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Sample records for diffusion aluminide coatings

  1. Oxidation behavior of niobium aluminide intermetallics protected by aluminide and silicide diffusion coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Soboyejo, W.; Rapp, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of a new class of damage-tolerant niobium aluminide (Nb 3 Al-xTi-yCr) intermetallics is studied between 650 C and 850 C. Protective diffusion coatings were deposited by pack cementation to achieve the siliciding or aluminizing of substrates with or without intervening Mo or Ni layers, respectively. The compositions and microstructures of the resulting coatings and oxidized surfaces were characterized. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics indicate that uncoated Nb-40Ti-15Al-based intermetallics may be used up to ∼750 C. Alloying with Cr improves the isothermal oxidation resistance between 650 C and 850 C. The most significant improvement in oxidation resistance is achieved by the aluminization of electroplated Ni interlayers. The results suggest that the high-temperature limit of niobium aluminide-based alloys may be increased to 800 C to 850 C by aluminide-based diffusion coatings on ductile Ni interlayers. Indentation fracture experiments also indicate that the ductile nickel interlayers are resistant to crack propagation in multilayered aluminide-based coatings

  2. Ion-plasma diffusion aluminide coatings for gas turbine blades (structure and properties)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muboyadzhyan, S.A.; Budinovskij, S.A.; Terekhova, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    A consideration is given to the ion-plasma method of heart resisting alloy diffusion coating with alloyed aluminides offering some advantages over routine techniques. Specific features of ion-plasma diffusion coatings production at the surface of heart resisting alloys using one- and multistage techniques are studied. The process of formation of coatings (Al-Si-Y, Al-Si-Ni-B, Al-Si-Cr-Y) along with coating effects on long-term heat resistance of nickel base alloys (ZhS6U, VZhL12U, ZhS26VNK) is investigated. The advantages of the new method of diffusion aluminide coatings are reported [ru

  3. The oxidation of aluminide diffusion coatings containing platinum used for the protection of IN738 superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, M.D.; Haworth, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminide coatings, as used for the protection against oxidation of most nickel-base superalloy components in modern jet engines, have been formed by a diffusion process on IN738 to give a coating that is essentially NiAl containing Al-rich precipitates. Aluminide coatings containing platinum have also been produced by initially depositing a thin layer (several microns thick) of Pt on the superalloy prior to the aluminisation process. Depending upon the details of the processing (such as the thickness of the Pt or the Al flux during the diffusion process) the structure of the coating on being formed was essentially either PtAl/sub 2/, PtAl or NiAl, or a mixture of these phases, but after some hours heat treatment at a high temperature (equivalent to service) was converted to either NiAl (containing Pt), or PtAl (containing Ni) or a mixture of PtAl and NiAl. The oxidation rate of these coatings at different temperatures between 800 and 1000 deg. C was studied using an automatic recording micro-balance and compared with the oxidation rate of a simple aluminide coating and of uncoated IN738. Further longer-term oxidation tests, including cyclic tests, were also undertaken. The Pt containing coatings gave approximately the same performance, and some were slightly better than the simple aluminide coatings, (and much better than the uncoated IN738). Both sections through the oxidised surface of the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ scale formed on the coatings were examined using optical microscopy and the SEM. The coating/scale interface on the platinum aluminide was seen to be slightly convoluted. It was more adherent and showed less tendency to spall than that formed on the simple aluminide coating. (author)

  4. Compatibility of aluminide-coated Hastelloy x and Inconel 617 in a simulated gas-cooled reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, J.; Johnson, W.R.; Chen, K.

    1982-03-01

    Commercially prepared aluminide coatings on Hastelloy X and Inconel 617 substrates were exposed to controlled-impurity helium at 850 0 and 950 0 C for 3000 h. Optical and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron microprobe profiles, and SEM X-ray mapping were used to evaluate and compare exposed and unexposed control samples. Four coatings were evaluated: aluminide, aluminide with platinum, aluminide with chromium, and aluminide with rhodium. With extended time at elevated temperature, nickel diffused into the aluminide coatings to form epsilon-phase (Ni 3 Al). This diffusion was the primary cause of porosity formation at the aluminide/alloy interface

  5. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel .... of hydrogen gas into CVD reactor, where nickel samples .... presence of three phases: β-NiAl, γ -Ni3Al and γ-Ni(Al).

  6. Microstructural Study on Oxidation Resistance of Nonmodified and Platinum Modified Aluminide Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana; Sieniawski, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Platinum electroplating layers (3 and 7 μm thick) were deposited on the surface of the Inconel 713 LC, CMSX 4, and Inconel 625 Ni-base superalloys. Diffusion treatment at 1050°C for 2 h under argon atmosphere was performed after electroplating. Diffusion treated samples were aluminized according to the low activity CVD process at 1050°C for 8 h. The nonmodified aluminide coatings consist of NiAl phase. Platinum modification let to obtain the (Ni,Pt)Al phase in coatings. The coated samples were subjected to cyclic oxidation testing at 1100°C. It was discovered that increase of the platinum electroplating thickness from 3 to 7 μm provides the improvement of oxidation resistance of aluminide coatings. Increase of the platinum thickness causes decreases in weight change and decreases in parabolic constant during oxidation. The platinum provides the pure Al2O3 oxide formation, slow growth oxide layer, and delay the oxide spalling during heating-cooling thermal cycles.

  7. Aluminide protective coatings on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kubicki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on aluminide protective coatings manufactured on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel. The main purpose of these coatings is protection against the high temperature corrosion, especially at high carburizing potential atmosphere. Coatings were obtained on cast steel type G–XNiCrSi36–18 with the following methods: pack cementation, paste method, cast method and slurry cementation. The phase composition, thickness and morphology of coatings were determined. Coatings capacity of carbon diffusion inhibition and thermal shocks resistance of coatings were determined with different methods. It was found, that all of the coatings reduce carbon diffusion in different degree and all coatings liable to degradation in consequence cracking and oxidation. Coating life time is mainly dependent on morphology, phase composition and service condition (thermal shocks first of all.

  8. Aluminide Coating on Stainless Steel for Nuclear Reactor Application: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishamuddin Husain; Zaifol Samsu; Yusof Abdullah; Muhamad Daud

    2015-01-01

    Stainless steels have been used as structural materials in the nuclear reactor since its first generation. Stainless steels type 304 and 316 are commonly used in structural components. Since the first generation materials, improvements were made on Stainless steels. This includes addition of stabilizing elements and by modification of metallurgical structure. This study investigates the formation of aluminide coating on Stainless steels by diffusion to help improve corrosion resistance. Stainless steels type 304 and 316 substrates were immersed in molten aluminium at 750 degree Celsius for 5 minutes. Interaction between molten aluminium and solid to form the outer aluminide coating by hot dipped aluminizing is studied. (Author)

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminide coatings on iron, nickel and superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, John T.; De, P.K.; Dubey, Vivekanand; Srinivasa, Raman

    2009-08-01

    Aluminide coatings are a class of intermetallic coatings applied on nickel and cobalt base superalloys and steels to protect them from different forms of environmental degradation at high temperatures. In this report a CVD system that can produce the aluminide coatings on iron, nickel and nickel base alloys has been described and the result of chemical vapor deposition of aluminide coatings on iron specimens, their characterization, and property evaluation have been presented. The CVD system consists of an AlCl 3 bath, a stainless steel retort as a hot-wall reacto, cold traps and vacuum system. Aluminium chloride vapor was carried in a stream of hydrogen gas at a flow rate of 150 SCCM (standard cubic centimeter per minute) into the CVD reactor maintained in the temperature range of 1173 - 1373 K and at a pressure of 1.33 kPa (10 Torr). Aluminum deposition takes place from aluminium subchlorides produced by reaction between AlCl 3 and pure aluminum kept in the CVD reactor. The aluminum diffuses into the iron samples and iron aluminide phases are formed at the surface. The coatings were shining bright and showed good adherence to the substrate. The coatings consisted of FeAl phase over a wide range of experimental conditions. The growth kinetics of the coating followed a parabolic rate law and the mean activation energy was 212 ±16 kJ/mol. Optical microscopic studies on the transverse section of the coating showed that the aluminide coating on iron consisted of two layers. The top layer had a thickness in the range of 20-50 μm, and the under layer had thickness ranging from 35 to 250 μm depending on coating temperature in two hours. The thickness of the aluminide layer increased with coating duration and temperature. Electron microprobe studies (EPMA) showed that the aluminum concentration decreased steadily as distance from the surface increased. TEM studies showed that the outer most layer had a B2 order (of the FeAl phase), which extended even into the under

  10. Synthesis and characterisation of pack cemented aluminide coatings on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houngninou, C.; Chevalier, S.; Larpin, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The exposition of metallic materials to high temperature environments leads to their corrosion because of oxidation or sulphidation. One way to protect such materials is to produce an Al 2 O 3 layer which needs to be continuous enough to limit diffusion of oxygen or metallic elements, and withstand this corrosion. Since a few years, it has been proved that aluminide compounds are one of the most effective materials to achieve this goal. Indeed, they possess sufficient Al and many beneficial mechanical properties when exposed to high temperature conditions to make possible the formation of a protective Al 2 O 3 scale. This study is aimed at the elaboration of iron, nickel and molybdenum aluminides by modification of the surface of the base materials by a pack cementation process. The as-cemented alloys were analysed by means of SEM coupled with EDX and by XRD. Cross-section examinations showed, in each case, a progressive diffusion of aluminium through the substrates. The diffusion thickness layer was more or less important depending on the base material and on the coating conditions

  11. Structure and Properties of the Aluminide Coatings on the Inconel 625 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiak, Stanisław; Bochnowski, Wojciech; Dziedzic, Andrzej; Filip, Ryszard; Szeregij, Eugeniusz

    2016-01-01

    The research samples used in this study were based on the Inconel 625 alloy; the examined samples were coated with aluminide films deposited in a low-activity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The samples' microstructure was investigated with optical and electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. Hardness measurements were performed using Vickers and Berkovich test methods. The adhesion of the aluminide coating was determined by fractography. It was shown that the fracture mechanism was different for the respective zones of the aluminide coating and the substrate material. The outer zone of the aluminide coating is characterized by an intercrystalline fracture, with a small contribution of transcrystalline fracture within individual grains (large crystallites in the bottom of the zone, composed of smaller crystallites, also show an intercrystalline fracture). The substrate material exhibited a ductile intercrystalline fracture. Based on this investigation, an increase of the microhardness of the material occurring at loads below 0.2 N was observed. When determining microhardness of aluminide coating it is necessary to take into account the optimal choice of the indentation tip.

  12. Formation of electrically insulating coatings on aluminided vanadium-base alloys in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, G.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were produced on vanadium and vanadium-base alloys by exposure of the materials to liquid lithium that contained 3-5 at.% dissolved aluminum in sealed capsules at temperatures between 775 and 880 degrees C. Reaction of the aluminide layer with dissolved nitrogen in liquid lithium provides a means of developing an in-situ electrical insulator coating on the surface of the alloys. The electrical resistivity of A1N coatings on aluminided V and V-20 wt.% Ti was determined in-situ

  13. Preparation of aluminide coatings on the inner surface of tubes by heat treatment of Al coatings electrodeposited from an ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Dongpeng; Chen, Yimin; Ling, Guoping; Liu, Kezhao; Chen, Chang’an; Zhang, Guikai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Al coating is prepared on the inner surface of one-meter tube. • Al coating shows good adherence to the substrate. • The thickness of Al coating is uniform along the tube. • Aluminide coating is obtained by heat treating Al coating. • Structure of aluminide coating is regulated by different thickness of Al coating. - Abstract: Aluminide coatings were prepared on the inner surface of 316L stainless steel tubes with size of Ø 12 mm × 1000 mm by heat-treating Al coatings electrodeposited from AlCl 3 -1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (AlCl 3 –EMIC) ionic liquid at room temperature. Studies on the electrolytic etching pretreatment of stainless tubes before Al coating electrodeposition were carried out. The Al coating showed good adherence to the substrate after electrolytic etching at 10 mA/cm 2 for 10 min. The thickness of Al coatings was uniform along the tube. The structure of prepared aluminide coatings can be regulated by different thickness of Al coating. The outer layer of aluminide coatings was FeAl, Fe 2 Al 5 and FeAl 3 for the samples of 1-μm, 5-μm and 10-μm thick Al coatings, respectively.

  14. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  15. A Novel Low-Temperature Fiffusion Aluminide Coating for Ultrasupercritical Coal-Fried Boiler Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying

    2009-12-31

    An ultrasupercritical (USC) boiler with higher steam temperature and pressure is expected to increase the efficiency of the coal-fired power plant and also decrease emissions of air pollutants. Ferritic/martensitic alloys have been developed with good creep strength for the key components in coal-fired USC plants. However, they typically suffer excessive steam-side oxidation, which contributes to one of main degradation mechanisms along with the fire-side corrosion in coal-fired boilers. As the steam temperature further increases in USC boilers, oxidation of the tube internals becomes an increasing concern, and protective coatings such as aluminide-based diffusion coatings need to be considered. However, conventional aluminizing processes via pack cementation or chemical vapor deposition are typically carried out at elevated temperatures (1000-1150 C). Thermochemical treatment of ferritic/martensitic alloys at such high temperatures could severely degrade their mechanical properties, particularly the alloy's creep resistance. The research focus of this project was to develop an aluminide coating with good oxidation resistance at temperatures {le} 700 C so that the coating processing would not detrimentally alter the creep performance of the ferritic/martensitic alloys. Nevertheless, when the aluminizing temperature is lowered, brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases, such as Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl{sub 3}, tend to form in the coating, which may reduce the resistance to fatigue cracking. Al-containing binary masteralloys were selected based on thermodynamic calculations to reduce the Al activity in the pack cementation process and thus to prevent the formation of brittle Al-rich intermetallic phases. Thermodynamic computations were carried out using commercial software HSC 5.0 for a series of packs containing various Cr-Al binary masteralloys. The calculation results indicate that the equilibrium partial pressures of Al halides at 700 C were a function of Al

  16. Formation of alumina-aluminide coatings on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, alumina-aluminide coatings were formed on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel substrate. First, coatings of aluminum were deposited electrochemically on T91 steel in a room temperature AlCl3-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquid, then the obtained coating was subjected to a two stage heat treatment procedure consisting of prolonged heat treatment of the sample in vacuum at 300 ○C followed by oxidative heat treatment in air at 650 ○C for 16 hours. X-ray diffraction measurement of the oxidatively heat treated samples indicated formation of Fe-Al and Cr-Al intermetallics and presence of amorphous alumina. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurement confirmed 50 wt- % O in the oxidized coating. Microscratch adhesion test conducted on alumina-aluminide coating formed on T91 steel substrate showed no major adhesive detachment up to 20 N loads. However, adhesive failure was observed at a few discrete points on the coating along the scratch track.

  17. Aluminide protective coatings on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kubicki; A. Kochmańska

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research on aluminide protective coatings manufactured on high–temperature creep resistant cast steel. The main purpose of these coatings is protection against the high temperature corrosion, especially at high carburizing potential atmosphere. Coatings were obtained on cast steel type G–XNiCrSi36–18 with the following methods: pack cementation, paste method, cast method and slurry cementation. The phase composition, thickness and morphology of coatings were...

  18. High quality aluminide and thermal barrier coatings deposition for new and service exposed parts by CVD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza, F.; Tuohy, C.; Whelan, L.; Kennedy, A.D. [SIFCO Turbine Components, Carrigtwohill, Cork (Ireland)

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the performance of CVD aluminide coatings is compared to that of coatings deposited by the classical pack cementation technique using standard SIFCO procedures. The CVD coatings always seem to behave better upon exposure to isothermal and cyclic oxidation conditions. This is explained by a longer term stability of CVD coatings, with higher Al amounts in the diffusion zone and less refractory element precipitation in the additive layer. The qualities of Pt/Al coatings by out-of-pack and CVD are also compared as a previous step for further thermal barrier coating deposition. As an example, YSZ thermal barrier coatings are deposited by MO-CVD on Pt/Al CVD bond coats rendering adherent and thick coatings around the surface of turbine blades. This process under development does not require complex manipulation of the component to be coated. (orig.)

  19. Effect of Hf Additions to Pt Aluminide Bond Coats on EB-PVD TBC Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James; Nagaraj, Ben; Williams, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    Small Hf additions were incorporated into a Pt aluminide coating during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on single crystal RENE N5 substrates. Standard yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats were subsequently deposited onto the coated substrates by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The coated substrates underwent accelerated thermal cycle testing in a furnace at a temperature in excess of 1121 C (2050 F) (45 minute hot exposure, 15 minute cool to approximately 121 C (250 F)) until the thermal barrier coating (TBC) failed by spallation. Incorporating Hf in the bond coat increased the TBC life by slightly more than three times that of a baseline coating without added Hf. Scanning electron microscopy of the spalled surfaces indicated that the presence of the Hf increased the adherence of the thermally grown alumina to the Pt aluminide bond coat. The presence of oxide pegs growing into the coating from the thermally grown alumina may also partially account for the improved TBC life by creating a near-surface layer with a graded coefficient of thermal expansion.

  20. Effect of grit blasting on the thermal cycling behavior of diffusion aluminide/YSZ TBCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxuciac@163.com; Huang, Guanghong; He, Limin; Mu, Rende; Wang, Kai; Dai, Jianwei

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • TBCs including of CVD NiAl bond coat and EB-PVD YSZ ceramic coating with and without grit blasting process. • Grain boundary ridges are the sites for spallation damage initiation in aluminide/YSZ TBCs. • Ridges are removed, and no cavity formation and this damage initiation mode are suppressed. • Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to TGO interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. -- Abstract: Thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited NiAl bond coat and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}–stabilized-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) ceramic coating with and without grit blasting process were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, cyclic oxidation behaviors of these coatings were studied in detail. Grain boundary ridges form on the surface of aluminide bond coat prior to the deposition of the ceramic coating by EB-PVD, which are shown to be the sites for spallation damage initiation in aluminide/YSZ TBCs. When these ridges are removed, there is no cavity formation and this damage initiation mode is suppressed. Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to TGO interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. A buckle failure once started may be arrested when it runs into a region of high bond coat to TGO interface toughness. Thus, complete failure requires further loss in toughness of the bond coat to TGO interface with additional cycling. From the result of thermal cycling, an averaged four folds lifetime improvement can be achieved with samples after grit blasting of bond coat surface as compared with those samples existence in ridges on the bond coats’ surface.

  1. High-velocity-oxidation performance of metal-chromium-aluminum (MCrAl), cermet, and modified aluminide coatings on IN-100 and type VIA alloys at 1093 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Cermet, MCrAl, and modified aluminide types of coatings applied to IN-100 and NASA-TRW-VIA alloy specimens were cyclically oxidation tested in a high velocity (Mach 1) gas flame at 1093 C. Several coating compositions of each type were evaluated for oxidation resistance. The modified aluminide coating, Pt-Al, applied to alloy 6A proved to be the best, providing oxidation protection to approximately 750 hours based on weight change measurements. The second best, a CoCrAlY coating applied to 6A, provided protection to 450 hours. The third best was a cermet + aluminide coating on 6A with a protection time to 385 hours.

  2. Interdiffusion behaviors of iron aluminide coatings on China low activation martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. X.; Yang, H. G.; Yuan, X. M.; Zhao, W. W.; Zhan, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The iron aluminide coating on China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was prepared by pack cementation and subsequent heat treatment. A surface Fe2Al5 layer was formed on CLAM substrate by pack cementation process with Fe2Al5 donor powder and NH4Cl activator. Diffusion heat treatment was performed in order to allow the phase transformation from Fe2Al5 to a phase with lower aluminum content. Morphology and composition of the coatings were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). There is a need to study the interdiffusion behaviors in these Al containing systems, as a basis for controlling the formation and subsequent degradation of the coating. In this paper, a predictive model was developed to describe the phase transformation of Fe2Al5 as a function of processing parameters. The Wagner's equation was used to calculate the interdiffusion coefficients based on the analysis of the Al concentration profiles. The results showed that the interdiffusion coefficients in the FeAl and α-Fe(Al) phase strongly depends on Al content and showed a maximum at about 28 at.% Al.

  3. Interdiffusion behaviors of iron aluminide coatings on China low activation martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.X.; Yang, H.G.; Yuan, X.M.; Zhao, W.W.; Zhan, Q.

    2014-01-01

    The iron aluminide coating on China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was prepared by pack cementation and subsequent heat treatment. A surface Fe 2 Al 5 layer was formed on CLAM substrate by pack cementation process with Fe 2 Al 5 donor powder and NH 4 Cl activator. Diffusion heat treatment was performed in order to allow the phase transformation from Fe 2 Al 5 to a phase with lower aluminum content. Morphology and composition of the coatings were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). There is a need to study the interdiffusion behaviors in these Al containing systems, as a basis for controlling the formation and subsequent degradation of the coating. In this paper, a predictive model was developed to describe the phase transformation of Fe 2 Al 5 as a function of processing parameters. The Wagner’s equation was used to calculate the interdiffusion coefficients based on the analysis of the Al concentration profiles. The results showed that the interdiffusion coefficients in the FeAl and α-Fe(Al) phase strongly depends on Al content and showed a maximum at about 28 at.% Al

  4. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  5. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  6. Microstructure and hot corrosion behaviors of two Co modified aluminide coatings on a Ni-based superalloy at 700 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Q.X.; Jiang, S.M.; Yu, H.J.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructures of two Co modified NiAl coatings have been studied. • The addition of Co improves the corrosion resistance in sulfate salts at 700 °C. • For the sulfide and its eutectic of Co are more stable than those of Ni. • In chloride salts coating with medium Co content has best corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Two Co modified aluminide coatings with different Co contents were prepared by pack cementation process and above-the-pack process. The hot corrosion tests of the two coatings were performed in mixed salts of 75 wt.% Na 2 SO 4 + 25 wt.% K 2 SO 4 and 75 wt.% Na 2 SO 4 + 25 wt.% NaCl at 700 °C, with a simple aluminide coating as the reference coating. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) were used to characterize the coatings and the corrosion scales. Results indicate that the addition of Co improves the hot corrosion resistance of the simple aluminide coating in the mixed sulfate salts, for the sulfide as well as its eutectic of cobalt are more stable, and possess higher melting points than those of nickel. While in the mixed salt containing chloride, the coating with medium Co content possesses the best corrosion resistance, primarily because the nitrides formed in the deposition process deteriorate the corrosion resistance of the coating with highest Co content

  7. Microstructure and hot corrosion behaviors of two Co modified aluminide coatings on a Ni-based superalloy at 700 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Q.X., E-mail: qxfan@imr.ac.cn; Jiang, S.M., E-mail: smjiang@imr.ac.cn; Yu, H.J.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Microstructures of two Co modified NiAl coatings have been studied. • The addition of Co improves the corrosion resistance in sulfate salts at 700 °C. • For the sulfide and its eutectic of Co are more stable than those of Ni. • In chloride salts coating with medium Co content has best corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Two Co modified aluminide coatings with different Co contents were prepared by pack cementation process and above-the-pack process. The hot corrosion tests of the two coatings were performed in mixed salts of 75 wt.% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 25 wt.% K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 75 wt.% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 25 wt.% NaCl at 700 °C, with a simple aluminide coating as the reference coating. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) were used to characterize the coatings and the corrosion scales. Results indicate that the addition of Co improves the hot corrosion resistance of the simple aluminide coating in the mixed sulfate salts, for the sulfide as well as its eutectic of cobalt are more stable, and possess higher melting points than those of nickel. While in the mixed salt containing chloride, the coating with medium Co content possesses the best corrosion resistance, primarily because the nitrides formed in the deposition process deteriorate the corrosion resistance of the coating with highest Co content.

  8. The Effects of Oxidation-Induced Failures on Thermal Barrier Coatings with Platinum Aluminide and NiCoCrAlY Bond Coats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yanar, N

    2001-01-01

    ...) deposited via electron beam vapor deposition (EBPVD). This TBC was deposited on both platinum aluminide and NiCoCrA1Y bond coats which in turn were deposited on superalloy substrates of Rare N5...

  9. Oxidation behavior of Hf-modified platinum aluminide coatings during thermal cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Ye

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Platinum aluminide coatings with different Hf contents were fabricated by using HfCl4. The oxidation kinetics and the rumpling behavior of oxide scale were investigated. After thermal cycling, the coating with 0.46 wt% Hf showed least weight gain. With the increase of Hf content, rumpling extent of the scale decreased. Meanwhile, HfO2 preferentially formed in the scale resulting in the increase of scale thickness. The oxidation of excessive Hf even caused the spallation of the scale. The results in the present study indicate that although Hf plays an important role in decreasing rumpling extent of TGO, the oxidation of Hf decreases the adhesion of the scale. Keywords: Pt-Al coating, Hf, Oxidation, Rumpling

  10. Development of aluminide coatings on vanadium-base alloys in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, D.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were produced on vanadium and vanadium-base alloys by exposure of the materials to liquid lithium that contained 3/5 at.% dissolved aluminum in sealed V and V-20 wt.% Ti capsules at temperatures between 775 and 880 degrees C. After each test, the capsules were opened and the samples were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and analyzed by electron-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction. Hardness of the coating layers and bulk alloys was determined by microidentation techniques. The nature of the coatings, i.e., surface coverage, thickness, and composition, varied with exposure time and temperature, solute concentration in lithium, and alloy composition. Solute elements that yielded adherent coatings on various substrates can provide a means of developing in-situ electrical insulator coatings by reaction of the reactive layers with dissolved nitrogen in liquid lithium

  11. Rhodium and Hafnium Influence on the Microstructure, Phase Composition, and Oxidation Resistance of Aluminide Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Małgorzata Wierzbińska; Jan Sieniawski

    2017-01-01

    A 0.5 μm thick layer of rhodium was deposited on the CMSX 4 superalloy by the electroplating method. The rhodium-coated superalloy was hafnized and aluminized or only aluminized using the Chemical vapour deposition method. A comparison was made of the microstructure, phase composition, and oxidation resistance of three aluminide coatings: nonmodified (a), rhodium-modified (b), and rhodium- and hafnium-modified (c). All three coatings consisted of two layers: the additive layer and the interdi...

  12. Microstructure and oxidation performance of a γ–γ′ Pt-aluminide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microstructure and oxidation performance of a –' Pt-aluminide bond coat on directionally solidified superalloy CM-247LC ... Keywords. Platinum aluminide bond coat; coating; cyclic oxidation; superalloy; microstructure. ... Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058, India ...

  13. THE USE OF COATINGS FOR HOT CORROSION AND EROSION PROTECTION IN TURBINE HOT SECTION COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayrettin AHLATCI

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available High pressure turbine components are subjected to a wide variety of thermal and mechanical loading during service. In addition, the components are exposed to a highly oxidizing atmosphere which may contain contaminants such as sulphates, chlorides and sulphuorous gases along with erosive media. So the variety of surface coatings and deposition processes available for the protection of blade and vane components in gas turbines are summarised in this study. Coating types range from simple diffusion aluminides to modified aluminides and a CoCrAlY overlayer. The recommendations for corrosion-resistant coatings (for low temperature and high temperature hot corrosion environments are as follows: silicon aluminide and platinumchromium aluminide for different gas turbine section superalloys substrates. Platinum metal additions are used to improve the properties of coatings on turbine components. Inorganic coatings based on ceramic films which contain aluminium or aluminium and silicon are very effective in engines and gas turbines. Diffusion, overlayer and thermal barrier coatings which are deposited on superalloys gas turbine components by pack cementation, plasma spraying processes and a number of chemical vapour deposition, physical vapour deposition processes (such as electron beam, sputtering, ion plating are described. The principles underlying the development of protective coatings serve as a useful guide in the choice of coatings for other high temperature applications.

  14. The adherence of aluminide coatings on MANET II stainless steel and their effect on its mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample, T.; Fenici, P.; Kolbe, H.; Orecchia, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the production and testing of two different aluminide coatings on the surface of MANET II stainless steel. The coatings were produced by heat treatment of a pure aluminium layer (∼ 100 μm) which had been deposited by vacuum plasma spray. Series 1 coatings were produced by a single heat treatment (1023 K/2h) while series 2 coatings were produced by two consecutive heat treatments (1348 K/30 min, 1023 K/2h). Series 1 coatings were ∼ 120 μm thick, richer in aluminium and harder than series 2 coatings which formed two layers of ∼ 120 μm each. Due to their softer character, series 2 coatings exhibited a greater resistance to cracking under cyclic testing than series 1 coatings. Tensile tests of coated specimens indicated that the coating procedures did not degrade the mechanical properties of the bulk MANET II. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. A study on the growth kinetics of CeO2-modified aluminide coating and its computer fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jiuba; Yang Liusong; Zhu Limin; Zhang Jinmin; Li QuanAn

    2009-01-01

    A CeO 2 -modified aluminide coating was obtained by composite electro-deposition Ni and CeO 2 particles on 20 steel with different holding time using pack cementation. The growth kinetics curve was given with computer fitting by measuring the thickness of the layer. Scanning electronic microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry were used to analyze the microstructure and components of the layer. The results showed that the content of CeO 2 was up to 5.21 wt.% in the rich area of NiAl coatings, which restrain the interdiffusion between the coating and the base during the oxidation process at high temperature. Meanwhile, the growth curve obtained could offer an important basis to forecasting and controlling the depth of the coating

  16. Alloying of aluminum and its influence on the properties of aluminide coatings: oxidation behavior and the chemical stability in Pb-17Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasbrenner, H.; Peric, Z.; Borgstedt, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical insulation of the structural material is necessary to reduce the MHD pressure drop in a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. This coating has to be compatible with liquid Pb-17Li up to 450 C. Specimens with different types of coatings were exposed to static Pb-17Li for 1200 h at 450 C in order to study their compatibility. Iron and a ferritic steel were coated with an aluminide layer by means of an aluminizing process. Iron metal plate was hot dip aluminized at Thyssen, Germany. The preheated sheet was coated for this purpose by exposing for a few seconds to a melt of Al with 10 wt% Si. The ferritic steel, MANET, was immersed into a melt of the same composition. In this case, cold specimens were dipped into the melt at 700 C for up to 10 min. The formation of the required oxide scale on top of the aluminide layer was performed by using two different methods: high temperature oxidation in air and anodic oxidation at room temperature. All the exposed specimens were examined before and after the corrosion experiments. The analytical method used is EDX measurements on the cut of the specimens and metallographical examinations. (orig.)

  17. Coatings for fast breeder reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    Several types of metallurgical coatings are used in the unique environments of the fast breeder reactor. Most of the coatings have been developed for tribological applications, but some also serve as corrosion barriers, diffusion barriers, or radionuclide traps. The materials that have consistently given the best performance as tribological coatings in the breeder reactor environments have been coatings based on chromium carbide, nickel aluminide, or Tribaloy 700 (a nickel-base hard-facing alloy). Other coatings that have been qualified for limited applications include chromium plating for low temperature galling protection and nickel plating for radionuclide trapping

  18. Protective coatings on structural materials for energy conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.T.; De, P.K.; Srinivasa, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Structural Materials and Components used in coal fired energy conversion systems, crude oil refineries and coal gasification plants are subjected to degradation due to oxidation, sulfidation, carbonization and halogenation. Suitable protective coatings can significantly enhance their life. Protective coatings work by forming a highly stable, self-healing and slow growing protective scale at the operating temperatures. These scales act as barriers between the corrosive environment and the alloy and prevent degradation of the substitute. Three types of scales that provide such protection are based on Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 and SiO 2 . Aluminide coatings are major alumina forming protecting coatings, applied on nickel, cobalt and iron base alloys. Aluminide coatings are prepared by enriching the surface of a component by aluminum. In this paper the formation of aluminide coatings of nickel, IN738, Alloy 800, Zircaloy-2 and pure iron by chemical vapor deposition has been described. In this technique, Aluminum chloride vapors from bath kept at 353-373 K are carried in a stream of hydrogen gas into a Hot Walled CVD chamber kept at 1173-1373 K. The AlCl 3 vapors were allowed to react with pure aluminum whereby aluminum sub-chlorides like AlCl and AlCl 2 are produced which deposit aluminum on the substrates. At the high temperature of the deposition, aluminum diffuses into the substrate and forms the aluminide coating. The process can be represented by the reaction Al (i) + AlCl 3(g) AlCl 2(s) + AlCl 2 (g) . XRD and optical microscopic studies have characterized the coatings. On pure nickel and Alloy 800 the coating consists of Ni 2 Al 3 and NiAl respectively. On pure iron the coatings consisted of FeAl. On Zircaloy-2, ZrAl 2 was also detected. The CVD coating process, XRD and optical microscopy data will be discussed further

  19. Novel Nanocrystalline Intermetallic Coatings for Metal Alloys in Coal-fired Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang; H. Y. Sohn

    2009-08-31

    Intermetallic coatings (iron aluminide and nickel aluminide) were prepared by a novel reaction process. In the process, the aluminide coating is formed by an in-situ reaction between the aluminum powder fed through a plasma transferred arc (PTA) torch and the metal substrate (steel or Ni-base alloy). Subjected to the high temperature within an argon plasma zone, aluminum powder and the surface of the substrate melt and react to form the aluminide coatings. The prepared coatings were found to be aluminide phases that are porosity-free and metallurgically bonded to the substrate. The coatings also exhibit excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance under the conditions which simulate the steam-side and fire-side environments in coal-fired boilers. It is expected that the principle demonstrated in this process can be applied to the preparation of other intermetallic and alloy coatings.

  20. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voděrová

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  1. PROTECTIVE LAYERS OF IRON AND NICKEL ALUMINIDES ON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Voderova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermediary phases Ni-Al and Fe-Al are promising materials due to their superior properties such as hardness and good resistance against oxidation at high temperatures. Moreover, Fe-Al phases are resistant in sulphur - containing atmospheres. Because of these characteristics, the above mentioned intermetallic phases seem to be prospective for the use in many technical applications such as energetics, chemical or automotive industry in a form of a bulk material or coatings. Presently, the protective aluminide layer is usually prepared by thermal spraying. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for complex-shaped components. Therefore, the aim of this work was to find an alternative way to prepare layers consisting of nickel or iron aluminides by other technique than thermal spraying. At first, carbon steel samples were coated using galvanic or electroless nickel plating. Coated samples were subsequently submerged into molten aluminium at various temperatures and process durations. The influence of the temperature and duration on the intermetallic phase growth was studied by scanning electron and light microscopy. Thickness and microhardness of the intermetallic layer was also measured.

  2. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of Titanium Aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, R; Sieber, M; Lampke, T; Grund, T; Wielage, B

    2016-01-01

    Due to their outstanding specific mechanical and high-temperature properties, titanium aluminides exhibit a high potential for lightweight components exposed to high temperatures. However, their application is limited through their low wear resistance and the increasing high-temperature oxidation starting from about 750 °C. By the use of oxide ceramic coatings, these constraints can be set aside and the possible applications of titanium aluminides can be extended. The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) represents a process for the generation of oxide ceramic conversion coatings with high thickness. The current work aims at the clarification of different electrolyte components’ influences on the oxide layer evolution on alloy TNM-B1 (Ti43.5Al4Nb1Mo0.1B) and the creation of compact and wear resistant coatings. Model experiments were applied using a ramp-wise increase of the anodic potential in order to show the influence of electrolyte components on the discharge initiation and the early stage of the oxide layer growth. The production of PEO layers with technically relevant thicknesses close to 100 μm was conducted in alkaline electrolytes with varying amounts of Na 2 SiO 3 ·5H 2 O and K 4 P 2 O 7 under symmetrically pulsed current conditions. Coating properties were evaluated with regard to morphology, chemical composition, hardness and wear resistance. The addition of phosphates and silicates leads to an increasing substrate passivation and the growth of compact oxide layers with higher thicknesses. Optimal electrolyte compositions for maximum coating hardness and thickness were identified by statistical analysis. Under these conditions, a homogeneous inner layer with low porosity can be achieved. The frictional wear behavior of the compact coating layer is superior to a hard anodized layer on aluminum. (paper)

  3. Simulation and experimental approach to CVD-FBR aluminide coatings on ferritic steels under steam oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, J.; Alcala, G.; Bolivar, F.J.; Sanchez, L.; Hierro, M.P.; Perez, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    The ferritic steels used to produce structural components for steam turbines are susceptible to strong corrosion and creep damage due to the extreme working conditions pushed to increase the process efficiency and to reduce pollutants release. The response of aluminide coatings on the P-92 ferritic steel, deposited by CVD-FBR, during oxidation in a simulated steam environment was studied. The analyses were performed at 650 deg. C in order to simulate the working conditions of a steam turbine, and 800 deg. C in order to produce a critical accelerated oxidation test. The Thermo-Calc software was used to predict the different solid phases that could be generated during the oxidation process, in both, coated and uncoated samples. In order to validate the thermodynamic results, the oxides scales produced during steam tests were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, SEM and EDS. The preliminary results obtained are discussed in the present work

  4. Mechanical matching and microstructural evolution at the coating/substrate interfaces of cold-sprayed Ni, Al coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.; Lee, S.; Shin, H.; Ko, K.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of mechanical hard/soft matching of raw powder and substrate in the cold gas dynamic spraying process (CDSP) on the formation of intermetallic compounds was examined. Instead of pre-alloyed materials, pure Al and Ni were selected as a soft and a hard material, respectively, and post-annealing was used for compound formation. Most of the aluminide layers were observed in the coated layer, but not in the substrate, along with the entire original interface for both Al coating on a Ni substrate and vice versa. Thickening of the compound layer depended mainly on the creation of defects during spraying and intrinsic diffusivity of atoms moving toward the coating side. When Ni was coated, the compound layer was made thicker by fast diffusion of Al, while the thickness was limited in soft Al coating on hard Ni substrate. However, the composition of the compound can be affected by relative transfer of diffusing atoms toward both the coating and the substrate. So, for Ni coating on an Al substrate, most of the intermetallic compound formed was Ni-rich and conversion of the Al-rich compound was observed after post-annealing above 500 deg. C.

  5. Wear and corrosion performance of metallurgical coatings in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.; Farwick, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    The friction, wear, and corrosion performance of several metallurgical coatings in 200 to 650 0 C sodium are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on those coatings which have successfully passed the qualification tests necessary for acceptance in breeder reactor environments. Tests include friction, wear, corrosion, thermal cycling, self-welding, and irradiation exposure under as-prototypic-as-possible service conditions. Materials tested were coatings of various refractory metal carbides in metallic binders, nickel-base and cobalt-base alloys and intermetallic compounds such as the aluminides and borides. Coating processes evaluated included plasma spray, detonation gun, sputtering, spark-deposition, and solid-state diffusion

  6. Aluminide slurry coatings for protection of ferritic steel in molten nitrate corrosion for concentrated solar power technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigié, Pauline; Bizien, Nicolas; Baráibar, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Sergio; Pastor, Ana; Hernández, Marta; Agüero, Alina

    2017-06-01

    Molten nitrates can be employed as heat storage fluids in solar concentration power plants. However molten nitrates are corrosive and if operating temperatures are raised to increase efficiencies, the corrosion rates will also increase. High temperature corrosion resistant coatings based on Al have demonstrated excellent results in other sectors such as gas turbines. Aluminide slurry coated and uncoated P92 steel specimens were exposed to the so called Solar Salt (industrial grade), a binary eutectic mixture of 60 % NaNO3 - 40 % KNO3, in air for 2000 hours at 550°C and 580°C in order to analyze their behavior as candidates to be used in future solar concentration power plants employing molten nitrates as heat transfer fluids. Coated ferritic steels constitute a lower cost technology than Ni based alloy. Two different coating morphologies resulting from two heat treatment performed at 700 and 1050°C after slurry application were tested. The coated systems exhibited excellent corrosion resistance at both temperatures, whereas uncoated P92 showed significant mass loss from the beginning of the test. The coatings showed very slow reaction with the molten Solar Salt. In contrast, uncoated P92 developed a stratified, unprotected Fe, Cr oxide with low adherence which shows oscillating Cr content as a function of coating depth. NaFeO2 was also found at the oxide surface as well as within the Fe, Cr oxide.

  7. Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings for boiler tube protection in coal-fired low NOx boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings are currently being considered for enhanced sulfidation resistance in coal-fired low NO{sub x} boilers. The use of these materials is currently limited due to hydrogen cracking susceptibility, which generally increases with an increase in aluminum concentration of the deposit. The overall objective of this program is to attain an optimum aluminum content with good weldability and improved sulfidation resistance with respect to conventional materials presently in use. Research has been initiated using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) in order to achieve this end. Under different sets of GTAW parameters (wire feed speed, current), both single and multiple pass overlays were produced. Characterization of all weldments was conducted using light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Resultant deposits exhibited a wide range of aluminum contents (5--43 wt%). It was found that the GTAW overlays with aluminum contents above {approximately}10 wt% resulted in cracked coatings. Preliminary corrosion experiments of 5 to 10 wt% Al cast alloys in relatively simple H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S gas mixtures exhibited corrosion rates lower than 304 stainless steel.

  8. Effect of microstructures on the hydrogen attack to gamma titanium aluminide at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamzah, E. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Technologi Malaysia 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)]. E-mail: esah@fkm.utm.my; Suardi, K. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Technologi Malaysia 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Ourdjini, A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Technologi Malaysia 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2005-04-25

    Intermetallic alloys based on gamma titanium aluminide are now regarded as promising candidates for high temperature applications such as for aerospace, marine and automotive engine components, due to their high specific strength and modulus. Their oxidation resistance is good, especially at intermediate and high temperature; oxidation resistance can be obtained up to 800 deg. C. One critical area of application is in combustion engines in aerospace vehicles such as hypersonic airplanes and high-speed civil transport airplanes. This entails the use of hydrogen as a fuel component and it has been widely reported by researchers that these materials exhibit corrosion in the form of environment embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen. A fair amount of research has been carried out to investigate the influence of hydrogen in {gamma}-titanium aluminide. Some researchers reported that {alpha}{sub 2} and lamellar phases had major influence in the susceptible of hydrogen to alloys, while hydrogen is too low to penetrate the {gamma}-phases. This research focused on the effect of different microstructures of {gamma}-titanium aluminide to the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (D) and the corrosion product after hydrogen attack. Modification of {gamma}-titanium aluminide can be achieved by heat treatment of as-cast binary samples Ti-45% Al and Ti-48% Al. All samples were then subjected to corrosion attack under cathodically charged with galvanostatic mode for 6 h. The potential variation with time was monitored from these data the values of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (D) to {gamma}-titanium aluminide was obtained. D was calculated based on Fick's second Law. These results were compared with that obtained from micro-Vickers hardness profiling, which was measured at cross-section area per depth from the top corroded surface. The hardness values were calculated using the error function equation. An image analyzer; X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron

  9. Effect of microstructures on the hydrogen attack to gamma titanium aluminide at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamzah, E.; Suardi, K.; Ourdjini, A.

    2005-01-01

    Intermetallic alloys based on gamma titanium aluminide are now regarded as promising candidates for high temperature applications such as for aerospace, marine and automotive engine components, due to their high specific strength and modulus. Their oxidation resistance is good, especially at intermediate and high temperature; oxidation resistance can be obtained up to 800 deg. C. One critical area of application is in combustion engines in aerospace vehicles such as hypersonic airplanes and high-speed civil transport airplanes. This entails the use of hydrogen as a fuel component and it has been widely reported by researchers that these materials exhibit corrosion in the form of environment embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen. A fair amount of research has been carried out to investigate the influence of hydrogen in γ-titanium aluminide. Some researchers reported that α 2 and lamellar phases had major influence in the susceptible of hydrogen to alloys, while hydrogen is too low to penetrate the γ-phases. This research focused on the effect of different microstructures of γ-titanium aluminide to the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (D) and the corrosion product after hydrogen attack. Modification of γ-titanium aluminide can be achieved by heat treatment of as-cast binary samples Ti-45% Al and Ti-48% Al. All samples were then subjected to corrosion attack under cathodically charged with galvanostatic mode for 6 h. The potential variation with time was monitored from these data the values of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (D) to γ-titanium aluminide was obtained. D was calculated based on Fick's second Law. These results were compared with that obtained from micro-Vickers hardness profiling, which was measured at cross-section area per depth from the top corroded surface. The hardness values were calculated using the error function equation. An image analyzer; X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron microscope (SEM) and secondary ion mass

  10. Synthesis of Complex-Alloyed Nickel Aluminides from Oxide Compounds by Aluminothermic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Gostishchev

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the investigation of complex-alloyed nickel aluminides obtained from oxide compounds by aluminothermic reduction. The aim of the work was to study and develop the physicochemical basis for obtaining complex-alloyed nickel aluminides and their application for enhancing the properties of coatings made by electrospark deposition (ESD on steel castings, as well as their use as grain refiners for tin bronze. The peculiarities of microstructure formation of master alloys based on the Al–TM (transition metal system were studied using optical, electronic scanning microscopy and X-ray spectral microanalysis. There were regularities found in the formation of structural components of aluminum alloys (Ni–Al, Ni-Al-Cr, Ni-Al-Mo, Ni-Al-W, Ni-Al-Ti, Ni-Cr-Mo-W, Ni-Al-Cr-Mo-W-Ti, Ni-Al-Cr-V, Ni-Al-Cr-V-Mo and changes in their microhardness, depending on the composition of the charge, which consisted of oxide compounds, and on the amount of reducing agent (aluminum powder. It is shown that all the alloys obtained are formed on the basis of the β phase (solid solution of alloying elements in nickel aluminide and quasi-eutectic, consisting of the β′ phase and intermetallics of the alloying elements. The most effective alloys, in terms of increasing microhardness, were Al-Ni-Cr-Mo-W (7007 MPa and Al-Ni-Cr-V-Mo (7914 MPa. The perspective is shown for applying the synthesized intermetallic master alloys as anode materials for producing coatings by electrospark deposition on steel of C1030 grade. The obtained coatings increase the heat resistance of steel samples by 7.5 times, while the coating from NiAl-Cr-Mo-W alloy remains practically nonoxidized under the selected test conditions. The use of NiAl intermetallics as a modifying additive (0.15 wt. % in tin bronze allows increasing the microhardness of the α-solid solution by 1.9 times and the microhardness of the eutectic (α + β phase by 2.7 times.

  11. Iron aluminide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Iron aluminides with the B2 structure are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant. They are thermodynamically compatible with a wide range of ceramics such as TiC, WC, TiB 2 , and ZrB 2 . In addition, liquid iron aluminides wet these ceramics very well. Therefore, FeAl/ceramic composites may be produced by techniques such as liquid phase sintering of powder mixtures, or pressureless melt infiltration of ceramic powders with liquid FeAl. These techniques, the resulting microstructures, and their advantages as well as limitations are described. Iron aluminide composites can be very strong. Room temperature flexure strengths as high as 1.8 GPa have been observed for FeAl/WC. Substantial gains in strength of elevated temperatures (1,073 K) have also been demonstrated. Above 40 vol.% WC the room temperature flexure strength becomes flaw-limited. This is thought to be due to processing flaws and limited interfacial strength. The fracture toughness of FeAl/WC is unexpectedly high and follows a rule of mixtures. Interestingly, sufficiently thin (<1 microm) FeAl ligaments between adjacent WC particles fracture not by cleavage, but in a ductile manner. For these thin ligaments the dislocation pile-ups formed during deformation are not long enough to nucleate cleavage fracture, and their fracture mode is therefore ductile. For several reasons, this brittle-to-ductile size transition does not improve the fracture toughness of the composites significantly. However, since no cleavage cracks are nucleated in sufficiently thin FeAl ligaments, slow crack growth due to ambient water vapor does not occur. Therefore, as compared to monolithic iron aluminides, environmental embrittlement is dramatically reduced in iron aluminide composites

  12. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to shield the blades of gas turbines from heat and wear. There is a pressing need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of TBCs in the thermal design of advanced gas turbines with high energy efficiency. These TBCs consist of a ceramic-based top coat and a bond coat on a superalloy substrate. Usually, the focus is on the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of the TBC because heat tends to diffuse from the surface of the top coat to the substrate. However, the in-plane thermal conductivity is also important in the thermal design of gas turbines because the temperature distribution within the turbine cannot be ignored. Accordingly, a method is developed in this study for measuring the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the top coat. Yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats are prepared by thermal spraying under different conditions. The in-plane and cross-plane thermal diffusivities of the top coats are measured by the flash method to investigate the anisotropy of thermal conduction in a TBC. It is found that the in-plane thermal diffusivity is higher than the cross-plane one for each top coat and that the top coats have significantly anisotropic thermal diffusivity. The cross-sectional and in-plane microstructures of the top coats are observed, from which their porosities are evaluated. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy are discussed in detail in relation to microstructure and porosity.

  13. Preparation and enhanced oxidation performance of a Hf-doped single-phase Pt-modified aluminide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.F.; Jiang, C.Y.; Yao, H.R.; Bao, Z.B.; Zhu, S.L.; Wang, F.H.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Tiny Hf particles were successfully incorporated into Pt plating via simple electro-plating method. The hafnium particles were either nipped at Pt grain boundaries or wrapped inside Pt grains, and most of them were below 3 μm in size, showing a uniform distribution within the Pt plating. - Highlights: • A Hf-rich belt formed between outer (Ni,Pt)Al and IDZ after aluminisation. • Hf-doped coating showed much decreased mass gain and oxidation rate constant k_p. • Hf-rich belt acted as diffusion barrier by restraining diffusions of Al and W. • Degradation of β was effectively postponed by the unique Hf addition. • Hf-doped coating exhibited lighter oxide scale rumpling tendency. - Abstract: A Hf-doped β-(Ni,Pt)Al coating was prepared by co-deposition of a Pt-Hf composite plating and successive aluminisation. Then, a distinct Hf-rich belt was formed internally between the outer additive (Ni,Pt)Al coating and interdiffusion zone. An isothermal oxidation test at 1100 °C revealed a relatively lower oxidation rate constant and decreased oxide scale rumpling tendency for the Hf-doped coating during which the Hf-rich belt partly acted as an effective diffusion barrier. The unique addition of Hf into a β-(Ni,Pt)Al coating can delay the transitional oxidation period from transient alumina to stable one and postpone the degradation from β to γ'.

  14. Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, Peter M.; Lindemuth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    The principal objective of this Phase 2 SBIR program was to develop and demonstrate a practically insoluble coating for nickel-based superalloys for Stirling engine heat pipe applications. Specific technical objectives of the program were: (1) Determine the solubility corrosion rates for Nickel 200, Inconel 718, and Udimet 72OLI in a simulated Stirling engine heat pipe environment, (2) Develop coating processes and techniques for capillary groove and screen wick structures, (3) Evaluate the durability and solubility corrosion rates for capillary groove and screen wick structures coated with an insoluble coating in cylindrical heat pipes operating under Stirling engine conditions, and (4) Design and fabricate a coated full-scale, partial segment of the current Stirling engine heat pipe for the Stirling Space Power Convertor program. The work effort successfully demonstrated a two-step nickel aluminide coating process for groove wick structures and interior wall surfaces in contact with liquid metals; demonstrated a one-step nickel aluminide coating process for nickel screen wick structures; and developed and demonstrated a two-step aluminum-to-nickel aluminide coating process for nickel screen wick structures. In addition, the full-scale, partial segment was fabricated and the interior surfaces and wick structures were coated. The heat pipe was charged with sodium, processed, and scheduled to be life tested for up to ten years as a Phase 3 effort.

  15. Isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Singh, J.P.; Tuval, E.; Weiss, I.

    1996-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminide has received considerable attention in recent years from the automotive industry as a potential material for making rotating and reciprocating components to produce a quieter and more efficient engine. The objectives of this study were to identify processing routes for the manufacture of automobile valves from gamma titanium aluminide. The issues considered were microstructure and composition of the material, and processing parameters such as deformation rates, temperatures, and total deformation. This paper examines isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide in order to develop a processing window for this type of material

  16. Duplex aluminized coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Grisaffe, S. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The surface of a metallic base system is initially coated with a metallic alloy layer that is ductile and oxidation resistant. An aluminide coating is then applied to the metallic alloy layer. The chemistry of the metallic alloy layer is such that the oxidation resistance of the subsequently aluminized outermost layer is not seriously degraded.

  17. Diffusion cell investigations into the acidic degradation of organic coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Victor Buhl; Wang, Ting; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Protective organic coatings work by preventing contact between an aggressive environment and a vulnerable substrate. However, the long required lifetime of a barrier coating provides a challenge when attempting to evaluate coating performance. Diffusion cells can be used as a tool to estimate...... coating barrier properties and lifetime. In this work, a diffusion cell array was designed, constructed, and compared to previous designs, with simplicity being the most important design parameter. Sulfuric acid diffusion through five different coatings was monitored using a battery of cells...

  18. Preliminary study of HDA coating on CLAM steel followed by high temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: newboy.chen@163.com; Huang, Qunying; Yan, Zilin; Song, Yong; Liu, Shaojun; Jiang, Zhizhong

    2013-11-15

    A hot-dip aluminizing process is expected to produce aluminide coatings on structural materials to resist tritium permeation, corrosion, and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects in the fusion reactor blanket. China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel, which is the candidate structural material for the LiPb blanket system in China, was coated with pure aluminum and with an Al–Si alloy. Factors affecting the thickness and morphology of the aluminide coatings were studied. After the hot-dipping treatment, FeAl{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} were observed at the Al/steel interface. The existence of silicon in the molten aluminum suppressed the growth of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}, built up the thickness of FeAl{sub 3} slightly, and contributed to reducing the thickness of the intermetallic layer. The brittle phase of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} had completely transformed to ductile phases of FeAl{sub 2}, FeAl and α-Fe(Al) after high temperature heat-treatment in air. Kirkendall voids were found in the diffusion layer, due to the rapid interdiffusion of iron and aluminum during oxidation. Cracks and pores were observed on the coating surface and at the interlayer. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction indicates the presence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the oxide layer.

