition under breast compression. The coefficients of the inverse-mapping functions used to determine material composition from dual-energy measurements were calculated by a least-squares analysis. The linear function poorly modeled both the aluminum thickness and the glandular ratio. The inverse-mapping functions were found to vary as analytic functions of second (conic) or third (cubic) order. By comparing the model predictions with the calibration values, the root-mean-square residuals for both the cubic and the conic functions were approximately 50 microm for the aluminum thickness and approximately 0.05 for the glandular ratio.

  4. Correlation of morphological variants of the soft palate and Need's ratio in normal individuals: A digital cephalometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Pradhuman; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Sachdeva, Suresh K; Juneja, Suruchi; Kumaraswam; Kikkeri Lakshminarayana; Basavaraju, Suman

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the variation of soft palate morphology in different age and gender groups. The correlations of radiographic velar length (VL), velar width (VW), pharyngeal depth (PD), and Need's ratio with soft palate variants were also studied in the North Indian subpopulation. The study sample consisted of 300 subjects aged between 15 and 45 (mean: 31.32) years. The velar morphology on lateral cephalograms was examined and grouped into six types. The results obtained were subjected to a statistical analysis to find the correlation between variants of the soft palate with gender and different age groups. The most frequent type of soft palate was leaf shaped (48.7%), and the least common was crook shaped (3.0%) among both the genders and various age groups, showing a significant correlation. The mean VL, VW, and PD values were significantly higher in males and significantly correlated with the types of soft palate. A significant correlation was observed between the mean VL, VW, PD, and Need's ratio with various age groups, showing an inconsistent pattern with an increase in age. The types of soft palate, gender, and Need's ratio were also significantly correlated, with an overall higher mean value of the Need's ratio among female subjects and the S-shaped soft palate. The knowledge of a varied spectrum of velar morphology and the variants of the soft palate help in a better understanding of the velopharyngeal closure and craniofacial anomalies.

  5. Tests of variable-band multilayers designed for investigating optimal signal-to-noise vs artifact signal ratios in Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography (DDSA) imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyers, D.; Ho, A.; Li, Q.; Piestrup, M.; Rice, M.; Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, various design techniques were applied to investigate the feasibility of controlling the bandwidth and bandshape profiles of tungsten/boron-carbon (W/B 4 C) and tungsten/silicon (W/Si) multilayers for optimizing their performance in synchrotron radiation based angiographical imaging systems at 33 keV. Varied parameters included alternative spacing geometries, material thickness ratios, and numbers of layer pairs. Planar optics with nominal design reflectivities of 30%--94% and bandwidths ranging from 0.6%--10% were designed at the Stanford Radiation Laboratory, fabricated by the Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company, and characterized on Beam Line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, in this paper we report selected results of these tests and review the possible use of the multilayers for determining optimal signal to noise vs. artifact signal ratios in practical Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography systems

  6. [Multiple finger geodes in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeffel, J C; Oprisescu, B; Bresson, A; Ploier, R; Vidailhet, M

    1993-06-01

    Three pediatric patients with multiple geodes in the fingers are reported. This condition occurs mainly between one and three years and at seven years of age and is more common in winter. Affected fingers are swollen. Roentgenograms disclose several small lucent defects which are usually located in the middle phalanx. Several fingers are usually involved. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate is increased in virtually every case. Resolution occurs spontaneously within a few weeks or months. There is no tendency towards recurrence. Although the condition is inflammatory, exposure to cold is probably a precipitating factor.

  7. Dermal pocketing following distal finger replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhaindran, Mark E; Paavilainen, Pasi; Tan, David M K; Peng, Yeong Pin; Lim, Aymeric Y T

    2010-08-01

    Replantation is an ideal technique for reconstruction following fingertip amputation as it provides 'like for like' total reconstruction of the nail complex, bone pulp tissue and skin with no donor-site morbidity. However, fingertips are often not replanted because veins cannot be found or are thought to be too small to repair. Attempts at 'cap-plasty' or pocketing of replanted tips with and without microvascular anastomosis have been done in the past with varying degrees of success. We prospectively followed up a group of patients who underwent digital replantation and dermal pocketing in the palm to evaluate the outcome of this procedure. There were 10 patients with 14 amputated digits (two thumbs, five index, four middle, two ring and one little) who underwent dermal pocketing of the amputated digit following replantation. Among the 14 digits that were treated with dermal pocketing, 11 survived completely, one had partial atrophy and two were completely lost. Complications encountered included finger stiffness (two patients) and infection of the replanted fingertip with osteomyelitis of the distal phalanx (one patient). We believe that this technique can help increase the chance of survival for distal replantation with an acceptable salvage rate of 85% in our series. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Agreement in Measurement of Optic Cup-to-Disc Ratio with Stereo Biomicroscope Funduscopy and Digital Image Analysis: Results from the Nigeria National Blindness and Visual Impairment Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyari, Fatima; Gilbert, Clare

    2017-02-01

    To determine agreement in estimations of vertical cup-to-disc ratio (VCDR) between clinical stereo-biomicroscopic funduscopy and digital fundus image analysis. Systematic sampling of 1-in-7 from a sample of 13,591 participants aged ≥40 years gave a subsample who were examined in detail. VCDR was estimated clinically by 60 diopter aspheric lens biomicroscopic funduscopy (c-VCDR) and by digital fundus images (i-VCDR) graded at the Moorfields Eye Hospital Reading Centre. Spearman's correlation coefficient, paired t-test and the Bland-Altman method to assess limits of agreement (LOA) between the two methods were applied. Of 1759 participants in the subsample, 848 participants (48%) with normal frequency doubling technology (FDT) visual fields and data for i-VCDR and c-VCDR in both eyes (n = 1696 eyes) were included in the analysis. By absolute difference of VCDR values for each eye between the two methods, 1585 eyes (94%) differed by ≤0.2. Mean i-VCDR was 0.381 (standard deviation, SD 0.156), and mean c-VCDR 0.321 (SD 0.145). i-VCDRs were significantly larger by a mean difference of 0.061 (SD 0.121; 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.055-0.066; p method were lower limit -0.182 (95% CI -0.192 to -0.172) and upper limit 0.303 (95% CI 0.293-0.313). The 95% LOA intervals narrowed with higher VCDR. Digital image analysis and clinical assessment are two distinct methods to measure VCDR; with larger i-VCDRs in this survey. Applying i-VCDR cut-off values to c-VCDR measurements in the Nigeria Blindness Survey might have underestimated glaucoma prevalence. It is recommended that all participants in glaucoma surveys have VCDR by digital image measurement.

  9. Finger dermatoglyphic variations in Rengma Nagas of Nagaland India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Sudip Datta; Pal, Paramita; Mukherjee, Deba P

    2009-03-01

    The Rengma Nagas are one of the major Mongoloid tribal populations in the North-Eastern state of Nagaland in India. Population variation and sexual dimorphism in respect of finger dermatoglyphic characteristics in 207 adult individuals (104 males and 103 females) are reported in this present context. Frequency distribution of finger pattern types in different digits (both left and right sides combined) showed that whorls were the most prevalent patterns among both males (52.19%) and females (55.69%), followed by loops (47.70% in males and 42.81% in females). Significant sex differences in Dankmeijer Index (t = 1.47; p dermatoglyphic pattern types, Pattern Intensity Index in fingers, TFRC and AFRC no significant sex differences were observed.

  10. Interrater reliability in finger joint goniometer measurement in Dupuytren's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Christina; Krevers, Barbro; Kvist, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    We investigated interrater reliability of motion (ROM) measurement in the finger joints of people with Dupuytren's disease. Eight raters measured flexion and extension of the three finger joints in one affected finger of each of 13 people with different levels of severity of Dupuytren's disease, giving 104 measures of joints and motions. Reliability measures, represented by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of the mean (SEM), and differences between raters with the highest and lowest mean scores, were calculated. ICCs ranged from .832 to .973 depending on joint and motion. The SEM was ≤3° for all joints and motions. Differences in mean between highest and lowest raters were larger for flexion than for extension; the largest difference was in the distal interphalangeal joint. The results indicate that following these standardized guidelines, the interrater reliability of goniometer measurements is high for digital ROM in people with Dupuytren's disease.

  11. Digit Ratio (2D:4D, Aggression, and Testosterone in Men Exposed to an Aggressive Video Stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam P. Kilduff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The relative lengths of the 2nd and 4th digits (2D:4D is a negative biomarker for prenatal testosterone, and low 2D:4D may be associated with aggression. However, the evidence for a 2D:4D-aggression association is mixed. Here we test the hypothesis that 2D:4D is robustly linked to aggression in “challenge” situations in which testosterone is increased. Participants were exposed to an aggressive video and a control video. Aggression was measured after each video and salivary free testosterone levels before and after each video. Compared to the control video, the aggressive video was associated with raised aggression responses and a marginally significant increase in testosterone. Left 2D:4D was negatively correlated with aggression after the aggressive video and the strength of the correlation was higher in those participants who showed the greatest increases in testosterone. Left 2D:4D was also negatively correlated to the difference between aggression scores in the aggressive and control conditions. The control video did not influence testosterone concentrations and there were no associations between 2D:4D and aggression. We conclude that 2D:4D moderates the impact of an aggressive stimulus on aggression, such that an increase in testosterone resulting from a “challenge” is associated with a negative correlation between 2D:4D and aggression.

  12. The left hand second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D does not discriminate world-class female gymnasts from age matched sedentary girls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten W Peeters

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D, a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. METHODS: In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129, competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129, alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy using AN(COVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. RESULTS: Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020 did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018, either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p0.01, somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01, mesomorphy (p<0.01 and ectomorphy (p<0.05 respectively all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. CONCLUSION: Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples, the present study cannot discriminate sedentary girls from world-class female gymnasts by means of the left hand 2D:4D ratio.

  13. Development, Optimization, and Evaluation of a Duplex Droplet Digital PCR Assay To Quantify the T-nos/hmg Copy Number Ratio in Genetically Modified Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix-Urquídez, Dalmira; Pérez-Urquiza, Melina; Valdez Torres, José-Benigno; León-Félix, Josefina; García-Estrada, Raymundo; Acatzi-Silva, Abraham

    2016-01-05

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) are required to guarantee the reliability of analytical measurements. The CRMs available in the field of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are characterized using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). This technology has limited application, because of its dependence on a calibrant. The objective of this study was to obtain a method with higher metrological quality, to characterize the CRMs for their contents of T-nos/hmg copy number ratio in maize. A duplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay was developed and optimized by a central composite design. The developed method achieved an absolute limit of detection (LOD) of 11 cP T-nos, a relative LOD of 0.034%, a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 23 cP (relative LOQ of 0.08%), and a dynamic range of 0.08%-100% T-nos/hmg ratio. The specificity and applicability of the assay were established for the analysis of low T-nos concentrations (0.9%) in several corn varieties. The convenience of DNA digestion to reduce measurement bias in the case of multiple-copy binding was confirmed through an enzymatic restriction assay. Given its overall performance, this method can be used to characterize CRM candidates for their contents of T-nos/hmg ratio.

  14. Development, Optimization, and Evaluation of a Duplex Droplet Digital PCR Assay To Quantify the T-nos/hmg Copy Number Ratio in Genetically Modified Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) are required to guarantee the reliability of analytical measurements. The CRMs available in the field of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are characterized using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). This technology has limited application, because of its dependence on a calibrant. The objective of this study was to obtain a method with higher metrological quality, to characterize the CRMs for their contents of T-nos/hmg copy number ratio in maize. A duplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay was developed and optimized by a central composite design. The developed method achieved an absolute limit of detection (LOD) of 11 cP T-nos, a relative LOD of 0.034%, a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 23 cP (relative LOQ of 0.08%), and a dynamic range of 0.08%–100% T-nos/hmg ratio. The specificity and applicability of the assay were established for the analysis of low T-nos concentrations (0.9%) in several corn varieties. The convenience of DNA digestion to reduce measurement bias in the case of multiple-copy binding was confirmed through an enzymatic restriction assay. Given its overall performance, this method can be used to characterize CRM candidates for their contents of T-nos/hmg ratio. PMID:26605751

  15. Comparing a recursive digital filter with the moving-average and sequential probability-ratio detection methods for SNM portal monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    The author compared a recursive digital filter proposed as a detection method for French special nuclear material monitors with the author's detection methods, which employ a moving-average scaler or a sequential probability-ratio test. Each of these nine test subjects repeatedly carried a test source through a walk-through portal monitor that had the same nuisance-alarm rate with each method. He found that the average detection probability for the test source is also the same for each method. However, the recursive digital filter may have on drawback: its exponentially decreasing response to past radiation intensity prolongs the impact of any interference from radiation sources of radiation-producing machinery. He also examined the influence of each test subject on the monitor's operation by measuring individual attenuation factors for background and source radiation, then ranked the subjects' attenuation factors against their individual probabilities for detecting the test source. The one inconsistent ranking was probably caused by that subject's unusually long stride when passing through the portal

  16. Three-dimensional viscous fingering of miscible fluids in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suekane, Tetsuya; Ono, Jei; Hyodo, Akimitsu; Nagatsu, Yuichiro

    2017-10-01

    Viscous fingering is a flow instability that is induced at the displacement front when a less-viscous fluid (LVF) displaces a more-viscous fluid (MVF). Because of the opaque nature of porous media, most experimental investigations of the structure of viscous fingering and its development in time have been limited to two-dimensional porous media or Hele-Shaw cells. In this study, we investigate the three-dimensional characteristics of viscous fingering in porous media using a microfocused x-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. Similar to two-dimensional experiments, characteristic events such as tip-splitting, shielding, and coalescence were observed in three-dimensional viscous fingering as well. With an increase in the Péclet number at a fixed viscosity ratio, M , the fingers appearing on the interface tend to be fine; however, the locations of the tips of the fingers remain the same for the same injected volume of the LVF. The finger extensions increase in proportion to ln M , and the number of fingers emerging at the initial interface increases with M . This fact agrees qualitatively with linear stability analyses. Within the fingers, the local concentration of NaI, which is needed for the x-ray CT scanner, linearly decreases, whereas it sharply decreases at the tips of the fingers. A locally high Péclet number as well as unsteady motions in lateral directions may enhance the dispersion at the tips of the fingers. As the viscosity ratio increases, the efficiency of each sweep monotonically decreases and reaches an asymptotic state; in addition, the degree of mixing increases with the viscosity ratio. For high flow rates, the asymptotic value of the sweep efficiency is low for high viscosity ratios, while there is no clear dependence of the asymptotic value on the Péclet number.

  17. Relationships between the second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) and game-related statistics in semi-professional female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Makailah; Short, Sandra E; Short, Martin; Manning, John T; Tomkinson, Grant R

    2018-01-01

    Digit ratio (2D:4D) is a negative correlate of sports performance, although this relationship may be weak in open-skill sports such as basketball. The primary aim was to quantify relationships between 2D:4D and game-related statistics in semi-professional female basketball players. The secondary aim was to quantify the differences in mean 2D:4Ds between players based on their position in the starting lineup. Using a cross-sectional design, 64 female basketball players who competed in the South Australian Premier League were measured in-season for height, mass, and 2D:4D, with game-related statistics collected end-season. Partial correlations (adjusted for age and body mass index) were used to quantify relationships between right and left 2D:4Ds and game-related statistics. Unpaired t-tests were used to quantify differences in mean 2D:4Ds between starting and reserve players. 2D:4D was a substantial negative correlate of blocks, rebounds, and field-goal percentage; meaning, females with lower 2D:4Ds were generally better defensively as they recorded more blocks and rebounds, and were more efficient scorers, irrespective of their age and body size. Mean 2D:4D differed by position in the starting lineup, as females with lower 2D:4Ds were more likely to be in the starting lineup. This study found evidence that 2D:4D was a correlate of performance in an open-skill sport. Female players with lower digit ratios tended to perform better in several aspects of basketball, especially defensively, and were more likely to be starters, suggesting they are the best players on the team in their positions. These results probably reflect the organizational benefits of prenatal testosterone. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dermatoglyphic patterns on fingers and gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Sakineh; Rasouli, Mina

    2018-03-01

    Fingerprints have so far been used for determining the basis of certain malignant diseases, with positive outcomes. Considering the high rates of cancer-related mortality in Iran, this study was conducted for the purpose of examining the dermatoglyphic pattern of fingers in patients with gynecological cancers as compared to healthy people. The present study was conducted on 151 women with gynecological cancers as the case group and 152 healthy women with no history of such cancers as control group. The dematographic details of participants from both control and case groups were collected using a checklist, and the pattern of their fingerprints was prepared and examined. The data were analyzed for their significance using chi-square test and t- test. Odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Dermatoglyphic analysis showed that arch and loop patterns significantly changed in cases group as compared to control. However, the odds ratio suggested that loop pattern in 6 or more fingers might be a risk factor for developing gynecological cancers. Our results showed that there is an association between fingerprint patterns and gynecological cancers and so, dermatoglyphic analysis may aid in the early diagnosis of these cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of complications relating to finger amputation and replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Young-Woo; Cheon, Ho-Jun; Nam, Hyun-Je; Kang, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jong-Min; Ahn, Hee-Chan

    2015-05-01

    There are many options in the management of fingertip or finger amputations. Injudicious revision amputation may cause complications. These complications can be prevented by tension-free closure of the amputation stump or primary coverage with appropriate flap. Replantation is the best way to keep the original length and maintain digital function. Patent vein repair or venous drainage with bleeding until neovascularization to the replanted part is the key to successful replantation. Prevention and management of complications in replantation and revision amputation increase patients' satisfaction and decrease costs. Research is needed to define new indications of replantation for digital amputation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 2nd to 4th digit ratio (2D:4D) and number of sex partners: evidence for effects of prenatal testosterone in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönekopp, Johannes; Voracek, Martin; Manning, John T

    2006-01-01

    The number of sexual partners per individual (NSP) is an important component of sexual behaviour. Here, we report two studies concerning the relationship between a probable negative correlate of prenatal testosterone, the ratio of the length of 2nd and 4th digits (2D:4D), and NSP in men. The right hand 2D:4D ratio appears to be more strongly related to prenatal testosterone than does the left hand. Accordingly we found: (a) in a sample of 99 German heterosexual male undergraduates right hand 2D:4D (but not left hand 2D:4D) was significantly negatively associated with reported lifetime NSP. The relationship between NSP and 2D:4D was independent of free testosterone, but free testosterone also showed a weak positive association with NSP (b) in a sample of 79 heterosexual and 95 homosexual Austrian men we found a significant negative association between right hand 2D:4D (but not left hand 2D:4D) and reported NSP in past year for heterosexual but not for homosexual men. The association in heterosexuals was independent of age, years of education, occupation and relationship status. We conclude that male NSP is likely to be influenced by the long-term organisational effects of prenatal testosterone. The relationship between NSP and 2D:4D appears to be confined to heterosexual men.

  1. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  2. [Finger extension. II. Materials and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, J N; Boabighi, A; Laudet, C; Guerin-Surville, H; Baux, S

    1992-06-01

    The study of the extensor apparatus through different methods concerns 200 fingers, the most of fresh cadavers. The dissection through direct observation or with surgical microscope of the dorsal aponeurosis of 30 fingers has been completed by an histological study of 10 fingers. The mechanic properties of each dorsal aponeurotic structure has been tested by extensometry on 12 fingers. The functional study of the role and of the transmission of the different motor components concerns 128 fingers. It has been completed by experimental sections of each aponeurotic structure concerning 20 fingers.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic findings of seal finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.; Isokangas, M.; Raeisaenen, S. [Oulu Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic findings of five patients with seal finger. Material and Methods: The MR images and radiographs of five patients with seal finger were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed on four patients in the subacute phase, and follow-up imaging was done on one of them at 5 months. One patient had MRI only at a later stage 5 years after onset. Radiographs were taken three times in the subacute phase and once at a later stage. One patient had had seal finger in another finger previously. Results: Short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence showed extensive subcutaneous soft tissue edema in all four patients in the subacute phase and tenosynovitis of the flexion tendons in two cases. Three patients had edema in 2-3 phalanges, and effusion in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was seen in one case. At the later stage, no signal pathology in soft tissues or bones was seen in STIR images. In the subacute phase, radiographs showed digital soft-tissue swelling in three patients, and one patient had a narrowed DIP joint, periarticular osteoporosis, and a periosteal reaction. At the later stage, flexion contracture of the finger was seen. Conclusion: In addition to soft-tissue infection, seal finger causes bone marrow edema, tenosynovitis, and effusion in the interphalangeal joints visible as increased signal intensity in STIR images. Radiographs reveal periarticular osteoporosis with loss of cartilage in the subacute phase and flexion contracture at the later stage. MRI (STIR) allows more precise delineation of the inflammatory process compared to radiography.

  5. A new technique to determine vertical dimension of occlusion from anthropometric measurements of fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Ladda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to find the correlation between vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO and length of fingers. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 dentate subjects comprising of 200 males and 200 females. Anthropometric measurements of VDO, length of index finger, length of little finger, and distance from tip of thumb to tip of index finger of right hand were recorded clinically using modified digital vernier caliper. Correlation between VDO and length of fingers was studied using Spearman′s coefficient. For the execution of regression command and preparation of prediction equations to estimate VDO, Statistical Package for Social Sciences Software Version 11.5 was used. Results: VDO was significantly and positively correlated with all the parameters studied. In males, correlation of VDO was strongest for length of index finger (r-0.406 whereas in females, it was strongest for length of little finger (r-0.385. VDO estimation using regression equation had a standard error of ± 3.76 in males and ± 2.86 in females for length of index finger, ±3.81 and ± 2.74 in males and females respectively for length of little finger, ±3.99 and ± 2.89 in males and females respectively for distance from tip of thumb to tip of index finger. Conclusions: Since the variations between VDO and finger lengths are within the range of 2-4 mm, VDO prediction through this method is reliable, and reproducible. Also the method is simple, economic, and non-invasive; hence, it could be recommended for everyday practice.

  6. A new technique to determine vertical dimension of occlusion from anthropometric measurements of fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladda, Ruchi; Bhandari, Aruna J; Kasat, Vikrant O; Angadi, Gangadhar S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the correlation between vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) and length of fingers. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 dentate subjects comprising of 200 males and 200 females. Anthropometric measurements of VDO, length of index finger, length of little finger, and distance from tip of thumb to tip of index finger of right hand were recorded clinically using modified digital vernier caliper. Correlation between VDO and length of fingers was studied using Spearman's coefficient. For the execution of regression command and preparation of prediction equations to estimate VDO, Statistical Package for Social Sciences Software Version 11.5 was used. VDO was significantly and positively correlated with all the parameters studied. In males, correlation of VDO was strongest for length of index finger (r-0.406) whereas in females, it was strongest for length of little finger (r-0.385). VDO estimation using regression equation had a standard error of ± 3.76 in males and ± 2.86 in females for length of index finger, ±3.81 and ± 2.74 in males and females respectively for length of little finger, ±3.99 and ± 2.89 in males and females respectively for distance from tip of thumb to tip of index finger. Since the variations between VDO and finger lengths are within the range of 2-4 mm, VDO prediction through this method is reliable, and reproducible. Also the method is simple, economic, and non-invasive; hence, it could be recommended for everyday practice.

  7. Cracking the finger code: an interview with CCR’s Susan Mackem | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The creation of the digits in our hand—the thumb, index-middle-ring fingers and pinky—begins early in development, but little is known about the exact programming that occurs to produce the different digit types. Investigators in the Cancer and Developmental Biology Laboratory, (CDBL), provide the first genetic evidence of how the tuning of signals sets digit identity by studying the effects of dysregulation (abnormal regulation) in several mutations. Read more…

  8. Effects of exposure equalization on image signal-to-noise ratios in digital mammography: A simulation study with an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinming; Lai Chaojen; Whitman, Gary J.; Geiser, William R.; Shen Youtao; Yi Ying; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The scan equalization digital mammography (SEDM) technique combines slot scanning and exposure equalization to improve low-contrast performance of digital mammography in dense tissue areas. In this study, full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired with an anti-scatter grid at various exposure levels were superimposed to simulate SEDM images and investigate the improvement of low-contrast performance as quantified by primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs). Methods: We imaged an anthropomorphic breast phantom (Gammex 169 ''Rachel,'' Gammex RMI, Middleton, WI) at various exposure levels using a FFDM system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). The exposure equalization factors were computed based on a standard FFDM image acquired in the automatic exposure control (AEC) mode. The equalized image was simulated and constructed by superimposing a selected set of FFDM images acquired at 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 times of exposure levels to the standard AEC timed technique (125 mAs) using the equalization factors computed for each region. Finally, the equalized image was renormalized regionally with the exposure equalization factors to result in an appearance similar to that with standard digital mammography. Two sets of FFDM images were acquired to allow for two identically, but independently, formed equalized images to be subtracted from each other to estimate the noise levels. Similarly, two identically but independently acquired standard FFDM images were subtracted to estimate the noise levels. Corrections were applied to remove the excess system noise accumulated during image superimposition in forming the equalized image. PSNRs over the compressed area of breast phantom were computed and used to quantitatively study the effects of exposure equalization on low-contrast performance in digital mammography. Results: We found that the highest achievable PSNR improvement factor was 1.89 for

  9. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  10. FURTHER EVIDENCE OF AN ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOW SECOND-TO-FOURTH DIGIT RATIO (2D:4D) AND SELECTION FOR THE UNIFORMED SERVICES: A STUDY AMONG POLICE PERSONNEL IN WROCŁAW, POLAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozieł, Sławomir; Kociuba, Marek; Chakraborty, Raja; Sitek, Aneta; Ignasiak, Zofia

    2017-08-22

    Males and females differ in their preference for occupations and sporting activities, and differ also in risk-taking attitudes. In addition to other explanations, prenatal hormone exposure has been implicated in these gender-associated differences. The ratio of the relative lengths of the second-to-fourth digits (2D:4D) is a proxy indicator of prenatal exposure to testosterone relative to oestrogen. The 2D:4D ratio has been found to be associated with choice of occupation, particularly among females. This study investigated whether 2D:4D differed between police officers and a control group of civilians in Wrocław, Poland. Participants were 147 male and 55 female police officers and 91 male and 75 female civilian controls. The police officers had to undergo rigorous physical ability tests during recruitment and their job bore relatively higher risk, whereas the controls had a normal civilian lifestyle. Height, weight, hand grip strength and lengths of the second and fourth digits were measured. Analyses of variance and covariance were employed to assess the significance of difference in digit ratio between groups (police officers and civilians) allowing for interaction with sex. The policewomen, compared with the female controls, were taller and had stronger hand grip strength, but had lower 2D:4D in the right hand and average 2D:4D of both hands. However, male and female police officers slightly differed only in the right hand digit ratio but not in the left hand ratio or the average for the two hands. However, the control group showed significant sex differences in all digit ratios with higher (feminine) mean values in females. The study provides further evidence that prenatal testosterone exposure, as reflected in the 2D:4D ratio, might have an association with choice of occupation, particularly among females.

  11. Digit ratio (2D:4D) moderates the relationship between cortisol reactivity and self-reported externalizing behavior in young adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Jill; Raine, Adrian; Glenn, Andrea L; Chen, Frances R; Choy, Olivia; Granger, Douglas A

    2015-12-01

    Although reduced cortisol reactivity to stress and increased circulating testosterone level are hypothesized to be associated with higher levels of externalizing behavior, empirical findings are inconsistent. One factor that may account for the heterogeneity in these relationships is prenatal testosterone exposure. This study examined whether the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal testosterone exposure, moderates the relationships of testosterone and cortisol reactivity with externalizing behavior. Left and right hand 2D:4D and self-reported externalizing behavior were measured in a sample of 353 young adolescents (M age=11.92 years; 178 females; 79.7% African American). Saliva samples were collected before and after a stress task and later assayed for cortisol. Testosterone levels were determined from an AM saliva sample. 2D:4D interacted with cortisol reactivity to predict externalizing behavior in males, but not females. In males, low cortisol reactivity was associated with higher levels of aggression and rule-breaking behavior, but only among subjects with low 2D:4D (i.e., high prenatal testosterone). Findings suggest the importance of a multi-systems approach in which interactions between multiple hormones are taken into account. Furthermore, results demonstrate the importance of considering the organizational influence of prenatal testosterone in order to understand the activational influence of circulating hormones during adolescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebral laterality for language is related to adult salivary testosterone levels but not digit ratio (2D:4D) in men: A functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Martin, Maryanne

    2017-03-01

    The adequacy of three competing theories of hormonal effects on cerebral laterality are compared using functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD). Thirty-three adult males participated in the study (21 left-handers). Cerebral lateralization was measured by fTCD using an extensively validated word generation task. Adult salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations were measured by luminescence immunoassay and prenatal T exposure was indirectly estimated by the somatic marker of 2nd to 4th digit length ratio (2D:4D). A significant quadratic relationship between degree of cerebral laterality for language and adult T concentrations was observed, with enhanced T levels for strong left hemisphere dominance and strong right hemisphere dominance. No systematic effects on laterality were found for cortisol or 2D:4D. Findings suggest that higher levels of T are associated with a relatively attenuated degree of interhemispheric sharing of linguistic information, providing support for the callosal and the sexual differentiation hypotheses rather than the Geschwind, Behan and Galaburda (GBG) hypothesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Feminist activist women are masculinized in terms of digit-ratio and social dominance: a possible explanation for the feminist paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Guy; Aasa, Ulrika; Wallert, John; Woodley, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The feminist movement purports to improve conditions for women, and yet only a minority of women in modern societies self-identify as feminists. This is known as the feminist paradox. It has been suggested that feminists exhibit both physiological and psychological characteristics associated with heightened masculinization, which may predispose women for heightened competitiveness, sex-atypical behaviors, and belief in the interchangeability of sex roles. If feminist activists, i.e., those that manufacture the public image of feminism, are indeed masculinized relative to women in general, this might explain why the views and preferences of these two groups are at variance with each other. We measured the 2D:4D digit ratios (collected from both hands) and a personality trait known as dominance (measured with the Directiveness scale) in a sample of women attending a feminist conference. The sample exhibited significantly more masculine 2D:4D and higher dominance ratings than comparison samples representative of women in general, and these variables were furthermore positively correlated for both hands. The feminist paradox might thus to some extent be explained by biological differences between women in general and the activist women who formulate the feminist agenda. PMID:25250010

  14. [Symmetrical lividity of the fingers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsard, E; Kossard, S

    1988-07-01

    Symmetric lividity of the soles of the feet was first reported in two children in 1925 by Pernet. The characteristic manifestation of this dermatosis consisted in hyperkeratosis and hyperhidrosis with livid discoloration of the pressure areas of the soles. Later the same name was applied to a similar dermatosis in which the hyperkeratotic and hyperhidrotic patches of skin on the soles had a whitish grey discoloration and the livid color, if present at all, was seen only over the marginal areas not affected by the keratosis. Similar livid keratoses affecting the palmar sides of the fingers have been seen only occasionally. The 17-year-old girl presented in this paper had a 11-year history of emotional hyperhidrosis and is a rare illustration of symmetrical lividity in its original form, localized to the fingers only.

  15. Effects of prenatal Leydig cell function on the ratio of the second to fourth digit lengths in school-aged children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Mitsui

    Full Text Available Prenatal sex hormones can induce abnormalities in the reproductive system and adversely impact on genital development. We investigated whether sex hormones in cord blood influenced the ratio of the second to fourth digit lengths (2D/4D in school-aged children. Of the 514 children who participated in a prospective cohort study on birth in Sapporo between 2002 and 2005, the following sex hormone levels were measured in 294 stored cord blood samples (135 boys and 159 girls; testosterone (T, estradiol (E, progesterone, LH, FSH, inhibin B, and insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3. A total of 350 children, who were of school age and could be contacted for this survey, were then requested via mail to send black-and-white photocopies of the palms of both the left and right hands. 2D/4D was calculated in 190 children (88 boys and 102 girls using photocopies and derived from participants with the characteristics of older mothers, a higher annual household income, higher educational level, and fewer smokers among family members. 2D/4D was significantly lower in males than in females (p<0.01. In the 294 stored cord blood samples, T, T/E, LH, FSH, Inhibin B, and INSL3 levels were significantly higher in samples collected from males than those from females. A multivariate regression model revealed that 2D/4D negatively correlated with INSL3 in males and was significantly higher in males with <0.32 ng/mL of INSL3 (p<0.01. No correlations were observed between other hormones and 2D/4D. In conclusion, 2D/4D in school-aged children, which was significantly lower in males than in females, was affected by prenatal Leydig cell function.

  16. Individual finger control of a modular prosthetic limb using high-density electrocorticography in a human subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotson, Guy; McMullen, David P.; Fifer, Matthew S.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Katyal, Kapil D.; Para, Matthew P.; Armiger, Robert; Anderson, William S.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Wester, Brock A.; Crone, Nathan E.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. We used native sensorimotor representations of fingers in a brain-machine interface (BMI) to achieve immediate online control of individual prosthetic fingers. Approach. Using high gamma responses recorded with a high-density electrocorticography (ECoG) array, we rapidly mapped the functional anatomy of cued finger movements. We used these cortical maps to select ECoG electrodes for a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis classification scheme to predict: (1) if any finger was moving, and, if so, (2) which digit was moving. To account for sensory feedback, we also mapped the spatiotemporal activation elicited by vibrotactile stimulation. Finally, we used this prediction framework to provide immediate online control over individual fingers of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory modular prosthetic limb. Main results. The balanced classification accuracy for detection of movements during the online control session was 92% (chance: 50%). At the onset of movement, finger classification was 76% (chance: 20%), and 88% (chance: 25%) if the pinky and ring finger movements were coupled. Balanced accuracy of fully flexing the cued finger was 64%, and 77% had we combined pinky and ring commands. Offline decoding yielded a peak finger decoding accuracy of 96.5% (chance: 20%) when using an optimized selection of electrodes. Offline analysis demonstrated significant finger-specific activations throughout sensorimotor cortex. Activations either prior to movement onset or during sensory feedback led to discriminable finger control. Significance. Our results demonstrate the ability of ECoG-based BMIs to leverage the native functional anatomy of sensorimotor cortical populations to immediately control individual finger movements in real time.

  17. Cross-finger dermal pocketing to augment venous outflow for distal fingertip replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Valerie H; Murugan, Arul; Foo, Tun-Lin; Puhaindran, Mark E

    2014-09-01

    Venous anastomosis in distal fingertip replantations is not always possible, and venous congestion is recognized as a potential cause of failure. Methods previously described to address this problem include amputate deepithelization and dermal pocketing postarterial anastomosis to augment venous outflow. However, attachment of the digit to the palm or abdomen resulted in finger stiffness. We describe a modification of the previous methods by utilizing dermal flaps raised from the adjacent digit in the form of a cross-finger flap. The key differences are the partial deepithelization of the replanted fingertip and subsequent replacement of the dermal flap to the donor digit to minimize donor site morbidity. During the period where the 2 digits are attached, interphalangeal joint mobilization is permitted to maintain joint mobility.

  18. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seun Ah; Kim, Baek Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Na [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hee [Incheon Baek Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists.

  19. Prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation of finger causes devastating physical, psychosocial, and economic damage to an individual. The concealment of an amputated part with the help of prosthesis can shield an amputee from social stigma. Prosthesis for such patient must be comfortable to wear lightweight, durable, cosmetically pleasing easy to put on and remove. The restoration of finger amputations depends on the amount of tissue involved, the involvement of bone, the angles and levels of amputation, and the involvement of other fingers. The microsurgical reimplantation helps to save many severely injured and traumatically amputed finger. The prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated finger is considered when microvascular reconstruction is not possible, unavailable, unsuccessful, or unaffordable. Most accepted material is silicones because of their better esthetics, ease of manipulation, and availability. This paper presents prosthetic rehabilitation of index finger of the right hand with custom made silicon prosthesis.

  20. In the finger it lingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Mohamad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 80-year-old woman presented with a history of a thorn prick injury over the distal phalange of her left finger obtained while gardening two months ago. She claimed to have a non-healing cut with a nodular lesion, which progressively increased in size, extending upwards towards the region of her left arm. There was no fever or palpable lymph nodes in the axillary region. She had been prescribed antibiotics from the local hospital but her condition did not improve.

  1. Asymptomatic Papulo-nodules Localized to One Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Kinjal D; Khopkar, Uday S

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous or deep granuloma annulare is a benign asymptomatic condition characterized by firm asymptomatic nodules in deep subcutaneous tissues that may be associated with intradermal lesions. A 53-year-old female presented with asymptomatic skin-colored, firm nodules over the right ring finger. Histopathology revealed a palisading granuloma with central degenerated collagen and mucin deposition in the dermis suggestive of granuloma annulare. Isolated and unilateral involvement of a single digit with clusters of nodules of subcutaneous granuloma annulare (GA) in an adult is rare and differentiation from its simulator rheumatoid nodule is essential. PMID:26538728

  2. Successful replantation of a finger in an 8-month old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D A; Coombs, C J

    2013-01-01

    A successful replantation of an index fingertip in an 8-month old girl is reported. A literature review of replants in very young children suggests this is one of the youngest patients ever to undergo digital replantation and possibly the youngest finger replant performed.

  3. DSA in digital replantations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liuhong; Chao Ming; Jiang Dingyao; Zhang Guangqiang; Wu Jianjun; Chen Xianyi; Li Bin; Sun Jihong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess revascularization and vessel anastomosis in digital replantations with DSA. Methods: Twelve cases of digital replantations underwent digital subtract angiography during 2 to 4 days after fingers reattachment. The vessel anastomosis, hemodynamics, stenosis and discontinuation were investigated. The unobstructed and smooth anastomosis was suggested as early stage survival of the reattached fingers, the spasm and stenosis of the reattached vessels were considered as mild vascular crisis, and the discontinuation of hemodynamics were indicated as severe vascular crisis. Results: The total 27 vessels were clearly displayed on DSA. Of these vessels, 23 vessels were unobstructed and smooth, all digits were survived. Diagnosis coincidence of early stage survival was 100% (23/23). Two vessels were obstructed, which were testified having thrombus by operation research. The other 2 vessels were spasm, the digits were also survived ultimately by expectant treatment. All 4 abnormal vessel anatomosis were found by DSA. Conclusion: DSA is important modality in assessing revascularization and blood circulation for digital replantations, guiding in dealing with the vascular crisis, and in predicting early stage survival of the reattached digits. (authors)

  4. The "Haptic Finger"- a new device for monitoring skin condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mami; Lévêque, Jean Luc; Tagami, Hachiro; Kikuchi, Katsuko; Chonan, Seifi

    2003-05-01

    Touching the skin is of great importance for the Clinician for assessing roughness, softness, firmness, etc. This type of clinical assessment is very subjective and therefore non-reproducible from one Clinician to another one or even from time to time for the same Clinician. In order to objectively monitor skin texture, we developed a new sensor, placed directly on the Clinician's finger, which generate some electric signal when slid over the skin surface. The base of this Haptic Finger sensor is a thin stainless steel plate on which sponge rubber, PVDF foil, acetate film and gauze are layered. The signal generated by the sensor was filtered and digitally stored before processing. In a first in vitro experiment, the sensor was moved over different skin models (sponge rubber covered by silicon rubber) of varying hardness and roughness. These experiments allowed the definition of two parameters characterizing textures. The first parameter is variance of the signal processed using wavelet analysis, representing an index of roughness. The second parameter is dispersion of the power spectrum density in the frequency domain, corresponding to hardness. To validate these parameters, the Haptic Finger was used to scan skin surfaces of 30 people, 14 of whom displayed a skin disorder: xerosis (n = 5), atopic dermatitis (n = 7), and psoriasis (n = 2). The results obtained by means of the sensor were compared with subjective, clinical evaluations by a Clinician who scored both roughness and hardness of the skin. Good agreement was observed between clinical assessment of the skin and the two parameters generated using the Haptic Finger. Use of this sensor could prove extremely valuable in cosmetic research where skin surface texture (in terms of tactile properties) is difficult to measure.

  5. Effects of gender, digit ratio, and menstrual cycle on intrinsic brain functional connectivity: A whole-brain, voxel-wise exploratory study using simultaneous local and global functional connectivity mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donishi, Tomohiro; Terada, Masaki; Kaneoke, Yoshiki

    2018-01-01

    Gender and sex hormones influence brain function, but their effects on functional network organization within the brain are not yet understood. We investigated the influence of gender, prenatal sex hormones (estimated by the 2D:4D digit ratio), and the menstrual cycle on the intrinsic functional network organization of the brain (as measured by 3T resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI)) using right-handed, age-matched university students (100 males and 100 females). The mean (± SD ) age was 20.9 ± 1.5 (range: 18-24) years and 20.8 ± 1.3 (range: 18-24) years for males and females, respectively. Using two parameters derived from the normalized alpha centrality analysis (one for local and another for global connectivity strength), we created mean functional connectivity strength maps. There was a significant difference between the male mean map and female mean map in the distributions of network properties in almost all cortical regions and the basal ganglia but not in the medial parietal, limbic, and temporal regions and the thalamus. A comparison between the mean map for the low 2D:4D digit ratio group (indicative of high exposure to testosterone during the prenatal period) and that for the high 2D:4D digit ratio group revealed a significant difference in the network properties of the medial parietal region for males and in the temporal region for females. The menstrual cycle affected network organization in the brain, which varied with the 2D:4D digit ratio. Most of these findings were reproduced with our other datasets created with different preprocessing steps. The results suggest that differences in gender, prenatal sex hormone exposure, and the menstrual cycle are useful for understanding the normal brain and investigating the mechanisms underlying the variable prevalence and symptoms of neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  6. Finger Replantation in Sanglah General Hospital: Report of Five Cases and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Roy Rusly Hariantana Hamid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Replantation is the prime treatment for amputated hands and fingers due to functional and aesthetic advantages. The absolute indications for replantation are amputations of the thumb, multiple fingers, trans metacarpal or hand, and any upper extremity in a child, regardless of the amputation level. A fingertip amputation distal to the insertion of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS is also a good indication. Indications have been expanded to include amputation at nail level, and when there is a request from the patient, replantation is attempted even for a single finger amputation regardless of the amputation level. Based on the mechanism of injury, a clean-cut sharp amputation is more likely replanted compare to a crush and avulsion injuries. With a proper management of the amputated finger, replantation can be attempted even after 24 hours. This report was written to provide examples of finger replantation cases and the measures that can be taken in a resource-limited hospital in order to conduct a replantation. Case Series: We reported five out of nine digital replantation cases in Sanglah General Hospital between January and July 2014. Two patients were a six and an eleven years old boys who accidentally cut their finger while playing, the rests were male labors between 20-30 years old whose amputations due to machine injuries. Result: A 100% replant survival was achieved. After a period of follow up with occupational therapy, all patients regain good functional and cosmetic results. 

  7. Surgical Treatment of Trigger Finger: Open Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, open A1 pulley release results were evaluated in patients with a trigger finger diagnosis. 45 patients (29 females, 16 males, mean age 50.7 ± 11.9; range (24-79, 45 trigger fingers were released via open surgical technique. On the 25 of 45 cases were involved in the right hand and 16 of them were at the thumb, 2 at index, 6 at the middle and 1 at ring finger. Similarly, at the left hand, 15 of 20 cases were at the thumb, 1 at the index finger, 2 at middle finger and 2 at ring finger. Average follow-up time was 10.2 ± 2.7 (range, 6-15 months. Comorbidities in patients were; diabetes mellitus at 6 cases (13.3%, hypertension at 11 cases (24.4%, hyperthyroidism at 2 cases (4.4%, dyslipidemia at 2 cases (4.4% and lastly 2 cases had carpal tunnel syndrome operation. The mean time between the onset of symptoms to surgery was 6.9 ± 4.8 (range, 2-24 months. Patient satisfaction was very good in 34 cases (75.4% and good in 11 (24.6% patients. The distance between the pulpa of the operated finger and the palm was normal in every case postoperatively. We have not encountered any postoperative complications. We can recommend that; A1 pulley release via open incision is an effective and reliable method in trigger finger surgery.

  8. Retinal image location of hand, fingers, and objects during manual tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, George T; Grose, Susan A; Quaney, Barbara M; Maino, Joseph H

    2008-04-01

    A new method was developed using the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) to investigate the effects of central visual loss on eye-hand coordination in manual tasks. Using the SLO, the retinal positions of the hand, fingers, and objects are imaged and recorded while a subject performs a manual task. A video camera images the subject's hand and objects to be manipulated in the SLO laser-beam raster, producing a video image of a subject's hand, fingers, and objects on the subject's retina while the objects are manipulated. A subject with bilateral central scotomas and an age-matched control subject with normal vision traced an ellipse with the index finger, tapped four disks in sequence, and carried out a pattern duplication task with pegs. Retinal positions of the fovea or preferred retinal locus (PRL), fingers, and objects were measured from digitized SLO images. In all tasks, the fovea or PRL was directed to an object or position before the fingers arrived. This lead time was much greater for the scotoma subject than the control subject ( approximately 1400 vs. approximately 400 ms, respectively). The scotoma subject was much less accurate in placing the PRL and fingers on objects and required substantially more time for task completion than the control subject. The coordination of foveal fixation and finger placement found with the SLO method was similar to that found by others using eyetracking techniques with visually normal subjects. The presence of a central scotoma and use of a PRL caused marked deterioration in the quality of this coordination. Unlike eyetracking methods, the SLO technique does not require calibration because the positions of the fingers and objects are directly observable on the retina. This method could be useful in studying eye-hand coordination of individuals with scotomas that affect foveal vision.

  9. Prevalence of self-reported finger deformations and occupational risk factors among professional cooks: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasu, Miwako; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Kogi, Kazutaka; Ito, Akiyoshi; Feskens, Edith J M; Tomita, Shigeru; Temmyo, Yoshiomi; Ueno, Mitsuo; Miyagi, Shigeji

    2011-05-26

    Previous studies have pointed out that the school lunch workers in Japan are suffering from work-related disorders including finger deformations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported finger deformations and the association with job-related risk factors. A cross-sectional questionnaire study of 5,719 subjects (response rate: 81%, 982 men and 4,737 women) was undertaken during September 2003 to February 2004. Finger deformations were found among 11.7% of the men and 35.6% of the women studied, with significant differences among sex, age and sex-age groups. For both men and women the pattern of finger deformations across the hand was similar for the right and the left hand. For women, the deformations were found in about 10% of the distal interphalangeal joints of all fingers. Based on multiple logistic regression analyses, the factors female sex, age, the number of cooked lunches per cook and cooking activities were independently associated with the prevalence of finger deformations. High prevalence odds ratios were found for those frequently carrying or using tools by hands such as delivering containers, distributing meals, preparing dishes, washing equipment, cutting and stirring foods. Among the school lunch workers studied, women had a higher prevalence of finger deformations on all joints of both hands. Various cooking tasks were associated with the prevalence of finger deformations. The results suggest that improvements in working conditions are important for preventing work-related disorders such as finger deformations.

  10. [Clinical effects of repair of wounds in fingers after electrical burn with wrist perforator free flaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, H P; Xia, C D; Xing, P P; Li, Q; Han, D W; Xue, J D; Cao, D Y

    2017-09-20

    Objective: To explore the clinical effects of repair of wounds in the fingers after electrical burn with wrist perforator free flaps. Methods: Twelve patients (13 fingers) with electrical burn were hospitalized in our burn ward from January 2016 to January 2017. After radical debridement, the size of wounds ranged from 5.0 cm×2.0 cm to 10.0 cm×7.0 cm. Wounds with size below or equal to 6.0 cm ×2.5 cm were repaired with free flaps based on the superficial palmar branch of radial artery, with flap area ranging from 2.5 cm×2.2 cm to 6.0 cm×4.5 cm. The superficial palmar branch of radial artery, subcutaneous vein, and palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve underwent end-to-end anastomosis with digital proper artery, dorsal superficial vein, and digital proper nerve in the finger, respectively. The donor sites were sutured directly. Wounds with size larger than 6.0 cm×2.5 cm were repaired with free flaps based on the dorsal carpal branch of ulnar artery, with flap area ranging from 4.5 cm×3.0 cm to 12.0 cm×8.5 cm. The dorsal carpal branch of ulnar artery, subcutaneous vein, and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve underwent end-to-end anastomosis with digital proper artery, dorsal superficial vein, and digital proper nerve in the finger, respectively. The donor sites were sutured directly or covered by full-thickness skin graft from abdomen. Results: Five free flaps based on the superficial palmar branch of radial artery and 8 free flaps based on the dorsal carpal branch of ulnar artery were used in the patients. In one week after surgery, 12 flaps survived completely, while one free flap based on the dorsal carpal branch of ulnar artery suffered from slight infection, after depressing change, it survived in the end. After the follow-up of half a year, the flaps were full in shape and the distance of two-point discrimination of ranged from 4.0 to 7.0 mm. The fingers showed good functional recovery and no deformity. The grade of function of the fingers was

  11. Evidence evaluation in fingerprint comparison and automated fingerprint identification systems--Modeling between finger variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli Anthonioz, N M; Champod, C

    2014-02-01

    In the context of the investigation of the use of automated fingerprint identification systems (AFIS) for the evaluation of fingerprint evidence, the current study presents investigations into the variability of scores from an AFIS system when fingermarks from a known donor are compared to fingerprints that are not from the same source. The ultimate goal is to propose a model, based on likelihood ratios, which allows the evaluation of mark-to-print comparisons. In particular, this model, through its use of AFIS technology, benefits from the possibility of using a large amount of data, as well as from an already built-in proximity measure, the AFIS score. More precisely, the numerator of the LR is obtained from scores issued from comparisons between impressions from the same source and showing the same minutia configuration. The denominator of the LR is obtained by extracting scores from comparisons of the questioned mark with a database of non-matching sources. This paper focuses solely on the assignment of the denominator of the LR. We refer to it by the generic term of between-finger variability. The issues addressed in this paper in relation to between-finger variability are the required sample size, the influence of the finger number and general pattern, as well as that of the number of minutiae included and their configuration on a given finger. Results show that reliable estimation of between-finger variability is feasible with 10,000 scores. These scores should come from the appropriate finger number/general pattern combination as defined by the mark. Furthermore, strategies of obtaining between-finger variability when these elements cannot be conclusively seen on the mark (and its position with respect to other marks for finger number) have been presented. These results immediately allow case-by-case estimation of the between-finger variability in an operational setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Does mean mean MEAN!? Digits For A Very Long Time Giving Us The Finger!: 1881 Statistics Log-Law was: Quanta=Digits!: BEC; Zipf 1/f-Law; Information-Thy; Random-#s = Euler V Bernoulli; Q-Computing = Arithmetic; P=/=NP SANS Complexity: Euclid 3-Mille

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward

    2008-03-01

    Classic statistics digits Newcomb[Am.J.Math.4,39,1881]-Weyl[Goett.Nachr.1912]-Benford[Proc.Am.Phil.Soc.78,4,51,1938]("NeWBe")probability ON-AVERAGE/MEAN log-law: =log[1+1/d]=log[(d+1)/d][google:``Benford's-Law'';"FUZZYICS": Siegel[AMS Nat.-Mtg.:2002&2008)]; Raimi[Sci.Am.221,109,1969]; Hill[Proc.AMS,123,3,887,1996]=log-base=units=SCALE-INVARIANCE!. Algebraic-inverse d=1/[ê(w)-1]: BOSONS(1924)=DIGITS(P(d=0)>=oo vs. P(d=1)> ,... simple-arithmetic!

  13. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  14. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-08-29

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis.

  15. Stainless steel quadralatch finger test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    The design of the quadralatch on the universal samplers was changed in response to flammable gas operating constraints. Additional redesign of the fingers was included to facilitate manufacturability. The new design was tested to assure satisfactory performance. It was shown that the fingers can hold a sampler in place with an upward force of at least 2200 N (500 pounds) and that the mechanical remote latch unit can release the quadralatch under this condition of maximum upward force

  16. Digital dermatoglyphics of Bulgarians from northeast Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karev, G B

    1986-01-01

    Digital dermatoglyphics were collected from 1,065 male and 1,065 female Bulgarians from northeast Bulgaria. None of the subjects had a diagnosed or suspected genetic or chronic disease of any kind. The fingerprints were classified by the 18-type system of Monique de Lestrange, modified to provide rapid and easy comparison with simpler classification systems. All the standard finger pattern indices were calculated. Certain modifications were introduced into the delta indices, it being borne in mind that each tented arch possesses a triradius and each complex (three-centered, accidental) whorl contains three triradii. A deltadiagram was constructed and its configuration was compared with those of some other populations. In addition, a new radioulnar index was proposed, representing a ratio between all the radial and all the ulnar patterns. The total, absolute, ulnar and radial finger ridge counts were calculated and their sample distributions were investigated. The dermatoglyphic features were evaluated and presented for each sex and each hand separately in order to investigate both the sex and bilateral differences. The set of data presented in this paper is a component of the physical anthropology of the general Bulgarian population. At the same time these data can be used as controls when analyzing the dermatoglyphic findings in Bulgarian patients with genetic diseases or congenital malformations.

  17. Finger replantation: surgical technique and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, S; Dap, F; Dautel, G

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we discuss the surgical technique of finger replantation in detail, distinguishing particularities of technique in cases of thumb amputation, children fingertip replantation, ring finger avulsion, and very distal replantations. We emphasize the principles of bone shortening, the spare part concept, the special importance of nerve sutures and the use of vein graft in case of avulsion or crushing. However, even if finger replantation is now a routine procedure, a clear distinction should be made between revascularization and functional success. The indications for finger replantation are then detailed in the second part of this paper. The absolute indications for replantation are thumb, multiple fingers, transmetacarpal or hand, and any upper extremity amputation in a child whatever the level. Fingertip amputations distal to the insertion of the Flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) are also a good indication. Other cases are more controversial because of the poor functional outcome, especially for the index finger, which is often functionally excluded. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  18. Cessation age of breast-feeding and pacifier use is associated with persistent finger-sucking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Emiko; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Koji; Furugen, Reiko; Kitamura, Masayasu; Kawashita, Yumiko; Hayashida, Hideaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Iijima, Youichi; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although some studies have reported that breast-feeding and pacifier use influence finger-sucking, few have demonstrated whether the age at cessation of breast-feeding or pacifier use and persistent finger-sucking are related. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether the age at cessation of breast-feeding and pacifier use influenced persistent finger-sucking. A cross-sectional study of 555 36- to 47-month-olds was conducted in Nagasaki, Japan, using a questionnaire. Using the optimal cutoff point in a receiver-operating characteristic curve, the age was estimated at which cessation of pacifier use and breast-feeding had the most significant effect on persistent finger-sucking, and the estimated ages were assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis, incorporating all the questions in the questionnaire as independent variables. The odds ratios for persistent finger-sucking when breast-feeding was stopped at an age younger than 12 months old or when pacifier use was stopped at an age younger than 14 months old were 3.77 (95 percent confidence interval (CI)=1.97-7.22) and 8.62 (95 percent CI=2.56-29.04), respectively. Cessation of breast-feeding before 12 months old or pacifier use before 14 months old was associated with persistent finger-sucking.

  19. Somatotopic Map and Inter- and Intra-Digit Distance in Brodmann Area 2 by Pressure Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Phil; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Gim, Seon-Young; Kim, Woo-Ram; Mun, Kyung-Ryul; Lim, Dae-Woon; Lee, Bongsoo; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The somatotopic representation of the tactile stimulation on the finger in the brain is an essential part of understanding the human somatosensory system as well as rehabilitation and other clinical therapies. Many studies have used vibrotactile stimulations and reported finger somatotopic representations in the Brodmann area 3 (BA 3). On the contrary, few studies investigated finger somatotopic representation using pressure stimulations. Therefore, the present study aimed to find a comprehensive somatotopic representation (somatotopic map and inter- and intra-digit distance) within BA 2 of humans that could describe tactile stimulations on different joints across the fingers by applying pressure stimulation to three joints-the first (p1), second (p2), and third (p3) joints-of four fingers (index, middle, ring, and little finger). Significant differences were observed in the inter-digit distance between the first joints (p1) of the index and little fingers, and between the third joints (p3) of the index and little fingers. In addition, a significant difference was observed in the intra-digit distance between p1 and p3 of the little finger. This study suggests that a somatotopic map and inter- and intra-digit distance could be found in BA 2 in response to pressure stimulation on finger joints. PMID:27452859

  20. Amputation of finger by horse bite with complete avulsion of both flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Lior; Stahl, Shalom; Rovitsky, Alexey; Peled, Eli

    2011-08-08

    Amputation of fingers with tendon avulsion occurs through a traction injury, and most occur through a ring avulsion mechanism. Usually the flexor digitorum profundus is torn out with the amputated finger. Replantation usually is recommended only when the amputation is distal to the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion. Animal bites are relatively common, with a decreasing order of frequency of dogs, cats, and humans. Horse bites are relatively infrequent but are associated with crush injuries and tissue loss when they occur. This article describes a 23-year-old man with amputation of his middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx after being bitten by a horse. The amputated stump was avulsed with the middle finger flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis torn from the muscle-tendon junction from approximately the middle of the forearm. The patient had no other injuries, and he was able to move his other 4 fingers with only mild pain. As the amputated digit was not suitable for replantation, the wound was irrigated and debrided. The edges of the phalanx were trimmed, and the edges of the wound were sutured. Tetanus toxoid and rabies vaccine were administered, along with intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The patient was discharged from the hospital 2 days later, with no sign of infection of the wound or compartment syndrome of the forearm. This case demonstrates the weakest point in the myotendinous junction and emphasizes the importance of a careful physical examination in patients with a traumatic amputation. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Hyaluronic Acid Injections for Trigger Finger: A Double-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ding-Hao; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Lin, Shan-Hui; Chou, Chen-Liang; Chiu, Jan-Wei; Chiang, Chao-Ching; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effects of ultrasound-guided injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) versus steroid for trigger fingers in adults. Prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled study. Tertiary care center. Subjects with a diagnosis of trigger finger (N=36; 39 affected digits) received treatment and were evaluated. Subjects were randomly assigned to HA and steroid injection groups. Both study medications were injected separately via ultrasound guidance with 1 injection. The classification of trigger grading, pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction were evaluated before the injection and 3 weeks and 3 months after the injection. At 3 months, 12 patients (66.7%) in the HA group and 17 patients (89.5%) in the steroid group exhibited no triggering of the affected fingers (P=.124). The treatment results at 3 weeks and 3 months showed similar changes in the Quinnell scale (P=.057 and .931, respectively). A statistically significant interaction effect between group and time was found for visual analog scale (VAS) and Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire (MHQ) evaluation (Pinjection (steroid 0.5±1.1 vs HA 2.7±2.4; Pinjection of HA demonstrated promising results for the treatment of trigger fingers. The optimal frequency, dosage, and molecular weight of HA injections for trigger fingers deserve further investigation for future clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Involvement of the Interosseous and Lumbrical Muscle-Tendon Units in the Lateral and Spiral Cords in Dupuytren's Disease of the Middle Fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Achilleas; Karpinski, Marta

    2017-07-01

    The nature of intrinsic muscle involvement in Dupuytren's disease of the middle fingers (long and ring) remains poorly characterized. Over the years, the authors have observed that both the spiral and lateral digital cords in the middle fingers receive contribution from intrinsic muscle-tendon units. This report describes the anatomical characteristics and frequency of intrinsic muscle-tendon unit involvement in Dupuytren's disease of the middle fingers. Intrinsic muscle involvement in the middle digits was recorded in the operative reports of patients undergoing Dupuytren's surgery between October of 2013 and February of 2016. The anatomical variations of diseased fascia were delineated and classified. Of the 113 digits with Dupuytren's contracture operated on during this period, 52 involved the middle fingers (12 long and 40 ring fingers). Intrinsic muscles were found to be involved in the contracture of 14 of these digits. Two unique contracture patterns were identified: type I contracture, which involves a lateral digital cord originating from intrinsic muscle-tendon units and contracting only the proximal interphalangeal joint; and type II contracture, which involves a spiral cord receiving contribution from intrinsic muscle-tendon units and contracting both the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints. The frequency of type I and type II contractures was 6 percent and 12 percent, respectively. Intrinsic hand muscles may contribute to Dupuytren's disease in the middle digits, and the authors suggest resecting cords as close as possible to their musculotendinous origin to improve postoperative outcomes.

  3. Finger multibiometric cryptosystems: fusion strategy and template security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jialiang; Li, Qiong; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2014-03-01

    We address two critical issues in the design of a finger multibiometric system, i.e., fusion strategy and template security. First, three fusion strategies (feature-level, score-level, and decision-level fusions) with the corresponding template protection technique are proposed as the finger multibiometric cryptosystems to protect multiple finger biometric templates of fingerprint, finger vein, finger knuckle print, and finger shape modalities. Second, we theoretically analyze different fusion strategies for finger multibiometric cryptosystems with respect to their impact on security and recognition accuracy. Finally, the performance of finger multibiometric cryptosystems at different fusion levels is investigated on a merged finger multimodal biometric database. The comparative results suggest that the proposed finger multibiometric cryptosystem at feature-level fusion outperforms other approaches in terms of verification performance and template security.

  4. Calculation of the static forces acting on ACV bag-finger skirts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y. N.; Hua, Y.

    A mathematical model of the geometry formation of an ACV bag-finger skirt is developed to determine skirt shape and its deflection for varying cushion pressures, and calculations for the reactions of supports of the rigid structure on the skirt at the inner and outer attachment points are obtained. The model assumption that the finger triangle of the two-dimensional bag-finger skirt turns around the inner attachment point with changing ratio of cushion pressure to bag pressure is confirmed by experiments using skirt rigs. Good agreement is found between theoretical and experimental results, and it is shown that when the cushion pressure is changing, the pressure ratio is the essential dimensionless parameter for the skirt geometry formation and its deflection, and for the forces acting on it.

  5. Simultaneous Dorsal Dislocation of the Proximal and Distal Interphalangeal Joints in the Middle Finger: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Sbai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dorsal dislocation of a proximal or distal interphalangeal joint is a common clinical problem. However, simultaneous dislocation of both joints in the same digit is rare. Case Presentation A 32-year-old male injured his left hand third finger while biking. Examination revealed a stepladder deformity. Neurovascular examination was normal. Radiographs revealed dorsal dislocation of both the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints. The finger was reduced easily by longitudinal manual traction under the digital block. The finger was splinted in the intrinsic plus position for 3 weeks accompanied with active range of motion. After 6 months, the patient returned to normal sporting activity without limitation of motion. Conclusions In case of simultaneous dorsal dislocation of a proximal and distal interphalangeal joint, closed reduction is the treatment of choice and it could result in good and normal range of motion.

  6. Admittance Control of a Multi-Finger Arm Based on Manipulability of Fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Huang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the previous studies, admittance control and impedance control for a finger-arm robot using the manipulability of the finger were studied and methods of realizing the controls have been proposed. In this study, two 3-DOF fingers are attached to the end-effector of a 6-DOF arm to configure a multi-finger arm robot. Based on the previous methods, the authors have proposed an admittance control for a multi-finger arm robot using the manipulability of the fingers in this study. Algorithms of the averaging method and the mini-max method were introduced to establish a manipulability criterion of the two fingers in order to generate a cooperative movement of the arm. Comparison of the admittance controls combined with the top search method and local optimization method for the multi-finger arm robot was made and features of the control methods were also discussed. The stiffness control and damping control were experimentally evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  7. Robotic finger perturbation training improves finger postural steadiness and hand dexterity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Ikeda, Atsutoshi; Shinohara, Minoru

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to understand the effect of robotic finger perturbation training on steadiness in finger posture and hand dexterity in healthy young adults. A mobile robotic finger training system was designed to have the functions of high-speed mechanical response, two degrees of freedom, and adjustable loading amplitude and direction. Healthy young adults were assigned to one of the three groups: random perturbation training (RPT), constant force training (CFT), and control. Subjects in RPT and CFT performed steady posture training with their index finger using the robot in different modes: random force in RPT and constant force in CFT. After the 2-week intervention period, fluctuations of the index finger posture decreased only in RPT during steady position-matching tasks with an inertial load. Purdue pegboard test score improved also in RPT only. The relative change in finger postural fluctuations was negatively correlated with the relative change in the number of completed pegs in the pegboard test in RPT. The results indicate that finger posture training with random mechanical perturbations of varying amplitudes and directions of force is effective in improving finger postural steadiness and hand dexterity in healthy young adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlation of morphological variants of the soft palate and Need's ratio in normal individuals: A digital cephalometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Pradhuman; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Sachdeva, Suresh K; Juneja, Suruchi [Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sriganganagar (India); Kumaraswam; Kikkeri Lakshminarayana [Dept. of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Farooqia Dental College, Mysore (India); Basavaraju, Suman [Dept. of Periodontics, J.S.S Dental College, Mysore (India)

    2014-09-15

    The present study was aimed to investigate the variation of soft palate morphology in different age and gender groups. The correlations of radiographic velar length (VL), velar width (VW), pharyngeal depth (PD), and Need's ratio with soft palate variants were also studied in the North Indian subpopulation. The study sample consisted of 300 subjects aged between 15 and 45 (mean: 31.32) years. The velar morphology on lateral cephalograms was examined and grouped into six types. The results obtained were subjected to a statistical analysis to find the correlation between variants of the soft palate with gender and different age groups. The most frequent type of soft palate was leaf shaped (48.7%), and the least common was crook shaped (3.0%) among both the genders and various age groups, showing a significant correlation. The mean VL, VW, and PD values were significantly higher in males and significantly correlated with the types of soft palate. A significant correlation was observed between the mean VL, VW, PD, and Need's ratio with various age groups, showing an inconsistent pattern with an increase in age. The types of soft palate, gender, and Need's ratio were also significantly correlated, with an overall higher mean value of the Need's ratio among female subjects and the S-shaped soft palate. The knowledge of a varied spectrum of velar morphology and the variants of the soft palate help in a better understanding of the velopharyngeal closure and craniofacial anomalies.

  9. Tendon displacements during voluntary and involuntary finger movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Nathalie; Gijsbertse, Kaj; Selles, Ruud W; de Korte, Chris L; Veeger, DirkJan H E J; Stegeman, Dick F; Maas, Huub

    2018-01-23

    In the human hand, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. One potential cause for this is mechanical connections between the tendons and muscle bellies corresponding to the different fingers. The aim of this study was to determine the tendon displacement of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) of both the instructed and the neighboring, non-instructed fingers during single finger flexion movements. In nine healthy subjects (age 22-29 years), instructed and non-instructed FDS finger tendon displacement of the index, middle and ring finger was measured using 2D ultrasound analyzed with speckle tracking software in two conditions: active flexion of all finger joints with all fingers free to move and active flexion while the non-instructed fingers were restricted. Our results of the free movement protocol showed an average tendon displacement of 27 mm for index finger flexion, 21 mm for middle finger flexion and 17 mm for ring finger flexion. Displacements of the non-instructed finger tendons (≈12 mm) were higher than expected based of the amount of non-instructed finger movement. In the restricted protocol, we found that, despite minimal joint movements, substantial non-instructed finger tendon displacement (≈9 mm) was still observed, which was interpreted as a result of tendon strain. When this strain component was subtracted from the tendon displacement of the non-instructed fingers during the free movement condition, the relationship between finger movement and tendon displacement of the instructed and non-instructed finger became comparable. Thus, when studying non-instructed finger tendon displacement it is important to take tendon strain into consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gravity Induced Ordering of Frictional Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jon; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Flekkøy, Eirik

    2014-05-01

    Experiments on confined two-phase flow systems, involving air and a dense suspension, have revealed highly non-trivial flow morphologies. As the air displaces the suspension, the grains that make up the suspension tend to accumulate along the interface, and can build up force chains that jam the accumulated region. This dynamics will generate "frictional fingers" of air coated by a region of densely packed grains. The fingers have a characteristic width that balances surface tension and frictional forces of the densely packed grains. When these fingers grow under the influence of gravity, they can align either horizontally or vertically, or grow in a random isotropic fashion. The transition between the different modes of finger growth depends on the density of grains, and the gravitational force component. We present an analytic model to account for the transitions between the modes. We further present a numerical scheme that enables us to simulate the dynamics of the process. The numerical and analytic results are in good agreements with the experimental findings. Finally we show how this process could explain patterns that emerge naturally in early stages of dyke formation. These patterns are formed when hot fluid displaces partly molten rocks and packs the hard mineral grains composing it together, thereby forming finger structures that remain frozen in the dyke walls.

  11. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    KAUST Repository

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.

    2015-02-23

    © 2015 American Physical Society. The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularization on the interface is not provided by surface tension but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalize high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularized solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this "selection" of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analog with surface tension. We treat the numerical problem of computing these Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling, which turns out to be more subtle than the analog with surface tension, since kinetic undercooling permits finger shapes which are corner-free but not analytic. We provide numerical evidence for the selection mechanism by setting up a problem with both kinetic undercooling and surface tension and numerically taking the limit that the surface tension vanishes.

  12. Viscoelastic fingering with a pulsed pressure signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corvera Poire, E; Rio, J A del

    2004-01-01

    We derive a generalized Darcy's law in the frequency domain for a linear viscoelastic fluid flowing in a Hele-Shaw cell. This leads to an analytic expression for the dynamic permeability that has maxima which are several orders of magnitude larger than the static permeability. We then follow an argument of de Gennes (1987 Europhys. Lett. 2 195) to obtain the smallest possible finger width when viscoelasticity is important. Using this and a conservation law, we obtain the lowest bound for the width of a single finger displacing a viscoelastic fluid. When the driving force consists of a constant pressure gradient plus an oscillatory signal, our results indicate that the finger width varies in time following the frequency of the incident signal. Also, the amplitude of the finger width in time depends on the value of the dynamic permeability at the imposed frequency. When the finger is driven with a frequency that maximizes the permeability, variations in the amplitude are also maximized. This gives results that are very different for Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids. For the former ones the amplitude of the oscillation decays with frequency. For the latter ones on the other hand, the amplitude has maxima at the same frequencies that maximize the dynamic permeability

  13. The impact of finger counting habits on arithmetic in adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sharlene D; Soylu, Firat

    2014-07-01

    Here, we explored the impact of finger counting habits on arithmetic in both adults and children. Two groups of participants were examined, those that begin counting with their left hand (left-starters) and those that begin counting with their right hand (right-starters). For the adults, performance on an addition task in which participants added 2 two-digit numbers was compared. The results revealed that left-starters were slower than right-starters when adding and they had lower forward and backward digit-span scores. The children (aged 5-12) showed similar results on a single-digit timed addition task-right-starters outperformed left-starters. However, the children did not reveal differences in working memory or verbal and non-verbal intelligence as a function of finger counting habit. We argue that the motor act of finger counting influences how number is represented and suggest that left-starters may have a more bilateral representation that accounts for the slower processing.

  14. Finger island flaps for treatment of dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Antonova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue defect will form after operative treatment of the dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of fingers interphalangeal joints of the 2–3 grades after excision of the scar. Using the island flaps (Littler at the central vascular pedicle is one of the classical methods of plastic closure of such defects. Goal. To study the effectiveness of the surgical treatment of dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal joints of the fingers by using finger island flaps at the central vascular or neuro-vascular pedicle. Materials and methods. 14 operations were carried out on 13 patients for removing dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of triphalangeal fingers over a 2-year period (2013–2015. The group included patients with a flexion contracture of the 2–3 grades PIP joints of triphalangeal fingers. Operations were performed on average 5 months after the injury (from 1.5 up to 16 months. Finger island flap in all cases was taken from adjacent finger by using the blood supply of their common finger artery. In all cases the island flap on the central pedicel was used, in 9 cases digital nerve was included in the pedicle (Littler. Closure of donor wound was made with free-skin grafts. Permanent splinting of the hand with extension of the interphalangeal joints and moderate flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joints were performed during 7–8 days after surgery, then exercise therapy was prescribed. Results. The results were estimated 6 and 12 months after surgery. All the results were regarded as excellent. In 5 cases of using the flap on a vascular pedicle flap hypoesthesia was detected, that has not led to dysfunction of the hand. Contracture recurrence during follow-up was not observed. Conclusions. Using the surgery for treatment of dermato-desmogenic flexion contractures of proximal interphalangeal joints of the fingers with the island flaps at the central vascular or neuro

  15. Finger forces in fastball baseball pitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi; Nasu, Daiki; Kadota, Koji; Matsuo, Tomoyuki; Fleisig, Glenn S

    2017-08-01

    Forces imparted by the fingers onto a baseball are the final, critical aspects for pitching, however these forces have not been quantified previously as no biomechanical technology was available. In this study, an instrumented baseball was developed for direct measurement of ball reaction force by individual fingers and used to provide fundamental information on the forces during a fastball pitch. A tri-axial force transducer with a cable having an easily-detachable connector were installed in an official baseball. Data were collected from 11 pitchers who placed the fingertip of their index, middle, ring, or thumb on the transducer, and threw four-seam fastballs to a target cage from a flat mound. For the index and middle fingers, resultant ball reaction force exhibited a bimodal pattern with initial and second peaks at 38-39ms and 6-7ms before ball release, and their amplitudes were around 97N each. The ring finger and thumb produced single-peak forces of approximately 50 and 83N, respectively. Shear forces for the index and middle fingers formed distinct peak at 4-5ms before release, and the peaks summed to 102N; a kinetic source for backspin on the ball. An additional experiment with submaximal pitching effort showed a linear relationship of peak forces with ball velocity. The peak ball reaction force for fastballs exceeded 80% of maximum finger strength measured, suggesting that strengthening of the distal muscles is important both for enhancing performance and for avoiding injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Zinc-finger nucleases: a panoramic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dana

    2011-02-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are emerging as very powerful tools for directed genome modifications. Their key features are: a DNA-binding domain comprised of zinc fingers that can be designed to favor very specific targets; a nonspecific cleavage domain that must dimerize to cut DNA--this requirement enhances specificity and minimizes random cleavage. ZFNs have been shown to be effective in a wide range of organisms and cell types. This article reviews discoveries that led to the development of ZFNs, cites examples of successes in genome engineering, and projects how ZFNs may be used in the future, particularly in applications to humans.

  17. Contamination by human fingers. The Midas touch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdz, R.; Grass, F.

    2004-01-01

    Anthropogenic activity is one of the causes of contamination in the human environment: contamination of air, water, top soils, plants and food products has complex effects on human health problems. Wear and abrasion of various surfaces are constant processes in daily life, and commonly include interaction between human fingers and surfaces of every conceivable material. New methods for investigation of trace transfer processes by human fingers are described. Results of transfer for commonly used metals such as gold, silver, zinc, cadmium, tin, cobalt, nickel, chromium and iron are presented. Relationship between transfer of metals by touch and the general problem of purity in analytical activities is briefly discussed. (author)

  18. Admittance Control of a Multi-Finger Arm Based on Manipulability of Fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hori

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the previous studies, admittance control and impedance control for a finger‐arm robot using the manipulability of the finger were studied and methods of realizing the controls have been proposed. In this study, two 3‐DOF fingers are attached to the end‐effector of a 6‐DOF arm to configure a multi‐finger arm robot. Based on the previous methods, the authors have proposed an admittance control for a multi‐finger arm robot using the manipulability of the fingers in this study. Algorithms of the averaging method and the mini‐max method were introduced to establish a manipulability criterion of the two fingers in order to generate a cooperative movement of the arm. Comparison of the admittance controls combined with the top search method and local optimization method for the multi‐finger arm robot was made and features of the control methods were also discussed. The stiffness control and damping control were experimentally evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  19. You can count on the motor cortex: Finger counting habits modulate motor cortex activation evoked by numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschentscher, Nadja; Hauk, Olaf; Fischer, Martin H.; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2012-01-01

    The embodied cognition framework suggests that neural systems for perception and action are engaged during higher cognitive processes. In an event-related fMRI study, we tested this claim for the abstract domain of numerical symbol processing: is the human cortical motor system part of the representation of numbers, and is organization of numerical knowledge influenced by individual finger counting habits? Developmental studies suggest a link between numerals and finger counting habits due to the acquisition of numerical skills through finger counting in childhood. In the present study, digits 1 to 9 and the corresponding number words were presented visually to adults with different finger counting habits, i.e. left- and right-starters who reported that they usually start counting small numbers with their left and right hand, respectively. Despite the absence of overt hand movements, the hemisphere contralateral to the hand used for counting small numbers was activated when small numbers were presented. The correspondence between finger counting habits and hemispheric motor activation is consistent with an intrinsic functional link between finger counting and number processing. PMID:22133748

  20. ANALYSIS WITH MSC ADAMS OF A 5-FINGER AND 3-PHALANX /FINGER UNDER-ACTUATEDMECHANICAL HAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe POPESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the analysis with MSC ADAMS of a 5-fingered and 3-phalanx/finger underactuatedmechanical hand, designed by the author to work on industrial robots. Moreover, in order to increasegrasping safety in the automated handling process, the author has fitted each finger with a locking sequence inthe final phase of grasping. Thus, the mechanism of mechanical hand is considered to be a mechanical systemand is treated like a set of rigid bodies connected by mechanical linkages and elastic elements. To model andsimulate this mechanism with MSC ADAMS programme, the author covered the following stages: constructionof the model, testing-simulation, validation, finishing, parameterization, and optimization

  1. 'Knocking-fingers' chest compression technique in infant cardiac arrest: single-rescuer manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Sung Oh; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, Yong Sung; Kim, Oh Hyun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Cha, Kyoung-Chul

    2018-01-30

    We designed a new chest compression technique, the 'knocking-fingers' chest compression (KF) technique, for a single rescuer in infant cardiac arrest. We compared the effectiveness and feasibility between the KF technique and the two-finger (TF) and two-thumb encircling hands (TT) techniques. A prospective, randomized, crossover study was carried out to compare the quality of chest compression and ventilation between the KF, TF, and TT techniques using a 30 : 2 compression-to-ventilation ratio and mouth-to-mouth ventilation. The area of chest compression, finger(s) pain, and fatigability were measured to compare safety and feasibility. The total frequency of chest compression for 5 min was the highest with the KF technique, followed by the TF and TT techniques. The total frequency of ventilation for 5 min was higher with the KF and TF techniques compared with the TT technique. The total hands-off time was the shortest with the KF technique, followed by the TF and TT techniques. The area of chest compression was the smallest in KF technique. Participants complained of severe finger pain and high fatigability in TF technique. The single-rescuer KF chest compression technique is an effective alternative to the TF or TT techniques for infant cardiac arrest.