  19. Development of iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKamey, C.G.; Viswanathan, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Sikka, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrating that improved engineering ductility (to 10-15% in Fe 3 Al) can be achieved in wrought Fe 3 Al-based iron aluminide alloys through control of composition and microstructure are discussed. Accompanying this improvement has been an increased understanding of the causes for ambient temperature embrittlement in this system. Because of these advances, iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. The understanding and control of cast structures are important steps in making iron-aluminide alloys viable engineering materials. This includes understanding the various components of cast structure, their evolution, their properties, their behavior during further processing, and, finally, their effect on mechanical properties. The first phase of the study of cast Fe 3 Al-based alloys characterized the various components of the cast structure in the FA-129 alloy, while the current phase of the research involves characterizing the as-cast mechanical properties of Fe 3 Al-based alloys. The investigation of the room temperature mechanical properties of as-cast Fe 3 Al, including tensile tests in air, oxygen, and water vapor environments is described. Studies have begun to refine the grain size of the cast structure. An investigation of the effect of environmental hydrogen embrittlement on the weldability of wrought alloys was also initiated during this period with the aim of understanding the role of environment in the cold-cracking of iron aluminides

  20. Tribological coatings for liquid metal and irradiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    Several metallurgical coatings have been developed that provide good tribological performances in high-temperature liquid sodium and that are relatively unaffected by neutron fluences to 6 X 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). The coatings that have consistently provided the best tribological performance have been the nickel aluminide diffusion coatings created by the pack cementation process, chromium carbide or Tribaloy 700 trade mark (a nickel-base hardfacing alloy) applied by the detonation-gun process, and chromium carbide and other hardfacing alloy) applied by the detonation-gun process, and chromium carbide and other hardfacing materials applied by the electro-spark deposition process. The latter process is a relatively recent development for nuclear applications and is expected to find wide usage. Other coating processes, such as plasma-spray coating, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition, were candidates for use on various components, but the coatings did not pass the required qualification tests or were not economically competitive. The advantages and limitations of the three selected processes are discussed, the tribological performance of the coatings is reviewed, and representative applications and their performance requirements are described

  1. Irradiation effects on low-friction coatings for LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.L.; Johnson, R.N.; Guthrie, G.L.; Aungst, R.C.

    1975-11-01

    A variety of wear-resistant low-friction materials has been irradiated in the EBR-II in order to assess their reponse to LMFBR environments. Pre- and postirradiation testing and examination efforts have concentrated on candidate materials for application to the wear pads on FTR ducts (fuel, control, and reflector assemblies), and a significant result has been qualification of a proprietary detonation-gun-applied chromium carbide coating which employs a Ni Cr binder. Additional materials such as Inconel-718, Haynes-273, aluminides, and various chromium carbide/binder combinations, and other application processes such as plasma-spray, weld-overlays, diffusion bonding and explosive bonding, have also been studied. The most detailed examinations were conducted on selected chromium carbide coatings and included visual inspection, weight and dimensional measurements, metallography, electron microprobe, epoxy-lift-off, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Chromium carbide coatings applied by the detonation-gun process have demonstrated a marked superiority to those applied by plasma-spray techniques

  2. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    Dual phase titanium aluminides composed vastly of gamma phase (TiAl) with moderate amount of alpha2 phase (Ti3Al) have been considered for several high temperature aerospace and automobile applications. High specific strength coupled with good high temperature performance in the areas of creep and oxidation resistance makes titanium aluminides "materials of choice" for next generation propulsion systems. Titanium alumnides are primarily being considered as potential replacements for Ni-based superalloys in gas turbine engine components with aim of developing more efficient and leaner engines exhibiting high thrust-to-weight ratio. Thermo-mechanical treatments have shown to enhance the mechanical performance of titanium aluminides. Additionally, small additions of interstitial elements have shown further and significant improvement in the mechanical performance of titanium alumnide alloys. However, titanium aluminides lack considerably in room temperature ductility and as a result manufacturing processes of these aluminides have greatly suffered. Traditional ingot metallurgy and investment casting based methods to produce titanium aluminide parts in addition to being expensive, have also been unsuccessful in producing titanium aluminides with the desired mechanical properties. Hence, the manufacturing costs associated with these methods have completely outweighed the benefits offered by titanium aluminides. Over the last two decades, several powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques have been studied to produce titanium aluminide parts. These techniques have been successful in producing titanium aluminide parts with a homogeneous and refined microstructure. These powder metallurgy techniques also hold the potential of significant cost reduction depending on the wide market acceptance of titanium aluminides. In the present study, a powder metallurgy based rapid consolidation technique has been used to produce near-net shape parts of titanium aluminides. Micron

  3. Environmental effects in titanium aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental effects on titanium aluminide alloys are potentially of great importance for engineering applications of these materials, although little has been published to date on such effects. The primary emphasis in this paper is on hydrogen effects, with a brief reference to oxygen effects. Hydrogen is readily absorbed at elevated temperature into all the titanium aluminide compositions studied to date, in amounts as large as 10 at.%, and on cooling virtually all this hydrogen is precipitated as a hydride phase or phases. The presence of these precipitated hydride plates affects mechanical properties in ways similar to what is observed in other hydride forming materials, although effects per unit volume of hydride are not particularly severe in the titanium aluminides. Microstructure, and thus thermal and mechanical history, plays a major role in controlling the severity of hydrogen effects

  4. Microstructure of Al-Si Slurry Coatings on Austenitic High-Temperature Creep Resisting Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka E. Kochmańska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of microstructural examinations on slurry aluminide coatings using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction. Aluminide coatings were produced in air atmosphere on austenitic high-temperature creep resisting cast steel. The function of aluminide coatings is the protection of the equipment components against the high-temperature corrosion in a carburising atmosphere under thermal shock conditions. The obtained coatings had a multilayered structure composed of intermetallic compounds. The composition of newly developed slurry was powders of aluminium and silicon; NaCl, KCl, and NaF halide salts; and a water solution of a soluble glass as an inorganic binder. The application of the inorganic binder in the slurry allowed to produce the coatings in one single step without additional annealing at an intermediate temperature as it is when applied organic binder. The coatings were formed on both: the ground surface and on the raw cast surface. The main technological parameters were temperature (732–1068°C and time of annealing (3.3–11.7 h and the Al/Si ratio (4–14 in the slurry. The rotatable design was used to evaluate the effect of the production parameters on the coatings thickness. The correlation between the technological parameters and the coating structure was determined.

  5. Deterioration of reflecting coatings by intermetallic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W R; Mikes, T L; Hass, G

    1972-07-01

    Gold diffraction gratings overcoated with Al + MgF(2) to increase their efficiency in the vacuum ultraviolet suffered a severe loss in efficiency within six months to a year after coating; for example, from 50% to 2% at lambda1216 A. The cause of this loss was assumed to be interdiffusion of Au and Al; therefore, a more complete study of Au-Al film combinations was performed. The coatings were aged at room and elevated temperatures. Reflectance measurements were made in the visible and vacuum ultraviolet spectral regions. For wavelengths longer than lambda900 A, the measurements show very little change until the diffusion boundary reaches the penetration depth of the radiation. If Al is the first surface layer, however, reflectance measurements at lambda584 A permit measuring the progress of the diffusion boundary toward the Al surface because of the low absorptance of Al at this wavelength. Interdiffusion can be effectively eliminated by the use of thin dielectric layers uch as SiO and the natural oxide of Al. Such protected coatings have been exposed for one week at a temperature of 170 degrees C with no visible sign of diffusion, whereas a similar coating without the barrier layer would become useless in less than 1 h. Some preliminary studies have been made with Pt-Al film combinations.

  6. Influence of Pt-aluminide coating on the oxidation and thermo-mechanical fatigue behaviour of the single crystal superalloy CMSX-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jargelius-Pettersson, R F.A.; Andersson, H C.M.; Lille, C; Haenstroem, S; Liu, L [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-10-01

    Oxidation and thermo-mechanical fatigue studies have been performed on a single crystal nickel base superalloy, CMSX-4, with and without an MDC150L Pt-modified diffusional aluminide coating. Oxidation for up to 500 hours at 900, 1050 and 1150 deg C revealed formation of mixed nickel-aluminium oxides, with a pronounced spalling tendency, on the base material, but parabolic growth of aluminium oxide on the coated material. The effect of water vapour and SO{sub 2} on the oxidation rate has also been investigated, and attempts have been made to apply thermodynamic and kinetic modelling to microstructural evolution in the interdiffusion zone between coating and substrate. Thermo-mechanical fatigue testing was performed on both coated and uncoated specimens. The temperature was cycled between 400 and 1050 deg C and mechanical strain ranges between 0.7 and 2.0% were used. Some specimens were cycled from a raised lower temperature estimated to be above the brittle transition temperature of the coat. Both in-phase and out-of-phase test conditions were used. No significant difference in fatigue life was detected between coated specimens cycled in-phase and out-of-phase. An improvement in fatigue life was observed with uncoated specimens tested out-of-phase. Coated specimens cycled above the transition temperature exhibited the longest fatigue life of all tested specimens. In the uncoated specimens the cracks started at the surface of the specimens. Initial cracks in the coated specimens may have started in the bond interface between the coat and the substrate or on the surface of the coat. The damage mechanism in all specimens is characterised by an initial strain hardening followed by crack initiation and crack propagation until final collapse. The load versus number of cycles curve features a maximum followed by a slow load drop and then a fast final load drop. The maxima is associated with crack initiation and the final fast load drop with plastic collapse of the specimen

  7. Application of aluminum diffusion coatings to mitigate the KCl-induced high-temperature corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Lomholt, T. N.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    Pack cementation was used to produce Fe1−xAl and Fe2Al5 diffusion coatings on ferritic-martensitic steel P91 and a Ni2Al3 diffusion coating on pure nickel. The performance of diffusion coatings against high-temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl) was evaluated by exposing...

  8. Hydrogen permeation rate reduction by post-oxidation of aluminide coatings on DIN 1.4914 martensitic steel (MANET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perujo, A.; Sample, T.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous work, it has been shown that lower aluminium content aluminide, having the same permeation rate reduction as the higher aluminium content, exhibited a lower hardness and greater ductility and therefore greater crack resistance than the higher aluminium content. In this work we combine this characteristic with a post-oxidation to obtain a further deuterium permeation reduction. The post-oxidation was performed in air at 1023 K for 15 h and at 1223 K for 10 h and 1 h. The maximum deuterium permeation rate reduction obtained is very moderate (maximum of a factor 500 for 1 h at 1223 K) as compared to that of the non-oxidised aluminide specimen (two orders of magnitude) and is constant in the temperature range studied (573-800 K). This method has the technological appeal of using air rather than the controlled environment used by other authors. (orig.)

  9. Spark plasma sintering of titanium aluminide intermetallics and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoshan, Abdelhakim Ahmed

    Titanium aluminide intermetallics are a distinct class of engineering materials having unique properties over conventional titanium alloys. gamma-TiAl compound possesses competitive physical and mechanical properties at elevated temperature applications compared to Ni-based superalloys. gamma-TiAl composite materials exhibit high melting point, low density, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is one of the powder metallurgy techniques where powder mixture undergoes simultaneous application of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. Unlike other sintering techniques such as hot iso-static pressing and hot pressing, SPS compacts the materials in shorter time (< 10 min) with a lower temperature and leads to highly dense products. Reactive synthesis of titanium aluminide intermetallics is carried out using SPS. Reactive sintering takes place between liquid aluminum and solid titanium. In this work, reactive sintering through SPS was used to fabricate fully densified gamma-TiAl and titanium aluminide composites starting from elemental powders at different sintering temperatures. It was observed that sintering temperature played significant role in the densification of titanium aluminide composites. gamma-TiAl was the predominate phase at different temperatures. The effect of increasing sintering temperature on microhardness, microstructure, yield strength and wear behavior of titanium aluminide was studied. Addition of graphene nanoplatelets to titanium aluminide matrix resulted in change in microhardness. In Ti-Al-graphene composites, a noticeable decrease in coefficient of friction was observed due to the influence of self-lubrication caused by graphene.

  10. Shock response of a gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas

    2008-01-01

    Potential use of γ-TiAl alloys in aerospace and other structural applications require knowledge of their impact behavior for better evaluation and modeling. In the present study plate impact experiments are conducted using a single-stage gas gun to better understand the shock behavior of the recently developed class of gamma titanium aluminide alloys--the Gamma-Met PX. The Gamma-Met PX showed superior shock properties when compared to the conventional titanium aluminide alloys. The spall strength of Gamma-Met PX is 1.8±0.09 GPa, which is four to six times higher than those reported for other gamma titanium aluminide alloys. Moreover, it has a Hugoniot elastic limit of 1.88 GPa at a target thickness of 3.86 mm, which drops to 1.15 GPa at target thickness of 15.8 mm. The decay in the elastic precursor is continuous without showing an asymptote to a constant level within the range of target thicknesses studied

  11. Structural characterisation of oxygen diffusion hardened alpha-tantalum PVD-coatings on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertl, C; Koll, L; Schmitz, T; Werner, E; Gbureck, U

    2014-08-01

    Titanium substrates were coated with tantalum layers of 5 μm thickness using physical vapour deposition (PVD). The tantalum layers showed a (110)-preferred orientation. The coated samples were hardened by oxygen diffusion. Using X-ray diffraction the crystallographic structure of the tantalum coatings was characterised, comparing untreated and diffusion hardened specimen conditions. Oxygen depth profiles were determined by glow discharge spectrometry. The hardening effect of the heat treatment was examined by Vickers microhardness testing. The increase of surface hardness caused by oxygen diffusion was at least 50%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Peculiarities of formation of zirconium aluminides in hydride cycle mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muradyan, G.N.

    2016-01-01

    The zirconium aluminides are promising structural materials in aerospace, mechanical engineering, chemical industry, etc. They are promising for manufacturing of heat-resistant wires, that will improve the reliability and efficiency of electrical networks. In the present work, the results of study of zirconium aluminides formation in the Hydride Cycle (HC) mode, developed in the Laboratory of high-temperature synthesis of the Institute of Chemical Physics of NAS RA, are described. The formation of zirconium aluminides in HC proceeded according to the reaction xZrH_2+(1-x)Al → alloy Zr_xAl(1-x)+H_2↑. The samples were certified using: chemical analysis to determine the content of hydrogen (pyrolysis method); differential thermal analysis (DTA, derivatograph Q-1500, T_heating = 1000°C, rate 20°C/min); X-ray analysis (XRD, diffractometer DRON-0.5). The influences of the ratio of powders ZrH_2/Al in the reaction mixture, compacting pressure, temperature and heating velocity on the characteristics of the synthesized aluminides were determined. In HC, the solid solutions of Al in Zr, single phase ZrAl_2 and ZrAl_3 aluminides and Zr_3AlH_4.49 hydride were synthesized. Formation of aluminides in HC mode took place by the solid-phase mechanism, without melting of aluminum. During processing, the heating of the initial charge up to 540°C resulted in the decomposition of zirconium hydride (ZrH_2) to HCC ZrH_1.5, that interacted with aluminum at 630°C forming FCC alumohydride of zirconium. Further increase of the temperature up to 800°C led to complete decomposition of the formed alumohydride of zirconium. The final formation of the zirconium aluminide occurred at 1000-1100°C in the end of HC process. Conclusion: in the synthesis of zirconium aluminides, the HC mode has several significant advantages over the conventional modes: lower operating temperatures (1000°C instead of 1800°C); shorter duration (1.5-2 hours instead of tens of hours); the availability of

  13. Plasma Spray and Pack Cementation Process Optimization and Oxidation Behaviour of Novel Multilayered Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng

    The hot section components in gas turbines are subjected to a harsh environment with the temperature being increased continuously. The higher temperature has directly resulted in severe oxidation of these components. Monolithic coatings such as MCrAIY and aluminide have been traditionally used to protect the components from oxidation; however, increased operating temperature quickly deteriorates the coatings due to accelerated diffusion of aluminum in the coatings. To improve the oxidation resistance a group of multilayered coatings are developed in this study. The multilayered coatings consist of a Cr-Si co-deposited layer as the diffusion barrier, a plasma sprayed NiCrA1Y coating as the middle layer and an aluminized top layer. The Cr-Si and aluminized layers are fabricated using pack cementation processes and the NiCrA1Y coatings are produced using the Mettech Axial III(TM) System. All of the coating processes are optimized using the methodology of Design of Experiments (DOE) and the results are analyzed using statistical method. The optimal processes are adopted to fabricate the multilayered coatings for oxidation tests. The coatings are exposed in air at 1050°C and 1150°C for 1000 hr. The results indicate that a Cr layer and a silicon-rich barrier layer have formed on the interface between the Cr-Si coating and the NiCrA1Y coating. This barrier layer not only prevents aluminum and chromium from diffusing into the substrate, but also impedes the diffusion of other elements from the substrate into the coating. The results also reveal that, for optimal oxidation resistance at 1050°C, the top layer in a multilayered coating should have at least Al/Ni ratio of one; whereas the multilayered coating with the All Ni ratio of two in the top layer exhibits the best oxidation resistance at 1150°C. The DOE methodology provides an excellent means for process optimization and the selection of oxidation test matrix, and also offers a more thorough understanding of the

  14. Thermal Diffusivity Measurement for Thermal Spray Coating Attached to Substrate Using Laser Flash Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Tanaka, Takashi; Endo, Satoshi; Baba, Tetsuya; Harada, Yoshio; Kojima, Yoshitaka; Kawasaki, Akira; Ono, Fumio

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings are used as heat and wear shields of gas turbine blades. There is a strong need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of coating for thermal design and use. The thermal conductivity of a bulk material is obtained as the product of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and density above room temperature in many cases. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity are unique for a given material because they are sensitive to the structure of the material. Therefore, it is important to measure them in each sample. However it is difficult to measure the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of coatings because coatings are attached to substrates. In order to evaluate the thermal diffusivity of a coating attached to the substrate, we have examined the laser flash method with the multilayer model on the basis of the response function method. We carried out laser flash measurements in layered samples composed of a CoNiCrAlY bond coating and a 8YSZ top coating by thermal spraying on a Ni-based superalloy substrate. It was found that the procedure using laser flash method with the multilayer model is useful for the thermal diffusivity evaluation of a coating attached to a substrate.

  15. Phase Transformation of Hot Dipped Aluminium during High Temperature Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhammad Daud; Hishamuddin Husain; Mohd Saari Ripin; Rusni Rejab; Zaiton Selamat; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2014-01-01

    Low alloy carbon steel was coated by hot-dipping into a molten aluminum bath. Isothermal oxidations were carried out at 750 degree Celsius in static air to study the oxidation behaviour of the hot-dipped aluminide steel. The phase transformation in the aluminide layer during diffusion at 750 degree Celsius in static air was analyzed by SEM-EDX and XRD. After hot-dip treatment, the coating layers consisted of three phases, where Al, thinner layer of FeAl 3 , and thicker layer of Fe 2 Al 5 were detected from external topcoat to the aluminide/ steel substrate. After oxidation, the Fe 2 Al 5 formed during the immersion process completely transformed to Fe 2 Al 5 , FeAl 2 , FeAl and Al-Fe(Al) phases because of the composition gradient and the chemical diffusion by oxidation. After oxidation, there are some voids were found at the coating/ substrate interface due to the rapid inter-diffusion of iron and aluminium during oxidation. The FeAl phase kept growing with increasing exposure time at 750 degree Celsius, while the Fe 2 Al 5 was consumed during oxidation. After 168 hrs oxidation, the Fe 2 Al 5 phase was going disappeared as the aluminum layer was consumed. (author)

  16. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, Kendall J.; Pena, Maria I.

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  17. Boundary conditions for diffusion in the pack-aluminizing of nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L. L.; Menon, N. B.

    1973-01-01

    The surface compositions of nickel specimens coated for various lengths of time in aluminizing packs at 2000 F were studied, in order to obtain information about the kinetics of the pack-cementation process in the formation of aluminide coatings. The results obtained indicate that the surface compositions of the coated nickel specimens are independent of time, at least for time between 0.5 and 20 hrs. Another important observation is that the specimens gained weight during the coating process.

  18. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V2C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V2C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  19. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong, E-mail: yongyang@ufl.edu

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V{sub 2}C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V{sub 2}C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  20. Ion Diffusion-Directed Assembly Approach to Ultrafast Coating of Graphene Oxide Thick Multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Weiwei; Yao, Weiquan; Jiang, Yanqiu; Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2017-10-24

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approach has been widely used to fabricate multilayer coatings on substrates with multiple cycles, whereas it is hard to access thick films efficiently. Here, we developed an ion diffusion-directed assembly (IDDA) strategy to rapidly make multilayer thick coatings in one step on arbitrary substrates. To achieve multifunctional coatings, graphene oxide (GO) and metallic ions were selected as the typical building blocks and diffusion director in IDDA, respectively. With diffusion of metallic ions from substrate to negatively charged GO dispersion spontaneously (i.e., from high-concentration region to low-concentration region), GO was assembled onto the substrate sheet-by-sheet via sol-gel transformation. Because metallic ions with size of subnanometers can diffuse directionally and freely in the aqueous dispersion, GO was coated on the substrate efficiently, giving rise to films with desired thickness up to 10 μm per cycle. The IDDA approach shows three main merits: (1) high efficiency with a μm-scale coating rate; (2) controllability over thickness and evenness; and (3) generality for substrates of plastics, metals and ceramics with any shapes and morphologies. With these merits, IDDA strategy was utilized in the efficient fabrication of functional graphene coatings that exhibit outstanding performance as supercapacitors, electromagnetic interference shielding textiles, and anticorrosion coatings. This IDDA approach can be extended to other building blocks including polymers and colloidal nanoparticles, promising for the scalable production and application of multifunctional coatings.

  1. Improving the Corrosion Resistance of Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys by Diffusion Coating Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Galit Katarivas; Aghion, Eli

    Magnesium alloys suffer from accelerated corrosion in physiological environment and hence their use as a structural material for biodegradable implants is limited. The present study focuses on a diffusion coating treatment that amplifies the beneficial effect of Neodymium on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. The diffusion coating layer was obtained by applying 1 µm Nd coating on EW10X04 magnesium alloy using Electron-gun evaporator and PVD process. The coated alloy was heat treated at 350°C for 3 hours in a protective atmosphere of N2+0.2%SF6. The micro structure characteristics were evaluated by SEM, XRD, and XPS; the corrosion resistance was examined by potentiodynamic polarization and EIS analysis. The corrosion resistance of the diffusion coated alloy was significantly improved compared to the uncoated material. This was related to: (i) formation of Nd2O3 in the outer scale, (ii) integration of Nd in the MgO oxide layer, and (iii) formation of secondary phase Mg41Nd5 along the grain boundaries of α-Mg.

  2. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  3. Silica-sol-based spin-coating barrier layer against phosphorous diffusion for crystalline silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzum, Abdullah; Fukatsu, Ken; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Tanimoto, Kenji; Yoshinaga, Seiya; Jiang, Yunjian; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorus barrier layers at the doping procedure of silicon wafers were fabricated using a spin-coating method with a mixture of silica-sol and tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which can be formed at the rear surface prior to the front phosphorus spin-on-demand (SOD) diffusion and directly annealed simultaneously with the front phosphorus layer. The optimization of coating thickness was obtained by changing the applied spin-coating speed; from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. The CZ-Si p-type silicon solar cells were fabricated with/without using the rear silica-sol layer after taking the sheet resistance measurements, SIMS analysis, and SEM measurements of the silica-sol material evaluations into consideration. For the fabrication of solar cells, a spin-coating phosphorus source was used to form the n(+) emitter and was then diffused at 930°C for 35 min. The out-gas diffusion of phosphorus could be completely prevented by spin-coated silica-sol film placed on the rear side of the wafers coated prior to the diffusion process. A roughly 2% improvement in the conversion efficiency was observed when silica-sol was utilized during the phosphorus diffusion step. These results can suggest that the silica-sol material can be an attractive candidate for low-cost and easily applicable spin-coating barrier for any masking purpose involving phosphorus diffusion.

  4. Microstructural evolution of aluminide coatings on Eurofer during heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanumurthy, K.; Krauss, W.; Konys, J.

    2011-01-01

    Development of ceramic coatings are essential for the realization of Demo fusion reactor beyond ITER. These functional coatings have to be stable at high temperatures, provide insulating coatings to reduce MHD effects and also act as corrosion barriers to reduce tritium permeation. Some of important development of high temperature coatings are CVD process, powder slurry coatings, hot-dip aluminization and plasma detonation jet processes. Recently Galvono-Al (ECA) process is being used for depositing Al from organic electrolyte, where Al is existing as an toluol-based Al(C x H y ) complex. The deposit is performed under Ar cover gas at 100 deg C with a deposit rate of 10-12 μm/hr. This process is suitable for coating large and complex shaped assemblies and is a well established industrial process for coating Al for wide range of applications including automobile industry. In order to study the effect of high temperature on these coatings, few Al coated on Eurofer specimens were obtained from M/s. Rasant-Alcotec, Germany. The thickness of these coating is around 20 μm. The objective of the presents studies is to subject these coatings to standard heat treatment schedule of Eurofer and study the evolution of microchemistry and microstructure

  5. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D. G.; Munoz-Morris, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the materials, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered. (Author)

  6. The corrosion and mechanical behaviour of Al, FeCrAlY, and CoCrAlY coatings in aggressive environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; Geerdink, Bert; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical and chemical behaviours of aluminide coatings applied by pack cementation, FeCrAlY coatings applied by plasma spraying and CoCrAlY coatings applied by electrodeposition were studied. The coatings were pretreated for 0.5 h in argon at 1373 K to improve the adhesion and structural

  7. Formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coatings on a 9Cr-1Mo steel, and corrosion evaluation in flowing Pb-17Li loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Sanjib, E-mail: sanjib@barc.gov.in [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Paul, Bhaskar [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Chakraborty, Poulami [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Kishor, Jugal; Kain, Vivekanand [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Dey, Gautam Kumar [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Materials Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-01

    Iron aluminide coating layers were formed on a ferritic martensitic grade 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) steel using pack aluminizing process. The formation of different aluminide compositions such as orthorhombic-Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}, B2-FeAl and A2-Fe(Al) on the pack chemistry and heat treatment conditions have been established. About 4–6 μm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale was formed on the FeAl phase by controlled heat treatment. The corrosion tests were conducted using both the FeAl and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coated specimens in an electro-magnetic pump driven Pb-17Li Loop at 500 °C for 5000 h maintaining a flow velocity of 1.5 m/s. The detailed characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy, back-scattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry revealed no deterioration of the coating layers after the corrosion tests. Self-healing oxides were formed at the cracks generated in the aluminide layers during thermal cycling and protected the base alloy (steel) from any kind of elemental dissolution or microstructural degradation. - Highlights: •Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coating produced on P91 steel by pack aluminizing and heat treatment. •Corrosion tests of coated steel conducted in flowing Pb-17Li loop at 500 °C for 5000 h. •Coating was protective against molten metal corrosion during prolonged exposure. •Self-healing protective oxides formed in the cracks generated in aluminide layers.

  8. Effects of Silicide Coating on the Interdiffusion between U-7Mo and Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Ki Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to and excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Ti, or Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide, or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-7Mo alloy powders were coated with silicide layers at varying T (T = 900 and 1000 .deg. C) for 30 min, respectively. U-Mo alloy powder was blended with Si powders and subsequently heat-treated to form uranium-silicide coating layers on the surface of U-Mo alloy particles. For an annealing test, silicide-coated U-Mo alloy powders were made into a compact, and Al powders were used as a matrix. From EDS results, transformed uranium aluminide intermetallic compounds were mainly U(Al,Si)3. U(Al,Si)3 phase left the silicide coating layer behind, and formed inside of U-7Mo particles, as shown in Fig. 3(a) and (b). In the case of sample B, Al could not penetrate the silicide coating layer and the coating layers were remained constant, as shown in Fig. 3(c) and (d). From the results, we made a comparison between the compacts of sample A and B, and it was shown that Al can easily diffuse into unreacted Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 5} mixed layer while U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} acted as a good diffusion barrier at 550 .deg. C though those layers had the same thickness.

  9. Effects of Silicide Coating on the Interdiffusion between U-7Mo and Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Ki Nam

    2015-01-01

    The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to and excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Ti, or Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide, or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-7Mo alloy powders were coated with silicide layers at varying T (T = 900 and 1000 .deg. C) for 30 min, respectively. U-Mo alloy powder was blended with Si powders and subsequently heat-treated to form uranium-silicide coating layers on the surface of U-Mo alloy particles. For an annealing test, silicide-coated U-Mo alloy powders were made into a compact, and Al powders were used as a matrix. From EDS results, transformed uranium aluminide intermetallic compounds were mainly U(Al,Si)3. U(Al,Si)3 phase left the silicide coating layer behind, and formed inside of U-7Mo particles, as shown in Fig. 3(a) and (b). In the case of sample B, Al could not penetrate the silicide coating layer and the coating layers were remained constant, as shown in Fig. 3(c) and (d). From the results, we made a comparison between the compacts of sample A and B, and it was shown that Al can easily diffuse into unreacted Si and U 3 Si 5 mixed layer while U 3 Si 2 acted as a good diffusion barrier at 550 .deg. C though those layers had the same thickness

  10. Evaluation of the Intrinsic and Extrinsic Fracture Behavior of Iron Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.

    2001-01-11

    In this paper, we first present the status of our computational modeling study of the thermal expansion coefficient of Fe/Al over a wide range of temperature and evaluate its dependence on selected additives. This will be accomplished by applying an isobaric Monte Carlo technique. The required total energy of the sample will be computed by using a tight-binding (TB) method that allows us to significantly increase the size of the computational data base without reducing the accuracy of the calculations. The parameters of the TB Hamiltonian are fitted to reproduce the band structure obtained by our quantum mechanical full-potential LMTO calculations. The combination of the three methods mentioned above creates an effective approach to the computation of the physical properties of the transition-metal aluminides and it can be extended to alloys with more than two components. At present, we are using a simplified approach for a first-round of results; and as a test of the simplified approach, have obtained excellent agreement with experiment for aluminum. Our previous experimental results showed that, because of their smaller grain size, FA-187 and FA-189 are extrinsically more susceptible to environmental embrittlement than FA-186 under low strain loading condition. To further investigate the grain boundary size effect as related to the susceptibility of hydrogen embrittlement, we conducted comparative finite element modeling simulations of initial intergranular fracture of two iron aluminides (FA186 and FA189) due to hydrogen embrittlement. Sequentially coupled stress and mass diffusion analyses are carried out to determine crack-tip stress state and the extent of hydrogen diffusion at the crack tip region, and a proper failure criteria is then adopted to simulate the intergranular fracture. Good qualitative agreement between the modeling predictions and experimental results is observed.

  11. Evaluation of the intrinsic and extrinsic fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Kang, B.S. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1998-07-27

    Iron aluminides have excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperatures with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides has been undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component has been on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}Al and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}Al. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large for one of the two types of iron sites. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences for hydrogen diffusion. Indeed, the ab-initio-based estimate of the divacancy binding energy indicates a likely tendency toward such clustering for iron vacancies on the sites with large lattice relaxation. The experimental work has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior.

  12. Evaluation of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion - corrosion resistant boiler tube coatings in low NO{sub x} boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuPont, J.N.; Banovic, S.W.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Low NOx burners are being installed in many fossil fired power plants in order to comply with new Clean Air Regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion is often enhanced and premature tube failures can occur. Failures due to oxidation and solid particle erosion are also a concern. A program was initiated in early 1996 to evaluate the use of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx boilers. Composite iron/aluminum wires will be used with the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process to prepare overlays on boiler tubes steels with aluminum contents from 8 to 16wt%. The weldability of the composite wires will be evaluated as a function of chemical composition and welding parameters. The effect of overlay composition on corrosion (oxidation and sulfidation) and solid particle erosion will also be evaluated. The laboratory studies will be complemented by field exposures of both iron aluminide weld overlays and co-extruded tubing under actual boiler conditions.

  13. A study of oxidation resistant coating on TiAl alloys by Cr evaporation and pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dong Ju; Jung, Hwan Gyo; Kim, Kyoo Young

    2002-01-01

    A Cr+Al-type composite coating is applied to improve the properties of aluminide coating layers, AiAl 3 , formed on TiAl alloys. This method is performed by Cr evaporation on the TiAl-XNb(X= 1,6at%) substrate followed by pack aluminizing. The coating layer formed by the composite coating process consists of the outer layer of Al 4 Cr and the inner layer of TiAl 3 regardless of the Nb content. however, these coating layers are transformed to Ti(Al,Cr) 3 layers with Ll 2 structures during oxidation. In particular, as Nb content increases, the grain size of the inner TiAl 3 layer becomes smaller and the diffusion rate of Cr increases after oxidation. Faster formation of a Ti(Al,Cr) 3 layer with an Ll 2 structure through Nb addition is more effective to improve cracking resistance at the beginning of oxidation of TiAl alloys. However, growth of Ti(Al,Cr) 3 formed on the coating layer becomes slower as the Nb content in the coating layer is increased. As a result, the addition of a large amount of Nb to composite coating layer is not desirable due to poor ductility of the coating layer. A Ti(Al,Cr) 3 layer with an Ll 2 structure developed during oxidation showed much better ductility compared with other coating layers

  14. Composition Effects on Aluminide Oxidation Performance: Objectives for Improved Bond Coats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pint, BA

    2001-01-01

    Formerly, the role of metallic coatings on Ni-base superalloys was simply to limit environmental attack of the underlying substrate. However, a new paradigm has been established for metallic coatings adapted as bond coats for thermal barrier coatings. It is no longer sufficient for the coating to just minimize the corrosion rate. The metallic coating must also form a slow-growing external Al(sub 2)O(sub 3) layer beneath the overlying low thermal conductivity ceramic top coat. This thermally grown oxide or scale must have near-perfect adhesion in order to limit spallation of the top coat, thereby achieving a long coating lifetime. While oxidation is not the only concern in complex thermal barrier coating systems, it is, however, a primary factor in developing the next generation of bond coats. Therefore, a set of compositional guidelines for coatings is proposed in order to maximize oxidation performance. These criteria are based on test results of cast alloy compositions to quantify an d understand possible improvements as a basis for further investigations using coatings made by chemical vapor deposited (CVD). Experimental work includes furnace cycle testing and in-depth characterization of the alumina scale, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  15. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  16. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding, Joining, and Coatings Research; Burt, R.P. [Alumax Technical Center, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  17. Creep deformation mechanisms in a γ titanium aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, Zakaria [Institute of Structural Materials, College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA18EN (United Kingdom); Ding, Rengen [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B152TT (United Kingdom); Martin, Nigel; Dixon, Mark [Rolls-Royce plc, P.O. Box 31, Derby DE248BJ (United Kingdom); Bache, Martin [Institute of Structural Materials, College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA18EN (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Titanium aluminides (TiAl) are considered as potential alternatives to replace nickel-based alloys of greater density for selected components within future gas turbine aero-engines. This is attributed to the high specific strength as well as the good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. The gamma (γ) titanium aluminide system Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb has previously demonstrated promising performance in terms of its physical and mechanical properties. The main aim of the current study, which is a continuation of a previously published paper, aims at evaluating the performance of this titanium aluminide system under high temperature creep conditions. Of particular interest, the paper is strongly demonstrating the precise capability of the Wilshire Equations technique in predicting the long-term creep behaviour of this alloy. Moreover, it presents a physically meaningful understanding of the various creep mechanisms expected under various testing conditions. To achieve this, two creep specimens, tested under distinctly different stress levels at 700 °C have been extensively examined. Detailed microstructural investigations and supporting transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have explored the differences in creep mechanisms active under the two stress regimes, with the deformation mechanisms correlated to Wilshire creep life prediction curves.

  18. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  19. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  20. Diffusion mechanism in molten salt baths during the production of carbide coatings via thermal reactive diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aliakbar Ghadi; Hassan Saghafian; Mansour Soltanieh; Zhi-gang Yang

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion mechanism of carbide-forming elements from a molten salt bath to a substrate surface was studied in this research, with particular focus on the processes occurring in the molten bath at the time of coating. Metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths were investi-gated, and the coating process was performed on H13 steel substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and electron-probe microanalysis were used to study the coated samples and the quenched salt bath. The thickness of the carbide coating layer was 6.5 ± 0.5, 5.2 ± 0.5, or 5.7 ± 0.5μm depending on whether it was deposited in a metal, oxide, or metal-oxide bath, respectively. The phase distribution of vanadium-rich regions was 63%, 57%, and 74% of the total coating deposited in metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths, respectively. The results obtained using the metal bath indicated that undissolved suspended metal particles deposited onto the substrate surface. Then, carbon subsequently diffused to the sub-strate surface and reacted with the metal particles to form the carbides. In the oxide bath, oxide powders dissolved in the bath with or without binding to the oxidative structure (Na2O) of borax; they were then reduced by aluminum and converted into metal particles. We concluded that, in the metal and oxide baths, the deposition of metal particles onto the sample surface is an important step in the formation of the coating.

  1. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  2. Gamma titanium aluminide production using the Induction Skull Melting (ISM) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, S.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1985, more than 2,000 titanium aluminide heats have been produced using the Induction Skull Melting (ISM) process. The history of ISM/Gamma production will be discussed in this paper. Gamma titanium aluminide processing with Induction Skull Melting offers many advantages over other types of reactive alloy melting methods. These advantages will be discussed as well as drawbacks. Also, potential markets and applications for ISM/Gamma will be presented

  3. Method of coating the interior surface of hollow objects with a diffusion coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Shawn D.; Senor, David J.; Forbes, Steven V.; Johnson, Roger N.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-03-15

    A method for forming a diffusion coating on the interior of surface of a hollow object wherein a filament, extending through a hollow object and adjacent to the interior surface of the object, is provided, with a coating material, in a vacuum. An electrical current is then applied to the filament to resistively heat the filament to a temperature sufficient to transfer the coating material from the filament to the interior surface of the object. The filament is electrically isolated from the object while the filament is being resistively heated. Preferably, the filament is provided as a tungsten filament or molybdenum filament. Preferably, the coating materials are selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hg, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni P, Pb, Pd, Pr, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Te, Tl, Y, Yb, Zn, and combinations thereof. The invention additionally allows for the formation of nitrides, hydrides, or carbides of all the possible coating materials, where such compounds exist, by providing a partial pressure of nitrogen, hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or combination thereof, within the vacuum.

  4. Progress in Protective Coatings for Aircraft Gas Turbines: A Review of NASA Sponsored Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merutka, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Problems associated with protective coatings for advanced aircraft gas turbines are reviewed. Metallic coatings for preventing titanium fires in compressors are identified. Coatings for turbine section are also considered, Ductile aluminide coatings for protecting internal turbine-blade cooling passage surface are also identified. Composite modified external overlay MCrAlY coatings deposited by low-pressure plasma spraying are found to be better in surface protection capability than vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings. Thermal barrier coating (TBC), studies are presented. The design of a turbine airfoil is integrated with a TBC, and computer-aided manufacturing technology is applied.

  5. Analyses on the U-Mo/Al Chemical Interaction and the Effects of Diffusion Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Kim, Woo Jeong; Cho, Woo Hyung; Jeong, Yong Jin; Lee, Yoon Sang; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    While many HEU-fueled research reactors have been converted by adopting LEU U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel in harmony with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, some high performance research reactors still need the development of advanced fuels with higher uranium densities. Currently, gamma-phase U-Mo alloys are considered promising candidates to be used as high uranium density fuel for the high performance reactors. For the production of UMo alloy powder, the centrifugal atomization technology developed by KAERI has been considered the most promising way because of high yield production and excellent powder quality when compared with other possible methods such as grinding, machining or hydriding-dehydriding. However, severe pore formation associated with an extensive interaction between the U-Mo and Al matrix, although the irradiation performance of U-Mo itself showed most stable, delay the fuel qualification of UMo fuel for high performance research reactors. Because the reaction products, i.e. uranium aluminides (UAlx), is less dense than the mixed reactants, the volume of the fuel meat increases after formation of interaction layer(IL). In addition to the impact on the swelling performance, the reaction layers between the U-Mo and Al matrix induces a degradation of the thermal conductivities of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels. The chemical interaction between the U-Mo and Al matrix are analyzed in this study to find remedies to reduce the growth of the interaction layers during irradiation. In addition, various coating technologies for the formation of diffusion barriers on U-Mo particles are proposed as a result of the analyses

  6. Effect of diffuse roof cover with anti-reflection coating for roses; Effect van diffuus kasdek met Anti Reflectie coating bij Roos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Victoria, N.; Kempkes, F.

    2012-10-15

    The rose Red Naomi was cultivated in two greenhouses at Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture in Bleiswijk, Netherlands (August 2010 - September 2011). One greenhouse covered with normal float glass; the other with AR coated diffuse glass (70% haze). This Anti-Reflection coating on both glass sides compensated for the loss in light transmission caused by the diffusing structure in the glass. The diffuse AR glass lead to a 5.2% higher production (>6.1% fresh weight). Sunscreens were necessary in spring and summer to avoid high light levels on the flower buds, as they cause very high bud temperatures leading to quality problems (blue petal edges and burnt leaf tips). The diffuse greenhouse cover allowed a 100 W/m{sup 2} higher screening threshold than the reference glass. This caused a 2.7% higher daily light integral, able to explain part of the extra production obtained. Part of the extra production achieved can not be explained by the measured factors as no differences were found in the amount of light intercepted by the crop or in leaf photosynthesis under both cover types. The light under the diffuse AR cover was nevertheless much smoother, so the crop seemed to suffer less (lower bud temperatures and less burned leaf tips), and this should provide an explanation for the rest of the extra production. The cover properties did not influence disease development (powdery mildew). The obtained extra production makes the tempered, diffuse glass with Anti Reflection coating on both sides economically feasible [Dutch] Tussen augustus 2010 en september 2011 is bij Wageningen UR Glastuinbouw het effect van diffuus glas, met dubbelzijdige AR coating, op de productie en energiegebruik van roos 'Red Naomi' onderzocht. Onder het diffuse glas werden 5,2% meer bloemtakken geproduceerd, deze rozen waren ook iets langer en zwaarder (6,1% meer versgewicht). Dit verschil kan deels verklaard worden doordat er onder het diffuse glas pas bij hogere stralingsniveau

  7. Diffusion barrier coatings for high temperature corrosion resistance of advanced carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Raman, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon possesses an excellent combination of mechanical and thermal properties, viz., excellent creep resistance at temperatures up to 2400 deg C in non-oxidizing environment and a low thermal expansion coefficient. These properties make carbon a potential material for very high temperature applications. However, the use of carbon materials at high temperatures is considerably restricted due to their extremely poor oxidation resistance at temperatures above 400 deg C. The obvious choice for improving high temperature oxidation resistance of such materials is a suitable diffusion barrier coating. This paper presents an overview of recent developments in advanced diffusion- and thermal-barrier coatings for ceramic composites, with particular reference to C/C composites. The paper discusses the development of multiphase and multi-component ceramic coatings, and recent investigations on the oxidation resistance of the coated C/C composites. The paper also discusses the cases of innovative engineering solutions for traditional problems with the ceramic coatings, and the scope of intelligent processing in developing coatings for the C/C composites. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  8. Atomic diffusion induced degradation in bimetallic layer coated cemented tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Zirong; Rohwerder, Michael; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Gault, Baptiste; Meiners, Thorsten; Friedrichs, Marcel; Kreilkamp, Holger; Klocke, Fritz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the temporal degradation of PtIr/Cr/WC and PtIr/Ni/WC systems. • Short cut diffusion, segregation, oxidation and interdiffusion reactions occurred. • Outward diffusion of Cr (Ni) via PtIr grain boundaries triggered the degradation. • The microstructure of the PtIr layer controlled the systems stability. • We propose an atomic diffusion induced degradation mechanism. - Abstract: We investigated the temporal degradation of glass moulding dies, made of cemented tungsten carbide coated with PtIr on an adhesive Cr or Ni interlayer, by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. During the exposure treatments at 630 °C under an oxygen partial pressure of 1.12 × 10"−"2"3 bar, Cr (Ni) was found to diffuse outwards via grain boundaries in the PtIr, altering the surface morphology. Upon dissolution of the interlayer, the WC substrate also started degrading. Extensive interdiffusion processes involving PtIr, Cr (Ni) and WC took place, leading to the formation of intermetallic phases and voids, deteriorating the adhesion of the coating.

  9. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  10. Hydrogen diffusion along grain boundaries in erbium oxide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Wei; Chikada, Takumi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion of interstitial atomic hydrogen in erbium oxide (Er 2 O 3 ) was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) methods. Hydrogen diffusivity in bulk, on (0 0 1) surface, and along Σ13 (4–3–1)/[1 1 1] symmetric tilt grain boundaries (GBs) were evaluated in a temperature range of 673–1073 K, as well as hydrogen diffusion barriers. It was found that H diffusion shows the faster on (0 0 1) surface than along GBs and in bulk. Also, energy barrier of H diffusion in bulk estimated by DFT and MD methods is somewhat higher than that along GBs evaluated in the experiments. This suggests that H diffusion in Er 2 O 3 coatings depends on GBs rather than bulk. In addition, with a correction of GB density, the simulated diffusivity along GBs in MD simulations is in good agreement with the experimental data within one order of magnitude. The discrepancy of H diffusivity between the experiments and the simulations should be reduced by considering H concentration, H diffusion direction, deviations of the initial configuration, vacancy defects, etc

  11. Thermal shock behavior of platinum aluminide bond coat/electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxuciac@163.com [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China); Dai, Jianwei [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China); Niu, Jing [Shenyang Liming Aero-engine (Group) Corporation Ltd., Institute of Metallurgical Technology, Technical Center, Shengyang 110043 (China); Li, Na; Huang, Guanghong; He, Limin [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Department 5, P.O. Box 81-5, Beijing 100095 (China)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • TBCs of (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and YSZ ceramic coating. • Grain boundary ridges are the sites for spallation damage initiation in TBCs. • Ridges removed, cavities formation appeared and the damage initiation deteriorated. • Damage initiation and progression at interface lead to a buckling failure. - Abstract: Thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) ceramic coating were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, thermal shock behaviors and residual stresses of the coatings were studied in detail. Grain boundary ridges still remain on the surface of bond coat prior to the deposition of the ceramic coating, which are shown to be the major sites for spallation damage initiation in TBCs. When these ridges are mostly removed, they appear some of cavities formation and then the damage initiation mode is deteriorated. Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. A buckle failure once started may be arrested when it runs into a region of high bond coat to TGO interface toughness. Thus, complete failure requires further loss in toughness of the bond coat to TGO interface during cooling. The suppressed cavities formation, the removed ridges at the grain boundaries, the relative high TGO to bond coat interface toughness, the uniform growth behavior of TGO thickening and the lower of the residual stress are the primary factors for prolonging the lifetime of TBCs.

  12. Ranking protective coatings: Laboratory vs. field experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Jeffrey A.; Connor, William B.

    1994-12-01

    Environmentally protective coatings are used on a wide range of gas turbine components for survival in the harsh operating conditions of engines. A host of coatings are commercially available to protect hot-section components, ranging from simple aluminides to designer metallic overlays and ceramic thermal barrier coatings. A variety of coating-application processes are available, and they range from simple pack cementation processing to complex physical vapor deposition, which requires multimillion dollar facilities. Detailed databases are available for most coatings and coating/process combinations for a range of laboratory tests. Still, the analysis of components actually used in engines often yields surprises when compared against predicted coating behavior from laboratory testing. This paper highlights recent work to develop new laboratory tests that better simulate engine environments. Comparison of in-flight coating performance as well as industrial and factory engine testing on a range of hardware is presented along with laboratory predictions from standard testing and from recently developed cyclic burner-rig testing.

  13. Production of Transitional Diffused Layers by Electrospark Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolentsev, Vladislav P.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Smolentsev, Evgeniy V.; Boldyrev, Alexander A.; Mozgalin, Vladislav L.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents a new method for production of diffused transitional layers with nano- and microthickness by local removal of nanofilms on aluminum alloys. This allows procuring of high-quality coatings on fusible alloys (for example, on aluminum ones) by materials, the melting point of which is 2-3 times higher than that of the basis (for example, of cast iron). This permits imparting new useful properties to workpieces made from light alloys with decent values for electrochemical working. The authors show that application of coatings provides minimum heating of workpieces. This enables the regulation in temperature condition of operating environment and permits efficiency improving during the process of electrochemical working by means of higher density current supply.

  14. Diffusion of Cr, Fe, and Ti ions from Ni-base alloy Inconel-718 into a transition alumina coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressler, M., E-mail: martin.dressler@bam.de; Nofz, M.; Doerfel, I.; Saliwan-Neumann, R.

    2012-04-30

    Heat treating metals at high temperatures trigger diffusion processes which may lead to the formation of oxide layers. In this work the diffusion of Cr, Fe and Ti into an alumina coating applied to Inconel-718 is being investigated. Mass gain measurements, UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied in order to study the evolution of the diffusion process. It was found that mainly Cr as well as minor amounts of Fe and Ti are being incorporated into the alumina coating upon prolonged heat treatment at 700 Degree-Sign C. It could be shown that alumina coatings being void of Cr have the same oxidation related mass gain as uncoated samples. However, incorporation of Cr into the alumina coating decreased their mass gain below that of uncoated substrates forming a Cr oxide scale only. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the diffusion of Cr into alumina coatings applied on IN-718. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ingress of Cr led to the formation of mixed alumina/chromium coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mass gain of mixed alumina/chromium coatings was compared to uncoated IN-718. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mixed alumina/chromium coatings improved the oxidation resistance of IN-718.

  15. Effect of aluminium concentration and boron dopant on environmental embrittlement in FeAl aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.T.; George, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the room-temperature tensile properties of FeAl aluminides determined as functions of aluminum concentration (35 to 43 at. % Al), test environment, and surface (oil) coating. The two lower aluminum alloys containing 35 and 36.5% Al are prone to severe environmental embrittlement, while the two higher aluminum alloys with 40 and 43% Al are much less sensitive to change in test environment and surface coating. The reason for the different behavior is that the grain boundaries are intrinsically weak in the higher aluminum alloys, and these weak boundaries dominate the low ductility and brittle fracture behavior of the 40 and 43% Al alloys. When boron is added to the 40% Al alloy as a grain-boundary strengthener, the environmental effect becomes prominent. In this case, the tensile ductility of the boron-doped alloy, just like that of the lower aluminum alloys, can be dramatically improved by control of test environment (e.g. dry oxygen vs air). Strong segregation of boron to the grain boundaries, with a segregation factor of 43, was revealed by Auger analyses

  16. Thermally induced atomic diffusion at the interface between release agent coating and mould substrate in a glass moulding press

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Jun; Fukase, Yasushi [Toshiba Machine Co., Ltd, Ooka 2068-3, Numazu-Shi, Shizuoka-Ken, 410-8510 (Japan); Yan Jiwang; Zhou Tianfeng; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto, E-mail: yanjw@pm.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-01, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    In a glass moulding press (GMP) for refractive/diffractive hybrid lenses, to improve the service life of nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) plated moulds, it is necessary to control the diffusion of constituent elements from the mould into the release agent coating. In this study, diffusion phenomena of constituents of Ni-P plating are investigated for two types of release agent coatings, iridium-platinum (Ir-Pt) and iridium-rhenium (Ir-Re), by cross-sectional observation, compositional analysis and stress measurements. The results show that Ni atoms in the plating layer flow from regions of compressive stress to regions of tensile stress. In the case of the Ir-Pt coated mould, the diffusion of Ni is promoted from the grain boundaries between the Ni and Ni{sub 3}P phases in the plating towards the surface of the Ir-Pt coating. However, in the Ir-Re coated mould, the diffusion of Ni is suppressed because the diffusion coefficient of Ni in the Ir-Re alloy is smaller than that in the Ir-Pt alloy, although the stress state is similar in both cases. By controlling the diffusion of Ni atoms, the use of Ir-Re alloy as a release agent coating for Ni-P plated moulds is expected to lead to a high degree of durability.

  17. Inter-diffusion of carbon into niobium coatings deposited on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilai, S.; Raveh, A.; Frage, N.

    2006-01-01

    The inter-diffusion of carbon (originating from a graphite substrate) into a niobium coating and the fabrication of its carbides by heat treatment in the temperature range of 1073-1773 K was studied. The thickness of the Nb 2 C and Nbc phases formed after heat treatment as well as the inter-diffusion coefficients for the formation of the carbide layers were also studied. It was found that the carbide layer growth displayed parabolic behavior patterns inherent in the growth rate constants (K) of Nb 2 C and NbC layers. By assuming that the inter-diffusion coefficients are independent of concentration, it was possible to determine the inter-diffusion coefficients of carbon D c into Nb 2 C and NbC layers as a function of temperature

  18. Determination of diffusion factors according to the distribution of coating components at isothermal hold-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatinskij, V.F.; Nesterenko, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    Calculation equations for estimate of coating metal diffusion coefficients are derived. The experimental checking of derived dependences is carried out. Studies have been made on flat samples of 2x10x15 mm dimensions made of armco iron with W,Mo,Cr, Ga, Ge coatings. The initial distribution of saturation elements determined experimentally, and approximated by functions, is presented. By the method of placing of values of initial distributions into the calculated dependences determined are the coefficients of diffusion for above elements in armco iron. For experimental ckecking of the problem made is a program of computer calculation for two-phase chromium coating on armco iron. Cr diffusion coefficients in α- and γ-phase are determined at 950 deg, which constitute 5.692x10 -10 cm 2 /s and 1.365x10 -10 cm 2 /s. respectively. The control tests have shown that the application of calculated diffusion coefficients permits to describe with high accuracy the redistribution of saturation element in matrix of the saturating metal

  19. Performance of Nb protective diffusion coating on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Sohn, Dong-Seong [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan; Nam, Ji Min; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To achieve this aim, it is necessary to increase the volume fraction of fuel particles inside the meat. However, the technical limit is reached at approximately 55 vol.% of fuel particles in the aluminum matrix. As a solution, an uranium compound with an higher uranium density than existing U3Si2 fuel has to be selected. Also alloying the uranium must stabilize γ-phase of uranium at room temperature because adequate properties of the γ -phase of uranium showed a good irradiation behavior in the past. Hence, U-Mo alloys were selected as the best candidates. The formation of interaction phase is a critical problem to apply U-Mo alloys to the high performance research reactor. Different means have been proposed to reduce the interaction between U-Mo fuel and Al matrix. There are three means. : 1. Addition of a diffusion limiting element to the matrix 2. Insertion of a diffusion barrier at the interface between the U-Mo and the Al 3. Alloying of the U-Mo with a third element Here we present the effect of Nb coating as diffusion barrier on formation of interaction layers between UMo powders and Al matrix. We present the effect of Nb coating on formation of interaction layers between U-Mo powders and Al matrix. Centrifugally atomized U-7 wt.% Mo powders were used, and Nb was coated on the surface of U-7 wt.% Mo by sputtering. Subsequently, the Nb-coated U-7 wt.% Mo powders were mixed with pure Al powders, and were made into compacts. The compacts were annealed at 550 .deg. C for 1, 3, 5 hours, respectively, and the result showed that the Nb coating on U-7 wt.% Mo effectively suppressed the growth of interaction layers between U-7 wt.% Mo and Al matrix.