  2. Non-invasive determination of the irradiation dose in fingers using low-frequency EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdravkova, M; Crokart, N; Trompier, F; Beghein, N; Gallez, B; Debuyst, R

    2004-01-01

    Several reports in the literature have described the effects of radiation in workers who exposed their fingers to intense radioactive sources. The radiation injuries occurring after local exposure to a high dose (20 to 100 Gy) could lead to the need for amputation. Follow-up of victims needs to be more rational with a precise knowledge of the irradiated area that risks tissue degradation and necrosis. It has been described previously that X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy could be used to assess the dose in irradiated amputated fingers. Here, we propose the use of low-frequency EPR spectroscopy to evaluate non-invasively the absorbed dose. Low-frequency microwaves are indeed less absorbed by water and penetrate more deeply into living material (∼10 mm in tissues using 1 GHz spectrometers). This work presents preliminary results obtained with baboon and human fingers compared with human dry phalanxes placed inside a surface-coil resonator. The EPR signal increased linearly with the dose. The ratio of the slopes of the dry bone to whole finger linear regression lines was around 5. The detection limit achievable with the present spectrometer and resonator is around 60 Gy, which is well within the range of accidentally exposed fingers. It is likely that the detection limit could be improved in the future, thanks to further technical spectrometer and resonator developments as well as to appropriate spectrum deconvolution into native and dosimetric signals

  3. Task specificity of finger dexterity tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; Krul, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Finger dexterity tests are generally used to assess performance decrease due to gloves, cold and pathology. It is generally assumed that the O’Connor and Purdue Pegboard test yield similar results. In this experiment we compared these two tests for dry conditions without gloves, and for dry and wet

  4. Task specificity of finger dexterity tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; Krul, A.J.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Finger dexterity tests are generally used to assess performance decrease due to gloves, cold and pathology. It is generally assumed that the O'Connor and Purdue Pegboard test yield similar results. In this experiment we compared these two tests for dry conditions without gloves, and for dry and wet

  5. Finger cold-induced vasodilation : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H. A M

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes

  6. Treatment Options for Mallet Finger : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jeroen M.; Beets, Michiel R.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Rood, Akkie; Welters, Carlo F. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mallet finger is a common injury. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the different treatment options of mallet injuries and their indications, outcomes, and potential complications. Methods: A literature-based study was conducted using the PubMed database comprising world

  7. Finger Search in Grammar-Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Christiansen, Anders Roy; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2016-01-01

    random access, that is, given a position in the original uncompressed string report the character at that position. In this paper we study the random access problem with the finger search property, that is, the time for a random access query should depend on the distance between a specified index f...

  8. Designing Fingers in Simulation based on Imprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuf Schwartz, Lukas Christoffer Malte; Wolniakowski, Adam; Werner, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Gripper design is nowadays an area of ongoing research activity. The problem of creating a generic and automated gripper design approach tailored for a specific task is still far from solved. In this paper, we propose a new method of generating finger cut-outs aimed at simplifying the design...

  9. Finger cold-induced vasodilation : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes

  10. Cutaneous Microembolism of Fingers and Toes

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Wollina; André Koch; Birgit Heinig; Georgi Tchernev; Torello Lotti

    2018-01-01

    A macro vascular embolism is a well-known emergency. In contrast, cutaneous microembolism is a lesser known symptom. However, cutaneous microembolism of fingers and toes is a red flag symptom for vascular emergencies. The underlying cause may involve infectious, immunological, metabolic and physical disorders, coagulation disorders and malignancies. Early recognition can help to live safe.

  11. [Repair of skin and soft tissue defects at distal end of finger and donor site with relaying reversed perforator flaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chengliang; Wei, Zairong; Sun, Guangfeng; Tang, Xiujun; Jin, Wenhu; Li, Hai; Wu, Bihua; Wang, Dali

    2015-04-01

    To explore the clinical effects of relaying reversed perforator flaps in repairing skin and soft tissue defects at distal end of finger and donor site. Seventeen patients (17 fingers) with skin and soft tissue defects at distal end of finger were hospitalized from June 2011 to June 2013. The reversed digital artery perforator flap with branch of digital nerve was used to repair the defect. The first donor site was repaired by dorsal metacarpal artery perforator flap; the second donor site was closed by suturing. The area of skin defect at distal end of finger ranged from 2.0 cm x 1.5 cm to 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm, and the area of digital artery perforator flap and dorsal metacarpal artery perforator flap ranged from 2.2 cm x 1.5 cm to 3.6 cm x 2.5 cm and 2.5 cm x 2.0 cm to 4.2 cm x 3.0 cm, respectively. All the 34 flaps survived completely. Cyanosis and partial necrosis of the epidermis appeared in 1 flap, which was healed after dressing change. All the patients were followed up for 1 to 18 months, with mean time of 8 months. The color, texture and appearance of flaps were satisfactory. There was no depression or breakdown in the first donor sites. Some linear scars appeared in the second donor sites, but they did not affect the general appearance. The donor sites at joint or tendon did not affect the joint activity after healing. The results of function evaluation of range of active movement of the fingers were excellent in 15 cases and good in 2 cases. The results of sensation of the flaps were S3 in 1 finger, S4 in 2 fingers, and S5 in 14 fingers. The distance of two-point discrimination of flaps ranged from 5 to 7 mm, with mean distance of 6 mm. Relaying reversed perforator flap, with reliable blood supply and both donor sites in the hand, can improve the appearance and function of the first donor site as well as repair skin and soft tissue defects at distal end of finger.

  12. The Relative Contribution to Small Finger Abduction of the Ulnar Versus Radial Slip of the EDM: Implications for Tendon Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinleye, Sheriff D; Culbertson, Maya Deza; Cappelleti, Giacomo; Garofolo, Garret; Choueka, Jack

    2017-09-01

    The extensor digiti minimi (EDM) tendon is commonly divided into a radial slip (EDM-R) and an ulnar slip (EDM-U). To our knowledge, the degree to which each EDM slip concomitantly abducts the small finger with active extension has not been formally tested. This study sought to characterize the comparative contributions of finger abduction inherent to each slip of the EDM to observe the sequelae of active small finger extension following transfer of the contralateral slip. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric hands were used in this study. Starting with the hand in resting position, a controlled traction of 10 N was applied to each slip of the EDM tendon. The range of small finger abduction with respect to the fixed ring finger was recorded utilizing infrared reflective markers tracked through the range of motion using a digital video camera. The mean abduction of the small finger when the radial slip of the EDM tendon was tested was 13.33° (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.10°-16.55°), which was significantly different ( P ≤ .001) than small finger abduction produced by the ulnar slip of the EDM, with a mean of 23.72° (95% CI: 19.40°-28.04°). Given the fact that the ulnar slip of the EDM tendon is shown to be the major contributor of aberrant abduction with active small finger extension, as traction on this slip produces almost twice as much abduction as the radial slip, the EDM-U is the ideal donor graft with respect to tendon transfers of the EDM.

  13. Novel Dexterous Robotic Finger Concept with Controlled Stiffness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, M.; Carloni, Raffaella; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel robotic finger concept for variable impedance grasping in unstructured tasks. The novel robotic finger combines three key features: minimal actuation, variable mechanical compliance and full manipulability. This combination of features allows for a minimal component

  14. Activity patterns of extrinsic finger flexors and extensors during movements of instructed and non-instructed fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Nathalie; Stegeman, Dick F; van den Noort, Josien C; H E J Veeger, DirkJan; Maas, Huub

    2018-02-01

    The fingers of the human hand cannot be controlled fully independently. This phenomenon may have a neurological as well as a mechanical basis. Despite previous studies, the neuromechanics of finger movements are not fully understood. The aims of this study were (1) to assess the activation and coactivation patterns of finger specific flexor and extensor muscle regions during instructed single finger flexion and (2) to determine the relationship between enslaved finger movements and respective finger muscle activation. In 9 healthy subjects (age 22-29), muscle activation was assessed during single finger flexion using a 90 surface electromyography electrode grid placed over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and the extensor digitorum (ED). We found (1) no significant differences in muscle activation timing between fingers, (2) considerable muscle activity in flexor and extensor regions associated with the non-instructed fingers and (3) no correlation between the muscle activations and corresponding movement of non-instructed fingers. A clear disparity was found between the movement pattern of the non-instructed fingers and the activity pattern of the corresponding muscle regions. This suggests that mechanical factors, such as intertendinous and myofascial connections, may also affect finger movement independency and need to be taken into consideration when studying finger movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Free toe pulp flap for finger pulp and volar defect reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoshid R Balan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fingertip injury requiring flap cover is very common in the modern era. The ideal cover should fulfill both functional and aesthetic improvement. Materials and Methods: From June 2015 to April 2016, we performed seven free toe pulp flaps for finger defect reconstruction. All patients were males. Five flaps were done in emergency post-traumatic cases, and two were done in elective set up. The cases included reconstruction of three thumbs, one index and one ring finger in an emergency set up and two ring fingers in the elective. Thumb reconstruction was done with great toe lateral pulp and the other digits reconstructed with second toe pulp flap. Follow-up evaluation included both functional and aesthetic assessment. Results: Five flaps survived completely, one suffered partial loss, and one flap failed completely. The median follow-up period was 9 months. The median duration of surgery was 255 min (range 210 to 300 min. The median two-point discrimination was 6.5 mm (range 4–8 mm. There was the return of temperature sensation in all patients; two had cold intolerance. The Semmes-Weinstein monofilament score varied from 3.61 to 5.07 (median filament index value 4.31/pressure value of 2 g/mm2. Three patients had delayed donor site wound healing. Conclusions: The free toe pulp flap is an efficient choice for fingertip and volar finger defects reconstruction with an excellent tissue match.

  16. Multi-Finger Interaction and Synergies in Finger Flexion and Extension Force Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaebum Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to discover finger interaction indices during single-finger ramp tasks and multi-finger coordination during a steady state force production in two directions, flexion, and extension. Furthermore, the indices of anticipatory adjustment of elemental variables (i.e., finger forces prior to a quick pulse force production were quantified. It is currently unknown whether the organization and anticipatory modulation of stability properties are affected by force directions and strengths of in multi-finger actions. We expected to observe a smaller finger independency and larger indices of multi-finger coordination during extension than during flexion due to both neural and peripheral differences between the finger flexion and extension actions. We also examined the indices of the anticipatory adjustment between different force direction conditions. The anticipatory adjustment could be a neural process, which may be affected by the properties of the muscles and by the direction of the motions. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC force was larger for flexion than for extension, which confirmed the fact that the strength of finger flexor muscles (e.g., flexor digitorum profundus was larger than that of finger extensor (e.g., extensor digitorum. The analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM hypothesis was used to quantify the motor synergy of elemental variables by decomposing two sources of variances across repetitive trials, which identifies the variances in the uncontrolled manifold (VUCM and that are orthogonal to the UCM (VORT. The presence of motor synergy and its strength were quantified by the relative amount of VUCM and VORT. The strength of motor synergies at the steady state was larger in the extension condition, which suggests that the stability property (i.e., multi-finger synergies may be a direction specific quantity. However, the results for the existence of anticipatory adjustment; however, no difference

  17. Transition to finger convection in double-diffusive convection

    OpenAIRE

    Kellner, M.; Tilgner, A.

    2014-01-01

    Finger convection is observed experimentally in an electrodeposition cell in which a destabilizing gradient of copper ions is maintained against a stabilizing temperature gradient. This double-diffusive system shows finger convection even if the total density stratification is unstable. Finger convection is replaced by an ordinary convection roll if convection is fast enough to prevent sufficient heat diffusion between neighboring fingers, or if the thermal buoyancy force is less than 1/30 of...

  18. Prevalence of self-reported finger deformations and occupational risk factors among professional cooks: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Shigeru

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have pointed out that the school lunch workers in Japan are suffering from work-related disorders including finger deformations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported finger deformations and the association with job-related risk factors. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study of 5,719 subjects (response rate: 81%, 982 men and 4,737 women was undertaken during September 2003 to February 2004. Results Finger deformations were found among 11.7% of the men and 35.6% of the women studied, with significant differences among sex, age and sex-age groups. For both men and women the pattern of finger deformations across the hand was similar for the right and the left hand. For women, the deformations were found in about 10% of the distal interphalangeal joints of all fingers. Based on multiple logistic regression analyses, the factors female sex, age, the number of cooked lunches per cook and cooking activities were independently associated with the prevalence of finger deformations. High prevalence odds ratios were found for those frequently carrying or using tools by hands such as delivering containers, distributing meals, preparing dishes, washing equipment, cutting and stirring foods. Conclusions Among the school lunch workers studied, women had a higher prevalence of finger deformations on all joints of both hands. Various cooking tasks were associated with the prevalence of finger deformations. The results suggest that improvements in working conditions are important for preventing work-related disorders such as finger deformations.

  19. [The choice of the finger dermatoglyphic patterns for the dermatoglyphic studies depending on the functional activity of the hands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitin, V A; Kir'yanov, P A

    The objective of the present study was to choose the finger dermatoglyphic patterns most closely related to the functional right- and left-handedness. The dependence of significance of the said patterns on the functional right- and left-handedness was estimated based on the results of the determination of the absolute number of various types and subtypes of finger dermatoglyphics on the right and left hands as well as their percentage ratio. The results obtained in the study were used to develop the classification of the finger dermatoglyphic patterns based on the analysis of the complicated influence of the functional right- and left-handedness on the prevalence of one or another pattern on the right or left hand. It was shown that the totality of the intricate finger dermatoglyphic patterns can not be used for the purpose of the dermatoglyphic studies due to their structural diversity.

  20. Digital broadcasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Hyeong

    1999-06-01

    This book contains twelve chapters, which deals with digitization of broadcast signal such as digital open, digitization of video signal and sound signal digitization of broadcasting equipment like DTPP and digital VTR, digitization of equipment to transmit such as digital STL, digital FPU and digital SNG, digitization of transmit about digital TV transmit and radio transmit, digital broadcasting system on necessity and advantage, digital broadcasting system abroad and Korea, digital broadcasting of outline, advantage of digital TV, ripple effect of digital broadcasting and consideration of digital broadcasting, ground wave digital broadcasting of DVB-T in Europe DTV in U.S.A and ISDB-T in Japan, HDTV broadcasting, satellite broadcasting, digital TV broadcasting in Korea, digital radio broadcasting and new broadcasting service.

  1. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger.

  2. Scavenging ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krey, P.W.; Toonkel, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    Total 90 Sr fallout is adjusted for dry deposition, and scavenging ratios are calculated at Seattle, New York, and Fayetteville, Ark. Stable-lead scavenging ratios are also presented for New York. These ratios show large scatter, but average values are generally inversely proportional to precipitation. Stable-lead ratios decrease more rapidly with precipitation than do those of 90 Sr, a decrease reflecting a lesser availability of lead to the scavenging processes

  3. Production of fish finger from sand smelt ( Atherina boyeri , RISSO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, changes of chemical, microbiological load and sensory properties of fish fingers prepared from sand smelt (Atherina boyeri, RISSO 1810) were investigated during storage (for 6 months at -18°C). The fish finger nutritional composition changed with the fish finger process. The changes in moisture, crude protein, ...

  4. The Incidence of Finger Ridge Counts among the Christian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was attempted to obtain the occurrence total and absolute finger ridge counts from 102 unrelated Christian populations (60 males and 42 females) of Mysore city, Karnataka state of India. Data were collected by biometric scanner (USB finger print reader). The mean values of Total finger ridge count and ...

  5. Association Between Finger Clubbing and Chronic Lung Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finger clubbed patients had higher risk of hypoxemia (46.7%), pulmonary hypertension (46.7%) and advanced disease in WHO stage III/ IV (91.7%) compared to non-finger clubbed patients. Finger clubbed patients had lower CD4 cells count and percentage (median 369cells, 13%) compared to non-clubbed patients ...

  6. Measurement of Finger Blood Flow in Raynauds Phenomenon by Radionuclide Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Joon; Choi, Sung Jae; Koh, Chang Soon

    1987-01-01

    In Raynauds phenomenon, the authors measured finger blood flow after ice water exposure by analyzing the time activity curve of radionuclide angiography on both hands. The results were as follows: 1) The digital blood flow did not decrease after ice water exposure in normal subjects. 2) In the patients with Raynauds phenomenon, there were two groups: the one had decreased digital blood flow after cold exposure, and the other had paradoxically increased digital blood flow after cold exposure. 3) There was no difference in the digital blood flow of hand in room temperature between the normal and the patients with reduced digital blood flow after cold exposure, but the digital blood flow of the hand in room temperature was markedly reduced in the patients with paradoxically increased flow after cold exposure. 4) In the static image the difference was not significant in comparison with the dynamic study, because it represents pooling of the blood in the vein rather than flow. 5) After the treatment with nifedipine, the digital blood flow increased. In conclusion, the radionuclide angiography was useful in measuring the digital blood flow in Raynauds phenomenon, and further studies with various drugs is expected.

  7. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found inmany structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers.In this article, we explore this ...

  8. [Treatment of mallet finger with dorsal nail glued splint: retrospective analysis of 270 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facca, S; Nonnenmacher, J; Liverneaux, P

    2007-11-01

    Management of mallet finger is both difficult and controversial. Sequelae are not uncommon, particularly after surgical treatment. Many authors advocate orthopedic treatment which is less invasive but requires greater patient participation to implement. Despite the large number of orthopedic methods proposed, none has proven superiority. We report here our experience with a dorsal adhesive splint which preserves digital pulp function and improves observance. This retrospective analysis included 270 mallet fingers presenting 153 tendon injuries and 117 bony injuries in 265 patients aged 42 years on average and treated from 2003 to 2005. Most of the tendon injuries involved the medius (38.7%) and most of the bony injuries involved the ring finger (35.4%). A splint was fashioned for the two distal phalanges and glued to the nail plate filed for this purpose. The splint was fashioned out of an L-shaped plastic sheet of thermo-malleable plastic dipped in hot water (60 degrees C). The L was molded to the dorsal aspect of the phalanges and rolled like a ring around the second phalanx, then glued to the nail. The splint was worn for eight weeks by patients with a tendon injury and six weeks for those with a bony injury. The splint was then worn at night for two weeks. Three criteria were used to analyze outcome: residual extension deficit, joint involvement, complications. Mean follow-up was 18 months. Mean time from trauma to definitive installation of the splint was six days. The complication rate for this orthopedic method was 14.3%, complications being observed in 6% of patients. All complications were transient except for one case of swan neck deformity and one case of painful osteoarthritis. Thirty splints (11%) became unglued but were all reinstalled using the same protocol. Thirty fingers (14%) presented residual deficit of active extension measuring less than 20 degrees. The quality of the result depended on the type of injury: tendon injuries led to extension

  9. A Diabetic Elderly Man with Finger Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Noraini; Badrin, Salziyan; Wan Abdullah, Wan Noor Hasbee

    2018-03-01

    Fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis is a differential diagnosis that can be considered in diabetic patients who present with a poorly healing ulcer. Although its prevalence is low, it can occur in patients with immunocompromised status. Here we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus who presented with a 1-month history of an unhealed ulcer over the tip of his left middle finger. He experienced a cat bite over his left middle finger 1 month prior to the appearance of the lesion. A skin biopsy revealed the presence of Sporothrix schenckii . Oral itraconazole 200 mg twice daily was started empirically and the patient showed marked improvement in the skin lesion after 2 months of therapy.

  10. Botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors in hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, A A; McGinn, M; Chappell, R

    2000-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors followed by intensive training of finger extensors. Fourteen subjects with chronic hemiplegia spasticity of the upper limb had electromyographic-guided botulinum toxin injection into the long finger flexors. All patients presented with minimal active finger extension with the wrist flexed, sustained clonus of the finger flexors, functional proximal arm function, and absence of fixed contracture. Cadaver dissections directed selection of two injection sites: the flexor digitorum sublimis and the flexor digitorum profundus. Fifty mouse units of botulinum toxin were injected into each muscle. After injection, the subjects were instructed in a home program of stretching the long finger flexors, upper limb weight bearing with a weight-bearing splint, and exercise to improve finger extension control. Compared with preinjection measures, assessment the first week after the initial injection showed significantly reduced tone, reduced clonus, and greater active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position. Four months later, the Ashworth scale increased to preinjection levels in the six subjects with repeated injections but was again decreased postinjection. Active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position and clonus showed a statistically nonsignificant trend toward cumulative improvement after the second injection. The greatest change in finger extension and spasticity reduction occurred after the first injection. Continued significant improvement in finger extension was not observed.

  11. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoding

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on performance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineering fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization; in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic performance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  12. A Parametric Modelling Method for Dexterous Finger Reachable Workspaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhen Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The well-known algorithms, such as the graphic method, analytical method or numerical method, have some defects when modelling the dexterous finger workspace, which is a significant kinematical feature of dexterous hands and valuable for grasp planning, motion control and mechanical design. A novel modelling method with convenient and parametric performances is introduced to generate the dexterous-finger reachable workspace. This method constructs the geometric topology of the dexterous-finger reachable workspace, and uses a joint feature recognition algorithm to extract the kinematical parameters of the dexterous finger. Compared with graphic, analytical and numerical methods, this parametric modelling method can automatically and conveniently construct a more vivid workspace's forms and contours of the dexterous finger. The main contribution of this paper is that a workspace-modelling tool with high interactive efficiency is developed for designers to precisely visualize the dexterous-finger reachable workspace, which is valuable for analysing the flexibility of the dexterous finger.

  13. Finger Search in the Implicit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Nielsen, Jesper Asbjørn Sindahl; Truelsen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    , and delete in times $\\mathcal{O}(q(t))$, $\\mathcal{O}(q^{-1}(\\log n)\\log n)$, $\\mathcal{O}(\\log n)$, and $\\mathcal{O}(\\log n)$, respectively, for any q(t) = Ω(logt). Finally we show that the search operation must take Ω(logn) time for the special case where the finger is always changed to the element...

  14. Angiolipoma of index finger: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Durmus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angiolipomas are usually found in the upper extremities, shoulder and back. They are seldom found in the hands, face and lower extremities. They usually occur as painful soft tissue masses or they may compress the neighboring structures (e.g. nerves depending on the size and location. In this report we present an angiolipoma case located in the finger and discuss related recent cases described in the literature. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(1.000: 22-25

  15. Finger muscle attachments for an OpenSim upper-extremity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hwa Lee

    Full Text Available We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms. Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5% for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm. Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths. The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements.

  16. Pacifier Use, Finger Sucking, and Infant Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rachel; Moore, Melisa; Mindell, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Few studies to date have investigated the relationship between pacifier use or finger sucking and infant sleep. One hundred and four mothers of infants (ages 0-11 months) completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ). Infants who engaged in finger sucking had fewer night wakings and longer stretches of nighttime sleep, although less daytime sleep. There were no significant differences in sleep patterns between pacifier users and infants who did not engage in nonnutritive sucking. Furthermore, no significant differences were found across groups for sleep ecology, including parental involvement at bedtime and following night wakings. Finally, infants were consistently able to retrieve their pacifiers independently by 7 months of age, although this did not appear to be associated with sleep outcomes. Results suggest that when parents are deciding whether to give their infant a pacifier, sleep may not be a critical factor. In contrast, parents of finger and thumb suckers should be reassured that this nonnutritive sucking is beneficial to sleep, at least in the first year of life.

  17. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ómar I. Jóhannesson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints.

  18. Adrenaline with lidocaine for digital nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Rath, Santosh; Kalaivani, Mani; Bhanderi, Neel

    2015-03-19

    Surgery on fingers is a common procedure in emergency and day care surgery. Adrenaline combined with lidocaine can prolong digital nerve block and provide a bloodless operating field. Extended postoperative pain relief can reduce the need for analgesics and can facilitate hand rehabilitation. Conventionally, adrenaline is avoided at anatomical sites with end arteries such as digits, penis and pinna because of concerns about arterial spasm, ischaemia and gangrene distal to the site of drug infiltration. To assess the safety and efficacy of use of adrenaline (any dilution) combined with lidocaine (any dilution) for digital nerve blocks (fingers and toes). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2014), MEDLINE via Ovid SP (1966 to 18 November 2014) and EMBASE via Ovid SP (1980 to 18 November 2014). We also searched specific websites, such as www.indmed.nic.in; www.cochrane-sadcct.org; and www.Clinicaltrials.gov. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the use of adrenaline with lidocaine and plain lidocaine in patients undergoing surgery on digits (fingers and toes). Our primary outcomes were duration of anaesthesia, adverse outcomes such as ischaemia distal to the injection site and cost analysis. Our secondary outcomes were duration of postoperative pain relief and reduced bleeding during surgery. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two review authors independently extracted details of trial methodology and outcome data from reports of all trials considered eligible for inclusion. We performed all analyses on an intention-to-treat basis. We used a fixed-effect model when no evidence of significant heterogeneity between studies was found and a random-effects model when heterogeneity was likely. We included four RCTs with 167 participants. Risk of bias of the included studies was high, as none of them reported method of randomization, allocation concealment

  19. The force synergy of human digits in static and dynamic cylindrical grasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Li-Chieh; Chen, Shih-Wei; Lin, Chien-Ju; Lin, Wei-Jr; Lin, Sheng-Che; Su, Fong-Chin

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the force synergy of human digits in both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions. The patterns of digit force distribution, error compensation, and the relationships among digit forces are examined to quantify the synergetic patterns and coordination of multi-finger movements. This study recruited 24 healthy participants to perform cylindrical grasps using a glass simulator under normal grasping and one-finger restricted conditions. Parameters such as the grasping force, patterns of digit force distribution, and the force coefficient of variation are determined. Correlation coefficients and principal component analysis (PCA) are used to estimate the synergy strength under the dynamic grasping condition. Specific distribution patterns of digit forces are identified for various conditions. The compensation of adjacent fingers for the force in the normal direction of an absent finger agrees with the principle of error compensation. For digit forces in anti-gravity directions, the distribution patterns vary significantly by participant. The forces exerted by the thumb are closely related to those exerted by other fingers under all conditions. The index-middle and middle-ring finger pairs demonstrate a significant relationship. The PCA results show that the normal forces of digits are highly coordinated. This study reveals that normal force synergy exists under both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions.

  20. The force synergy of human digits in static and dynamic cylindrical grasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chieh Kuo

    Full Text Available This study explores the force synergy of human digits in both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions. The patterns of digit force distribution, error compensation, and the relationships among digit forces are examined to quantify the synergetic patterns and coordination of multi-finger movements. This study recruited 24 healthy participants to perform cylindrical grasps using a glass simulator under normal grasping and one-finger restricted conditions. Parameters such as the grasping force, patterns of digit force distribution, and the force coefficient of variation are determined. Correlation coefficients and principal component analysis (PCA are used to estimate the synergy strength under the dynamic grasping condition. Specific distribution patterns of digit forces are identified for various conditions. The compensation of adjacent fingers for the force in the normal direction of an absent finger agrees with the principle of error compensation. For digit forces in anti-gravity directions, the distribution patterns vary significantly by participant. The forces exerted by the thumb are closely related to those exerted by other fingers under all conditions. The index-middle and middle-ring finger pairs demonstrate a significant relationship. The PCA results show that the normal forces of digits are highly coordinated. This study reveals that normal force synergy exists under both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions.

  1. Distinct digit kinematics by professional and amateur pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winges, S A; Furuya, S

    2015-01-22

    Many everyday tasks such as typing, grasping, and object manipulation require coordination of dynamic movement across multiple joints and digits. Playing a musical instrument is also one such task where the precise movement of multiple digits is transformed into specific sounds defined by the instrument. Through extensive practice musicians are able to produce precisely controlled movements to interact with the instrument and produce specific sequences of sounds. The present study aimed to determine what aspects of these dynamic movement patterns differ between pianists who have achieved professional status compared to amateur pianists that have also trained extensively. Common patterns of movement for each digit strike were observed for both professional and amateur pianists that were sequence specific, i.e. influenced by the digit performing the preceding strike. However, group differences were found in multi-digit movement patterns for sequences involving the ring or little finger. In some sequences, amateur subjects tended to work against the innate connectivity between digits while professionals allowed slight movement at non-striking digits (covariation) which was a more economical strategy. In other sequences professionals used more individuated finger movements for performance. Thus the present study provided evidence in favor of enhancement of both movement covariation and individuation across fingers in more skilled musicians, depending on fingering and movement sequence. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of fingers in number processing in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLafay

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4- to 7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children’s performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task, even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations.

  3. The role of fingers in number processing in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafay, Anne; Thevenot, Catherine; Castel, Caroline; Fayol, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4-7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children's performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task), even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations.

  4. Quantitation of specific binding ratio in 123I-FP-CIT SPECT: accurate processing strategy for cerebral ventricular enlargement with use of 3D-striatal digital brain phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akihiro; Onishi, Hideo; Amijima, Hizuru

    2018-04-26

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of ventricular enlargement on the specific binding ratio (SBR) and to validate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-Mask algorithm for quantitative SBR assessment of 123 I-FP-CIT single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images with the use of a 3D-striatum digital brain (SDB) phantom. Ventricular enlargement was simulated by three-dimensional extensions in a 3D-SDB phantom comprising segments representing the striatum, ventricle, brain parenchyma, and skull bone. The Evans Index (EI) was measured in 3D-SDB phantom images of an enlarged ventricle. Projection data sets were generated from the 3D-SDB phantoms with blurring, scatter, and attenuation. Images were reconstructed using the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm and corrected for attenuation, scatter, and resolution recovery. We bundled DaTView (Southampton method) with the CSF-Mask processing software for SBR. We assessed SBR with the use of various coefficients (f factor) of the CSF-Mask. Specific binding ratios of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 corresponded to SDB phantom simulations with true values. Measured SBRs > 50% that were underestimated with EI increased compared with the true SBR and this trend was outstanding at low SBR. The CSF-Mask improved 20% underestimates and brought the measured SBR closer to the true values at an f factor of 1.0 despite an increase in EI. We connected the linear regression function (y = - 3.53x + 1.95; r = 0.95) with the EI and f factor using root-mean-square error. Processing with CSF-Mask generates accurate quantitative SBR from dopamine transporter SPECT images of patients with ventricular enlargement.

  5. Functional improvement with digital prosthesis use after multiple digit amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifchez, Scott D; Marchant-Hanson, Judith; Matloub, Hani S; Sanger, James R; Dzwierzynski, William W; Nguyen, Hanh H

    2005-07-01

    Patients who sustain traumatic amputation of multiple fingers suffer both a functional and psychologic loss. Previous studies of prosthesis use for finger amputees have focused primarily on the psychologic benefits. Clinically our group noticed a functional improvement on hand function tests when patients with multiple digit amputations used a prosthesis. Given the expense of multiple finger prostheses we sought to determine if they led to a consistent functional improvement in these patients. Ten consecutive patients performed a battery of hand function tests and rated their ability to perform a variety of activities of daily living both with and without their prosthesis using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire. Our results show a significant improvement in 3-finger-pinch strength and grip strength and a trend of improvement of tip-pinch, lateral-pinch, and grip strength in dynamometer positions 1, 2, 3, and 4 in these patients when tested with and without their prostheses. Function in activities of daily living, as assessed by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire, was improved globally with prosthesis use. In addition, significant improvement was noted in several specific activities including opening a jar, writing, and turning a key, among others. These results show that prosthesis use provides a functional benefit to these patients in multiple activities.

  6. Fingering instabilities and pattern formation in a two-component dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Kui-Tian; Byrnes, Tim; Saito, Hiroki

    2018-02-01

    We study fingering instabilities and pattern formation at the interface of an oppositely polarized two-component Bose-Einstein condensate with strong dipole-dipole interactions in three dimensions. It is shown that the rotational symmetry is spontaneously broken by fingering instability when the dipole-dipole interactions are strengthened. Frog-shaped and mushroom-shaped patterns emerge during the dynamics due to the dipolar interactions. We also demonstrate the spontaneous density modulation and domain growth of a two-component dipolar BEC in the dynamics. Bogoliubov analyses in the two-dimensional approximation are performed, and the characteristic lengths of the domains are estimated analytically. Patterns resembling those in magnetic classical fluids are modulated when the number ratio of atoms, the trap ratio of the external potential, or tilted polarization with respect to the z direction is varied.

  7. The Role of Vision in the Development of Finger-Number Interactions: Finger-Counting and Finger-Montring in Blind Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crollen, Virginie; Mahe, Rachel; Collignon, Olivier; Seron, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of the fingers may play a functional role in the development of a mature counting system. However, the role of developmental vision in the elaboration of a finger numeral representation remains unexplored. In the current study, 14 congenitally blind children and 14 matched sighted controls undertook…

  8. Stabilization of miscible viscous fingering by a step-growth polymerization reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunton, Patrick; Stewart, Simone; Marin, Daniela; Tullier, Michael; Meiburg, Eckart; Pojman, John

    2017-11-01

    Viscous fingering is a hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a more mobile fluid displaces a fluid of lower mobility. Viscous fingering is often undesirable in industrial processes such as secondary petroleum recovery where it limits resource recovery. Linear stability analysis by Hejazi et al. (2010) has predicted that a non-monotonic viscosity profile at an otherwise unstable interface can in some instances stabilize the flow. We use step-growth polymerization at the interface between two miscible monomers as a model system. A dithiol monomer displacing a diacrylate react to form a linear polymer that behaves as a Newtonian fluid. Viscous fingering was imaged in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell via Schlieren, which is sensitive to polymer conversion. By varying reaction rate via initiator concentration along with flow rate, we demonstrated increasing stabilization of the flow with increasing Damkohler number (ratio of the reaction rate to the flow rate). Results were compared with regions of predicted stability from the results of Hejazi et al. (2010). When the advection outran the reaction, viscous fingering occurred as usual. However, when the reaction was able to keep pace with the advection, the increased viscosity at the interface stabilized the flow. We acknowledge support from NSF CBET-1335739 and NSF CBET 1511653.

  9. Osteoclastic finger arthrosis - a subtype of polyarthrosis of the hand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.; Dihlmann, A.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: Description of a subtype of arthrosis deformans of the hand which is characterised as osteoclastic arthrosis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of radiographs of the hands of 150 women and 100 men with radiological findings of arthrosis deformans. Results: 5% of women and 2% of men showed at least one digital joint with subchondral osteolysis of one or both articulating bones involving at least a third of the phalanx. This subchondral osteolysis far exceeds the cysts which are situated in the epiphyseal part of the articular region. It may develop within a year. Conclusion: Osteoclastic arthrosis of the finger is a subtype of polyarthrosis of the hand. Serial observations suggest that an osteoclast stimulating substance is produced by the cysts or arises directly from the synovial fluid; this enters the subchondral part of the bone through clefts which may or may not be visible radiologically and that this produces osteoclastic activity. The most important differential diagnoses are chronic tophacious gout and a benign tumor. (orig.) [de

  10. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  11. Aspergillus Sydowi Infection of Human Finger Nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Barde

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Aspergillus sydowi infection of left middle finger nail is described ′ The presence of fungal hypae with phialids and spores on direct microscopy as well as in culture, the colour of the sub-ungual mass of the nail resembling the colour of the fungus in, culture′ repeated isolations of A sydowi from the diseased tissue along with the absence of any established pathogenic species in the specimen are taken as evidences that this fungus was invading the nail tissue.

  12. Finger Injuries in Football and Rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, Kate E; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-02-01

    Football and rugby athletes are at increased risk of finger injuries given the full-contact nature of these sports. Some players may return to play early with protective taping, splinting, and casting. Others require a longer rehabilitation period and prolonged time away from the field. The treating hand surgeon must weigh the benefits of early return to play for the current season and future playing career against the risks of reinjury and long-term morbidity, including post-traumatic arthritis and decreased range of motion and strength. Each player must be comprehensively assessed and managed with an individualized treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Finger Clubbing Caused by Herbal Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifudin Rashiq

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Clubbing of the fingers is often taken to be a sign of serious illness. Its discovery, particularly if there are associated symptoms in the cardiovascular, respiratory or gastrointestinal systems, usually leads to exhaustive investigation. A case is presented in which the etiology of clubbing was found only when a new history of heavy ingestion of herbal tea was obtained, extensive work-up having previously been unhelpful. Other cases appearing in the English-language literature are cited, some universal etiological associations are described, and an attempt is made to explain the phenomenon, based on a recent theory of the cause of clubbing.

  14. Genome editing with engineered zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urnov, Fyodor D; Rebar, Edward J; Holmes, Michael C; Zhang, H Steve; Gregory, Philip D

    2010-09-01

    Reverse genetics in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana, zebrafish and rats, efficient genome engineering in human embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells, targeted integration in crop plants, and HIV resistance in immune cells - this broad range of outcomes has resulted from the application of the same core technology: targeted genome cleavage by engineered, sequence-specific zinc finger nucleases followed by gene modification during subsequent repair. Such 'genome editing' is now established in human cells and a number of model organisms, thus opening the door to a range of new experimental and therapeutic possibilities.

  15. Discrimination of Finger Area of Somatosensory Cortex by NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingdi; Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji

    We carried out a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to observe the hemodynamic responses associated with cortical activation in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) by finger electrical stimulation. We examined whether NIRS can assist in investigating the somatotopic arrangement of fingers on the SI hand area. We found that although relatively low in spatial resolution, NIRS can to some extent help to discriminate the representations of thumb and ring finger on the SI hand area.

  16. Sensing DNA damage by PARP-like fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Petrucco, Stefania

    2003-01-01

    PARP-like zinc fingers are protein modules, initially described as nick-sensors of poly(ADP-ribosyl)-polymerases (PARPs), which are found at the N-terminus of different DNA repair enzymes. I chose to study the role of PARP-like fingers in AtZDP, a 3′ DNA phosphoesterase, which is the only known enzyme provided with three such finger domains. Here I show that PARP-like fingers can maintain AtZDP onto damaged DNA sites without interfering with its DNA end repair functions. Damage recognition by...

  17. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of mathematical biology. Our attraction to another body increases if the body is sym- metrical and in proportion. If a face or a structure is in pro- ... his practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery, and he developed a mask using the concept of golden ratio. The mask is called the. Marquardt beauty mask (Figure 1) [1]. Keywords.

  18. Cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in human fingers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffman, J.D.; Cohen, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of a cholinergic agonist and antagonist on finger blood flow (FBF) was studied in 10 normal subjects. Total finger blood flow was measured by venous occlusion, air plethysmography, and capillary blood flow (FCF) by the disappearance rate of a radio-isotope from a fingertip injection. Methacholine in doses of 10-80 ..mu..g/min was given by constant infusion via a brachial artery catheter. Average FBF and vascular resistance were not significantly affected. However, the half time (t/sub 1/2/) of the disappearance rate decreased from 50.8 +/- 13.4 to 11.1 +/- 1.5 min; a decrease occurred in all subjects. In seven subjects, atropine (0.2 mg) had no affect alone but inhibited the effect of methacholine on FCF and prevented the redness and sweating of the forearm and hand that occurs with this agent. This study demonstrates a muscarinic cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in the fingertip that uniquely increase capillary blood flow.

  19. Oxidation-Mediated Fingering in Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Hight, David C.; O'Regan, John D.; Dickey, Michael D.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2017-10-01

    We identify and characterize a new class of fingering instabilities in liquid metals; these instabilities are unexpected due to the large interfacial tension of metals. Electrochemical oxidation lowers the effective interfacial tension of a gallium-based liquid metal alloy to values approaching zero, thereby inducing drastic shape changes, including the formation of fractals. The measured fractal dimension (D =1.3 ±0.05 ) places the instability in a different universality class than other fingering instabilities. By characterizing changes in morphology and dynamics as a function of droplet volume and applied electric potential, we identify the three main forces involved in this process: interfacial tension, gravity, and oxidative stress. Importantly, we find that electrochemical oxidation can generate compressive interfacial forces that oppose the tensile forces at a liquid interface. The surface oxide layer ultimately provides a physical and electrochemical barrier that halts the instabilities at larger positive potentials. Controlling the competition between interfacial tension and oxidative (compressive) stresses at the interface is important for the development of reconfigurable electronic, electromagnetic, and optical devices that take advantage of the metallic properties of liquid metals.

  20. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that

  1. Finger-like voids induced by viscous fingering during phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bo

    2012-07-01

    The formation mechanism of phase-inversion ceramic hollow fibre membranes has not been well understood. In this paper, we report on the formation of finger-like macrovoids during non-solvent-induced phase inversion of alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. A membrane structure without such finger-like macrovoids was observed when the suspension was slowly immersed into pure ethanol or a mixture of 70. wt% NMP and 30. wt% water, whereas finger-like macrovoids occurred when the suspension was slid into the non-solvents at higher speeds. We found that the formation process of finger-like macrovoids could be fully or partially reversed when nascent membranes were taken out from water shortly after immersion, depending on the duration of the immersion. Splitting of the fingers during the formation of the macrovoids was also observed during the phase inversion of two alumina/PES/NMP suspensions. These experimental observations were not predicted by current theories of finger-like macrovoid formation in polymer membranes, but appear to mimic the well-known viscous fingering phenomenon. We therefore propose that in the phase inversion of ceramic suspensions, the viscous fingering phenomenon is an important mechanism in the formation of finger-like voids. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Estimation of Sex From Index and Ring Finger Lengths in An Indigenous Population of Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Jaydip; Ghosh, Ahana; Mondal, Nitish; Krishan, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Forensic anthropology involves the identification of human remains for medico-legal purposes. Estimation of sex is an essential element of medico-legal investigations when identification of unknown dismembered remains is involved. Aim The present study was conducted with an aim to estimate sex from index and ring finger lengths of adult individuals belonging to an indigenous population of eastern India. Materials and Methods A total of 500 unrelated adult individuals (18-60 years) from the Rajbanshi population (males: 250, females: 250) took part in the study. A total of 400 (males: 200, 200 female) participants were randomly used to develop sex estimation models using Binary Logistic Regression Analysis (BLR). A separate group of 200 adults (18-60 years) from the Karbi tribal population (males 100, females 100) were included to validate the results obtained on the Rajbanshi population. The univarate and bivariate models derived on the study group (n=400) were tested on hold-out sample of Rajbanshi participants (n=100) and the other test population of the Karbi (n=200) participants. Results The results indicate that Index Finger Length (IFL) and Ring Finger Length (RFL) of both hands were significantly longer in males as compared to females. The ring finger was longer than the index finger in both sexes. The study successfully highlights the existence of sex differences in IFL and RFL (p<0.05). No sex differences were however, observed for the index and ring finger ratio. The predictive accuracy of IFL and RFL in sex estimation ranged between 70%-75% (in the hold out sample from the Rajbanshi population) and 60-66% (in the test sample from the Karbi population). A Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis was performed to test the predictive accuracy after predicting the probability of IFL and RFL in sex estimation. The predicted probabilities using ROC analysis were observed to be higher on the left side and in multivariate analysis. Conclusion The

  3. Modelling salt finger formation using the Imperial College Ocean Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacTavish, F. P.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    We present numerical simulations of salt finger formation produced using the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM) which is a finite element model using adaptive meshing. Our aim is to validate the model against published data and to develop the capability to simulate salt finger formation using adaptive meshes. Salt fingering is a form of double-diffusion which occurs because heat diffuses more quickly than salt. When an area of warm, salty water overlies an area of colder, fresher water, an initial perturbation can lead to some of the water from the lower layer moving into the top layer. Its temperature then increases more quickly than its salinity, so that the water is less dense than its surroundings and it will rise up more. This process repeats to form salt fingers, with salt fingers also forming in the downward direction. Salt fingers play a role in oceanic mixing, in particular they are responsible for maintaining thermohaline staircases such as the C-SALT staircase which have been observed extensively, particularly in the tropics. The study of salt fingers could therefore improve our understanding of processes in the ocean, and inform the design of subgrid parameterisations in general circulation models. We used the salt finger formation test case of Oezgoekmen et al (1998) in order to validate ICOM. The formation of salt fingers is modelled by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for a two-dimensional rectangular area of Boussinesq fluid, beginning with two layers of water, the top warm and salty and the bottom cold and fresh, with parameters chosen to match the test case of Oezgoekmen et al (1998). The positions of the interfaces between the fingering layer and the mixed layers as well as the finger growth rate and the kinetic energy are plotted against time. The results are compared with those of Oezgoekmen et al (1998). We present results from structured meshes and preliminary results using adaptive meshing.

  4. Delayed finger tapping and cognitive responses in preterm-born male teenagers with mild spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Mei, Xi; Chen, Andrew C N

    2015-02-01

    Information on fine motor and basic cognitive functions in spastic diplegia is sparse in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate index finger's tapping speed and cognitive functions in categorization and old/new recognition of pictures in patients with mild spastic diplegia. Fifteen preterm-born male teenagers with mild spastic diplegia and 15 healthy male teenagers participated in this study. Finger-tapping tests and cognitive tests were performed on all participants. Outcomes were compared between the two groups. In the finger-tapping tests, the tapping speed was significantly slower in patients than in controls. In the tests of tapping one key persistently and tapping two keys alternately, the reaction time gaps between the left and right digits were larger in patients than in controls. In the categorization tests, the accuracies and reaction times for animal/plant and girl face pictures, but not for boy face pictures, were significantly worse in patients than in controls. In the recognition tests, the accuracies for old/new, animal/plant, and boy/girl face pictures were significantly lower in patients than in controls. The reaction times for old/new, animal/plant, and new face pictures, but not for old face pictures, were significantly longer in patients compared with controls. Our results demonstrate delayed finger tapping and cognitive responses in preterm-born male teenagers with mild spastic diplegia. Our experimental paradigm is sensitive for the study of fine motor and cognitive functions between patients and healthy controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. substitute for Zn(II) in zinc fingers?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc finger domains consist of sequences of amino acids containing cysteine and histidine residues tetrahedrally coordinated to a zinc ion. The role of zinc in a DNA binding finger was considered purely structural due to the absence of redox chemistry in zinc. However, whether other metals e.g. Co(II) or Cd(II) can substitute ...

  6. Experience of Percutaneous Trigger Finger Release under Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trigger finger is a common disorder of upper extremity. Majority of the patients can be treated conservatively but some resistant cases eventually need surgery. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of percutaneous trigger finger release under local anesthesia. Subjects and Methods: This is a ...

  7. Pattern of Trigger Finger among Patients Attending a Musculo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trigger finger is a common finger problem thought to be due to thickening of tendon sheath with or without localized tendon thickening, resulting in a narrowed tunnel for tendon excursion with ultimate restriction of tendon movement. It can be seen in anyone, it is however seen frequently in diabetic patients and ...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended... generic type of device includes prostheses that consist of a single flexible across-the-joint component...

  9. Biomimetic finger extension mechanism for soft wearable hand rehabilitation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Heo, Si-Hwan; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2017-07-01

    For the rehabilitation and assistance of the hand functions, wearable devices have been developed, and the interest in tendon driven mechanisms have especially increased since it allows light weight and compact design. The tendon driven hand rehabilitation devices provides grasping force via exo-tendons routed on the dorsal and palmar sides of the hand pulled by remotely located actuators. However, most of the devices were not able to provide natural joint extension sequence of the finger and showed hyperextension of finger joints because the tendons for extension were fixed at the fingertip, concentrating the torque at the distal interphalangeal joint. In this study, a ring-type biomimetic finger extension mechanism was developed, which mimics the origin, structure, and orientation of the extensor tendon. The biomimetic mechanism was evaluated by comparing the motion with voluntary finger extension and the motion made by other conventional tendon driven finger extension mechanisms. The biomimetic extension mechanism provided the same joint extension sequence with voluntary finger extension, and the fully extended posture was most close to the voluntary finger extension among the tendon-driven mechanisms used in the experiments. The joint angle differences between the proposed tendon mechanism and the voluntary finger extension was -1.2 °±3.4 °, -2.9°±2.0°, and -3.1°±8.0° for distal phalangeal, proximal phalangeal, and metacarpo-phalangeal joint, respectively.

  10. A biomechanical study of the finger pulley system during repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirouche, F; Gonzalez, M; Koldoff, J; Tioco, J; Ham, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the mechanics of the finger/pulley system when subjected to various excisions and repairs. Several cadaver hands were used to study the finger/pulley's function, finger joint dynamics, and the relationship between tendon excursion and finger joint angles of rotation. By using a method of continuous and simultaneous data acquisition of the entire finger joint's motion, a more detailed analysis was achieved. Our experimental investigation is based on the use of four micro-potentiometers inserted at the finger's joints and a pulley system to simulate tendon excursion. Using this procedure, a detailed kinematic analysis of the entire finger was performed. This included analysis of the intact hand, various pulley excisions, and reconstruction. In addition to introducing a new method of acquisition, a mathematical model was developed for the inverse dynamic analysis of the finger pulley system. From this model, the torques required at the joints for the motion were computed. The results provided new insight into possible ways of characterizing kinematic changes resulting from pulley damage and repair.

  11. Can We Call It "Stinky-finger Syndrome?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Masood; War, Firdous Ahmed; Kumar, Mohit

    2017-01-01

    Many accounts refer to insertion of finger into anus mostly for gratification from stimulation of prostate gland, but index case Mr. M. continued doing this to get rid of constipation that eventually led to feelings of guilt, stinky fingers, not able to defecate normally, and dysphoric emotions. Further research is needed to find out the phenomenology of this condition.

  12. In-depth study of DNA binding of Cys2His2 finger domains in testis zinc-finger protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chi Chou

    Full Text Available Previously, we identified that both fingers 1 and 2 in the three Cys2His2 zinc-finger domains (TZD of testis zinc-finger protein specifically bind to its cognate DNA; however, finger 3 is non-sequence-specific. To gain insights into the interaction mechanism, here we further investigated the DNA-binding characteristics of TZD bound to non-specific DNAs and its finger segments bound to cognate DNA. TZD in non-specific DNA binding showed smaller chemical shift perturbations, as expected. However, the direction of shift perturbation, change of DNA imino-proton NMR signal, and dynamics on the 15N backbone atom significantly differed between specific and non-specific binding. Using these unique characteristics, we confirmed that the three single-finger segments (TZD1, TZD2 and TZD3 and the two-finger segment (TZD23 non-specifically bind to the cognate DNA. In comparison, the other two-finger segment (TZD12 binding to the cognate DNA features simultaneous non-specific and semi-specific binding, both slowly exchanged in terms of NMR timescale. The process of TZD binding to the cognate DNA is likely stepwise: initially TZD non-specifically binds to DNA, then fingers 1 and 2 insert cooperatively into the major groove of DNA by semi-specific binding, and finally finger 3 non-specifically binds to DNA, which promotes the specific binding on fingers 1 and 2 and stabilizes the formation of a specific TZD-DNA complex.

  13. Effect of incorporating finger millet in wheat flour on mixolab behavior, chapatti quality and starch digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bharati; Gujral, Hardeep Singh; Solah, Vicky

    2017-09-15

    Wheat and finger millet flour (two cultivars) were blended in the ratio (3:1) to form a composite flour and its dough properties were studied on the mixolab. The chapatti making and digestibility behavior of the composite flour was also investigated. The wheat finger millet (WFM) flour blend displayed up to 30.7% higher total phenolic content (TPC), 38.2% higher total flavonoid content (TFC) and 75.4% higher antioxidant activity (AOA) than the wheat flour. Chapattis prepared from the composite blends exhibited lower retrogradation as evident by the mixolab retrogradation index, higher values of soluble starch and soluble amylose in stored chapatti. The slowly digestible starch (SDS) correlated positively (R=0.816, pflour had higher SDS and resistant starch (RS) values demonstrating potential as a food with functional characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Control No. 2900- NEW (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any... Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits...

  15. Granular fingering as a mechanism for ridge formation in debris avalanche deposits: Laboratory experiments and implications for Tutupaca volcano, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, P.; Roche, O.; Samaniego, P.; van Wyk des Vries, B.; Araujo, G.

    2018-01-01

    The origin of subparallel, regularly-spaced longitudinal ridges often observed at the surface of volcanic and other rock avalanche deposits remains unclear. We addressed this issue through analogue laboratory experiments on flows of bi-disperse granular mixtures, because this type of flow is known to exhibit granular fingering that causes elongated structures resembling the ridges observed in nature. We considered four different mixtures of fine (300-400 μm) glass beads and coarse (600-710 μm to 900-1000 μm) angular crushed fruit stones, with particle size ratios of 1.9-2.7 and mass fractions of the coarse component of 5-50 wt%. The coarse particles segregated at the flow surface and accumulated at the front where flow instabilities with a well-defined wavelength grew. These formed granular fingers made of coarse-rich static margins delimiting fines-rich central channels. Coalescence of adjacent finger margins created regular spaced longitudinal ridges, which became topographic highs as finger channels drained at final emplacement stages. Three distinct deposit morphologies were observed: 1) Joined fingers with ridges were formed at low (≤ 1.9) size ratio and moderate (10-20 wt%) coarse fraction whereas 2) separate fingers or 3) poorly developed fingers, forming series of frontal lobes, were created at larger size ratios and/or higher coarse contents. Similar ridges and lobes are observed at the debris avalanche deposits of Tutupaca volcano, Peru, suggesting that the processes operating in the experiments can also occur in nature. This implies that volcanic (and non-volcanic) debris avalanches can behave as granular flows, which has important implications for interpretation of deposits and for modeling. Such behaviour may be acquired as the collapsing material disaggregates and forms a granular mixture composed by a right grain size distribution in which particle segregation can occur. Limited fragmentation and block sliding, or grain size distributions

  16. Moving objects with clumsy fingers: how predictive is grip force control in patients with impaired manual sensibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Dennis A; Hermsdörfer, Joachim; Marquardt, Christian; Topka, Helge

    2003-03-01

    Anticipatory grip force adjustments to movement-induced load fluctuations of a hand-held object suggest that motion planning is based on an internal forward model of both the external object properties and the dynamics of the own motor apparatus. However, the central nervous system also refers to real time sensory feedback from the grasping digits in order to achieve a highly economical coupling between grip force and the actual loading requirements. We analyzed grip force control during vertical point-to-point arm movements with a hand-held instrumented object in 9 patients with moderately impaired tactile sensibility of the grasping digits due to chronic median nerve compression (n = 3), axonal (n = 3) and demyelinating sensory polyneuropathy (n = 3) in comparison to 9 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects. Point-to-point arm movements started and ended with the object being held stationary at rest. Load force changes arose from inertial loads related to the movement. A maximum of load force occurred early in upward and near the end of downward movements. Compared to healthy controls, patients with impaired manual sensibility generated similar static grip forces during stationary holding of the object and similar force ratios between maximum grip and load force. These findings reflect effective grip force scaling in relation to the movement-induced loads despite reduced afferent feedback from the grasping digits. For both groups the maxima of grip and load force coincided very closely in time, indicating that the temporal regulation of the grip force profile with the load profile was processed with a similar high precision. In addition, linear regression analyses between grip and load forces during movement-related load increase and load decrease phases revealed a similar precise temporo-spatial coupling between grip and load forces for patients and controls. Our results suggest that the precise and anticipatory adjustment of the grip force profile to the

  17. Measurement of digital blood pressure after local cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    A double-inlet plastic cuff was designed for local cooling and systolic blood pressure measurement on the middle phalanx of the fingers. With a tourniquet on the proximal phalanx of one finger, cooling for 5 min made the digital artery temperature equal the skin temperature. The difference between...... the systolic pressure in a control finger and in the cooled finger give the reopening pressure in the digital arteries. At 30, 25, 20, 15, and 10 degrees C, respectively the percent decrease of the finger pressure was 0.2 (0.2), 1.5 (2.5), 8.5 (3.7), 11.4 (3.4), and 15.3 (3.1) in normal young women....... In patients with primary or secondary Raynaud's phenomenon, the arterial tone showed an abrupt increase that most often led to complete closure of the digital arteries. The pathological response was expressed as an increased threshold temperature or a well-defined closing temperature that showed only small...

  18. Measurement of digital blood pressure after local cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    the systolic pressure in a control finger and in the cooled finger give the reopening pressure in the digital arteries. At 30, 25, 20, 15, and 10 degrees C, respectively the percent decrease of the finger pressure was 0.2 (0.2), 1.5 (2.5), 8.5 (3.7), 11.4 (3.4), and 15.3 (3.1) in normal young women......A double-inlet plastic cuff was designed for local cooling and systolic blood pressure measurement on the middle phalanx of the fingers. With a tourniquet on the proximal phalanx of one finger, cooling for 5 min made the digital artery temperature equal the skin temperature. The difference between....... In patients with primary or secondary Raynaud's phenomenon, the arterial tone showed an abrupt increase that most often led to complete closure of the digital arteries. The pathological response was expressed as an increased threshold temperature or a well-defined closing temperature that showed only small...

  19. Digit forces bias sensorimotor transformations underlying control of fingertip position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Daisuke; Kappers, Astrid M. L.; Santello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Humans are able to modulate digit forces as a function of position despite changes in digit placement that might occur from trial to trial or when changing grip type for object manipulation. Although this phenomenon is likely to rely on sensing the position of the digits relative to each other and the object, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To address this question, we asked subjects (n = 30) to match perceived vertical distance between the center of pressure (CoP) of the thumb and index finger pads (dy) of the right hand (“reference” hand) using the same hand (“test” hand). The digits of reference hand were passively placed collinearly (dy = 0 mm). Subjects were then asked to exert different combinations of normal and tangential digit forces (Fn and Ftan, respectively) using the reference hand and then match the memorized dy using the test hand. The reference hand exerted Ftan of thumb and index finger in either same or opposite direction. We hypothesized that, when the tangential forces of the digits are produced in opposite directions, matching error (1) would be biased toward the directions of the tangential forces; and (2) would be greater when the remembered relative contact points are matched with negligible digit force production. For the test hand, digit forces were either negligible (0.5–1 N, 0 ± 0.25 N; Experiment 1) or the same as those exerted by the reference hand (Experiment 2).Matching error was biased towards the direction of digit tangential forces: thumb CoP was placed higher than the index finger CoP when thumb and index finger Ftan were directed upward and downward, respectively, and vice versa (p forces. We propose that the expected sensory consequence of motor commands for tangential forces in opposite directions overrides estimation of fingertip position through haptic sensory feedback. PMID:25136304

  20. Tangential finger forces use mechanical advantage during static grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, Gregory P; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-02-01

    When grasping and manipulating objects, the central controller utilizes the mechanical advantage of the normal forces of the fingers for torque production. Whether the same is valid for tangential forces is unknown. The main purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of finger tangential forces and the use of mechanical advantage as a control mechanism when dealing with objects of nonuniform finger positioning. A complementary goal was to explore the interaction of mechanical advantage (moment arm) and the role a finger has as a torque agonist/antagonist with respect to external torques (±0.4 N m). Five 6-df force/torque transducers measured finger forces while subjects held a prism handle (6 cm width × 9 cm height) with and without a single finger displaced 2 cm (handle width). The effect of increasing the tangential moment arm was significant (p forces (in >70% of trials) and hence creating greater moments. Thus, the data provides evidence that the grasping system as a rule utilizes mechanical advantage for generating tangential forces. The increase in tangential force was independent of whether the finger was acting as a torque agonist or antagonist, revealing their effects to be additive.

  1. Torque control of underactuated tendon-driven fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Abdallah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Given an underactuated tendon-driven finger, the finger posture is underdetermined and can move freely ("flop" in a region of slack tendons. This work shows that such an underactuated finger can be operated in tendon force control (rather than position control with effective performance. The force control eliminates the indeterminate slack while commanding a parameterized space of desired torques. The torque will either push the finger to the joint limits or wrap around an external object with variable torque – behavior that is sufficient for primarily gripping fingers. In addition, introducing asymmetric joint radii to the design allows the finger to command an expanded range of joint torques and to scan an expanded set of external surfaces. This study is motivated by the design and control of the secondary fingers of the NASA-GM R2 humanoid hand.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  2. [Digital cephalometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongkosuwito, E.M.; Katsaros, C.; Bodegom, J.C.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    There are different methods to produce digital head films and all have advantages and disadvantages. With a digital head film and a computer programme for digital cephalometry an analysis can be performed easily. All existing computer programmes for digital cephalometry use reference values to

  3. Digital squares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Kim, Chul E

    1988-01-01

    Digital squares are defined and their geometric properties characterized. A linear time algorithm is presented that considers a convex digital region and determines whether or not it is a digital square. The algorithm also determines the range of the values of the parameter set of its preimages. ....... The analysis involves transforming the boundary of a digital region into parameter space of slope and y-intercept......Digital squares are defined and their geometric properties characterized. A linear time algorithm is presented that considers a convex digital region and determines whether or not it is a digital square. The algorithm also determines the range of the values of the parameter set of its preimages...

  4. The relation between the anthropometric characteristics of fingers and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mardanshahi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthropometry is a science of human body measurement that could be used for manufacturing artificial limbs or prosthesis, investigating body differences between populations, utilizing in forensics and criminology, or even in the diagnosis of some diseases. Two of the most important anthropometric characteristics are dermatoglyphic patterns and finger length. Many studies have evaluated the relation between these two characteristics in different diseases such as cancers. It assumed that dermatoglyphic patterns and finger length could be used as predictors of some cancers such as gastric, ovarian, prostate, testicular, and breast cancers. In this review, we evaluated the relation between dermatoglyphic variability and finger length in different cancers more precisely.

  5. Multi-finger coordination in healthy subjects and stroke patients: a mathematical modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrarin Maurizio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 60% of stroke survivors experience hand dysfunction limiting execution of daily activities. Several methods have been proposed to objectively quantify fingers' joints range of motion (ROM, while few studies exist about multi-finger coordination during hand movements. The present work analysed this aspect, by providing a complete characterization of spatial and temporal aspects of hand movement, through the mathematical modelling of multi-joint finger motion in healthy subjects and stroke patients. Methods Hand opening and closing movements were examined in 12 healthy volunteers and 14 hemiplegic stroke survivors by means of optoelectronic kinematic analysis. The flexion/extension angles of metacarpophalangeal (MCPJ and proximal interphalangeal joints (IPJ of all fingers were computed and mathematically characterized by a four-parameter hyperbolic tangent function. Accuracy of the selected model was analysed by means of coefficient of determination (R2 and root mean square error (RMSE. Test-retest reliability was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and test-retest errors. Comparison between performances of healthy controls and stroke subjects were performed by analysing possible differences in parameters describing angular and temporal aspects of hand kinematics and inter-joint, inter-digit coordination. Results The angular profiles of hand opening and closing were accurately characterized by the selected model, both in healthy controls and in stroke subjects (R2 > 0.973, RMSE 0.75 and remarking errors comparable to those obtained with other methods. Comparison with healthy controls revealed that hemiparetic hand movement was impaired not only in joints ROM but also in the temporal aspects of motion: peak velocities were significantly decreased, inter-digit coordination was reduced of more than 50% and inter-joint coordination patterns were highly disrupted. In particular, the stereotypical

  6. Multi-finger coordination in healthy subjects and stroke patients: a mathematical modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinella, Ilaria; Jonsdottir, Johanna; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2011-04-20

    Approximately 60% of stroke survivors experience hand dysfunction limiting execution of daily activities. Several methods have been proposed to objectively quantify fingers' joints range of motion (ROM), while few studies exist about multi-finger coordination during hand movements. The present work analysed this aspect, by providing a complete characterization of spatial and temporal aspects of hand movement, through the mathematical modelling of multi-joint finger motion in healthy subjects and stroke patients. Hand opening and closing movements were examined in 12 healthy volunteers and 14 hemiplegic stroke survivors by means of optoelectronic kinematic analysis. The flexion/extension angles of metacarpophalangeal (MCPJ) and proximal interphalangeal joints (IPJ) of all fingers were computed and mathematically characterized by a four-parameter hyperbolic tangent function. Accuracy of the selected model was analysed by means of coefficient of determination (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE). Test-retest reliability was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and test-retest errors. Comparison between performances of healthy controls and stroke subjects were performed by analysing possible differences in parameters describing angular and temporal aspects of hand kinematics and inter-joint, inter-digit coordination. The angular profiles of hand opening and closing were accurately characterized by the selected model, both in healthy controls and in stroke subjects (R2 > 0.973, RMSE 0.75 and remarking errors comparable to those obtained with other methods. Comparison with healthy controls revealed that hemiparetic hand movement was impaired not only in joints ROM but also in the temporal aspects of motion: peak velocities were significantly decreased, inter-digit coordination was reduced of more than 50% and inter-joint coordination patterns were highly disrupted. In particular, the stereotypical proximal-to-distal opening sequence (reversed during

  7. Comparison of spectroscopically measured finger and forearm tissue ethanol concentration to blood and breath ethanol measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, Trent D.; Hull, Edward L.; Ver Steeg, Benjamin J.; Laaksonen, Bentley D.

    2011-02-01

    Previous works investigated a spectroscopic technique that offered a promising alternative to blood and breath assays for determining in vivo alcohol concentration. Although these prior works measured the dorsal forearm, we report the results of a 26-subject clinical study designed to evaluate the spectroscopic technique at a finger measurement site through comparison to contemporaneous forearm spectroscopic, venous blood, and breath measurements. Through both Monte Carlo simulation and experimental data, it is shown that tissue optical probe design has a substantial impact on the effective path-length of photons through the skin and the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectroscopic measurements. Comparison of the breath, blood, and tissue assays demonstrated significant differences in alcohol concentration that are attributable to both assay accuracy and alcohol pharmacokinetics. Similar to past works, a first order kinetic model is used to estimate the fraction of concentration variance explained by alcohol pharmacokinetics (72.6-86.7%). A significant outcome of this work was significantly improved pharmacokinetic agreement with breath (arterial) alcohol of the finger measurement (mean kArt-Fin = 0.111 min-1) relative to the forearm measurement (mean kArt-For = 0.019 min-1) that is likely due to the increased blood perfusion of the finger.

  8. Control of viscous fingering by nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Nasser; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal

    2017-12-01

    A substantial viscosity increase by the addition of a low dose of nanoparticles to the base fluids can well influence the dynamics of viscous fingering. There is a lack of detailed theoretical studies that address the effect of the presence of nanoparticles on unstable miscible displacements. In this study, the impact of nonreactive nanoparticle presence on the stability and subsequent mixing of an originally unstable binary system is examined using linear stability analysis (LSA) and pseudospectral-based direct numerical simulations (DNS). We have parametrized the role of both nondepositing and depositing nanoparticles on the stability of miscible displacements using the developed static and dynamic parametric analyses. Our results show that nanoparticles have the potential to weaken the instabilities of an originally unstable system. Our LSA and DNS results also reveal that nondepositing nanoparticles can be used to fully stabilize an originally unstable front while depositing particles may act as temporary stabilizers whose influence diminishes in the course of time. In addition, we explain the existing inconsistencies concerning the effect of the nanoparticle diffusion coefficient on the dynamics of the system. This study provides a basis for further research on the application of nanoparticles for control of viscosity-driven instabilities.

  9. Development of Functional Recovery Training Device for Hemiplegic Fingers with Finger-expansion Facilitation Exercise by Stretch Reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong; Iwashita, Hisashi; Kawahira, Kazumi; Hayashi, Ryota

    This paper develops a functional recovery training device to perform repetition facilitating exercise for hemiplegic finger rehabilitation. On the facilitation exercise, automatic finger expansion can be realized and facilitated by stretch reflex, where a stimulation forces is applied instantaneously on flexion finger for making strech reflex and resistance forces are applied for maintaining the strech reflex. In this paper, novel parallel mechanisms, force sensing system with high sensitivity and resistance accompanying cooperation control method are proposed for sensing, controlling and realizing the stimulation force, resistance forces, strech reflex and repetition facilitating exercise. The effectivities and performances of the device are shown by some experiments.

  10. Fuzzy based finger vein recognition with rotation invariant feature matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhilmaran, D.; Joseph, Rose Bindu

    2017-11-01

    Finger vein recognition is a promising biometric with commercial applications which is explored widely in the recent years. In this paper, a finger vein recognition system is proposed using rotation invariant feature descriptors for matching after enhancing the finger vein images with an interval type-2 fuzzy method. SIFT features are extracted and matched using a matching score based on Euclidian distance. Rotation invariance of the proposed method is verified in the experiment and the results are compared with SURF matching and minutiae matching. It is seen that rotation invariance is verified and the poor quality issues are solved efficiently with the designed system of finger vein recognition during the analysis. The experiments underlines the robustness and reliability of the interval type-2 fuzzy enhancement and SIFT feature matching.

  11. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  12. Sonographic evaluation of digital annular pulley tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E.; Bianchi, S.; Garcia, J.F.; Nebiolo, M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the sonographic (US) appearance of digital annular pulley (DAP) tears in high-level rock climbers. Design and patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the US examinations of 16 high-level rock climbers with clinical signs of DAP lesions. MRI and surgical evaluation were performed in five and three patients respectively. The normal US and MRI appearances of DAP were evaluated in 40 and three normal fingers respectively. Results. Nine of 16 patients presented a DAP tear. In eight subjects (seven with complete tears involving the fourth finger and one the fifth finger), US diagnosis was based on the indirect sign of volar bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Injured pulleys were not appreciated by US. Tears concerned the A2 and A3 in six patients and the A3 and A4 in two patients. A2 pulley thickening and hypoechogenicity compatible with a partial tear was demonstrated in one patient. MRI and surgical data correlated well with the US findings. Four patients had tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons but no evidence of pulley disruption. US examinations of three patients were normal. In the healthy subjects US demonstrated DAP in 16 of 40 digits. Conclusion. US can diagnose DAP tears and correlates with the MRI and surgical data. Because of its low cost and non-invasiveness we suggest US as the first imaging modality in the evaluation of injuries of the digital pulley. (orig.)

  13. Sonographic evaluation of digital annular pulley tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Bianchi, S.; Garcia, J.F. [Dept. de Radiologie, Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Geneve (Switzerland); Nebiolo, M. [Reparto Pronto Soccorso Medico, Pietra Ligure (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. To evaluate the sonographic (US) appearance of digital annular pulley (DAP) tears in high-level rock climbers. Design and patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the US examinations of 16 high-level rock climbers with clinical signs of DAP lesions. MRI and surgical evaluation were performed in five and three patients respectively. The normal US and MRI appearances of DAP were evaluated in 40 and three normal fingers respectively. Results. Nine of 16 patients presented a DAP tear. In eight subjects (seven with complete tears involving the fourth finger and one the fifth finger), US diagnosis was based on the indirect sign of volar bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Injured pulleys were not appreciated by US. Tears concerned the A2 and A3 in six patients and the A3 and A4 in two patients. A2 pulley thickening and hypoechogenicity compatible with a partial tear was demonstrated in one patient. MRI and surgical data correlated well with the US findings. Four patients had tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons but no evidence of pulley disruption. US examinations of three patients were normal. In the healthy subjects US demonstrated DAP in 16 of 40 digits. Conclusion. US can diagnose DAP tears and correlates with the MRI and surgical data. Because of its low cost and non-invasiveness we suggest US as the first imaging modality in the evaluation of injuries of the digital pulley. (orig.)

  14. Palmar and digital dermatoglyphic patterns in Malawian subjects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish palmar and digital dermatoglyphic patterns. Design: Cross sectional study of randomly selected black Malawian subjects. Setting: Chichiri Secondary School and College of Medicine in Blantyre, Malawi. Main outcome measures: Total finger ridge count (TFRC), atd angle, a-b ridge counts, pattern ...

  15. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed. Relevance to industry Prolonged, intensive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves have been used as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. However, their effectiveness for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations remains unclear. This study enhanced the understanding of the glove effects on finger vibration and provided useful information on the effectiveness of typical VR gloves at reducing the vibration transmitted to the fingers. The new

  16. Robotic Hand with Flexible Fingers for Grasping Cylindrical Objects

    OpenAIRE

    柴田, 瑞穂

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, a robotic hand for grasping a cylindrical object is proposed. This robotic hand has flexible fingers that can hold a cylindrical object during moving. We introduce a grasping strategy for a cylindrical object in terms of state transition graph. In this strategy the robotic hand picks up the cylindrical object utilizing a suction device before the hand grasp the object. We also design the flexible fingers; then, we investigate the validity of this robotic hand via several e...

  17. Finger avulsion injuries: A report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejjal N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury that occurs to a finger wearing a ring though rare can have grave consequences. It is a preventable injury which has a peculiar mode of trauma that is usually occupational. Injury ranges from simple contusion to degloving of soft tissues to traumatic amputation. We hereby report our experience of four cases of finger avulsion injuries due to a ring and discuss their variable clinical presentation and individualized management.

  18. Finger blood content, light transmission, and pulse oximetry errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, T M; Lawson, R A; Young, J D

    1992-01-01

    The changes in light emitting diode current necessary to maintain a constant level of light incident upon a photodetector were measured in 20 volunteers at the two wavelengths employed by pulse oximeters. Three states of finger blood content were assessed; exsanguinated, hyperaemic, and normal. The changes in light emitting diode current with changes in finger blood content were small and are not thought to represent a significant source of error in saturation as measured by pulse oximetry.

  19. Downward finger displacement distinguishes Parkinson disease dementia from Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Abraham; Deep, Aman; Shi, Jiong; Dhall, Rohit; Shafer, Saulena; Moguel-Cobos, Guillermo; Dhillon, Ravneet; Frames, Christopher W; McCauley, Margaret

    2018-02-01

    Purpose/Aim of the study: To study finger displacement in patients with Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). We examined 56 patients with PDD and 35 with AD. Patients were examined during their regular outpatient clinic visit. Finger displacement was measured by observers not actively involved in the study using a creative grid ruler for all PDD and AD patients. Finger displacement was examined by asking patients to point their index fingers toward the grid ruler with the nails facing upward. Patients were asked to maintain the pointing position for 15 s. After 15 s, patients were asked to close their eyes for another 15 s while maintaining the same position. A positive result was downward index finger displacement of ≥5 cm within the 15-second time window with eyes closed. Of the 56 PDD patients, 53 had bilateral finger displacement of >5 cm. In comparison, of the 35 AD patients, only 1 patient had minimal displacement. Results of the non-invasive finger displacement test may provide insight, on an outpatient basis, of the integrity of subcortical-cortical circuits. Downward finger displacement, especially bilateral downward displacement, may signal the extensive disruption of subcortical-cortical circuits that occurs in PDD patients. AChE: acetylcholinesterase; AD: Alzheimer disease; DLB: dementia with Lewy bodies; ET: essential tremor; MDS-UPDRS: Movement Disorder Society-sponsored Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale; MMSE: Mini-Mental State Examination; PD: Parkinson disease; PDD: Parkinson disease dementia.

  20. Peak power ratio generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  1. Elastic fingering in rotating Hele-Shaw flows

    KAUST Repository

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.

    2014-05-21

    The centrifugally driven viscous fingering problem arises when two immiscible fluids of different densities flow in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. In this conventional setting an interplay between capillary and centrifugal forces makes the fluid-fluid interface unstable, leading to the formation of fingered structures that compete dynamically and reach different lengths. In this context, it is known that finger competition is very sensitive to changes in the viscosity contrast between the fluids. We study a variant of such a rotating flow problem where the fluids react and produce a gellike phase at their separating boundary. This interface is assumed to be elastic, presenting a curvature-dependent bending rigidity. A perturbative weakly nonlinear approach is used to investigate how the elastic nature of the interface affects finger competition events. Our results unveil a very different dynamic scenario, in which finger length variability is not regulated by the viscosity contrast, but rather determined by two controlling quantities: a characteristic radius and a rigidity fraction parameter. By properly tuning these quantities one can describe a whole range of finger competition behaviors even if the viscosity contrast is kept unchanged. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  2. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRitchie, Jennifer; McPherson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterization of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction. PMID:26082732

  3. High-frequency ultrasonographic examination of the finger pulley system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Titécat, Marie; Demondion, Xavier; Glaude, Eddy; Fontaine, Christian; Cotten, Anne

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of high-frequency ultrasonography to provide for direct evaluation of the annular and cruciform finger pulley system. In the first part of the work, a cadaveric study was performed to outline the normal anatomy of the annular and cruciform finger pulley system. Eighteen cadaveric hands were cut (n = 10) or dissected (n = 8). Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus the photographs of anatomic sections and dissections. This cadaveric study gave the 2 readers the opportunity to learn the normal anatomy of the finger pulley system. In the second part of the work, the annular and cruciform finger pulley system of 20 hands of volunteers was evaluated by ultrasonography with a 17-MHz linear transducer. Images were retrospectively analyzed by means of consensus of the 2 radiologists with respect to the visibility of each finger pulley. For annular (A) pulleys, high frequency ultrasonography showed A1, A2, A3, and A4 in 100%, 100%, 65%, and 100% of cases, respectively. For cruciform (C) pulleys, high-frequency ultrasonography showed only C1 in 45% of cases. Direct visualization of A5, C2, and C3 was not possible. High-frequency ultrasonography allows excellent depiction of finger pulleys except for annular pulley A5 and cruciform pulleys C2 and C3.