  20. An overview of the oxidation performance of silicide diffusion coatings for vanadium-based alloys for generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaia, N.; Mathieu, S.; Cozzika, T.; Rouillard, F.; Desgranges, C.; Courouau, J.L.; Petitjean, C.; David, N.; Vilasi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Diffusion barrier to oxygen were manufactured by pack cementation diffusion process. ► The use of CrSi 2 + Si and TiSi 2 + Si as masteralloys increased the quality of the coating. ► Thermodynamic stability (coatings/vanadium) was obtained at the operating temperature. ► MSi 2 coatings developed low growing oxide scale in air and at low oxygen pressure. ► Coatings presented high compatibility with liquid sodium ( 2 ) for 360 h. - Abstract: This study focuses on the development of new protective coatings for the vanadium-based alloy V-4Cr-4Ti. Halide-activated pack-cementation (HAPC) technique was used to develop V x Si y multilayered diffusive silicide coatings. The outer layers (coatings) were formed of VSi 2 doped with 27 at.% Cr or TiSi 2 . These compounds exhibited a very low oxidation rate at 650 °C, both in air and at a low oxygen pressure (He, 5 ppm O 2 ). The coatings formed mainly of MSi 2 were found to be insensitive to pesting and largely unreactive to liquid sodium ( 2 ) during a 360 h compatibility test at 550 °C.

  1. Determination of the DBTT of Aluminide Coatings and its Influence on the Mechanical Behavior of Coated Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The ductility of various coatings deposited by chemical vapor deposition, pack cementation and slurry processes on Fe- and Ni-based alloys was characterized by indentation at room temperature. A hot indentation apparatus has also been developed to more rapidly determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature of coated specimens. Creep testing has been conducted on bare and coated alloy 230 (NiCrW) specimens at 800 C with a significant decrease in creep life observed. Based on the observed failure of coated 230 specimens, the impact of coating ductility on substrate creep properties is discussed.

  2. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr.ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  3. The effects of zirconium and carbon on the hot cracking resistance of iron aluminides. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Iron aluminides have been of interest for about 60 years because of their good high temperature strengths (below 600{degrees}C) and excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance, as well as their relatively low cost and conservation of strategic elements. These advantageous properties have driven the development of iron aluminides as potential structural materials. However, the industrial application of iron aluminides has been inhibited because of a sharp reduction in strength at temperatures higher than 600{degrees}C and low ductility at ambient temperatures due to hydrogen embrittlement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown in recent years that room temperature properties of alloys containing 28% Al (all compositions are in atomic percent unless otherwise noted) can be improved through thermomechanical processing and alloying. Iron aluminides must have good weldability if they are to be used as structural materials. A coarse fusion zone microstructure is formed when iron aluminides are welded, increasing their susceptibility to cold cracking in water vapor. A recent study at Colorado School of Mines has shown that refining the fusion zone microstructure by weld pool oscillation effectively reduces cold cracking. Weld pool inoculation has been shown to refine fusion zone microstructures, but coarse carbide distribution caused this approach to reducing cold cracking to be ineffective.

  4. Coating-Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    vapor phase NiA ! aluminide and NiAI(Cr.Zr) coated Rene N5 samples cycled at 1093°C with Ae, = 0.35%. PtAI VPA NiAI(Cr,Zr) EQ Y-Y’ 10000.0... 505 (2001). 2. T.M. Pollock and S. Tin, AIAA J. Propulsion and Power, 22, 2, (2006), pp. 361 - 374. 3. A.G. Evans, D.R. Clarke and C.G. Lev

  5. Composite interlayer for diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A ductile interlayer is described, which is useful for transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of metallic articles; the interlayer consisting of a melting point depressant and a plurality of ductile lamellae which are free from carbides, aluminides and borides. The composition and fabrication of the lamellae, and the process for bonding the metallic articles, depend on the composition of the metals to be bonded, and are exemplified in the specification. (U.K.)

  6. Steam oxidation resistance of Ni-aluminide/Fe-aluminide duplex coatings formed on creep resistant ferritic steels by low temperature pack cementation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Z.D.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, C.Y.; Rose, S.R.; Datta, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The Ni 2 Al 3 /Fe 2 Al 5 duplex coating on ferritic steel is resistant against steam oxidation at 650 o C. → The coating shows evidence of enhanced thermal stability. → The enhanced thermal stability of the coating is facilitated by thermodynamic constraints. → The lifetime of the coating can be enhanced by controlling the layer structure of the coating. - Abstract: Steam oxidation resistance and thermal stability were studied at 650 o C for a coating with an outer Ni 2 Al 3 layer and an inner Fe 2 Al 5 layer formed on P92 steel surface. The parabolic rate law of oxidation was obeyed only in less than 2000 h with positive deviations occurring at longer oxidation times. The outer layer of the coating was transformed to NiAl during oxidation, but it remained stable once it was formed. The mechanisms for the enhanced thermal stability were discussed and a simple approach to enhancing the lifetime of the coating was proposed.

  7. Drug diffusion and biological responses of arteries using a drug-eluting stent with nonuniform coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito N

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Noboru Saito, Yuhei Mori, Sayaka Uchiyama Terumo Corporation R&D Center, Inokuchi, Nakai-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a nonuniform coating, abluminal-gradient coating (AGC, which leaves the abluminal surface of the curves and links parts of the stent free from the drug coating, on the diffusion direction of the drug and the biological responses of the artery to drug-eluting stent (DES by comparing the AGC-sirolimus stent and the conventional full-surface coating (CFC sirolimus stent. The study aimed to verify whether the AGC approach was appropriate for the development of a safer DES, minimizing the risks of stent thrombosis due to delayed endothelialization by the drug and distal embolization due to cracking of the coating layer on the hinge parts of the DES on stent expansion. In the in vitro local drug diffusion study, we used rhodamine B as a model drug, and rhodamine B released from the AGC stent diffused predominantly into the abluminal side of the alginate artery model. Conversely, rhodamine B released from the CFC stent quickly spread to the luminal side of the artery model, where endothelial cell regeneration is required. In the biological responses study, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the AGC-sirolimus stent in a rabbit iliac artery for 2 weeks was completely covered with endothelial-like cells. On the other hand, the luminal surface of the iliac artery implanted with the CFC-sirolimus stent for 2 weeks only showed partial coverage with endothelial-like cells. While thrombosis was observed in two of the three CFC-sirolimus stents, it was observed in only one of the three AGC-sirolimus stents. Taken together, these findings indicate that the designed nonuniform coating (AGC is an appropriate approach to ensure a safer DES. However, the number of studies is limited and a larger study should be conducted to reach a statistically

  8. Effects of thermomechanical processing on titanium aluminide strip cast by the melt overflow process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, T.A. (Ribbon Technology Corporation, PO Box 30758, Columbus, OH 43230 (United States)); Hackman, L.E. (Ribbon Technology Corporation, PO Box 30758, Columbus, OH 43230 (United States)); Batawi, E. (Sulzer-Innotec, Division 1511, PO Box 65, Winterthur 8404 (Switzerland)); Peters, J.A. (Sulzer-Innotec, Division 1511, PO Box 65, Winterthur 8404 (Switzerland))

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this research project was to investigate the feasibility of producing titanium aluminide foils from direct cast strip using ribbon technology''s plasma melt overflow process. Niobium-modified Ti[sub 3]Al alloys were melted in a cold copper crucible using a transferred plasma arc and then direct cast into strip on a rotating chill roll.Samples cut from the as-cast Ti[sub 3]Al-Nb ([alpha][sub 2]) titanium aluminide strip were encapsulated into a pack. The packs were heated to the rolling temperature and then hot rolled at low strain rates. Foils 70 [mu]m (0.003 in) thick, having a uniform [alpha][sub 2]-B2 microstructure with oxygen contents as low as 900 wt.ppm were obtained after pack rolling. The strips and foils were characterized in terms of microstructure and chemical composition in the as-received, heat-treated and pack-rolled conditions.The results indicated that it was technically feasible to produce foils from direct cast titanium aluminide strip using pack-rolling technology. The advantage of this technology lies in its cost-effectiveness, since the relatively low cost direct-cast titanium aluminide strip was thermomechanically processed into foil with the desired microstructure without any intermediate processing steps. ((orig.))

  9. Saturated bonds and anomalous electronic transport in transition-metal aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.

    2006-05-22

    This thesis deals with the special electronic properties of the transition-metal aluminides. Following quasicrystals and their approximants it is shown that even materials with small elementary cells exhibit the same surprising effects. So among the transition-metal aluminides also semi-metallic and semiconducting compounds exist, although if they consist of classic-metallic components like Fe, Al, or Cr. These properties are furthermore coupled with a deep pseusogap respectively gap in the density of states and strongly covalent bonds. Bonds are described in this thesis by two eseential properties. First by the bond charge and second by the energetic effect of the bond. It results that in the caes of semiconducting transition-metal aluminides both a saturation of certain bonds and a bond-antibond alteration in the Fermi level is present. By the analysis of the near-order in form of the so-calles coordination polyeders it has been succeeded to establish a simple rule for semiconductors, the five-fold coordination for Al. This rule states that aluminium atoms with their three valence electrons are not able to build more than five saturated bonds to their nearest transition-metal neighbours. In excellent agreement with the bond angles predicted theoretically under assumption of equal-type bonds it results that all binary transition-element aluminide semiconductors exhibit for the Al atoms the same near order. Typical values for specific resistances of the studied materials at room temperature lie in the range of some 100 {mu}{omega}cm, which is farly larger than some 10 {mu}{omega}cm as in the case of the unalloyed metals. SUrprising is furthermore a high transport anisotropy with a ratio of the specific resistances up to 3.0. An essential result of this thesis can be seen in the coupling of the properties of the electronic transport and the bond properties. The small conducitivities could be explained by small values in the density of states and a bond

  10. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; Sikka, Vinod K.; Hajaligol, Mohammed R.

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  11. Simulation of uranium aluminide dissolution in a continuous aluminum dissolver system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.R.; Farman, R.F.; Christian, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which recovers highly-enriched uranium (uranium that contains at least 20 atom percent 235 U) from spent nuclear reactor fuel by dissolution of the fuel elements and extraction of the uranium from the aqueous dissolver product. Because the uranium is highly-enriched, consideration must be given to whether a critical mass can form at any stage of the process. In particular, suspended 235 U-containing particles are of special concern, due to their high density (6.8 g/cm 3 ) and due to the fact that they can settle into geometrically unfavorable configurations when not adequately mixed. A portion of the spent fuel is aluminum-alloy-clad uranium aluminide (UAl 3 ) particles, which dissolve more slowly than the cladding. As the aluminum alloy cladding dissolves in mercury-catalyzed nitric acid, UAl 3 is released. Under standard operating conditions, the UAl 3 dissolves rapidly enough to preclude the possibility of forming a critical mass anywhere in the system. However, postulated worst-case abnormal operating conditions retard uranium aluminide dissolution, and thus require evaluation. To establish safety limits for operating parameters, a computerized simulation model of uranium aluminide dissolution in the aluminum fuel dissolver system was developed

  12. A Review on the Properties of Iron Aluminide Intermetallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zamanzade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron aluminides have been among the most studied intermetallics since the 1930s, when their excellent oxidation resistance was first noticed. Their low cost of production, low density, high strength-to-weight ratios, good wear resistance, ease of fabrication and resistance to high temperature oxidation and sulfurization make them very attractive as a substitute for routine stainless steel in industrial applications. Furthermore, iron aluminides allow for the conservation of less accessible and expensive elements such as nickel and molybdenum. These advantages have led to the consideration of many applications, such as brake disks for windmills and trucks, filtration systems in refineries and fossil power plants, transfer rolls for hot-rolled steel strips, and ethylene crackers and air deflectors for burning high-sulfur coal. A wide application for iron aluminides in industry strictly depends on the fundamental understanding of the influence of (i alloy composition; (ii microstructure; and (iii number (type of defects on the thermo-mechanical properties. Additionally, environmental degradation of the alloys, consisting of hydrogen embrittlement, anodic or cathodic dissolution, localized corrosion and oxidation resistance, in different environments should be well known. Recently, some progress in the development of new micro- and nano-mechanical testing methods in addition to the fabrication techniques of micro- and nano-scaled samples has enabled scientists to resolve more clearly the effects of alloying elements, environmental items and crystal structure on the deformation behavior of alloys. In this paper, we will review the extensive work which has been done during the last decades to address each of the points mentioned above.

  13. Low-cycle fatigue and damage of an uncoated and coated single crystal nickel-base superalloy SCB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekovic, S.; Ericsson, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour and damage mechanisms of uncoated and coated specimens of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy SCB tested at 500 C and 900 C. Four coatings were deposited on the base material, an overlay coating AMDRY997, a platinum-modified aluminide diffusion coating RT22 and two innovative coatings called IC1 and IC3 with a NiW diffusion barrier in the interface. AMDRY997 and RT22 were used as reference coatings. The LCF tests were performed at three strain amplitudes, 1.0, 1.2 and 1.4%, with R = -1, in laboratory air and without any dwell time. The LCF life of the specimens is determined by crack initiation and propagation. Crack data are presented for different classes of crack size in the form of crack density, that is, the number of cracks normalised to the investigated interface length. Micrographs of damage of the coatings are also shown. The effect of the coatings on the LCF life of the superalloy was dependent on the test temperature and deposited coating. At 500 C all coatings had a detrimental effect on the LCF life of the superalloy. At 900 C both AMDRY997 and IC1 prolonged the fatigue life of the superalloy by factors ranging between 1.5 and 4 while RT22 and IC3 shortened the life of the coating-substrate system. Specimens coated with RT22 exhibited generally more damage than other tested coatings at 900 C. Most of the cracks observed initiated at the coating surface and a majority were arrested in the interdiffusion zone between the base material and the coating. No topologically close-packed phases were found. Delamination was only found in AMDRY997 at higher strains. Surface roughness or rumpling was found in the overlay coating AMDRY997 with some cracks initiating from the rumples. The failure morphology at 900 C reflected the role of oxidation in the fatigue life, the crack initiation and propagation of the coated specimens. The wake of the cracks grown into the substrate was severely oxidised leading to

  14. Effect of cerium addition on the corrosion behaviour of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mungole, M.N.; Bharagava, S.; Baligidad, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides Fe-20.0Al-2.0C, Fe-18.5Al-3.6C and Fe-19.2Al-3.3C-0.07Ce (in at.%) has been studied. The potentiodynamic polarization behaviour of the alloys was evaluated in freely aerated 0.25 mol/l H 2 SO 4 . A 0.05% C steel was used for comparison purposes. All the alloys exhibited active-passive behaviour in the acidic solution. The addition of Ce destroyed passivity as indicated by lower breakdown potentials in polarization studies. This has been related to the finer distribution of the carbides in the microstructure. Corrosion rates were evaluated by immersion testing. The iron aluminide with Ce addition exhibited a lower corrosion rate compared to the aluminides without Ce addition. This has been attributed to modifications in surface film with Ce addition. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to localized galvanic corrosion due to the presence of carbides in the microstructure

  15. A comparative study on laser processing of commercially available titanium aluminide (TI-48AL-2CR-2NB) and in-situ alloying of titanium aluminide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hoosain, Shaik E

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminides (TiAl) are acknowledged as promising high temperature structural materials due to their high melting point, high strength to density, high elastic modulus and high creep strength. Due to their low ductility, it is difficult...

  16. Thermal cycling behavior of EB-PVD TBCs on CVD platinum modified aluminide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxubiam@aliyun.com; Wang, Zhankao; Huang, Guanghong; Mu, Rende; He, Limin

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The removed ridges at the grain boundaries with grit blasting. • The ridge, oxidation and cracking are features of damage initiation in TBCs. • Spalled location either at TGO/bond coat interface or inside of TGO layer. • The lower strain energy release rate within TGO layer can prolong of TBCs life. - Abstract: Thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) ceramic coating were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, cyclic oxidation behaviors and residual stresses of the TBCs were studied in detail. It was found that the fracture path traverses through the ceramic coating to TGO interface, as well as at the TGO to bond coat interface is obviously detected. The change in fracture plane occurs at grain boundaries. The ridge top spallation leads to separate of sufficient size to result in unstable fracture driven by the strain energy stored in the TGO. The bond coat can undergo a volume increase upon oxidation, so that a cavity, enlarged strictly by oxidation would be full to overflowing with TGO layer. The spalled location of the TBCs probably occurs either at the interface of TGO layer and bond coat or inside of TGO layer. The lower strain energy release rate within TGO layer during thermal cycling is beneficial to prolong of TBCs life. The lower is the compressive stress within TGO layer, the longer is the lifetime of TBCs.

  17. Microstructural and mechanical property characterization of ingot metallurgy ODS iron aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hall, F.; Valykeo, J. [Hoskins Mfg. Co., Hamburg, MI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with a novel, lower cost method of producing a oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-aluminide alloy. A large 250-kg batch of ODS iron-aluminide alloy designated as FAS was produced by Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) [Hamburg, Michigan] using the new process. Plate and bar stock of the ODS alloy were the two major products received. Each of the products was characterized for its microstructure, including grain size and uniformity of oxide dispersion. Tensile tests were completed from room temperature to 1100 C. Only 100-h creep tests were completed at 800 and 1000 C. The results of these tests are compared with the commercial ODS alloy designated as MA-956. An assessment of these data is used to develop future plans for additional work and identifying applications.

  18. High temperature tribological performance of CrAlYN/CrN nanoscale multilayer coatings deposited on ?-TiAl

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, J.C.; Ross, I.M.; Reinhard, C.; Rainforth, W.M.; Hovsepian, P.Eh.

    2009-01-01

    This paper details the effect of temperature on the frictional behaviour of highly novel CrAlYN/CrN multilayer coatings, deposited by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) on a Titanium Aluminide alloy used as fan blade material in the aerospace and a turbo-charger wheel in the automotive industries. The work was the first to discover the high temperature oxide 'glaze' layer formation which occurred on CrN multilayer-type coatings at higher temperatures and has received significant...

  19. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Frederick

    2005-01-01

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments

  20. Advances in the Systems and Processes for the Production of Gamma Titanium Aluminide Bars and Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Robert E.

    2017-12-01

    A historical look at the melt processing of gamma titanium aluminides is presented first, followed by recent advances in melting equipment design by Retech to produce 50-mm and 100-mm-diameter ingots up to 1000 mm long. Equipment design for the economical production of gamma titanium aluminide powder is then discussed. The focus in industry has shifted away from basic research to cost-effective production of these titanium alloys for aerospace and automotive engine applications.

  1. Multiple-diffusion flame synthesis of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Memon, Nasir; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2013-01-01

    A multi-element diffusion flame burner (MEDB) is useful in the study of flame synthesis of nanomaterials. Here, the growth of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) using an MEDB is demonstrated. Hydrogen (H2), oxygen (O2), and argon

  2. Interdiffusion behavior of Al-rich oxidation resistant coatings on ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Y.; Hawkins, E.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505-0001 (United States); Pint, B.A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6156 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic-martensitic alloys was investigated in the temperature range of 650-700 C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H{sub 2}O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. The model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650-700 C based on a minimum Al content (C{sub b}) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a C{sub b} value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700 C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Photoluminescence studies of organic phosphor coated diffusing surface using blue inorganic light-emitting diode as excitation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Gyanendra; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2013-01-01

    We report the studies on photoluminescence (PL) of organic phosphor coated on a diffusing surface using a blue inorganic light-emitting diode (LED) array as an excitation source. The organic phosphor composite coated diffuser was used to scatter the directional blue light from the LED array. Some of the blue light is absorbed by the organic phosphor composite and the phosphor molecules are excited and re-emit light at longer wavelengths due to the PL process. The output light consists of scattered blue light plus phosphor generated broadband yellow light, thus making white light. The diffuser was made up of a plastic substrate coated with an organic composite of small molecule fluorescent material zinc(II)bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Znq 2 ) doped with different percentages of electro-phosphorescent metal complex iridium(III)bis(2-methyldibenzo-[f, h] quinoxaline) (acetylacetonate) ([Ir(MDQ) 2 (acac)]). By means of changing the concentration and the thickness of the phosphor composite material the colour coordinates of white light were achieved. The CIE coordinates and correlated colour temperature were calculated for various thicknesses and phosphor composite concentrations and the results are reported. (paper)

  4. Improving long term oxidation protection for {gamma}-TiAl substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, K.; Schlaefer, T.; Bruehl, M.; Linke, T.F. [Thermisches Spritzen, Institut fuer Oberflaechentechnik (IOT), RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Warda, T.

    2011-11-15

    In previous work, a thermal spray multilayer system consisting of Zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) and MCrAlY top coat showed promising results regarding the oxidation behavior of the Gamma Titanium Aluminides substrates tested, which encouraged further research activities. Diffusion of substrate material was successfully inhibited by a ceramic Zirconia coating. A building up of a dense and stable oxide layer could be achieved by additional application of an MCrAlY top coat, leading to improved oxidation resistance and thus showing feasibility. In this work the main focus for development was put on enhancing adhesion and lowering residual stresses of the coatings in order to allow long term and cyclic testing without delamination taking place. Being a very brittle material, Gamma Titanium Aluminides require special surface treatment to enable roughening which is crucial for a strong mechanical bond between substrate and coating. Alternatives to conventional grit blasting as a standard preparation method were investigated. These were micro-abrasive blasting and blasting at elevated temperature ({approx}300-550 C) to allow a more ductile behavior. The paper will highlight the implications by means of these measures and will also show the present development status of the multilayer system. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Precipitation-strengthening effects in iron-aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.; McKamey, C.G.; Goodwin, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to produce precipitation to improve both high-temperature strength and room-temperature ductibility in FeAl-type(B2 phase) iron-aluminides. Previous work has focused on primarily wrought products, but stable precipitates can also refine the grain size and affect the properties of as-cast and/or welded material as well. New work began in FY 1994 on the properties of these weldable, strong FeAl alloys in the as-cast condition. Because the end product of this project is components for industry testing, simpler and better (cheaper, near-net-shape) processing methods must be developed for industrial applications of FeAl alloys.

  6. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.P., E-mail: thpfys@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Yang, G.Y.; Jia, W.P.; He, W.W.; Lu, S.L. [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); Qian, M., E-mail: ma.qian@rmit.edu.au [State Key Laboratory of Porous Metal Materials, Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi' an 710016 (China); RMIT University, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2015-06-11

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways.

  7. Additive manufacturing of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy by selective electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.P.; Yang, G.Y.; Jia, W.P.; He, W.W.; Lu, S.L.; Qian, M.

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers a radical net-shape manufacturing approach for titanium aluminide alloys but significant challenges still remain. A study has been made of the AM of a high niobium-containing titanium aluminide alloy (Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W, in at% throughout the paper) using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The formation of various types of microstructural defects, including banded structures caused by the vaporization of aluminum, was investigated with respect to different processing parameters. To avoid both micro- and macro-cracks, the use of higher preheating temperatures and an intermediate reheating process (to reheat each solidified layer during SEBM) was assessed in detail. These measures enabled effective release of the thermal stress that developed during SEBM and therefore the avoidance of cracks. In addition, the processing conditions for the production of a fine full lamellar microstructure were identified. As a result, the Ti–45Al–7Nb–0.3W alloy fabricated showed outstanding properties (compression strength: 2750 MPa; strain-to-fracture: 37%). SEBM can be used to fabricate high performance titanium aluminide alloys with appropriate processing parameters and pathways

  8. Electro-spark deposition technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated critical to the life and economy of the advanced fossil energy systems as the higher temperatures and corrosive environments exceed the limits of known structural materials to accommodate the service conditions. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. A new development is the demonstration of advanced aluminide-based ESD coatings for erosion and wear applications. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that yields an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Achieving this regime has required the development of advanced ESD electronic capabilities. Development is now focused on further improvements in deposition rates, system reliability when operating at process extremes, and economic competitiveness.

  9. High-temperature resistant, thermally sprayed diffusion barrier coatings on CFC lightweight materials; Hochtemperaturbestaendige, thermisch gespritzte Diffusionsbarriereschichten auf CFC-Leichtbauchargiergestellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drehmann, Rico; Rupprecht, Christian; Wielage, Bernhard; Lampke, Thomas [Technische Univ. Chemnitz (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft und Werkstofftechnik (IWW); Gilbert, Maria; Uhlig, Volker; Trimis, Dimosthenis [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Waermetechnik und Thermodynamik (IWTT); Heuer, Volker [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Hanau (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    In heat treating processes as well as in high temperature brazing processes, charge carriers enable the positioning and transport of work pieces. Recently, charge carriers consisting of graphite or carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) are used. The main disadvantage of charge carriers based on CFC is the undesirable carburization of the overlying components due to diffusion processes. Under this aspect, thermally sprayed coatings are applied on CFC and tested with respect to their suitability as a high-temperature diffusion barrier. The ceramic powders aluminium oxide, aluminium oxide/chromium oxide, aluminium oxide/titanium oxide and zirconium oxide/yttrium oxide are used as a coating material which is processed by means of the powder flame spraying as well as atmospheric plasma spraying. Molybdenum and silicon carbide are used as an adhesive layer. The coating materials aluminium oxide and aluminium oxide/chromium oxide on siliconized CFC presented excellent results. This supplies a large potential of application for thermally sprayed ceramic coatings on carbon-based lightweight materials.

  10. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for Fe-base and refractory alloys. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1998-03-10

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels and refractory metal alloys. A new comprehensive theory to treat the multi-component thermodynamic equilibria in the gas phase for several coexisting solid phases was developed and used. Many different processes to deposit various types of coatings on several types of steels were developed: Cr-Si codeposition for low- or medium-carbon steels, Cr-Al codeposition on low-carbon steels to yield either a Kanthal-type composition (Fe-25Cr-4Al in wt.%) or else a (Fe, Cr){sub 3}Al surface composition. An Fe{sub 3}Al substrate was aluminized to achieve an FeAl surface composition, and boron was also added to ductilize the coating. The developmental Cr-lean ORNL alloys with exceptional creep resistance were Cr-Al coated to achieve excellent oxidation resistance. Alloy wires of Ni-base were aluminized to provide an average composition of Ni{sub 3}Al for use as welding rods. Several different refractory metal alloys based on Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb have been silicided, also with germanium additions, to provide excellent oxidation resistance. A couple of developmental Cr-Zr alloys were similarly coated and tested.

  11. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  12. Corrosion and Fatigue Behavior of High-Strength Steel Treated with a Zn-Alloy Thermo-diffusion Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, C. P.; Vigilante, G. N.; Cannon, J. J.

    2017-11-01

    High and low cycle fatigue tests were conducted on high-strength steel using four-point bending. The materials tested were ASTM A723 steel in the as-machined condition, grit-blasted condition, MIL-DTL-16232 heavy manganese phosphate-coated condition, and ASTM A1059 Zn-alloy thermo-diffusion coated (Zn-TDC). The ASTM A723 steel base material exhibits a yield strength of 1000 MPa. The effects of the surface treatments versus uncoated steel were examined. The fatigue life of the Zn-TDC specimens was generally reduced on as-coated specimens versus uncoated or phosphate-coated specimens. Several mechanisms are examined including the role of compressive residual stress relief with the Zn-TDC process as well as fatigue crack initiation from the hardened Zn-Fe alloy surface layer produced in the gas-metal reaction. Additionally, the effects of corrosion pitting on the fatigue life of coated specimens are explored as the Zn-TDC specimens exhibit significantly improved corrosion resistance over phosphate-coated and oiled specimens.

  13. Evolution of interfacial toughness of a thermal barrier system with a Pt-diffused {gamma}/{gamma}' bond coat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.; Liu, J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Rickerby, D.S.; Jones, R.J. [Rolls-Royce Plc., PO Box 31, Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom); Xiao, P., E-mail: ping.xiao@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    A strain-to-fail method has been employed to examine the interfacial adhesion of electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with a Pt-diffused {gamma}/{gamma}' bond coat. Based on a previously established model, the estimated interfacial toughness decreases with oxidation time of TBCs. Furthermore, the interfacial toughness value varies considerably with the use of different Young's moduli in the model. It is believed that the modulus obtained from beam bending represents the columnar structure of the TBC. In this case, the mode I interfacial toughness was found to vary from 10 J m{sup -2} for as-deposited TBCs to 0.79 J m{sup -2} for the 60 h oxidized TBCs. The degradation of adhesion could be attributed to the defect formation and impurity segregation at the TGO/bond coat interface, which is associated with the diffusion of Pt.

  14. Multiple-diffusion flame synthesis of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Memon, Nasir

    2013-09-01

    A multi-element diffusion flame burner (MEDB) is useful in the study of flame synthesis of nanomaterials. Here, the growth of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) using an MEDB is demonstrated. Hydrogen (H2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar) are utilized to establish the flame, whereas titanium tetraisopropoxide is used as the precursor for TiO2. The nanoparticles are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, with elemental mapping (of C, O, and Ti), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The growth of pure anatase TiO2 nanoparticles occurs when Ar and H2 are used as the precursor carrier gas, while the growth of carbon-coated nanoparticles ensues when Ar and ethylene (C2H4) are used as the precursor carrier gas. A uniform coating of 3-5nm of carbon is observed around TiO2 particles. The growth of highly crystalline TiO2 nanoparticles is dependent on the gas flow rate of the precursor carrier and amorphous particles are observed at high flow rates. Carbon coating occurs only on crystalline nanoparticles, suggesting a possible growth mechanism of carbon-coated TiO2 nanoparticles. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  15. Characterization of Secondary Mineral Grain Coatings and their Role as Diffusion-controlled Sinks and Sources for Metal Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. A.; Guo, H.; Lai, B.; Kemner, K. M.; Ercius, P.; Fox, P. M.; Singer, D. M.; Minor, A.; Waychunas, G.

    2012-12-01

    Many important geochemical reactions occur at the mineral-water interface, including sorption and desorption reactions of contaminants. Fundamental knowledge of the kinetics of these processes is based primarily on experimental observations of reactions at faces of single crystals or macroscopic data from pure mineral powder suspensions. Sorption reactions at crystal faces are generally very fast, on the order of microseconds or less, with reaction times often limited only by film diffusion at the mineral-water interface. In well-stirred suspensions of aquifer sediments, however, sorptive equilibrium can take many hours or days to achieve steady-state concentrations. We have examined the potential reasons for sorption rate limitation using uranium(VI) sorption by sediments from a sandy aquifer in Savannah River, South Carolina (USA). U(VI) sorption by sand-sized grains from the aquifer is dominated by reaction with secondary mineral coatings on quartz and feldspar grains. The coatings studied were on the order of 15 microns in thickness (i.e., from quartz grain to aqueous solution) and composed primarily of clay minerals and hematite of varying particle size. Microfocused-XRF imaging of elemental concentrations (e.g., U, Fe) of polished cross-sections of the grain/coating contact showed strong spatial correlations of U and Fe within the coatings, regardless of the length of reaction time (30 minutes to 4 weeks). The spatial resolution of the μ-XRF technique is of the order of 2 microns in horizontal directions, but the uncertainty of the observed spatial gradients is high due to grain curvature away from the polished surface and fluorescence contributed from the entire 30 micron thickness of a typical grain/epoxy thin section. TEM characterization of focused-ion-beam (FIB), vertically-extracted samples of the grain-coating contact shows that complex pore networks exist within the coatings of variable dimensions and unknown connectivity. Using scanning TEM (STEM

  16. Effects of humidity and filter material on diffusive sampling of isocyanates using reagent-coated filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneken, H.; Vogel, M.; Karst, U.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusive sampling of methyl isocyanate (MIC) on 4-nitro-7-piperazinobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBDPZ)-coated glass fibre (GF) filters is strongly affected by high relative humidity (RH) conditions. It is shown that the humidity interference is a physical phenomenon, based on displacement of reagent

  17. Active bio-based food-packaging: Diffusion and release of active substances through and from cellulose nanofiber coating toward food-packaging design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoine, Nathalie; Guillard, Valérie; Desloges, Isabelle; Gontard, Nathalie; Bras, Julien

    2016-09-20

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) were recently investigated for the elaboration of new functional food-packaging materials. Their nanoporous network was especially of interest for controlling the release of active species. Qualitative release studies were conducted, but quantification of the diffusion phenomenon observed when the active species are released from and through CNF coating has not yet been studied. Therefore, this work aims to model CNF-coated paper substrates as controlled release system for food-packaging using release data obtained for two model molecules, namely caffeine and chlorhexidine digluconate. The applied mathematical model - derived from Fickian diffusion - was validated for caffeine only. When the active species chemically interacts with the release device, another model is required as a non-predominantly diffusion-controlled release was observed. From caffeine modeling data, a theoretical active food-packaging material was designed. The use of CNFs as barrier coating was proved to be the ideal material configuration that best meets specifications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Liquid phase diffusion bonding of A1070 by using metal formate coated Zn sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, K.; Koyama, S.; shohji, I.

    2017-05-01

    Aluminium alloy have high strength and easily recycle due to its low melting point. Therefore, aluminium is widely used in the manufacturing of cars and electronic devices. In recent years, the most common way for bonding aluminium alloy is brazing and friction stir welding. However, brazing requires positional accuracy and results in the formation of voids by the flax residue. Moreover, aluminium is an excellent heat radiating and electricity conducting material; therefore, it is difficult to bond together using other bonding methods. Because of these limitations, liquid phase diffusion bonding is considered to the suitable method for bonding aluminium at low temperature and low bonding pressure. In this study, the effect of metal formate coating processing of zinc surface on the bond strength of the liquid phase diffusion bonded interface of A1070 has been investigated by SEM observation of the interfacial microstructures and fractured surfaces after tensile test. Liquid phase diffusion bonding was carried out under a nitrogen gas atmosphere at a bonding temperature of 673 K and 713 K and a bonding load of 6 MPa (bonding time: 15 min). As a result of the metal formate coating processing, a joint having the ultimate tensile strength of the base aluminium was provided. It is hypothesized that this is because metallic zinc is generated as a result of thermal decomposition of formate in the bonded interface at lower bonding temperatures.

  19. Development of low friction materials for LMFBR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.; Aungst, R.C.; Hoffman, N.J.; Cowgill, M.G.; Whitlow, G.A.; Wilson, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    The number of materials capable of providing low friction, low wear, and good corrosion resistance in low-oxygen (less than 1 ppM) sodium at temperatures up to 650 0 C are extremely limited. The paper describes the development, evaluation, and qualification of low-friction materials for this environment with emphasis on chromium carbide base coatings and nickel aluminide diffusion coatings. Design criteria and typical applications in liquid-metal-cooled reactors are described and recommendations offered for conditions under which these materials should and, perhaps more importantly, should not be used. Design parameters required to achieve optimum performance of these materials are discussed

  20. Static and dynamic oxidation of Ti-14Al-21Nb and coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, K.E.; Sankaran, S.N.; Clark, R.K.; Wallace, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the oxidation of Ti-14Al-21Nb (wt.%) studied under static conditions at 649 to 1093 degrees C for as long as 120 hr. and under simulated hypersonic flight (dynamic oxidation) conditions at 982 degrees C for as many as 16 half-hour cycles. Under simulated hypersonic flight conditions heavy oxidation and spalling of the oxide was observed. It was concluded that titanium aluminides used in hypersonic applications must have oxidation protective coatings. In this preliminary study coatings about one micrometer thick were applied by sputter deposition, form solutions, and from sol-gels. The materials applied by sputter deposition were oxides or fluorides thought to be stable against the metal and the materials applied from solutions and sol-gels were generally glass-formers and were intended for use in the final coating formulation as topcoats to the sputter-deposited coatings. Form weight gain and cross-sectional microscopy of the coated materials after oxidation exposure for 1 hr at 982 degrees C, it was found that because of cracks and porosity the sputter-deposited coatings did not have sufficient film integrity to shield the alloy

  1. Recubrimientos protectores para componentes de turbinas de aviación y de generación de energía depositados por proyección por plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agüero Bruna, A.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Coatings produced by aluminium diffusion, called aluminide are employed to increase the oxidation and corrosion resistance, increasing the life of Ni and Co base superalloys components at temperatures comprised between 900 and 1050ºC. Consequently these coatings are frequently employed in aeronautic and power generation turbines as well as in the chemical industry. Aluminides are industrially produced by pack cementation or CVD and recently it has been demonstrated that its resistance significantly increases when Cr is added (chrome-aluminides. During this work, a feasibility study has been carried out in order to determine if plasma spray can be employed for depositing this type of coatings on turbine blades. Therefore, aluminium and aluminium/chromium layers were deposited on Ni base IN100 superalloy specimens that were subsequently subjected to a diffusion heat treatment under Ar flow. Characterisation and analysis of the coatings were carried out by metallography , SEM and EDS. Cyclic oxidation tests were carried out at 1050º C while molten sulphate hot corrosion was performed at 900º C. The results of this preliminary study are promising and indicate that plasma spray can be developed as an industrial process for production of aluminide and chrome-aluminide coatings.

    Los recubrimientos producidos por difusión de aluminio, llamados aluminuros, se emplean para aumentar la resistencia a la oxidación y a la corrosión, incrementando la vida de componentes fabricados con superaleaciones de níquel y cobalto a temperaturas comprendidas entre 900 y 1050º C. Por ello se emplean muy frecuentemente en turbinas aeronaúticas y de producción de energía y en la industria química. Los aluminuros se obtienen industrialmente mediante cementación o CVD y recientemente se ha demostrado que su resistencia aumenta significativamente cuando se añade cromo (cromoaluminuros. Durante el presente trabajo, se ha realizado un estudio de viabilidad

  2. Moisture diffusion coefficients determination of furan bonded sands and water based foundry coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Muoio, Giovanni Luca; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2016-01-01

    Moisture content in furan bonded sand and water based coatings can be one of the main causes for gas related defects in large cast iron parts. Moisture diffusion coefficients for these materials are needed to precisely predict the possible moisture levels in foundry moulds. In this study, we first...... provide an example on how it is possible to apply this knowledge to estimate moisture variation in a sand mould during production....

  3. Effects of high temperature surface oxides on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing, heat treatment (750 {degrees}C in air, one hour) or simulated in-service-type oxidation (1000{degrees}C in air, 24 hours) on the room-temperature aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of iron aluminides. Materials evaluated included the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84, FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo, a FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385, and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy, FAPY. Tests were performed in a mild acid-chloride solution to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Cyclic-anodic-polarization tests were employed to evaluate resistances to localized aqueous corrosion. The high-temperature oxide surfaces consistently produced detrimental results relative to mechanically or chemically cleaned surfaces. Specifically, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the as-processed and 750{degrees} C surfaces, relative to the cleaned surfaces, for FA-84, FA-129, FAL-Mo, FA-385 and FAPY. Furthermore, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the 1000{degrees}C surfaces, relative to cleaned surfaces, for FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo.

  4. Sodium compatibility of aluminide and chromium nitride coatings on austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler-Latge, P.; Ardellier, A.; Depierre, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The present study is a part of a more general research and development program which is presented in another session of this meeting. The main aim of this program was the selection of coatings or treatments able to improve the tribological behaviour of austenitic stainless steel intended to use as structural material for subassemblies and diagrid of a LMFBR in project. Among this environmental conditions imposed for that application, we can retain: in normal conditions of operation, a purified sodium flow at about 400 0 C with a certain number of accidental cold thermal shocks, during the 30 years period of life of the reactor, and also with some hot variations of the sodium temperature from 400 0 C to 550 0 C. Some coatings which had been preselected for that use having not yet been tested in compatibility with liquid sodium for a long period, it was necessary to proceed to corrosion resistance tests in sodium environment almost for the thinner of them, in order to see if they were able to bear the environment conditions required for the project. Consecutively of these tests, metallurgical examinations have been made on samples, firstly after a 4000 hours period of dwell in sodium flowing at 400 0 C, and secondly after an additional dwelling period in flowing sodium of 500 hours at 550 0 C. The main metallurgical observations relative to three coatings or treatments are related thereafter

  5. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  6. Effect of Nb on phase transformations and microstructure in high Nb titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, Glenn E.; Kesler, Michael S.; Manuel, Michele V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamically-guided design of heat treatment schedules. • Linking chemistry and heat treatment to phase morphology. • Strong dependence of phase transformation behavior on Nb concentration. - Abstract: Titanium aluminides are of interest due to their high specific strength and performance up to 750 °C. Research into high-Nb γ-TiAl based titanium aluminides has shown promising improvements in performance by introduction of the σ-Nb 2 Al phase. However, one current challenge is improving mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures in order to enable their further implementation. These properties are closely tied with microstructural refinement, and thus phase evolution and microstructural development is the focus of this work. Phase transformation temperatures and stability ranges were determined experimentally through DSC analysis of arc melted alloys, then compared with predictions based upon computational models, and investigated through heat treatment of experimental alloys to develop an ultrafine γ + σ microstructure

  7. Effect of Nb on phase transformations and microstructure in high Nb titanium aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, Glenn E.; Kesler, Michael S.; Manuel, Michele V., E-mail: mmanuel@mse.ufl.edu

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Thermodynamically-guided design of heat treatment schedules. • Linking chemistry and heat treatment to phase morphology. • Strong dependence of phase transformation behavior on Nb concentration. - Abstract: Titanium aluminides are of interest due to their high specific strength and performance up to 750 °C. Research into high-Nb γ-TiAl based titanium aluminides has shown promising improvements in performance by introduction of the σ-Nb{sub 2}Al phase. However, one current challenge is improving mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures in order to enable their further implementation. These properties are closely tied with microstructural refinement, and thus phase evolution and microstructural development is the focus of this work. Phase transformation temperatures and stability ranges were determined experimentally through DSC analysis of arc melted alloys, then compared with predictions based upon computational models, and investigated through heat treatment of experimental alloys to develop an ultrafine γ + σ microstructure.

  8. Oxidation-sulfidation behavior of Ni aluminide in oxygen-sulfur mixed-gas atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation-sulfidation studies were conducted with sheet samples of nickel aluminide, containing 23.5 at. % Al, 0.5 at. % Hf, and 0.2 at. % B, in an annealed condition and after preoxidation treatments. Continuous weight-change measurements were made by a thermogravimetric technique in exposure atmospheres of air, a low-pO/sub 2/ gas mixture, and low-pO/sub 2/ gas mixtures with several levels of sulfur. The air-exposed specimens developed predominantly nickel oxide; the specimen exposed to a low-pO/sub 2/ environment developed an aluminum oxide scale. As the sulfur content of the gas mixture increased, the alumina scale exhibited spallation and the alloy tended to form nickel sulfide as the reaction phase. The results indicated that the sulfidation reaction of nickel aluminide specimens (both bare and preoxidized) was determined by the rate of transport of nickel from the substrate through the scale to the gas/alumina scale interface, the mechanical integrity of the oxide scale, and the H/sub 2/S concentration in the exposure environment

  9. Surface Coatings as Xenon Diffusion Barriers for Improved Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates surface coatings as xenon diffusion barriers on plastic scintillators. The motivation for the work is improved radioxenon detection systems, used within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). One type of radioxenon detection systems used in this context is the Swedish SAUNA system. This system uses a cylindrical plastic scintillator cell to measure the beta decay from radioxenon isotopes. The detector cell also acts as a container...

  10. Detection of thermally grown oxides in thermal barrier coatings by nondestructive evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, A.; Rogé, B.; Thornton, J.

    2006-03-01

    The thermal-barrier coatings (TBC) sprayed on hot-section components of aircraft turbine engines commonly consist of a partially stabilized zirconia top-coat and an intermediate bond-coat applied on the metallic substrate. The bond-coat is made of an aluminide alloy that at high engine temperatures forms thermally grown oxides (TGO). Although formation of a thin layer of aluminum oxide at the interface between the ceramic top-coat and the bond-coat has the beneficial effect of protecting the metallic substrate from hot gases, oxide formation at splat boundaries or pores within the bond-coat is a source of weakness. In this study, plasma-sprayed TBC specimens are manufactured from two types of bond-coat powders and exposed to elevated temperatures to form oxides at the ceramic-bond-coat boundary and within the bond-coat. The specimens are then tested using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and destructive metallography and compared with the as-manufactured samples. The objective is to determine if NDE can identify the oxidation within the bond-coat and give indication of its severity. While ultrasonic testing can provide some indication of the degree of bond-coat oxidation, the eddy current (EC) technique clearly identifies severe oxide formation within the bond-coat. Imaging of the EC signals as the function of probe location provides information on the spatial variations in the degree of oxidation, and thereby identifies which components or areas are prone to premature damage.

  11. Optimization of laboratory hot rolling of brittle Fe-40at.%Al-Zr-B aluminide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schindler, I.; Hadasik, E.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Kawulok, P.; Fabík, R.; Opěla, P.; Rusz, S.; Kawulok, R.; Jabłońska, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2015), s. 1693-1701 ISSN 1733-3490 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/10/0438 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : iron aluminides * EBSD * textures * modelling Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.090, year: 2014

  12. Aqueous pathways dominate permeation of solutes across Pisum sativum seed coats and mediate solute transport via diffusion and bulk flow of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Sylvia; Burghardt, Markus; Popp, Christian; Riederer, Markus

    2013-05-01

    The permeability of seed coats to solutes either of biological or anthropogenic origin plays a major role in germination, seedling growth and seed treatment by pesticides. An experimental set-up was designed for investigating the mechanisms of seed coat permeation, which allows steady-state experiments with isolated seed coats of Pisum sativum. Permeances were measured for a set of organic model compounds with different physicochemical properties and sizes. The results show that narrow aqueous pathways dominate the diffusion of solutes across pea seed coats, as indicated by a correlation of permeances with the molecular sizes of the compounds instead of their lipophilicity. Further indicators for an aqueous pathway are small size selectivity and a small effect of temperature on permeation. The application of an osmotic water potential gradient across isolated seed coats leads to an increase in solute transfer, indicating that the aqueous pathways form a water-filled continuum across the seed coat allowing the bulk flow of water. Thus, the uptake of organic solutes across pea testae has two components: (1) by diffusion and (2) by bulk water inflow, which, however, is relevant only during imbibition. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Shaping optimal zinc coating on the surface of high-quality ductile iron casting. Part II – Technological formula and value of diffusion coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopyciński D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The completed research presented in the first part of the article has allowed linking the manufacturing technology of ductile iron castings with the process of hot dip galvanizing. On the basis of these data simulations were carried out to examine the behaviour of zinc diffusion coefficient D in the galvanized coating. The adopted model of zinc coating growth helped to explain the cases of excessive growth of the intermetallic phases in this type of coating. The paper analyzes covered the relationship between the roughness and phase composition of the top layer of product and the thickness and kinetics of zinc coating growth referred to individual sub-layers of the intermetallic phases.Roughness and phase composition in the surface layer of product were next related to the diffusion coefficient D examined in respective sublayers of the intermetallic phases.

  14. Microstructures and superplasticity in near-gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bampton, C.C.; Martin, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    Microstructure control by thermomechanical processing in near-gamma titanium aluminide alloys has recently progressed to a point where the authors are able to reliably produce a wide range of microstructures in a single alloy. The authors are now studying the basic superplastic deformation microstructures. Correlations are made between microstructural details and flow stress, strain hardening, strain-rate hardening, necking, cavitation and failure. Special emphasis is given to the cavitation behavior since this phenomenon may constitute a major limitation to the useful application of superplastic forming for gamma TiAl structures

  15. Structural formation of aluminide phases on titanium alloy during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamaeva, A.A.; Romankov, S.E.; Sagdoldina, Zh.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aluminum layer on the surface of titanium alloy has been formed by thermal deposition. The structural formation of aluminide phases on the surface has been studied. The sequence of structural transformations at the Ti/Al interface is limited by the reaction temperature and time. The sequence of aluminide phase formation is occurred in compliance with Ti-Al equilibrium phase diagram. At the initial stages at the Ti/Al interface the Al3Ti alloy starts forming as a result of interdiffusion, and gradually the whole aluminum films is spent on the formation of this layer. The Al3Ti layer decomposes with the increase of temperature (>600C). At 800C the two-phase (Ti3Al+TiAl) layer is formed on the titanium surface. The TiAl compound is unstable and later on with the increase of the exposure time at 800C gradually transforms into the Ti3Al. The chain of these successive transformations leads to the formation of the continuous homogeneous layer consisting of the Ti3Al compound on the surface. At temperatures exceeding the allotropic transformation temperature (>900C) the Ti3Al compound starts decomposing. All structural changes taking place at the Ti/Al interface are accompanied by considerable changes in micro hardness. The structure of initial substrate influences on kinetics of phase transformation and microstructure development. (author)

  16. Effect of temperature on gamma prime and coating in a super alloy MAR-M200 Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusair, A.; Salam, I.; Tauqir, I.; Haq, A.U.

    1999-01-01

    Over temperature analysis was conducted on Mar M200-Hf, a Ni base super alloy used to cast turbine blades. The material has an aluminide coating. Samples cut from the coated material were exposed to temperatures from 1800 - 2000 deg. F in air, for 3.6 x 10/sup 3/ to 3.6 x 10/sup 5/ seconds. The processed samples were subjected to microstructural examination to study the behavior of gamma prime in the matrix and the effects on the coating. The exposure to temperatures ranging from 1800 to 2000 deg. F reveals the changes in microstructural features. The morphology of the gamma prime precipitates change from cuboidal to spherical as time and/or temperature is increased. At 2000 deg. F coalescence and then dissolution starts. The effect on coating is unusual and needle-like carbides dissolve while pores are generated. The study determines systematic relationships between exposure temperatures and the changes in microstructural changes. (author)

  17. Titanium Aluminide Scramjet Inlet Flap Subelement Benchmark Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, David L.; Draper, Susan L.

    2005-01-01

    A subelement-level ultimate strength test was completed successfully at the NASA Glenn Research Center (http://www.nasa.gov/glenn/) on a large gamma titanium aluminide (TiAl) inlet flap demonstration piece. The test subjected the part to prototypical stress conditions by using unique fixtures that allowed both loading and support points to be located remote to the part itself (see the photograph). The resulting configuration produced shear, moment, and the consequent stress topology proportional to the design point. The test was conducted at room temperature, a harsh condition for the material because of reduced available ductility. Still, the peak experimental load-carrying capability exceeded original predictions.