  4. Fluidic Channels Produced by Electro Hydrodynamic Viscous Fingering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, Kristopher; Wetzel, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Viscous fingering is a term describing fingerlike extensions of liquid from a column of low viscosity liquid that has been injected into a more viscous liquid. The modification of viscous fingering, known as electro hydrodynamic viscous fingering (EHVF), utilizes large electrical potentials of 10-60 kV. The fingers see a reduction in size and increase in branching behavior due to the potential applied to the system. The resulting finely structured patterns are analogous to biological systems such as blood vessels and the lymphatic system. In this study silicone oils and water were studied in thin channel Hele-Shaw cells. The interfacial tension was optimized by altering the surfactant concentration in the silicone oils. EHVF of liquid filled packed beds consisting of beads and silicone oils showed retardation of the relaxation of the fingers after the voltage was turned off. Decreased relaxation provides a means to solidify patterns into a curable material, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the water is evacuated from the fingers, the cured materials then possess hollow channels that can be refilled and emptied, thus creating an artificial circulatory system.

  5. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMacRitchie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterisation of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  6. Pressure head distribution during unstable flow in relation to the formation and dissipation of fingers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiroyuki Cho,; Rooij, de G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Wetting front instability creates a shallow induction zone from which fingers emerge that rapidly transport water and solutes downwards. How the induction zone affects finger location and spacing is unknown. In the moist subsoil, fingers may well dissipate because the finger tips no longer have to

  7. Digital Culture and Digital Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın Yalçınkaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study; digital culture and digital library which have a vital connection with each other are examined together. The content of the research consists of the interaction of culture, information, digital culture, intellectual technologies, and digital library concepts. The study is an entry work to integrity of digital culture and digital library theories and aims to expand the symmetry. The purpose of the study is to emphasize the relation between the digital culture and digital library theories acting intersection of the subjects that are examined. Also the perspective of the study is based on examining the literature and analytical evaluation in both studies (digital culture and digital library. Within this context, the methodology of the study is essentially descriptive and has an attribute for the transmission and synthesis of distributed findings produced in the field of the research. According to the findings of the study results, digital culture is an inclusive term that describes the effects of intellectual technologies in the field of information and communication. Information becomes energy and the spectrum of the information is expanding in the vertical rise through the digital culture. In this context, the digital library appears as a new living space of a new environment. In essence, the digital library is information-oriented; has intellectual technology support and digital platform; is in a digital format; combines information resources and tools in relationship/communication/cooperation by connectedness, and also it is the dynamic face of the digital culture in time and space independence. Resolved with the study is that the digital libraries are active and effective in the formation of global knowing and/or mass wisdom in the process of digital culture.

  8. Cross-Cultural and Intra-Cultural Differences in Finger-Counting Habits and Number Magnitude Processing: Embodied Numerosity in Canadian and Chinese University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Richard Morrissey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent work in numerical cognition has shown-that number magnitude is not entirely abstract, and at least partly rooted in embodied and situated experiences, including finger-counting. The current study extends previous cross-cultural research to address within-culture individual differences in finger counting habits. Results indicated that Canadian participants demonstrated an additional cognitive load when comparing numbers that require more than one hand to represent, and this pattern of performance is further modulated by whether they typically start counting on their left hand or their right hand. Chinese students typically count on only one hand and so show no such effect, except for an increase in errors, similar to that seen in Canadians, for those whom self-identify as predominantly two-hand counters. Results suggest that the impact of finger counting habits extend beyond cultural experience and concord in predictable ways with differences in number magnitude processing for specific number-digits. We conclude that symbolic number magnitude processing is partially rooted in learned finger-counting habits, consistent with a motor simulation account of embodied numeracy and that argument is supported by both cross-cultural and within-culture differences in finger-counting habits.

  9. Ultrasound evaluation of stress injuries and physiological adaptations in the fingers of adolescent competitive rock climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kathryn; Jaramillo, Diego; Rubesova, Erika

    2018-03-01

    The impact of high-intensity, repetitive training on the fingers of adolescent climbers is relatively unknown. To evaluate this effect by ultrasound (US) and to confirm some findings by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The US study was performed in 20 adolescent rock climbers (ages 10-17 years) and 6 non-climbing controls (ages 11-15 years). US was used to examine the third digit of the right hand for differences in thickness of soft tissue, flexor and extensor tendon, volar plate and bony and growth plate adaptations. In four climbers with finger deformity or pain, 3-T MR images were compared with US findings. Number of hours/week and years of climbing were used to group climbers in three levels (3=most intense training). Mann-Whitney test was used for statistical analysis. Compared with non-climbing controls, climbers demonstrated significantly thicker flexor tendons, volar plates and soft tissues. Joint effusions were found in 13/19 (68%) climbers. Significant phalangeal malalignment was seen in 10/19 (53%) climbers. Growth plate deformities were identified in three level 3 climbers. US findings correlated with MRI for effusions, phalangeal growth plate injury, malalignment and adaptive changes. MRI additional showed capsule rupture (n=1), stress fracture (n=1) and phalangeal physeal stress injury (n=1). Competitive rock climbing results in physiological adaptations in the fingers, an example being significant soft-tissue hypertrophy of the flexor. US demonstrated several non-physiological changes in response to repetitive stress in half of the climbers. MRI showed additional stress injuries to the growth plate, joints and bone.

  10. Paroxysmal finger haematoma--a benign acrosyndrome occurring in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Patrick H; Maricq, Hildegard R; Biro, Christine; Jiguet, Myriam; Seinturier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal finger haematoma (PFH) is an under-recognised vascular acrosyndrome with no epidemiological description to date. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of PFH in a population-based sample of subjects and to describe their semiological characteristics. This cross-sectional study of random samples of the general population in three geographic areas of France involved 802 subjects, 548 women and 254 men, aged 18 to 84 years. The diagnosis of PFH was made from a report by the subject of a history of recurrent haematoma in the fingers with a sudden, painful and unexpected occurrence. Diagnosis of associated conditions and evaluation of lifestyle variables were obtained through standardised medical interview and examination. A history of PFH was detected in 71 subjects, with a prevalence of 1.2% in men and 12.4% in women; there was no significant regional variation. Onset before 40 years of age was rare. Besides female sex and age, no socio-economical nor lifestyle risk factors were detected. PFH was associated with Raynaud phenomenon and a history of chilblains, but no link with any health threatening disease was found. In addition to the sudden onset of pain and hematoma, the main clinical features were a frequent digital swelling during the painful attack, and their predominant location on the volar side of the first and second phalanges of the third or second fingers of the dominant hand. PFH is a benign phenomenon, frequently found in middle-aged women, to be classified among the vascular acrosyndromes. Patients seeking medical evaluation for this disorder should be reassured.

  11. INCORRECT PRESERVATION OF AMPUTATED DIGITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Ahčan

    2004-09-01

    completely amputated finger or fingers; the occurence was at its highest in 1998 (28 cases and at its lowest (23 in the years 2000 and 2002 (at an average of 24.8 annually. The number of attempted replantations has been demonstrated to be on the rise (28.8% of all severed fingers replanted in 1998; and 47.9% in 2002. The success rate throughout the 5 year period was 81%. The type of injury under investigation is most frequent in population of the age group 30 to 50.The presented cases clearly indicate that the incorrect, hypothermic treatment of the amputated extremity has a demonstrable negative effect on the result of the replantation.Conclusions. It is obvious that the knowledge on the treatment of severed digits is lacking in both lay and professional public. The most common error in the preservation of the severed digit is dangerously low temperature during transport. Optimal conditions of hypothermic preservation are, however, difficult to maintain in the field. A more engaged education would greatly improve the conditions of transport, and increase the success rate of replantations. Adequate educational programmes; instructions to both lay persons and professionals; and devising a transport bag for hypothermic preservation of severed digits are urgently called for.

  12. Tracing the evolution of avian wing digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Mackem, Susan

    2013-06-17

    It is widely accepted that birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs, but there is an apparent conflict: modern birds have been thought to possess only the middle three fingers (digits II-III-IV) of an idealized five-digit tetrapod hand based on embryological data, but their Mesozoic tetanuran dinosaur ancestors are considered to have the first three digits (I-II-III) based on fossil evidence. How could such an evolutionary quirk arise? Various hypotheses have been proposed to resolve this paradox. Adding to the confusion, some recent developmental studies support a I-II-III designation for avian wing digits whereas some recent paleontological data are consistent with a II-III-IV identification of the Mesozoic tetanuran digits. A comprehensive analysis of both paleontological and developmental data suggests that the evolution of the avian wing digits may have been driven by homeotic transformations of digit identity, which are more likely to have occurred in a partial and piecemeal manner. Additionally, recent genetic studies in mouse models showing plausible mechanisms for central digit loss invite consideration of new alternative possibilities (I-II-IV or I-III-IV) for the homologies of avian wing digits. While much progress has been made, some advances point to the complexity of the problem and a final resolution to this ongoing debate demands additional work from both paleontological and developmental perspectives, which will surely yield new insights on mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of the linkers between the zinc fingers in zinc finger protein 809 on gene silencing and nuclear localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Yu, E-mail: ichida-y@ncchd.go.jp; Utsunomiya, Yuko; Onodera, Masafumi

    2016-03-18

    Zinc finger protein 809 (ZFP809) belongs to the Kruppel-associated box-containing zinc finger protein (KRAB-ZFP) family and functions in repressing the expression of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV). ZFP809 binds to the primer-binding site (PBS)located downstream of the MoMLV-long terminal repeat (LTR) and induces epigenetic modifications at integration sites, such as repressive histone modifications and de novo DNA methylation. KRAB-ZFPs contain consensus TGEKP linkers between C2H2 zinc fingers. The phosphorylation of threonine residues within linkers leads to the inactivation of zinc finger binding to target sequences. ZFP809 also contains consensus linkers between zinc fingers. However, the function of ZFP809 linkers remains unknown. In the present study, we constructed ZFP809 proteins containing mutated linkers and examined their ability to silence transgene expression driven by MLV, binding ability to MLV PBS, and cellular localization. The results of the present study revealed that the linkers affected the ability of ZFP809 to silence transgene expression. Furthermore, this effect could be partly attributed to changes in the localization of ZFP809 proteins containing mutated linkers. Further characterization of ZFP809 linkers is required for understanding the functions and features of KRAB-ZFP-containing linkers. - Highlights: • ZFP809 has three consensus linkers between the zinc fingers. • Linkers are required for ZFP809 to silence transgene expression driven by MLV-LTR. • Linkers affect the precise nuclear localization of ZFP809.

  14. Digital Tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Karl; Borup, Ruben; Søndergaard, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Digital Tectonics treats the architectonical possibilities in digital generation of form and production. The publication is the first volume of a series, in which aspects of the strategic focus areas of the Aarhus School of Architecture will be disseminated.......Digital Tectonics treats the architectonical possibilities in digital generation of form and production. The publication is the first volume of a series, in which aspects of the strategic focus areas of the Aarhus School of Architecture will be disseminated....

  15. Digital skrivedidaktik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Digital skrivedidaktik består af to dele. Første del præsenterer teori om skrivekompetence og digital skrivning. Digital skrivning er karakteriseret ved at tekster skrives på computer og med digitale værktøjer, hvilket ændrer skrivningens traditionelle praksis, produkt og processer. Hvad er digital...... om elevens skriveproces) og Blogskrivning (der styrker eleverne i at bruge blogs i undervisningen)....

  16. Adverse events of open A1 pulley release for idiopathic trigger finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnzeel, Hanneke; Neuhaus, Valentin; Fostvedt, Sigrid; Jupiter, Jesse B; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Ring, David C

    2012-08-01

    To classify and report adverse events of trigger finger release in a large cohort of patients. We retrospectively reviewed 1,598 trigger finger releases performed by 12 surgeons in 984 patients between 2001 and 2011. Adverse events were classified based on a system derived from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria and clinical experience. Risk factors for various adverse events were sought in bivariate and multivariable statistical analysis. At the latest follow-up, 66 patients (7%), or 84 operated trigger digits (5%), experienced a documented adverse event. The most common adverse events were recovery issues in 46 patients (3%) (such as postoperative symptoms treated with steroid injection or slow recovery of motion treated with hand therapy), wound problems in 30 patients (2%) (consisting of suture abscess, superficial infection, or wound separation), persistent postoperative triggering in 10 patients (0.6%), and recurrent triggering in 4 patients (0.3%). Diabetes mellitus was associated with wound problems, slow recovery of motion, and recurrence. Concomitant carpal tunnel release on the same side was associated with slow recovery. Fourteen patients, less than 1%, in this cohort experienced an adverse event, such as persistent or recurrent triggering, requiring secondary surgery. No nerve injury or deep infection occurred in our cohort. One in 15 patients experienced a minor transient or treatable adverse event, and patients with diabetes were at greater risk. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Finger tapping movements of Parkinson's disease patients automatically rated using nonlinear delay differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscsek, C; Rowat, P; Schettino, L; Lee, D; Song, D; Letellier, C; Poizner, H

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative condition whose severity is assessed by clinical observations of motor behaviors. These are performed by a neurological specialist through subjective ratings of a variety of movements including 10-s bouts of repetitive finger-tapping movements. We present here an algorithmic rating of these movements which may be beneficial for uniformly assessing the progression of the disease. Finger-tapping movements were digitally recorded from Parkinson's patients and controls, obtaining one time series for every 10 s bout. A nonlinear delay differential equation, whose structure was selected using a genetic algorithm, was fitted to each time series and its coefficients were used as a six-dimensional numerical descriptor. The algorithm was applied to time-series from two different groups of Parkinson's patients and controls. The algorithmic scores compared favorably with the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale scores, at least when the latter adequately matched with ratings from the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Moreover, when the two sets of mean scores for all patients are compared, there is a strong (r = 0.785) and significant (p<0.0015) correlation between them.

  18. DIGITAL FORGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarhan M. Musa1

    2017-01-01

    Forgery is the criminal act that provides misleading information about a product or service. It is the process of making, adapting, or imitating documents or objects with the intent to deceive. Digital forgery (or digital tampering) is the process of manipulating documents or images for the intent of financial, social or political gain. This paper provides a brief introduction to the digital forgery.

  19. Digital Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Canan Gungoren, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Era in which we live is known and referred as digital age.In this age technology is rapidly changed and developed. In light of these technological advances in 21st century, schools have the responsibility of training "digital citizen" as well as a good citizen. Digital citizens must have extensive skills, knowledge, Internet and …

  20. Making fingers and words count in a cognitive robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Vivian M; Di Nuovo, Alessandro; Di Nuovo, Santo; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from developmental as well as neuroscientific studies suggest that finger counting activity plays an important role in the acquisition of numerical skills in children. It has been claimed that this skill helps in building motor-based representations of number that continue to influence number processing well into adulthood, facilitating the emergence of number concepts from sensorimotor experience through a bottom-up process. The act of counting also involves the acquisition and use of a verbal number system of which number words are the basic building blocks. Using a Cognitive Developmental Robotics paradigm we present results of a modeling experiment on whether finger counting and the association of number words (or tags) to fingers, could serve to bootstrap the representation of number in a cognitive robot, enabling it to perform basic numerical operations such as addition. The cognitive architecture of the robot is based on artificial neural networks, which enable the robot to learn both sensorimotor skills (finger counting) and linguistic skills (using number words). The results obtained in our experiments show that learning the number words in sequence along with finger configurations helps the fast building of the initial representation of number in the robot. Number knowledge, is instead, not as efficiently developed when number words are learned out of sequence without finger counting. Furthermore, the internal representations of the finger configurations themselves, developed by the robot as a result of the experiments, sustain the execution of basic arithmetic operations, something consistent with evidence coming from developmental research with children. The model and experiments demonstrate the importance of sensorimotor skill learning in robots for the acquisition of abstract knowledge such as numbers.

  1. Digital preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Deegan, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Digital preservation is an issue of huge importance to the library and information profession right now. With the widescale adoption of the internet and the rise of the world wide web, the world has been overwhelmed by digital information. Digital data is being produced on a massive scale by individuals and institutions: some of it is born, lives and dies only in digital form, and it is the potential death of this data, with its impact on the preservation of culture, that is the concern of this book. So how can information professionals try to remedy this? Digital preservation is a complex iss

  2. Do not rush to return to sports after trigger finger injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeehae; Jo, Leechan; Lee, Jong In

    2015-04-01

    Trigger finger, or digital stenosing tenosynovitis, is a common hand problem. A widely accepted treatment is steroid injection into the flexor tendon sheath. This can cause rupture of the flexor tendon. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no report on tendon rupture after a single corticosteroid injection. Moreover, there are no guidelines for patients with tendinopathy who want to return to sports after corticosteroid injection. Clinicians who perform local steroid injections for tendinopathy treatment should be aware of the possible dangers of tendon rupture and should confirm that steroids are not administrated into the tendon. Patients should also be warned about returning to sports prematurely and should be encouraged to gradually resume sports after the injection to prevent further damage. Herein, we report an unusual case of flexor digitorum profundus rupture after a single corticosteroid injection in a 57-yr-old male golfer and we also present a review of the literature.

  3. Direct repair of the sagittal band for extensor tendon subluxation caused by finger flicking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, In Tae; Oh, Chi Hoon; Sim, Young Suk; Han, Soo Hong

    2017-09-01

    For patients with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) extensor tendon subluxation caused by finger flicking injury, we performed an extensor tendon realignment and direct repair technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome after direct repair of the sagittal band in patients with MCP extensor tendon subluxation caused by finger flicking injury and to introduce the repair technique. A total of 26 patients with a mean age of 39.9 years were included in the study. The mean time from injury to surgery was 51.3 days. The ruptured sagittal band was reattached to the lateral side of the extensor tendon using a continuous interlocking suture. Patients were evaluated for pain using a visual analog scale (VAS), range of motion, long fingertip pinch strength, disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, and the recurrence of extensor tendon subluxation or dislocation. All patients had full range of motion compared to the uninjured contralateral digit. Long fingertip pinch strength was also comparable to that of the contralateral digit in all patients. The DASH score was also improved from a preoperative average of 28.8 to a postoperative average of 1.0. Realignment of the extensor tendon and direct repair of the superficial layer of the sagittal band to the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendon is recommended as a treatment option in patients with chronic MCP extensor tendon subluxation, as well as for acute MCP extensor tendon subluxation in patients that have failed or could not maintain conservative treatment approaches.

  4. Hybrid-Actuated Finger Prosthesis with Tactile Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yee Low

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Finger prostheses are devices developed to emulate the functionality of natural human fingers. On top of their aesthetic appearance in terms of shape, size and colour, such biomimetic devices require a high level of dexterity. They must be capable of gripping an object, and even manipulating it in the hand. This paper presents a biomimetic robotic finger actuated by a hybrid mechanism and integrated with a tactile sensor. The hybrid actuation mechanism comprises a DC micromotor and a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA wire. A customized test rig has been developed to measure the force and stroke produced by the SMA wire. In parallel with the actuator development, experimental investigations have been conducted on Quantum Tunnelling Composite (QTC and Pressure Conductive Rubber (PCR towards the development of a tactile sensor for the finger. The viability of using these materials for tactile sensing has been determined. Such a hybrid actuation approach aided with tactile sensing capability enables a finger design as an integral part of a prosthetic hand for applications up to the transradial amputation level.

  5. Effect of individual finger skin temperature on vibrotactile perception threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Harazin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In healthy people, the vibrotactile perception threshold (VPT at fingertips depends on a given measurement method and on individual characteristics such as age, gender and finger skin temperature. The aim of the study was to compare the VPT values in 2 groups of healthy subjects with different finger skin temperature. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 56 males and 76 females, who formed pairs matched with respect to age, gender and body mass index (BMI but differing in terms of finger skin temperature at pre-launch testing. The finger skin temperature of less than 29°C indicated the subjects with "cold hands" and that of more than 29°C, the subjects with "warm hands". The measuring system made use of P8 pallesthesiometer (EMSON-MAT, Poland and the measurement procedure was in compliance with the ISO 13091-1:2001 standard. VPT measurements were performed for the index, middle and ring fingers of both hands at the frequencies of 4 Hz, 25 Hz, 31.5 Hz, 63 Hz, 125 Hz and 250 Hz. Results: The findings of the study revealed that the mean VPTs among the subjects with "cold hands" were significantly higher than the corresponding values among the subjects with "warm hands". Conclusions: The type of individual peripheral thermoregulation should be considered when assessing the VPT and determining its reference values.

  6. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumoto, K.; Fujino, M.; Supriyadi; Suzuki, T.; Hayashi, T.

    1991-01-01

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 10 8 /g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10kGy and 20kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers

  7. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumoto, Kyoden; Fujino, Masayuki; Supriyadi (Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Research Inst. for Food Science); Suzuki, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Toru

    1991-08-01

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 10{sup 8}/g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10 kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10 kGy and 20 kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers. (author).

  8. Evaluation of electron beam irradiation for disinfection of turmeric fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumoto, Kyoden; Fujino, Masayuki; Supriyadi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Toru.

    1991-01-01

    Turmeric finger as one of the most popular spices has been widely used for food manufacturing. However, it has also been a major cause of bacterial infestation of food materials especially in curry, ham and sausage manufacturing. In this study decontamination of bacteria in turmeric finger by electron beam irradiation was evaluated by comparing with several other decontamination methods: i.e., boiling, microwave irradiation, treatment by twin screw extruder and gamma-ray irradiation. By estimation of colony counting on nutrient agar plate, turmeric finger without any treatment gave total viable cell at 10 8 /g. Turmeric finger which was irradiated by electron beam at 10 kGy dose dramatically reduced thermotolerant cell population below self restriction level (<1000/g), which has been required by food hygiene law. The same level of sterilization effect was obtained only by gamma-ray irradiation at 10 kGy and 20 kGy. On the other hand, although treatment through twin screw extruder slightly reduced bacterial numbers, neither boiling nor microwave irradiation gave sufficient decontamination effect on turmeric fingers. (author)

  9. A Method for Recognizing State of Finger Flexure and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terado, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Osamu

    In our country, the handicapped and the elderly people in bed increase rapidly. In the bedridden person’s daily life, there may be limitations in the physical movement and the means of mutual communication. For the support of their comfortable daily lives, therefore, the development of human interface equipment becomes an important task. The equipment of this kind is being already developed by means of laser beam, eye-tracking, breathing motion and myo-electric signals, while the attachment and handling are normally not so easy. In this study, paying attention to finger motion, we have developed human interface equipment easily attached to the body, which enables one to measure the finger flexure and extension for mutual communication. The state of finger flexure and extension is identified by a threshold level analysis from the 3D-locus data for the finger movement, which can be measured through the infrared rays from the LED markers attached to a glove with the previously developed prototype system. We then have confirmed from an experiment that nearly 100% recognition for the finger movement can be achieved.

  10. Angioplasty of forearm arteries as a finger salvage procedure for patient with end-stage renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yuk Law, Yiu Che Chan, Stephen Wing-Keung Cheng Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Abstract: Due to the relatively low metabolic demand and extensive collaterals of the upper limb, peripheral arterial disease seldom leads to tissue loss, except in patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF, rheumatologic diseases, Raynaud’s disease, frostbites, or distal emboli. We report a case of a 51-year-old lady with ESRF who presented to our tertiary referral vascular center with infected gangrene of her right ring finger. Duplex ultrasound showed that her forearm arteries were severely diseased. Digital subtraction angiogram showed severe multilevel stenoses/occlusions in her forearm radial and ulnar arteries. These lesions were successfully angioplastized with 2 mm × 25 mm angioplasty balloon. Completion angiogram showed good radiological results with some post-dilatation spasm which improved with intra-arterial glyceryl trinitrate. The sepsis improved after revascularization, and the distal phalanx was allowed to self-demarcate with dressings and autoamputate with good clinical results. Our case illustrated that even in delayed setting, patients could still benefit from specialist vascular care with a combination of expert care and angioplasty of forearm arteries, with successful salvage of her finger. Keywords: end-stage renal disease, finger septic gangrene, peripheral arterial disease, angioplasty, salvage

  11. Prediction of contact forces of underactuated finger by adaptive neuro fuzzy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Abbasi, Almas; Kiani, Kourosh; Al-Shammari, Eiman Tamah

    2015-12-01

    To obtain adaptive finger passive underactuation can be used. Underactuation principle can be used to adapt shapes of the fingers for grasping objects. The fingers with underactuation do not require control algorithm. In this study a kinetostatic model of the underactuated finger mechanism was analyzed. The underactuation is achieved by adding the compliance in every finger joint. Since the contact forces of the finger depend on contact position of the finger and object, it is suitable to make a prediction model for the contact forces in function of contact positions of the finger and grasping objects. In this study prediction of the contact forces was established by a soft computing approach. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied as the soft computing method to perform the prediction of the finger contact forces.

  12. Dorsal finger texture recognition: Investigating fixed-length SURF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Daniel; Kückelhahn, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We seek to create fixed-length features from dorsal finger skin images extracted by the SURF interest point detector to combine it in the privacy enhancing helper data scheme. The source of the biometric samples is the GUC45 database which features finger vein, fingerprint and dorsal finger skin...... images for modality fusion. First, the region of interest (ROI) is extracted, after which SURF features are extracted, and finally two different approaches for creating fixed length feature vectors are applied. SURF performance on the ROI is comparable to the PolyU database reported in the literature...... the complexity of the SURF matching scheme, a reduction in run-time of 75%–80% has been achieved, with only minimal precision loss; EER increases from 0.74% to 1%. The complexity of the matching can be reduced from O(n2) to constant time, but at a higher precision cost and resulting in an EER of 16.51%....

  13. Compensating Pose Uncertainties Through Appropriate Gripper Finger Cutouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Gams, Andrej; Kiforenko, Lilita

    2017-01-01

    capabilities in a sample industrial object grasping scenario for a finger that was designed using an automated simulation-based geometry optimization method [1, 2]. We test the developed gripper with a set of grasps subjected to structured perturbation in a simulation environment and in the real-world setting......The gripper finger design is a recurring problem in many robotic grasping platforms used in industry. The task of switching the gripper configuration to accommodate for a new batch of objects typically requires engineering expertise, and is a lengthy and costly iterative trial-and-error process....... We provide a comparison of the data obtained by using both of these approaches. We argue that the strong correspondence observed in results validates the use of dynamic simulation for the gripper finger design and optimization....

  14. Compensating Pose Uncertainties through Appropriate Gripper Finger Cutouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Gams, Andrej; Kiforenko, Lilita

    2018-01-01

    The gripper finger design is a recurring problem in many robotic grasping platforms used in industry. The task of switching the gripper configuration to accommodate a new batch of objects typically requires engineering expertise and is a lengthy and costly iterative trial-and-error process. One...... in a sample industrial object grasping scenario for a finger that was designed using an automated simulation-based geometry optimization method (Wolniakowski et al., 2013, 2015). We test the developed gripper with a set of grasps subjected to structured perturbation in a simulation environment and in the real......-world setting. We provide a comparison of the data obtained by using both of these approaches. We argue that the strong correspondence observed in results validates the use of dynamic simulation for the gripper finger design and optimization....

  15. Design of rehabilitation robot hand for fingers CPM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Chan, T. W.; Tong, K. Y.; Kwong, K. K.; Yao, Xifan

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a low-cost prototype for rehabilitation robot aide patient do hands CPM (continuous passive motion) training. The design of the prototype is based on the principle of Rutgers Master II glove, but it is better in performance for more improvement made. In the design, it uses linear motors to replace pneumatic actuators to make the product more portable and mobile. It increases finger training range to 180 degree for the full range training of hand finger holding and extension. Also the prototype can not only be wearing on palm and fore arm do training for face to face with finger move together, but also be put in the opposite hand glove wear direction for hand rehabilitation training. During the research, Solidworks is used as the tool for mechanical design and movement simulation. It proved through experiment that the prototype made in the research is appropriate for hand do CPM training.

  16. Finger vein recognition based on convolutional neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Gesi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biometric Authentication Technology has been widely used in this information age. As one of the most important technology of authentication, finger vein recognition attracts our attention because of its high security, reliable accuracy and excellent performance. However, the current finger vein recognition system is difficult to be applied widely because its complicated image pre-processing and not representative feature vectors. To solve this problem, a finger vein recognition method based on the convolution neural network (CNN is proposed in the paper. The image samples are directly input into the CNN model to extract its feature vector so that we can make authentication by comparing the Euclidean distance between these vectors. Finally, the Deep Learning Framework Caffe is adopted to verify this method. The result shows that there are great improvements in both speed and accuracy rate compared to the previous research. And the model has nice robustness in illumination and rotation.

  17. Trigger finger presenting secondary to leiomyoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harb Ziad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a previously undescribed entity: trigger finger secondary to a leiomyoma. This is the first time such a case has been reported and highlights the fact that common conditions can sometimes present secondary to rare diseases. Case presentation A 39-year-old Caucasian man presented with a fairly typical presentation of trigger finger. During surgical treatment, the lesion was excised and sent for histology, which showed tissue consistent with a leiomyoma. The patient made an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Trigger finger is a common condition that is usually easily diagnosed and managed. However, it is important to appreciate that uncommon conditions, such as leiomyoma, can present with what is sometimes considered trivial disease, and one should always consider the differential diagnoses even when faced with relatively benign conditions.

  18. Digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bick, Ulrich; Diekmann, Felix

    2010-01-01

    This state-of-the-art reference book provides in-depth coverage of all aspects of digital mammography, including detector technology, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, soft-copy reading, digital workflow, and PACS. Specific advantages and disadvantages of digital mammography in comparison to screen-film mammography are thoroughly discussed. By including authors from both North America and Europe, the book is able to outline variations in the use, acceptance, and quality assurance of digital mammography between the different countries and screening programs. Advanced imaging techniques and future developments such as contrast mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis are also covered in detail. All of the chapters are written by internationally recognized experts and contain numerous high-quality illustrations. This book will be of great interest both to clinicians who already use or are transitioning to digital mammography and to basic scientists working in the field. (orig.)

  19. Finger doses for staff handling radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Gauri S; Sharma, Sanjay K; Rath, Gaura K

    2006-09-01

    Radiation doses to the fingers of occupational workers handling 99mTc-labeled compounds and 131I for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The doses were measured at the base of the ring finger and the index finger of both hands in 2 groups of workers. Group 1 (7 workers) handled 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, and group 2 (6 workers) handled 131I for diagnosis and therapy. Radiation doses to the fingertips of 3 workers also were measured. Two were from group 1, and 1 was from group 2. The doses to the base of the fingers for the radiopharmacy staff and physicians from group 1 were observed to be 17+/-7.5 (mean+/-SD) and 13.4+/-6.5 microSv/GBq, respectively. Similarly, the dose to the base of the fingers for the 3 physicians in group 2 was estimated to be 82.0+/-13.8 microSv/GBq. Finger doses for the technologists in both groups could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 1 wk. The doses to the fingertips of the radiopharmacy worker and the physician in group 1 were 74.3+/-19.8 and 53.5+/-21.9 microSv/GBq, respectively. The dose to the fingertips of the physician in group 2 was 469.9+/-267 microSv/GBq. The radiation doses to the fingers of nuclear medicine staff at our center were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y), except for a physician who handled large quantities of 131I for treatment. Because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year, the doses to the base of the fingers or the fingertips should not exceed the prescribed annual limit of 500 mSv.

  20. Finger injuries from infant mittens; a continuing but preventable hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, M D; Seymour, P

    1996-04-01

    During the last 4 years, three infants have presented with finger-tip injuries secondary to entrapment in woollen/synthetic mittens. The accident happened at home in one case but the other two occurred in different neonatal units. Spontaneous amputation of the terminal phalanx of the index finger occurred in two patients but in the other there was complete healing. This problem may be avoided by restricting the use of mittens, by changing their design, and by a greater awareness of this hazard.

  1. Trace element finger printing of emeralds by PIXE and PIGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei; Palmer, G.R.; MacArthur, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of 18 major- and minor-elements in 12 Emeralds from different mines and two synthetic ones are measured with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and γ-ray emission (PIGE). The concentration and distribution of 18 elements are used to establish the characteristic finger print pattern of each Emerald. With the help of cluster analysis of SYSTAT statistical package for IBMPC, these finger prints are analysed, from which a quantitative description of the dissimilarities between Emeralds can be given

  2. Digital Signage

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Karl Peter

    2011-01-01

    Digital Signage for in-store advertising at gas stations/retail stores in Germany: A field study Digital Signage networks provide a novel means of advertising with the advantage of easily changeable and highly customizable animated content. Despite the potential and increasing use of these media empirical research is scarce. In a field study at 8 gas stations (with integrated convenience stores) we studied the effect of digital signage advertising on sales for different products and servi...

  3. Digital Forensics

    OpenAIRE

    Garfinkel, Simson L.

    2013-01-01

    A reprint from American Scientist the magazine of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Since the 1980s, computers have had increasing roles in all aspects of human life—including an involvement in criminal acts. This development has led to the rise of digital forensics, the uncovering and examination of evidence located on all things electronic with digital storage, including computers, cell phones, and networks. Digital forensics researchers and practitione...

  4. An alternative treatment for contractures of the elderly institutionalized persons: Microinvasive percutaneous needle tenotomy of the finger flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Alexis; Diebold, Aurélie; Parratte, Bernard; Tliba, Laurent; Genêt, Francois; Denormandie, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Almost 10% of older adults in nursing homes have a fixed flexion deformity of the fingers (claw hand). Such contractures have important functional consequences, often leading to hygiene difficulties. Medical treatment (such as botulinum toxin injections, physiotherapy or positioning) is not always effective and surgery is often not possible in such fragile patients. Microinvasive tenotomy with a large needle could be a useful alternative because it can be carried out in an ambulatory setting under local anaesthesia. A single center, retrospective study involving the 2012-2014 database from the day-hospital unit of a neuro-orthopaedic department in France. All patients who underwent percutaneous needle tenotomy of the finger or thumb flexors were included. Outcomes included Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) and the distance in centimeters between the palm and the pulp of the most flexed digit (PPD). Eighteen patients underwent tenotomy (13 women; mean age: 76±14 years); all patients lived in a nursing home. The limb to be treated was nonfunctional in all patients. The principal goal was determined by consensus with the patients and their health-care teams and was most often to facilitate hand hygiene. Eight patients had at least one secondary goal. In total, 10 patients underwent microinvasive tenotomy for 4 fingers, 5 patients 1 to 4 fingers and 3 patients only the thumb. At 3 months after treatment, goals were achieved for 11 patients, 5 patients progressed toward the goal without attaining it, and for 2 patients, scores were worse. The T-scores of the GAS and the PPD were significantly increased at 3 months (P=0.0326 and P=0.0002, respectively). No serious adverse events occurred. Large-needle tenotomy seems safe and effective for treating claw hand in fragile older patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic digital amperometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthasarathy, R.

    1982-01-01

    A digital amperometer was designed and fabricated in this laboratory for use in biamperometric titrimetry. Satisfactory tests were carried out in the laboratory by the analysis of uranium. The instrument holds application potential in plutonium estimation and also in the determination of oxygen to metal ratios (O/M) of nuclear fuel materials. The heart of the instrument is a current to voltage converter which converts the amperometric signals from the analysis cell into precise voltage levels which are displayed in the front panel by a digital panel meter (DPM). The instrument provides a variable precision millivolt source for the analysis cell which is also displayed by a DPM.

  6. Finger movement function after ultrasound-guided percutaneous pulley release for trigger finger: effects of postoperative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Szu-Ching; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Jou, I-Ming; Sun, Yung-Nien; Su, Fong-Chin

    2015-01-01

    To develop and test a postoperative rehabilitation protocol for use by individuals with trigger finger undergoing ultrasound-guided percutaneous pulley release. Nonrandomized controlled trial. Hospital and local community. Individuals suffering from trigger finger with joint contracture (N=21) were recruited and grouped into an intervention group (n=9) or a control group (n=12). All the participants underwent the same surgical procedure performed by the same surgeon. A 4-week postoperative rehabilitation program was designed based on the wound healing process. The intervention group received postoperative rehabilitation after the surgery, whereas the control group received no treatment after the surgery. The finger movement functions were quantitatively evaluated before and 1 month after the surgery using a 3-dimensional motion capture system. The fingertip workspace and joint range of motion (ROM) were evaluated while the participant was performing a sequential 5-posture movement, including finger extension, intrinsic plus, straight fist, full fist, and hook fist. The intervention group demonstrated significantly more improvements than the control group in the fingertip workspace (49% vs 17%), ROM of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint (16% vs 4%), ROM of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (21% vs 5%), and total active ROM (17% vs 5%). This pilot study evaluated a postoperative rehabilitation protocol for trigger finger and demonstrated its effects on various finger functions. Participants who underwent the rehabilitation program had significantly more improvements in the fingertip workspace, ROM of the DIP and PIP joints, and total active ROM. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Linear stability analysis and nonlinear simulation of the channeling effect on viscous fingering instability in miscible displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazari, M. R.; Maleka Ashtiani, I.; Saberi, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of channeling on viscous fingering instability of miscible displacement in porous media is studied. In fact, channeling is introduced as a solution to stabilize the viscous fingering instability. In this solution, narrow channels were placed next to the walls, and by considering an exponential function to model the channeling effect, a heterogeneous media is assumed. In linear stability analysis, the governing equations are transferred to Fourier space, and by introducing a novel numerical method, the transferred equations are analyzed. The growth rate based on the wave number diagram has been drawn up in three sections of the medium. It is found that the flow becomes more stable at the center and unstable along the walls when the permeability ratio is increased. Also when the permeability ratio is approximately equal to one, the channeling has no significant effect. In nonlinear simulations, by using stream function and vortices, new equations have been rewritten and it is shown that channeling has a profound effect on the growth of the fingers and mechanisms. In addition to the superposition of velocity vectors and concentration contours, the development of instability is investigated using the mixing length and sweep efficiency diagram. The results show that although channeling reduces instability, it increases the displacement process time.