  18. Relationship of interaction of titanium aluminides with alloying elements as a basis for design of high-temperature alloys and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povarova, K.B.; Bannykh, O.A.; Antonova, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    One analyzed the available ternary phase diagrams of Ti-Al-AE where AE - alloying metal or metalloid. Nature of interaction of titanium aluminides, in particular, α 2 -Ti 3 Al, γ-TiAl and TiAl 3 with alloying elements (AE) in the uninvestigated systems was hypothesized with regard to the available binary and ternary phase diagrams and data on electron structure of AE. One determined that structure of Ti-Al-AE ternary phase diagrams, namely, position of domains of γ-TiAl and α 2 -Ti 3 Al base solid solutions, nature of substitution for AE positions in Ti or Al sublattices and position of (α 2 +γ)/γ domain boundary were governed by likeness or difference of electron structure of AE and of the substituted metal (Ti or Al) in titanium aluminide lattice and by value of dimension factor (difference of atomic radii of Al and Ti or Al). One analyzed promises offered by application of solid solution alloying and microalloying of aluminides by I-VIII group metals of the Periodic System [ru

  19. Studies on the formation of aluminides in heated Nb–Al powder mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sina, H.; Iyengar, S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Combustion initiates with NbAl{sub 3} formation above the melting point of aluminum. • Nb + 3Al samples yield almost 100% NbAl{sub 3} after combustion. • Nb-rich samples yield multi-phase products after heating to 1000 °C. • Reacted Nb-rich samples yield stable phases on reheating. • For NbAl{sub 3}, calculations show ΔH{sub formation} = −153 ± 15, E{sub activation} = 255 ± 26 kJ mol{sup −1}. - Abstract: The formation of aluminides during the heating of Nb–Al powder mixtures with different initial compositions (25, 33.3 and 75 at.% Al) has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter. The effect of parameters like particle size, compaction and heating rate on the onset temperature of reaction has been determined. The results show that an increase in heating rate leads to an increase in onset temperature for compacted as well as loose powder samples in the particle size range considered. For Al-rich mixtures, compaction increases the onset temperature irrespective of particle size. For all samples, finer aluminum particles and slower heating rates resulted in a decrease in onset temperature while higher aluminum contents in the mixture led to a higher reaction temperature. In Nb-rich samples, compaction led to a decrease in the onset temperatures. NbAl{sub 3} was the first compound to form in all the mixtures, irrespective of the initial composition. After heating to 1000 °C, EDS and XRD analyses confirmed the formation of only NbAl{sub 3} in Al-rich samples and a mixture of NbAl{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}Al along with unreacted niobium particles in Nb-rich samples. A subsequent heat treatment was necessary to obtain a single aluminide corresponding to the initial composition. These observations can be explained on the basis of niobium dissolution in molten aluminum and subsequent precipitation of NbAl{sub 3} in Al-rich samples and solid state diffusion through Nb{sub 3}Al and Nb{sub 2}Al phases in Nb-rich samples. For Nb

  20. Effect of Al added to a NiCrMo alloy on the development of the oxide layer of intermetallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Oliveira, A.S.C.M.; Cangue, F.J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Components performance in different environment is strongly dependent on oxides that develop on their surfaces. This study analyzed the oxide layer that develops on coatings processed with mixtures of an atomized Hastelloy C alloy with Al powders. Powder mixtures containing 10, 20 and 30wt%Al were deposited on AISI 1020 and AISI304 steel plates. Coatings were subsequently exposed to 850 deg C for two hours in a low PO 2 environment. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the phases that developed in the coating during processing and Raman analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to characterize the oxide layers. The results showed that coatings processed with the richer Al mixtures, 30wt%Al, which developed NiAl aluminides, reduced the development of α alumina when processing was done on AISI 304. Coatings processed on AISI 1020 with the three powder mixtures tested developed the different allotropic forms of alumina, as predicted for the tested temperature. (author)

  1. Wire rod coating process of gas diffusion layers fabrication for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, A.M.; Sadananda, S.; Parker, D.; Munukutla, L. [Electronic Systems Department, Arizona State University, 7001 E Williams Field Road, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Wertz, J. [Hollingsworth and Vose Co., A.K. Nicholson Research Lab, 219 Townsend Road West Groton, MA 01472 (United States); Thommes, M. [Quantachrome Instruments, 1900 Corporate Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Gas diffusion layers (GDLs) were fabricated using non-woven carbon paper as a macro-porous layer substrate developed by Hollingsworth and Vose Company. A commercially viable coating process was developed using wire rod for coating micro-porous layer by a single pass. The thickness as well as carbon loading in the micro-porous layer was controlled by selecting appropriate wire thickness of the wire rod. Slurry compositions with solid loading as high as 10 wt.% using nano-chain and nano-fiber type carbons were developed using dispersion agents to provide cohesive and homogenous micro-porous layer without any mud-cracking. The surface morphology, wetting characteristics and pore size distribution of the wire rod coated GDLs were examined using FESEM, Goniometer and Hg porosimetry, respectively. The GDLs were evaluated in single cell PEMFC under various operating conditions (temperature and RH) using hydrogen and air as reactants. It was observed that the wire rod coated micro-porous layer with 10 wt.% nano-fibrous carbon based GDLs showed the highest fuel cell performance at 85 C using H{sub 2} and air at 50% RH, compared to all other compositions. (author)

  2. Microstructure and wear resistance of a laser clad TiC reinforced nickel aluminides matrix composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Wang, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Wear resistant TiC/(NiAl-Ni 3 Al) composite coating was fabricated on a substrate of electrolyzed nickel by laser cladding using Ni-Al-Ti-C alloy powders. The laser clad coating is metallurgically bonded to the substrate and has a homogenous fine microstructure consisting of the flower-like equiaxed TiC dendrite and the dual phase matrix of NiAl and Ni 3 Al. The intermetallic matrix composite coating exhibits excellent wear resistance under both room- and high-temperature sliding wear test conditions due to the high hardness of TiC coupled with the strong atomic bonds of intermetallic matrix

  3. Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigarov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This is the final report for the Research Grant DE-FG02-08ER54989 'Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts'. The UCSD group including: A.Yu. Pigarov (PI), S.I. Krasheninnikov and R.D. Smirnov, was working on modeling of the impact of lithium coatings on edge plasma parameters in NSTX with the multi-species multi-fluid code UEDGE. The work was conducted in the following main areas: (i) improvements of UEDGE model for plasma-lithium interactions, (ii) understanding the physics of low-recycling divertor regime in NSTX caused by lithium pumping, (iii) study of synergistic effects with lithium coatings and non-diffusive ballooning-like cross-field transport, (iv) simulation of experimental multi-diagnostic data on edge plasma with lithium pumping in NSTX via self-consistent modeling of D-Li-C plasma with UEDGE, and (v) working-gas balance analysis. The accomplishments in these areas are given in the corresponding subsections in Section 2. Publications and presentations made under the Grant are listed in Section 3.

  4. Covalent bonding and band-gap formation in ternary transition-metal di-aluminides: Al4MnCo and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajci, M.; Hafner, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we extend our previous study of the electronic structure of and bonding mechanism in transition-metal (TM) di-aluminides to ternary systems. We have studied the character of the bonding in Al 4 MnCo and related TM di-aluminides in the C11 b (MoSi 2 ) and C54 (TiSi 2 ) crystal structures. A peculiar feature of the electronic structure of these TM di-aluminides is the existence of a semiconducting gap at the Fermi level. In our previous work we predicted a gap in Al 2 TM compounds where the TM atoms have eight valence electrons. Here we demonstrate that the semiconducting gap does not disappear if the TM sites are occupied by two different TMs, provided that the electron-per-atom ratio is conserved. Such a replacement substantially increases the class of possibly semiconducting TM di-aluminides. Substitution for 3d TMs of 4d or 5d TMs enhances the width of the gap. From the analysis of the charge density distribution and the crystal orbital overlap population, we conclude that the bonding between atoms has dominantly covalent character. This is confirmed not only by the enhanced charge density halfway between atoms, but also by the clear bonding-antibonding splitting of the electronic states. If the gaps between split states that correspond to all bonding configurations in the crystal have a common overlap at the Fermi level, the intermetallic compound becomes a semiconductor. However, the results of the total-energy calculations suggest that the existence of a band gap does not necessarily imply a stable structure. Strong covalent bonds can exist also in Al-TM structures where no band gap is observed. (author)

  5. Management of the acceptance process of RTR aluminide type spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auziere, P.; Thomasson, J.

    2002-01-01

    A wide range of Research Test Reactor aluminide type spent fuel is already received for treatment conditioning at the La Hague reprocessing complex. Such a diversity calls for an utmost attention to be paid to all safety-related systems and technical aspects, to all regulatory and administrative constraints. Despite of such multiple data inputs and rigid constraints, a close cooperation between the Research Reactor operator and COGEMA enables to reach adequate and cost effective solutions also relevant to spent fuel having had an uneven history. The acceptance process is primarily based on the client descriptive data and status declaration issued by the Research Reactor (RR) operator under QA. This acceptance process is a key step, to be keenly scheduled as it is directly interactive with the RR evacuation plans and the La Hague industrial plant program. It is also governed by the reviews conducted by the French Safety Authority and generally translated into operational authorisations. Concerned by maintaining high safety standards, reliable and proven operational levels of its nuclear services performed in the La Hague facilities COGEMA includes, all through this acceptance process, the operating, regulatory and administrative requirements. This paper sets forth an overview of the approach implemented in the COGEMA organisation for the management of the acceptance process of RTR aluminide type spent fuel. (author)

  6. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  7. Degradation of gas turbine coatings and life assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheruvu, N S [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1999-12-31

    MCrAlY coatings are widely used on hot section components of gas turbines to provide hot corrosion and/or oxidation protection by formation of an oxide layer on the surface. As the protective oxide scale exfoliates during service, aluminum from the coating diffuses outward for reformation of the protective scale. Aluminum may also diffuse inward due to the differences in composition between the coating and the substrate. Thus, the coatings degrade due to oxidation, oxide scale spallation, and inward and outward diffusion of aluminum. Service life of these coatings is controlled by the aluminum content in the coating, operating temperature and start- shutdown cycles. In-service degradation of CoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY coatings is presented. A procedure to predict the remaining service life of coatings under oxidizing conditions is discussed. (orig.) 12 refs.

  8. Degradation of gas turbine coatings and life assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheruvu, N.S. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31

    MCrAlY coatings are widely used on hot section components of gas turbines to provide hot corrosion and/or oxidation protection by formation of an oxide layer on the surface. As the protective oxide scale exfoliates during service, aluminum from the coating diffuses outward for reformation of the protective scale. Aluminum may also diffuse inward due to the differences in composition between the coating and the substrate. Thus, the coatings degrade due to oxidation, oxide scale spallation, and inward and outward diffusion of aluminum. Service life of these coatings is controlled by the aluminum content in the coating, operating temperature and start- shutdown cycles. In-service degradation of CoCrAlY and CoNiCrAlY coatings is presented. A procedure to predict the remaining service life of coatings under oxidizing conditions is discussed. (orig.) 12 refs.

  9. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  10. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S [San Antonio, TX; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry [San Antonio, TX; Liang, Wuwei [Austin, TX

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  11. Influences of MCrAlY coatings on oxidation resistance of single crystal superalloy DD98M and their inter-diffusion behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Long [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xin, Li, E-mail: xli@imr.ac.cn [Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Xinyue; Wang, Xiaolan; Wei, Hua; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui [Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Oxidation and interdiffusion behaviors of Ni-based single crystal superalloy DD98M with nominal compositions Ni–5.0Co–6.0Cr–6.3Al–6.0W–2.0Mo–6.0Ta–1.0Ti (in wt.%) and two types of MCrAlY coatings at 1000 °C and 1050 °C were investigated. Complex oxides formed on the surface of DD98M alloy when oxidized at 1000 °C and 1050 °C, which stratified, cracked and spalled. The faceted-like AlN and the particle-like and strip-like TiN formed in the alloy. The application of the NiCrAlY and NiCoCrAlYHfSi coatings greatly improved the oxidation resistance of DD98M alloy. After 500 h oxidation, α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was still the dominate phase in the oxide scales formed on the coated specimens. The adhesion of the oxide scale on the NiCoCrAlYHfSi coating was much better than that on the NiCrAlY coating. Interdiffusion occurred between the coatings and the substrate, which led to the formation of the IDZ and SRZ. The IDZ of the NiCrAlY coated specimen was composed of γ phase and Al- and Ta-rich γ′ phase. The γ′ phase in the IDZ accommodated most of the inward diffusing aluminum, so the SRZ formation was suppressed when oxidized at 1050 °C. However the formation of SRZ with μ-TCP still occurred when oxidized at 1000 °C probably due to the low solubility and slow diffusion rate of the alloying elements at lower temperature. The IDZ of the NiCoCrAlYHfSi coated specimen was a single γ phase. A large amount of μ-TCP precipitated in the SRZ of the NiCoCrAlYHfSi coated specimen when oxidized at 1000 °C and 1050 °C. It can be concluded coating composition has a significant effect on the development of the IDZ and SRZ. Thermal exposure temperature also has influences on the formation of the SRZ. The mechanism of SRZ formation and TCP precipitation are discussed. - Graphical abstract: The TEM micrograph of the IDZ and SRZ of the NiCoCrAlYHfSi-coated specimen oxidized at 1050 °C for 100 h and the respective diffraction patterns of the needle-like and the

  12. Surface coatings as xenon diffusion barriers on plastic scintillators : Improving Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the ability of transparent surface coatings to reduce xenon diffusion into plastic scintillators. The motivation for the work is improved radioxenon monitoring equipment, used with in the framework of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A large part of the equipment used in this context incorporates plastic scintillators which are in direct contact with the radioactive gas to be detected. One problem with such setup is that radioxenon...

  13. Microstructural characterization of silicon added titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.N.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium aluminides intermetallic compounds have received great attention during the past decade, since they have the potential, in aircraft and automotive engines, to replace the high density Ni-base superalloys However, these intermetallics possess poor oxidation properties at high temperatures. Previous studies showed that protective alumina scale formation on gamma-TiAl can be obtained by small additions (around 2 at.%) of Ag. In the present study, a number of cast Ti-Al-Si alloys were investigated in relation to transient oxide formation in air at 1300 deg. C. After various oxidation times the oxide composition, microstructure and morphology were studied by combining a number of analysis techniques. The TiAl-Si alloys appear to form Al Ti and Si oxides. However, the formation of silicon oxide at the interface of base metal and scale slows down the oxidation rate significantly. (author)

  14. Determination of diffusible and total hydrogen concentration in coated and uncoated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabho, Nonhlangabezo

    2010-09-23

    The new trend in the steel industry demands thin, flexible, high strength steels with low internal embrittlement. It is a well known fact that the atomic hydrogen which is picked up during production, fabrication and service embrittles the steel. This has led to an extensive research towards the improvement of the quality of metallic materials by focusing on total and diffusible hydrogen concentrations which are responsible for hydrogen embrittlement. Since the internal embrittlement cannot be foreseen, the concentrations of diffusible hydrogen work as indicators while the total hydrogen characterizes the absorbed quantities and quality of that particular product. To meet these requirements, the analytical chemistry methods which include the already existing carrier gas melt (fusion) extraction methods that use infrared and thermal conductivity for total hydrogen detection were applied. The newly constructed carrier gas thermal desorption mass spectroscopy was applied to monitor the diffusible concentration at specific temperatures and desorption rates of hydrogen which will contribute towards the quality of materials during service. The TDMS method also involved the characterization of the energy quantity (activation energy) required by hydrogen to be removed from traps of which irreversible traps are preferred because they enhance the stability of the product by inhibiting the mobility of hydrogen which is detrimental to the metallic structures. The instrumentation for TDMS is quite simple, compact, costs less and applicable to routine analysis. To determine total and diffusible hydrogen, the influence of the following processes: chemical and mechanical zinc coating removal, sample cleaning with organic solvents, conditions for hydrogen absorption by electrolytic hydrogen charging, conditions of hydrogen desorption by storing the sample at room temperature, solid CO{sub 2} and at temperatures of the drier was analysed. The contribution of steel alloys towards

  15. Desafios na proteção de equipamentos: "re-inventando" revestimentos soldados Challenges on equipment protection: "reinventing" welded coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sofia C. M. D'Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A produção de revestimentos soldados permite a proteção de componentes respeitando suas propriedades estruturais e em simultâneo otimiza a resistência ao meio. Avanços significativos podem ser conseguidos se for possível usufruir materiais com propriedades mais nobres mas tipicamente associadas a baixa. Procedimentos de síntese de aluminetos in-situ por plasma com arco transferido utilizando misturas de pós e as características dos revestimentos obtidos são revisados. É feita a análise de revestimentos obtidos pela síntese simultânea de uma camada de alumina(Al2O3 e da camada de aluminetos de ligação com o substrato metálico. Estes revestimentos apresentam um gradiente de propriedades severo, apresentando um diferencial na produção de sistemas de materiais com potencial para operar em condições de elevada agressividade. Os materiais foram sintetizados durante a deposição de misturas de pós de quartzo e de alumínio com composição química pré-determinada sobre liga de NiCr2%Nb e aço AISI 1020. A estratificação dos revestimentos é destacada e sua microestrutura analisada. Avaliação preliminar do desempenho ao desgaste e sua correlação com revestimentos de superligas de Co mostrou que a perda de massa em deslizamento abrasivo foi reduzida em até 5x.Hardfacing allows to protect components with coatings exhibiting very distinct properties from those of the substrate. This procedure maintains the structural properties of the substrate and optimizes resistance of the surface to the working environment. A step towards enhanced performance of components can be achieved if high hardness and chemical inertia, low weldability materials can be used. In-situ aluminide processing, involving the development of aluminide during the deposition by Plasma Transferred Arc of powder mixtures is reviewed. Analysis of coatings exhibiting a gradient of properties obtained by the in-situ synthesis of an alumina and an aluminide bond

  16. PTA hardfacing of Nb/Al coatings Revestimentos Nb/Al depositados por PTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Graf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hardfacing is widely applied to components yet the majority of the welding techniques available restrain the variety of hard alloys that can be deposited. Plasma Transferred Arc hardfacing offsets this drawback by using powdered feedstock offering the ability to tailor the chemical composition of the coating and as a consequence its properties. The high strength and chemical inertia of aluminide alloys makes them very suitable to protect components. However, the strong interaction with the substrate during hardfacing requires analysis of each alloy system to optimize its properties and weldability. This work analyzed coatings processed with a cast and ground Nb40wt%Al alloy and the effect of Fe and C on the coatings features. It confirmed that sound Nb aluminide coatings can be processed by plasma Transferred arc hardfacing and will have a strong interaction with the substrate, which determines the final microstructure and properties of coatings. Final remarks point out that during Nb-Al coating tailoring the interaction with the substrate has to be considered at the early stages of design process.Revestimentos soldados são amplamente usados para proteger componentes mecânicos entretanto a maioria das técnicas de soldagem disponíveis restringe a variedade de ligas de alta resistência que podem ser depositadas. O processo de plasma por arco transferido permite ultrapassar esta limitação ao utilizar material de adição na forma de pó, oferecendo a possibilidade de se customizar a composição dos revestimentos e em consequências as suas propriedades. A elevada resistência mecânica e inercia química das ligas de aluminetos tornam estas ligas atrativas para a proteção de componentes diversos. Entretanto a grande interação com o substrato que ocorre quando do processamento exige que para a otimização das propriedades e soldabilidade seja realizada uma a análise de cada sistema liga e substrato. Neste trabalho foram processados e

  17. Electrochemical and wear behavior of niobium-vanadium carbide coatings produced on AISI H13 tool steel through thermo-reactive deposition/diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejo Nieto, Fabio Enrique; Olaya Flores, Jhon Jairo; Alfonso Orjuela, Jose Edgar

    2016-01-01

    We deposited of niobium-vanadium carbide coatings on tool steel AISI H13 using the thermo-reactive substrates deposition/diffusion (TRD) technique. The carbides were obtained using salt baths composed of molten borax, ferroniobium, vanadium and aluminum, by heating this mixture at 1020°C for 4 hours. The coatings were characterized morphologically via electron microscopy scanning (SEM), the chemical surface composition was determined through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX); the crystal structure was analyzed using x-ray diffraction (XRD), the mechanical properties of the coatings were evaluated using nano-indentation, The tribological properties of the coatings obtained were determined using a Pin-on-disk tribometer and the electrochemical behavior was studied through potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that the hardness of the coated steel increased four times with respect to uncoated steel, and the electrochemical test established that the corrosion current is lower by one order of magnitude for coated steel

  18. Interface-related deformation phenomena in intermetallic γ-titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, F.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of titanium aluminides towards higher ductility concentrates on Ti-rich alloys which are composed of the intermetallic phases γ(TiAl) and α 2 (Ti 3 Al). The two phases form a lamellar microstructure with various types of interfaces. The deformation behaviour of these materials was investigated by compression tests, which were performed for different orientations of the interfacial boundaries with respect to the sample axis. With regard to the mechanical properties the structure of the interfaces and the micromechanisms of deformation were studied by conventional and high resolution electron microscopy. Accordingly, the interfacial boundaries impede the propagation of slip across the lamellae, leading to an athermal contribution to the flow stress. (orig.)

  19. Interface-related deformation phenomena in intermetallic γ-titanium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, F.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of titanium aluminides towards higher ductility concentrates on Ti-rich alloys which are composed of the intermetallic phases γ(TiAl) and α2(Ti3Al). The two phases form a lamellar microstructure with various types of interfaces. The deformation behaviour of these materials was investigated by compression tests, which were performed for different orientations of the interfacial boundaries with respect to the sample axis. With regard to the mechanical properties the structure of the interfaces and the micromechanisms of deformation were studied by conventional and high resolution electron microscopy. Accordingly, the interfacial boundaries impede the propagation of slip across the lamellae, leading to an athermal contribution to the flow stress.

  20. Protective coatings for high temperature alloys state of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goward, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings used on nickel- and cobalt-base superalloy blades and vanes in gas turbine engines typify the state of coating technology for high temperature alloys. Coatings formed by interdiffusion of aluminum with the alloys to form layers consisting mainly of intermetallic compounds, such as NiAl and CoAl, were the first systems used for protection of gas turbine airfoils. The protectivity of these systems is derived from the formation of protective alumina scales. In a general way, coating degradation occurs by cyclic oxidation, molten salt hot corrosion and, at higher temperatures, interdiffusion with the substrate. Thermal fatigue properties are governed by the brittle-ductile transition behavior of the intermetallic compounds NiAl and CoAl. Both positive and negative effects occur, depending on the shapes of thermal strain-temperature curves for particular applications. Significant increases in hot corrosion and oxidation resistance have been obtained by the incorporation of noble metals, such as platinum, in aluminide coatings. The so-called MCrAlY overlay coatings, based on nickel, cobalt, iron and combinations thereof with chromium, aluminum and yttrium can be formulated over a wide range of compositions nominally independent of those of substrate alloys. Improved oxidation resistance and, in part, hot corrosion resistance is derived from yttrium which enhances protective oxide adherence. Mechanical properties, principally ductility, and therefore thermal fatigue resistance, can be adjusted to the requirements of specific applications. Incremental improvements in performance of the MCrAlY coatings are expected as research programs define degradation mechanisms in greater detail and more complex compositions are devised. More basic evaluations of mixed metal-ceramic insulative coatings have been initiated to determine if these systems are capable of effecting further increases in airfoil durability

  1. Friction stir weld assisted diffusion bonding of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghshenas, M.; Abdel-Gwad, A.; Omran, A.M.; Gökçe, B.; Sahraeinejad, S.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Successful lap joints of Al 5754 sheet to coated DP600 and 22MnB5 steels. • Negligible effect of welding speed on mechanical properties of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints. • Lower strength of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints compared with Al 5754/DP600 joints. - Abstract: In the present paper friction stir-induced diffusion bonding is used for joining sheets of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels (DP600 and 22MnB5) by promoting diffusion bonding in an overlap configuration. Mechanical performance and microstructures of joints were analyzed by overlap shear testing, metallography, and X-ray diffraction. Our results show that the strength of joint is dependent upon tool travel speed and the depth of the tool pin relative to the steel surface. The thickness and types of intermetallic compounds formed at the interface play a significant role in achieving a joint with optimum performance. That is, the formation of high aluminum composition intermetallic compounds (i.e. Al 5 Fe 2 ) at the interface of the friction stir lap joint appeared to have a more negative effect on joint strength compared to the presence of high iron composition intermetallic phases (i.e. FeAl). This is in agreement with previously reported findings that FeAl intermetallic can improve the fracture toughness and interface strength in Al/St joints

  2. Hydrogen permeation resistant phosphate coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for reducing hydrogen diffusion through metal wherein the metal is coated with a phosphate-radical-containing, phosphate-glass-forming material on at least one surface thereof. The coating is then heated to at least 350 0 C to form a phosphate glass. This method is especially applicable to nuclear reactors to minimize tritium diffusion. The coating is preferably formed with a solution of phosphoric acid which may also contain compounds such as MnSO 4 , SiO 2 and Na 2 Cr 2 0 7 . (author)

  3. Hydrogen permeation resistant phosphate coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for reducing hydrogen diffusion through metal is described. The metal is coated with a phosphate-radical-containing, phosphate-glass-forming material on at least one surface. The coating is then heated to at least 350 0 C to form a phosphate glass. This method is especially applicable to nuclear reactors to minimize tritium diffusion. The coating is preferably formed with a solution of phosphoric acid which may also contain compounds such as MnSO 4 , SiO 2 and Na 2 Cr 2 O 7 . (author)

  4. Hot-Dip Coating of Lead-free Aluminum on Steel Substrates with Ultrasonic Vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hot-dip coating has been practically employed in manufacturing zinc alloy coated steel sheets. However, it is difficult to coat aluminum alloy on a bulky steel substrate without sufficient preheating, because a rapidly solidified layer containing gas babbles is formed on a substrate surface. A variety of iron-aluminides are also formed at the interface of a steel and aluminum hot-dip coating system, which is the main difficulty in joining of steel with aluminum. Ultrasonic vibration was applied to a steel substrate during hot-dip coating of aluminum alloy to control a rapidly solidified layer and a brittle reaction layer. Hot dipping of columnar steel substrates into molten aluminum alloy (Al-2.7 mass fraction Si-4.6 mass fraction Sn) was carried out through the use of a Langevin oscillator with resonant frequency of 19.5 kHz. The application of ultrasonic vibration is quite effective to control a rapidly solidified layer and a surface oxide layer from a substrate surface by the sonocapillary effect based on a cavitation phenomenon, so that the intimate contact is achieved at the beginning of hot-dip coating. The application of ultrasonic vibration to hot-dipping is effective to control a reaction layer with less than 5μm in thickness. An impact test exhibits that the good adhesive strength is approved in hot-dipped aluminum coatings with a thin reaction layer of approximately 5μm.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Al/Fe-aluminide in-situ composite prepared by reactive stir casting route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Subhranshu; Sinha, Arijit; Das, Debdulal; Ghosh, Sumit; Basumallick, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Iron aluminide particulate reinforced aluminium composites were prepared by a simple liquid metal stir casting route. The particulate intermetallic reinforcements were formed by in-situ reaction between molten aluminium and a rotating mild steel stirrer at 800 °C. X-ray diffraction studies were carried out to identify the types of iron aluminide particulates present in the as cast composite. Compositional variations of the composite samples were estimated with the aid of energy dispersive spectroscopy. The microstructural features of the composite were studied with respect to different heat treatment schedules and deformation conditions. Microhardness and nanoindentation measurements were also carried out to assess the micromechanical behaviour e.g., hardness and elastic modulus in micrometric length scale of the composite samples. Tensile tests and fractographic analysis were performed to estimate the mechanical properties and determine the mode of failure of the samples. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the composite samples were correlated and discussed

  6. The obtainment of highly concentrated uranium pellets for plate type (MTR) fuel by dispersion of uranium aluminides in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morando, R.A.; Raffaeli, H.A.; Balzaretti, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the intermetallic UAl 3 for manufacturing plate type MTR fuel with 20% U 235 enriched uranium and a density of about 20 kg/m 3 is analyzed. The technique used is the dispersion of UAl 3 particles in aluminium powder. The obtainment of the UAl 3 intermetallic was performed by fusion in an induction furnace in an atmosphere of argon at a pressure of 0.7 BAR (400 mm) using an alumina melting pot. To make the aluminide powder and attain the wished granulometry a cutting and a rotating crusher were used. Aluminide powders of different granulometries and different pressures of compactation were analyzed. In each case the densities were measured. The compacts were colaminated with the 'Picture Frame' technique at temperatures of 490 and 0 deg C with excellent results from the manufacturing view point. (M.E.L.) [es

  7. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) phase inversion coating as a diffusion layer to enhance the cathode performance in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Wulin

    2014-12-01

    A low cost poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) phase inversion coating was developed as a cathode diffusion layer to enhance the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A maximum power density of 1430 ± 90 mW m-2 was achieved at a PVDF-HFP loading of 4.4 mg cm-2 (4:1 polymer:carbon black), with activated carbon as the oxygen reduction cathode catalyst. This power density was 31% higher than that obtained with a more conventional platinum (Pt) catalyst on carbon cloth (Pt/C) cathode with a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) diffusion layer (1090 ± 30 mW m-2). The improved performance was due in part to a larger oxygen mass transfer coefficient of 3 × 10-3 cm s-1 for the PVDF-HFP coated cathode, compared to 1.7 × 10-3 cm s -1 for the carbon cloth/PTFE-based cathode. The diffusion layer was resistant to electrolyte leakage up to water column heights of 41 ± 0.5 cm (4.4 mg cm-2 loading of 4:1 polymer:carbon black) to 70 ± 5 cm (8.8 mg cm-2 loading of 4:1 polymer:carbon black). This new type of PVDF-HFP/carbon black diffusion layer could reduce the cost of manufacturing cathodes for MFCs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernieres, Jerome, E-mail: Jerome.vernieres@oist.jp; Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Diaz, Rosa E. [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Bobo, Jean-François [Centre d’Elaboration de Materiaux et d’Etudes Structurales (CEMES), 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Sowwan, Mukhles, E-mail: Mukhles@oist.jp [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Nanotechnology Research Laboratory, Al-Quds University, P.O. Box 51000, East Jerusalem, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO{sub 3} phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  9. On the interfacial degradation mechanisms of thermal barrier coating systems: Effects of bond coat composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R.T., E-mail: WU.Rudder@nims.go.jp [International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); Wang, X.; Atkinson, A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems based on an electron beam physical vapour deposited, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat and a substrate material of CMSX-4 superalloy were identically prepared to systematically study the behaviour of different bond coats. The three bond coat systems investigated included two {beta}-structured Pt-Al types and a {gamma}-{gamma}' type produced by Pt diffusion without aluminizing. Progressive evolution of stress in the thermally grown aluminium oxide (TGO) upon thermal cycling, and its relief by plastic deformation and fracture, were studied using luminescence spectroscopy. The TBCs with the LT Pt-Al bond coat failed by a rumpling mechanism that generated isolated cracks at the interface between the TGO and the YSZ. This reduced adhesion at this interface and the TBC delaminated when it could no longer resist the release of the stored elastic energy of the YSZ, which stiffened with time due to sintering. In contrast, the TBCs with Pt diffusion bond coats did not rumple, and the adhesion of interfaces in the coating did not obviously degrade. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms are strongly associated with differences in the high-temperature mechanical properties of the bond coats.

  10. Laminated structure in internally oxidized Ru-Ta coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yung-I, E-mail: yichen@mail.ntou.edu.tw

    2012-12-01

    During the development of refractory alloy coatings for protective purposes at high temperature under oxygen-containing atmospheres, previous studies noted and examined the internal oxidation phenomenon for Mo-Ru and Ru-Ta coatings. The internally oxidized zone shows a laminated structure, consisting of alternating oxygen-rich and deficient layers stacked with a general orientation. Previous studies proposed a forming mechanism. To investigate in detail, Ru-Ta coatings were prepared with various rotating speeds of a substrate-holder. The coatings were annealed at 600 Degree-Sign C in an atmosphere continuously purged with 1% O{sub 2}-99% Ar mixed gas for 30 min. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the laminated-layer periods. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles certified the periodical variation of the related constituents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy proved the valence variation of Ta in the near surface, accompanied by the introduction of oxygen ions. The inward diffusion of oxygen was dominated by lattice diffusion. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laminated Ru-Ta coatings consisted of a cyclical gradient concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The as-deposited coatings showed a laminated structure with a period of 4-34 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Internal oxidation of Ru-Ta coatings executed after annealing in 1% O{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen inward diffusion was dominated by lattice diffusion.

  11. The Effect Of The Reactive Element On The CHROMOXIDE And Aluminide Layers In The High Temperature Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dani, Mohammad; Effendi, Nurdin

    2000-01-01

    Oxide layers at high temperature condition, as Cr 2 O 3 , AI 2 O 3 , growing act not only as corrosion barrier, but also as a diffusion barrier of agressive components. MA956 and Ni75Cr25 alloy were studied to observe the elIect of Yttrium coating on their oxidation behavior. The influence ofthese coatings on the oxidation behaviour of the alloy was studied, Thin coatings of Yttrium have been applied to the surface of those alloys by vacuum coating The growth of the oxide layers under controlled has been investigated in this work by Analytical Transmission Electron Microscope (ATEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), It was found that addition of small amounts of elements such as Yttrium to these alloys greatly increase their oxidation resistance,

  12. Study on microstructure of Al coating on beryllium substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruiwen; Xian Xiaobin; Zou Juesheng; Zhang Pengcheng

    2002-01-01

    Magnetron sputtering ion plating and plasma spraying have been used to make aluminium coating on beryllium substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron energy spectrum (AES) and X-ray stress analysis were used to study microstructure and interface and residual stress and diffusion content of Al coating. The results show that width of diffusion zone made by magnetron sputtering ion plating is about 1 μm, coating is composed of columnar grains and internal stress of Al coating is about zero. Coating deposited by plasma spraying is not homogeneous and there are microcracks at interface

  13. In-depth study of the mechanical properties for Fe_3Al based iron aluminide fabricated using the wire-arc additive manufacturing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Chen; Pan, Zengxi; Cuiuri, Dominic; Dong, Bosheng; Li, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate iron aluminide alloy in-situ, through separate feeding of pure Fe and Al wires into a molten pool that is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This paper investigates the morphologies, chemical compositions and mechanical properties of the as-fabricated 30 at% Al iron aluminide wall components, and how these properties vary at different locations within the buildup wall. The tensile properties are also measured in different loading orientations; as epitaxial growth of large columnar grains is observed in the microstructures. Fe_3Al is the only phase detected in the middle buildup section of the wall structure, which constitutes the majority of the deposited material. The bottom section of the structure contains a dilution affected region where some acicular Fe_3AlC_0_._5 precipitates can be observed, induced by carbon from the steel substrate that was used for fabrication. The microhardness and chemical composition indicate relatively homogeneous material properties throughout the buildup wall. However, the tensile properties are very different in the longitudinal direction and normal directions, due to epitaxial growth of large columnar grains. In general, the results have demonstrated that the WAAM process is capable of producing full density in-situ-alloyed iron aluminide components with tensile properties that are comparable to powder metallurgy methods.

  14. Thermal and Irradiation Creep Behavior of a Titanium Aluminide in Advanced Nuclear Plant Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Per; Chen, Jiachao; Hoffelner, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Titanium aluminides are well-accepted elevated temperature materials. In conventional applications, their poor oxidation resistance limits the maximum operating temperature. Advanced reactors operate in nonoxidizing environments. This could enlarge the applicability of these materials to higher temperatures. The behavior of a cast gamma-alpha-2 TiAl was investigated under thermal and irradiation conditions. Irradiation creep was studied in beam using helium implantation. Dog-bone samples of dimensions 10 × 2 × 0.2 mm3 were investigated in a temperature range of 300 °C to 500 °C under irradiation, and significant creep strains were detected. At temperatures above 500 °C, thermal creep becomes the predominant mechanism. Thermal creep was investigated at temperatures up to 900 °C without irradiation with samples of the same geometry. The results are compared with other materials considered for advanced fission applications. These are a ferritic oxide-dispersion-strengthened material (PM2000) and the nickel-base superalloy IN617. A better thermal creep behavior than IN617 was found in the entire temperature range. Up to 900 °C, the expected 104 hour stress rupture properties exceeded even those of the ODS alloy. The irradiation creep performance of the titanium aluminide was comparable with the ODS steels. For IN617, no irradiation creep experiments were performed due to the expected low irradiation resistance (swelling, helium embrittlement) of nickel-base alloys.

  15. The dependence of tensile ductility on investment casting parameters in gamma titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raban, R.; Rishel, L.L.; Pollock, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    Plates of three gamma titanium aluminide alloys have been investment cast with a wide variety of casting conditions designed to influence cooling rates. These alloys include Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nv, Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb+0.5at%B and Ti-45Al-2Cr-2Nb+0.9at%B. Cooling rates have been estimated with the use of thermal data from casting experiments, along with the UES ProCAST simulation package. Variations in cooling rate significantly influenced the microstructure and tensile properties of all three alloys

  16. Phase stability and electronic structure of transition-metal aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will describe the interplay between die electronic structure and structural energetics in simple, complex, and quasicrystalline Al-transition metal (T) intermetallics. The first example is the Ll 2 -DO 22 competition in Al 3 T compounds. Ab-initio electronic total-energy calculations reveal surprisingly large structural-energy differences, and show that the phase stability of both stoichiometric and ternary-substituted compounds correlates closely with a quasigap in the electronic density of states (DOS). Secondly, ab-initio calculations for the structural stability of the icosahedrally based Al 12 W structure reveal similar quasigap effects, and provide a simple physical explanation for the stability of the complex aluminide structures. Finally, parametrized tight-binding model calculations for the Al-Mn quasicrystal reveal a large spread in the local Mn DOS behavior, and support a two-site model for the quasicrystal's magnetic behavior

  17. Determination of hydrogen permeability in uncoated and coated superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Vesely, E. J., Jr.; Hill, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen permeability, diffusivity, and solubility data were obtained for eight wrought and cast high temperature alloys over the range 650 to 815 C. Data were obtained for both uncoated alloys and wrought alloys coated with four commercially available coatings. Activation energies for permeability, diffusivity and solubility were calculated.

  18. Radiation induced diffusion as a method to protect surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumvol, I.J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced diffusion forms a coating adeherent and without interface on the surface of metalic substrates. This coating improves the behaviour of metal to corrosion and abrasion. The effect of radiation induced diffusion of tin and calcium on pure iron surface is described and analyzed in this work. (author) [pt

  19. In-depth study of the mechanical properties for Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminide fabricated using the wire-arc additive manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen; Pan, Zengxi, E-mail: zengxi@uow.edu.au; Cuiuri, Dominic; Dong, Bosheng; Li, Huijun

    2016-07-04

    An innovative wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) process is used to fabricate iron aluminide alloy in-situ, through separate feeding of pure Fe and Al wires into a molten pool that is generated by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This paper investigates the morphologies, chemical compositions and mechanical properties of the as-fabricated 30 at% Al iron aluminide wall components, and how these properties vary at different locations within the buildup wall. The tensile properties are also measured in different loading orientations; as epitaxial growth of large columnar grains is observed in the microstructures. Fe{sub 3}Al is the only phase detected in the middle buildup section of the wall structure, which constitutes the majority of the deposited material. The bottom section of the structure contains a dilution affected region where some acicular Fe{sub 3}AlC{sub 0.5} precipitates can be observed, induced by carbon from the steel substrate that was used for fabrication. The microhardness and chemical composition indicate relatively homogeneous material properties throughout the buildup wall. However, the tensile properties are very different in the longitudinal direction and normal directions, due to epitaxial growth of large columnar grains. In general, the results have demonstrated that the WAAM process is capable of producing full density in-situ-alloyed iron aluminide components with tensile properties that are comparable to powder metallurgy methods.

  20. The effect of aluminium on the creep behavior of titanium aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, T.K.; Mishra, R.S.; Gogia, A.K.; Banerjee, D.

    1995-01-01

    Small increases in the Al content of Ti 3 Al-Nb alloys are known to improve creep resistance at the expense of the room temperature ductility. Though considerable work has been done on the creep behavior of titanium aluminide alloys, a systematic investigation involving the role of Al on the creep of aluminides is lacking. In the present study the authors have therefore carried out a complete investigation on stress and temperature effects on two alloys with differing Al contents, Ti-24Al-15Nb and Ti-26Al-15Nb (nominal composition in at%) in order to understand the effect of Al in terms of power law creep behavior. The following conclusions are made: (1) A strong Al effect on the creep resistance of O phase alloys in the Ti-Al-Nb systems has been confirmed, through a study of stress and temperature effects on the creep behavior of the Ti-24Al-15Nb and the Ti-26Al-15Nb compositions. (2) It has been shown, however, that the small differences in Al do not affect either the activation energies for creep (∼370 kJ/mole) or the creep mechanism (climb controlled creep with a stress exponent of 4). The activation energies and stress exponents are similar to that observed in single phase O alloys. (3) It is suggested that Al influences creep strength through an intrinsic effect on the pre-exponential term AD o in the power law creep equation. It is possible that this effect is related to a higher ordering energy of the O phase with increasing Al content

  1. The Role of Diffusion Media in Nitriding Process on Surface Layers Characteristics of AISI 4140 with and without Hard Chrome Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Widi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The surface layer characteristics of the AISI 4140 tool steel treated by nitriding gas before and after hard chrome plating utilizing pure nitrogen diffusion media (fluidized bed reactor and the without gas (muffle reactor has been studied experimentally. The result shows that nitriding substrate with hard chrome layers has nitrogen atoms concentration almost twice greater than that without hard chrome layers. After being given a hard chrome plating, nitriding on AISI 4140 steel generally has a nitrogen concentration of up to 4 times more than the substrate without hard chrome coating. Almost the entire specimen showed the highest concentration of N atoms in the area below the surface (hardening depth of 200 to 450 µm. N atoms diffusion depth profile has a correlation with hardening depth profile, especially on the specimens layered with hard chromium. The substrate without hard chrome plating tends to have higher surface hardness than the sub-surface. The results show that the effectiveness and efficiency of the gas nitriding diffusion process can be produced without the use of gas in the muffle reactor but the specimens must be hard chromium coated first. This phenomenon can be explained by the role of the passive layer formation that works as a barrier to keeps the spreading of N atoms concentrated in sub-surface areas.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF NICKEL ALUMINIDE (NI3AL) NANOSTRUCTURED COATED ECONOMISER TUBE IN BOILER

    OpenAIRE

    * Gokulakannan A, Karuppasamy K

    2016-01-01

    Thermal Power Stations all over the world are facing the problem of boiler tube leakage frequently. The consequences of which affects the performance of power plant and huge amount of money loss. Hot corrosion and erosion are recognized as serious problems in coal based power generation plants in India. The maximum number of cause of failure in economizer unit is due to flue gas erosion. The corrosion resistant coatings used conventionally are having some limitations like degradation of the c...

  3. Study of radioactivity diffusion for bitumen-coated blocks produced by an industrial coating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodier, J.; Lefillatre, G.

    1969-01-01

    The solidification by bitumen of chemical coprecipitation sludges from the Marcoule waste treatment station has been studied in the laboratory and has led to the construction of an industrial coating plant. The quality of the coated material obtained has been controlled by the lixiviation test carried out with ordinary water and with sea-water on 45 ml laboratory samples and on industrial coated blocks of 150 litres. Tests on blocks of such a size have necessitated the installation of three special tanks. Two, each of 2000 litres capacity, contain ordinary and sea-water which was continuously recycled at a rate of 2.5 cm/hr and renewed periodically. In the third tank having a capacity of 11000 litres, the coated block was buried in earth and sprinkled with ordinary water with a view to studying the migration of radioelements in soil. The results of these tests confirm those obtained during the laboratory experiments. (authors) [fr

  4. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  5. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  6. Vanadium carbide coatings: deposition process and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, A.; Borisov, Y.; Shavlovsky, E.; Mits, I.; Castermans, L.; Jongbloed, R.

    2001-01-01

    Vanadium carbide coatings on carbon and alloyed steels were produced by the method of diffusion saturation from the borax melt. Thickness of the vanadium carbide layer was 5-15 μm, depending upon the steel grade and diffusion saturation parameters. Microhardness was 20000-28000 MPa and wear resistance of the coatings under conditions of end face friction without lubrication against a mating body of WC-2Co was 15-20 times as high as that of boride coatings. Vanadium carbide coatings can operate in air at a temperature of up to 400 o C. They improve fatigue strength of carbon steels and decrease the rate of corrosion in sea and fresh water and in acid solutions. The use of vanadium carbide coatings for hardening of various types of tools, including cutting tools, allows their service life to be extended by a factor of 3 to 30. (author)

  7. Electrochemical corrosion of cermet coatings in artificial marine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabot, P.L.; Fernandez, J.; Guilemany, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The electrochemical corrosion of different WC+12Co coatings sprayed on 34CrMo4 (UNS-G41350) steel by the high velocity oxygen fuel technique has been studied by corrosion potential and impedance measurements considering previous SEM observations and EDX microanalysis. The experiments were conducted in artificial marine water at 20 C and the impedance spectra were obtained at the corresponding corrosion potentials for the substrate, coating and substrate-coating systems. The impedance diagrams indicated that the electrochemical corrosion of the steel-coating systems is controlled by oxygen diffusion through a porous film of corrosion products, as in the case of the shot-blasted steel. In contrast, the corrosion of the coating appeared to be controlled by diffusion of oxygen through the electrolyte. The impedance diagrams obtained for the steel-coating systems depended on the porosities of the cermet coatings, thus being an useful procedure to characterize metals coated by cermets. (orig.)

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Oxygen and Cation Diffusion in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is of interest to the aerospace community, notably for its application as a thermal barrier coating for turbine engine components. In such an application, diffusion of both oxygen ions and cations is of concern. Oxygen diffusion can lead to deterioration of a coated part, and often necessitates an environmental barrier coating. Cation diffusion in YSZ is much slower than oxygen diffusion. However, such diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, potentially affecting the mechanical integrity and phase stability of the coating. In other applications, the high oxygen diffusivity of YSZ is useful, and makes the material of interest for use as a solid-state electrolyte in fuel cells. The kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) method offers a number of advantages compared with the more widely known molecular dynamics simulation method. In particular, kMC is much more efficient for the study of processes, such as diffusion, that involve infrequent events. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen and cation diffusion in YSZ. Using diffusive energy barriers from ab initio calculations and from the literature, we present results on the temperature dependence of oxygen and cation diffusivity, and on the dependence of the diffusivities on yttria concentration and oxygen sublattice vacancy concentration. We also present results of the effect on diffusivity of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the barrier cations that determine the oxygen diffusion energy barriers.

  9. Effect of Al added to a NiCrMo alloy on the development of the oxide layer of intermetallic coatings; Efeito do teor de Al adicionado a liga NiCrMo no desenvolvimento dos filmes de oxidos em revestimentos intermetalicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Oliveira, A.S.C.M.; Cangue, F.J.R. [Universidade Federal do Parana (DEM/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Clark, E.; Levi, C. [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Components performance in different environment is strongly dependent on oxides that develop on their surfaces. This study analyzed the oxide layer that develops on coatings processed with mixtures of an atomized Hastelloy C alloy with Al powders. Powder mixtures containing 10, 20 and 30wt%Al were deposited on AISI 1020 and AISI304 steel plates. Coatings were subsequently exposed to 850 deg C for two hours in a low PO{sub 2} environment. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the phases that developed in the coating during processing and Raman analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to characterize the oxide layers. The results showed that coatings processed with the richer Al mixtures, 30wt%Al, which developed NiAl aluminides, reduced the development of {alpha} alumina when processing was done on AISI 304. Coatings processed on AISI 1020 with the three powder mixtures tested developed the different allotropic forms of alumina, as predicted for the tested temperature. (author)

  10. Microstructure evaluation and mechanical behavior of high-niobium containing titanium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Glenn Estep, Jr.

    Ti-Al-Nb-based alloys with gamma(TiAl)+sigma(Nb2Al) microstructure have shown promise for potential high temperature applications due to their high specific strength. Recent research has been aimed towards increasing strength and operating temperatures through microstructural refinement and control. Alloys with 10 - 30% sigma-phase have been investigated, exploring relationships between chemistry, microstructure development, and flow behavior. Alloys with composition Ti-45Al-xNb-5Cr-1Mo (where x = 15, 20, 25 at%) have been produced, characterized, and tested at high temperature under compression. Processing, microstructure and mechanical property relationships are thoroughly investigated to reveal a significant connection between phase stability, morphology and their resultant effects on mechanical properties. Phase transformation temperatures and stability ranges were predicted using the ThermoCalc software program and a titanium aluminide database, investigated through thermal analysis, and alloys were heat treated to develop an ultrafine gamma+sigma microstructure. It has been demonstrated that microstructural development in these alloys is sensitive to composition and processing parameters, and heating and cooling rates are vital to the modification of gamma+sigma microstructure in these alloys. Towards the goal of designing a high-Nb titanium aluminide with ultrafine, disconnected gamma+sigma morphology, it has been established that microstructural control can be accomplished in alloys containing 15-25at% Nb through targeted chemistry and processing controls. The strength and flow softening characteristics show strain rate sensitivity that is also affected by temperature. From the standpoint of microstructure development and mechanical behavior at elevated temperature, the most favorable results are obtained with the 20 at% Nb alloy, which produces a combination of high strength and fine disconnected gamma+sigma microstructure. Microstructural analysis reveals

  11. Enhanced corrosion protective PANI-PAA/PEI multilayer composite coatings for 316SS by spin coating technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Junaid Ali; Lu, Hongbin; Tang, Shaochun; Meng, Xiangkang, E-mail: mengxk@nju.edu.cn

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • PANI-PAA/PEI multilayers with controllable thickness were fabricated by spin assembly. • PAA matrix results in the homogeneous dispersion of PANI in the composite coatings. • Spin coating combined with heating assures the linear increase in thickness with n. • The corrosion protection property of PANI-PAA/PEI coatings were optimized at n = 20. • Enhanced protection owing to multilayer structure that lengthens the diffusion pathway of ions. - Abstract: In the present study, polyaniline-polyacrylic acid/polyethyleneimine (PANI-PAA/PEI) composite coatings with a multilayer structure for corrosion protection of 316 stainless steels (316SS) were prepared by an alternate deposition. Spin coating combined with heating assists removal of residual water that result in a linear increase in thickness with layer number (n). The combination of PANI-PAA composite with PEI and their multilayer structure provides a synergistic enhancement of corrosion resistance properties as determined by electrochemical measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution. Importantly, the PANI-PAA/PEI coating with an optimized layer number of n = 20 shows improved corrosion protection. The superior performance was attributed to the formation of an interfacial oxide layer as well as the multilayer structure that extend the diffusion pathway of corrosive ions.

  12. Release of fission products from irradiated aluminide fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshikazu; Kanda, Keiji; Mishima, Kaichiro; Tamai, Tadaharu; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Snelgrove, James L.; Stahl, David; Matos, James E.; Travelli, Armando; Case, F. Neil; Posey, John C.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiated uranium aluminide fuel plates of 40% U-235 enrichment were heated for the determination of fission products released under flowing helium gas at temperatures up to and higher than the melting point of fuel cladding material. The release of fission products from the fuel plate at temperature below 500 deg. C was found negligible. The first rapid release of fission products was observed with the occurrence of blistering at 561±1 deg. C on the plates. The next release at 585. C might be caused by melting of the cladding material of 6061-Al alloy. The last release of fission product gases was occurred at the eutectic temperature of 640 deg. C of U-Al x . The released material was mostly xenon, but small amounts of iodine and cesium were observed. (author)

  13. Release of fission products from irradiated aluminide fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, T.; Kanda, K.; Mishima, K.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiated uranium aluminide fuel plates of 40% U-235 enrichment were heated for the determination of fission products released under flowing helium gas at temperatures up to and higher than the melting point of fuel-cladding material. The release of fission products from the fuel plate at temperature below 500 0 C was found negligible. The firist rapid release of fission products was observed with the occurrence of blistering at 561 +- 1 0 C on the plates. The next release at 585 0 C might be caused by melting of the cladding material of 6061-Al alloy. The last release of fission product gases was occurred at the eutectic temperature of 640 0 C of U-Al/sub x/. The released material was mostly xenon, but small amounts of iodine and cesium were observed

  14. Barrier mechanism of multilayers graphene coated copper against atomic oxygen irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijing; Ren, Siming; Pu, Jibin; Xue, Qunji

    2018-06-01

    Graphene has been demonstrated as a protective coating for Cu under ambient condition because of its high impermeability and light-weight oxidation barrier. However, it lacks the research of graphene as a protective coating in space environment. Here, we experimentally and theoretically study the oxidation behavior of graphene-coated Cu in vacuum atomic oxygen (AO) condition. After AO irradiation, the experimental results show multilayer graphene has better anti-oxidation than monolayer graphene. Meanwhile, the calculation results show the oxidation appeared on the graphene's grain boundaries or the film's vacancy defects for the monolayer graphene coated Cu foil. Moreover, the calculation results show the oxidation process proceeds slowly in multilayers because of the matched defects overlaps each other to form a steric hindrance to suppress the O atom diffusion in the vertical direction, and the mismatched defects generates potential energy barriers for interlayer to suppress the O atom diffusion in the horizontal direction. Hence, multilayer graphene films could serve as protection coatings to prevent diffusion of O atom.

  15. Multilayer oxidation resistant coating for SiC coated carbon/carbon composites at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hejun; Jiao Gengsheng; Li Kezhi; Wang Chuang

    2008-01-01

    To prevent carbon/carbon (C/C) composites from oxidation, a multilayer coating based on molybdenum disilicide and titanium disilicide was formed using a two-step pack cementation technique in argon atmosphere. XRD and SEM analysis showed that the internal coating was a bond SiC layer that acts as a buffer layer, and that the external multilayer coating formed in the two-step pack cementation was composed of two MoSi 2 -TiSi 2 -SiC layers. This coating, which is characterized by excellent thermal shock resistance, could effectively protect the composites from exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere at 1773 K for 79 h. The oxidation of the coated C/C composites was primarily due to the reaction of C/C matrix and oxygen diffusing through the penetrable cracks in the coating

  16. Aluminum and Other Coatings for the Passivation of Tritium Storage Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Korinko, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-16

    Using a highly sensitive residual gas analyzer, the off-gassing of hydrogen, water, and hydrocarbons from surface-treated storage vessels containing deuterium was measured. The experimental storage vessels were compared to a low-off-gassing, electro-polished 304L canister. Alternative vessels were made out of aluminum, or were coatings on 304L steel. Coatings included powder pack aluminide, electro-plated aluminum, powder pack chromide, dense electro-plated chromium, copper plated, and copper plated with 25 and 50 percent nano-diamond. Vessels were loaded with low pressure deuterium to observe exchange with protium or hydrogen as observed with formation of HD and HDO. Off gas of D2O or possible CD4 was observed at mass 20. The main off-gas in all of the studies was H2. The studies indicated that coatings required significant post-coating treatment to reduce off-gas and enhance the permeation barrier from gases likely added during the coating process. Dense packed aluminum coatings needed heating to drive off water. Electro-plated aluminum, chromium and copper coatings appeared to trap hydrogen from the plating process. Nano-diamond appeared to enhance the exchange rate with hydrogen off gas, and its coating process trapped significant amounts of hydrogen. Aluminum caused more protium exchange than chromium-treated surfaces. Aluminum coatings released more water, but pure aluminum vessels released small amounts of hydrogen, little water, and generally performed well. Chromium coating had residual hydrogen that was difficult to totally outgas but otherwise gave low residuals for water and hydrocarbons. Our studies indicated that simple coating of as received 304L metal will not adequately block hydrogen. The base vessel needs to be carefully out-gassed before applying a coating, and the coating process will likely add additional hydrogen that must be removed. Initial simple bake-out and leak checks up to 350° C for a few hours was

  17. Functional Plasma-Deposited Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo Pashechko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the problem of low adhesion of plasma sprayed coatings to the substrate. The subsequent laser treatment modes and their influence on the coating-substrate interface were studied. This allows to decrease the level of metstability of the coating, thus decreasing its hardness down to 11-12 GPa on the surface and to about 9 GPa on depth of 400 µm. The redistribution of alloying elements through solid and liquid diffusion improves mechanical properties and rises the adhesion up to 450 MPa after remelting and up to 90-110 MPa after laser-aided thermal cycling. At he same time, remelting of coating helps to decrease its porosity down to 1%. Obtained complex of properties also allows to improve wear resistance of coatings and to decrease friction factor.

  18. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  19. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-01-01

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life

  20. Microstructure and bonding strength of Ni-based alloy coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Qing

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A Ni-Cr-B-Si coating technique was developed and successfully applied on austenite grey iron substrate in a conventional resistance furnace under graphite powder protection. The microstructure, phase distribution, chemical composition profile and microhardness along the coating layer depth were investigated. Shear strength of the coating was also tested. Microanalysis shows that the coating is consist of γ-Ni solution and γ-Ni+Ni3B lamellar eutectic, as well as small amount of Cr5B3 particles. Diffusion induced metallurgical bonding occurs at the coating/substrate interfaces, and the higher the temperature, the more sufficient elements diffused, the broader interfusion region and the larger bonding strength, but it has an optimum value. And the bonding strength at the interface can be enable to reach 250-270 MPa, which is nearly the same as that of processed by flame spray. The microhardness along the coating layer depth shows a gradient distribution manner.

  1. A density functional theory study of the carbon-coating effects on lithium iron borate battery electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftager, Simon; García-Lastra, Juan María; Vegge, Tejs

    2017-01-18

    Lithium iron borate (LiFeBO 3 ) is a promising cathode material due to its high theoretical specific capacity, inexpensive components and small volume change during operation. Yet, challenges related to severe air- and moisture-induced degradation have prompted the utilization of a protective coating on the electrode which also improves the electronic conductivity. However, not much is known about the preferential geometries of the coating as well as how these coating-electrode interfaces influence the lithium diffusion between the coating and the electrode. Here, we therefore present a density functional theory (DFT) study of the anchoring configurations of carbon coating on the LiFeBO 3 electrode and its implications on the interfacial lithium diffusion. Due to large barriers associated with Li-ion diffusion through a parallel-oriented pristine graphene coating on the FeBO 3 and LiFeBO 3 electrode surfaces, large structural defects in the graphene coating are required for fast Li-ion diffusion. However, such defects are expected to exist only in small concentrations due to their high formation energies. Alternative coating geometries were therefore investigated, and the configuration in which the coating layers were anchored normal to the electrode surface at B and O atoms was found to be most stable. Nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations of the lithium diffusion barriers across the interface between the optimally oriented coating layers and the electrode show no kinetic limitations for lithium extraction and insertion. Additionally, this graphite-coating configuration showed partial blocking of electrode-degrading species.

  2. Thermophysical Properties of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Cu-Cr-X Alloys, NiAl and NiCrAlY Coatings. Part 1; Electrical and Thermal Conductivity, Thermal Diffusivity, and Total Hemispherical Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    This two-part paper reports the thermophysical properties of several cold and vacuum plasma sprayed monolithic Cu and Ni-based alloy coatings. Part I presents the electrical and thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and total hemispherical emissivity data while Part II reports the specific heat capacity data for these coatings. Metallic copper alloys, stoichiometric NiAl and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold sprayed or the vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal property measurements between 77 and 1223 K. The temperature dependencies of the thermal conductivities, thermal diffusivities, electrical conductivities and total hemispherical emissivities of these cold and vacuum sprayed monolithic coatings are reported in this paper. The electrical and thermal conductivity data correlate reasonably well for Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and NiAl in accordance with the Wiedemann-Franz (WF) law although a better fit is obtained using the Smith-Palmer relationship. The Lorentz numbers determined from the WF law are close to the theoretical value.

  3. Cermet Coatings for Solar Stirling Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic are being considered for the heat inlet surface of a solar Stirling space power converter. This paper will discuss the solar absorption characteristics of as-deposited cermet coatings as well as the solar absorption characteristics of the coatings after heating. The role of diffusion and island formation, during the deposition process and during heating will also be discussed.

  4. Failure characteristics and mechanisms of EB-PVD TBCs with Pt-modified NiAl bond coats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Le; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Huang, Ke; Park, Young Whan; Sohn, Yongho, E-mail: Yongho.Sohn@ucf.edu

    2015-06-18

    Microstructural evolution and failure characteristics/mechanisms were investigated for thermal barrier coatings that consist of electron beam physical vapor deposited ZrO{sub 2}−8 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (YSZ) topcoat, Pt-modified nickel aluminide, (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat, and CMSX-4 superalloy substrate with furnace cycling at 1100 °C with 1-h dwell. Photo stimulated luminescence spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the residual stress of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) and microstructural changes. For comparison, (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat on CMSX-4 without the YSZ topcoat was also characterized. The TGO grew faster for the YSZ-coated (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat than the (Ni,Pt)Al coating without the YSZ topcoat. Correspondingly, the β-to-γ′/martensite formation in the (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat occurred faster on the YSZ-coated (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. However the rumpling occurred much faster and with larger amplitude on the (Ni,Pt)Al coating without the YSZ topcoat. Still, the rumpling at the TGO/bond coat interface caused crack initiation as early as 10 thermal cycles, decohesion at the YSZ/TGO interface, and eventual spallation failure primarily through the TGO/bond coat interface. The magnitude of compressive residual stress in the TGO showed an initial increase up to 3−4 GPa followed by a gradual decrease. The rate of stress relaxation was much quicker for the TGO scale without the YSZ topcoat with distinctive relief corresponding to the cracking at the top of geometrical ridges associated with the (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. The maximum elastic energy for the TGO scale was estimated at 90 J/m{sup 2} at 50% of its lifetime (N{sub f}=545 cycles). The YSZ presence/adhesion to the TGO scale is emphasized to minimize the undulation of the TGO/bond coat interface, i.e., decohesion at the YSZ/TGO scale accelerates the rumpling and crack-coalescence at the TGO/bond coat

  5. Al-Mn CVD-FBR coating on P92 steel as protection against steam oxidation at 650 °C: TGA-MS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, S. I.; Pérez, F. J.

    2018-02-01

    The initial stages oxidation of the P92 ferritic/martensitic steel with and without Al-Mn coating at 650 °C in Ar+40%H2O for 240 h were investigated by mass spectrometry (MS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA-MS measurements were conducted in a closed steam loop. An Al-Mn coating was deposited on P92 steel at 580 °C for 2 h by chemical vapour deposition in a fluidized bed reactor (CVD-FBR). The coating as-deposited was treated in the same reactor at 700 °C in Ar for 2h, in order to produce aluminide phases that form the protective alumina layer (Al2O3) during oxidation. MS measurements at 650 °C of the Al-Mn/P92 sample for 200 h indicated the presence of (Al-Mn-Cr-Fe-O) volatile species of small intensity. Uncoated P92 steel oxidized under the same steam oxidation conditions emitted greater intensities of volatile species of Cr, Fe and Mo in comparison with intensities from coated steel. TGA measurements verified that the mass gained by the coated sample was up to 300 times lower than for uncoated P92 steel. The morphology, composition and structure of samples by Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM, Backscattered Electron (BSE) detection, X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDAX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) are described.

  6. Investigations of surface coatings to reduce memory effect in plastic scintillator detectors used for radioxenon detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläckberg, L.; Fay, A.; Jõgi, I.; Biegalski, S.; Boman, M.; Elmgren, K.; Fritioff, T.; Johansson, A.; Mårtensson, L.; Nielsen, F.; Ringbom, A.; Rooth, M.; Sjöstrand, H.; Klintenberg, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work Al2O3 and SiO2 coatings are tested as Xe diffusion barriers on plastic scintillator substrates. The motivation is improved beta-gamma coincidence detection systems, used to measure atmospheric radioxenon within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. One major drawback with the current setup of these systems is that the radioxenon tends to diffuse into the plastic scintillator material responsible for the beta detection, resulting in an unwanted memory effect. Here, coatings with thicknesses between 20 and 900 nm have been deposited onto plastic scintillators, and investigated using two different experimental techniques. The results show that all tested coatings reduce the Xe diffusion into the plastic. The reduction is observed to increase with coating thickness for both coating materials. The 425 nm Al2O3 coating is the most successful one, presenting a diffusion reduction of a factor 100, compared to uncoated plastic. In terms of memory effect reduction this coating is thus a viable solution to the problem in question.

  7. Investigations of surface coatings to reduce memory effect in plastic scintillator detectors used for radioxenon detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaeckberg, L.; Fay, A.; Jogi, I.; Biegalski, S.; Boman, M.; Elmgren, K.; Fritioff, T.; Johansson, A.; Martensson, L.; Nielsen, F.; Ringbom, A.; Rooth, M.; Sjoestrand, H.; Klintenberg, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 coatings are tested as Xe diffusion barriers on plastic scintillator substrates. The motivation is improved beta-gamma coincidence detection systems, used to measure atmospheric radioxenon within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. One major drawback with the current setup of these systems is that the radioxenon tends to diffuse into the plastic scintillator material responsible for the beta detection, resulting in an unwanted memory effect. Here, coatings with thicknesses between 20 and 900 nm have been deposited onto plastic scintillators, and investigated using two different experimental techniques. The results show that all tested coatings reduce the Xe diffusion into the plastic. The reduction is observed to increase with coating thickness for both coating materials. The 425 nm Al 2 O 3 coating is the most successful one, presenting a diffusion reduction of a factor 100, compared to uncoated plastic. In terms of memory effect reduction this coating is thus a viable solution to the problem in question.

  8. Microstructural Analysis and Transport Properties of Thermally Sprayed Multiple-Layer Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Haynes, J. Allen; Porter, Wallace D.; England, Roger D.; Hays, Michael; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-02-01

    Multilayer, graded ceramic/metal coatings were prepared by an air plasma spray method on Ti-6Al-4V, 4140 steel and graphite substrates. The coatings were designed to provide thermal barriers for diesel engine pistons to operate at higher temperatures with improved thermal efficiency and cleaner emissions. A systematic, progressive variation in the mixture of yttria-stabilized zirconia and bondcoat alloys (NiCoCrAlYHfSi) was designed to provide better thermal expansion match with the substrate and to improve thermal shock resistance and cycle life. Heat transfer through the layers was evaluated by a flash diffusivity technique based on a model of one-dimensional heat flow. The aging effect of the as-sprayed coatings was captured during diffusivity measurements, which included one heating and cooling cycle. The hysteresis of thermal diffusivity due to aging was not observed after 100-h annealing at 800 °C. The measurements of coatings on substrate and freestanding coatings allowed the influence of interface resistance to be evaluated. The microstructure of the multilayer coating was examined using scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalysis.

  9. Comparison of orthorhombic and alpha-two titanium aluminides as matrices for continuous SiC-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.R.; Graves, J.A.; Rhodes, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    The attributes of an orthorhombic Ti aluminide alloy, Ti-21Al-22Nb (at. pct), and an alpha-two Ti aluminide alloy, Ti-24Al-11Nb (at. pct), for use as a matrix with continuous SiC (SCS-6) fiber reinforcement have been compared. Foil-fiber-foil processing was used to produce both unreinforced (''neat'') and unidirectional ''SCS-6'' reinforced panels. Microstructure of the Ti-24Al-11Nb matrix consisted of ordered Ti 3 Al (α 2 ) + disordered beta (β), while the Ti-21Al-22Nb matrix contained three phases: α 2 , ordered beta (β 0 ), and ordered orthorhombic (O). Fiber/matrix interface reaction zone growth kinetics at 982 C were examined for each composite system. Although both systems exhibited similar interface reaction products (i.e., mixed Ti carbides, silicides, and Ti-Al carbides), growth kinetics in the α 2 + β matrix composite were much more rapid than in the O + β 0 + α 2 matrix composite. Additionally, interfacial reaction in the α 2 + β composite resulted in a relatively large brittle matrix zone, depleted of beta phase, which was not present in the O + β 0 + α 2 matrix composite. Mechanical property measurements included room and elevated temperature tensile, thermal stability, thermal fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue (TMF), and creep. The three-phase orthorhombic-based alloy outperformed the α 2 + β alloy in all of these mechanical behavioral areas, on both an absolute and a specific (i.e., density corrected) basis

  10. Incorporating Embedded Microporous Layers into Topologically Equivalent Pore Network Models for Oxygen Diffusivity Calculations in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Gas Diffusion Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazeli, Mohammadreza; Hinebaugh, James; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pore network model for modeling PEMFC MPL-coated GDL effective diffusivity. • Bilayered GDL (substrate and MPL) is modeled with a hybrid network of block MPL elements combined with discrete substrate pores. • Diffusivities of MPL-coated GDLs agree with analytical solutions. - Abstract: In this work, a voxel-based methodology is introduced for the hybridization of a pore network with interspersed nano-porous material elements allowing pore network based oxygen diffusivity calculations in a 3D image of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell gas diffusion layer (GDL) with an embedded microporous layer (MPL). The composite GDL is modeled by combining a hybrid network of block MPL elements with prescribed bulk material properties and a topologically equivalent network of larger discrete pores and throats that are directly derived from the 3D image of the GDL substrate. This hybrid network was incorporated into a pore network model, and effective diffusivity predictions of GDL materials with MPL coatings were obtained. Stochastically generated numerical models of carbon paper substrates with and without MPLs were used, and the pore space was directly extracted from this realistic geometry as the input for the pore network model. The effective diffusion coefficient of MPL-coated GDL materials was predicted from 3D images in a pore network modeling environment without resolving the nano-scale structure of the MPL. This method is particularly useful due to the disparate length scales that are involved when attempting to capture pore-scale transport in the GDL. Validation was performed by comparing our predicted diffusivity values to analytical predictions, and excellent agreement was observed. Upon conducting a mesh sensitivity study, it was determined that an MPL element size of 7 μm provided sufficiently high resolution for accurately describing the MPL nano-structure.

  11. Oxide-assisted crack growth in hold-time low-cycle-fatigue of single-crystal superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Akane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive hold-time low-cycle fatigue is one of the important damage modes in Ni-based superalloy hot-gas path components. In strain controlled LCF, the compressive hold typically degrades fatigue life significantly due to creep relaxation and the resultant generation of tensile stress upon returning to zero strain. Crack initiation typically occurs on the surface, and therefore, the cracks are covered with layers of oxides. Recent finite element modeling based on experimental observations has indicated that the in-plane compressive stress in the alumina layer formed on the surface of the bond coat assists rumpling and, eventually, leads to initiation of cracks. The stress in the oxide layer continues to assist crack extension by pushing the alumina layer along the crack front during the compressive hold. In-situ measurements of the growth strains of alumina were performed using high energy synchrotron X-rays at Argonne National Lab. Specimens of single-crystal superalloys with and without aluminide coatings were statically pre-oxidized to form a layer of alumina at 1093 and 982 ∘C. For the in-situ synchrotron measurements, the specimens were heated up to the pre-oxidation temperatures with a heater. The alumina layers on both bare and coated specimens show compressive in-plane strains at both temperatures. The oxide strains on the superalloys showed dependency on temperature; on the other hand, the oxide strains in the aluminide coatings were insensitive to temperature. The magnitude of the compressive strains was larger on the superalloys than the ones on the aluminide coatings.

  12. Diffusion through composite materials made with thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Bruno.

    1981-08-01

    Medium and low-level radioactive wastes may be coated in a solid matrix mainly made with thermosetting resins: the study of water and cesium migration through composite materials made with thermosetting resins is usefull to compare the water tightness of different coatings. Disks with a thickness of two millimeters were used to measure the water absorption. Diffusion cells including a plane membrane the thickness of which was at least 70μ were used to measure the diffusion of cesium 137. The diffusion coefficient of water in pure thermosetting resins, polyester or epoxyde, is about 10 -9 cm 2 .s -1 ; the diffusion coefficients of cesium in the same materials are about 10 -12 cm 2 .s -1 ; the introduction of solid particles in these polymers generally induces an acceleration of the diffusion process: the diffusion coefficient may reach 10 -8 cm 2 .s -1 . This lost of water-tightness may be reduced either by rendering insoluble the filler mixed to the polymer, or by diminushing the porosity of the interfacial zones by improving the bonding between the polymer and the filler [fr

  13. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  14. Development of silicide coating over molybdenum based refractory alloy and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.P.; Banerjee, S.; Sharma, I.G.; Suri, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Molybdenum based refractory alloys are potential candidate materials for structural applications in high temperature compact nuclear reactors and fusion reactors. However, these alloys being highly susceptible to oxidation in air or oxygen at elevated temperature, undergoes severe losses from highly volatile molybdenum trioxide species. Present investigation, therefore, examines the feasibility of development of silicide type of coating over molybdenum base TZM alloy shape (Mo > 99 wt.%) using pack cementation coating technique. TZM alloy was synthesized in this laboratory from oxide intermediates of MoO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 in presence of requisite amount of carbon, by alumino-thermic reduction smelting technique. The arc melted and homogenized samples of TZM alloy substrate was then embedded in the chosen and intimately mixed pack composition consisting of inert matrix (Al 2 O 3 ), coating powder (Si) and activator (NH 4 Cl) taken in the judicious proportion. The sealed charge packs contained in an alumina crucible were heated at temperatures of 1000 o C for 8-16 h heating cycle to develop the coating. The coating phase was confirmed to be of made of MoSi 2 by XRD analysis. The morphology of the coating was studied by SEM characterization. It had revealed that the coating was diffusion bonded where Si from coating diffused inward and Mo from TZM substrate diffused outward to form the coating. The coating was found to be resistant to oxidation when tested in air up to 1200 o C. A maximum 100 μm of coating thickness was achieved on each side of the substrate.

  15. Plastic flow and microstructure of cast nickel aluminides at 1273 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneibel, J. H.; Porter, W. D.; Horton, J. A.

    1987-12-01

    Chill-cast nickel aluminides based on Ni3Al were compression-tested in vacuum at 1273 K at strain rates ranging from 10-5 s-1 to 10-1 s-1. As the strain rate increases, the propensity for intergranular cracking increases. The ductile-to-brittle transition strain rate (DBTS) of as-cast Ni-22.5Al-0.5Hf-0.1B (at. pct) is approximately 10-1 s-1. Homogenization lowers this value by three orders of magnitude, to 10-4 s-1 (a homogenized specimen disintegrated completely at a rate of 10-3 s-1). The fine-grained structure of the as-cast alloy plays an important role in its relatively high DBTS. A hafnium-free alloy, Ni-24A1-0.1B, on the other hand, shows only a weak dependence of the DBTS on prior homogenization, and possible reasons for this finding are discussed.

  16. Improved cyclic oxidation resistance of electron beam physical vapor deposited nano-oxide dispersed {beta}-NiAl coatings for Hf-containing superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Hongbo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, No. 37, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, No. 37, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)], E-mail: Guo.hongbo@buaa.edu.cn; Cui Yongjing; Peng Hui; Gong Shengkai [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, No. 37, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, No. 37, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-04-15

    Oxide dispersed (OD) {beta}-NiAl coatings and OD-free {beta}-NiAl coatings were deposited onto a Hf-containing Ni-based superalloy by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). Excessive enrichment of Hf was found in the TGO on the OD-free coating due to outward diffusion of Hf from the superalloy, causing accelerated TGO thickening and spalling. The OD-coating effectively prevented Hf from outward diffusion. Only small amount of Hf diffused to the coating surface and improved the TGO adherence by virtue of the reactive element effect. The OD-coating exhibited an improved oxidation resistance as compared to the OD-free coating.

  17. Optimization and design of pigments for heat-insulating coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Hai; Zhang, Yue

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports that heat insulating property of infrared reflective coatings is obtained through the use of pigments which diffuse near-infrared thermal radiation. Suitable structure and size distribution of pigments would attain maximum diffuse infrared radiation and reduce the pigment volume concentration required. The optimum structure and size range of pigments for reflective infrared coatings are studied by using Kubelka—Munk theory, Mie model and independent scattering approximation. Taking titania particle as the pigment embedded in an inorganic coating, the computational results show that core-shell particles present excellent scattering ability, more so than solid and hollow spherical particles. The optimum radius range of core-shell particles is around 0.3 ~ 1.6 μm. Furthermore, the influence of shell thickness on optical parameters of the coating is also obvious and the optimal thickness of shell is 100-300 nm.

  18. Efficient dual layer interconnect coating for high temperature electrochemical devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palcut, Marián; Mikkelsen, Lars; Neufeld, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Effects of novel dual layer coatings Co3O4/La0.85Sr0.15MnO3−δ on high temperature oxidation behaviour of candidate steels for interconnects are studied at 1123 K in flowing simulated ambient air (air + 1% H2O) and oxygen. Four alloys are investigated: Crofer 22 APU, Crofer 22 H, E-Brite and AL 29...... that the oxidation reaction is limited by outward Cr3+ diffusion in the chromia scale. The coating effectively reduces the oxidation rate. Reactions and cation inter-diffusion between the coating and the oxide scale are observed. Long term effects of these interactions are discussed and practical implications...

  19. Preparation of sustained release capsules by electrostatic dry powder coating, using traditional dip coating as reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Shen, Lian; Yuan, Feng; Fu, Hui; Shan, Weiguang

    2018-05-30

    Lately, a great deal of attention is being paid to capsule coating, since the coat protects active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) from damage, as is in the case of tablet and pellet. However, moisture and heat sensitivity of gelatin shells make it challenging to coat capsules using the conventional aqueous coating techniques. In an effort to overcome this challenge, the present study aims to coat capsules using two different coating techniques: electrostatic dry powder coating (EDPC) and dip coating (DC). Both capsule coatings and free films were prepared by these two coating techniques, and the effects of coating formulations and processing conditions on the film quality were investigated. The corresponding drug in vitro release and mechanisms were characterized and compared. The results of dissolution tests demonstrated that the drug release behavior of both EDPC and DC coated capsules could be optimized to a sustained release of 24 h, following the Fick's diffusion law. The results of this study suggest that EDPC method is better than DC method for coating capsules, with respect to the higher production efficiency and better stability, indicating that this dry coating technology has promised in gelatin capsule coating applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High-rate sputter deposition of NiAl on sapphire fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, K.; Martinez, C.; Cremer, R.; Neuschuetz, D. [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Huettenkunde, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Once the fiber-matrix bonding has been optimized to meet the different requirements during fabrication and operation of the later composite component, sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl will be a potential candidate to substitute conventional superalloys as structural material for gas turbine blades. To improve the composite fabrication process, a direct deposition of the intermetallic matrix material onto hBN coated sapphire fibers prior to the consolidation of the fiber-matrix composite is proposed. It is believed that this will simplify the fabrication process and prevent pore formation during the diffusion bonding. In addition, the fiber volume fraction can be quite easily adjusted by varying the NiAl coating thickness. For this, a high-rate deposition of NiAl is in any case necessary. It has been achieved by a pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of combined Al-Ni targets with the fibers rotating between the two facing cathodes. The obtained nickel aluminide coatings were analyzed as to structure and composition by means of X-ray (GIXRD) as well as electron diffraction (RHEED) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The morphology of the NiAl coatings was examined by SEM. (orig.)

  1. On the texture of spray formed gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staron, P.; Bartels, A.; Brokmeier, H.-G.; Gerling, R.; Schimansky, F.P.; Clemens, H.

    2006-01-01

    Spray forming is an attractive processing route for titanium aluminides that combines advantages both of ingot and powder metallurgy. Spray formed deposits were produced using the electrode induction melting gas atomization technique. The texture of a spray formed Ti-48.9 at.% Al deposit in the as-sprayed state and after isothermal forging as well as after isothermal forging and a subsequent stress relief heat treatment was analysed by means of neutron diffraction. The spray formed deposit was found to have a very weak -fibre texture with a maximum pole density of 1.12 multiples of random distribution. After isothermal forging of cylinders to 77% reduction at an initial strain rate of 2 x 10 -3 s -1 at 1150 deg. C, a band of orientations from to with a maximum close to was found. A Zener-Hollomon parameter of 12.6 is estimated, which indicates that during isothermal forging dynamic recrystallization is governed by nucleation of new grains. A subsequent stress relief treatment at 1030 deg. C for 2 h caused additional grain growth, after which the maximum pole density is increased from 3.3 to 3.8 times random

  2. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  3. Benchmark Testing of the Largest Titanium Aluminide Sheet Subelement Conducted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Krause, David L.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate wrought titanium aluminide (gamma TiAl) as a viable candidate material for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) exhaust nozzle, an international team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field successfully fabricated and tested the largest gamma TiAl sheet structure ever manufactured. The gamma TiAl sheet structure, a 56-percent subscale divergent flap subelement, was fabricated for benchmark testing in three-point bending. Overall, the subelement was 84-cm (33-in.) long by 13-cm (5-in.) wide by 8-cm (3-in.) deep. Incorporated into the subelement were features that might be used in the fabrication of a full-scale divergent flap. These features include the use of: (1) gamma TiAl shear clips to join together sections of corrugations, (2) multiple gamma TiAl face sheets, (3) double hot-formed gamma TiAl corrugations, and (4) brazed joints. The structural integrity of the gamma TiAl sheet subelement was evaluated by conducting a room-temperature three-point static bend test.

  4. Diffusion and phase transformation behavior in poly-synthetically-twinned (PST) titanium-aluminum/titanium diffusion couple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ling

    Motivated by the great potential applications of gamma titanium aluminide based alloys and the important effect of diffusion on the properties of gamma-TiAl/alpha2-Ti3Al two-phase lamellar structure, we conduct this thesis research to explore the microstructural evolution and interdiffusion behavior, and their correlations in multi-phase solid state diffusion couples made up of pure titanium and polysynthetically-twinned (PST) Ti-49.3 at.% Al "single" crystal, in the temperature range of 973--1173 K. The diffusion couples are prepared by high vacuum hot-pressing, with the diffusion direction parallel to the lamellar planes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are employed to observe the microstructure at various interfaces/interphases. A reaction zone (RZ) of polycrystalline alpha 2-Ti3Al phase forms along the PST Ti-Al/Ti bonding interface having a wavy interface with the PST crystal and exhibits deeper penetration in alpha2 lamellae, consisting of many fine alpha2 and secondary gamma laths, than in primary gamma lamellae. Direct measurement of the RZ thickness on SEM back-scattered electron images reveals a parabolic growth of the RZ, indicating a macroscopically diffusion-controlled growth. Concentration profiles from Ti, through the RZ, into the alpha2 lamellae of the PST crystal are measured by quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). A plateau of composition adjacent to the RZ/(mixed alpha2 lath in PST) interface forms in the deeply penetrated RZ grains, implying a diffusion barrier crossing the interface and some extent of interface control in the RZ grain growth. The interdiffusion coefficient is evaluated both independent of composition and as a function of composition. No significant concentration dependence of the interdiffusion coefficients is observed using Boltzmann-Matano analysis

  5. A density functional theory study of the carbon-coating effects on lithium iron borate battery electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loftager, Simon; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Vegge, Tejs

    2017-01-01

    a density functional theory (DFT) study of the anchoring configurations of carbon coating on the LiFeBO3 electrode and its implications on the interfacial lithium diffusion. Due to large barriers associated with Li-ion diffusion through a parallel-oriented pristine graphene coating on the FeBO3 and LiFeBO3......Lithium iron borate (LiFeBO3) is a promising cathode material due to its high theoretical specific capacity, inexpensive components and a small volume change during operation. Yet, challenges relating to severe air- and moisture-induced degradation necessitate the application of a protective...... coating on the electrode which also improves the electronic conductivity. However, not much is known about the preferential geometries of the coating as well as how these coating–electrode interfaces influence the lithium diffusion between the coating and the electrode. Here, we therefore present...

  6. Infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies on sodium borosilicate glass interacted with thermally oxidized aluminides formed on alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusufali, C.; Dutta, R.S.; Dey, G.K.; Kshirsagar, R.J.; Jagannath; Mishra, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Thermally oxidized aluminides formed on Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates were subjected to interaction with sodium borosilicate melt (used as matrices for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste) at 1248 K for 192 hours. After the interaction, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis of glass samples indicated the incorporation of Al in the glass network. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of glass specimens revealed modified glass structure. (author)

  7. Nanocomposite Coatings: Preparation, Characterization, Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Nguyen-Tri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of nanofillers into the organic coatings might enhance their barrier performance, by decreasing the porosity and zigzagging the diffusion path for deleterious species. Thus, the coatings containing nanofillers are expected to have significant barrier properties for corrosion protection and reduce the trend for the coating to blister or delaminate. On the other hand, high hardness could be obtained for metallic coatings by producing the hard nanocrystalline phases within a metallic matrix. This article presents a review on recent development of nanocomposite coatings, providing an overview of nanocomposite coatings in various aspects dealing with the classification, preparative method, the nanocomposite coating properties, and characterization methods. It covers potential applications in areas such as the anticorrosion, antiwear, superhydrophobic area, self-cleaning, antifouling/antibacterial area, and electronics. Finally, conclusion and future trends will be also reported.

  8. Formation of microstructural features in hot-dip aluminized AISI 321 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huilgol, Prashant; Rajendra Udupa, K.; Udaya Bhat, K.

    2018-02-01

    Hot-dip aluminizing (HDA) is a proven surface coating technique for improving the oxidation and corrosion resistance of ferrous substrates. Although extensive studies on the HDA of plain carbon steels have been reported, studies on the HDA of stainless steels are limited. Because of the technological importance of stainless steels in high-temperature applications, studies of their microstructural development during HDA are needed. In the present investigation, the HDA of AISI 321 stainless steel was carried out in a pure Al bath. The microstructural features of the coating were studied using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed that the coating consists of two regions: an Al top coat and an aluminide layer at the interface between the steel and Al. The Al top coat was found to consist of intermetallic phases such as Al7Cr and Al3Fe dispersed in an Al matrix. Twinning was observed in both the Al7Cr and the Al3Fe phases. Furthermore, the aluminide layer comprised a mixture of nanocrystalline Fe2Al5, Al7Cr, and Al. Details of the microstructural features are presented, and their formation mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Degradation rates and mechanisms of acid-resistant coatings in copper-leaching tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Victor Buhl

    coating where the lifetime was estimated to 1:6 ± 0:2 and 1:4 ± 0:1 years, respectively. Part IV A series of newly designed and constructed diffusion cells were used to measure sulfuric acid diffusion rates through the coatings. A mathematical model was developed to simulate the experimental data...... potential in the mineral industry has not yet been thoroughly investigated. This particular industry poses unique challenges, with high operational temperatures (around 75 °C) and combined acidicerosive environments. The use of organic coatings to protect tanks, pipes, and secondary exposure areas, may....... Part I An in-depth literature study was performed to uncover and review uses and limitations ofacid-resistant coatings in the chemical industry, with a comparison to alternative resistant materialsbased on metals and ceramics. In addition, coating degradation phenomena caused by acid exposure, were...

  10. Optimization and design of pigments for heat-insulating coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guang-Hai; Zhang Yue

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that heat insulating property of infrared reflective coatings is obtained through the use of pigments which diffuse near-infrared thermal radiation. Suitable structure and size distribution of pigments would attain maximum diffuse infrared radiation and reduce the pigment volume concentration required. The optimum structure and size range of pigments for reflective infrared coatings are studied by using Kubelka—Munk theory, Mie model and independent scattering approximation. Taking titania particle as the pigment embedded in an inorganic coating, the computational results show that core-shell particles present excellent scattering ability, more so than solid and hollow spherical particles. The optimum radius range of core-shell particles is around 0.3 ∼ 1.6 μm. Furthermore, the influence of shell thickness on optical parameters of the coating is also obvious and the optimal thickness of shell is 100–300 nm. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. Constrained sintering of an air-plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocks, A.C.F.; Fleck, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    A micromechanical model is presented for the constrained sintering of an air-plasma-sprayed, thermal barrier coating upon a thick superalloy substrate. The coating comprises random splats with intervening penny-shaped cracks. The crack faces make contact at asperities, which progressively sinter in-service by interfacial diffusion, accommodated by bulk creep. Diffusion is driven by the reduction in interfacial energy at the developing contacts and by the local asperity contact stress. At elevated operating temperature, both sintering and creep strains accumulate within the plane of the coating. The sensitivities of sintering rate and microstructure evolution rate to the kinetic parameters and thermodynamic driving forces are explored. It is demonstrated that the sintering response is governed by three independent timescales, as dictated by the material and geometric properties of the coating. Finally, the role of substrate constraint is assessed by comparing the rate of constrained sintering with that for free sintering.

  12. A simple stir casting technique for the preparation of in situ Fe-aluminides reinforced Al-matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K. Pradhan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a simple stir casting technique for the development of Fe-aluminides particulate reinforced Al-matrix composites. It has been demonstrated that stirring of super-heated Al-melt by a mild steel plate followed by conventional casting and hot rolled results in uniform dispersion of in situ Al13Fe4 particles in the Al matrix; the amount of reinforcement is found to increase with increasing melt temperature. With reference to base alloy, the developed composite exhibits higher hardness and improved tensile strength without much loss of ductility; since, composite like base alloy undergoes ductile mode of fracture.

  13. Hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, J.P.; Boving, H.J.; Hintermann, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Hard, wear resistant and low friction coatings are presently produced on a world-wide basis, by different processes such as electrochemical or electroless methods, spray technologies, thermochemical, CVD and PVD. Some of the most advanced processes, especially those dedicated to thin film depositions, basically belong to CVD or PVD technologies, and will be looked at in more detail. The hard coatings mainly consist of oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides or carbon. Over the years, many processes have been developed which are variations and/or combinations of the basic CVD and PVD methods. The main difference between these two families of deposition techniques is that the CVD is an elevated temperature process (≥ 700 C), while the PVD on the contrary, is rather a low temperature process (≤ 500 C); this of course influences the choice of substrates and properties of the coating/substrate systems. Fundamental aspects of the vapor phase deposition techniques and some of their influences on coating properties will be discussed, as well as the very important interactions between deposit and substrate: diffusions, internal stress, etc. Advantages and limitations of CVD and PVD respectively will briefly be reviewed and examples of applications of the layers will be given. Parallel to the development and permanent updating of surface modification technologies, an effort was made to create novel characterisation methods. A close look will be given to the coating adherence control by means of the scratch test, at the coating hardness measurement by means of nanoindentation, at the coating wear resistance by means of a pin-on-disc tribometer, and at the surface quality evaluation by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Finally, main important trends will be highlighted. (orig.)

  14. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source. This confi......We report the use of a novel plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber with coaxial electrode geometry for the SiOx deposition. This novel plasma setup exploits the diffusion of electrons through the inner most electrode to the interior samples space as the major energy source...... effect of single-layer coatings deposited under different reaction conditions was studied. The coating thickness and the carbon content in the coatings were found to be the critical parameters for the barrier property. The novel barrier coating was applied on different polymeric materials...

  15. Cathodic delamination: Quantification of ionic transport rates along coating-steel interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.A.; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Weinell, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    So-called cathodic delamination is one of the major modes of failure for organic coatings immersed in electrolyte solutions (e.g. seawater). Cathodic delamination occurs as a result of the electrochemical reactions, which takes place on a corroding steel surface. This means that reactants must...... continuously be transported from the bulk solution to the cathodic areas. The transport of sodium ions from a defect in the coating to the cathodic areas is generally considered the rate-determining step for cathodic delamination because the transport of oxygen and water through the coating is sufficient...... for the corrosion processes. In this work, a novel practical method, which allows direct estimation of the apparent diffusion coefficient of sodium ions in the ultrathin aqueous layer at the coating-steel interface, is described. The apparent diffusion coefficients estimated are of similar magnitude as previously...

  16. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  17. Thin low Z coatings for plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Bowers, D.A.

    1978-05-01

    Coating the walls of the vacuum chamber with beryllium or some other low Z material has been proposed as a possible means of solving the problems of high Z influx into plasmas. We attempt to demonstrate that very thin, low Z coatings are compatible with the operation of plasma devices and beneficial to plasma performance. We determine that the thickness of coating material required is only about 10 monolayers. In a radiation environment, radiation-induced solute segregation should help to maintain the integrity of such thin coatings against diffusion and other processes. We discuss the properties of these thin coatings and possible means of in situ application and maintenance. Since deposition of plasma impurities on the walls will occur anyway, we discuss injection of solid pellets into the plasma as a direct way of introducing impurities which would ultimately serve as coating material

  18. Crystallization and deuterium permeation behaviors of yttrium oxide coating prepared by metal organic decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Chikada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yttrium oxide coatings were fabricated on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels by metal organic decomposition with a dip-coating technique, and their deuterium permeation behaviors were investigated. The microstructure of the coatings varied with heat-treatment temperature: amorphous at 670ºC (amorphous coating and crystallized at 700ºC (crystallized coating. Deuterium permeation flux of the amorphous coating was lower than the uncoated steel by a factor of 5 at 500ºC, while that of the crystallized coating was lower by a factor of around 100 at 400‒550ºC. The permeation fluxes of both coatings were drastically decreased during the measurements at higher temperatures by a factor of up to 790 for the amorphous coating and 1000 for the crystallized one, indicating a microstructure modification occurred by an effect of test temperature with hydrogen flux. Temperature dependence of deuterium diffusivity in the coatings suggests that the decrease of the permeation flux has been derived from a decrease of the diffusivity. Characteristic permeation behaviors were observed with different annealing conditions; however, they can be interpreted using the permeation mechanism clarified in the previous erbium oxide coating studies.

  19. Characterization of titanium aluminide alloy components fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, L.E.; Gaytan, S.M.; Ceylan, A.; Martinez, E.; Martinez, J.L.; Hernandez, D.H.; Machado, B.I.; Ramirez, D.A.; Medina, F.; Collins, S.; Wicker, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Intermetallic, γ-TiAl, equiaxed, small-grain (∼2 μm) structures with lamellar γ/α 2 -Ti 3 Al colonies with average spacing of 0.6 μm have been fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) of precursor, atomized powder. The residual microindentation (Vickers) hardness (HV) averaged 4.1 GPa, corresponding to a nominal yield strength of ∼1.4 GPa (∼HV/3), and a specific yield strength of 0.37 GPa cm 3 g -1 (for a density of 3.76 g cm -3 ), in contrast to 0.27 GPa cm 3 g -1 for EBM-fabricated Ti-6Al-4V components. These results demonstrate the potential to fabricate near net shape and complex titanium aluminide products directly using EBM technology in important aerospace and automotive applications.

  20. Preparation of Ti-aluminide reinforced in situ aluminium matrix composites by reactive hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.; Ghosh, S.; Basumallick, A.; Basu, B.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminium based metal matrix composites reinforced with in situ Ti-aluminide and alumina particles were prepared by reactive hot pressing a powder mix of aluminium and nanosized TiO 2 powders. The reinforcements were formed in situ by exothermal reaction between the TiO 2 nano crystalline powder and aluminium. The thermal characteristics of the in situ reaction were studied with the aid of Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to study the microstructural architecture of the composites as a function of hot pressing temperature and volume percent reinforcement. Microhardness measurements on the as prepared in situ aluminium matrix composites exhibit significant increase in hardness with increase in hot pressing temperature and volume fraction of reinforcement

  1. A Stochastic Reliability Model for Application in a Multidisciplinary Optimization of a Low Pressure Turbine Blade Made of Titanium Aluminide

    OpenAIRE

    Dresbach,Christian; Becker,Thomas; Reh,Stefan; Wischek,Janine; Zur,Sascha; Buske,Clemens; Schmidt,Thomas; Tiefers,Ruediger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are a lot of research activities dealing with gamma titanium aluminide (γ-TiAl) alloys as new materials for low pressure turbine (LPT) blades. Even though the scatter in mechanical properties of such intermetallic alloys is more distinctive as in conventional metallic alloys, stochastic investigations on γ -TiAl alloys are very rare. For this reason, we analyzed the scatter in static and dynamic mechanical properties of the cast alloy Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb. It wa...

  2. Permanganate diffusion and reaction in sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyuan; Dong, Hailiang; Towne, Rachael M; Fischer, Timothy B; Schaefer, Charles E

    2014-04-01

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate has frequently been used to treat chlorinated solvents in fractured bedrock aquifers. However, in systems where matrix back-diffusion is an important process, the ability of the oxidant to migrate and treat target contaminants within the rock matrix will likely determine the overall effectiveness of this remedial approach. In this study, a series of diffusion experiments were performed to measure the permanganate diffusion and reaction in four different types of sedimentary rocks (dark gray mudstone, light gray mudstone, red sandstone, and tan sandstone). Results showed that, within the experimental time frame (~2 months), oxidant migration into the rock was limited to distances less than 500 μm. The observed diffusivities for permanganate into the rock matrices ranged from 5.3 × 10(-13) to 1.3 × 10(-11) cm(2)/s. These values were reasonably predicted by accounting for both the rock oxidant demand and the effective diffusivity of the rock. Various Mn minerals formed as surface coatings from reduction of permanganate coupled with oxidation of total organic carbon (TOC), and the nature of the formed Mn minerals was dependent upon the rock type. Post-treatment tracer testing showed that these Mn mineral coatings had a negligible impact on diffusion through the rock. Overall, our results showed that the extent of permanganate diffusion and reaction depended on rock properties, including porosity, mineralogy, and organic carbon. These results have important implications for our understanding of long-term organic contaminant remediation in sedimentary rocks using permanganate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Creation of leak-proof silicon carbide diffusion barriers by means of pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinecke, A.-M.; Lustfeld, M.; Lippmann, W., E-mail: wolfgang.lippmann@tu-dresden.de; Hurtado, A.

    2014-05-01

    TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated fuel particles are a crucial element of the HTR safety concept. While TRISO coated particles have been proven as a very efficient barrier for a large range of fission products in HTR experimental reactors, some particular fission products could still diffuse at a considerable rate. Most importantly, radioactive silver {sup 110m}Ag was found to be released from coated particles. In future HTRs with active components like a gas turbine in the primary circuit, such silver contamination may severely limit maintainability of these parts with the result of reduced life-time performance. So far, experimental analyses on silver diffusion through silicon carbide have led to contradictory results. In this work, an alternative method was used to generate silicon carbide layers as a basis for analysis of silver diffusion. With pulsed laser deposition (PLD), it is possible to generate coatings of different materials and various kinds of compounds. In particular, this technology allows the generation of layers very well defined with respect to their composition, purity and density. The microstructure can precisely be manipulated through various parameters. Based on different silicon carbide coatings with well-defined properties, we are going to investigate the silver diffusion process. Our goal is to derive the properties of an ideal silicon carbide coating preventing silver diffusion entirely. In this paper we present the major aspects of our work creating crystalline SiC layers as well as silver and CsI layers both on plane and spherical substrates. Analyses with X-ray diffraction, X-ray spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry show that complex multilayer systems comprising a graphite substrate, a crystalline SiC layer and an intermediate silver layer were successfully created. Major challenges to approach in the future are the handling of high-level intrinsic stresses forming in the layer structure as well as the high vapour

  4. Development of advanced metallic coatings resistant to corrosion in high temperature industrial atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, T.; Bender, R.; Rosado, C.; Schuetze, M. [DECHEMA e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Following the experimental results that {gamma}-TiAl is highly resistant in reducing sulfidizing atmospheres the development of Ti-Al-co-diffusion coatings produced in a single step pack cementation process was started. The appropriate diffusion powder compositions were selected using thermodynamical calculations. Different Al-Ti-, Al-Si- and Al-Ti-Si-diffusion coatings were successfully applied on austenitic steels as well as Ni-base materials and showed excellent behaviour in reducing sulfidizing atmospheres with high carbon contents (CH{sub 4} - 1% CO - 1% CO{sub 2} - 10% H{sub 2} - 7% H{sub 2}S) up to 700 deg. C, under metal dusting conditions (H{sub 2} - 25 CO - 2% H{sub 2}O and CO - 2.4% CO{sub 2} - 1% CH{sub 4} - 9.4% N{sub 2} - 23.4% H{sub 2} - 0.2% H{sub 2}O - 1 ppm H{sub 2}S-0.3 ppm HCl) at temperatures of 620 deg. C and 700 deg. C. The application of diffusion coatings on ferritic materials has to be modified due to the specific requirements on the mechanical properties which are affected by the heat treatment during the diffusion process. TiAl was also applied by the HVOF thermal spray method on ferritic steels. Due to similarity of the thermal expansion coefficients this substrate-coating system proved to be mechanically very stable also under thermal cycling conditions. (authors)

  5. Electrochemical characterization of V{sub x}Nb{sub y}C{sub z}/Bi{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} coatings produced through thermo-reactive diffusion and the sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro H, S. A.; Alfonso, J. E.; Olaya, J. J., E-mail: jealfonso@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, AA-14490 Bogota (Colombia)

    2016-11-01

    We present and experimental study of the structural evolution of a bilayer V{sub x}Nb{sub y}C{sub z}/Bi{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} coating produced via thermo-reactive diffusion (TRD) and the RF sputtering process on D-2 steel substrate. The TRD treatments were carried out in a molten mixture consisting of borax, ferro-niobium, ferro-vanadium, and aluminum, at 1313 K for 3 hours, using a resistance-heating furnace. Bi{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} coatings were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering on TRD coatings, in order to carry out a study of the corrosion behavior of this compound. The crystallographic structure of the coatings was determined via X-ray diffraction, the corrosion resistance was analyzed through the potentiodynamic polarization test (Tafel Extrapolation) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis (EIS). X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the ternary coating (VNbC{sub 2}) was preferentially oriented along the [200] direction with a cubic-centered face structure, and the Bi{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} coatings were amorphous. The electrochemical studies showed that the resistance corrosion of the coatings increased with respect to the bare substrate, and that polarization resistance in the bilayer coatings increased with respect to the ternary coatings, suggesting that the titanate has anti corrosive barrier effects. (Author)

  6. Oxidation study of Cr-Ru hard coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yung-I, E-mail: yichen@mail.ntou.edu.tw; Kuo, Yu-Chu; Chen, Sin-Min

    2012-01-01

    Cr-Ru alloy coatings with Cr content ranging from 47 to 83 at.% were deposited at 400 Degree-Sign C by direct current magnetron co-sputtering with a Ti interlayer on silicon substrates. With a total input power of 300 W, the Cr content in the Cr-Ru coatings increased linearly with the increasing input power of Cr. The intermetallic compound phase Cr{sub 2}Ru with columnar structure was identified for the as-deposited Cr{sub 56}Ru{sub 44} and Cr{sub 65}Ru{sub 35} coatings, resulting in an increase of hardness up to 15-16 GPa. To evaluate the performance of Cr-Ru coatings as a protective coating on glass molding dies, the annealing treatment was conducted at 600 Degree-Sign C in a 50 ppm O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere. The outward diffusion and preferential oxidization of Cr in the Cr-Ru coatings resulted in the variations of the crystalline structure, chemical composition distribution, and surface hardness after annealing. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) proved that an oxide scale consisting of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed on the free surface. Scanning electron microscopy and TEM observed the surface morphology and structural variation. The chemical composition depth profiles were analyzed by Auger electron microscopy, verifying the presence of a Cr-depleted zone beneath the oxide scale. The hardness of Cr{sub 56}Ru{sub 44} and Cr{sub 65}Ru{sub 35} coatings decreased to 11-12 GPa after annealing, accompanied by the replacement of the Cr{sub 2}Ru phase by the Ru phase. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared crystalline Cr-Ru alloy coatings by direct current magnetron sputtering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr-Ru coatings were annealed at 600 Degree-Sign C for 2 h in a 50 ppm O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr diffused outwardly and oxidized to form a stable and protective oxide scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The original columnar grains recrystallized to polycrystalline grains.

  7. Improvement of Silicide Coating Method as Diffusion Barrier for U-Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Ti, or Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of the interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-Mo-Ti alloy powders were coated with silicide layers. The coating process was improved when compared to the previous coating in terms of the ball milling and heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, silicide coated U-Mo-Ti powders and pure aluminum powders were mixed and made into a compact for the annealing test. The compacts were annealed at 550 .deg. C for 2hr, and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). 1. Uniform, homogeneous, thickness controllable silicide layers were successfully coated on the surface of U-7wt%Mo-1wt%Ti powders. 2. U{sub 3}Si, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} silicide layers formed on the surface of U-7wt%Mo-1wt%Ti powders, and were identified by XRD and EDS analyses.

  8. Cermet coatings for solar Stirling space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic, are being considered for the heat inlet surface of a solar Stirling space power convertor. The role of the cermet coating is to absorb as much of the incident solar energy as possible. The ability to mix metal and ceramic at the atomic level offers the opportunity to tailor the composition and the solar absorptance of these coatings. Several candidate cermet coatings were created and their solar absorptance was characterized as-manufactured and after exposure to elevated temperatures. Coating composition was purposely varied through the thickness of the coating. As a consequence of changing composition, islands of metal are thought to form in the ceramic matrix. Computer modeling indicated that diffusion of the metal atoms played an important role in island formation while the ceramic was important in locking the islands in place. Much of the solar spectrum is absorbed as it passes through this labyrinth

  9. Devising Strain Hardening Models Using Kocks–Mecking Plots—A Comparison of Model Development for Titanium Aluminides and Case Hardening Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Bambach

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the development of strain hardening models taking into account the peculiarities of titanium aluminides. In comparison to steels, whose behavior has been studied extensively in the past, titanium aluminides possess a much larger initial work hardening rate, a sharp peak stress and pronounced softening. The work hardening behavior of a TNB-V4 (Ti–44.5Al–6.25Nb–0.8Mo–0.1B alloy is studied using isothermal hot compression tests conducted on a Gleeble 3500 simulator, and compared to the typical case hardening steel 25MoCrS4. The behavior is analyzed with the help of the Kocks-Mecking plots. In contrast to steel the TNB-V4 alloy shows a non-linear course of θ (i.e., no stage-III hardening initially and exhibits neither a plateau (stage IV hardening nor an inflection point at all deformation conditions. The present paper describes the development and application of a methodology for the design of strain hardening models for the TNB-V4 alloy and the 25CrMoS4 steel by taking the course of the Kocks-Mecking plots into account. Both models use different approaches for the hardening and softening mechanisms and accurately predict the flow stress over a wide range of deformation conditions. The methodology may hence assist in further developments of more sophisticated physically-based strain hardening models for TiAl-alloys.

  10. Protective coatings for commercial particulates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindl, B.; Teng, Y.H.; Liu, Y.L.

    1994-01-01

    SiC/Al composites are in large-scale production with Al-Si alloy matrices. The same composites with pure Al or low Si matrices need diffusion barriers on the SiC reinforcement to control the interfacial reaction. The present paper describes various approaches taken to obtain protective coatings...... of alumina and zirconia on SiC particulates by sol-gel techniques. Aqueous and organic precursors have been used. The extent of the reaction, i.e., the Si and Al4C3 content in the matrix, was determined by differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The reaction rates of some coated particulates...... in liquid Al are decreased by as much as one order of magnitude during the first 15 min of immersion. Pretreatments of the SiC surface, the composition and thickness of the coating interphase and heat treatments of the coated materials have been studied, and are discussed in relation to their effect...

  11. High Speed, Low Cost Fabrication of Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Membrane Electrode Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeCastro, Emory S.; Tsou, Yu-Min; Liu, Zhenyu

    2013-09-20

    Fabrication of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) depends on creating inks or pastes of catalyst and binder, and applying this suspension to either the membrane (catalyst coated membrane) or gas diffusion media (gas diffusion electrode) and respectively laminating either gas diffusion media or gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) to the membrane. One barrier to cost effective fabrication for either of these approaches is the development of stable and consistent suspensions. This program investigated the fundamental forces that destabilize the suspensions and developed innovative approaches to create new, highly stable formulations. These more concentrated formulations needed fewer application passes, could be coated over longer and wider substrates, and resulted in significantly lower coating defects. In March of 2012 BASF Fuel Cell released a new high temperature product based on these advances, whereby our customers received higher performing, more uniform MEAs resulting in higher stack build yields. Furthermore, these new materials resulted in an “instant” increase in capacity due to higher product yields and material throughput. Although not part of the original scope of this program, these new formulations have also led us to materials that demonstrate equivalent performance with 30% less precious metal in the anode. This program has achieved two key milestones in DOE’s Manufacturing R&D program: demonstration of processes for direct coating of electrodes and continuous in-line measurement for component fabrication.

  12. Progress on Fabrication of Planar Diffusion Couples with Representative TRISO PyC/SiC Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jolly, Brian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Campbell, Anne A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schumacher, Austin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Release of fission products from tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel limits the fuel’s operational lifetime and creates potential safety and maintenance concerns. A need for diffusion analysis in representative TRISO layers exists to provide fuel performance models with high fidelity data to improve fuel performance and efficiency. An effort has been initiated to better understand fission product transport in, and release from, quality TRISO fuel by investigating diffusion couples with representative pyrocarbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC). Here planar PyC/SiC diffusion couples are being developed with representative PyC/SiC layers using a fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) system identical to those used to produce laboratory-scale TRISO fuel for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Qualification and Development Program’s (AGR) first fuel irradiation. The diffusivity of silver, the silver and palladium system, europium, and strontium in the PyC/SiC will be studied at elevated temperatures and under high temperature neutron irradiation. The study also includes a comparative study of PyC/SiC diffusion couples with varying TRISO layer properties to understand the influence of SiC microstructure (grain size) and the PyC/SiC interface on fission product transport. The first step in accomplishing these goals is the development of the planar diffusion couples. The diffusion couple construction consists of multiple steps which includes fabrication of the primary PyC/SiC structures with targeted layer properties, introduction of fission product species and seal coating to create an isolated system. Coating development has shown planar PyC/SiC diffusion couples with similar properties to AGR TRISO fuel can be produced. A summary of the coating development process, characterization methods, and status are presented.