  8. Training finger individuation with a mechatronic-virtual reality system leads to improved fine motor control post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielbar, Kelly O; Lord, Thomas J; Fischer, Heidi C; Lazzaro, Emily C; Barth, Kristin C; Stoykov, Mary E; Triandafilou, Kristen M; Kamper, Derek G

    2014-12-26

    Dexterous manipulation of the hand, one of the features of human motor control, is often compromised after stroke, to the detriment of basic functions. Despite the importance of independent movement of the digits to activities of daily living, relatively few studies have assessed the impact of specifically targeting individuated movements of the digits on hand rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of such finger individuation training, by means of a novel mechatronic-virtual reality system, on fine motor control after stroke. An actuated virtual keypad (AVK) system was developed in which the impaired hand controls a virtual hand playing a set of keys. Creation of individuated digit movements is assisted by a pneumatically actuated glove, the PneuGlove. A study examining efficacy of the AVK system was subsequently performed. Participants had chronic, moderate hand impairment resulting from a single stroke incurred at least 6 months prior. Each subject underwent 18 hour-long sessions of extensive therapy (3x per week for 6 weeks) targeted at finger individuation. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups: the first group (Keypad: N = 7) utilized the AVK system while the other group (OT: N = 7) received a similarly intensive dose of occupational therapy; both groups worked directly with a licensed occupational therapist. Outcome measures such as the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (JTHFT), Action research Arm Test (ARAT), Fugl-Meyer Upper Extremity Motor Assessment/Hand subcomponent (FMUE/FMH), grip and pinch strengths were collected at baseline, post-treatment and one-month post-treatment. While both groups exhibited some signs of change after the training sessions, only the Keypad group displayed statistically significant improvement both for measures of impairment (FMH: p = 0.048) and measures of task performance (JTHFT: p = 0.021). Additionally, the finger individuation index - a measure of finger

  9. The Relationship Between Digit Independence and Digital Sesamoids in Humans and a Proposal of a New Digital Sesamoid Evolutionary Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2018-01-03

    Digital sesamoids are found in the metapodial-phalangeal joints of most mammals and quadrupedal tetrapods, yet their functional significance is still unclear. During primate evolution, a slight decline in their frequency has been associated with brachiation in gibbons, followed by a quasi-complete absence in orangutans then a slight resurgence occurred in gorillas and chimpanzees. Simultaneously, forearm muscles showed a progressive division in hominoid evolution towards a more "individualistic" musculature yielding more mobility and independence to some fingers. In humans, sesamoids are consistently observed in thumbs and big toes and frequently in other hypermobile digits such as the index and little fingers. Using a simple mathematical equation, this paper attempted to quantify a presumed association between hypermobile fingers and sesamoid frequency and distribution in humans. To this, an anatomic definition of digital independence has been formulated which includes three variables; (1) number and (2) frequency of independent flexor/extensor forearm muscles destined to a single finger, (3) and number of free/absent webspace. Results of previous meta-analyses and means of big sample studies were used to evaluate the frequency of such muscles. The expected values obtained via this model were found to be very close to the observed (published) values of the ossified sesamoids in human hands, and that in terms of frequency and distribution. The findings in humans showed a quasi-linear association between the degree of mobility and sesamoid frequency. The more the number of independent muscles destined to a finger, the more its metacarpo-phalangeal joint is likely to bear sesamoids. Based on our results and on a new analysis of primates' forearm/hand muscles and sesamoid evolution, a new hypothesis is proposed to answer two questions; the evolution of digital sesamoid frequency in primates and its sesamoid distribution in human digits. It claims that the number

  10. Morpho-agronomic Classification of Some Native and Exotic Finger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.) is one of the important indigenous crops of Africa. The productivity of the crop, however, is very low owing to several factors including the inherent low-yielding potential of the cultivars. Information on genetic diversity among the available germplasm collections is very useful for breeding ...

  11. Cold-Blooded Attention: Finger Temperature Predicts Attentional Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Rodrigo C.; Moënne-Loccoz, Cristóbal; Maldonado, Pedro E.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal stress has been shown to increase the chances of unsafe behavior during industrial and driving performances due to reductions in mental and attentional resources. Nonetheless, establishing appropriate safety standards regarding environmental temperature has been a major problem, as modulations are also be affected by the task type, complexity, workload, duration, and previous experience with the task. To bypass this attentional and thermoregulatory problem, we focused on the body rather than environmental temperature. Specifically, we measured tympanic, forehead, finger and environmental temperatures accompanied by a battery of attentional tasks. We considered a 10 min baseline period wherein subjects were instructed to sit and relax, followed by three attentional tasks: a continuous performance task (CPT), a flanker task (FT) and a counting task (CT). Using multiple linear regression models, we evaluated which variable(s) were the best predictors of performance. The results showed a decrement in finger temperature due to instruction and task engagement that was absent when the subject was instructed to relax. No changes were observed in tympanic or forehead temperatures, while the environmental temperature remained almost constant for each subject. Specifically, the magnitude of the change in finger temperature was the best predictor of performance in all three attentional tasks. The results presented here suggest that finger temperature can be used as a predictor of alertness, as it predicted performance in attentional tasks better than environmental temperature. These findings strongly support that peripheral temperature can be used as a tool to prevent unsafe behaviors and accidents. PMID:28955215

  12. Cold-Blooded Attention: Finger Temperature Predicts Attentional Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo C. Vergara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stress has been shown to increase the chances of unsafe behavior during industrial and driving performances due to reductions in mental and attentional resources. Nonetheless, establishing appropriate safety standards regarding environmental temperature has been a major problem, as modulations are also be affected by the task type, complexity, workload, duration, and previous experience with the task. To bypass this attentional and thermoregulatory problem, we focused on the body rather than environmental temperature. Specifically, we measured tympanic, forehead, finger and environmental temperatures accompanied by a battery of attentional tasks. We considered a 10 min baseline period wherein subjects were instructed to sit and relax, followed by three attentional tasks: a continuous performance task (CPT, a flanker task (FT and a counting task (CT. Using multiple linear regression models, we evaluated which variable(s were the best predictors of performance. The results showed a decrement in finger temperature due to instruction and task engagement that was absent when the subject was instructed to relax. No changes were observed in tympanic or forehead temperatures, while the environmental temperature remained almost constant for each subject. Specifically, the magnitude of the change in finger temperature was the best predictor of performance in all three attentional tasks. The results presented here suggest that finger temperature can be used as a predictor of alertness, as it predicted performance in attentional tasks better than environmental temperature. These findings strongly support that peripheral temperature can be used as a tool to prevent unsafe behaviors and accidents.

  13. Systematic classification of the His-Me finger superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Jagoda; Matelska, Dorota; Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2017-11-16

    The His-Me finger endonucleases, also known as HNH or ββα-metal endonucleases, form a large and diverse protein superfamily. The His-Me finger domain can be found in proteins that play an essential role in cells, including genome maintenance, intron homing, host defense and target offense. Its overall structural compactness and non-specificity make it a perfectly-tailored pathogenic module that participates on both sides of inter- and intra-organismal competition. An extremely low sequence similarity across the superfamily makes it difficult to identify and classify new His-Me fingers. Using state-of-the-art distant homology detection methods, we provide an updated and systematic classification of His-Me finger proteins. In this work, we identified over 100 000 proteins and clustered them into 38 groups, of which three groups are new and cannot be found in any existing public domain database of protein families. Based on an analysis of sequences, structures, domain architectures, and genomic contexts, we provide a careful functional annotation of the poorly characterized members of this superfamily. Our results may inspire further experimental investigations that should address the predicted activity and clarify the potential substrates, to provide more detailed insights into the fundamental biological roles of these proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Reference values for the nickel concentration in human finger nails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Peters, K; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    A reference value for the nickel concentration in finger nails from people who are not occupationally exposed to nickel was determined on the basis of nail samples from 95 healthy individuals. The mean +/- standard deviation was 1.19 +/- 1.61 mg/kg and the median was 0.49 mg/kg (range 0.042-7.50 mg...

  15. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc .... tered to a defined family based on binding data. How-.

  16. Finger-stylus for non touch-enable systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since computer was invented, people are using many devices to interact with computer. Initially there were keyboard, mouse etc. but with advancement of technology, new ways are being discovered that are quite common and natural to the humans like stylus for touch-enabled systems. In the current age of technology, the user is expected to touch the machine interface to give input. Hand gesture is used in such a way to interact with machines where natural bare hand is used to communicate without touching machine interface. It gives a feeling to the user that he is interacting in a natural way with some human, not with traditional machines. This paper presents a technique where the user need not touch the machine interface to draw on the screen. Here hand finger draws shapes on monitor like stylus, without touching the monitor. This method can be used in many applications including games. The finger is used as an input device that acts like a paint-brush or finger-stylus and is used to make shapes in front of the camera. Fingertip extraction and motion tracking were done in Matlab with real time constraints. This work is an early attempt to replace stylus with the natural finger without touching the screen.

  17. Amniogenesis in Schreiber's long-fingered bat Miniopterus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schreiber's long-fingered bat, Miniopterus schreibersii natalensis is seasonally monoestrous, carrying a single foetus in the right uterine horn. Implantation is superficial, the amnion being a pleuramnion. Lateral folds, originating from the ends of the caudal and cephalic folds, are the main contributors in the formation of the ...

  18. Development of transgenic finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-18

    Jan 18, 2012 ... tropical regions of Africa and Asia (O'Kennedy et al. 2006). Finger millet ... University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore, was used for the introduction of rice chitinase gene. A tissue culture protocol (Ceasar and Ignacimuthu 2008) was used for the ... The culture was maintained at 26°C on an orbital shaker.

  19. Cortical activation during finger tapping in thyroid dysfunction: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADU

    Cortical activation during finger tapping in thyroid dysfunction: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study. S KHUSHU. 1,*, S SENTHIL KUMARAN. 1, T SEKHRI. 2, R P TRIPATHI. 1, P C JAIN. 3 and V JAIN. 1. 1NMR Research Centre, 2Thyroid Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied sciences,. Brig.

  20. Moving Fingers under a Stick: A Laboratory Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massalha, Taha; Lanir, Yuval; Gluck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We consider a demonstration in which pupils alternately slide and stop their fingers under a long horizontal rod which they support. The changeover is described in terms of the relevant kinetic and static friction. We present a model calculation, performed on a spreadsheet, which clarifies the process and describes graphically the stepwise…

  1. Optimal Finger Search Trees in the Pointer Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Lagogiannis, George; Makris, Christos

    2003-01-01

    We develop a new finger search tree with worst-case constant update time in the Pointer Machine (PM) model of computation. This was a major problem in the field of Data Structures and was tantalizingly open for over twenty years while many attempts by researchers were made to solve it. The result...

  2. Development of transgenic finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-18

    Jan 18, 2012 ... quickly in size, leading to death of seedlings within 25–30 days after the spraying of the fungal spores. High level of resistance was conferred by transgenic finger ... viral diseases through alien gene transfer. Fungal disease is a major constraint in the crop production due to high yield loss. Significant yield ...

  3. Compensating Pose Uncertainties Through Appropriate Gripper Finger Cutouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolniakowski, Adam; Gams, Andrej; Kiforenko, Lilita

    2018-01-01

    The gripper finger design is a recurring problem in many robotic grasping platforms used in industry. The task of switching the gripper configuration to accommodate for a new batch of objects typically requires engineering expertise, and is a lengthy and costly iterative trial-and-error process. ...

  4. Gold Finger: Metal Jewellery as a Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Therapy!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hlaing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is a chronic, progressive and disabling auto-immune disease often affecting the small joints of the hands in a symmetrical fashion. The disease can progress rapidly causing joint swelling and damaging cartilage and bone around the joints resulting in severe deformities. We report a very unusual case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with polyarticular psoriatic arthritis affecting all proximal interphalangeal (PIP joints of both hands except the left ring finger PIP joint. On clinical examination there was no evidence of arthritis in the left ring finger PIP joint. We confirmed the paucity of joint damage in the PIP joint of the left ring finger using more modern imaging modalities such as musculoskeletal ultrasound and MRI scan of the small joints of the hands. All other PIP joints in both hands demonstrated advanced degrees of joint damage secondary to chronic psoriatic inflammatory arthritis. We postulated that wearing a gold wedding ring has helped protecting the PIP joint of the left ring finger from the damaging effect of inflammatory arthritis. The possible mechanisms by which metal jewellery (gold ring confer protection to adjacent joints was discussed.

  5. Tensile Strength of Finger Joints at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter C.; Olesen, Frits Bolonius

    A series of test s aimed a t establishing the effect of temperature upon the tensile strength parallel-to-grain of finger jointed laminae for glulam has been conducted in the Fire Research Laboratory at Aalborg University Centre. The objective of this report is to present the background...

  6. Variability and trait relationships among finger millet accessions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    of finger millet to determine the genetic potential for future use in breeding programmes. A total of 100 accessions were evaluated for morpho-agronomic characters in a 10 x 10 lattice design at. NaSARRI and Ikulwe in Uganda for two seasons. Analysis of variance revealed mean squares of the genotypes were significant ...

  7. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... Support Vector Machine (SVM) is a state-of-the-art classifica- tion technique. Using canonical binding model, the C2H2 zinc finger protein–DNA interaction interface is modelled by the pairwise amino acid–base interactions. Using a classification framework, known examples of non-binding ZF–DNA pairs.

  8. The potential of young, green finger-jointed Eucalyptus grandis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drying will occur naturally while the lumber is fixed within the roof truss structure. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the strength and stiffness variation of the finger-jointed E. grandis product in both the green and dry state for different age and dimension lumber, (2) to investigate the variation in density, warp ...

  9. Singing Greeting Card Beeper as a Finger Pulse Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belusic, Gregor; Zupancic, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a robust and low-priced finger pulse sensor from a singing greeting card beeper. The beeper outputs the plethysmographic signal, which is indistinguishable from that of commercial grade sensors. The sensor can be used in school for a number of experiments in human cardiovascular physiology.

  10. Effect of Intercropping Finger Millet with two Indigenous Legumes at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In phase one, an indigenous edible legume (Crotalaria brevidens) and a fodder legume (Trifolium quartinianum) were intercropped with finger millet. Each plot was supplied with three nitrogen fertilizer rates (0, 20, and 40 Kg N/ha) in the form of Urea (46% N) in a completely randomized block design with three replicates.

  11. Osseointegrated silicone finger prosthesis using dental implants: a renovated technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Sankar, V Vijay; Chirumamilla, Naveen; Reddy, V Vamsikrishna

    2014-11-01

    In clinical practice, we come across patients with traumatically amputated or congenitally missing partial or complete fingers that can be restored using microsurgical replantation or transplantation procedures. However, in some cases this might not be possible due to systemic or local factors and the lost or missing part has to be replaced prosthetically to offer psychological and functional wellbeing. These prostheses can be constructed with various materials like acrylics or silicone retained with the help of auxiliary aids. However, these prostheses cause some hindrance in performing functions like writing, typing, etc. The aim of the present trial was to ameliorate the existing design of implant supported finger prosthesis. Distal phalange of middle finger replaced with implant supported silicone finger prosthesis is modified by utilizing a metal framework to support silicone material to improve rigidity while working. We could achieve a good function, esthetics and tactile sensibility with this modified design. Whenever, feasible this design can improve the performance and patients feel a deep sense of satisfaction and improved self-esteem with this modified prosthesis.

  12. Corticokinematic coherence during active and passive finger movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piitulainen, H; Bourguignon, M; De Tiège, X; Hari, R; Jousmäki, V

    2013-05-15

    Corticokinematic coherence (CKC) refers to coupling between magnetoencephalographic (MEG) brain activity and hand kinematics. For voluntary hand movements, CKC originates mainly from the primary sensorimotor (SM1) cortex. To learn about the relative motor and sensory contributions to CKC, we recorded CKC from 15 healthy subjects during active and passive right index-finger movements. The fingertip was either touching or not touching table, resulting in active-touch, active-no-touch, passive-touch, and passive-no-touch conditions. The kinematics of the index-finger was measured with a 3-axis accelerometer. Beamformer analysis was used to locate brain activations for the movements; somatosensory-evoked fields (SEFs) elicited by pneumatic tactile stimulation of the index finger served as a functional landmark for cutaneous input. All active and passive movements resulted in statistically significant CKC at the movement frequency (F0) and its first harmonic (F1). The main CKC sources at F0 and F1 were in the contralateral SM1 cortex with no spatial differences between conditions, and distinct from the SEF sources. At F1, the coherence was by two thirds stronger for passive than active movements, with no difference between touch vs. no-touch conditions. Our results suggest that the CKC occurring during repetitive finger movements is mainly driven by somatosensory, primarily proprioceptive, afferent input to the SM1 cortex, with negligible effect of cutaneous input. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Efficacy of acupuncture on pain after replantation of severed finger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Chen, Yuezhen; Feng, Zhengen; Fu, Juan; Zhou, Fangyan

    2015-07-01

    To observe the efficacy of acupuncture on pain after replantation of severed finger. A total of 80 patients who underwent replantation of severed finger were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 40 cases in each one. The patients in the control group were treated with postoperative routine care of hand surgery, while patients in the observation group, based on the regular treatment, were treated with acupuncture within first 72 h of surgery. The health side of Yanglingquan (GB 34), Xuehai (SP 10), Hegu (LI 4), Houxi (SI 3) were selected and the needles were retained for 30 min. The acupuncture was given for 6 times. The evaluation was performed by using visual analogue scale (VAS) 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h after surgery. The use of analgesics after surgery was recorded in the two groups, and the blood supply and survival rate of severed finger were evaluated. Compared between the two groups, the VAS 4 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after surgery in the observation group was lower than that in the control group (all Pobservation group was lower than that in the control group (Pobservation group was lower than that in the control group (Ppostoperative pain of replantation of severed finger, and reduce the occurrence rate of abnormal blood supply, which is worthy of clinical promotion.

  14. Bioethanol production from finger millet ( Eleusine coracana ) straw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possibility of producing bioethanol from the biomass of finger millet straw was studied. The effects of temperature, acid concentration, hydrolysis time, and substrate concentration were investigated. The result showed that a maximum sugar content of 79.04 and 82.01 %w/w was achieved using phenol-sulfuric acid and ...

  15. Digital Audiobooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Iben; Pedersen, Birgitte Stougaard

    Audiobooks are rapidly gaining popularity with widely accessible digital downloading and streaming services. The paper is framing how the digital audiobook expands and changes the target groups for book publications and how it as an everyday activity is creating new reading experiences, places...

  16. Digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nariya; Cha, Joo Hee; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2005-01-01

    Mammography is the best imaging modality for the detection of early breast cancer in asymptomatic women. However, 10-30% of cases are missed with current film-screen mammography. Digital mammography allows for the separate optimization of image acquisition and display. In addition to the obvious data storage, retrieval, and transmission advantages that digital mammography allows, additional advances such as computer-aided diagnosis, tomosynthesis and dual energy mammography are in development. This review will discuss the technology of digital mammography including detectors and displays, the results of clinical trials comparing film-screen and digital mammography, and the use of computer-aided detection. Digital mammography is a promising new technology for breast cancer detection in the Korean women

  17. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting, and preser......Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting......, and preserving material to study, as an object of study in its own right, as an analytical tool, or for collaborating, and for disseminating results. The term "digital humanities" was coined around 2001, and gained currency within academia in the following years. However, computers had been used within...

  18. Digital displacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2014-01-01

    digital interface. However, the transformation of citizen services from traditional face-to-face interaction to digital self-service gives rise to new practices; some citizens need support to be able to manage self-service through digital tools. A mixture of support and teaching, named co...... digital reforms in Denmark and shows how citizen service is transformed from service to support. The frontline employee’s classical tasks such as casework are being displaced into educational and support-oriented tasks with less professional content. Thus an unintended effect of digitisation is blurred......In recent years digital reforms are being introduced in the municipal landscape of Denmark. The reforms address the interaction between citizen and local authority. The aim is, that by 2015 at least 80 per cent of all correspondence between citizens and public authority will be transmitted through...

  19. Sports Digitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xiao; Hedman, Jonas; Tan, Felix Ter Chian

    2017-01-01

    evolution, as digital technologies are increasingly entrenched in a wide range of sporting activities and for applications beyond mere performance enhancement. Despite such trends, research on sports digitalization in the IS discipline is surprisingly still nascent. This paper aims at establishing......Ever since its first manifesto in Greece around 3000 years ago, sports as a field has accumulated a long history with strong traditions while at the same time, gone through tremendous changes toward professionalization and commercialization. The current waves of digitalization have intensified its...... a discourse on sports digitalization within the discipline. Toward this, we first provide an understanding of the institutional characteristics of the sports industry, establishing its theoretical importance and relevance in our discipline; second, we reveal the latest trends of digitalization in the sports...

  20. Finger and foot tapping sensor system for objective motor assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić-Jovičić Milica

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Finger tapping test is commonly used in neurological examinations as a test of motor performance. The new system comprising inertial and force sensors and custom proprietary software was developed for quantitative estimation and assessment of finger and foot tapping tests. The aim of this system was to provide diagnosis support and objective assessment of motor function. Methods. Miniature inertial sensors were placed on fingertips and used for measuring finger movements. A force sensor was placed on the fingertip of one finger, in order to measure the force during tapping. For foot tapping assessment, an inertial sensor was mounted on the subject’s foot, which was placed above a force platform. By using this system, various parameters such as a number of taps, tapping duration, rhythm, open and close speed, the applied force and tapping angle, can be extracted for detailed analysis of a patient’s motor performance. The system was tested on 13 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 14 healthy controls. Results. The system allowed easy measurement of listed parameters, and additional graphical representation showed quantitative differences in these parameters between neurological patient and healthy subjects. Conclusion. The novel system for finger and foot tapping test is compact, simple to use and efficiently collects patient data. Parameters measured in patients can be compared to those measured in healthy subjects, or among groups of patients, or used to monitor progress of the disease, or therapy effects. Created data and scores could be used together with the scores from clinical tests, providing the possibility for better insight into the diagnosis. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 175090 and Grant no. 175016

  1. The results of surgical and nonsurgical treatment of mallet finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starčević Branislav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The injury of the hand tendon classified as mallet finger presents the loss of continuity of the united lateral band of the extensor apparatus above distal interphalangeal joint, which consequently leads to specific deformity of distal interphalangeal joint which is called mallet (hammer finger. Objective Our paper had several research Objectives: presentation of the existing Results of surgical and nonsurgical treatment of mallet finger deformities and comparison of our findings and other authors’ Results. Method: The study was retro-prospective, and analyzed 62 patients treated in the Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade (at the Institute of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, and the Emergency Center in the period 1998 to 2003. The follow up of these patients lasted at least 8 months (from 8.3 months to 71.7 months. An average follow up was 28.7 months. The Objective parameters used in the study were as follows: sex, age, dominating hand, hand injury, finger injury, mode of treatment, complications, distal interphalangeal joint flexion and total movement of the distal interphalangeal joint. Collected data were analyzed by χ2-test and Student’s t-test. The confidence interval was p=0.05. Results: A total range of motion was 51.9±6.6 for nonsurgically treated patients, and 48.2±4.2 degrees for operated patients. Mean extension deficit of the distal interphalangeal joint was 6.5±3.3 for nonsurgical and 10.0±3.2 for operated patients. Conclusion: The Results confirmed that nonsurgical mode of treatment of mallet finger deformity was much more successful than surgical Method of treating the same deformity.

  2. Psychomotor Impairment Detection via Finger Interactions with a Computer Keyboard During Natural Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancardo, L.; Sánchez-Ferro, A.; Butterworth, I.; Mendoza, C. S.; Hooker, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Modern digital devices and appliances are capable of monitoring the timing of button presses, or finger interactions in general, with a sub-millisecond accuracy. However, the massive amount of high resolution temporal information that these devices could collect is currently being discarded. Multiple studies have shown that the act of pressing a button triggers well defined brain areas which are known to be affected by motor-compromised conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that the daily interaction with a computer keyboard can be employed as means to observe and potentially quantify psychomotor impairment. We induced a psychomotor impairment via a sleep inertia paradigm in 14 healthy subjects, which is detected by our classifier with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.93/0.91. The detection relies on novel features derived from key-hold times acquired on standard computer keyboards during an uncontrolled typing task. These features correlate with the progression to psychomotor impairment (p typed, and perform consistently with different keyboards. The ability to acquire longitudinal measurements of subtle motor changes from a digital device without altering its functionality may allow for early screening and follow-up of motor-compromised neurodegenerative conditions, psychological disorders or intoxication at a negligible cost in the general population.

  3. Pressure head distribution during unstable flow in relation to the formation and dissipation of fingers

    OpenAIRE

    H. Cho; G. H. de Rooij; G. H. de Rooij

    2002-01-01

    Wetting front instability creates a shallow induction zone from which fingers emerge that rapidly transport water and solutes downwards. How the induction zone affects finger location and spacing is unknown. In the moist subsoil, fingers may well dissipate because the finger tips no longer have to overcome the water entry value. Both flow regions were investigated in a two-dimensional chamber with a fine-over-coarse glass bead porous medium. A capillary fringe was created by upward wetting th...

  4. Pressure head distribution during unstable flow in relation to the formation and dissipation of fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki Cho; Rooij, de, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    International audience; Wetting front instability creates a shallow induction zone from which fingers emerge that rapidly transport water and solutes downwards. How the induction zone affects finger location and spacing is unknown. In the moist subsoil, fingers may well dissipate because the finger tips no longer have to overcome the water entry value. Both flow regions were investigated in a two-dimensional chamber with a fine-over-coarse glass bead porous medium. A capillary fringe was crea...

  5. Interaction between Fingering and Heterogeneity during Viscous Oil Recovery in Carbonate Rocks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, K. K.; Doorwar, S.

    2013-12-01

    recovery in the tertiary polymer flood in the dolomite rock can be attributed to the heterogeneity and wettability of the carbonate core. The heterogeneous micromodels show that viscous fingering during waterflood leaves behind a lot of mobile oil. Tertiary polymer floods recover the mobile oil. The finger size and spacing are a function of heterogeneity, viscosity ratio and wettabiltiy. Imbibition can also bring oil from low permeability regions to adjacent high permeability regions, which helps in subsequent oil recovery. The experiments help us in understanding the difference in the performance of a secondary and tertiary polymer floods for viscous oils. They also give insight on the interaction between heterogeneity and fingering in porous media.

  6. From palmistry to anthropometry: can 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D) predict the risk of prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomão, Layla; Figueiredo, Rui Teófilo; Oliveira Santos, Rafael; Damião, Ronaldo; da Silva, Eloisio Alexsandro

    2014-01-01

    The 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D) is inversely related to androgen exposure during the fetal period, which may represent a risk factor for several steroid-related diseases. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between 2D:4D ratio and the risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa). We assessed the 2D:4D ratio of 474 men >40 years old, stratified into three groups: group 1 (n = 222) patients with PCa, group 2 (n = 82) subjects with high risk of PCa, and group 3 (n = 170) men with low risk of PCa. Subjects were submitted to a digital picture of the ventral surface of the right hand and 2nd and 4th fingers measurements were determined by the distance from the proximal crease to the tip using computer-assisted analysis. The mean serum prostate-specific antigen level was 7.5 ng/ml in the high-risk group and 0.92 ng/ml in the low-risk group (p < 0.05). The mean 2D:4D ratios were 0.96 ± 0.04, 0.97 ± 0.04 and 0.96 ± 0.04 for the PCa, high-risk and low-risk groups, respectively, and no difference was found among the three groups (p = 0.12). Anthropometry of the hand using the 2D:4D ratio is not a predictor of PCa. 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Modelling solute leaching during fingered flow by integrating and expanding various theoretical and empirical concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de G.H.; Hiroyuki Cho,

    1999-01-01

    Wetting front instability (fingered flow) accelerates solute transport through the unsaturated zone to the groundwater table. Whether fingers widen or dissipate close to the groundwater is unclear. Water flow in a two-dimensional artificial capillary fringe below a dry layer exhibiting fingered flow

  8. Computer simulation of viscous fingering in a lifting Hele-Shaw cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report a computer simulation study of fingering patterns, where circular or square grooves are etched on to the lower plate. Results are compared with experiments. Keywords. Viscous fingering; Hele-Shaw cell; simulation. PACS Nos 47.15.gp; 47.20.Gv; 07.05.Tp. 1. Introduction. Viscous fingering in the lifting Hele-Shaw ...

  9. Computer simulation of viscous fingering in a lifting Hele-Shaw cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We simulate viscous fingering generated by separating two plates with a constant force, in a lifting Hele-Shaw cell. Variation in the patterns for different fluid viscosity and lifting force is studied. Viscous fingering is strongly affected by anisotropy. We report a computer simulation study of fingering patterns, where circular or ...

  10. Squamous cell carcinoma of the finger masquerading as an abscess. Case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S T

    2012-02-03

    A 43-year-old man presented with an abscess on his left ring finger, which recurred despite multiple drainage procedures. Histological examination of the lesion was unhelpful; it was only on histopathological examination of the finger after ray amputation that the diagnosis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma was established. This case illustrates the need to consider malignancy when dealing with chronic finger infections.

  11. Finger nail plate shape and size for personal identification – a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of 4 sets of identical twins showed no difference in the shapes and sizes of the fingernails on each finger. It would appear that the finger nail plate shapes /sizes of the hands show diversities similar to finger prints and therefore can be considered and developed further for personal identification in developing ...

  12. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, M.; Dal Soglio, S.; Pittet-Barbier, L.; Ranchoup, Y.; Thony, F.; Ferretti, G.; Robert, F.

    1992-01-01

    Digital projection radiography may replace conventional radiography some day, provided it can meet several requirements: equal or better diagnostic effectiveness of the screen-film systems; reasonable image cost; real improvement in the productivity of the Departments of Imaging. All digital radiographic systems include an X-ray source, an image acquisition and formatting sub-system, a display and manipulation sub-system, and archiving subsystem and a laser editing system, preferably shared by other sources of digital images. Three digitization processes are available: digitization of the radiographic film, digital fluorography and phospholuminescent detectors with memory. The advantages of digital fluoroscopy are appealing: real-time image acquisition, suppression of cassettes; but its disadvantages are far from negligible: it cannot be applied to bedside radiography, the field of examination is limited, and the wide-field spatial resolution is poor. Phospholuminescent detectors with memory have great advantages: they can be used for bedside radiographs and on all the common radiographic systems; spatial resolution is satisfactory; its current disadvantages are considerable. These two systems, have common properties making up the entire philosophy of digital radiology and specific features that must guide our choice according to the application. Digital fluorography is best applied in pediatric radiology. However, evaluation works have showed that it was applicable with sufficient quality to many indications of general radiology in which a fluoroscopic control and fast acquisition of the images are essential; the time gained on the examination may be considerable, as well as the savings on film. Detectors with memory are required for bedside radiographs, in osteoarticular and thoracic radiology, in all cases of traumatic emergency and in the resuscitation and intensive care departments

  13. Digital dermatoglyphic heritability differences as evidenced by a female twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, João Felipe; Fernandes, Paula Roquetti; Roquetti, Ricardo Wagner; Filho, José Fernandes

    2010-10-01

    The genetic and environmental contributions to determine digital dermatoglyphic traits were investigated by using female dizygotic and monozygotic twin pairs to estimate heritability indexes (h(2)). The evaluated sample was composed by 20 monozygotic twin pairs and 13 dizygotic twin pairs. A significant heritability (h(2) = 0.65 to 0.96) was observed for 12 dermatoglyphic characteristics (delta indexes and ridge counts for right hand, left hand and both hands, and ridge counts for most individual fingers). A negative correlation between the ridge counts and heritability indexes from individual fingers was found for the left hand, which appears to be associated to a higher arch pattern frequency in most left-hand fingers, since this frequency was negatively correlated with ridge counts and positively correlated with heritability indexes. Heritability indexes of right-hand fingers were positively correlated with loop pattern frequency and negatively correlated with whorl pattern frequency. The low heritability of ridge counts from left thumb, ring and little fingers (h(2) = 0.11 to 0.32) indicates a higher chance that the chorion type had an influence in the intra-pair variance of monozygotic twins. Results confirmed the predominant genetic influence on the total ridge count. The heritability indexes varied in up to 8 times between different fingers and its association to ridge counts and pattern frequency was very variable between hands, evidencing that the use of dermatoglyphic traits from individual fingers as indicators of genetic influences to other human traits should consider this variability.

  14. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zani, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray radiography is a very common technique used to check the homogeneity of a material or the inside of a mechanical part. Generally the radiation that goes through the material to check, produced an image on a sensitized film. This method requires time because the film needs to be developed, digital radiography has no longer this inconvenient. In digital radiography the film is replaced by digital data and can be processed as any computer file. This new technique is promising but its main inconvenient is that today its resolution is not so good as that of film radiography. (A.C.)

  15. Digital electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, John

    2013-01-01

    An essential companion to John C Morris's 'Analogue Electronics', this clear and accessible text is designed for electronics students, teachers and enthusiasts who already have a basic understanding of electronics, and who wish to develop their knowledge of digital techniques and applications. Employing a discovery-based approach, the author covers fundamental theory before going on to develop an appreciation of logic networks, integrated circuit applications and analogue-digital conversion. A section on digital fault finding and useful ic data sheets completes th

  16. Digital Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zupancic, Tadeja; Verbeke, Johan; Achten, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Leadership is an important quality in organisations. Leadership is needed to introduce change and innovation. In our opinion, in architectural and design practices, the role of leadership has not yet been sufficiently studied, especially when it comes to the role of digital tools and media....... With this paper we intend to initiate a discussion in the eCAADe community to reflect and develop ideas in order to develop digital leadership skills amongst the membership. This paper introduces some important aspects, which may be valuable to look into when developing digital leadership skills....

  17. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Shoichi

    1993-01-01

    Firstly, from an historic point of view, fundamental concepts on digital imaging were reviewed to provide a foundation for discussion of digital radiography. Secondly, this review summarized the results of ongoing research in computed radiography that replaces the conventional film-screen system with a photo-stimulable phosphor plate; and thirdly, image quality, radiation protection, and image processing techniques were discussed with emphasis on picture archiving and communication system environment as our final goal. Finally, future expansion of digital radiography was described based on the present utilization of computed tomography at the National Defense Medical College Hospital. (author) 60 refs

  18. Foster replantation of fingertip using neighbouring digital artery in a young child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-Hong; Gao, Zheng-Jun; Yao, Jing-Ming; Tan, Wei-Qiang; Dawreeawo, Javed

    2010-06-01

    Reconstruction of an amputated fingertip in a young child demands special techniques for success. We report a 2.5-year-old female patient with an amputated left index fingertip with the vascular defect being too severe to perform the usual replantation. Comparing several methods, we used the neighbouring digital artery as the feeding artery to perform foster replantation. Finally, the patient was satisfied with the appearance and function of her fingers. The clinical case, techniques, results are described and discussed. We consider it a useful technique, especially for those with a rather severe vascular defect. A 2.5-year-old girl suffered a crush amputation of the left index fingertip. Only the flexor tendon of the amputated fingertip was connected to the proximal finger tissue and the blood supply was completely lost (Figure 1). The distal amputated fingertip was fixed using Kirschner wire under general anaesthesia. Then, microsurgery operation was carried out immediately to replant this amputated fingertip. Both ulnar and radial digital arteries were avulsed, while the dorsal vein was intact and the digital nerve was also surviving. The integrity of blood vessels was too traumatised to connect to the proximal part. In the case of the distal part of the ulnar artery of the injured index finger, the blood supply was established by anastomosing the distal end of the amputated tip and the radial artery of the middle finger, which was the feeding artery (Figure 2). A 11/0 nylon suture was used. The dorsal vein and digital nerve were repaired by means of microsurgical anastomosis. The wound was covered with the dorsal skin of the middle finger and the palmar skin of the index finger to form a skin pedicle, and then, immobility of the two fingers was maintained to prevent avulsion. The index tip obtained good blood supply and survived completely (Figure 3). Detachment of the index and middle finger was performed after 3 weeks, and both of the fingers showed good

  19. Osteoclastic finger arthrosis - a subtype of polyarthrosis of the hand; Osteoklastische Fingerarthrose - Subtyp der Handpolyarthrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W. [Radiologische Praxis, Hamburg-Barmbek (Germany); Dihlmann, A. [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Unfallkrankenhaus Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-02-01

    Aim: Description of a subtype of arthrosis deformans of the hand which is characterised as osteoclastic arthrosis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of radiographs of the hands of 150 women and 100 men with radiological findings of arthrosis deformans. Results: 5% of women and 2% of men showed at least one digital joint with subchondral osteolysis of one or both articulating bones involving at least a third of the phalanx. This subchondral osteolysis far exceeds the cysts which are situated in the epiphyseal part of the articular region. It may develop within a year. Conclusion: Osteoclastic arthrosis of the finger is a subtype of polyarthrosis of the hand. Serial observations suggest that an osteoclast stimulating substance is produced by the cysts or arises directly from the synovial fluid; this enters the subchondral part of the bone through clefts which may or may not be visible radiologically and that this produces osteoclastic activity. The most important differential diagnoses are chronic tophacious gout and a benign tumor. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Beschreibung eines Subtyps der Arthrosis deformans an der Hand, der als osteoklastische Arthrose bezeichnet wird. Patienten und Methode: Retrospektive Analyse der Handroentgenaufnahmen von 150 Frauen und 100 Maennern mit Roentgenbefunden der Arthrosis deformans. Ergebnisse: 5% der Frauen und 2% der maennlichen Patienten des durchgesehenen Krankenguts zeigten an mindestens einem Fingergelenk eine Arthrose mit subchondralen Osteolysen an einem oder beiden artikulierenden Knochen, die mindestens ein Drittel der Phalanxlaenge erfasst hatten. Diese subchondralen Osteolysen gehen ueber die Groesse und Form der arthrotischen Geroellzysten, die lediglich im knoechernen (epiphysaeren) Gelenksockel sitzen, weit hinaus. Sie koennen innerhalb eines Jahres entstehen. Schlussfolgerung: Die osteoklastische Arthrose der Finger ist ein Subtyp der Handpolyarthrose. Nach Verlaufsbeobachtungen wird vermutet, dass eine

  20. A Systematic Review of Outcomes after Revision Amputation for Treatment of Traumatic Finger Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Frank; McGlinn, Evan P; Giladi, Aviram M; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-07-01

    Revision amputation is often the treatment for traumatic finger amputation injuries. However, patient outcomes are inadequately reported, and their impact is poorly understood. The authors performed a systematic review to evaluate outcomes of revision amputation and amputation wound coverage techniques. The authors searched all available English literature in the PubMed and Embase databases for articles reporting outcomes of nonreplantation treatments for traumatic finger amputation injuries, including revision amputation, local digital flaps, skin grafting, and conservative treatment. Data extracted were study characteristics, patient demographic data, sensory and functional outcomes, patient-reported outcomes, and complications. A total of 1659 articles were screened, yielding 43 studies for review. Mean static two-point discrimination was 5.0 ± 1.5 mm (n = 23 studies) overall, 6.1 ± 2.4 mm after local flap procedures, and 3.8 ± 0.4 mm after revision amputation. Mean total active motion was 93 ± 8 percent of normal (n = 6 studies) overall. It was 90 ± 9 percent of normal after local flap procedures and 95 percent of normal after revision amputation. Seventy-seven percent of patients reported cold intolerance after revision amputation. Ninety-one percent of patients (217 of 238) reported "satisfactory" or "good/excellent" ratings regardless of treatment. Revision amputation and conservative treatments result in better static two-point discrimination outcomes compared with local flaps. All techniques preserve total active motion, although arc of motion is slightly better with revision amputation. Revision amputation procedures are frequently associated with cold intolerance. Patients report "satisfactory," "good," or "excellent" ratings in appearance and quality of life with all nonreplantation techniques.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of CCCH zinc finger family in poplar (Populus trichocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Guohua

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CCCH zinc finger proteins contain a typical motif of three cysteines and one histidine residues and serve regulatory functions at all stages of mRNA metabolism. In plants, CCCH type zinc finger proteins comprise a large gene family represented by 68 members in Arabidopsis and 67 in rice. These CCCH proteins have been shown to play diverse roles in plant developmental processes and environmental responses. However, this family has not been studied in the model tree species Populus to date. Results In the present study, a comprehensive analysis of the genes encoding CCCH zinc finger family in Populus was performed. Using a thorough annotation approach, a total of 91 full-length CCCH genes were identified in Populus, of which most contained more than one CCCH motif and a type of non-conventional C-X11-C-X6-C-X3-H motif was unique for Populus. All of the Populus CCCH genes were phylogeneticly clustered into 13 distinct subfamilies. In each subfamily, the gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved. Chromosomal localization of these genes revealed that most of the CCCHs (81 of 90, 90 % are physically distributed on the duplicated blocks. Thirty-four paralogous pairs were identified in Populus, of which 22 pairs (64.7 % might be created by the whole genome segment duplication, whereas 4 pairs seem to be resulted from tandem duplications. In 91 CCCH proteins, we also identified 63 putative nucleon-cytoplasm shuttling proteins and 3 typical RNA-binding proteins. The expression profiles of all Populus CCCH genes have been digitally analyzed in six tissues across different developmental stages, and under various drought stress conditions. A variety of expression patterns of CCCH genes were observed during Populus development, of which 34 genes highly express in root and 22 genes show the highest level of transcript abundance in differentiating xylem. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR was further performed to

  2. Comprehensive analysis of CCCH zinc finger family in poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guohua; Hu, Ruibo; Zhang, Dongyuan; Qi, Guang; Zuo, Ran; Cao, Yingping; Chen, Peng; Kong, Yingzhen; Zhou, Gongke

    2012-06-18

    CCCH zinc finger proteins contain a typical motif of three cysteines and one histidine residues and serve regulatory functions at all stages of mRNA metabolism. In plants, CCCH type zinc finger proteins comprise a large gene family represented by 68 members in Arabidopsis and 67 in rice. These CCCH proteins have been shown to play diverse roles in plant developmental processes and environmental responses. However, this family has not been studied in the model tree species Populus to date. In the present study, a comprehensive analysis of the genes encoding CCCH zinc finger family in Populus was performed. Using a thorough annotation approach, a total of 91 full-length CCCH genes were identified in Populus, of which most contained more than one CCCH motif and a type of non-conventional C-X(11)-C-X(6)-C-X(3)-H motif was unique for Populus. All of the Populus CCCH genes were phylogeneticly clustered into 13 distinct subfamilies. In each subfamily, the gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved. Chromosomal localization of these genes revealed that most of the CCCHs (81 of 90, 90 %) are physically distributed on the duplicated blocks. Thirty-four paralogous pairs were identified in Populus, of which 22 pairs (64.7 %) might be created by the whole genome segment duplication, whereas 4 pairs seem to be resulted from tandem duplications. In 91 CCCH proteins, we also identified 63 putative nucleon-cytoplasm shuttling proteins and 3 typical RNA-binding proteins. The expression profiles of all Populus CCCH genes have been digitally analyzed in six tissues across different developmental stages, and under various drought stress conditions. A variety of expression patterns of CCCH genes were observed during Populus development, of which 34 genes highly express in root and 22 genes show the highest level of transcript abundance in differentiating xylem. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) was further performed to confirm the tissue-specific expression and

  3. Digital clubbing in tuberculosis – relationship to HIV infection, extent of disease and hypoalbuminemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smieja Marek

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital clubbing is a sign of chest disease known since the time of Hippocrates. Its association with tuberculosis (TB has not been well studied, particularly in Africa where TB is common. The prevalence of clubbing in patients with pulmonary TB and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, severity of disease, and nutritional status was assessed. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among patients with smear-positive TB recruited consecutively from the medical and TB wards and outpatient clinics at a public hospital in Uganda. The presence of clubbing was assessed by clinical signs and measurement of the ratio of the distal and inter-phalangeal diameters (DPD/IPD of both index fingers. Clubbing was defined as a ratio > 1.0. Chest radiograph, serum albumin and HIV testing were done. Results Two hundred patients (82% HIV-infected participated; 34% had clubbing by clinical criteria whilst 30% had clubbing based on DPD/IPD ratio. Smear grade, extensive or cavitary disease, early versus late HIV disease, and hypoalbuminemia were not associated with clubbing. Clubbing was more common among patients with a lower Karnofsky performance scale score or with prior TB. Conclusion Clubbing occurs in up to one-third of Ugandan patients with pulmonary TB. Clubbing was not associated with stage of HIV infection, extensive disease or hypoalbuminemia.

  4. Digital Snaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbye, Mette; Larsen, Jonas

    Purikura Photography / Mette Sandbye -- ch. 7. 'Buying an Instrument Does Not Necessarily Make You a Musician': Studio Photography and the Digital Revolution / Sigrid Lien -- pt. III. NEW PUBLIC FORMS -- ch. 8 Paparazzi Photography, Seriality and the Digital Photo Archive / Anne Jerslev and Mette Mortensen......The New Face of Snapshot Photography / Jonas Larsen and Mette Sandbye -- pt. I. IMAGES ON WEB 2.0 AND THE CAMERA PHONE -- ch. 1. Overlooking, Rarely Looking and Not Looking / Martin Lister -- ch. 2. The (Im)mobile Life of Digital Photographs: The Case of Tourist Photography / Jonas Larsen -- ch. 3....... Distance as the New Punctum / Mikko Villi -- pt. II. FAMILY ALBUMS IN TRANSITION -- ch. 4. How Digital Technologies Do Family Snaps, Only Better / Gillian Rose -- ch. 5. Friendship Photography: Memory, Mobility and Social Networking / Joanne Garde-Hansen -- ch. 6. Play, Process and Materiality in Japanese...

  5. Digital Discretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Peter Andre; Zinner Henriksen, Helle

    2018-01-01

    discretion is suggested to reduce this footprint by influencing or replacing their discretionary practices using ICT. What is less researched is whether digital discretion can cause changes in public policy outcomes, and under what conditions such changes can occur. Using the concept of public service values......This study reviews 44 peer-reviewed articles on digital discretion published in the period from 1998 to January 2017. Street-level bureaucrats have traditionally had a wide ability to exercise discretion stirring debate since they can add their personal footprint on public policies. Digital......, we suggest that digital discretion can strengthen ethical and democratic values but weaken professional and relational values. Furthermore, we conclude that contextual factors such as considerations made by policy makers on the macro-level and the degree of professionalization of street...

  6. Digital fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Winter 2012 (vol. 14 no. 3) issue of the Nexus Network Journal features seven original papers dedicated to the theme “Digital Fabrication”. Digital fabrication is changing architecture in fundamental ways in every phase, from concept to artifact. Projects growing out of research in digital fabrication are dependent on software that is entirely surface-oriented in its underlying mathematics. Decisions made during design, prototyping, fabrication and assembly rely on codes, scripts, parameters, operating systems and software, creating the need for teams with multidisciplinary expertise and different skills, from IT to architecture, design, material engineering, and mathematics, among others The papers grew out of a Lisbon symposium hosted by the ISCTE-Instituto Universitario de Lisboa entitled “Digital Fabrication – A State of the Art”. The issue is completed with four other research papers which address different mathematical instruments applied to architecture, including geometric tracing system...

  7. Becoming digital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2015-01-01

    . Originality/value: The study contributes to ethnographic research in public administration by combining two separate subfields, e-government and street-level bureaucracy, to discern recent transformations in public service delivery. In the digital era, tasks, control and equality are distributed in ways......The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of e-government reforms on street-level bureaucrats’ professionalism and relation to citizens, thus demonstrating how the bureaucratic encounter unfolds in the digital era. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on an ethnographic study....... An ethnographic account of how digital reforms are implemented in practice shows how street-level bureaucrat’s classic tasks such as specialized casework are being reconfigured into educational tasks that promote the idea of “becoming digital”. In the paper, the author argues that the work of “becoming digital...

  8. "Suture fixation of the fingers": an effective method for positioning burned and contracted fingers using a pulley system as a guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Bakhshaeekia, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Preserving function of the hand is the aim of treatment in burned hands; appropriate splinting is one of the important measures during acute and chronic treatment. We introduce an effective safe method for positioning of fingers without violating the joints; In this method before performing skin graft for palmar finger burn or contracture release we suture tip of finger with silk 2-0 and fix it to dorsum of hand while extending the finger and for preventing slipping we insert some pulley like circles tied with silk 2-0 fixing over dorsum of mid phalanx. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Digital Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Masudul Alam Choudhury

    2013-01-01

    The present fever to launch an extensive digitalization program is sweeping the Bangladesh political, business, and elitist minds. In the face of an overarching outlook of sustainable development the Bangladesh digitalization program runs into some grave questions. The paper points out that ethics as a strongly endogenous force in development is indispensable to keep in view the simultaneity of attaining growth and social justice. These targets are variously manifested in different sectors an...

  10. Digital Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Zupanzic, Tadeja; Verbeke, Johan; Achten, Henri; Herneoja, Aulikki

    2016-01-01

    Leadership is an important quality in organisations. Leadership is needed to introduce change and innovation. In our opinion, in architectural and design practices, the role of leadership has not yet been sufficiently studied, especially when it comes to the role of digital tools and media. With this paper, we intend to initiate a discussion in the eCAADe community to reflect and develop ideas in order to develop digital leadership skills amongst the membership. This paper introduces some imp...

  11. fMRI assessment of somatotopy in human Brodmann area 3b by electrical finger stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, R; Villringer, K; Mackert, B M; Schwiemann, J; Braun, J; Curio, G; Villringer, A; Wolf, K J

    1998-01-26

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is capable of detecting focal brain activation induced by electrical stimulation of single fingers in human subjects. In eight subjects somatotopic arrangement of the second and fifth finger was found in Brodmann area 3b of the primary somatosensory cortex. In four subjects the representation area of the second finger was located lateral and inferior to the fifth finger; in one subject the somatotopy was reversed. In three subjects representation areas of the two fingers in Brodmann area 3b were found overlapping. Additional activated areas were found on the crown of ipsilateral and contralateral postcentral gyrus (Brodmann areas 1 and 2) and posterior parietal cortex.

  12. Charge pumping with finger capacitance for body sensor energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Alyssa Y; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2017-07-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous and increasingly integrated with and on the human body; powering such "body network" devices remains an outstanding problem. In this paper, we demonstrate a touch interrogation powered energy harvesting system. This system transforms the kinetic energy of a human finger to electric energy, with each tap producing approximately 1 nJ of energy at a storage capacitor. As is well known for touch display devices, the proximity of a finger can alter the effective value of small capacitances; we demonstrate that these capacitance changes can drive a current which is rectified to charge a capacitor. As a demonstration, an untethered circuit charged this way can deliver enough instantaneous power to light a red LED every ~ 10 seconds. This technology illustrates the ability to communicate with and operate low-power sensors with motions already used for interfacing to devices.

  13. Reference values for the nickel concentration in human finger nails

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Peters, K; Menné, T

    1991-01-01

    A reference value for the nickel concentration in finger nails from people who are not occupationally exposed to nickel was determined on the basis of nail samples from 95 healthy individuals. The mean +/- standard deviation was 1.19 +/- 1.61 mg/kg and the median was 0.49 mg/kg (range 0.042-7.50 mg....../kg). The 95% confidence interval of the population mean was 0.51-1.26 mg/kg and the 95% confidence interval of the population median was 0.39-0.74 mg/kg. The random sample consisted of 59 women and 36 men. No significant difference between the nickel levels in finger nails from men and women could...

  14. Pressure head distribution during unstable flow in relation to the formation and dissipation of fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetting front instability creates a shallow induction zone from which fingers emerge that rapidly transport water and solutes downwards. How the induction zone affects finger location and spacing is unknown. In the moist subsoil, fingers may well dissipate because the finger tips no longer have to overcome the water entry value. Both flow regions were investigated in a two-dimensional chamber with a fine-over-coarse glass bead porous medium. A capillary fringe was created by upward wetting through capillary rise. Upon ponding with dye-coloured water, fingers emerged, propagated downward and diverged when reaching the capillary fringe. Microtensiometers were installed in the induction zone, the fingers, and in the capillary fringe. In the induction zone, a lateral sinusoidal pressure head developed within minutes. Only in one of two experiments could the observed pressure head pattern be satisfactorily reproduced by a steady-state model assuming uniform induction zone properties and uniform infiltration. Later, fingers emerged below the pressure head minima. The induction zone did not affect finger properties. The pressure head in the induction zone was determined by the depth of the finger tips. The water requirement of the fingers dictated the lateral pressure head gradients. The pressure heads in the capillary fringe supported the hypothesis that the flow stabilised and dissipated there. Keywords: fingered flow, wetting front instability, unsaturated flow, microtensiometers, induction zone, capillary fringe

  15. Use of a robotic device to measure age-related decline in finger proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemanson, Morgan L; Rowe, Justin B; Chan, Vicky; Wolbrecht, Eric T; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in proprioception are known to affect postural stability, yet the extent to which such changes affect the finger joints is poorly understood despite the importance of finger proprioception in the control of skilled hand movement. We quantified age-related changes in finger proprioception in 37 healthy young, middle-aged, and older adults using two robot-based tasks wherein participants' index and middle fingers were moved by an exoskeletal robot. The first task assessed finger position sense by asking participants to indicate when their index and middle fingers were directly overlapped during a passive crisscross movement; the second task assessed finger movement detection by asking participants to indicate the onset of passive finger movement. When these tasks were completed without vision, finger position sense errors were 48 % larger in older adults compared to young participants (p proprioceptive reaction time was 78 % longer in older adults compared to young adults (p proprioception, these age-related differences were no longer apparent. No difference between dominant and non-dominant hand performance was found for either proprioception task. These findings demonstrate that finger proprioception is impaired in older adults, and visual feedback can be used to compensate for this deficit. The findings also support the feasibility and utility of the FINGER robot as a sensitive tool for detecting age-related decline in proprioception.

  16. Customizing Extensor Reconstruction in Vascularized Toe Joint Transfers to Finger Proximal Interphalangeal Joints: A Strategic Approach for Correcting Extensor Lag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Charles Yuen Yung; Hsu, Chung-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Shih-Heng; Lien, Shwu-Huei; Lin, Chih-Hung; Wei, Fu-Chan; Lin, Yu-Te

    2017-04-01

    Vascularized toe proximal interphalangeal joint transfer allows the restoration of damaged joints. However, extensor lag and poor arc of motion have been reported. The authors present their outcomes of treatment according to a novel reconstructive algorithm that addresses extensor lag and allows for consistent results postoperatively. Vascularized toe joint transfers were performed in a consecutive series of 26 digits in 25 patients. The average age was 30.5 years, with 14 right and 12 left hands. Reconstructed digits included eight index, 10 middle, and eight ring fingers. Simultaneous extensor reconstructions were performed and eight were centralization of lateral bands, five were direct extensor digitorum longus-to-extensor digitorum communis repairs, and 13 were central slip reconstructions. The average length of follow-up was 16.7 months. The average extension lag was 17.9 degrees. The arc of motion was 57.7 degrees (81.7 percent functional use of pretransfer toe proximal interphalangeal joint arc of motion). There was no significant difference in the reconstructed proximal interphalangeal joint arc of motion for the handedness (p = 0.23), recipient digits (p = 0.37), or surgical experience in vascularized toe joint transfer (p = 0.25). The outcomes of different techniques of extensor mechanism reconstruction were similar in terms of extensor lag, arc of motion, and reconstructed finger arc of motion compared with the pretransfer toe proximal interphalangeal joint arc of motion. With this treatment algorithm, consistent outcomes can be produced with minimal extensor lag and maximum use of potential toe proximal interphalangeal joint arc of motion. Therapeutic, IV.

  17. Increased densities and calcifications in the finger bones of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, A; Bruk, I; Laron, Z

    1976-06-01

    A feature of irregular calcifications and increased densities in the metaphyseal region of the fingers of the hand in adolescent children, occurring mostly in males, is described. These changes become evident at puberty and disappear with the closure of the epiphyses. The etiology of this feature does not appear to be related to a specific hormone. It may be the result of an imbalance between those hormones which cause the pubertal spurt, possibly combined with an irregularity of testosterone secretion.

  18. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J; Johnson, Simon A; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-06

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick-slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function.

  19. Closed traumatic rupture of the ring finger flexor tendon pulley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropet, Y; Menez, D; Balmat, P; Pem, R; Vichard, P

    1990-09-01

    We report an unusual case of closed traumatic rupture of the ring finger flexor tendon pulley not previously reported in the literature. This injury occurred in a 21-year-old athlete during rockclimbing. Lack of flexion of the distal interphalangeal joint was accompanied by a palpable subcutaneous cord on the palmar side of the proximal phalanx. A simple repair of the pulley was done. The postoperative functional result was satisfactory.

  20. Hypermobility and proprioception in the finger joints of flautists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigues-Cano, Isabel; Bird, Howard A

    2014-06-01

    Ergonomically, the flute is especially complex among wind instruments, and flautists may therefore be at particular risk of performance-related musculoskeletal disorders. Yet little is known about injury prevalence among flute players, and even less in those flautists who are also hypermobile. Recent research has found hand and wrist pain to be common complaints among flautists. Understanding of the predictors of injury and pain is therefore crucial as the presence of pain decreases performance quality and causes unnecessary time loss. There is a strong relationship between hypermobility and impaired proprioception, although many musicians may acquire greater proprioception than the average population. We have compared flexibility and proprioception of the hand in a study of flautists. Twenty flautists took part in the study. General hypermobility, the passive range of motion of the 3 specific joints most involved in flute playing, and proprioception acuity were all measured accurately for the first time in this awkward instrument that needs high levels of dexterity. Flautists' finger joints have a greater range of movement than in the general population. This group of flute players had especially large ranges of movement in the finger joints, which take the weight of the instrument. Although flautists have hypermobile finger joints, they are not generally hypermobile elsewhere as measured by the Beighton Scale. Flautists, even with very mobile finger joints, have very accurate proprioception, which may be acquired through training. The study of instrumentalists may provide an ideal model for study of the interaction between localized joint flexibility and joint proprioception, both inherited and acquired.

  1. Successful replantation in ten-digit amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Umit; Cepel, Selim; Buldu, Halil

    2010-01-01

    Amputations involving ten digits are very rare because of different lengths of the digits. A 34-year-old man working in a printing house presented one hour after guillotine amputation involving all ten digits. Surgery was initiated 80 minutes after admission and took seven hours. Under axillary anesthesia, the operation was performed by two teams each consisting of two microsurgeons and two assistants. Replantation was completed without the use of any skin graft or flap. Fingertip examination showed poor arterial circulation in the second, third, and fourth digits of the left hand after 24 hours of replantation and surgical exploration was performed, during which anastomosis of the ulnar digital artery of the second digit was re-established and a Y-shaped vein graft was placed at the level of the third web to restore revascularization of the third and fourth digits. However, these interventions did not prevent the development of necrosis in the distal segment of the fourth digit which resulted in dry gangrene that required amputation. After 38 months of replantation, radiographic examination showed complete union in all fingers without malunion or damage to the joint surface and about 8 degrees of medial angulation in the proximal phalanx of the fourth digit of the right hand. The patient did not have difficulty in performing daily activities and had a considerably good pinching. Losses of active range of motion of the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints were within the rage of 10 to 30 degrees in both hands. In the assessment of sensation, static and dynamic two-point discrimination test results were 6.1 mm and 4.0 mm, respectively.

  2. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive finger convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Vacher, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid finite element, integrated finite difference numerical model is developed for the simulation of double-diffusive and multicomponent flow in two and three dimensions. The model is based on a multidimensional, density-dependent, saturated-unsaturated transport model (SUTRA), which uses one governing equation for fluid flow and another for solute transport. The solute-transport equation is applied sequentially to each simulated species. Density coupling of the flow and solute-transport equations is accounted for and handled using a sequential implicit Picard iterative scheme. High-resolution data from a double-diffusive Hele-Shaw experiment, initially in a density-stable configuration, is used to verify the numerical model. The temporal and spatial evolution of simulated double-diffusive convection is in good agreement with experimental results. Numerical results are very sensitive to discretization and correspond closest to experimental results when element sizes adequately define the spatial resolution of observed fingering. Numerical results also indicate that differences in the molecular diffusivity of sodium chloride and the dye used to visualize experimental sodium chloride concentrations are significant and cause inaccurate mapping of sodium chloride concentrations by the dye, especially at late times. As a result of reduced diffusion, simulated dye fingers are better defined than simulated sodium chloride fingers and exhibit more vertical mass transfer. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Online Signature Verification on MOBISIG Finger-Drawn Signature Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Antal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present MOBISIG, a pseudosignature dataset containing finger-drawn signatures from 83 users captured with a capacitive touchscreen-based mobile device. The database was captured in three sessions resulting in 45 genuine signatures and 20 skilled forgeries for each user. The database was evaluated by two state-of-the-art methods: a function-based system using local features and a feature-based system using global features. Two types of equal error rate computations are performed: one using a global threshold and the other using user-specific thresholds. The lowest equal error rate was 0.01% against random forgeries and 5.81% against skilled forgeries using user-specific thresholds that were computed a posteriori. However, these equal error rates were significantly raised to 1.68% (random forgeries case and 14.31% (skilled forgeries case using global thresholds. The same evaluation protocol was performed on the DooDB publicly available dataset. Besides verification performance evaluations conducted on the two finger-drawn datasets, we evaluated the quality of the samples and the users of the two datasets using basic quality measures. The results show that finger-drawn signatures can be used by biometric systems with reasonable accuracy.

  4. ZifBASE: a database of zinc finger proteins and associated resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punetha Ankita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the occurrence of zinc finger protein motifs in genomes is crucial to the developing field of molecular genome engineering. The knowledge of their target DNA-binding sequences is vital to develop chimeric proteins for targeted genome engineering and site-specific gene correction. There is a need to develop a computational resource of zinc finger proteins (ZFP to identify the potential binding sites and its location, which reduce the time of in vivo task, and overcome the difficulties in selecting the specific type of zinc finger protein and the target site in the DNA sequence. Description ZifBASE provides an extensive collection of various natural and engineered ZFP. It uses standard names and a genetic and structural classification scheme to present data retrieved from UniProtKB, GenBank, Protein Data Bank, ModBase, Protein Model Portal and the literature. It also incorporates specialized features of ZFP including finger sequences and positions, number of fingers, physiochemical properties, classes, framework, PubMed citations with links to experimental structures (PDB, if available and modeled structures of natural zinc finger proteins. ZifBASE provides information on zinc finger proteins (both natural and engineered ones, the number of finger units in each of the zinc finger proteins (with multiple fingers, the synergy between the adjacent fingers and their positions. Additionally, it gives the individual finger sequence and their target DNA site to which it binds for better and clear understanding on the interactions of adjacent fingers. The current version of ZifBASE contains 139 entries of which 89 are engineered ZFPs, containing 3-7F totaling to 296 fingers. There are 50 natural zinc finger protein entries ranging from 2-13F, totaling to 307 fingers. It has sequences and structures from literature, Protein Data Bank, ModBase and Protein Model Portal. The interface is cross linked to other public

  5. Digital evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukić Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although computer makes human activities faster and easier, innovating and creating new forms of work and other kinds of activities, it also influenced the criminal activity. The development of information technology directly affects the development of computer forensics without which, it can not even imagine the discovering and proving the computer offences and apprehending the perpetrator. Information technology and computer forensic allows us to detect and prove the crimes committed by computer and capture the perpetrators. Computer forensics is a type of forensics which can be defined as a process of collecting, preserving, analyzing and presenting digital evidence in court proceedings. Bearing in mind, that combat against crime, in which computers appear as an asset or object of the offense, requires knowledge of digital evidence as well as specific rules and procedures, the author in this article specifically addresses the issues of digital evidence, forensic (computer investigation, specific rules and procedures for detecting, fixing and collecting digital evidence and use of this type of evidence in criminal proceedings. The author also delas with international standards regarding digital evidence and cyber-space investigation.

  6. Digital watermark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Maver

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The huge amount of multimedia contents available on the World-Wide-Web is beginning to raise the question of their protection. Digital watermarking is a technique which can serve various purposes, including intellectual property protection, authentication and integrity verification, as well as visible or invisible content labelling of multimedia content. Due to the diversity of digital watermarking applicability, there are many different techniques, which can be categorised according to different criteria. A digital watermark can be categorised as visible or invisible and as robust or fragile. In contrast to the visible watermark where a visible pattern or image is embedded into the original image, the invisible watermark does not change the visual appearance of the image. The existence of such a watermark can be determined only through a watermark ex¬traction or detection algorithm. The robust watermark is used for copyright protection, while the fragile watermark is designed for authentication and integrity verification of multimedia content. A watermark must be detectable or extractable to be useful. In some watermarking schemes, a watermark can be extracted in its exact form, in other cases, we can detect only whether a specific given watermarking signal is present in an image. Digital libraries, through which cultural institutions will make multimedia contents available, should support a wide range of service models for intellectual property protection, where digital watermarking may play an important role.

  7. Digital Snaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbye, Mette; Larsen, Jonas

    The New Face of Snapshot Photography / Jonas Larsen and Mette Sandbye -- pt. I. IMAGES ON WEB 2.0 AND THE CAMERA PHONE -- ch. 1. Overlooking, Rarely Looking and Not Looking / Martin Lister -- ch. 2. The (Im)mobile Life of Digital Photographs: The Case of Tourist Photography / Jonas Larsen -- ch. ...... -- ch. 9. Retouch Yourself: The Pleasures and Politics of Digital Cosmetic Surgery / Tanya Sheehan -- ch. 10. Virtual Selves: Art and Digital Autobiography / Louise Wolthers -- ch. 11. Mobile-Media Photography: New Modes of Engagement / Michael Shanks and Connie Svabo.......The New Face of Snapshot Photography / Jonas Larsen and Mette Sandbye -- pt. I. IMAGES ON WEB 2.0 AND THE CAMERA PHONE -- ch. 1. Overlooking, Rarely Looking and Not Looking / Martin Lister -- ch. 2. The (Im)mobile Life of Digital Photographs: The Case of Tourist Photography / Jonas Larsen -- ch. 3....... Distance as the New Punctum / Mikko Villi -- pt. II. FAMILY ALBUMS IN TRANSITION -- ch. 4. How Digital Technologies Do Family Snaps, Only Better / Gillian Rose -- ch. 5. Friendship Photography: Memory, Mobility and Social Networking / Joanne Garde-Hansen -- ch. 6. Play, Process and Materiality in Japanese...

  8. Transfer of noroviruses between fingers and fomites and food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuladhar, Era; Hazeleger, Wilma C; Koopmans, Marion; Zwietering, Marcel H; Duizer, Erwin; Beumer, Rijkelt R

    2013-11-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) contaminated hands are important routes for transmission. Quantitative data on transfer during contact with surfaces and food are scarce but necessary for a quantitative risk assessment. Therefore, transfer of MNV1 and human NoVs GI.4 and GII.4 was studied by artificially contaminating human finger pads, followed by pressing on stainless steel and Trespa® surfaces and also on whole tomatoes and cucumber slices. In addition, clean finger pads were pressed on artificially contaminated stainless steel and Trespa® surfaces. The transfers were performed at a pressure of 0.8-1.9 kg/cm(2) for approximately 2s up to 7 sequential transfers either to carriers or to food products. MNV1 infectivity transfer from finger pads to stainless steel ranged from 13 ± 16% on the first to 0.003 ± 0.009% on the sixth transfer on immediate transfer. After 10 min of drying, transfer was reduced to 0.1 ± 0.2% on the first transfer to 0.013 ± 0.023% on the fifth transfer. MNV1 infectivity transfer from stainless steel and Trespa® to finger pads after 40 min of drying was 2.0 ± 2.0% and 4.0 ± 5.0% respectively. MNV1 infectivity was transferred 7 ± 8% to cucumber slices and 0.3 ± 0.5% to tomatoes after 10 min of drying, where the higher transfer to cucumber was probably due to the higher moisture content of the cucumber slices. Similar results were found for NoVs GI.4 and GII.4 transfers measured in PCR units. The results indicate that transfer of the virus is possible even after the virus is dried on the surface of hands or carriers. Furthermore, the role of fingers in transmission of NoVs was quantified and these data can be useful in risk assessment models and to establish target levels for efficacy of transmission intervention methods. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Digital Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledborg Hansen, Richard

    -­rich information and highly interesting communication are sky-­high and rising. With a continuous increase in digitized communication follows a decrease in face-­to-­face encounters and our ability to engage in inter-­personal relationships are suffering for it (Davis, 2013). The behavior described in this paper...... of residual deposits from technology in organizations and its effect on individuals ability to connect to one another. Based on the case study the paper describes indications and suggests potential implication hereof. Given the inherent enhancement possibilities of technology our expectation for entertainment......-­‐Jones, 2011) for increases in effectiveness and efficiency we indiscriminately embrace digital communication and digitized information dissemination with enthusiasm – at the risk of ignoring the potentially dark side of technology. However, technology also holds a promise for better understanding precisely...

  10. Digital "X"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baiyere, Abayomi; Grover, Varun; Gupta, Alok

    2017-01-01

    Interest in using digital before existing research concepts seem to be on the rise in the IS field. This panel is positioned to explore what value lies in labelling our research as digital “x” as opposed to the well established IT “x” (where “x” can be strategy, infrastructure, innovation, artifact......, capability e.t.c). The question this raises is that of how much this contributes novel insight to IS scholarship versus how much this is merely a relabeling of old wines in new wine bottles. The panel is expected to provide conceptual clarity on the use of the digital “x” concept and provide a delineation...

  11. Digital Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson Brooks, Eva; Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the outcomes from children’s play with technology in early childhood learning practices. The paper addresses questions related to how digital technology can foster creativity in early childhood learning environments. It consists of an analysis of children......’s interaction with the KidSmart furniture focusing on digital creativity potentials and play values suggested by the technology. The study applied a qualitative approach and included125 children (aged three to five), 10 pedagogues, and two librarians. The results suggests that educators should sensitively...... consider intervening when children are interacting with technology, and rather put emphasize into the integration of the technology into the environment and to the curriculum in order to shape playful structures for children’s digital creativity....

  12. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, M.; Lissner, J.; Rienmueller, R.; Haendle, J.; Siemens A.G., Erlangen

    1984-01-01

    Using a prototype of an electronic, universal examination unit equipped with a special X-ray TV installation, spotfilm exposures and digital angiographies with high spatial resolution and wide-range contrast could be made in the clinic for the first time. With transvenous contrast medium injection, the clinical results of digital angiography show excellent image quality in the region of the carotids and renal arteries as well as the arteries of the extremities. The electronic series exposures have an image quality almost comparable to the quality obtained with cutfilm changers in conventional angiography. There are certain limitations due to the input field of 25 cm X-ray image intensified used. In respect of the digital angiography imaging technique, the electronic universal unit is fully suitable for clinical application. (orig.) [de

  13. Effects of Partially Ionised Medical Oxygen, Especially with O2•−, in Vibration White Finger Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomír Perečinský

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A major symptom of hand-arm vibration syndrome is a secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon—vibration white finger (VWF—which results from a vasospasm of the digital arteries caused by work with vibration devices leading to occupational disease. Pharmacotherapy of VWF is often ineffective or has adverse effects. The aim of this work was to verify the influence of inhalation of partially ionized oxygen (O2•− on peripheral blood vessels in the hands of patients with VWF. Ninety one (91patients with VWF underwent four-finger adsorption plethysmography, and the pulse wave amplitude was recorded expressed in numeric parameters—called the native record. Next, a cold water test was conducted following with second plethysmography. The patients were divided in to the three groups. First and second inhaled 20-min of ionized oxygen O2•− or oxygen O2 respectively. Thirth group was control without treatment. All three groups a follow-up third plethysmography—the post-therapy record. Changes in the pulse wave amplitudes were evaluated. Inpatients group inhaling O2•− a modest increase of pulse wave amplitude was observed compared to the native record; patients inhaling medical oxygen O2 and the control showed a undesirable decline of pulse wave amplitude in VWF fingers. Strong vasodilatation were more frequent in the group inhaling O2•− compare to O2 (p < 0.05. Peripheral vasodilatation achieved by inhalation of O2•− could be used for VWF treatment without undesirable side effect in hospital as well as at home environment.

  14. Digital photogrammetry

    CERN Document Server

    Egels, Yves

    2003-01-01

    Photogrammetry is the use of photography for surveying primarily and is used for the production of maps from aerial photographs. Along with remote sensing, it represents the primary means of generating data for Geographic Information Systems (GIS). As technology develops, it is becoming easier to gain access to it. The cost of digital photogrammetric workstations are falling quickly and these new tools are therefore becoming accessible to more and more users. Digital Photogrammetry is particularly useful as a text for graduate students in geomantic and is also suitable for people with a good basic scientific knowledge who need to understand photogrammetry, and who wish to use the book as a reference.

  15. Digital voltmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohannes Kamadi; Soekarno.

    1976-01-01

    The electrical voltage measuring equipment with digital display has been made. This equipment uses four digits display with single polarity measurement and integrating system. Pulses from the oscillator will be counted and converted to the staircase voltages, and compared to the voltage measured. When the balance is already achieved, the pulse will appear at the comparator circuit. This pulse will be used to trigger univibrator circuit. The univibrator output is used as signal for stopping the counting, and when reading time T already stops, the counting system will be reset. (authors)

  16. Digital caliper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Louella E.

    1967-01-01

    The large number of measurements needed to describe fully the characteristics of biological specimens and other objects has always been tedious and time consuming. The work can be done much more rapidly and with greater accuracy with a digital caliper recently developed by us. The digital caliper is a new electronic instrument built to measure objects precisely throughout the range of 0.1 mm to 1.0 m. Calipers of several different discrete sizes make it possible to select the most convenient unit for the particular range of length and degree of accuracy desired.

  17. Digital literacies

    CERN Document Server

    Hockly, Nicky; Pegrum, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic shifts in our communication landscape have made it crucial for language teaching to go beyond print literacy and encompass the digital literacies which are increasingly central to learners' personal, social, educational and professional lives. By situating these digital literacies within a clear theoretical framework, this book provides educators and students alike with not just the background for a deeper understanding of these key 21st-century skills, but also the rationale for integrating these skills into classroom practice. This is the first methodology book to address not jus

  18. Digital communication

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Apurba

    2010-01-01

    ""Digital Communications"" presents the theory and application of the philosophy of Digital Communication systems in a unique but lucid form. This book inserts equal importance to the theory and application aspect of the subject whereby the authors selected a wide class of problems. The Salient features of the book are: the foundation of Fourier series, Transform and wavelets are introduces in a unique way but in lucid language; the application area is rich and resemblance to the present trend of research, as we are attached with those areas professionally; a CD is included which contains code

  19. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elander, S.

    1986-01-01

    The report deals with a project for the development of digital, cerebral angiography competence in Norway. An IIS image processor and a DIGITAL VAX 11/750 were used for the processing of X-ray pictures. The pictures were scanned on an OPTRON C4100 and photographed on a MATRIX INSTR. 3000 videoprinter. The highpass functions Laplace, Roberts, and Sobel were utilized to enhance edges. Further, the room-variant contrast-stretch method WALLIS and the Local Adaptive Histogram Equalization (LAHE) from the SPIDER software package were applied

  20. Digital filters

    CERN Document Server

    Hamming, Richard W

    1997-01-01

    Digital signals occur in an increasing number of applications: in telephone communications; in radio, television, and stereo sound systems; and in spacecraft transmissions, to name just a few. This introductory text examines digital filtering, the processes of smoothing, predicting, differentiating, integrating, and separating signals, as well as the removal of noise from a signal. The processes bear particular relevance to computer applications, one of the focuses of this book.Readers will find Hamming's analysis accessible and engaging, in recognition of the fact that many people with the s

  1. Digital Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  2. Effects of Finger Counting on Numerical Development – The Opposing Views of Neurocognition and Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Korbinian; Martignon, Laura; Wessolowski, Silvia; Engel, Joachim; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Children typically learn basic numerical and arithmetic principles using finger-based representations. However, whether or not reliance on finger-based representations is beneficial or detrimental is the subject of an ongoing debate between researchers in neurocognition and mathematics education. From the neurocognitive perspective, finger counting provides multisensory input, which conveys both cardinal and ordinal aspects of numbers. Recent data indicate that children with good finger-based numerical representations show better arithmetic skills and that training finger gnosis, or “finger sense,” enhances mathematical skills. Therefore neurocognitive researchers conclude that elaborate finger-based numerical representations are beneficial for later numerical development. However, research in mathematics education recommends fostering mentally based numerical representations so as to induce children to abandon finger counting. More precisely, mathematics education recommends first using finger counting, then concrete structured representations and, finally, mental representations of numbers to perform numerical operations. Taken together, these results reveal an important debate between neurocognitive and mathematics education research concerning the benefits and detriments of finger-based strategies for numerical development. In the present review, the rationale of both lines of evidence will be discussed. PMID:22144969

  3. Blood pressure measurement of all five fingers by strain gauge plethysmography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirai, M; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1976-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to study the methodological problems involved in measuring systolic blood pressure in all five fingers by the strain gauge technique. In 24 normal subjects, blood pressure at the proximal phalanx of finger I and both at the proximal and the intermediate phalanx...... of the other fingers was measured using a 24-mm-wide cuff. Blood pressure at the proximal phalanx was higher than that at the intermediate phalanx in all fingers except finger V. The difference of blood pressure values corresponded well with circumference of the finger. In 15 normal subjects, blood pressure...... of the mean values was larter with the 27-mm-wide cuff than with the 24-mm-wide cuff, the 24-mm-wide cuff was considered to be most suitable for clinical use in fingers I, II, III, and IV. By using the 20-mm-wide cuff in finger V and the 24-mm-wide cuff in the other fingers, normal value of finger blood...

  4. Digital Tidbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Maha; Geary, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Technology has transformed libraries. There are digital libraries, electronic collections, online databases and catalogs, ebooks, downloadable books, and much more. With free technology such as social websites, newspaper collections, downloadable online calendars, clocks and sticky notes, online scheduling, online document sharing, and online…

  5. Digital Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harron, Jason; Langdon, John; Gonzalez, Jennifer; Cater, Scott

    2017-01-01

    The term forensic science may evoke thoughts of blood-spatter analysis, DNA testing, and identifying molds, spores, and larvae. A growing part of this field, however, is that of digital forensics, involving techniques with clear connections to math and physics. This article describes a five-part project involving smartphones and the investigation…

  6. Digital books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes digital books.

  7. Digital Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, R.

    2013-01-01

    In Digital Methods, Richard Rogers proposes a methodological outlook for social and cultural scholarly research on the Web that seeks to move Internet research beyond the study of online culture. It is not a toolkit for Internet research, or operating instructions for a software package; it deals

  8. Digital Humanities and networked digital media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Ole Finnemann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses digital humanities and the growing diversity of digital media, digital materials and digital methods. The first section describes the humanities computing tradition formed around the interpretation of computation as a rule-based process connected to a concept of digital materials centred on the digitisation of non-digital, finite works, corpora and oeuvres. The second section discusses “the big tent” of contemporary digital humanities. It is argued that there can be no unifying interpretation of digital humanities above the level of studying digital materials with the help of software-supported methods. This is so, in part, because of the complexity of the world and, in part, because digital media remain open to the projection of new epistemologies onto the functional architecture of these media. The third section discusses the heterogeneous character of digital materials and proposes that the study of digital materials should be established as a field in its own right.