  13. Influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour on 13% chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K G; Meisel, H; Sessler, W

    1986-01-01

    The influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour of 13% chromium steel has been studied. There have been selected different coating systems: Barrier coating (enamel), diffusion coatings, (aluminizing, chromizing) and anodic coating, (aluminium, zinc, tin, cadmium). The corrosion fatigue limits of coated with uncoated specimens in neutral NaCl-solution are compared. Salt-concentrations were 0,01 and 22% (=0,38 M) NaCl at 80/sup 0/C and 150/sup 0/C. The tests were carried out with alternating tensions and a constant frequency of 50 Hz. Only the use of anodic coatings improved the corrosion fatigue behaviour of the chromium steel.

  14. Oxidation behavior of Al/Cr coating on Ti2AlNb alloy at 900 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengang; Liang, Wenping; Miao, Qiang; Chen, Bowen; Ding, Zheng; Roy, Nipon

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the Al/Cr coating was fabricated on the surface of Ti2AlNb alloy via rf magnetron sputtering and double glow treatment to enhance oxidation resistance. The protective coating with an outer layer of Al and inner layer of Cr has great bonding strength due to the in-diffusion of Cr and the inter-diffusion between Al and Cr to form Al-Cr alloyed layer which has great hardness. Acoustic emission curve which was detected via WS-2005 scratch tester indicates the bonding strength between Al/Cr coating and substrate is great. Morphology of Ti2AlNb alloy with Al/Cr coating after scratch test shows that the scratch is smooth without disbanding, and the depth and breadth of scratch are changed uniformly. The mass change was reduced after oxidation test due to the Al/Cr protective coating. Isothermal oxidation test at 900 °C was researched. Results indicate that Al/Cr coating provided oxidation resistance of Ti2AlNb alloy with prolonged air exposure at 900 °C. Al2O3 was detected by XRD patterns and SEM images, and was formed on the surface of Ti2AlNb alloy to protect substrate during oxidation test. A certain content of Cr is beneficial for the formation of Al2O3. Besides, Cr2O3 was produced under Al2O3 by outward diffusion of Cr to protect substrate sequentially, no cracks were discovered on Al/Cr protective coating. The process of Ti outward diffusion into surface was suppressive due to integration of Cr-Ti and Al-Ti intermetallics. A steady, adherent and continuous coated layer of Al/Cr on Ti2AlNb alloy increases oxidation resistance.

  15. Halo Formation During Solidification of Refractory Metal Aluminide Ternary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N.; Feitosa, L. M.; West, G. D.; Dong, H. B.

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of eutectic morphologies following primary solidification has been studied in the refractory metal aluminide (Ta-Al-Fe, Nb-Al-Co, and Nb-Al-Fe) ternary systems. The undercooling accompanying solid growth, as related to the extended solute solubility in the primary and secondary phases can be used to account for the evolution of phase morphologies during ternary eutectic solidification. For small undercooling, the conditions of interfacial equilibrium remain valid, while in the case of significant undercooling when nucleation constraints occur, there is a departure from equilibrium leading to unexpected phases. In Ta-Al-Fe, an extended solubility of Fe in σ was observed, which was consistent with the formation of a halo of μ phase on primary σ. In Nb-Al-Co, a halo of C14 is formed on primary CoAl, but very limited vice versa. However, in the absence of a solidus projection it was not possible to definitively determine the extended solute solubility in the primary phase. In Nb-Al-Fe when nucleation constraints arise, the inability to initiate coupled growth of NbAl3 + C14 leads to the occurrence of a two-phase halo of C14 + Nb2Al, indicating a large undercooling and departure from equilibrium.

  16. Investigation of Iron Aluminide Weld Overlays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.B.; Levin, B.F.; Marder, A.R.

    1999-08-02

    Conventional fossil fired boilers have been retrofitted with low NO(sub)x burners in order for the power plants to comply with new clean air regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion typically has been enhanced resulting in premature tube failure. To protect the existing panels from accelerated attack, weld overlay coatings are typically being applied. By depositing an alloy that offers better corrosion resistance than the underlying tube material, the wastage rates can be reduced. While Ni-based and stainless steel compositions are presently providing protection, they are expensive and susceptible to failure via corrosion-fatigue due to microsegregation upon solidification. Another material system presently under consideration for use as a coating in the oxidation/sulfidation environments is iron-aluminum. These alloys are relatively inexpensive, exhibit little microsegregation, and show excellent corrosion resistance. However, their use is limited due to weldability issues and their lack of corrosion characterization in simulated low NO(sub)x gas compositions. Therefore a program was initiated in 1996 to evaluate the use of iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in fossil fired boilers with low NO(sub)x burners. Investigated properties included weldability, corrosion behavior, erosion resistance, and erosion-corrosion performance.

  17. Niobium–niobium oxide multilayered coatings for corrosion protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for ["1"8F] production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skliarova, Hanna; Renzelli, Marco; Azzolini, Oscar; Felicis, Daniele de; Bemporad, Edoardo; Johnson, Richard R.; Palmieri, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Chemically inert coatings on Havar"® entrance foils of the targets for ["1"8F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar"®. During current investigation, magnetron sputtered niobium and niobium oxide were chosen as the candidates for protective coatings because of their superior chemical resistance. Aluminated quartz substrates allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. As far as niobium coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering are columnar, the grain boundaries provide a fast diffusion path for active species of corrosive media to penetrate and to corrode the substrate. Amorphous niobium oxide films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering showed superior barrier properties according to the corrosion tests performed. In order to prevent degrading of brittle niobium oxide at high pressures, multilayers combining high ductility of niobium with superior diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium oxide were proposed. The intercalation of niobium oxide interlayers was proved to interrupt the columnar grain growth of niobium during sputtering, resulting in improved diffusion barrier efficiency of obtained multilayers. The thin layer multilayer coating architecture with 70 nm bi-layer thickness was found preferential because of higher thermal stability. - Highlights: • Diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium, niobium oxide and their multilayers was studied. • The intercalation of niobium oxide layers interrupted the columnar grain growth of niobium. • The bilayer architectures influenced the stability of the multilayer coatings. • The thin layer multilayer coating with 70 nm double-layer was found superior.

  18. Niobium–niobium oxide multilayered coatings for corrosion protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for [{sup 18}F] production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliarova, Hanna, E-mail: Hanna.Skliarova@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Renzelli, Marco, E-mail: marco.renzelli@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Azzolini, Oscar, E-mail: Oscar.Azzolini@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Felicis, Daniele de, E-mail: daniele.defelicis@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Bemporad, Edoardo, E-mail: edoardo.bemporad@uniroma3.it [University of Rome “Roma TRE”, Via della Vasca Navale, 79, 00146 Rome (Italy); Johnson, Richard R., E-mail: richard.johnson@teambest.com [BEST Cyclotron Systems Inc., 8765 Ash Street Unit 7, Vancouver BC V6P 6T3 (Canada); Palmieri, Vincenzo, E-mail: Vincenzo.Palmieri@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Padua, Padua (Italy)

    2015-09-30

    Chemically inert coatings on Havar{sup ®} entrance foils of the targets for [{sup 18}F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar{sup ®}. During current investigation, magnetron sputtered niobium and niobium oxide were chosen as the candidates for protective coatings because of their superior chemical resistance. Aluminated quartz substrates allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modeling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. As far as niobium coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering are columnar, the grain boundaries provide a fast diffusion path for active species of corrosive media to penetrate and to corrode the substrate. Amorphous niobium oxide films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering showed superior barrier properties according to the corrosion tests performed. In order to prevent degrading of brittle niobium oxide at high pressures, multilayers combining high ductility of niobium with superior diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium oxide were proposed. The intercalation of niobium oxide interlayers was proved to interrupt the columnar grain growth of niobium during sputtering, resulting in improved diffusion barrier efficiency of obtained multilayers. The thin layer multilayer coating architecture with 70 nm bi-layer thickness was found preferential because of higher thermal stability. - Highlights: • Diffusion barrier efficiency of niobium, niobium oxide and their multilayers was studied. • The intercalation of niobium oxide layers interrupted the columnar grain growth of niobium. • The bilayer architectures influenced the stability of the multilayer coatings. • The thin layer multilayer coating with 70 nm double-layer was found superior.

  19. A Study on Silicide Coatings as Diffusion barrier for U-7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Ju Jin; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Ki Nam; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Chong Tak [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gamma phase U-Mo alloys are regarded as one of the promising candidates for advanced research reactor fuel when it comes to the irradiation performance. However, it has been reported that interaction layer formation between the UMo alloys and Al matrix degrades the irradiation performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel. The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of the interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-7Mo alloy powders were coated with silicide layers at 900 .deg. C for 1hr. U-Mo alloy powder was mixed with MoSi{sub 2}, Si and ZrSi{sub 2} powders and subsequently heat-treated to form uranium-silicide coating layers on the surface of U-Mo alloy particles. Silicide coated U-Mo powders and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The ZrSi{sub 2} coating layers has a thickness of about 1∼ 2μm. The surface of a silicide coated particle was very rough and silicide powder attached to the surface of the coating layer. 3. The XRD analysis of the coating layers showed that, they consisted of compounds such as U3Si{sub 2}, USi{sub 2}.

  20. Diffusion zinc plating of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Goncharov, Ivan; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    The report deals with the research on diffusion zinc plating of structural steels when replacing their cyanide cadmium plating. The results of the experiments in the open air, in vacuum, in the inert atmosphere, under various temperatures (300 - 500 deg.C) for different steel brands are presented. It is shown that diffusion zinc plating in argon or nitrogen atmosphere ensures obtaining the qualitative anticorrosion coating with insignificant change of mechanical properties of steels. The process is simple, reliable, ecology pure and cost-effective. (authors)

  1. Cerium-loaded algae exoskeletons for active corrosion protection of coated AA2024-T3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denissen, Paul J.; Garcia, Santiago J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Nanoporous diatom algae exoskeletons allow for local inhibitor loading. •Cerium loaded exoskeletons show diffusion controlled release from coatings. •In-situ opto-electrochemical analysis allows for accurate corrosion evaluation. •Raman spectroscopy allows for precise identification of Ce at IMs in a scribe. •High levels of protection were obtained with the Ce-diatom coatings. -- Abstract: The use of micron sized nanoporous diatom algae exoskeletons for inhibitor storage and sustained corrosion protection of coated aluminium structures upon damage is presented. In this concept the algae exoskeleton allows local inhibitor loading, limits the interaction between the cerium and the epoxy/amine coating and allows for diffusion-controlled release of the inhibitor when needed. The inhibitor release and corrosion protection by loaded exoskeletons was evaluated by UV/Vis spectrometry, a home-built optical-electrochemical setup, and Raman spectroscopy. Although this concept has been proven for a cerium-epoxy-aluminium alloy system the main underlying principle can be extrapolated to other inhibitor-coating-metal systems.

  2. Co-sputtered amorphous Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr coatings for corrosion protection of cyclotron targets for [{sup 18}F] production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliarova, Hanna, E-mail: Hanna.Skliarova@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell’Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Azzolini, Oscar, E-mail: Oscar.Azzolini@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell’Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Johnson, Richard R., E-mail: richard.johnson@teambest.com [BEST Cyclotron Systems Inc., 8765 Ash Street Unit 7, Vancouver, BC V6P 6T3 (Canada); Palmieri, Vincenzo, E-mail: Vincenzo.Palmieri@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell’Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Padua, Padua (Italy)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr alloy films were deposited by co-sputtering. • Co-sputtered Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta alloy coatings had crystalline microstructures. • Diffusion barrier efficiency of Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta decreased with the increase of Nb %. • Co-sputtered Ta–Zr films with 30–73 at.% Ta were amorphous. • Sputtered amorphous Ta–Zr films showed superior diffusion barrier efficiency. - Abstract: Protective corrosion resistant coatings serve for decreasing the amount of ionic contaminants from Havar® entrance foils of the targets for [{sup 18}F] production. The corrosion damage of coated entrance foils is caused mainly by the diffusion of highly reactive products of water radiolysis through the protective film toward Havar® substrate. Since amorphous metal alloys (metallic glasses) are well-known to perform a high corrosion resistance, the glass forming ability, microstructure and diffusion barrier efficiency of binary alloys containing chemically inert Nb, Ta, Zr were investigated. Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr films of different alloy composition and ∼1.5 μm thickness were co-deposited by magnetron sputtering. Diffusion barrier efficiency tests used reactive aluminum underlayer and protons of acid solution and gallium atoms at elevated temperature as diffusing particles. Though co-sputtered Nb–Ta and Nb–Zr alloy films of different contents were crystalline, Ta–Zr alloy was found to form dense amorphous microstructures in a range of composition with 30–73% atomic Ta. The diffusion barrier efficiency of Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta alloy coatings decreased with increase of Nb content. The diffusion barrier efficiency of sputtered Ta–Zr alloy coatings increased with the transition from nanocrystalline columnar microstructure to amorphous for coatings with 30–73 at.% Ta.

  3. Microstructural effects on the creep and crack propagation behaviors of γ-Ti aluminide alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinc, V.; Onofrio, G.; Nazmy, M.; Staubli, M.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides class of materials possess several unique physical and mechanical properties. These characteristics can be attractive for specific industrial applications. By applying different heat treatment schedules one can change the microstructural features of this class of materials. In the present investigation, two heat treatment schedules were used to produce two different microstructures, duplex (D) and nearly lamellar (NL) in the cast and HIP'ed Ti-47Al-2W-0.5Si alloy. The tensile strength and creep behavior, in the 700--850 C temperature range, of this alloy have been determined and correlated to the corresponding microstructures. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation behavior in this alloy has been studied at different temperatures. The results on the creep behavior showed that the alloy with nearly lamellar microstructure has a strongly improved creep strength as compared with that of the duplex microstructure

  4. Investigations on Wear Mechanisms of PVD Coatings on Carbides and Sialons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staszuk M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results on the wear resistance of PVD coatings on cutting inserts made from sintered carbide and sialon ceramics. The exploitative properties of coatings in technological cutting trials were defined in the paper, which also examined the adhesion of coatings to the substrate, the thickness of the coating, and the microhardness. As a result, it was found that isomorphic coating with AlN-h phase of covalent interatomic bonds exhibits much better adhesion to the sialon substrate than isomorphic coating with titanium nitride TiN. These coatings assure the high wear resistance of the coated tools, and the high adhesion combined with the high microhardness and fine-grained structure assure an increase in the exploitative life of the coated tools. In the case of coatings on substrate made from sintered carbide, there was a significant influence on the properties of the tools coated with them as concerns the existence of the diffusion zone between the substrate and the coating.

  5. Factors affecting the hot-dip zinc coatings structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sere, P.R.; Cuclcasi, J.D.; Elsner, C.I.; Sarli, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Coating solidification during hot-dip galvanizing is a very complex process due to Al-Fe, Al-Fe-Zn and Fe-Zn intermetallic compounds development . Fe-Zn intermetallics are brittle and detrimental for the coating ductility, while the diffusion towards the surface of a segregated insoluble alloying such as antimonium causes the sheet darkness. Steel of different roughness were hot-dip galvanized under different operation conditions using a laboratory scale simulator. The effect of steel roughness and process parameters upon coating characteristics were analysed. Experimental results showed that the steel roughness affects the coating thickness, zinc grain size and texture as well as the out-bursts development, while the process parameters affects the Fe 2 Al 5 morphology and antimonium segregation. (Author) 11 refs

  6. Using Diffusion Bonding in Making Piezoelectric Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Frank E.

    2003-01-01

    A technique for the fabrication of piezoelectric actuators that generate acceptably large forces and deflections at relatively low applied voltages involves the stacking and diffusion bonding of multiple thin piezoelectric layers coated with film electrodes. The present technique stands in contrast to an older technique in which the layers are bonded chemically, by use of urethane or epoxy agents. The older chemical-bonding technique entails several disadvantages, including the following: It is difficult to apply the bonding agents to the piezoelectric layers. It is difficult to position the layers accurately and without making mistakes. There is a problem of disposal of hazardous urethane and epoxy wastes. The urethane and epoxy agents are nonpiezoelectric materials. As such, they contribute to the thickness of a piezoelectric laminate without contributing to its performance; conversely, for a given total thickness, the performance of the laminate is below that of a unitary piezoelectric plate of the same thickness. The figure depicts some aspects of the fabrication of a laminated piezoelectric actuator by the present diffusion- bonding technique. First, stock sheets of the piezoelectric material are inspected and tested. Next, the hole pattern shown in the figure is punched into the sheets. Alternatively, if the piezoelectric material is not a polymer, then the holes are punched in thermoplastic films. Then both faces of each punched piezoelectric sheet or thermoplastic film are coated with a silver-ink electrode material by use of a silkscreen printer. The electrode and hole patterns are designed for minimal complexity and minimal waste of material. After a final electrical test, all the coated piezoelectric layers (or piezoelectric layers and coated thermoplastic films) are stacked in an alignment jig, which, in turn, is placed in a curved press for the diffusion-bonding process. In this process, the stack is pressed and heated at a specified curing temperature

  7. A multilayer innovative solution to improve the adhesion of nanocrystalline diamond coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulon-Quintin, A., E-mail: poulon@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Faure, C.; Teulé-Gay, L.; Manaud, J.P. [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of the NCD adhesion on WC-12%Co substrates for tooling applications using a multi-interlayer additional system. • Reduction of the graphite layer thickness and continuity at the interface with the diamond. • Transmission electron microscopy study for a better understanding of the diffusion phenomena occurring at the interfaces. - Abstract: Nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films grown under negative biased substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are widely used as surface overlay coating onto cermet WC-Co cutting tools to get better performances. To improve the diamond adhesion to the cermet substrate, suitable multi-layer systems have been added. They are composed of a cobalt diffusion barrier close to the substrate (single and sequenced nitrides layers) coated with a nucleation extra layer to improve the nucleus density of diamond during CVD processing. For all systems, before and after diamond deposition, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been performed for a better understanding of the diffusion phenomena occurring at the interfaces and to evaluate the presence of graphitic species at the interface with the diamond. Innovative multilayer system dedicated to the regulation of cobalt diffusion coated with a bilayer system optimized for the carbon diffusion control, is shown as an efficient solution to significantly reduce the graphite layer formation at the interface with the diamond down to 10 nm thick and to increase the adhesion of NCD diamond layer as scratch-tests confirm.

  8. Field study of the long-term release of block copolymers from fouling-release coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noguer, Albert Camós; Olsen, A.; Hvilsted, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The addition of block copolymers (i.e. oils) is a common technique to enhance the biofouling-resistance properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based fouling-release coatings. These copolymers diffuse from the bulk to the surface of the coating, thus modifying the properties of the surface an...... fouling-release coatings. Finally, the potential of long-term field-studies is discussed, as compared to short-term laboratory experiments usually performed within fouling-release coatings studies....

  9. Evaluation of Antibacterial Effects of Silver-Coated Stainless Steel Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Keikhaee, Fatemeh; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Khafri, Soraya; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    White spots and enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets are among the most important complications resulting from orthodontic treatments. Since the antibacterial properties of metals and metallic particles have been well documented, the aim of this study was to assess the antibacterial effect of stainless steel orthodontic brackets coated with silver (Ag) particles. In this study, 40 standard metal brackets were divided into two groups of 20 cases and 20 controls. The brackets in the case group were coated with Ag particles using an electroplating method. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the adequacy of the coating process. In addition, antibacterial tests, i.e., disk diffusion and direct contact tests were performed at three, six, 24, and 48 hours, and 15 and 30 days using a Streptococcus mutans strain. The results were analyzed using Student's t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. Analyses via SEM and AFM confirmed that excellent coatings were obtained by using an electroplating method. The groups exhibited similar behavior when subjected to the disk diffusion test in the agar medium. However, the bacterial counts of the Ag-coated brackets were, in general, significantly lower (PBrackets coated with Ag, via an electroplating method, exhibited antibacterial properties when placed in direct contact with Streptococcus mutans. This antibacterial effect persisted for 30 days after contact with the bacteria.

  10. Interface bonding of NiCrAlY coating on laser modified H13 tool steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, M. S.; Aqida, S. N.; Ismail, I.

    2016-06-01

    Bonding strength of thermal spray coatings depends on the interfacial adhesion between bond coat and substrate material. In this paper, NiCrAlY (Ni-164/211 Ni22 %Cr10 %Al1.0 %Y) coatings were developed on laser modified H13 tool steel surface using atmospheric plasma spray (APS). Different laser peak power, P p, and duty cycle, DC, were investigated in order to improve the mechanical properties of H13 tool steel surface. The APS spraying parameters setting for coatings were set constant. The coating microstructure near the interface was analyzed using IM7000 inverted optical microscope. Interface bonding of NiCrAlY was investigated by interfacial indentation test (IIT) method using MMT-X7 Matsuzawa Hardness Tester Machine with Vickers indenter. Diffusion of atoms along NiCrAlY coating, laser modified and substrate layers was investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) using Hitachi Tabletop Microscope TM3030 Plus. Based on IIT method results, average interfacial toughness, K avg, for reference sample was 2.15 MPa m1/2 compared to sample L1 range of K avg from 6.02 to 6.96 MPa m1/2 and sample L2 range of K avg from 2.47 to 3.46 MPa m1/2. Hence, according to K avg, sample L1 has the highest interface bonding and is being laser modified at lower laser peak power, P p, and higher duty cycle, DC, prior to coating. The EDXS analysis indicated the presence of Fe in the NiCrAlY coating layer and increased Ni and Cr composition in the laser modified layer. Atomic diffusion occurred in both coating and laser modified layers involved in Fe, Ni and Cr elements. These findings introduce enhancement of coating system by substrate surface modification to allow atomic diffusion.

  11. Inhibited Aluminization of an ODS FeCr Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vande Put Ep Rouaix, Aurelie; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for fusion energy applications both for compatibility with liquid Pb-Li and to form an alumina layer that acts as a tritium permeation barrier. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are a structural material candidate for commercial reactor concepts expected to operate above 600 C. Aluminizing was conducted in a laboratory scale chemical vapor deposition reactor using accepted conditions for coating Fe- and Ni-base alloys. However, the measured mass gains on the current batch of ODS Fe-14Cr were extremely low compared to other conventional and ODS alloys. After aluminizing at two different Al activities at 900 C and at 1100 C, characterization showed that the ODS Fe-14Cr specimens formed a dense, primarily AlN layer that prevented Al uptake. This alloy batch contained a higher (> 5000 ppma) N content than the other alloys coated and this is the most likely reason for the inhibited aluminization. Other factors such as the high O content, small (∼ 140 nm) grain size and Y-Ti oxide nano-clusters in ODS Fe-14Cr also could have contributed to the observed behavior. Examples of typical aluminide coatings formed on conventional and ODS Fe- and Ni-base alloys are shown for comparison.

  12. Diffusion of Nickel into Ferritic Steel Interconnects of Solid Oxide Fuel/Electrolysis Stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2013-01-01

    diffusion of nickel from the Ni/YSZ electrode or the contact layer into the interconnect plate. Such diffusion can cause austenization of the ferritic structure and could possibly alter corrosion properties of the steel. Whereas this process has already been recognized by SOFC stack developers, only...... a limited number of studies have been devoted to the phenomenon. Here, diffusion of Ni into ferritic Crofer 22 APU steel is studied in a wet hydrogen atmosphere after 250 hours of exposure at 800 °C using Ni-plated (~ 10 micron thick coatings) sheet steel samples as a model system. Even after...... this relatively short time all the metallic nickel in the coating has reacted and formed solid solutions with iron and chromium. Diffusion of Ni into the steel causes formation of the austenite FCC phase. The microstructure and composition of the oxide scale formed on the sample surface after 250 hours is similar...

  13. The Influence of the Coating Deposition Process on the Interdiffusion Behavior Between Nickel-Based Superalloys and MCrAlY Bond Coats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaß, M.; Frommherz, M.; Oechsner, M.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, interdiffusion between two nickel-based superalloys and two MCrAlY bond coats is investigated. The MCrAlY bond coats were applied using two different spraying processes, high velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF) and low-pressure plasma spraying. Of primary interest is the evolution of Kirkendall porosity, which can form at the interface between substrate and bond coat and depends largely on the chemical compositions of the coating and substrate. Experimental evidence further suggested that the formation of Kirkendall porosity depends on the coating deposition process. Formation of porosity at the interface causes a degradation of the bonding strength between substrate and coating. After coating deposition, the samples were annealed at 1050 °C for up to 2000 h. Microstructural and compositional analyses were performed to determine and evaluate the Kirkendall porosity. The results reveal a strong influence of both the coating deposition process and the chemical compositions. The amount of Kirkendall porosity formed, as well as the location of appearance, is largely influenced by the coating deposition process. In general, samples with bond coats applied by means of HVOF show accelerated element diffusion. It is hypothesized that recrystallization of the substrate material is a main root cause for these observations.

  14. Development of novel protective high temperature coatings on heat exchanger steels and their corrosion resistance in simulated coal firing environment; Developpement de revetements pour les aciers d'echangeurs thermiques et amelioration de leur resistance a la corrosion en environnement simulant les fumees de combustion et de charbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohr, V.

    2005-10-15

    Improving the efficiencies of thermal power plants requires an increase of the operating temperatures and thus of the corrosion resistance of heat exchanger materials. Therefore, the present study aimed at developing protective coatings using the pack cementation process. Two types of heat exchanger steels were investigated: a 17% Cr-13% Ni austenitic steel and three ferritic-martensitic steels with 9 (P91 and P92) and 12% Cr (HCM12A). The austenitic steel was successfully aluminized at 950 C. For the ferritic-martensitic steels, the pack cementation temperature was decreased down to 650 C, in order to maintain their initial microstructure. Two types of aluminides, made of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and FeAl, were developed. A mechanism of the coating formation at low temperature is proposed. Furthermore, combining the pack cementation with the conventional heat treatment of P91 allowed to take benefit of higher temperatures for the deposition of a two-step Cr+Al coating. The corrosion resistance of coated and uncoated steels is compared in simulated coal firing environment for durations up to 2000 h between 650 and 700 C. It is shown that the coatings offer a significant corrosion protection and, thus, an increase of the component lifetime. Finally, the performance of coated 9-12% Cr steels is no longer limited by corrosion but by interdiffusion between the coating and the substrate. (author)

  15. Effects of stress concentrations on the fatigue life of a gamma based titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trail, S.J.; Bowen, P.

    1995-01-01

    S-N curves for a gamma based titanium aluminide alloy of composition Ti-47.2Al-2.1Mn-1.9Nb(at.%)+2TiB 2 (wt.%) have been used to define fatigue life. Effects of residual stress, stressed volume, loading ratio, loading mode, elevated temperature and surface roughness have been considered. Residual tensile stresses and micro-cracking are introduced by Electro Discharge Machining and the fatigue life is reduced slightly compared with polished samples. Notched fatigue tests show a significant notch strengthening effect which increases with increasing stress concentration factor. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested at room temperature reveal fully brittle failure mechanisms and no evidence of stable crack growth is observed. The fatigue life appears, therefore, to be determined predominantly by the number of cycles to crack initiation. At the elevated temperature of 830 C, evidence for some stable fatigue crack growth has been found. Probable sites for crack initiation are addressed

  16. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-11-29

    Fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) have been acknowledged as a critical issue in a metallic fuel/steel cladding system due to the formation of low melting intermetallic eutectic compounds between the fuel and cladding steel, resulting in reduction in cladding wall thickness as well as a formation of eutectic compounds that can initiate melting in the fuel at lower temperature. In order to mitigate FCCI, diffusion barrier coatings on the cladding inner surface have been considered. In order to generate the required coating techniques, pack cementation, electroplating, and electrophoretic deposition have been investigated. However, these methods require a high processing temperature of above 700 oC, resulting in decarburization and decomposition of the martensites in a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) cladding steel. Alternatively, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) can be a promising process due to its low processing temperature of below 600 oC. The aim of the project is to conduct applied and fundamental research towards the development of diffusion barrier coatings on the inner surface of F/M fuel cladding tubes. Advanced cladding steels such as T91, HT9 and NF616 have been developed and extensively studied as advanced cladding materials due to their excellent irradiation and corrosion resistance. However, the FCCI accelerated by the elevated temperature and high neutron exposure anticipated in fast reactors, can have severe detrimental effects on the cladding steels through the diffusion of Fe into fuel and lanthanides towards into the claddings. To test the functionality of developed coating layer, the diffusion couple experiments were focused on using T91 as cladding and Ce as a surrogate lanthanum fission product. By using the customized OMCVD coating equipment, thin and compact layers with a few micron between 1.5 µm and 8 µm thick and average grain size of 200 nm and 5 µm were successfully obtained at the specimen coated between 300oC and

  17. A respiratory model for uranium aluminide based on occupational data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R W; Eckerman, K F; Jr, J D Boice

    2005-01-01

    As part of an epidemiological study, doses from intake of radionuclides were estimated for workers employed during a 52-year period at the Rocketdyne/Atomics International facility in California. The facility was involved in a variety of research programmes, including nuclear fuel fabrication, spent nuclear fuel decladding, and reactor operation and disassembly. Most of the documented intakes involved inhalation of enriched uranium (U), fission products, or plutonium (Pu). Highest doses were estimated for a group of workers exposed to airborne uranium aluminide (UAl x ) during the fabrication of reactor fuel plates. Much of the exposure to UAl x occurred early in the fuel fabrication programme, before it was recognised that intake and lung retention were being underestimated from urinary data due to an unexpected delayed dissolution of the inhaled material. In workers who had been removed from exposure, the rate of urinary excretion of U increased for a few months, peaked, and then declined at a rate consistent with moderately soluble material. This pattern differs markedly from the monotonically decreasing absorption rates represented by the default absorption types in the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This paper summarises the findings on the behaviour of UAl x in these workers and describes material-specific parameter values of the HRTM based on this information

  18. Understanding particulate coating microstructure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine Cardinal

    How a dispersion of particulates suspended in a solvent dries into a solid coating often is more important to the final coating quality than even its composition. Essential properties like porosity, strength, gloss, particulate order, and concentration gradients are all determined by the way the particles come together as the coating dries. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryoSEM) is one of the most effective methods to directly visualize a drying coating during film formation. Using this method, the coating is frozen, arresting particulate motion and solidifying the sample so that it be imaged in an SEM. In this thesis, the microstructure development of particulate coatings was explored with several case studies. First, the effect of drying conditions was determined on the collapse of hollow latex particles, which are inexpensive whiteners for paint. Using cryoSEM, it was found that collapse occurs during the last stages of drying and is most likely to occur at high drying temperatures, humidity, and with low binder concentration. From these results, a theoretical model was proposed for the collapse of a hollow latex particle. CryoSEM was also used to verify a theoretical model for the particulate concentration gradients that may develop in a coating during drying for various evaporation, sedimentation and particulate diffusion rates. This work created a simple drying map that will allow others to predict the character of a drying coating based on easily calculable parameters. Finally, the effect of temperature on the coalescence and cracking of latex coatings was explored. A new drying regime for latex coatings was identified, where partial coalescence of particles does not prevent cracking. Silica was shown to be an environmentally friendly additive for preventing crack formation in this regime.

  19. The role that bond coat depletion of aluminum has on the lifetime of APS-TBC under oxidizing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renusch, D.; Schorr, M.; Schuetze, M. [Karl-Winnacker-Institut der DECHEMA e.V., D-60486 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Bond coat oxidation as well as bond coat depletion of Al are still believed to be a major degradation mechanism with respect to the lifetime of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. In this study the top coat lifetime is described as being limited by both bond coat depletion of Al and mechanical failure of the top coat. The empirical results are introduced by considering three spallation cases, namely, Al depletion failure, thermal fatigue failure, and thermal aging failure. Al depletion failure occurs when the Al content within the bond coat reaches a critical value. In this paper bond coat depletion of Al is modeled by considering the diffusion of Al into both the thermally grown oxide (TGO) and substrate. The diffusion model results are compared to Al concentration profiles measured with an electron beam microprobe. These measured results are from oxidized air plasma sprayed TBC systems (APS-TBC) with vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) bond coats for exposures up to 5000 h in the temperature range of 950-1100 C. This paper focuses on the Al depletion failure and how it relates to top coat spallation. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Hot corrosion of pack cementation aluminized carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, A.F.; Mohamed, K.E.; Abd El-Azim, M.E.; Soliman, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    Low carbon steel was aluminized by the pack cementation technique at various aluminizing temperatures and times in or der to have different aluminide coatings. The aluminized specimens were sprayed at the beginning of the hot corrosion experiments with Na C 1+Na 2 SO 4 solution. The hot corrosion tests were carried out by thermal cycling at 850 degree C in air. The results were evaluated by, corrosion kinetics based on weight change measurements, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. It was found that the maximum corrosion resistance to this corrosive environment is achieved by aluminizing at 900 degree C for 19 h or 950 degree C for >4 h. These aliminizing conditions lead to formation of thick aluminide coatings with sufficient aluminium concentration (>15 wt%) at their outer surface necessary for continuous formation of protective Al 2 O 3 scale. The tested materials are used in protection of some components used in electric power stations (conventional or nuclear)

  1. Cerium oxide as conversion coating for the corrosion protection of aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA GULICOVSKI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available CeO2 coatings were formed on the aluminum after Al surface preparation, by dripping the ceria sol, previously prepared by forced hydrolysis of Ce(NO34. The anticorrosive properties of ceria coatings were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS during the exposure to 0.03 % NaCl. The morphology of the coatings was examined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM. EIS data indicated considerably larger corrosion resistance of CeO2-coated aluminum than for bare Al. The corrosion processes on Al below CeO2 coating are subjected to more pronounced diffusion limitations in comparison to the processes below passive aluminum oxide film, as the consequence of the formation of highly compact protective coating. The results show that the deposition of ceria coatings is an effective way to improve corrosion resistance for aluminum.

  2. Use of ion beams to simulate reaction of reactor fuels with their cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Baldo, P.

    2006-01-01

    Processes occurring within reactor cores are not amenable to direct experimental observation. Among major concerns are damage, fission gas accumulation and reaction between the fuel and its cladding all of which lead to swelling. These questions can be investigated through simulation with ion beams. As an example, we discuss the irradiation driven interaction of uranium-molybdenum alloys, intended for use as low-enrichment reactor fuels, with aluminum, which is used as fuel cladding. Uranium-molybdenum coated with a 100 nm thin film of aluminum was irradiated with 3 MeV Kr ions to simulate fission fragment damage. Mixing and diffusion of aluminum was followed as a function of irradiation with RBS and nuclear reaction analysis using the 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si reaction which occurs at a proton energy of 991.9 keV. During irradiation at 150 deg. C, aluminum diffused into the uranium alloy at a irradiation driven diffusion rate of 30 nm 2 /dpa. At a dose of 90 dpa, uranium diffusion into the aluminum layer resulted in formation of an aluminide phase at the initial interface. The thickness of this phase grew until it consumed the aluminum layer. The rapid diffusion of Al into these reactor fuels may offer explanation of the observation that porosity is not observed in the fuel particles but on their periphery

  3. Thin coatings in packaging: Fundamental and practical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, N.A.

    1996-01-01

    A beverage or food can is very much a functionalized product, the overall performance characteristics being achieved by the use of several materials each of which provides a specific property. Schematically, the metal substrate provides the mechanical and barrier properties, whereby the chemical resistance is provided by specific surface treatments to the metal surface and the application of a thin organic coating. Between about 4 endash 15 μm in thickness, this organic coating has a double protective role, as it must protect the substrate from the foodstuff (corrosion) and the foodstuff from the substrate (taste..) over the required shelflife of the product. To give an idea of the industrial importance of this application, over 100 billion beverage cans per year are produced worldwide, each being individually sprayed with a protective organic layer. To perform correctly these coatings need to possess the following characteristics: emdash ability to be applied in thin, homogeneous layers without macroscopic or microscopic defects, emdash sufficient adhesion with the substrate and possess considerable interface stability emdash mechanical properties sufficient to withstand the can forming operations emdash intrinsic diffusion barrier properties necessary to prevent significant interaction with the substrate emdash sufficient chemical resistance to withstand any significant modification of the coating structure and hence intrinsic properties induced by the foodstuff Whereas a considerable amount of scientific attention has been applied to ''bulk'' systems, such as the mechanical properties of epoxies used for composite materials, diffusion in polymer packaging..., little published work is available concerning the specific properties of these thin coatings. The task is not helped by the commercial nature of the resin formulations used, the need to adapt these formulations to the multitude of industrial operations and the physical size of the coatings

  4. Evaluation of the microstructure and microhardness of laser-fabricated titanium aluminate coatings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminide intermetallics are very brittle at room temperature, hence they are challenging to fabricate even by conventional manufacturing techniques such as casting and forging. The production of TiAl from elemental powders using industrial...

  5. Synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles containing Fe, Si, and V using multiple diffusion flames and catalytic oxidation capability of carbon-coated nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Mohamed; Memon, Nasir K.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles containing iron, silicon, and vanadium are synthesized using multiple diffusion flames. The growth of carbon-coated (C–TiO2), carbon-coated with iron oxide (Fe/C–TiO2), silica-coated (Si–TiO2), and vanadium-doped (V–TiO2) TiO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated using a single-step process. Hydrogen, oxygen, and argon are utilized to establish the flame, with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as the precursor for TiO2. For the growth of Fe/C–TiO2 nanoparticles, TTIP is mixed with xylene and ferrocene. While for the growth of Si–TiO2 and V–TiO2, TTIP is mixed with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and vanadium (V) oxytriisopropoxide, respectively. The synthesized nanoparticles are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with energy-filtered TEM for elemental mapping (of Si, C, O, and Ti), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen adsorption BET surface area analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. Anatase is the dominant phase for the C–TiO2, Fe/C–TiO2, and Si–TiO2 nanoparticles, whereas rutile is the dominant phase for the V–TiO2 nanoparticles. For C–TiO2 and Fe/C–TiO2, the nanoparticles are coated with about 3-5-nm thickness of carbon. The iron-based TiO2 nanoparticles significantly improve the catalytic oxidation of carbon, where complete oxidation of carbon occurs at a temperature of 470 °C (with iron) compared to 610 °C (without iron). Enhanced catalytic oxidation properties are also observed for model soot particles, Printex-U, when mixed with Fe/C-TiO2. With regards to Si–TiO2 nanoparticles, a uniform coating of 3 to 8 nm of silicon dioxide is observed around the TiO2 particles. This coating mainly occurs due to variance in the chemical reaction rates of the precursors. Finally, with regards to V–TiO2, vanadium is doped within the TiO2 nanoparticles as visualized by HRTEM and XPS further confirms the formation of

  6. Synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles containing Fe, Si, and V using multiple diffusion flames and catalytic oxidation capability of carbon-coated nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Mohamed

    2016-01-19

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles containing iron, silicon, and vanadium are synthesized using multiple diffusion flames. The growth of carbon-coated (C–TiO2), carbon-coated with iron oxide (Fe/C–TiO2), silica-coated (Si–TiO2), and vanadium-doped (V–TiO2) TiO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated using a single-step process. Hydrogen, oxygen, and argon are utilized to establish the flame, with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as the precursor for TiO2. For the growth of Fe/C–TiO2 nanoparticles, TTIP is mixed with xylene and ferrocene. While for the growth of Si–TiO2 and V–TiO2, TTIP is mixed with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and vanadium (V) oxytriisopropoxide, respectively. The synthesized nanoparticles are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with energy-filtered TEM for elemental mapping (of Si, C, O, and Ti), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen adsorption BET surface area analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. Anatase is the dominant phase for the C–TiO2, Fe/C–TiO2, and Si–TiO2 nanoparticles, whereas rutile is the dominant phase for the V–TiO2 nanoparticles. For C–TiO2 and Fe/C–TiO2, the nanoparticles are coated with about 3-5-nm thickness of carbon. The iron-based TiO2 nanoparticles significantly improve the catalytic oxidation of carbon, where complete oxidation of carbon occurs at a temperature of 470 °C (with iron) compared to 610 °C (without iron). Enhanced catalytic oxidation properties are also observed for model soot particles, Printex-U, when mixed with Fe/C-TiO2. With regards to Si–TiO2 nanoparticles, a uniform coating of 3 to 8 nm of silicon dioxide is observed around the TiO2 particles. This coating mainly occurs due to variance in the chemical reaction rates of the precursors. Finally, with regards to V–TiO2, vanadium is doped within the TiO2 nanoparticles as visualized by HRTEM and XPS further confirms the formation of

  7. Potential assisted fabrication of metal-ceramic composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knote, A.; Schindler, U.; Krueger, H.G.; Kern, H.

    2003-01-01

    A possibility to produce uniform metal-ceramic composite coatings with a high content of ceramic particles up to 60 vol.% will be presented in this study. This method includes a combination of electrophoretic deposition and electrolytic deposition by several steps. A yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (Tosoh TZ-8Y) was first electrophoretically deposited on a ferritic steel plate and then sintered by 1100 C to an open porous layer. In the next step nickel was electrodeposited into the pores of the layer. By a final annealing step it was possible to improve the bonding of the composit coating on the substrate by diffusion of the metal components. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  8. Thermal oxidation of tungsten-based sputtered coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louro, C.; Cavaleiro, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of the addition of nickel, titanium, and nitrogen on the air oxidation behavior of W-based sputtered coatings in the temperature range 600 to 800 C was studied. In some cases these additions significantly improved the oxidation resistance of the tungsten coatings. As reported for bulk tungsten, all the coatings studied were oxidized by layers following a parabolic law. Besides WO 3 and WO x phases detected in all the oxidized coatings, TiO 2 and NiWO 4 were also detected for W-Ti and W-Ni films, respectively. WO x was present as an inner protective compact layer covered by the porous WO 3 oxide. The best oxidation resistance was found for W-Ti and W-N-Ni coatings which also presented the highest activation energies (E a = 234 and 218 kJ/mol, respectively, as opposed to E a ∼ 188 kJ/mol for the other coatings). These lower oxidation weight gains were attributed to the greater difficulty of the inward diffusion of oxygen ions for W-Ti films, owing to the formation of fine particles of TiO 2 , and the formation of the external, more protective layer of NiWO 4 for W-N-Ni coatings

  9. Coating of evaporation concentrates with bitumen. Progress Report No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodier, J.; Lefillatre, G.; Rodi, L.; Cudel, Y.

    1968-01-01

    Laboratory tests have been carried out on the coating by bitumen of evaporation concentrates having a free nitric acidity of 1 N or 2.5 N, and a high mineralization (400 gm/litre). In order to neutralize the free acidity and to trap the radio-elements, these concentrates have been subjected before coating to various treatments designed to decrease the solubility. As a result of these treatments, sludges were obtained which could be coated directly with the bitumen. By measuring the radioactive diffusion factors of the bitumen coated products immersed both in ordinary and sea water, it was possible to compare the efficiency of the processes developed and of the various types of bitumen used. On the whole the radioactive diffusion tests were satisfactory and the process using successive co-precipitations (hydroxides, nickel ferrocyanide, barium sulphate) was chosen. From the bitumens tried out, a straight - asphalt, Mexphalt 40/50 was selected for low and medium activity concentrates as it ensures good isolation of the radio-elements; an air-blowing asphalt, Mexphalte R 90/40, was chosen for concentrates of high activity because of its higher resistance to irradiation. As a result of this work, a simple coating technology was evolved and pilot experiments will soon begin. Briefly, it appears that although a method for coating evaporation concentrates with bitumen has been defined, it will inevitably be necessary to devise a specific decontamination process each time that a new type of concentrate is encountered (composition, nature of the salts, radio-element distribution). (author) [fr

  10. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  11. Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating on austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovitskaya, N.V.; Kolenchenko, L.D.; Larikov, L.N.

    1989-01-01

    Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating deposited on 08Kh18N10T steel substrate using ''Bulat'' device are studied. Use of complex investigation methods permitted despite small coating thickness (1μm) to aquire information on hardness, porosity, to study phase composition in all coating thickness. The surface layer (∼0.1 μm) consists of ε-Ti 2 N, TiN 0.6 , TiC 0.35 , that is formed with carbon participation from oil vacuum. In more deeper layers beside ε-Ti 2 N TiC 0.14 N 0.77 is present. Effect of carbon diffusion from substrate to forming coating is stated. Gradient of element concentrations in the substrate-coating interface causes recrystallization of austenite

  12. Index of refraction enhancement of calcite particles coated with zinc carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattaud, Kathleen; Vilminot, Serge; Hirlimann, Charles; Parant, Hubert; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    ZnCO 3 coating on calcite particles has been developed in order to enhance the index of refraction of this mineral that is used as a charge in paper, paint and polymer industries. Chemical reaction between calcite particles in an aqueous suspension with zinc chloride promotes the formation of a ZnCO 3 coating consisting of two layers with different interactions with the calcite particle. The refraction index of the resulting composite particles increases with the Zn/Ca ratio. A model allows to evaluate the coating thickness. The value of the scattering S and diffusion K coefficients of sheets coated with the ZnCO 3 coated particles reveal a dependence on the preparation conditions with a 15% increase for the best samples.

  13. Effect of Zinc Phosphate on the Corrosion Behavior of Waterborne Acrylic Coating/Metal Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongxia; Song, Dongdong; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Dawei; Gao, Jin; Du, Cuiwei

    2017-06-14

    Waterborne coating has recently been paid much attention. However, it cannot be used widely due to its performance limitations. Under the specified conditions of the selected resin, selecting the function pigment is key to improving the anticorrosive properties of the coating. Zinc phosphate is an environmentally protective and efficient anticorrosion pigment. In this work, zinc phosphate was used in modifying waterborne acrylic coatings. Moreover, the disbonding resistance of the coating was studied. Results showed that adding zinc phosphate can effectively inhibit the anode process of metal corrosion and enhance the wet adhesion of the coating, and consequently prevent the horizontal diffusion of the corrosive medium into the coating/metal interface and slow down the disbonding of the coating.

  14. A Mechanistic Model for Drug Release in PLGA Biodegradable Stent Coatings Coupled with Polymer Degradation and Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxiang; Braatz, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating for applications in drug-eluting stents has been receiving increasing interest as a result of its unique properties compared with biodurable polymers in delivering drug for reducing stents-related side effects. In this work, a mathematical model for describing the PLGA degradation and erosion and coupled drug release from PLGA stent coating is developed and validated. An analytical expression is derived for PLGA mass loss that predicts multiple experimental studies in the literature. An analytical model for the change of the number-average degree of polymerization (or molecular weight) is also derived. The drug transport model incorporates simultaneous drug diffusion through both the polymer solid and the liquid-filled pores in the coating, where an effective drug diffusivity model is derived taking into account factors including polymer molecular weight change, stent coating porosity change, and drug partitioning between solid and aqueous phases. The model is used to describe in vitro sirolimus release from PLGA stent coating, and demonstrates the significance of simultaneous sirolimus release via diffusion through both polymer solid and pore space. The proposed model is compared to existing drug transport models, and the impact of model parameters, limitations and possible extensions of the model are also discussed. PMID:25345656

  15. Experimental Study on Influence of Process Variables on Crater Dimensions in Micro- EDM of γ-Titanium Aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Paul, G.; Sarkar, S.; Nagahanumaiah

    2011-01-01

    In the present work the effect of different dielectric mediums in micro-EDM of γ-Titanium Aluminide alloy have been investigated. Experiments were conducted both in the absence (dry conditions) and in presence of dielectric (EDM oil).Circular craters were produced both in the presence and absence of dielectric fluid using varying micro-EDM process variables i.e. open circuit voltage, discharge capacitance, pulse frequency and pulse-on-time. Over cut was measured from optical microscope images using Image Analyzer software. Influences of process variables and optimal conditions for minimum over cut on crater dimensions were investigated. ANOVA test which shows that capacitance of RC circuit contributes significantly in crater formation followed by pulse frequency. Optical photographs exhibit that over cut are less in air medium compared to oil medium.

  16. Oxidation resistance of CrN/(Cr,V)N hard coatings deposited by DC magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panjan, P., E-mail: peter.panjan@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drnovšek, A.; Kovač, J.; Gselman, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bončina, T. [University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Smetanova 17, 2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Paskvale, S.; Čekada, M.; Kek Merl, D.; Panjan, M. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-09-30

    In recent years vanadium-doped hard coatings have become available as possible candidates for self-lubrication at high temperatures. Their low coefficient of friction has mainly been attributed to the formation of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} phase. However, the formation of vanadium oxides must be controlled by the out-diffusion of vanadium in order to achieve the combination of a low coefficient of friction and good mechanical properties for the protective coatings. In this work the application of a nanolayer of CrN/(Cr,V)N hard coating was proposed as a way to better control the out-diffusion of vanadium, while the topmost chromium oxide layer acts as barrier for the vanadium diffusion. However, the aim of this investigation was not only to focus on the formation of the oxide layer. Special attention was given to the oxidation process that takes place at the growth defects, where we observed a strong diffusion of vanadium taking place. The CrN/(Cr,V)N nanolayer coatings were deposited by DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering in an CC800/9 (CemeCon) industrial unit. The vanadium concentration in the (Cr,V)N layers was varied in the range 1.0–11.5 at.%. - Highlights: • Oxidation processes of CrN/(Cr,V)N nanolayers with vanadium content were investigated. • The CrN/(Cr,V)N hard layers were oxidized at high temperature in O2 atm. • The top chromium oxide layer acts as a diffusion barrier for vanadium ions during oxidation. • Important role of growth defects during the oxidation process is demonstrated.

  17. Oxidation resistance of CrN/(Cr,V)N hard coatings deposited by DC magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panjan, P.; Drnovšek, A.; Kovač, J.; Gselman, P.; Bončina, T.; Paskvale, S.; Čekada, M.; Kek Merl, D.; Panjan, M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years vanadium-doped hard coatings have become available as possible candidates for self-lubrication at high temperatures. Their low coefficient of friction has mainly been attributed to the formation of the V_2O_5 phase. However, the formation of vanadium oxides must be controlled by the out-diffusion of vanadium in order to achieve the combination of a low coefficient of friction and good mechanical properties for the protective coatings. In this work the application of a nanolayer of CrN/(Cr,V)N hard coating was proposed as a way to better control the out-diffusion of vanadium, while the topmost chromium oxide layer acts as barrier for the vanadium diffusion. However, the aim of this investigation was not only to focus on the formation of the oxide layer. Special attention was given to the oxidation process that takes place at the growth defects, where we observed a strong diffusion of vanadium taking place. The CrN/(Cr,V)N nanolayer coatings were deposited by DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering in an CC800/9 (CemeCon) industrial unit. The vanadium concentration in the (Cr,V)N layers was varied in the range 1.0–11.5 at.%. - Highlights: • Oxidation processes of CrN/(Cr,V)N nanolayers with vanadium content were investigated. • The CrN/(Cr,V)N hard layers were oxidized at high temperature in O2 atm. • The top chromium oxide layer acts as a diffusion barrier for vanadium ions during oxidation. • Important role of growth defects during the oxidation process is demonstrated.

  18. Hybrid polyacrylamide/carbon coating on sulfur cathode for advanced lithium sulfur battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tao; Yuan, Yan; Hong, Bo; Cao, Huawei; Zhang, Kai; Lai, Yanqing; Liu, Yexiang; Huang, Zixin

    2017-01-01

    Commercialized conductive slurry consisting of polyacrylamide (PAM) and two kinds of carbon black was coated on the surface of sulfur cathode. The hybrid PAM/C coating not only physically blocks but also chemically anchors polysulfides within the cathode, confining their out-diffusion and shuttle. Besides, the flexible and highly-conductive coating layer buffers volume change of the cathode during discharge-charge process and reduces charge transfer resistance. A specific capacity of as high as ∼900 mAh g −1 after 300 cycles is demonstrated for the PAM/C coated cathode, which is a significant improvement of reversible capacity and cycle capability compared to uncoated or conventional PVDF/C coated cathode.

  19. Corrosion behavior of ceramic-coated ZIRLO™ exposed to supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandapaka, Kiran K.; Cahyadi, Rico S.; Yalisove, Steven; Kuang, Wenjun; Sickafus, K.; Patel, Maulik K.; Was, Gary S.

    2018-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of ceramic coated ZIRLO™ tubing was evaluated in a supercritical water (SCW) environment to determine its behavior in high temperature water. Two coating architectures were analyzed; a 4 bi-layer TiAlN/TiN coating with Ti bond coat, and a TiN monolithic coating with Ti bond layer on ZIRLO™ tubes using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition (CA-PVD) technique. Femtosecond laser ablation was used to introduce reproducible defects in some of the coated tubes. On exposure to deaerated supercritical water at 542 °C for 48 h, coated tubes exhibited significantly higher weight gain compared to uncoated ZIRLO™. Examination revealed formation of a uniform ZrO2 layer beneath the coating of a thickness similar to that on the uncoated tube inner surface. The defects generated during the coating process acted as preferential paths for diffusion of oxygen resulting in the oxidation of substrate ZIRLO™. However, there was no delamination of the coating. There were insignificant differences in the oxidation weight gain between laser ablated and non-ablated tubes and the laser induced defects did not spread beyond their original size.

  20. Diffusive Interaction Between Ni-Cr-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacz-Śmiech, Katarzyna; Danielewski, Marek; Bożek, Bogusław; Berent, Katarzyna; Zientara, Dariusz; Zajusz, Marek

    2017-05-01

    In high-temperature coatings, welded parts, and a range of other applications, components in the contact zone interdiffuse at elevated temperatures and may react to change the phase composition. The diffusion zone can be complex and can consist of sequential layers of intermediate phases, solid solutions, and in the case of multicomponent systems also of multiphase layers. In this work, the interdiffusion in Ni-Cr-Al alloys is studied experimentally and modeled numerically. The diffusion multiples were prepared by hot isostatic pressing and post-annealing at 1473 K (1200 °C). The concentration profiles were measured with wide-line EDS technique which allowed obtaining high-accuracy diffusion paths. The experimental profiles and diffusion paths were compared with numerical results simulated with application of very recent model of interdiffusion in muticomponent-multiphase systems. The calculated and experimental data show good agreement.