  9. Digital Humanities and networked digital media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Ole Finnemann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses digital humanities and the growing diversity of digital media, digital materials and digital methods. The first section describes the humanities computing tradition formed around the interpretation of computation as a rule-based process connected to a concept of digital materials centred on the digitisation of non-digital, finite works, corpora and oeuvres. The second section discusses “the big tent” of contemporary digital humanities. It is argued that there can be no unifying interpretation of digital humanities above the level of studying digital materials with the help of software-supported methods. This is so, in part, because of the complexity of the world and, in part, because digital media remain open to the projection of new epistemologies onto the functional architecture of these media. The third section discusses the heterogeneous character of digital materials and proposes that the study of digital materials should be established as a field in its own right.

  10. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eNissler

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive / rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called intent detection, has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper we explore a novel method to solve the problem, that we call Optical Myography (OMG. The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags and a standard web-camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.. Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05 to 0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range, in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented- / virtual-reality setup.

  11. Concurrent pyogenic granuloma and bullous impetigo of a pregnant woman's finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rosie; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-03-15

    Bullous impetigo is a superficial skininfection caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus). Pyogenic granuloma is a common benigntumor frequently associated with prior trauma.Bullous impetigo and pyogenic granuloma may occurin pregnant women. The features of a pregnant womanwith pyogenic granuloma and bullous impetigoconcurrently present in a lesion on her finger aredescribed. PubMed was used to search the followingterms: bullous impetigo, pregnancy, and pyogenicgranuloma. All papers were reviewed; relevantarticles, along with their references, were evaluatedResults: A red ulcerated nodule with a collaretteof epithelium around the tumor and surroundingbullae appeared on the fifth digit of the left hand of a31-year-old woman who was at 36 weeks gestation. Abacterial culture grew methicillin sensitive S. aureus.An excisional biopsy was performed. Histologicfindings revealed not only a benign vascular tumorwith an infiltrate of mixed inflammatory cells, butalso an intraepidermal blister. She received oralantibiotics and there was complete resolution of thefinger lesion and infection with preservation of digitfunction. Albeit uncommon, pyogenic granulomaand bullous impetigo may concurrently occur in thesame lesion. Therapeutic intervention should focuson treating both the benign skin tumor and theinfection.

  12. Kinematic design of a finger abduction mechanism for an anthropomorphic robotic hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-A. A. Demers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the kinematic design of an abduction mechanism for the fingers of an underactuated anthropomorphic robotic hand. This mechanism will enhance the range of feasible grasps of the underactuated hand without significantly increasing its complexity. The analysis of the link between the index finger and the third finger is first assessed, where the parameters are studied in order to follow the amplitude constraint and to minimize the coordination error. Then, the study of the mechanism joining the third finger and the little finger is summarized. Finally, a prototype of the finger's abduction system is presented.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  13. Ret Finger Protein: An E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Juxtaposed to the XY Body in Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Gillot

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During prophase I of male meiosis, the sex chromosomes form a compact structure called XY body that associates with the nuclear membrane of pachytene spermatocytes. Ret Finger Protein is a transcriptional repressor, able to interact with both nuclear matrix-associated proteins and double-stranded DNA. We report the precise and unique localization of Ret Finger Protein in pachytene spermatocytes, in which Ret Finger Protein takes place of lamin B1, between the XY body and the inner nuclear membrane. This localization of Ret Finger Protein does not seem to be associated with O-glycosylation or sumoylation. In addition, we demonstrate that Ret Finger Protein contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. These observations lead to an attractive hypothesis in which Ret Finger Protein would be involved in the positioning and the attachment of XY body to the nuclear lamina of pachytene spermatocytes.

  14. Case report 466: Granulomatous tenosynovitis (left 3rd finger)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggenspack, G.A.; Amparo, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic resonance features of a digital flexor tendon sheath mass are described in a patient with a painless enlarged digit. MRI provided precise anatomical localization of a caseating granulomatous mass within the flexor tendon sheath space and facilitated definitive surgical treatment, whereas the radiographic findings showed soft tissue swelling of the phalanx but were unable to compartmentalize or characterize the underlying abnormality. (orig.)

  15. Case report 466: Granulomatous tenosynovitis (left 3rd finger)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggenspack, G.A.; Amparo, E.G.

    1988-03-01

    The magnetic resonance features of a digital flexor tendon sheath mass are described in a patient with a painless enlarged digit. MRI provided precise anatomical localization of a caseating granulomatous mass within the flexor tendon sheath space and facilitated definitive surgical treatment, whereas the radiographic findings showed soft tissue swelling of the phalanx but were unable to compartmentalize or characterize the underlying abnormality.

  16. Person recognition using fingerprints and top-view finger images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panyayot Chaikan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Our multimodal biometric system combines fingerprinting with a top-view finger image captured by a CCD camera without user intervention. The greyscale image is preprocessed to enhance its edges, skin furrows, and the nail shape before being manipulated by a bank of oriented filters. A square tessellation is applied to the filtered image to create a feature map, called a NailCode, which is employed in Euclidean distance computations. The NailCode reduces system errors by 17.68% in the verification mode, and by 6.82% in the identification mode.

  17. Viscous fingering and channeling in chemical enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daripa, Prabir; Dutta, Sourav

    2017-11-01

    We have developed a hybrid numerical method based on discontinuous finite element method and modified method of characteristics to compute the multiphase multicomponent fluid flow in porous media in the context of chemical enhanced oil recovery. We use this method to study the effect of various chemical components on the viscous fingering and channeling in rectilinear and radial flow configurations. We will also discuss about the efficiency of various flooding schemes based on these understandings. Time permitting, we will discuss about the effect of variable injection rates in these practical setting. U.S. National Science Foundation Grant DMS-1522782.

  18. HE upgrade beyond phase 1. Finger scintillator option.

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Sergey; Boyarintsev, A.Yu; Emeliantchik, Igor; Golutvin, Igor; Grinyov, B.V; Ershov, Yuri; Levchuk, Leonid; Litomin, Aliaksandr; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Popov, V.F; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Sorokin, Pavlo; Zhmurin, Petro

    2014-01-01

    CMS hadron calorimeters (HB, HE, HO) have been in operation for several years and contributed substantially to the success of the CMS Physics Program. The endcap calorimeter HE suffered more radiation damage than anticipated causing rapid degradation of scintillator segments (tiles) which have a higher radiation flux from secondary particles than HB and HO. A proposal to upgrade of HE calorimeter will provide a solution for survivability at future LHC higher luminosity. A finger-strip plastic scintillator option has many advantages and is a lower cost alternative to keep the excellent HE performance at high luminosity. Measurements and simulations have been performed and this method is a good upgrade strategy.

  19. Static model for a 3-DOF underactuated finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guay

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a static model of a three-degree-of-freedom underactuated finger. The model includes all static forces, namely actuation forces, return forces and gravity. All geometric and static parameters can be freely changed (pulley radius, member's mass, etc.. Hence, the model allows complete static simulations to be performed and it can also be used for numerical optimization.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  20. Finger image quality based on singular point localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinghua; Olsen, Martin A.; Busch, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Singular points are important global features of fingerprints and singular point localization is a crucial step in biometric recognition. Moreover the presence and position of the core point in a captured fingerprint sample can reflect whether the finger is placed properly on the sensor. Therefore...... and analyze the importance of singular points on biometric accuracy. The experiment is based on large scale databases and conducted by relating the measured quality of a fingerprint sample, given by the positions of core points, to the biometric performance. The experimental results show the positions of core...

  1. Kinematic analysis of the finger exoskeleton using MATLAB/Simulink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiłowski, Krzysztof; Awrejcewicz, Jan; Lewandowski, Donat

    2014-01-01

    A paralyzed and not fully functional part of human body can be supported by the properly designed exoskeleton system with motoric abilities. It can help in rehabilitation, or movement of a disabled/paralyzed limb. Both suitably selected geometry and specialized software are studied applying the MATLAB environment. A finger exoskeleton was the base for MATLAB/Simulink model. Specialized software, such as MATLAB/Simulink give us an opportunity to optimize calculation reaching precise results, which help in next steps of design process. The calculations carried out yield information regarding movement relation between three functionally connected actuators and showed distance and velocity changes during the whole simulation time.

  2. Mallet fingers with bone avulsion and DIP joint subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, T; Oda, T

    2015-01-01

    One-third of all mallet fingers are associated with a fracture. Mallet fractures associated with large fracture fragments may result in volar subluxation of the distal phalanx. The management of mallet fractures varies based on injury pattern and surgeon preference. These treatment options include splinting regimens, closed reduction and percutaneous pinning and open reduction and internal fixation. Although numerous surgical techniques have been described, there is little clear consensus on operative treatment. Moreover, there is insufficient evidence to support operative over nonoperative treatment for mallet fractures. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Dynamics of fingering convection II: The formation of thermohaline staircases

    OpenAIRE

    Stellmach, S.; Traxler, A.; Garaud, P.; Brummell, N.; Radko, T.

    2011-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/jfm.2011.99 Regions of the ocean's thermocline unstable to salt fingering are often observed to host thermohaline staircases, stacks of deep well-mixed convective layers separated by thin stably-stratified interfaces. Decades after their discovery, however, their origin remains controversial. In this paper we use 3D direct numerical simulations to shed light on the problem. We study the evolution of an analogous d...

  4. Impact of viscous fingering and permeability heterogeneity on fluid mixing in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, C.; Jha, B.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid mixing plays a fundamental role in many natural and engineered processes, including groundwater flows in porous media, enhanced oil recovery, and microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems[1]. Recent developments have explored the effect of viscosity contrast on mixing, suggesting that the unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or viscous fingering, provides a powerful mechanism to increase fluid--fluid interfacial area and enhance mixing[2]. In this paper, we revisit the problem of subsurface contaminant transport through a heterogeneous aquifer in a quarter five-spot geometry[3] and we focus on the impact of two principal sources of disorder in the flow field: viscosity contrast between the fluids and heterogeneity in the permeability field. We consider a wide range of viscosity ratios of the contaminant and the water, from a less viscous to a more viscous contaminant, flowing through a range of permeability fields, from almost homogeneous to strongly heterogeneous. We ask the following practical question: how does the interplay between viscosity contrast and permeability heterogeneity determine the evolution of macroscopic quantities that characterize the spatial structure and temporal evolution of a contaminant plume? We answer this question by conducting high resolution simulations of contaminant flow and transport in an aquifer, and by analyzing both point measurements of contaminant breakthrough and clean-up times as well as global degree of mixing and dilution of the contaminant plume. [1] M. Dentz, T. Le Borgne, A. Englert, and B. Bijeljic, Mixing, spreading and reaction in heterogeneous media: A brief review, J. Contam. Hydrol. 120, 1-17 (2011). [2] B. Jha, L. Cueto-Felgueroso, and R. Juanes, Fluid mixing from viscous fingering. Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 194502 (2011) [3] J. Luo, M. Dentz, O. A. Cirpka, and P. K. Kitanidis, Breakthrough curve tailing in a dipole flow field, Water Resour. Res. 43(9), W09403 (2007).

  5. Financial Key Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on computing techniques starting from trial balance data regarding financial key ratios. There are presented activity, liquidity, solvency and profitability financial key ratios. It is presented a computing methodology in three steps based on a trial balance.

  6. Normal tendon sheath of the second to fifth fingers as seen on oblique views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-01-01

    Oblique views of the fingers, using a low kilovolt technique, show a portion of the tendon sheaths which can be regarded as representative of the entire sheath. Because of the varying obliquity of each finger, this proportion differs in the fingers. With increasing age the projected portion of the sheath becomes smaller because it is covered by increasing bone formation in the insertion of the tendon sheat. Normal values have been obtained for adults according to their decades; from these, quite minor degrees of tendon sheat thickening can be determined. In camptodactyly of the fifth finger, which is not uncommon, the tendon sheat may be widened in the absence of a tenosynovitis.

  7. Sensory Feedback Training for Improvement of Finger Perception in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Blumenstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop and to test a feedback training system for improvement of tactile perception and coordination of fingers in children and youth with cerebral palsy. Methods. The fingers of 7 probands with cerebral palsy of different types and severity were stimulated using small vibration motors integrated in the fingers of a hand glove. The vibration motors were connected through a microcontroller to a computer and to a response 5-button keyboard. By pressing an appropriate keyboard button, the proband must indicate in which finger the vibration was felt. The number of incorrect responses and the reaction time were measured for every finger. The perception and coordination of fingers were estimated before and after two-week training using both clinical tests and the measurements. Results. Proper functioning of the developed system in persons with cerebral palsy was confirmed. The tactile sensation of fingers was improved in five of seven subjects after two weeks of training. There was no clear tendency towards improvement of selective use of fingers. Conclusion. The designed feedback system could be used to train tactile perception of fingers in children and youth with cerebral palsy. An extensive study is required to confirm these findings.

  8. A gene encoding 22 highly related zinc fingers is expressed in lymphoid cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Lovering, R; Trowsdale, J

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA was isolated from a T cell library using an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to a sequence conserved in proteins with multiple zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. The predicted protein structure of this cDNA (ZNF43) showed that it contained 22 of the Krüppel type of zinc finger motifs in tandem. The amino acid sequence was strongly conserved between each of the finger domains of this cDNA, except for variable residue positions within the putative DNA binding site. Within the zinc finger ...

  9. Effects of finger counting on numerical development – the opposing views of neurocognition and mathematics education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbinian eMoeller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Usually children learn the basic principles of number and arithmetic by the help of finger-based representations. However, whether the reliance on finger-based representations is only beneficial or whether it may even become detrimental is the subject of an ongoing debate between neuro-cognitive and mathematics education researchers. From the neuro-cognitive perspective finger counting provides multi-sensory input conveying both cardinal and ordinal aspects of numbers. Recent data indicate that children with good finger-based numerical representations show better arithmetic skills and that training finger gnosis enhances mathematical skills. From this neuro-cognitive researchers conclude that elaborate finger-based numerical representations are beneficial for later numerical development.However, mathematics education research recommends fostering mental numerical representations so as to induce children to abandon finger-counting. More precisely mathematics education recommends moving from finger counting to concrete structured representations and then, finally, to mental representations of numbers.Taken together, there is obviously an important debate between the neuro-cognitve and mathematics education research concerning the benefits or detriments of finger-based strategies for numerical development. In the present review, the rationale of both lines of evidence will be presented and discussed.

  10. Common substrate for mental arithmetic and finger representation in the parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Michael; Michaux, Nicolas; Pesenti, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    The history of mathematics provides several examples of the use of fingers to count or calculate. These observations converge with developmental data showing that fingers play a critical role in the acquisition of arithmetic knowledge. Further studies evidenced specific interference of finger movements with arithmetic problem solving in adults, raising the question of whether or not finger and number manipulations rely on common brain areas. In the present study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the possible overlap between the brain areas involved in mental arithmetic and those involved in finger discrimination. Solving subtraction and multiplication problems was found to increase cerebral activation bilaterally in the horizontal part of the intraparietal sulcus (hIPS) and in the posterior part of the superior parietal lobule (PSPL). Finger discrimination was associated with increased activity in a bilateral occipito-parieto-precentral network extending from the extrastriate body area to the primary somatosensory and motor cortices. A conjunction analysis showed common areas for mental arithmetic and finger representation in the hIPS and PSPL bilaterally. Voxelwise correlations further showed that finger discrimination and mental arithmetic induced a similar pattern of activity within the parietal areas only. Pattern similarity was more important for the left than for the right hIPS and for subtraction than for multiplication. These findings provide the first evidence that the brain circuits involved in finger representation also underlie arithmetic operations in adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A microelectrostatic repulsive-torque rotation actuator with two-width fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chao; He, Siyuan

    2015-01-01

    A microelectrostatic repulsive-torque rotation actuator with two-width fingers is presented. The actuator consists of finger-shaped electrodes and is made of two thin film layers, i.e. one movable layer and one fixed layer. There are two types of finger electrodes, namely constant-width and two-width fingers. The two-width finger has a narrow lower segment and a wide top segment. The constant-width finger has only the narrow lower segment. Each rotation finger has its corresponding aligned and unaligned fixed fingers. The electrostatic repulsive torque is generated and acts on the rotation fingers to rotate them up and away from the substrate. As a result, rotation is not limited by the gap between the movable and fixed layers and the ‘pull-in’ instability is avoided. Thus a large out-of-plane rotation and high operational stability can be achieved. The actuator is suitable for two-layer surface micromachining. The model of the actuator is developed. Prototypes are fabricated and tested. The experimental tests show that the actuator achieved a mechanical rotation of 7.65° at a driving voltage of 150 V. The settling time for a mechanical rotation of 5° is 5.7 ms. (paper)

  12. Becoming digital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2015-01-01

    government, and draws on empirical material generated through observations, field notes, interviews and policy documents. The material is documenting how service is performed by frontline agents in the ‘bureaucratic encounter’ with citizens, who needs assistance to use digital self-service in order to apply...... online for a public benefit. Findings: The paper shows that e-government technology changes the mode of professionalism in citizen service from service to support. The paper gives an empirical account of recent Danish digital reforms and shows how the reforms both enable and constrain the work...... of ‘becoming digital’ by frontline agents. Overall the street-level bureaucrat’s classical tasks such as specialized casework are being displaced into promoting and educational tasks. An implication of this is blurred distinctions between professional skills and personal competences of the frontline agent...

  13. Digital resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Bibliotheca Latinitatis Mediaevalis (circa VII sec. - XIV sec. IntraText Digital Library [01/06] Corpus Scriptorum Latinorum. A digital library of Latin literature by David Camden [01/06] Fonti disponibili online concernenti la vita religiosa medievale Rete Vitae Religiosae Mediaevalis Studia Conectens [01/06] Fuentes del Medievo Hispanico Instituto de Historia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas [01/06] Latin Literature Forum Romanum [01/06] Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Dissertazioni sopra le antichità italiane, 1751 Biblioteca dei Classici Italiani di Giuseppe Bonghi [01/06] Medieval Latin The Latin Library [01/06] Médiévales Presses Universitaires de Vincennes - Revues.org [01/06] Regesta imperii Deutsche Kommission für die Bearbeitung der Regesta Imperii e.V. [01/06] Suda On Line Byzantine Lexicography [01/06

  14. Digital produktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen sætter fokus på digital produktion, som er en stærk læringsform, der faciliterer elevernes læreprocesser og kvalificerer elevernes faglige læringsresultater. Det sker når lærerne udarbejder didaktiske rammedesign, hvor eleverne arbejder selvstændigt inden for dette rammedesign, og hvor mål ...

  15. EFEKTIFITAS PELAKSANAAN FINGER PRINT DI IAIN RADEN FATAH PALEMBANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahir Badruddin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, discipline becomes an important thing that becomes the focus of attention in almost all organizations. Some studies even linking discipline with performance that if the level of discipline members of the organization better then the performance will increase. IAIN Raden Fatah Palembang as one of the organizations also see discipline as an important factor that must be considered by all employees and lecturers mainly based on Government Regulation No. 30 1980 which was amended by Government Regulation No. 53 in 2010. Meanwhile, for the Ministry of Religion itself translated back through the Minister of Religion No. 28 in 2013 and again by Decree especially Rector IAIN Raden Fatah regulating the working hours of employees and lecturers. To obtain a report of presence accountable, it is used in the finger print machine IAIN Raden Fatah Palembang. To see the effectiveness of the implementation of these activities, we conducted observations, interviews and documentation as a means of collecting data. And, the resulting data will be analyzed qualitatively and elaborated descriptively. After the stages of research, showed that the application of the rules the government has been running well and supported by adequate facilities. However, not maximal processing, synchronization data and application of punishment and reward led to a lack of effective use of finger prints on the existing units in IAIN Raden Fatah Palembang.

  16. Unveiling the Biometric Potential of Finger-Based ECG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, André; Silva, Hugo; Fred, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The ECG signal has been shown to contain relevant information for human identification. Even though results validate the potential of these signals, data acquisition methods and apparatus explored so far compromise user acceptability, requiring the acquisition of ECG at the chest. In this paper, we propose a finger-based ECG biometric system, that uses signals collected at the fingers, through a minimally intrusive 1-lead ECG setup recurring to Ag/AgCl electrodes without gel as interface with the skin. The collected signal is significantly more noisy than the ECG acquired at the chest, motivating the application of feature extraction and signal processing techniques to the problem. Time domain ECG signal processing is performed, which comprises the usual steps of filtering, peak detection, heartbeat waveform segmentation, and amplitude normalization, plus an additional step of time normalization. Through a simple minimum distance criterion between the test patterns and the enrollment database, results have revealed this to be a promising technique for biometric applications. PMID:21837235

  17. Unveiling the biometric potential of finger-based ECG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, André; Silva, Hugo; Fred, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The ECG signal has been shown to contain relevant information for human identification. Even though results validate the potential of these signals, data acquisition methods and apparatus explored so far compromise user acceptability, requiring the acquisition of ECG at the chest. In this paper, we propose a finger-based ECG biometric system, that uses signals collected at the fingers, through a minimally intrusive 1-lead ECG setup recurring to Ag/AgCl electrodes without gel as interface with the skin. The collected signal is significantly more noisy than the ECG acquired at the chest, motivating the application of feature extraction and signal processing techniques to the problem. Time domain ECG signal processing is performed, which comprises the usual steps of filtering, peak detection, heartbeat waveform segmentation, and amplitude normalization, plus an additional step of time normalization. Through a simple minimum distance criterion between the test patterns and the enrollment database, results have revealed this to be a promising technique for biometric applications.

  18. Crustal fingering: solidification on a viscously unstable interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Porter, Mark; Juanes, Ruben

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments, here we study the volumetric expansion of a less viscous gas pocket into a more viscous liquid when the gas-liquid interfaces readily solidify due to hydrate formation. We first present a high-pressure microfluidic experiment to study the depressurization-controlled expansion of a Xenon gas pocket in a water-filled Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution of the pocket is controlled by three processes: (1) volumetric expansion of the gas; (2) rupturing of existing hydrate films on the gas-liquid interface; and (3) formation of new hydrate films. These result in gas fingering leading to a complex labyrinth pattern. To reproduce these observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the formation of hydrate shell on viscously unstable interfaces. We design the free energy of the three-phase system to rigorously account for interfacial effects, gas compressibility and phase transitions. We model the hydrate shell as a highly viscous fluid with shear-thinning rheology to reproduce shell-rupturing behavior. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex crustal fingering patterns as a result of gas expansion dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  19. Habitual biting of a finger in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Sarveswari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old male child was brought by his parents with a nonhealing ulcer on the right middle finger having no significant history except for an injury sustained to the right elbow in December 2013. On further probing, the mother revealed that the child used to indulge in habitual biting of his right middle finger while watching TV. Initially he was investigated extensively by a vascular surgeon and no abnormality was detected. He was later referred to the dermatology department and on examination, the patient was attentive with normal behaviour. The right upper limb was slightly larger than left. There was no deformity of the right elbow. The right third fingertip was enlarged and mutilated. There was no nerve thickening or hypopigmented patch. There was loss of sensation on the right hand and arm. Differential diagnosis of Lesch–Nyhan syndrome and congenital sensory neuropathy were considered. The patient was referred to a neurologist who investigated further with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and the final diagnosis of syringomyelia was made based on MRI findings.

  20. Baseline Screening Mammography: Performance of Full-Field Digital Mammography Versus Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Elizabeth S; McCarthy, Anne Marie; Akhtar, Amana L; Synnestvedt, Marie B; Schnall, Mitchell; Conant, Emily F

    2015-11-01

    Baseline mammography studies have significantly higher recall rates than mammography studies with available comparison examinations. Digital breast tomosynthesis reduces recalls when compared with digital mammographic screening alone, but many sites operate in a hybrid environment. To maximize the effect of screening digital breast tomosynthesis with limited resources, choosing which patient populations will benefit most is critical. This study evaluates digital breast tomosynthesis in the baseline screening population. Outcomes were compared for 10,728 women who underwent digital mammography screening, including 1204 (11.2%) baseline studies, and 15,571 women who underwent digital breast tomosynthesis screening, including 1859 (11.9%) baseline studies. Recall rates, cancer detection rates, and positive predictive values were calculated. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios of recall for digital mammography versus digital breast tomosynthesis for patients undergoing baseline screening and previously screened patients, adjusted for age, race, and breast density. In the baseline subgroup, recall rates for digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis screening were 20.5% and 16.0%, respectively (p = 0.002); digital breast tomosynthesis screening in the baseline subgroup resulted in a 22% reduction in recall compared with digital mammography, or 45 fewer patients recalled per 1000 patients screened. Digital breast tomosynthesis screening in the previously screened patients resulted in recall reduction of 14.3% (p mammography alone.

  1. Timing and extent of finger force enslaving during a dynamic force task cannot be explained by EMG activity patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mirakhorlo

    Full Text Available Finger enslaving is defined as the inability of the fingers to move or to produce force independently. Such finger enslaving has predominantly been investigated for isometric force tasks. The aim of this study was to assess whether the extent of force enslaving is dependent on relative finger movements. Ten right-handed subjects (22-30 years flexed the index finger while counteracting constant resistance forces (4, 6 and 8 N orthogonal to the fingertip. The other, non-instructed fingers were held in extension. EMG activities of the mm. flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS and extensor digitorum (ED in the regions corresponding to the index, middle and ring fingers were measured. Forces exerted by the non-instructed fingers increased substantially (by 0.2 to 1.4 N with flexion of the index finger, increasing the enslaving effect with respect to the static, pre-movement phase. Such changes in force were found 260-370 ms after the initiation of index flexion. The estimated MCP joint angle of the index finger at which forces exerted by the non-instructed fingers started to increase varied between 4° and 6°. In contrast to the finger forces, no significant changes in EMG activity of the FDS regions corresponding to the non-instructed fingers upon index finger flexion were found. This mismatch between forces and EMG of the non-instructed fingers, as well as the delay in force development are in agreement with connective tissue linkages being slack when the positions of the fingers are similar, but pulled taut when one finger moves relative to the others. Although neural factors cannot be excluded, our results suggest that mechanical connections between muscle-tendon structures were (at least partly responsible for the observed increase in force enslaving during index finger flexion.

  2. Palmar and digital dermatoglyphic patterns in the Ndokwas of Delta State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibor, E; Igbigbi, P S; Avwioro, O G; Okpor, A

    2011-09-01

    We determined asymmetry, complexity and pattern polarization of dermal ridges and palmar variables of atd angle, a - b ridge count and total finger ridge count of dermal ridges among the Ndokwa people of Nigeria. 400 healthy students who are Ndokwas were studied. Ink prints of their fingers and palms were obtained. Counting and classifying of Palmar and digital ridge pattern configurations of arches, loops and whorls was based on standard techniques. Ulnar loops polarized preferentially to digits III, IV and V and radial loops to digit II. Female subjects had higher counts of radial loops (p < 0.001) than the males. Male subjects had a higher whorl count than the females (p < 0.05). Our findings form useful baseline data for subsequent longitudinal cytogenetic studies on the Ndokwa people.

  3. A novel technique: Subatmospheric pressure wound therapy for treating venous congestion of replanted digits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Woon Man Fok

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Venous congestion remains to be a major factor in causing digit replantation failures. The established solutions are: use of medical leech, local application of heparin gauze, and continuous nail bed massage. However, each method has its drawbacks. In theory, subatmospheric pressure wound therapy promotes continuous bleeding from the venules of the applied area, resulting in the relief of congestion. We applied subatmospheric pressure wound therapy to two replanted fingers of which venous congestion was noted shortly after the operation. The therapy was applied to each patient for one week. Both replanted fingers survived. No complication was noted.

  4. Determination of the hand from single digit fingerprint: a study of whorls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjit; Chattopadhyay, P K; Garg, R K

    2005-09-10

    In this investigation 400 bilateral rolled fingerprints of Punjabi Jat males have been examined for the determination of the hand from single digit fingerprint from whorl patterns. Direction of the flow of the apex ridges, rotation of centrally circular ridges, angles between the core and the delta, ridge tracing, ridge counting and the position of the perpendiculars drawn between the delta and the core are useful for establishing in most of the cases the hand and finger involved from the fingers having whorl pattern.

  5. Digital citizens Digital nations: the next agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. (Bert) Mulder; M.W. (Martijn) Hartog

    2015-01-01

    DIGITAL CITIZENS CREATE A DIGITAL NATION Citizens will play the lead role as they – in the next phase of the information society – collectively create a digital nation. Personal adoption of information and communication technology will create a digital infrastructure that supports individual and

  6. Digital Humanities and networked digital media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2014-01-01

    of software-supported methods. This is so, in part, because of the complexity of the world and, in part, because digital media remain open to the projection of new epistemologies onto the functional architecture of these media. The third section discusses the heterogeneous character of digital materials......This article discusses digital humanities and the growing diversity of digital media, digital materials and digital methods. The first section describes the humanities computing tradition formed around the interpretation of computation as a rule-based process connected to a concept of digital...

  7. Distal digital replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazayeri, Leila; Klausner, Jill Q; Chang, James

    2013-11-01

    Hand surgeons have been hesitant to perform distal digital replantation because of the technical challenges and the perception of a high cost-to-benefit ratio. Recent studies, however, have shown high survival rates and excellent functional and aesthetic results, providing renewed enthusiasm for distal replantation. The authors reviewed the literature and summarize key points regarding the surgical treatment, perioperative care, and outcomes of distal digital replantation. They describe specific techniques and considerations for surgical repair in each of four distal zones as described by Sebastin and Chung. Zone 1A replantation involves an artery-only anastomosis of a longitudinal pulp artery. Venous anastomosis first becomes possible in zone 1B. Zone 1C involves periarticular amputations where arthrodesis of the distal interphalangeal joint is usually indicated. Repair of the artery, vein, and nerve is technically optimal in zone 1D, where venous anastomosis should be performed. Overall, survival rates for distal digital replantation are similar to those reported for more proximal replantation. The literature reports good outcomes regarding nail salvage, fingertip sensibility, and range of motion, with restoration of length and aesthetic appearance. Distal replantation performed at institutions that specialize in microsurgery and specifically tailored to the level of injury is associated with good survival, function, and patient satisfaction and superior aesthetic outcome. More prospective data are needed to evaluate the cost of treatment, psychological outcomes, and functional outcomes of distal replantation compared with revision amputation.

  8. An fMRI study during finger movement tasks and recalling finger movement tasks in normal subjects and schizophrenia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Takefumi

    2003-01-01

    Using fMRI, we investigated the region of the brain, which was activated by the finger movement tasks (F1) and the recalling finger movement tasks (F2). Six right-handed age-matched healthy controls and six Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV) Schizophrenia patients were included in the study. In healthy controls, contralateral motor area, supplementary motor area and somatosensory area were all activated during F1 and F2. However the contralateral parietal lobe (supramarginal gyrus etc) and ipsilateral cerebellum were also activated during F2. In schizophrenia patients, the contralateral motor area was activated during F1, but the activated region was smaller than that observed in healthy subjects. During F2, the bilateral parietal lobes (sensorimotor cortices, association cortex) were activated, while the activated regions were smaller than those seen in healthy controls and no laterality was observed. In addition, no laterality of the activated regions was clearly observed. These results suggest that the function of recalling motor tasks can be mapped onto the contralateral motor area, somatosensory area, supplementary motor area, parietal association cortices, and ipsilateral cerebellum. In schizophrenia patients, the activated regions are smaller than those observed in healthy controls, and parietal regions are also activated bilaterally during recalling motor tasks. Schizophrenia patients may therefore process to recall motor task differently from healthy subjects while also demonstrate less laterality of the brain. (author)

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the CCCH zinc finger family identifies tissue specific and stress responsive candidates in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Seema; Kant, Chandra; Verma, Subodh; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2017-01-01

    The CCCH zinc finger is a group of proteins characterised by a typical motif consisting of three cysteine residues and one histidine residue. These proteins have been reported to play important roles in regulation of plant growth, developmental processes and environmental responses. In the present study, genome wide analysis of the CCCH zinc finger gene family was carried out in the available chickpea genome. Various bioinformatics tools were employed to predict 58 CCCH zinc finger genes in chickpea (designated CarC3H1-58), which were analysed for their physio-chemical properties. Phylogenetic analysis classified the proteins into 12 groups in which members of a particular group had similar structural organization. Further, the numbers as well as the types of CCCH motifs present in the CarC3H proteins were compared with those from Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula. Synteny analysis revealed valuable information regarding the evolution of this gene family. Tandem and segmental duplication events were identified and their Ka/Ks values revealed that the CarC3H gene family in chickpea had undergone purifying selection. Digital, as well as real time qRT-PCR expression analysis was performed which helped in identification of several CarC3H members that expressed preferentially in specific chickpea tissues as well as during abiotic stresses (desiccation, cold, salinity). Moreover, molecular characterization of an important member CarC3H45 was carried out. This study provides comprehensive genomic information about the important CCCH zinc finger gene family in chickpea. The identified tissue specific and abiotic stress specific CCCH genes could be potential candidates for further characterization to delineate their functional roles in development and stress.

  10. Digital fluorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, H.A. de.

    1980-11-01

    The specifications of a digital fluorimeter. That with adequated analytical techniques permits to determine trace amounts of fluorescents materials in samples, are described. The fluorimeter is of the reflection type, and uses fluorescents lamps for the excitation and an optical system which is connected to a photomultiplyer machine and permits the measurement of the light intensity. In the case of IEN (Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear) the equipment is used for to determine the uranium content in sample materials to be exported. The precision of the instrument is about + - 1% in the scale of 0.1 which is the normally one used in the current researchs. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Experimental model of trigger finger through A1 pulley constriction in a human cadaveric hand: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kristina J; Thomson, J Grant

    2013-10-01

    Although it can be reasonably assumed that trigger digits occur as the result of a size mismatch in the pulley-tendon system, it is unclear whether locking, histological changes, and nodule formation occur owing to an intrinsically too small pulley or an enlarged digital flexor tendon. Our purposes in this feasibility study were to (1) create a model of trigger digit by pulley constriction in nonpreserved human tissue, (2) measure the change in work of flexion as the force of pulley constriction increased, (3) compare the work of flexion between nontriggering and triggering conditions, and (4) determine whether triggering can occur at the A2, A3, and A4 pulleys under similar conditions. Using a tensiometer, we studied the work of flexion in 4 fingers (thumb, index, middle, and ring) in a human cadaveric hand. The load of flexion was measured as the A1 to A4 pulleys were incrementally constricted in order to induce triggering. Work of flexion was analyzed for differences among trial conditions. Triggering was successfully induced in all 4 digits through constriction of the A1 pulley. No triggering occurred in any of the A2, A3, or A4 pulley systems in this model. We successfully created a trigger model in a human cadaveric hand. Our results demonstrate that the A1 pulley can cause triggering from manual constriction of the pulley alone. A trigger model such as this may allow investigations of pathophysiology, and this may result in novel treatment strategies and modalities. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased enslaving in elderly is associated with changes in neural control of the extrinsic finger muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirakhorlo, M.; Maas, H.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2018-01-01

    Aging has consequences for hand motor control, among others affecting finger force enslaving during static pressing tasks. The aim of this study was to assess whether the extent of finger force enslaving changes with aging during a task that involves both static and dynamic phases. Ten

  13. Blood pressure measurement of all five fingers by strain gauge plethysmography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirai, M; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1976-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to study the methodological problems involved in measuring systolic blood pressure in all five fingers by the strain gauge technique. In 24 normal subjects, blood pressure at the proximal phalanx of finger I and both at the proximal and the intermediate phalanx of...

  14. Fifteen years experience with finger arterial pressure monitoring : Assessment of the technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imholz, B.P.M.; Wieling, W.; Montfrans, G.A. van; Wesseling, K.H.

    1998-01-01

    We review the Finapres technology, embodied in several TNO-prototypes and in the Ohmeda 2300 and 2300e Finapres NIBP. Finapres is an acronym for FINger Arterial PRESsure, the device delivers a continuous finger arterial pressure waveform. Many papers report on the accuracy of the device in

  15. Fifteen years experience with finger arterial pressure monitoring: assessment of the technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imholz, B. P.; Wieling, W.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Wesseling, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    We review the Finapres technology, embodied in several TNO-prototypes and in the Ohmeda 2300 and 2300e Finapres NIBP. Finapres is an acronym for FINger Arterial PRESsure, the device delivers a continuous finger arterial pressure waveform. Many papers report on the accuracy of the device in

  16. Impaired Finger Dexterity in Parkinson's Disease Is Associated with Praxis Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbellingen, T.; Kersten, B.; Bellion, M.; Temperli, P.; Baronti, F.; Muri, R.; Bohlhalter, S.

    2011-01-01

    A controversial concept suggests that impaired finger dexterity in Parkinson's disease may be related to limb kinetic apraxia that is not explained by elemental motor deficits such as bradykinesia. To explore the nature of dexterous difficulties, the aim of the present study was to assess the relationship of finger dexterity with ideomotor praxis…

  17. Gold finger formation studied by high-resolution mass spectrometry and in silico methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laskay, Ü.A.; Garino, C.; Tsybin, Y.O.; Salassa, L.; Casini, A.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies were employed for characterizing the formation of two gold finger (GF) domains from the reaction of zinc fingers (ZF) with gold complexes. The influence of both the gold oxidation state and the ZF coordination sphere

  18. Design and evaluation of two different finger concepts for body-powered prosthetic hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Plettenburg, D.H.; Van der Helm, F.C.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to find an efficient method of energy transmission for application in an anthropomorphic underactuated body-powered (BP) prosthetic hand. A pulley-cable finger and a hydraulic cylinder finger were designed and tested to compare the pulley-cable transmission principle with

  19. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3210 Section 888.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a metacarpophalangeal (finger) joint...

  20. Esthetic, functional, and prosthetic outcomes with implant-retained finger prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Cemal; Nemli, Secil Karakoca; Yilmaz, Handan

    2013-04-01

    Traumatic amputation of fingers results in a serious impairment of hand function and affects the psychological status of the patients. The implant-retained finger prostheses are an alternative treatment. The aim of this case report is to represent the use of osseointegrated implants for retention of finger prostheses in a patient with amputated thumb and index finger. Dental implants were placed in the residual bone of the fingers using two-stage surgery. Custom-made attachments were used to provide retention between implants and silicone prostheses. Prosthetic fingernails were made of composite resin material. After 6 months, implants were clinically successful, and the patient was satisfied with the appearance and the function of the prostheses. The complications of broken prosthetic nail and mild discoloration were observed. Reconstruction of amputated fingers with implant-retained prosthesis is a worthwhile treatment providing esthetic, functional, and psychological benefits, although some complications might be experienced. Clinical relevance Implant-retained finger prostheses are an acceptable treatment modality for patients with amputated fingers. Evaluating implant prognosis, functional results and prosthetic results of the patients are necessary to address the benefits and complications of the treatment.