  1. A study on the role of diboride in the heterogeneous nucleation of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, O. M.

    2004-01-01

    The intangible role of titanium and aluminium diboride in the nucleation of aluminium was re-examined. Two different techniques, complemented with scanning electron microscopy, allowed determining the stability of the diboride in the presence of titanium tri aluminides and liquid aluminium phases. Through rapid scintillated quenching the high temperature diboride were retained and studied. Then, in a diffusion couple, the reactivity of such diboride was tested in contact with pure titanium tri aluminide. It is proposed that a ternary diboride acts as the main catalytic particle in the crystallization of aluminium alloys with refined grains. (Author) 27 refs

  2. Molecular weight dependence of exciton diffusion in poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masri, Zarifi; Ruseckas, Arvydas; Emelianova, Evguenia V.

    2013-01-01

    A joint experimental and theoretical study of singlet exciton diffusion in spin-coated poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films and its dependence on molecular weight is presented. The results show that exciton diffusion is fast along the co-facial π–π aggregates of polymer chromophores and about 100...... times slower in the lateral direction between aggregates. Exciton hopping between aggregates is found to show a subtle dependence on interchain coupling, aggregate size, and Boltzmann statistics. Additionally, a clear correlation is observed between the effective exciton diffusion coefficient...

  3. Improving thermal insulation of TC4 using YSZ-based coating and SiO2 aerogel

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Lei; Li, Peizhong; Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Guodong; Wang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, air plasmas spray (APS) was used to prepare YSZ and Sc2O3–YSZ (ScYSZ) coating in order to improve the thermal insulation ability of TC4 alloy. SiO2 aerogel was also synthesized and affixed on TC4 titanium alloy to inhabit thermal flow. The microstructures, phase compositions and thermal insulation performance of three coatings were analyzed in detail. The results of thermal diffusivity test by a laser flash method showed that the thermal diffusivities of YSZ, Sc2O3–YSZ and SiO2...

  4. On the interdiffusion in multilayered silicide coatings for the vanadium-based alloy V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaia, N., E-mail: nabil.chaia@usp.br [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, Universidade de São Paulo, Pólo Urbo-Industrial Gleba AI-6, 12602-810 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Portebois, L., E-mail: leo.portebois@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, Cedex (France); Mathieu, S., E-mail: stephane.mathieu@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, Cedex (France); David, N., E-mail: nicolas.david@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, Cedex (France); Vilasi, M., E-mail: michel.vilasi@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, Cedex (France)

    2017-02-15

    To provide protection against corrosion at high temperatures, silicide diffusion coatings were developed for the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, which can be used as the fuel cladding in next-generation sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. The multilayered coatings were prepared by halide-activated pack cementation using MgF{sub 2} as the transport agent and pure silicon (high activity) as the master alloy. Coated pure vanadium and coated V-4Cr-4Ti alloy were studied and compared as substrates. In both cases, the growth of the silicide layers (V{sub 3}Si, V{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, V{sub 6}Si{sub 5} and VSi{sub 2}) was controlled exclusively by solid-state diffusion, and the growth kinetics followed a parabolic law. Wagner's analysis was adopted to calculate the integrated diffusion coefficients for all silicides. The estimated values of the integrated diffusion coefficients range from approximately 10{sup −9} to 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}. Then, a diffusion-based numerical approach was used to evaluate the growth and consumption of the layers when the coated substrates were exposed at critical temperatures. The estimated lifetimes of the upper VSi{sub 2} layer were 400 h and 280 h for pure vanadium and the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, respectively. The result from the numeric simulation was in good agreement with the layer thicknesses measured after aging the coated samples at 1150 °C under vacuum. - Highlights: • The pack cementation technique is implemented to study interdiffusion in V/Si and V-4Cr-4Ti/Si couples. • Interdiffusion coefficients of vanadium silicides were experimentally determined within the range 1100–1250 °C. • For either V/Si or V-4Cr-4Ti/Si couples, the VSi{sub 2} layer has the highest growth rate. • The Cr and Ti alloying elements mainly modified the V{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and V{sub 6}Si{sub 5} growth rate. • Numerical simulation allows for a confident assessment of the VSi{sub 2} coating lifetime on V-4Cr-4Ti.

  5. Effect of hydrophobic paints coating for tritium reduction in concrete materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edao, Y.; Fukada, S.; Nishimura, Y.; Katayama, K.; Takeishi, T.; Hatano, Y.; Taguchi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effects of hydrophobic paint coating in tritium transport are investigated. ► Two kinds of paints, acrylic-silicon resin and epoxy resin are used. ► The hydrophobic paints are effective to reduce tritium permeation. ► The effect of tritium reduction of epoxy paint is higher than that of silicon. - Abstract: The effects of hydrophobic paint coating on a concrete material of cement paste on the tritium transport are investigated. The cement paste is coated with two kinds of paints, acrylic-silicon resin paint and epoxy resin paint. We investigated the amount of tritium trapped in the samples exposed to tritiated water vapor by means of sorption and release. It was found that both the hydrophobic paints could reduce effectively tritium permeation during 50 days exposure of tritiated water vapor. The effect of tritium reduction of the epoxy paint was higher than that of silicon while the amount of tritium trapped in the epoxy paint was larger than that of silicon due to difference of the structure. Based on an analysis of a diffusion model, the rate-determining step of tritium migration through cement paste coated with the paints is diffusion through the paints respectively. It was found that tritium was easy to penetrate through silicon because there were many pores or voids in the silicon comparatively. In the case of tritium released from the epoxy paint, it is considered that tritium diffusion in epoxy is slow due to retardation by isotope exchange reaction to water included in epoxy paint.

  6. Damage and Performance Assessment of Protective Coatings on Turbine Blades

    OpenAIRE

    Pokluda, Jaroslav; Kianicová, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Protective coatings on blades serve as physical barriers between the underlying substrate and the outer environment. This article presents an overview of damage mechanisms leading to failure of all basic types of coatings (diffusion, overlay and thermal barrier) on turbine blades of aircraft engines during service. Although a special emphasize is devoted to destructive effects of thermo-mechanical fatigue and overheating, the severe effects of hot corrosion, oxidation and erosion effects are ...

  7. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  8. Surface-Coating Regulated Lithiation Kinetics and Degradation in Silicon Nanowires for Lithium Ion Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli; Yang, Hui; Yan, Pengfei; Travis, Jonathan J.; Lee, Younghee; Liu, Nian; Piper, Daniela M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Zhao, Peng; George, Steven M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Cui, Yi; Zhang, Sulin; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-05-26

    Silicon (Si)-based materials hold promise as the next-generation anodes for high-energy lithium (Li)-ion batteries. Enormous research efforts have been undertaken to mitigate the chemo-mechanical failure due to the large volume changes of Si during lithiation and delithiation cycles. It has been found nanostructured Si coated with carbon or other functional materials can lead to significantly improved cyclability. However, the underlying mechanism and comparative performance of different coatings remain poorly understood. Herein, using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) through a nanoscale half-cell battery, in combination with chemo-mechanical simulation, we explored the effect of thin (~5 nm) alucone and Al2O3 coatings on the lithiation kinetics of Si nanowires (SiNWs). We observed that the alucone coating leads to a “V-shaped” lithiation front of the SiNWs , while the Al2O3 coating yields an “H-shaped” lithiation front. These observations indicate that the difference between the Li surface diffusivity and bulk diffusivity of the coatings dictates lithiation induced morphological evolution in the nanowires. Our experiments also indicate that the reaction rate in the coating layer can be the limiting step for lithiation and therefore critically influences the rate performance of the battery. Further, the failure mechanism of the Al2O3 coated SiNWs was also explored. Our studies shed light on the design of high capacity, high rate and long cycle life Li-ion batteries.

  9. Enhancement and degradation of the R2* relaxation rate resulting from the encapsulation of magnetic particles with hydrophilic coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Hendrick W; Paquet, Chantal

    2011-12-01

    The effects of including a hydrophilic coating around the particles are studied across a wide range of particle sizes by performing Monte Carlo simulations of protons diffusing through a system of magnetic particles. A physically realistic methodology of implementing the coating by cross boundary jump scaling and transition probabilities at the coating surface is developed. Using this formulation, the coating has three distinct impacts on the relaxation rate: an enhancement at small particle sizes, a degradation at intermediate particle sizes, and no effect at large particles sizes. These varied effects are reconciled with the underlying dephasing mechanisms by using the concept of a full dephasing zone to present a physical picture of the dephasing process with and without the coating for all sizes. The enhancement at small particle sizes is studied systemically to demonstrate the existence of an optimal ratio of diffusion coefficients inside/outside the coating to achieve maximal increase in the relaxation rate. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1990-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, lightweight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention.

  11. Oxidation behaviour of a Ti2AlN MAX-phase coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qimin; Kim, Kwangho; Garkas, W; Renteria, A Flores; Leyens, C; Sun Chao

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we reported the oxidation behaviour of Ti 2 AlN coatings on a -TiAl substrate. The coatings composed mainly of Ti 2 AlN MAX phase were obtained by magnetron sputtering and subsequent vacuum annealing. Isothermal oxidation tests at 700-900 deg. C were performed in air. The results indicated that the oxidation resistance of the -TiAl alloy can be improved by depositing a Ti 2 AlN layer on the alloy surface, especially at high temperatures. An Al-rich oxide scale formed on the coating surfaces during oxidation. This scale acts as diffusion barrier blocking the ingress of oxidation, and effectively protects the coated alloys from further oxidation attack.

  12. Suppressing propylene carbonate decomposition by coating graphite electrode foil with silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.; Zhang, H.P.; Fu, L.J.; Zhang, T.; Wu, Y.P.; Takamura, T.; Wu, H.Q.; Holze, R.

    2007-01-01

    A method has been developed to suppress the decomposition of propylene carbonate (PC) by coating graphite electrode foil with a layer of silver. Results from electrochemical impedance measurements show that the Ag-coated graphite electrode presents lower charge transfer resistance and faster diffusion of lithium ions in comparison with the virginal one. Cyclic voltammograms and discharge-charge measurements suggest that the decomposition of propylene carbonate and co-intercalation of solvated lithium ions are prevented, and lithium ions can reversibly intercalate into and deintercalate from the Ag-coated graphite electrode. These results indicate that Ag-coating is a good way to improve the electrochemical performance of graphitic carbon in PC-based electrolyte solutions

  13. Hydrogen permeation through sol-gel-coated iron during galvanostatic charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakorchemna, I.; Carmona, N.; Zakroczymski, T.

    2008-01-01

    One-layer sol-gel silica-zirconia and two-layer silica-zirconia and zirconia coatings were deposited on one side of iron membranes by spin-coating, densified in air and annealed up to 800 deg. C in vacuum. Hydrogen permeation through the membranes, coated and uncoated, polarised cathodically under galvanostatic control in 0.1 M NaOH solution was studied using the electrochemical permeation technique. During the initial period, the effect of the sol-gel coatings was insignificant. However, the coatings quite efficiently prevented the iron surface become more active to hydrogen entry during a long-lasting cathodic polarisation. In addition, the electrochemical-corrosion behaviour of the coated iron and the effect of the sol-gel coatings on the effective diffusivity of hydrogen in the coated membranes were studied. On the basis of the polarisation curves and the hydrogen permeation data it was proved that the sol-gel coatings blocked the iron surface for the hydrogen evolution reaction and, consequently, for the hydrogen entry into iron. The effective coating coverage was determined by comparison of the hydrogen fluxes permeating the coated and uncoated membranes. Finally the real concentration of hydrogen beneath the uncoated iron sites and the amount of hydrogen stored in a membrane were evaluated

  14. Diffusion barriers of Al2O3 to reduce the bondcoat-oxidation of MCrAlY alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K.G.; Dietl, U.

    1992-01-01

    Under operating conditions in gas turbines plasma sprayed MCrAlY bondcoats (M = Co and/or Ni) for thermal barrier coatings are exposed to a strong oxidation attack. One possibility to reduce bondcoat oxidation is the application of diffusion barriers. Onto the bondcoat, diffusion barriers of Al 2 O 3 are deposited by CVD, PVD and plasma pulse process. The oxidation behaviour of these coating systems were examined at a temperature of 1273 K for times up to 250 hours. The CVD and PVD Al 2 O 3 - coated specimens show compared to the uncoated specimens smaller oxidation rates. The porous Al 2 O 3 coatings, produced by plasma pulse process are not fit for oxidation protection of the bondcoat. There is hope for further improvement of the oxidation resistance by optimizing the CVD- and PVD-process parameters. (orig.) [de

  15. Corrosion Performance of Nano-ZrO₂ Modified Coatings in Hot Mixed Acid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Wang, Zhenyu; Han, En-Hou; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Qian

    2018-06-01

    A nano-ZrO₂ modified coating system was prepared by incorporation of nano-ZrO₂ concentrates into phenolic-epoxy resin. The corrosion performance of the coatings was evaluated in hot mixed acid solution, using electrochemical methods combined with surface characterization, and the effects of nano-ZrO₂ content were specially focused on. The results showed that 1% and 3% nano-ZrO₂ addition enhanced the corrosion resistance of the coatings, while 5% nano-ZrO₂ addition declined it. The coating with 3% nano-ZrO₂ presented the minimum amount of species diffusion, the lowest average roughness (5.94 nm), and the highest C/O ratio (4.55) and coating resistance, and it demonstrated the best corrosion performance among the coating specimens.

  16. Tribology of nitrided-coated steel-a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Santosh V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering such as surface treatment, coating, and surface modification are employed to increase surface hardness, minimize adhesion, and hence, to reduce friction and improve resistance to wear. To have optimal tribological performance of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD hard coating to the substrate materials, pretreatment of the substrate materials is always advisable to avoid plastic deformation of the substrate, which may result in eventual coating failure. The surface treatment results in hardening of the substrate and increase in load support effect. Many approaches aim to improve the adhesion of the coatings onto the substrate and nitriding is the one of the best suitable options for the same. In addition to tribological properties, nitriding leads to improved corrosion resistance. Often corrosion resistance is better than that obtainable with other surface engineering processes such as hard-chrome and nickel plating. Ability of this layer to withstand thermal stresses gives stability which extends the surface life of tools and other components exposed to heat. Most importantly, the nitrogen picked-up by the diffusion layer increases the rotating-bending fatigue strength in components. The present article reviews mainly the tribological advancement of different nitrided-coated steels based on the types of coatings, structure, and the tribo-testing parameters, in recent years.

  17. Tribology of nitrided-coated steel-a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Santosh V.; Kudal, Hari N.

    2017-01-01

    Surface engineering such as surface treatment, coating, and surface modification are employed to increase surface hardness, minimize adhesion, and hence, to reduce friction and improve resistance to wear. To have optimal tribological performance of Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) hard coating to the substrate materials, pretreatment of the substrate materials is always advisable to avoid plastic deformation of the substrate, which may result in eventual coating failure. The surface treatment results in hardening of the substrate and increase in load support effect. Many approaches aim to improve the adhesion of the coatings onto the substrate and nitriding is the one of the best suitable options for the same. In addition to tribological properties, nitriding leads to improved corrosion resistance. Often corrosion resistance is better than that obtainable with other surface engineering processes such as hard-chrome and nickel plating. Ability of this layer to withstand thermal stresses gives stability which extends the surface life of tools and other components exposed to heat. Most importantly, the nitrogen picked-up by the diffusion layer increases the rotating-bending fatigue strength in components. The present article reviews mainly the tribological advancement of different nitrided-coated steels based on the types of coatings, structure, and the tribo-testing parameters, in recent years.

  18. Investigation of the Phase Formation of AlSi-Coatings for Hot Stamping of Boron Alloyed Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veit, R.; Kolleck, R.; Hofmann, H.; Sikora, S.

    2011-01-01

    Hot stamping of boron alloyed steel is gaining more and more importance for the production of high strength automotive body parts. Within hot stamping of quenchenable steels the blank is heated up to austenitization temperature, transferred to the tool, formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. To avoid scale formation during the heating process of the blank, the sheet metal can be coated with an aluminium-silicum alloy. The meltimg temperature of this coating is below the austenitization temperature of the base material. This means, that a diffusion process between base material and coating has to take place during heating, leading to a higher melting temperature of the coating.In conventional heating devices, like roller hearth furnaces, the diffusion process is reached by relatively low heating rates. New technologies, like induction heating, reach very high heating rates and offer great potentials for the application in hot stamping. Till now it is not proofed, that this technology can be used with aluminum-silicon coated materials. This paper will present the results of comparative heating tests with a conventional furnace and an induction heating device. For different time/temperature-conditions the phase formation within the coating will be described.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of an aqueous wax emulsion for controlled-release coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, P S; Stout, P J; Turton, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the use of an aqueous carnauba wax emulsion (Primafresh HS, Johnson Wax) in a spray-coating process. This involved assessing the effectiveness of the wax in sustaining the release of the drug, theophylline. Second, the process by which the drug was released from the wax-coated pellets was modeled. Finally, a method to determine the optimum blend of pellets with different wax thicknesses, in order to yield a zero-order release profile of the drug, was addressed. Nonpareil pellets were loaded with theophylline using a novel powder coating technique. These drug-loaded pellets were then coated with different levels of carnauba wax in a 6-in. diameter Plexiglas fluid bed with a 3.5-in. diameter Wurster partition. Drug release was measured using a spin-filter dissolution device. The study resulted in continuous carnauba wax coatings which showed sustained drug release profile characteristics typical of a barrier-type, diffusion-controlled system. The effect of varying wax thickness on the release profiles was investigated. It was observed that very high wax loadings would be required to achieve long sustained-release times. The diffusion model, developed to predict the release of the drug, showed good agreement with the experimental data. However, the data exhibited an initial lag-time for drug release which could not be predicted a priori based on the wax coating thickness. A method of mixing pellets with different wax thicknesses was proposed as a way to approximate zero-order release.

  20. Literature survey of matrix diffusion theory and of experiments and data including natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlsson, Yvonne; Neretnieks, I.

    1995-08-01

    Diffusion theory in general and matrix diffusion in particular has been outlined, and experimental work has been reviewed. Literature diffusion data has been systematized in the form of tables and data has been compared and discussed. Strong indications of surface diffusion and anion exclusion have been found, and natural analogue studies and in-situ experiments suggest pore connectivity in the scale of meters. Matrix diffusion, however, mostly seem to be confined to zones of higher porosity extending only a few centimeters into the rock. Surface coating material do not seem to hinder sorption or diffusion into the rock. 54 refs, 18 tabs

  1. Interaction of Cr-Ti-Si coating on VN-3 niobium alloy with air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, Eh.M.; Kozlov, A.T.; Monakhova, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation of heat-resistance, microstructure and phase composition of Cr-Ti-Si coating on VN-3 niobium alloy with air oxidation in the temperature interval of 1200-1600 deg C is conducted. Thermogravimetry, metallography, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis methods are used. It is ascertained that the coating is a dense niobium disilicide layer, luriched on the surface with chromium and titanium disilicides and separated and from the protected alloy by a narrow zone of the lowest niobium silicide Nb 5 Si 3 . The coating protective junctions are provided by a selective chromium and titanium disilicides oxidation as well as niobium disilicide oxidation at the temperature of 1600 deg C, and by the rates of niobium and silicon diffusion through Nb 5 SI 3 and NbSi 2 and oxygen diffusion through the amorphous SiO 2

  2. Antibacterial activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoog, S.A. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Bayati, M.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Petrochenko, P.E. [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Stafslien, S.; Daniels, J.; Cilz, N. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, 1805 Research Park Drive, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States); Comstock, D.J.; Elam, J.W. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Narayan, R.J., E-mail: roger_narayan@msn.com [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Box 7115, Raleigh, NC 27695-7115 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic layer deposition was used to deposit ZnO on nanoporous alumina membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scanning electron microscopy showed continuous coatings of zinc oxide nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activity against B. subtilis, E. coli, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis was shown. - Abstract: Nanoporous alumina membranes, also known as anodized aluminum oxide membranes, are being investigated for use in treatment of burn injuries and other skin wounds. In this study, atomic layer deposition was used for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes with zinc oxide. Agar diffusion assays were used to show activity of zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes against several bacteria found on the skin surface, including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. On the other hand, zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not show activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. These results suggest that zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes have activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that are associated with skin colonization and skin infection.

  3. Corrosion Protection Performance of Polyester-Melamine Coating with Natural Wood Fiber Using EIS Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, PyongHwa; Shon, MinYoung [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jo, DuHwan [POSCO, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In the present study, polyester-melamine coating systems with natural wood fiber (NWF) were prepared and the effects of NWF on the corrosion protectiveness of the polyester-melamine coating were examined using EIS analysis. From the results, higher average surface roughness was observed with increase of NWF content. Water diffusivity and water uptake into the polyester-melamine coatings with NWF were much higher than that into the pure polyester-melamine coating. The decrease in the impedance modulus |Z| was associated with the localized corrosion on carbon steel, confirming that corrosion protection of the polyester-melamine coatings with NWF well agrees with its water transport behavior.

  4. Behavior of an improved Zr fuel cladding with oxidation resistant coating under loss-of-coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Jun, E-mail: pdj@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Hyun Gil; Jung, Yang Il; Park, Jung Hwan; Yang, Jae Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2016-12-15

    This study investigates protective coatings for improving the high temperature oxidation resistance of Zr fuel claddings for light water nuclear reactors. FeCrAl alloy and Cr layers were deposited onto Zr plates and tubes using cold spraying. For the FeCrAl/Zr system, a Mo layer was introduced between the FeCrAl coating and the Zr matrix to prevent inter-diffusion at high temperatures. Both the FeCrAl and Cr coatings improved the oxidation resistance compared to that of the uncoated Zr alloy when exposed to a steam environment at 1200 °C. The ballooning behavior and mechanical properties of the coated cladding samples were studied under simulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The coated samples showed higher burst temperatures, lower circumferential strain, and smaller rupture openings compared to the uncoated Zr. Although 4-point bend tests of the coated samples showed a small increase in the maximum load, ring compression tests of a sectioned sample showed increased ductility. - Highlights: • Cr and FeCrAl were coated onto Zr fuel cladding for light water nuclear reactors. • Mo layer between FeCrAl and Zr prevented inter-diffusion at high temperatures. • Coated claddings were tested under loss-of-cooling accident conditions. • Coating improved high-temperature oxidation resistance and mechanical properties.

  5. Deformation behaviour of {gamma}+{alpha}{sub 2} Ti aluminide processed through reaction synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K., E-mail: rohitkumar_gupta@vssc.gov.in [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India); Pant, Bhanu [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India); Kumar, Vinod [SAIL-RDCIS, Ranchi (India); Agarwala, Vijaya [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Sinha, P.P. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO, Trivandrum, Kerala 695 022 (India)

    2013-01-01

    {gamma}+{alpha}{sub 2} titanium aluminide alloys made through reaction synthesis have been used for deformation study. Hot isothermal compression test is carried out to study the deformation characteristics of the alloys using Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. Three alloys based on Ti48Al2Cr2Nb0.1B (at%) are tested at different temperatures and at different strain rates. True stress-true strain plots are analyzed along with analysis of tested specimens. Tested specimens are observed under optical and electron microscopes. Presence of various deformation morphologies and phases were confirmed. Microhardness evaluation and transmission electron microscopic examination are used to confirm the presence of different phases. It is found that dynamic recrystallization is mainly playing role in deformation of these alloys. Presence of dynamically recrystallized (DRX) grains and lamellar microstructures is confirmed at the intergranular area and inside the grains, respectively. A nucleation model is suggested for DRX and lamellar grain nucleation during deformation. Attempt has been made to quantify the presence of various phases through optical microscopy. Hot workability map is also suggested on the basis of microstructural and visual observation of compression tested specimens.

  6. Thermal diffusivity of samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, W.; Wan, C.L.; Xu, Q.; Wang, J.D.; Qu, Z.X.

    2007-01-01

    We synthesized samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions and determined their thermal diffusivities, Young's moduli and thermal expansion coefficients, which are very important for their application in thermal barrier coatings. Samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions have extremely low thermal diffusivity between 20 and 600 deg. C. The solid solutions have lower Young's moduli and higher thermal expansion coefficients than those of pure samarium and gadolinium zirconates. This combination of characteristics is promising for the application of samarium and gadolinium zirconates in gas turbines. The mechanism of phonon scattering by point defects is discussed

  7. Hybrid diffusive/PVD treatments to improve the tribological resistance of Ti-6Al-4V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, E; Offoiach, R; Lanzutti, A; Regis, M; Fusi, S; Fedrizzi, L

    2014-01-01

    Titanium alloys are nowadays used for a wide range of biomedical applications thanks to their combination of high mechanical resistance, high corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Nevertheless, the applicability of titanium alloys is sometimes limited due to their low microhardness and tribological resistance. Thus the titanium alloys cannot be successfully applied to prosthetic joint couplings. A wide range of surface treatments, in particular PVD coatings such as CrN and TiN, have been used in order to improve the tribological behaviour of titanium alloys. However, the low microhardness of the titanium substrate often results in coating failure due to cracks and delamination. For this reason, hybrid technologies based on diffusive treatments and subsequent PVD coatings may improve the overall coating resistance. In this work, conventional PVD coatings of CrN or TiCN, deposited on Titanium Grade 5, were characterized and then combined with a standard thermal diffusive nitriding treatment in order to improve the tribological resistance of the titanium alloys and avoid coating delamination. The different treatments were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy both on the sample surface and in cross-section. In-depth composition profiles were obtained using glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) and localized energy dispersive X-ray diffraction on linear scan-lines. The microhardness and adhesion properties of the different treatments were evaluated using Vickers microhardness tests at different load conditions. The indentations were observed by means of SEM in order to evaluate delaminated areas and the crack's shape and density. The tribological behaviour of the different treatments was tested in dry conditions and in solution, in alternate pin-on-flat configuration, with a frequency of 0.5 Hz. After testing, the surface was investigated by means of stylus profilometry and SEM both on the surface and in cross-section. The standalone PVD

  8. Diffusivities of Ag, Cs, Sr, and Kr in TRISO fuel particles and graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles have been developed and studied since the late 1950s when the concept of coated particles was invented by Roy Huddle of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. Several decades of work by half a dozen countries on fission product transport in TRISO fuel through numerous irradiation and heating experiments have led to several recommendations of transport data and to the adoption of various sets of diffusion coefficients. In 1997, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) gathered all these historical results and issued a technical document (TECDOC-978 [IAEA]) that summarizes these sets of recommended diffusion coefficients. Table 1 shows the reference literature articles for the diffusivities that have historically been recommended by the American and German TRISO fuel development programs and that are summarized in the IAEA report (see section 7 for full references of these articles).

  9. Implanted Deuterium Retention and Release in Carbon-Coated Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Longhurst, G. R.; Pawelko, R. J.; Oates, M. A.

    1997-06-01

    Deuterium implantation experiments have been conducted on samples of clean and carbon-coated beryllium. These studies entailed preparation and characterization of beryllium samples coated with carbon thicknesses of 100, 500, and 1000 Å. Heat treatment of a beryllium sample coated with carbon to a thickness of approximately 100 Å revealed that exposure to a temperature of 400°C under high vacuum conditions was sufficient to cause substantial diffusion of beryllium through the carbon layer, resulting in more beryllium than carbon at the surface. Comparable concentrations of carbon and beryllium were observed in the bulk of the coating layer. Higher than expected oxygen levels were observed throughout the coating layer as well. Samples were exposed to deuterium implantation followed by thermal desorption without exposure to air. Differences were observed in deuterium retention and postimplantation release behavior in the carbon-coated samples as compared with bare samples. For comparable implantation conditions (sample temperature of 400°C and an incident deuterium flux of approximately 6 × 1019 D/m2-s), the quantity of deuterium retained in the bare sample was less than that retained in the carbon-coated samples. Further, the release of the deuterium took place at lower temperatures for the bare beryllium surfaces than for carbon-coated beryllium samples.

  10. Effect of H2O and Y(O on Oxidation Behavior of NiCoCrAl Coating Within Thermal Barrier Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yi-qun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available NiCoCrAl coatings containing Y and Y oxide were made using vacuum plasma deposition and high-velocity oxygen fuel respectively, high temperature oxidation dynamics and cross-section microstructures of NiCoCrAl+Y and NiCoCrAl+Y(O coatings in Ar-16.7%O2, Ar-3.3%H2O and Ar-0.2%H2-0.9%H2O at 1100℃ were investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA and optical and electron microscope. The influencing mechanism of Y oxide on the oxidation of coatings at different atmosphere was compared by computation using First-Principles. The results show that Al2O3 layer on NiCoCrAl+Y coatings has more holes for internal oxidation on account of the element Y diffusion and enrichment on the interface. In addition, steam can promote the internal oxidation. While a thinner and uniform alumina form on NiCoCrAl+Y(O coatings because element Y is pinned by oxygen atoms during the preparation of coatings. Water vapor has less influence on protective alumina formation on the NiCoCrAl+Y(O coating. Therefore, oxidation behavior of NiCoCrAl coatings vary in composition and structure in different oxidizing atmosphere. Besides, Y and Y-enrichment oxides have key influences on the microstructure and the growth rate.

  11. Development and application of an exchange model for anisotropic water diffusion in the microporous MOF aluminum fumarate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splith, Tobias; Fröhlich, Dominik; Henninger, Stefan K.; Stallmach, Frank

    2018-06-01

    Diffusion of water in aluminum fumarate was studied by means of pulsed field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Due to water molecules exchanging between the intracrystalline anisotropic pore space and the isotropic intercrystalline void space the model of intracrystalline anisotropic diffusion fails to describe the experimental PFG NMR data at high observation times. Therefore, the two-site exchange model developed by Kärger is extended to the case of exchange between an anisotropic and an isotropic site. This extended exchange model is solved by numerical integration. It describes the experimental data very well and yields values for the intracrystalline diffusion coefficient and the mean residence times of the respective sites. Further PFG NMR studies were performed with coatings consisting of small aluminum fumarate crystals, which are used in adsorptive heat transformation applications. The diffusion coefficients of water in the small crystal coating are compared to the values expected from the extended two-site exchange model and from the model of long-range diffusion.

  12. Impact of surface coating and environmental conditions on the fate and transport of silver nanoparticles in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Laura-Jayne A.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lead, Jamie R., E-mail: Jlead@mailbox.sc.edu [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Center for Environmental Nanoscience and Risk (CENR), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia 29208 (United States); Baalousha, Mohammed, E-mail: Mbaalous@mailbox.sc.edu [Center for Environmental Nanoscience and Risk (CENR), Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia 29208 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    The role of surface coating (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate) and water chemistry on the fate and behavior of AgNPs in aquatic microcosms is reported in this study. The migration and transformation of the AgNPs was examined in low (ultrapure water-UPW) and high ionic strength (moderately hard water – MHW) preparations, and in the presence of modeled natural organic matter (NOM) of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA). The migration and fate of the AgNPs in the microcosms was validated using a sedimentation-diffusion model and the aggregation behavior was monitored by UV–visible spectrometry (UV–vis). Dissolved and particulate Ag concentrations (% Ag) were analyzed by ultrafiltration methods. Imaging of the AgNPs was captured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results indicate that PVP-coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) remained stable for 28 days with similarly distributed concentrations of the PVP-AgNPs throughout the columns in each of the water conditions after approximately 96 h (4 days). The sedimentation-diffusion model confirmed PVP-AgNP stability in each condition, by showing diffusion dominated transport by using the original unaltered AgNP sizes to fit the parameters. In comparison, citrate AgNPs were largely unstable in the more complex water preparations (MHW). In MHW, aggregation dominated behavior followed by sedimentation/dissolution controlled transport was observed. The addition of SRFA to MHW resulted in small stabilizing effects, to the citrate coated AgNPs, producing smaller sized AgNPs (TEM) and mixed sedimentation and diffusion migration compared the studies absent of SRFA. The results suggest that surface coating and solution chemistry has a major impact on AgNP stability, furthermore the corresponding modeling will support the experimental understanding of the overall fate of AgNPs in the environment. - Highlights: • Aquatic microcosms were used to study the transport and behavior of AgNPs • Experiments were conducted in low

  13. Impact of surface coating and environmental conditions on the fate and transport of silver nanoparticles in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Laura-Jayne A.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Lead, Jamie R.; Baalousha, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The role of surface coating (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate) and water chemistry on the fate and behavior of AgNPs in aquatic microcosms is reported in this study. The migration and transformation of the AgNPs was examined in low (ultrapure water-UPW) and high ionic strength (moderately hard water – MHW) preparations, and in the presence of modeled natural organic matter (NOM) of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA). The migration and fate of the AgNPs in the microcosms was validated using a sedimentation-diffusion model and the aggregation behavior was monitored by UV–visible spectrometry (UV–vis). Dissolved and particulate Ag concentrations (% Ag) were analyzed by ultrafiltration methods. Imaging of the AgNPs was captured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results indicate that PVP-coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) remained stable for 28 days with similarly distributed concentrations of the PVP-AgNPs throughout the columns in each of the water conditions after approximately 96 h (4 days). The sedimentation-diffusion model confirmed PVP-AgNP stability in each condition, by showing diffusion dominated transport by using the original unaltered AgNP sizes to fit the parameters. In comparison, citrate AgNPs were largely unstable in the more complex water preparations (MHW). In MHW, aggregation dominated behavior followed by sedimentation/dissolution controlled transport was observed. The addition of SRFA to MHW resulted in small stabilizing effects, to the citrate coated AgNPs, producing smaller sized AgNPs (TEM) and mixed sedimentation and diffusion migration compared the studies absent of SRFA. The results suggest that surface coating and solution chemistry has a major impact on AgNP stability, furthermore the corresponding modeling will support the experimental understanding of the overall fate of AgNPs in the environment. - Highlights: • Aquatic microcosms were used to study the transport and behavior of AgNPs • Experiments were conducted in low

  14. Ni-Al phase transformation of dual layer coating prepared by pack cementation and electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afandi, A.; Sugiarti, E.; Ekaputra, R.; Sudiro, T.; Thosin, K. A. Z.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, Fe-Cr alloys were coated via Aluminum (Al) pack cementation, followed by Nickel (Ni) electrodeposition. The process of pack cementation was done with mixing powders of Al, Al203 and NH4Cl with weight percentage of 15%, 85%, and 5% respectively. To control successful Al diffusion to the substrate, pack cementation was conducted for 7 hours with two holding temperatures treatment at 400 °C for 4 hours, and 800 ° C hours for 2 hours. Subsequently, the electrodeposition of Ni was applied with the solution consisting of NiSO4, H3BO3, and NiCl2. The samples were placed in the cathode, and then dipped in the solutions, while Ni plate used as anode. Successfully the samples were coated by dual Al-Ni layers, the samples were slowly heat treated at 900 °C for 10 hours. The inter-diffusion of Al and Ni were characterized with SEM/EDX to investigate the distribution of the elements. Mechanical properties of the coated substrates were analyzed with Hardness Vickers (HV). It was found the hardness of the substrate increased significantly, from originally 255 HV to the 1177 HV after pack cementation. The hardness of the substrates has decreased to 641 HV after Ni plating, but subsequent heat treatment has been able to increase the hardness to 842 HV. This phenomenon can be correlated to the inward Al diffusion, and outward Fe, Cr diffusion. The formation of intermetallic compounds due to Al inward and Fe, Cr outward diffusion were discussed in details.

  15. The behaviour of transport from the fission products caesium and strontium in coated particles for high temperature reactors under irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, P.

    1976-07-01

    At first survey is given about existing knowledge of the behaviour of caesium and strontium fission product transport in coated particles. In order to describe the complicated fission product transport mechanisms under irradiation conditions a suitable calculating model (SLIPPER) is taken over and modified to the special problems of an irradiation experiment. Fundamentally, the fission product transport is represented by the two contributions of diffusion and recoil, at which the diffusion is described by effective diffusion coefficients. In difference of that the possibility of a two-phase-diffusion is examined for the Cs diffusion in the fuel kernel. The model application on measuring results from irradiation experiments of KFA-Juelich and Mol-Belgien allowed the explanation from the characteristic of fission product transport in coated particles under irradiation conditions and produced effective diffusion coefficients for the fission products Cs and Sr. (orig.) [de

  16. Oxidation resistance coating for niobium base structural composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabaru, T.; Shobu, K.; Kim, J.H.; Hirai, H.; Hanada, S.

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation behavior of Al-rich Mo(Si,Al) 2 base alloys, which is a candidate material for the oxidation resistance coating on Nb base structural composites, were investigated by thermogravimetry. The Mo(Si,Al) 2 base alloys containing Mo 5 (Si,Al) 3 up to about 10 vol% exhibits excellent oxidation resistance at temperatures ranging from 780 to 1580 K, particularly at 1580 K due to continuous Al 2 O 3 layer development. To evaluate the applicability of the Mo(Si,Al) 2 base coating, plasma spraying on Nb base composites were undertaken. However, interface reaction layer was found to form during the following heat treatment. Preparation of Mo(Si,Al) 2 /Al 2 O 3 /Nb layered structures via powder metallurgical process was attempted to preclude diffusion reaction between coating and substrate. (orig.)

  17. Methods to improve the PVD coatability of brass by using diffusion barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Bernd

    Previous work involving PVD coatings on brass has used a combination of multilayers consisting of electroplated films like nickel or chromium and deposited decorative PVD coatings like TiN, TiAIN or ZrN systems. The disadvantages of these systems are the combination of wet electrochemistry and high tech vacuum processes. Furthermore the allergic reaction to nickel and the toxic nature of Cr(VI) must be considered.There is a need for intermediate layers to 'seal-off the brass in order to avoid the evaporation of zinc in vacuum using a diffusion barrier. Furthermore the intermediate layers are required to act as a corrosion barrier.This thesis reports on the development of PVD coatings on heat sensitive brass substrate materials utilising ABS technology with Al, CuAl8 and Nb targets as vapour sources.The brass pretreatment includes careful grinding, polishing and cleaning steps as well as steered arc metal ion etching using the above target materials. The coatings are produced at temperatures between 100 and 250°C in the unbalanced magnetron mode, including layers made from Al, Al-Nb, CuA18, CuAl8-Nb and Nb.Scratch adhesion and Rockwell indentation tests are found not to be directly applicable to the system of soft brass and ductile coating(s). Therefore a new classification for both scratch and indentation tests was defined. The best adhesion was shown by the CuA18 coatings on brass. Corrosion tests showed good results for the Al coatings and poor results for the pure Nb coatings directly applied on brass. The best corrosion result was obtained with a CuAl8-Nb layer system. This layer system also offers very good barrier behaviour concerning Zn diffusion.Other investigations like Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were undertaken to characterise the new coating systems for brass.

  18. Protection of uranium by metallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Koch, P.; Dominget, R.; Darras, R.

    1968-01-01

    A study is made of the possibilities of inhibiting or limiting, by means of protective metallic coatings, the oxidation of uranium by carbon dioxide at high temperature. In general, surface films containing intermetallic compounds or solid solutions of uranium with aluminium, zirconium, copper, niobium, nickel or chromium are formed, according to the techniques employed which are described here. The processes most to be recommended are those of direct diffusion starting from a thin sheet or tube, of vacuum deposition, or of immersion in a molten bath of suitable composition. The conditions for preparing these coatings have been optimized as a function of the protective effect obtained in carbon dioxide at 450 or at 500 C. Only the aluminium and zirconium based coatings are really satisfactory since they can lead to a reduction by a factor of 5 to 10 in the oxidation rate of uranium in the conditions considered; they make it possible in particular to avoid or to reduce to a very large extent the liberation of powdered oxide. Furthermore, the coatings produced generally give the uranium good protection against atmospheric corrosion. (author) [fr

  19. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M; Tichelaar, F D

    2015-01-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al 2 O 3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm 2 to 2500 μm 2 ) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism. (paper)

  20. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Tichelaar, F. D.; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M.

    2015-02-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al2O3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm2 to 2500 μm2) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism.

  1. Thermal spray deposition and evaluation of low-Z coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.; Swindeman, C.J.; White, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Thermally sprayed low-Z coatings of B 4 C on Al substrates were investigated as candidate materials for first-wall reactor protective surfaces. Comparisons were made to thermally sprayed coatings of B, MgAl 2 O 4 , Al 2 O 3 , and composites. Graded bond layers were applied to mitigate coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch. Microstructures, thermal diffusivity before and after thermal shock loading, steel ball impact resistance, CO 2 pellet cleaning and erosion tolerance, phase content, stoichiometry by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and relative tensile strengths were measured

  2. Active Layer Spin Coating Speed Dependence of Inverted Organic Solar Cell Based on Eosin-Y-Coated ZnO Nanorod Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, R. T.; Yap, C. C.; Yahaya, M.; Fauzia, V.; Salleh, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    The active layer spin coating speed dependence of the performance of inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) based on Eosin-Y-coated ZnOnanorods has been investigated. An active layer consisted of poly(2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl)-hexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV) as donor and phenyl-c61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as acceptor was employed, whereas ZnO nanorods were utilized as electron transporting layer. The active layer was deposited on top of Eosin-Y-coated ZnO nanorods with various spin coating speeds (1000-4000 rpm). Inverted OSCs with a structure of FTO/Eosin-Y-coated ZnO nanorods/MEH-PPV:PCBM /Ag were characterized through the current density-voltage (J-V) measurement under illumination intensity of 100 mW/cm2. Based on the investigation, the short circuit current density (Jsc) and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) enhanced significantly, where as fill factor slightly increased with spin coating speed. The two-diode equivalent model was found to fit the experimental J-V curves very well. The optimum PCE of 1.18 ± 0.07% was achieved at the highest spin coating speed of 4000 rpm, as a result of the decrement of diffusion current density (Jdiff), recombination current density (Jrec), and ideality factor, thus further confirms the strong built-in electric field in thinner photoactive layer.

  3. Effects of surface coatings on the light collection in plastic scintillators used for radioxenon detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bläckberg, L; Klintenberg, M; Sjöstrand, H; Ringbom, A

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition coatings are under investigation to reduce the diffusion of radioxenon into plastic scintillators. This paper investigates the impact of such surface coating on the light collection efficiency in a cylindrical geometry. A high and uniform light collection efficiency is important to preserve detector resolution. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements have been carried out to study the influence of coating thickness, refractive index and surface quality. It was found that it is important to achieve a smooth coating and good optical match between the refractive indices of the coating and the plastic scintillator. Taking into account these considerations, the detector under study could be coated without a significant degradation of its resolution.

  4. Oxidation behaviour of a Ti{sub 2}AlN MAX-phase coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qimin; Kim, Kwangho [National Core Research Center for Hybrid Materials Solution, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Garkas, W; Renteria, A Flores [Chair of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Technology, Technical University of Brandenburg at Cottbus, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Leyens, C [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University of Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 7, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Sun Chao, E-mail: qmwang@pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: kwhokim@pusan.ac.kr [Division of Surface Engineering of Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-10-29

    In this paper, we reported the oxidation behaviour of Ti{sub 2}AlN coatings on a -TiAl substrate. The coatings composed mainly of Ti{sub 2}AlN MAX phase were obtained by magnetron sputtering and subsequent vacuum annealing. Isothermal oxidation tests at 700-900 deg. C were performed in air. The results indicated that the oxidation resistance of the -TiAl alloy can be improved by depositing a Ti{sub 2}AlN layer on the alloy surface, especially at high temperatures. An Al-rich oxide scale formed on the coating surfaces during oxidation. This scale acts as diffusion barrier blocking the ingress of oxidation, and effectively protects the coated alloys from further oxidation attack.

  5. Failure behavior of nano-SiO2 fillers epoxy coating under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Li; Cui Yu; Li Ying; Zhang Tao; Wang Fuhui

    2012-01-01

    The failure of organic coating (epoxy resin filled with 5 mass% nano-SiO 2 particles) on mild steel under high hydrostatic pressure (35 atm) has been studied compared with that under atmospheric pressure (1 atm), using impedance measurements, gravimetric testing, adhesion testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that high hydrostatic pressure accelerated the failure of the organic coating by promoting diffusion of water in the coating, which speeds up water spread and electrochemical reactions at the interface. The roughness of the coating and steel has been discussed from point of view of their respective fractal dimensions D fc and D fdl , as deduced from impedance measurements

  6. Thick boron carbide coatings for protection of tokamak first wall and divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzhinskij, O.I.; Semenets, Yu.M.

    1999-01-01

    A review of characteristics of various types of boron carbide coatings considered as candidate materials for protection of tokamak inner surfaces against high energy heat fluxes is presented. Such coatings are produced by various methods: chemical vapor deposition by means of chloride and fluoride techniques, gas conversion, plasma spray and reaction-sintering. Contrary to pure carbon materials, B 4 C has much lower chemical and high-temperature sputtering, is capable to oxygen gettering and lower hydrogen recycling. In contrast to thin boronization films, the thick coatings can resist high heat fluxes such as in tokamak divertors. Comparative analysis shows that coatings produced by the diffusion methods, such as fluoride CVD and gas conversion, are more resistent to heat loads, and one of the most promising candidates are the fluoride CVD coatings. (orig.)

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

    2012-01-01

    The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

  9. Corrosion properties of zirconium-based ceramic coatings for micro-bearing and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkowicz, J.; Zavaleyev, V.; Dobruchowska, E.; Murzynski, D.; Donkov, N.; Zykova, A.; Safonov, V.; Yakovin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Ceramic oxide ZrO2 and oxynitride ZrON coatings are widely used as protective coatings against diffusion and corrosion. The enhancement of the coatings' mechanical properties, as well as their wear and corrosion resistance, is very important for their tribological performance. In this work, ZrO2 and ZrON coatings were deposited by magnetron sputtering on stainless steel (AISI 316) substrates. The adhesion, hardness and elastic properties were evaluated by standard methods. The surface structure of the deposited coatings was observed by electron scanning microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The composition of the coatings was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The corrosion resistance properties were evaluated using the potentiodynamic method. The results show that the corrosion parameters are significantly increased in the cases of both oxynitride and oxide coatings in comparison with the stainless steel (AISI 316) substrates.

  10. Quantification of simultaneous solvent evaporation and chemical curing in thermoset coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of simultaneous solvent evaporation and film formation in high-solids thermoset coatings are considered. The relevant phenomena, chemical reactions, solvent diffusion and evaporation, gelation, vitrification, network mobility restrictions, and crosslinking, are quantified and a mat...

  11. Method of producing oxidation resistant coatings for molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmons, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for producing a molybdenum element having adherently bonded thereto a thermally self-healing plasma-sprayed coating consisting essentially of a composite of molybdenum and a refactory oxide material capable of reacting with molybdenum oxide under oxidizing conditions to form a substantially thermally stable refractory compound of molybdenum, the method comprising plasma-spraying a coating formed by the step-wise application of a plurality of interbonded plasma-sprayed layers of a composite of molybdenum/refractory oxide material produced from a particulate mixture thereof. The coating comprises a first layer of molybdenum plasma-sprayed bonded to the substrate of the molybdenum element, a second layer of plasma-sprayed mixture of particulate molybdenum/refactory oxide consisting essentially of predominantly molybdenum bonded to the first layer, and succeeding layers of this mixture. The next step is heating the coated molybdenum element under oxidizing conditions to an elevated temperature sufficient to cause oxygen to diffuse into the surface of the multi-layered coating to react with dispersed molybdenum therein to form molybdenum oxide and effect healing of the coating by reaction of the molybdenum oxide with the contained refractory oxide and thereby protect the substrate of the molybdenum element against oxidation

  12. Tough-coated hard powders for hardmetals of novel properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, R.E.; Smid, I.; Kladler, G.; Korb, G.; Sherman, A.; Ettmayer, P.

    2001-01-01

    The properties and performance of conventional materials and composites are constrained by solubility limits, diffusion coefficients, and compatibility of physical and chemical constituent properties in their phase equilibria. To escape these limits, ingenious ways of combining strength, toughness, and wear resistance by way of various coatings and laminations have been devised. These coated tools are systematically discarded after only about 10 % of their wear tolerance has been used. Tough-coated hard powders (TCHP), patented by EnDurAloy (USA), are hard refractory particles CVD coated with nanolayers of WC and Co. Consolidation of TCHP creates an engineered homogeneous cellular structure whose interconnected tough WC-Co 'shells' each contain a wear-resistant core (e.g., TiN). In TCHP's, the coating is throughout the tool, not only on the surface, combining the strength, heat resistance, and toughness of cemented carbides with the chemical and abrasion wear resistance of harder materials. As wear progresses, new wear-resistant material continuously replaces the working surfaces and edges of the tool until its geometry reaches its maximum limits. TCHP tools are then reusable many times. Specific coating and consolidation processes, characterization of compacts, and test comparisons with conventional materials are discussed. (author)

  13. Synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles containing Fe, Si, and V using multiple diffusion flames and catalytic oxidation capability of carbon-coated nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Mohamed A. [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Clean Combustion Research Center (Saudi Arabia); Memon, Nasir K., E-mail: nmemon@qf.org.qa [HBKU, Qatar Foundation, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI) (Qatar); Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Anjum, Dalaver H. [KAUST, Imaging and Characterization Lab (Saudi Arabia); Chung, Suk Ho [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Clean Combustion Research Center (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-01-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles containing iron, silicon, and vanadium are synthesized using multiple diffusion flames. The growth of carbon-coated (C–TiO{sub 2}), carbon-coated with iron oxide (Fe/C–TiO{sub 2}), silica-coated (Si–TiO{sub 2}), and vanadium-doped (V–TiO{sub 2}) TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles is demonstrated using a single-step process. Hydrogen, oxygen, and argon are utilized to establish the flame, with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as the precursor for TiO{sub 2}. For the growth of Fe/C–TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, TTIP is mixed with xylene and ferrocene. While for the growth of Si–TiO{sub 2} and V–TiO{sub 2}, TTIP is mixed with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and vanadium (V) oxytriisopropoxide, respectively. The synthesized nanoparticles are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with energy-filtered TEM for elemental mapping (of Si, C, O, and Ti), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen adsorption BET surface area analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. Anatase is the dominant phase for the C–TiO{sub 2}, Fe/C–TiO{sub 2}, and Si–TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, whereas rutile is the dominant phase for the V–TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. For C–TiO{sub 2} and Fe/C–TiO{sub 2}, the nanoparticles are coated with about 3-5-nm thickness of carbon. The iron-based TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles significantly improve the catalytic oxidation of carbon, where complete oxidation of carbon occurs at a temperature of 470 °C (with iron) compared to 610 °C (without iron). Enhanced catalytic oxidation properties are also observed for model soot particles, Printex-U, when mixed with Fe/C-TiO{sub 2}. With regards to Si–TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, a uniform coating of 3 to 8 nm of silicon dioxide is observed around the TiO{sub 2} particles. This coating mainly occurs due to variance in the chemical reaction rates of the precursors. Finally, with regards

  14. Influence of temperature on oxidation mechanisms of fiber-textured AlTiTaN coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetan, Vishal; Valle, Nathalie; Duday, David; Michotte, Claude; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-03-26

    The oxidation kinetics of AlTiTaN hard coatings deposited at 265 °C by DC magnetron sputtering were investigated between 700 and 950 °C for various durations. By combining dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (D-SIMS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of the different oxidized coatings, we were able to highlight the oxidation mechanisms involved. The TEM cross-section observations combined with XRD analysis show that a single amorphous oxide layer comprising Ti, Al, and Ta formed at 700 °C. Above 750 °C, the oxide scale transforms into a bilayer oxide comprising an Al-rich upper oxide layer and a Ti/Ta-rich oxide layer at the interface with the coated nitride layer. From the D-SIMS analysis, it could be proposed that the oxidation mechanism was governed primarily by inward diffusion of O for temperatures of ≤700 °C, while at ≥750 °C, it is controlled by outward diffusion of Al and inward diffusion of O. Via a combination of structural and chemical analysis, it is possible to propose that crystallization of rutile lattice favors the outward diffusion of Al within the AlTiTa mixed oxide layer with an increase in the temperature of oxidation. The difference in the mechanisms of oxidation at 700 and 900 °C also influences the oxidation kinetics with respect to oxidation time. Formation of a protective alumina layer decreases the rate of oxidation at 900 °C for long durations of oxidation compared to 700 °C. Along with the oxidation behavior, the enhanced thermal stability of AlTiTaN compared to that of the TiAlN coating is illustrated.

  15. Intense pulsed light annealing of copper zinc tin sulfide nanocrystal coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Bryce A.; Smeaton, Michelle A.; Holgate, Collin S.; Trejo, Nancy D.; Francis, Lorraine F., E-mail: francis@umn.edu; Aydil, Eray S., E-mail: aydil@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 151 Amundson Hall, 421 Washington Avenue SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A promising method for forming the absorber layer in copper zinc tin sulfide [Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS)] thin film solar cells is thermal annealing of coatings cast from dispersions of CZTS nanocrystals. Intense pulsed light (IPL) annealing utilizing xenon flash lamps is a potential high-throughput, low-cost, roll-to-roll manufacturing compatible alternative to thermal annealing in conventional furnaces. The authors studied the effects of flash energy density (3.9–11.6 J/cm{sup 2}) and number of flashes (1–400) during IPL annealing on the microstructure of CZTS nanocrystal coatings cast on molybdenum-coated soda lime glass substrates (Mo-coated SLG). The annealed coatings exhibited cracks with two distinct linear crack densities, 0.01 and 0.2 μm{sup −1}, depending on the flash intensity and total number of flashes. Low density cracking (0.01 μm{sup −1}, ∼1 crack per 100 μm) is caused by decomposition of CZTS at the Mo-coating interface. Vapor decomposition products at the interface cause blisters as they escape the coating. Residual decomposition products within the blisters were imaged using confocal Raman spectroscopy. In support of this hypothesis, replacing the Mo-coated SLG substrate with quartz eliminated blistering and low-density cracking. High density cracking is caused by rapid thermal expansion and contraction of the coating constricted on the substrate as it is heated and cooled during IPL annealing. Finite element modeling showed that CZTS coatings on low thermal diffusivity materials (i.e., SLG) underwent significant differential heating with respect to the substrate with rapid rises and falls of the coating temperature as the flash is turned on and off, possibly causing a build-up of tensile stress within the coating prompting cracking. Use of a high thermal diffusivity substrate, such as a molybdenum foil (Mo foil), reduces this differential heating and eliminates the high-density cracking. IPL annealing in presence of sulfur

  16. Application of the aqueous coating suspension for the protection of Gas Turbine Engine parts from corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Ivanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the physical nature of receiving diffusion coatings from aqueous suspensions of various alloys for various conditions and their further exploitation. Structure of coatings, advantages and features of the production of coatings from aqueous suspensions are shown. Based on the analysis of thermodynamic reactions in the systems of elements formulations of aqueous suspensions were developed and practical recommendations for their application to the parts of gas turbine engine were given.

  17. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E.

    2013-10-01

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  18. Lifetime modelling for MCrAlY coatings in industrial gas turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krukovsky Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel theoretical and experimental approach for lifetime modelling of MCrAlY coatings for stationary gas turbines has been undertaken using the Inverse Problem Solution (IPS technique. With this technique feasible experimental data acquired after a defined experimental time t e are used as input values for the model parameters estimation. In the first stage of the approach a model, based on the oxidation and diffusion processes (Fick's first and second law was assumed, which considers the Al concentration profile across the coating. The measured average Al concentration profiles in the two-phase g+b and g - regions of coating as well as base metal were used as input values for the model parameters estimation and calculational prediction of the long term diffusion and oxidation behavior of the coating was performed. The time, when the b-NiAl phase is completely consumed was assumed as the coating lifetime end. Exposure experiments were carried out with a NiCoCrAlY coating (200 micron thickness with 8% Al in air at 900 °C and 950 °C, currently up to 10000 h. The oxide scale is growing continuously and no other oxides were observed. The average and b-NiAl phase concentration profiles of Al across the coating thickness were determined by electron microprobe and image analysis systems in the initial state after 700 and 10000 h of oxidation. The concentration profile measured after 700 h was used as input values for the model parameters estimation in order to calculate the Al and b-NiAl phase concentration profiles after 10000 h. The computational forecast for 10000 h at 950 °C and 900 °C are in good agreement with the measured data. The approach was applied for NiCoCrAlY (200 micron thickness coating lifetime modelling at 950 °C and 900 °C as well as for different coating thicknesses at 950 °C.

  19. Bitumen coating as a tool for improving the porosity and chemical stability of simulated cement-waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Coating process of simulated cement-based waste form with bitumen was evaluated by performing physical and chemical experimental tests. X-ray diffraction (X-RD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and electron microscope investigations were applied on coated and non-coated simulated waste forms. Experimental results indicated that coating process improved the applicable properties of cement-based waste form such as porosity and leachability. Diffusion coefficients and leach indecies of coated specimens were calculated and show acceptable records. It could be stated that coating cemented waste form by bitumen emulsion, isolate the radioactive contaminants, thus reduces their back release to surrounding and in consequently save the environment proper and safe

  20. The Effect of Nb Addition on the Microstructure and the High-Temperature Strength of Fe3Al Aluminide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvíl, Petr; Švec, Martin; Král, Robert; Veselý, Jozef; Lukáč, Pavel; Vlasák, Tomáš

    2018-02-01

    The microstructural and high-temperature mechanical properties of Fe-26Al-xNb (x = 3 and 5 at. pct) are compared. The alloys were investigated "as cast" and after hot rolling at 1473 K (1200 °C). Scanning electron microscopes equipped with EDS and EBSD were used for the microstructure and phase identification. The addition of 3 at. pct of Nb into the Fe3Al matrix leads to the formation of C14 λ—Laves phase (Fe,Al)2Nb (LP) particles spread in the Fe3Al matrix, while an eutectic with thin lamellae of LP C14 λ—Laves phase (Fe,Al)2Nb and matrix is also formed in the iron aluminide with 5 at. pct of Nb. The presence of incoherent precipitates is connected with the enhancement of the high-temperature strength and creep resistance.

  1. Implanted deuterium retention and release in carbon-coated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Oates, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium implantation experiments have been conducted on samples of clean and carbon-coated beryllium. These studies entailed preparation and characterization of beryllium samples coated with carbon thicknesses of 100, 500, and 1000 angstrom. Heat treatment of a beryllium sample coated with carbon to a thickness of approximately 100 angstrom revealed that exposure to a temperature of 400 degrees C under high vacuum conditions was sufficient to cause substantial diffusion of beryllium through the carbon layer, resulting in more beryllium than carbon at the surface. Comparable concentrations of carbon and beryllium were observed in the bulk of the coating layer. Higher than expected oxygen levels were observed throughout the coating layer as well. Samples were exposed to deuterium implantation followed by thermal desorption without exposure to air. Differences were observed in deuterium retention and postimplantation release behavior in the carbon-coated samples as compared with bare samples. For comparable implantation conditions (sample temperature of 400 degrees C and an incident deuterium flux of approximately 6 X 10 19 D/m 2 sec), the quantity of deuterium retained in the bare sample was less than that retained in the carbon-coated samples. Further, the release of the deuterium took place at lower temperatures for the bare beryllium surfaces than for carbon-coated beryllium samples. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  2. The influence of processing on microstructure and properties of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K.; Anderson, M.T. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

    1997-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide alloys based on Fe3Al have been formed by reaction synthesis from elemental powders followed by hot extrusion. The resulting alloys have approximately 2.5% by volume Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles dispersed throughout the material. A proper combination of extrusion temperature, extrusion ratio, and post-consolidation heat treatment results in a secondary recrystallized microstructure with grain sizes greater than 25mm. ODS material with 5% Cr addition exhibits approximately an order of magnitude increase in time to failure at 650 C compared to a similar alloy without the oxide dispersion. Addition of Nb and Mo along with Cr results in decreased minimum creep rates, however, the time to rupture is greatly reduced due to fracture at low strains initiated at large Nb particles that were not put into solution. The activation energy for creep in the 5% Cr ODS material is on the order of 210 kJ/mole and the power law creep exponent is 9--9.5. Transmission electron microscopy examination of the substructure of deformed samples indicates some formation of low angle dislocation boundaries, however, most of the dislocations are pinned at particles. The TEM observations and the value of the creep exponent are indicative of dislocation breakaway from particles as the rate controlling deformation mechanism. The TEM results indicate that particles smaller than about 100nm and larger than about 500 nm do not contribute significantly to dislocation pinning.

  3. HCP to FCT + precipitate transformations in lamellar gamma-titanium aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadge, Mallikarjun Baburao

    Fully lamellar gamma-TiAl [alpha2(HCP) + gamma(FCT)] based alloys are potential structural materials for aerospace engine applications. Lamellar structure stabilization and additional strengthening mechanisms are major issues in the ongoing development of titanium aluminides due to the microstructural instability resulting from decomposition of the strengthening alpha 2 phase. This work addresses characterization of multi-component TiAl systems to identify the mechanism of lamellar structure refinement and assess the effects of light element additions (C and Si) on creep deformation behavior. Transmission electron microscopy studies directly confirmed for the first time that, fine lamellar structure is formed by the nucleation and growth of a large number of basal stacking faults on the 1/6 dislocations cross slipping repeatedly into and out of basal planes. This lamellar structure can be tailored by modifying jog heights through chemistry and thermal processing. alpha 2 → gamma transformation during heating (investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction) is a two step process involving the formation of a novel disordered FCC gamma' TiAl [with a(gamma') = c(gamma)] as an intermediate phase followed by ordering. Addition of carbon and silicon induced Ti2AlC H-type carbide precipitation inside the alpha2 lath and Ti 5(Al,Si)3 zeta-type silicide precipitation at the alpha 2/gamma interface. The H-carbides preserve alpha2/gamma type interfaces, while zeta-silicide precipitates restrict ledge growth and interfacial sliding enabling strong resistance to creep deformation.

  4. Fatigue-crack propagation in gamma-based titanium aluminide alloys at large and small crack sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzic, J.J.; Campbell, J.P.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-01-01

    Most evaluations of the fracture and fatigue-crack propagation properties of γ+α 2 titanium aluminide alloys to date have been performed using standard large-crack samples, e.g., compact-tension specimens containing crack sizes which are on the order of tens of millimeters, i.e., large compared to microstructural dimensions. However, these alloys have been targeted for applications, such as blades in gas-turbine engines, where relevant crack sizes are much smaller ( 5 mm) and (c ≅ 25--300 microm) cracks in a γ-TiAl based alloy, of composition Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr-0.2B (at.%), specifically for duplex (average grain size approximately17 microm) and refined lamellar (average colony size ≅150 microm) microstructures. It is found that, whereas the lamellar microstructure displays far superior fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth resistance in the presence of large cracks, in small-crack testing the duplex microstructure exhibits a better combination of properties. The reasons for such contrasting behavior are examined in terms of the intrinsic and extrinsic (i.e., crack bridging) contributions to cyclic crack advance

  5. Structural Property Effects for Platinum Modified Aluminide Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    change from a low energy fracture to a high energy one occurs is called the DBTT. Transition temperatures are exhibited by body centered cubic and...tdapcrature as a result of residual ~:n~~.’ estresses unless the sample had been plastically deformed. Use ofpl~stic ..... .:,.as jilwed exam-ination of a...34 Fracture Properties of Superalloys," Superalloys Source Book, American Society for Metals, 1984. 11. American Society for Metals, Metals Handbook, Desk

  6. Infiltration processing of metal matrix composites using coated ceramic particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Patino, Carlos Alberto

    2001-07-01

    A new process was developed to fabricate particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs). The process involves three steps: (1) modifying the particulate surface by metal coating, (2) forming a particulate porous compact; and (3) introducing metal into the channel network by vacuum infiltration. MMCs with different reinforcements, volume fractions, and sizes can be produced by this technique. Powders of alumina and silicon carbide were successfully coated with nickel and copper in preparation for infiltration with molten aluminum. Electroless Ni and Cu deposition was used since it enhances the wettability of the reinforcements for composite fabrication. While Cu deposits were polycrystalline, traces of phosphorous co-deposited from the electroless bath gave an amorphous Ni-P coating. The effect of metal coating on wetting behavior was evaluated at 800°C on plain and metal-coated ceramic plates using a sessile drop technique. The metallic films eliminated the non-wetting behavior of the uncoated ceramics, leading to equilibrium contact angles in the order of 12° and below 58° for Ni and Cu coated ceramics, respectively. The spreading data indicated that local diffusion at the triple junction was the governing mechanism of the wetting process. Precipitation of intermetallic phases in the drop/ceramic interface delayed the formation of Al4C3. Infiltration with molten Al showed that the coated-particulates are suitable as reinforcing materials for fabricating MMCs, giving porosity-free components with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterparts. Liquid state diffusion kinetics due to temperature dependent viscosity forces controlled the infiltration process. Microstructural analysis indicated the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2, in the case of Cu coating, and Ni2Al3 and NiAl 3 when Ni-coated powders were infiltrated. The

  7. A Review of Tribological Coatings for Control Drive Mechanisms in Space Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CJ Larkin; JD Edington; BJ Close

    2006-01-01

    Tribological coatings must provide lubrication for moving components of the control drive mechanism for a space reactor and prevent seizing due to friction or diffusion welding to provide highly reliable and precise control of reflector position over the mission lifetime. Several coatings were evaluated based on tribological performance at elevated temperatures and in ultrahigh vacuum environments. Candidates with proven performance in the anticipated environment are limited primarily to disulfide materials. Irradiation data for these coatings is nonexistent. Compatibility issues between coating materials and structural components may require the use of barrier layers between the solid lubricant and structural components to prevent deleterious interactions. It would be advisable to consider possible lubricant interactions prior to down-selection of structural materials. A battery of tests was proposed to provide the necessary data for eventual solid lubricant/coating selection

  8. Development of an oxidation resistant glass-ceramic composite coating on Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbo; Zhu, Shenglong; Chen, Minghui; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Fuhui

    2014-02-01

    Three glass-ceramic composite coatings were prepared on Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy by air spraying technique and subsequent firing. The aim of this work is to study the reactions between glass matrix and inclusions and their effects on the oxidation resistance of the glass-ceramic composite coating. The powders of alumina, quartz, or both were added into the aqueous solution of potassium silicate (ASPS) to form slurries used as the starting materials for the composite coatings. The coating formed from an ASPS-alumina slurry was porous, because the reaction between alumina and potassium silicate glass resulted in the formation of leucite (KAlSi2O6), consuming substantive glass phase and hindering the densification of the composite coating. Cracks were observed in the coating prepared from an ASPS-quartz slurry due to the larger volume shrinkage of the coating than that of the alloy. In contrast, an intact and dense SiO2-Al2O3-glass coating was successfully prepared from an ASPS-alumina-silica slurry. The oxidation behavior of the SiO2-Al2O3-glass composite coating on Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy was studied at 900 °C. The SiO2-Al2O3-glass composite coating acted as an oxygen diffusion barrier, and prevented the inward diffusion of the oxygen from the air to the coating/alloy interface, therefore, decreasing the oxidation rate of the Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloy significantly.

  9. Electrodeposition of Ni(OH)2 reinforced polyaniline coating for corrosion protection of 304 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Syed, Junaid Ali; Gao, Yangzhi; Lu, Hongbin; Meng, Xiangkang

    2018-05-01

    In the present paper, polyaniline (PANI) coating was electropolymerized in the presence of phosphoric acid with subsequent deposition of Ni(OH)2 particles. The Ni(OH)2 reinforced PANI coating significantly enhances the corrosion resistance of 304 stainless steel (304SS) in comparison with the pristine PANI coating. The galvanostatically deposited Ni(OH)2 particles fill the pores of the pristine PANI coating and improves the coatings hydrophobicity which decreases the diffusion of aggressive media. Importantly, the Rp values of Ni(OH)2 reinforced PANI coating is much higher than that of pristine PANI coating and the Ni(OH)2 reinforced PANI coating presents a long-term anti-corrosive ability (360 h) in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. The prolonged corrosion protection of Ni(OH)2 reinforced PANI coating is attributed to the improved physical barrier as well as the facile formation of passive oxide film that sustain the anodic protection of the coating.

  10. Microstructure and Oxidation Behavior of CrAl Laser-Coated Zircaloy-4 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser coating of a CrAl layer on Zircaloy-4 alloy was carried out for the surface protection of the Zr substrate at high temperatures, and its microstructural and thermal stability were investigated. Significant mixing of CrAl coating metal with the Zr substrate occurred during the laser surface treatment, and a rapidly solidified microstructure was obtained. A considerable degree of diffusion of solute atoms and some intermetallic compounds were observed to occur when the coated specimen was heated at a high temperature. Oxidation appears to proceed more preferentially at Zr-rich region than Cr-rich region, and the incorporation of Zr into the CrAl coating layer deteriorates the oxidation resistance because of the formation of thermally unstable Zr oxides.

  11. Microstructure and oxidation performance of a γ–γ ′ Pt-aluminide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    examined and its cyclic oxidation performance at 1100 °C in air is ... mechanical properties of the alloy (Alam et al 2010a). In ... enhances the adherence of the alumina scale and, thereby, .... ture of coatings in as-coated condition: (a) γ–γ ′ coating and (b) ..... ture corrosion (eds) D R Holmes and A Rahmel (London:.

  12. Corrosion properties of zirconium-based ceramic coatings for micro-bearing and biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkowicz, J; Zavaleyev, V; Dobruchowska, E; Murzynski, D; Donkov, N; Zykova, A; Safonov, V; Yakovin, S

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic oxide ZrO 2 and oxynitride ZrON coatings are widely used as protective coatings against diffusion and corrosion. The enhancement of the coatings' mechanical properties, as well as their wear and corrosion resistance, is very important for their tribological performance. In this work, ZrO 2 and ZrON coatings were deposited by magnetron sputtering on stainless steel (AISI 316) substrates. The adhesion, hardness and elastic properties were evaluated by standard methods. The surface structure of the deposited coatings was observed by electron scanning microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The composition of the coatings was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The corrosion resistance properties were evaluated using the potentiodynamic method. The results show that the corrosion parameters are significantly increased in the cases of both oxynitride and oxide coatings in comparison with the stainless steel (AISI 316) substrates. (paper)

  13. Diffusivity, solubility and thermodynamic modelling of diffusion growth of Ga"3"+-doped LiTaO_3 thin film for integrated optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, De-Long; Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Pei; Kang, Jian; Wong, Wing-Han; Yu, Dao-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Diffusion growth of Ga"3"+-doped LiTaO_3(LT) thin film was studied thermodynamically. Some Ga"3"+-doped LT thin films were grown on LT surface by in-diffusion of homogeneously coated Ga_2O_3 film at the temperature range of (1273 to 1473) K. The Ga"3"+ profile in the grown thin film was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Form the measured Ga"3"+ profiles, some thermodynamic parameters were obtained. These include diffusivity, diffusion constant, chemical activation energy, solubility, solubility constant and enthalpy of solution. These parameters are crucial to design and growth of a Ga"3"+-doped LT thin film with desired Ga"3"+ profile for integrated optics application. A thermodynamic model is suggested for the growth and verified experimentally. - Highlights: • Diffusion growth of Ga"3"+-doped LiTaO_3 thin film were studied thermodynamically. • Diffusion constant is 1.41 · 10"−"6 m"2/s and activation energy is 237.2 kJ/mol. • Solubility constant is 22.9 · 10"2"6 ions/m"3 and enthalpy of solution is 28.9 kJ/mol. • Ga"3"+ dopant has small effect on LiTaO_3 refractive index. • Ga"3"+ growth can be described by a Fick-type equation with a constant diffusivity. - Abstract: A thermodynamic study was performed on diffusion growth of Ga"3"+-doped LiTaO_3(LT) thin film for integrated optics. Some Ga"3"+-doped LT thin films were grown on LT surface by in-diffusion of homogeneously coated Ga_2O_3 film at the temperature range of (1273 to 1473) K. After growth, the refractive indices at Ga"3"+-doped and un-doped surface parts were measured by prism coupling technique and Li composition there was evaluated from the measured refractive indices. The results show that Ga"3"+ dopant has small effect on the LT index. Li_2O out-diffusion is not measurable. The Ga"3"+ profile in the grown thin film was analysed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is found that the grown Ga"3"+ ions follow a complementary error function profile. A

  14. Oxidation-resistant Ge-doped silicide coating on Cr-Cr2Nb alloys by pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yirong

    1997-01-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on Cr-Cr 2 Nb alloys in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the pack composition and processing schedule and also on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi 2 and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. Under cyclic and isothermal oxidation conditions, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation and from pesting by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. (orig.)

  15. Oxidation behavior of Ru–Al multilayer coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yung-I, E-mail: yichen@mail.ntou.edu.tw; Zheng, Zhi-Ting; Kai, Wu; Huang, Yu-Ren

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Ru{sub 0.63}Al{sub 0.37} multilayer coatings were fabricated using cosputtering. • Oxidation behavior of Ru{sub 0.63}Al{sub 0.37} coatings in 1% O{sub 2}–99% Ar was studied. • Internal oxidation of Ru{sub 0.63}Al{sub 0.37} coatings at 400–600 °C was multi stage parabolic. • External oxidation of Ru{sub 0.63}Al{sub 0.37} was conducted after annealing at 700–800 °C. - Abstract: Ru{sub 0.63}Al{sub 0.37} coatings were deposited through a cyclical gradient concentration deposition at 400 °C with a substrate-holder rotation speed of 1 rpm by direct current magnetron cosputtering. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the as-deposited coatings exhibited a multilayer structure along with the columnar structure. The oxidation behavior of the Ru{sub 0.63}Al{sub 0.37} coatings was examined through X-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Oxidation kinetics was measured using a thermogravimetric analyzer. Internal oxidation was observed for Ru{sub 0.63}Al{sub 0.37} coatings annealed in a 1% O{sub 2}–99% Ar atmosphere at 400–600 °C accompanied with activation energies of 72–84 kJ/mol. By contrast, external oxidation was observed after annealing at 700–800 °C, resulting in the formation of a continuous alumina scale consisting of crystalline δ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} domains, which can be attributable to the outward diffusion of Al.

  16. Adsorptive removal of nickel from aqueous solutions by activated carbons from doum seed (Hyphaenethebaica coat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal El-Sadaawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the possibility of using low cost agriculture waste as doum-palm seed coat for the removal of nickel ions from aqueous solutions. Two activated carbons had been prepared from raw doum-palm seed coat (DACI and DACII; as well, the raw material was used as an adsorbent (RD. Batch adsorption experiments were performed as a function of pH of solution, initial nickel ions concentration, dose of adsorbent and contact time. Adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and D–R Models. Different error analysis conforms that the isotherm data followed Freundlich models for all adsorbents. Adsorption kinetic data were tested using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Elovich model. Adsorption mechanism was investigated using the intra-particle diffusion model. Diffusion coefficients were calculated using the film and intraparticle diffusion models. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Ni2+ ions onto RD, DACI and DACII followed pseudo-second order kinetic model, and indicates that the intra-particle diffusion controls the rate of adsorption but it is not the rate limiting step.

  17. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  18. High-Temperature Oxidation-Resistant and Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion NiAl-Base Bond Coat Developed for a Turbine Blade Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Many critical gas turbine engine components are currently made from Ni-base superalloys that are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC). The TBC consists of a ZrO2-based top coat and a bond coat that is used to enhance the bonding between the superalloy substrate and the top coat. MCrAlY alloys (CoCrAlY and NiCrAlY) are currently used as bond coats and are chosen for their very good oxidation resistance. TBC life is frequently limited by the oxidation resistance of the bond coat, along with a thermal expansion mismatch between the metallic bond coat and the ceramic top coat. The aim of this investigation at the NASA Glenn Research Center was to develop a new longer life, higher temperature bond coat by improving both the oxidation resistance and the thermal expansion characteristics of the bond coat. Nickel aluminide (NiAl) has excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance and can sustain a protective Al2O3 scale to longer times and higher temperatures in comparison to MCrAlY alloys. Cryomilling of NiAl results in aluminum nitride (AlN) formation that reduces the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the alloy and enhances creep strength. Thus, additions of cryomilled NiAl-AlN to CoCrAlY were examined as a potential bond coat. In this work, the composite alloy was investigated as a stand-alone substrate to demonstrate its feasibility prior to actual use as a coating. About 85 percent of prealloyed NiAl and 15 percent of standard commercial CoCrAlY alloys were mixed and cryomilled in an attritor with stainless steel balls used as grinding media. The milling was carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The milled powder was consolidated by hot extrusion or by hot isostatic pressing. From the consolidated material, oxidation coupons, four-point bend, CTE, and tensile specimens were machined. The CTE measurements were made between room temperature and 1000 C in an argon atmosphere. It is shown that the CTE of the NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY composite bond coat

  19. Structure of MeCrAlY + AlSi coatings deposited by Arc-PVD method on CMSX4 single crystal alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swadzba, L.; Hetmanczyk, M.; Mendala, B.; Saunders, S.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigations of depositing high temperature resistant coatings on the Ni base superalloys by Arc-PVD method using exothermic reaction processes between Ni and Al with NiAl intermetallic formation are presented in the article. By the diffusion heating at 1050 o C in vacuum, NiAl diffusion coating containing 21% at. Al and 50 μm thick were obtained. In the next stage coatings with more complex chemical composition - MeCrAlY were formed. The MeCrAlY coatings were made from two targets. Good correlation between the chemical composition of the targets and a uniform distribution of elements in the coatings was shown. Then the surface was also covered with aluminium by the Arc-PVD method . In the vacuum chamber of the equipment a synthesis reaction between NiCoCrAlY and Al with the formation of NiAl intermetallics of high Co, Cr, Y content was initiated. The final heat treatment of coatings was conducted in vacuum at 1323 K. Strong segregation of yttrium into the oxide scale in the specimens heated in the air was shown. It was possible to form NiAl and intermetallics phase coatings modified by Co, Cr and Y by the Arc-PVD method. The coatings were formed on a single crystal CMSX-4. The structure, morphology and phase composition of coatings was carried out. (author)

  20. Ion irradiation and thermal cycling tests of TiC coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, S.; Ohara, H.; Son, P.; Miyake, M.

    1984-01-01

    Ion irradiation of TiC coatings prepared by diffusion annealing was performed with 20-40 keV He + ions for different doses at room temperature. The polished TiCsub(0.99) coatings irradiated with 40 keV He + ions showed the surface damage and erosion due to blistering and exfoliation above a dose of 1.8x10 17 ions/cm 2 , whereas no change in the surface morphology could be detected for the as-prepared coatings up to a dose of 1.4x10 18 ions/cm 2 . The results suggested that surface erosion due to blistering can be effectively reduced on the rough surface of the as-prepared TiC coating. The average blister diameter in the polished TiCsub(0.99) coating increased with increasing projectile energy. For the 40 keV He + ion irradiation of the polished TiCsub(0.5) coatings, general features in blisters were similar to those observed for the TiCsub(0.99) coatings, but the critical dose for blistering shifted to a higher value in comparison with the polished TiCsub(0.99) coating. Thermal cycling between 500 and 1200 0 C caused serious surface damage for the TiCsub(0.99) coating irradiated with 40 keV He + ions below the critical dose for blistering, while the coating with surface damage due to blistering showed no significant change in the surface topography after thermal cycling. (orig.)

  1. Contribution to the study of zirconium self-diffusion in zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Chul

    1972-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to determine experimental conditions allowing the measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient of zirconium in zirconium carbide. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of zirconium carbide samples. He reports the use of ion implantation as technique to obtain a radio-tracer coating. The obtained results give evidence of the impossibility to use sintered samples with small grains because of the demonstrated importance of intergranular diffusion. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained in the case of zirconium carbide with grains having a diameter of few millimetres. The presence of 95 Nb from the disintegration of 95 Zr indicates that these both metallic elements have very close diffusion coefficients at 2.600 C [fr

  2. Gelatin Tight-Coated Poly(lactide-co-glycolide Scaffold Incorporating rhBMP-2 for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface coating is the simplest surface modification. However, bioactive molecules can not spread well on the commonly used polylactone-type skeletons; thus, the surface coatings of biomolecules are typically unstable due to the weak interaction between the polymer and the bioactive molecules. In this study, a special type of poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA-based scaffold with a loosened skeleton was fabricated by phase separation, which allowed gelatin molecules to more readily diffuse throughout the structure. In this application, gelatin modified both the internal substrate and external surface. After cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, the surface layer gelatin was tightly bound to the diffused gelatin, thereby preventing the surface layer gelatin coating from falling off within 14 days. After gelatin modification, PLGA scaffold demonstrated enhanced hydrophilicity and improved mechanical properties (i.e., increased compression strength and elastic modulus in dry and wet states. Furthermore, a sustained release profile of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 was achieved in the coated scaffold. The coated scaffold also supported the in vitro attachment, proliferation, and osteogenesis of rabbit bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs, indicating the bioactivity of rhBMP-2. These results collectively demonstrate that the cross-linked-gelatin-coated porous PLGA scaffold incorporating bioactive molecules is a promising candidate for bone tissue regeneration.

  3. Open volume defects and magnetic phase transition in Fe{sub 60}Al{sub 40} transition metal aluminide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedke, M. O., E-mail: m.liedke@hzdr.de; Anwand, W.; Butterling, M.; Wagner, A. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Bali, R.; Cornelius, S.; Potzger, K. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Trinh, T. T. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technical University Dresden, Helmholtzstr. 10, 01609 Dresden (Germany); Salamon, S.; Walecki, D.; Smekhova, A.; Wende, H. [Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstraße 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-04-28

    Magnetic phase transition in the Fe{sub 60}Al{sub 40} transition metal aluminide from the ferromagnetic disordered A2-phase to the paramagnetic ordered B2-phase as a function of annealing up to 1000 °C has been investigated by means of magneto-optical and spectroscopy techniques, i.e., Kerr effect, positron annihilation, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The positron annihilation spectroscopy has been performed in-situ sequentially after each annealing step at the Apparatus for In-situ Defect Analysis that is a unique tool combining positron annihilation spectroscopy with temperature treatment, material evaporation, ion irradiation, and sheet resistance measurement techniques. The overall goal was to investigate the importance of the open volume defects onto the magnetic phase transition. No evidence of variation in the vacancy concentration in matching the magnetic phase transition temperature range (400–600 °C) has been found, whereas higher temperatures showed an increase in the vacancy concentration.

  4. Suppression of interfacial reactions between Li4Ti5O12 electrode and electrolyte solution via zinc oxide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Cuiping; He, Yan-Bing; Li, Hongfei; Li, Baohua; Du, Hongda; Qin, Xianying; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 (LTO) based batteries have severe gassing behavior due to the strong interfacial reactions between LTO and the electrolyte solution, which hampers the practical application of LTO in high power LIBs. The ZnO coating on LTO particles as a barrier layer can effectively suppress the interfacial reactions between LTO and the electrolyte solution. Simultaneously, the ZnO coating significantly reduces the charge-transfer resistance and increases the lithium ion diffusion coefficient, which leads to great improvement of rate and cyclic performance of LTO electrode. - Highlights: • A ZnO coating layer was constructed on the LTO particles by a chemical process as a barrier layer between LTO and surrounding electrolyte solution. • The ZnO coating can effectively stabilize the electrode/electrolyte interface and suppress interfacial reactions between LTO and electrolyte solution. • The ZnO coating can improve the electronic conductivity and lithium ion diffusion coefficient, which contributes to a great improvement in cyclic and high rate capabilities of LTO electrode. • The ZnO coating on LTO may be an effective method to solve the gassing behavior of LTO based battery and promote its wide application in lithium ion power battery. - Abstract: Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 (LTO) based batteries have severe gassing behavior during charge/discharge and storage process. The interfacial reactions between LTO and electrolyte solution may be the main reason. In this work, the LTO spinel particles are modified with ZnO coating using a chemical process to reduce the surface reactivity of LTO particles. Results show that the ZnO coating can effectively stabilize the electrode/electrolyte interface and suppress the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film. Simultaneously, this ZnO modification can improve the electronic conductivity and lithium ion diffusion coefficient, which contributes to a great improvement in cyclic and high rate

  5. Underwater explosive compaction-sintering of tungsten-copper coating on a copper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xiaojie; Yan, Honghao; Wang, Xiaohong; Chen, Saiwei

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated underwater explosive compaction-sintering for coating a high-density tungsten-copper composite on a copper surface. First, 50% W-50% Cu tungsten-copper composite powder was prepared by mechanical alloying. The composite powder was pre-compacted and sintered by hydrogen. Underwater explosive compaction was carried out. Finally, a high-density tungsten-copper coating was obtained by diffusion sintering of the specimen after explosive compaction. A simulation of the underwater explosive compaction process showed that the peak value of the pressure in the coating was between 3.0 and 4.8 GPa. The hardness values of the tungsten-copper layer and the copper substrate were in the range of 87-133 and 49 HV, respectively. The bonding strength between the coating and the substrate was approximately 100-105 MPa.

  6. Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Coated onto Macronutrient Fertilizers in an Alkaline Calcareous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Narges; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Kirby, Jason K.; Beak, Douglas G.; Stacey, Samuel P.; McLaughlin, Mike J.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles may provide a more soluble and plant available source of Zn in Zn fertilizers due to their greater reactivity compared to equivalent micron- or millimetre-sized (bulk) particles. However, the effect of soil on solubility, spatial distribution and speciation of ZnO nanoparticles has not yet been investigated. In this study, we examined the diffusion and solid phase speciation of Zn in an alkaline calcareous soil following application of nanoparticulate and bulk ZnO coated fertilizer products (monoammonium phosphate (MAP) and urea) using laboratory-based x-ray techniques and synchrotron-based μ-x-ray fluorescence (μ–XRF) mapping and absorption fine structure spectroscopy (μ–XAFS). Mapping of the soil-fertilizer reaction zones revealed that most of the applied Zn for all treatments remained on the coated fertilizer granule or close to the point of application after five weeks of incubation in soil. Zinc precipitated mainly as scholzite (CaZn2(PO4)2.2H2O) and zinc ammonium phosphate (Zn(NH4)PO4) species at the surface of MAP granules. These reactions reduced dissolution and diffusion of Zn from the MAP granules. Although Zn remained as zincite (ZnO) at the surface of urea granules, limited diffusion of Zn from ZnO-coated urea granules was also observed for both bulk and nanoparticulate ZnO treatments. This might be due to either the high pH of urea granules, which reduced solubility of Zn, or aggregation (due to high ionic strength) of released ZnO nanoparticles around the granule/point of application. The relative proportion of Zn(OH)2 and ZnCO3 species increased for all Zn treatments with increasing distance from coated MAP and urea granules in the calcareous soil. When coated on macronutrient fertilizers, Zn from ZnO nanoparticles (without surface modifiers) was not more mobile or diffusible compared to bulk forms of ZnO. The results also suggest that risk associated with the presence of ZnO NPs in calcareous soils would be the

  7. Quasi-epitaxial barium hexaferrite thin films prepared by a topotactic reactive diffusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Siqin; Yue, Zhenxing; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Li, Longtu

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-epitaxial barium hexaferrite thin films (BaM) with crystallographic c-axis parallel to film normal were prepared through a topotactic reactive diffusion process using two-step solution deposition on c-plane sapphire. The two-step spin coating process involves preparing an epitaxial hematite film, coating the film with barium precursor solution and thermal annealing. The crystal orientation and magnetic anisotropy of BaM thin films were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis, SEM observation and magnetic measurements. Hysteresis loops showed good magnetic anisotropy and high remanence ratio (RR) Mr/Ms = 0.97. The films fabricated by two-step spin coating process displayed wider rocking curve width but better magnetic anisotropy than one-step spin coating. The possible mechanism of this discrepancy is discussed in this paper.

  8. Quasi-epitaxial barium hexaferrite thin films prepared by a topotactic reactive diffusion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Siqin; Yue, Zhenxing, E-mail: yuezhx@tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Li, Longtu

    2014-01-30

    Quasi-epitaxial barium hexaferrite thin films (BaM) with crystallographic c-axis parallel to film normal were prepared through a topotactic reactive diffusion process using two-step solution deposition on c-plane sapphire. The two-step spin coating process involves preparing an epitaxial hematite film, coating the film with barium precursor solution and thermal annealing. The crystal orientation and magnetic anisotropy of BaM thin films were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis, SEM observation and magnetic measurements. Hysteresis loops showed good magnetic anisotropy and high remanence ratio (RR) Mr/Ms = 0.97. The films fabricated by two-step spin coating process displayed wider rocking curve width but better magnetic anisotropy than one-step spin coating. The possible mechanism of this discrepancy is discussed in this paper.

  9. Surface characteristic of chemically converted graphene coated low carbon steel by electro spray coating method for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell bipolar plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Yang Do; Nam, Dae Geun

    2013-05-01

    Graphene was coated on low carbon steel (SS400) by electro spray coating method to improve its properties of corrosion resistance and contact resistance. Exfoliated graphite was made of the graphite by chemical treatment (Chemically Converted Graphene, CCG). CCG is distributed using dispersing agent, and low carbon steel was coated with diffuse graphene solution by electro spray coating method. The structure of the CCG was analyzed using XRD and the coating layer of surface was analyzed using SEM. Analysis showed that multi-layered graphite structure was destroyed and it was transformed in to fine layers graphene structure. And the result of SEM analysis on the surface and the cross section, graphene layer was uniformly formed with 3-5 microm thickness on the surface of substrate. Corrosion resistance test was applied in the corrosive solution which is similar to the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack inside. And interfacial contact resistance (ICR) test was measured to simulate the internal operating conditions of PEMFC stack. As a result of measuring corrosion resistance and contact resistance, it could be confirmed that low carbon steel coated with CCG was revealed to be more effective in terms of its applicability as PEMFC bipolar plate.

  10. Controlled release from drug microparticles via solventless dry-polymer coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Maxx; Barrows, Jason; Davé, Rajesh N

    2015-04-01

    A novel solvent-less dry-polymer coating process employing high-intensity vibrations avoiding the use of liquid plasticizers, solvents, binders, and heat treatments is utilized for the purpose of controlled release. The main hypothesis is that such process having highly controllable processing intensity and time may be effective for coating particularly fine particles, 100 μm and smaller via exploiting particle interactions between polymers and substrates in the dry state, while avoiding breakage yet achieving conformal coating. The method utilizes vibratory mixing to first layer micronized polymer onto active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particles by virtue of van der Waals forces and to subsequently mechanically deform the polymer into a continuous film. As a practical example, ascorbic acid and ibuprofen microparticles, 50-500 μm, are coated with the polymers polyethylene wax or carnauba wax, a generally recognized as safe material, resulting in controlled release on the order of seconds to hours. As a novelty, models are utilized to describe the coating layer thickness and the controlled-release behavior of the API, which occurs because of a diffusion-based mechanism. Such modeling would allow the design and control of the coating process with application for the controlled release of microparticles, particularly those less than 100 μm, which are difficult to coat by conventional solvent coating methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Influence of microstructure on laser damage threshold of IBS coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolz, C.J.; Genin, F.Y.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Long, D.; Lalazari, R.; Wu, Z.L.; Kuo, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering (IBS) coatings were developed for the laser gyro industry to meet significantly different requirements than those of fusion lasers. Laser gyro mirrors are small ( 26 J/cm 2 at 1,064 nm with 3-ns pulses). As part of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) coating development effort, IBS coatings are being studied to explore the possible benefits of this technology to NIF optics. As an initial step to achieving the NIF size and damage threshold requirements, the coating process is being scaled to uniformly coat a 20 x 40 cm 2 area with reduced spectral, reflected wavefront, and laser damage threshold requirements. Here, multilayer coatings deposited by ion-beam sputtering with amorphous layers were found to have lower damage thresholds at 1,064 nm than similar coatings with crystalline layers. Interestingly, at higher fluences the damage was less severe for the amorphous coatings. The magnitude of the difference in damage thresholds between the two different microstructures was strongly influenced by the size of the tested area. To better understand the microstructure effects, single layers of HfO 2 with different microstructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy, ellipsometry, and a photothermal deflection technique. Since the laser damage initiated at defects, the influence of thermal diffusivity on thermal gradients in nodular defects is also presented

  12. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving the Performance of Lithium–Sulfur Batteries by Conductive Polymer Coating

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2011-11-22

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for next-generation high-performance energy storage systems because of their high theoretical specific energy, low materials cost, and environmental safety. One of the major obstacles for its commercialization is the rapid capacity fading due to polysulfide dissolution and uncontrolled redeposition. Various porous carbon structures have been used to improve the performance of Li-S batteries, as polysulfides could be trapped inside the carbon matrix. However, polysulfides still diffuse out for a prolonged time if there is no effective capping layer surrounding the carbon/sulfur particles. Here we explore the application of conducting polymer to minimize the diffusion of polysulfides out of the mesoporous carbon matrix by coating poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)- poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) onto mesoporous carbon/sulfur particles. After surface coating, coulomb efficiency of the sulfur electrode was improved from 93% to 97%, and capacity decay was reduced from 40%/100 cycles to 15%/100 cycles. Moreover, the discharge capacity with the polymer coating was ∼10% higher than the bare counterpart, with an initial discharge capacity of 1140 mAh/g and a stable discharge capacity of >600 mAh/g after 150 cycles at C/5 rate. We believe that this conductive polymer coating method represents an exciting direction for enhancing the device performance of Li-S batteries and can be applicable to other electrode materials in lithium ion batteries. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Controlling the scattering properties of thin, particle-doped coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, William; Corbett, Madeleine; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2013-03-01

    Coatings and thin films of small particles suspended in a matrix possess optical properties that are important in several industries from cosmetics and paints to polymer composites. Many of the most interesting applications require coatings that produce several bulk effects simultaneously, but it is often difficult to rationally formulate materials with these desired optical properties. Here, we focus on the specific challenge of designing a thin colloidal film that maximizes both diffuse and total hemispherical transmission. We demonstrate that these bulk optical properties follow a simple scaling with two microscopic length scales: the scattering and transport mean free paths. Using these length scales and Mie scattering calculations, we generate basic design rules that relate scattering at the single particle level to the film's bulk optical properties. These ideas will be useful in the rational design of future optically active coatings.

  15. Anisotropic biodegradable lipid coated particles for spatially dynamic protein presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Randall A; Mathew, Mohit P; Ben-Akiva, Elana; Sunshine, Joel C; Shmueli, Ron B; Ren, Qiuyin; Yarema, Kevin J; Green, Jordan J

    2018-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of particles coated with lipids for applications ranging from drug delivery, gene delivery, and diagnostic imaging to immunoengineering. To date, almost all particles with lipid coatings have been spherical despite emerging evidence that non-spherical shapes can provide important advantages including reduced non-specific elimination and increased target-specific binding. We combine control of core particle geometry with control of particle surface functionality by developing anisotropic, biodegradable ellipsoidal particles with lipid coatings. We demonstrate that these lipid coated ellipsoidal particles maintain advantageous properties of lipid polymer hybrid particles, such as the ability for modular protein conjugation to the particle surface using versatile bioorthogonal ligation reactions. In addition, they exhibit biomimetic membrane fluidity and demonstrate lateral diffusive properties characteristic of natural membrane proteins. These ellipsoidal particles simultaneously provide benefits of non-spherical particles in terms of stability and resistance to non-specific phagocytosis by macrophages as well as enhanced targeted binding. These biomaterials provide a novel and flexible platform for numerous biomedical applications. The research reported here documents the ability of non-spherical polymeric particles to be coated with lipids to form anisotropic biomimetic particles. In addition, we demonstrate that these lipid-coated biodegradable polymeric particles can be conjugated to a wide variety of biological molecules in a "click-like" fashion. This is of interest due to the multiple types of cellular mimicry enabled by this biomaterial based technology. These features include mimicry of the highly anisotropic shape exhibited by cells, surface presentation of membrane bound protein mimetics, and lateral diffusivity of membrane bound substrates comparable to that of a plasma membrane. This platform is demonstrated to

  16. Environmentally benign sol-gel antifouling and foul-releasing coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detty, Michael R; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Bright, Frank V; Pagliaro, Mario

    2014-02-18

    Biofouling on ships and boats, characterized by aquatic bacteria and small organisms attaching to the hull, is an important global issue, since over 80000 tons of antifouling paint is used annually. This biofilm, which can form in as little as 48 hours depending on water temperature, increases drag on watercraft, which greatly reduces their fuel efficiency. In addition, biofouling can lead to microbially induced corrosion (MIC) due to H2S formed by the bacteria, especially sulfate-reducing bacteria. When the International Maritime Organization (IMO) international convention banned the use of effective but environmentally damaging coatings containing tributyl tin in 2008, the development of clean and effective antifouling systems became more important than ever. New nonbiocidal coatings are now in high demand. Scientists have developed new polymers, materials, and biocides, including new elastomeric coatings that they have obtained by improving the original silicone (polydimethylsiloxane) formulation patented in 1975. However, the high cost of silicones, especially of fluoropolymer-modified silicones, has generally prevented their large-scale diffusion. In 2009, traditional antifouling coatings using cuprous oxide formulated in copolymer paints still represented 95% of the global market volume of anti-fouling paints. The sol-gel nanochemistry approach to functional materials has emerged as an attractive candidate for creating low fouling surfaces due to the unique structure and properties of silica-based coatings and of hybrid inorganic-organic silicas in particular. Sol-gel formulations easily bind to all types of surfaces, such as steel, fiberglass, aluminum, and wood. In addition, they can cure at room temperature and form thin glassy coatings that are markedly different from thick silicone elastomeric foul-releasing coatings. Good to excellent performance against biofouling, low cure temperatures, enhanced and prolonged chemical and physical stability, ease of

  17. Thermal Conductivity and Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To protect aluminum parts in vehicle engines, metal-based thermal barrier coatings in the form of Fe59Cr12Nb5B20Si4 amorphous coatings were prepared by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF spraying under two different conditions. The microstructure, thermal transport behavior, and wear behavior of the coatings were characterized simultaneously. As a result, this alloy shows high process robustness during spraying. Both Fe-based coatings present dense, layered structure with porosities below 0.9%. Due to higher amorphous phase content, the coating H-1 exhibits a relatively low thermal conductivity, reaching 2.66 W/(m·K, two times lower than the reference stainless steel coating (5.85 W/(m·K, indicating a good thermal barrier property. Meanwhile, the thermal diffusivity of amorphous coatings display a limited increase with temperature up to 500 °C, which guarantees a steady and wide usage on aluminum alloy. Furthermore, the amorphous coating shows better wear resistance compared to high carbon martensitic GCr15 steel at different temperatures. The increased temperature accelerating the tribological reaction, leads to the friction coefficient and wear rate of coating increasing at 200 °C and decreasing at 400 °C.

  18. Comparison of diffusion coefficients and activation energies for AG diffusion in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Yeo, Sung Hwan; Lee, Young Woo; Cho, Moon Sung

    2015-01-01

    The migration of silver (Ag) in silicon carbide (SiC) and 110mAg through SiC of irradiated tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel has been studied for the past three to four decades. However, there is no satisfactory explanation for the transport mechanism of Ag in SiC. In this work, the diffusion coefficients of Ag measured and/or estimated in previous studies were reviewed, and then pre-exponential factors and activation energies from the previous experiments were evaluated using Arrhenius equation. The activation energy is 247.4 kJ·mol -1 from Ag paste experiments between two SiC layers produced using fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD), 125.3 kJ·mol -1 from integral release experiments (annealing of irradiated TRISO fuel), 121.8 kJ·mol -1 from fractional Ag release during irradiation of TRISO fuel in high flux reactor (HFR), and 274.8 kJ·mol -1 from Ag ion implantation experiments, respectively. The activation energy from ion implantation experiments is greater than that from Ag paste, fractional release and integral release, and the activation energy from Ag paste experiments is approximately two times greater than that from integral release experiments and fractional Ag release during the irradiation of TRISO fuel in HFR. The pre-exponential factors are also very different depending on the experimental methods and estimation. From a comparison of the pre-exponential factors and activation energies, it can be analogized that the diffusion mechanism of Ag using ion implantation experiment is different from other experiments, such as a Ag paste experiment, integral release experiments, and heating experiments after irradiating TRISO fuel in HFR. However, the results of this work do not support the long held assumption that Ag release from FBCVD-SiC, used for the coating layer in TRISO fuel, is dominated by grain boundary diffusion. In order to understand in detail the transport mechanism of Ag through the coating layer, FBCVD-SiC in TRISO fuel, a

  19. Laboratory Investigations of Ni-Al Coatings Exposed to Conditions Simulating Biomass Firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Duoli; Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2016-01-01

    Fireside corrosion is a key problem when using biomass fuels in power plants. A possible solution is to apply corrosion resistant coatings. The present paper studies the corrosion and interdiffusion behaviour of a Ni-Al diffusion coating on austenitic stainless steel (TP347H). Ni-Al coatings were...... prepared by electrolytic deposition of nickel followed by pack aluminizing performed at 650˚C. A uniform and dense Ni-Al coating with an outer layer of Ni2Al3 and an inner Ni layer was formed. Samples were exposed to 560°C for 168h in an atmosphere simulating biomass combustion. This resulted in localized...... corrosion attack. Interdiffusion was studied by isothermal heat treatment in static air at 650˚C or 700˚C for up to 3000h. The Ni2Al3 gradually transformed into NiAl and Ni3Al during the interdiffusion process. Porosity developed at the interface between the Ni-Al coating and the Ni layer and expanded...

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of antimicrobial silver coating on Ormocer (registered) microneedles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittard, S D; Narayan, R J; Jin, C; Monteiro-Riviere, N A [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ovsianikov, A; Chichkov, B N [Laser Zentrum Hannover, Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Stafslien, S; Chisholm, B, E-mail: roger_narayan@msn.co [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, 1805 Research Park Drive, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    One promising option for transdermal delivery of protein- and nucleic acid-based pharmacologic agents involves the use of microneedles. However, microneedle-generated pores may allow microorganisms to penetrate the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis and cause local or systemic infection. In this study, microneedles with antimicrobial functionality were fabricated using two-photon polymerization-micromolding and pulsed laser deposition. The antibacterial activity of the silver-coated organically modified ceramic (Ormocer (registered) ) microneedles was demonstrated using an agar diffusion assay. Human epidermal keratinocyte viability on the Ormocer (registered) surfaces coated with silver was similar to that on uncoated Ormocer (registered) surfaces. This study indicates that coating microneedles with silver thin films using pulsed laser deposition is a useful and novel approach for creating microneedles with antimicrobial functionality. (communication)

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of antimicrobial silver coating on Ormocer (registered) microneedles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittard, S D; Narayan, R J; Jin, C; Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Ovsianikov, A; Chichkov, B N; Stafslien, S; Chisholm, B

    2009-01-01

    One promising option for transdermal delivery of protein- and nucleic acid-based pharmacologic agents involves the use of microneedles. However, microneedle-generated pores may allow microorganisms to penetrate the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis and cause local or systemic infection. In this study, microneedles with antimicrobial functionality were fabricated using two-photon polymerization-micromolding and pulsed laser deposition. The antibacterial activity of the silver-coated organically modified ceramic (Ormocer (registered) ) microneedles was demonstrated using an agar diffusion assay. Human epidermal keratinocyte viability on the Ormocer (registered) surfaces coated with silver was similar to that on uncoated Ormocer (registered) surfaces. This study indicates that coating microneedles with silver thin films using pulsed laser deposition is a useful and novel approach for creating microneedles with antimicrobial functionality. (communication)

  2. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  3. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM, an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route.

  4. Effect of Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Aluminide Alloy Fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Process of Electron Beam Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ashfaq; Alahmari, Abdulrahman M; Mohammed, Muneer Khan; Renganayagalu, Ravi Kottan; Moiduddin, Khaja

    2017-02-21

    Titanium aluminides qualify adequately for advanced aero-engine applications in place of conventional nickel based superalloys. The combination of high temperature properties and lower density gives an edge to the titanium aluminide alloys. Nevertheless, challenges remain on how to process these essentially intermetallic alloys in to an actual product. Electron Beam Melting (EBM), an Additive Manufacturing Method, can build complex shaped solid parts from a given feedstock powder, thus overcoming the shortcomings of the conventional processing techniques such as machining and forging. The amount of energy supplied by the electron beam has considerable influence on the final build quality in the EBM process. Energy input is decided by the beam voltage, beam scan speed, beam current, and track offset distance. In the current work, beam current and track offset were varied to reflect three levels of energy input. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated for these samples. The microstructure gradually coarsened from top to bottom along the build direction. Whereas higher energy favored lath microstructure, lower energy tended toward equiaxed grains. Computed tomography analysis revealed a greater amount of porosity in low energy samples. In addition, the lack of bonding defects led to premature failure in the tension test of low energy samples. Increase in energy to a medium level largely cancelled out the porosity, thereby increasing the strength. However, this trend did not continue with the high energy samples. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations were carried out to understand this non-linear behavior of the strength in the three samples. Overall, the results of this work suggest that the input energy should be considered primarily whenever any new alloy system has to be processed through the EBM route.

  5. Chloride-induced corrosion mechanism and rate of enamel- and epoxy-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Fujian; Chen, Genda; Brow, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    The chloride-induced corrosion mechanisms of uncoated, pure enamel (PE)-coated, mixed enamel (ME)-coated, double enamel (DE)-coated, and fusion bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar cylinders are investigated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution and compared through electrochemical tests and visual inspection. Corrosion initiated after 29 or 61 days of tests in all uncoated and enamel-coated steel bars, and after 244 days of tests in some FBE-coated steel bars. In active stage, DE- and FBE-coated steel bars are subjected to the highest and lowest corrosion rates, respectively. The uncoated and ME-coated steel bars revealed relatively uniform corrosion while the PE-, DE-, and FBE-coated steel bars experienced pitting corrosion around damaged coating areas. Due to the combined effect of ion diffusion and capillary suction, wet–dry cyclic immersion caused more severe corrosion than continuous immersion. Both exposure conditions affected the corrosion rate more significantly than the water–cement ratio in mortar design.

  6. Comparing Two Antibacterial Treatments for Bioceramic Coatings at Short Culture Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, H.; Madrid, C.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings were employed industrially for decades to improve osteointegration of articular implants, but many studies have warned about the problems inherent to this procedure (mechanical properties, harmful phases). Consequently, a combination of hydroxyapatite with TiO2 sprayed by high velocity oxy-fuel spray was considered in this study. As infection after joint replacement surgery is one of the most critical concerns when considering implant performance, it is necessary to study possible ways to reduce or eliminate it. Two coating treatments were chosen for this study: addition of a percentage of ZnO and immersion in gentamicin for 24 h. Furthermore, three bacteria were considered: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. The evolution of bacteria viability in solution was measured at 0, 2, and 4 h; and plate assays were performed to study antibacterial effects by diffusion. The results show an important antibacterial effect of the as-sprayed coating, attributed to the presence of -OH radicals on the surface. The presence of ZnO did not have any additional influence on bacteria viability, but gentamicin-treated samples showed an improvement in antibacterial behavior for Gram-negative bacteria in solution, as well as a bactericidal effect in diffusion conditions.

  7. Residual stress in deuterium implanted nominal copper coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inal, M. Y.; Alam, M.; Peascoe, R. A.; Watkins, T. R.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of deuterium (D) implantation on the residual stresses in Cu and CuAl 2 phases present in nominal Cu coatings (containing Al) deposited on Al-alloy (Al-6061) substrates were measured using an x-ray diffraction technique. The coatings were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering of a pure Cu target under identical conditions and Al was incorporated in the coatings during growth by diffusion from the substrate. Deuterium was implanted in the coatings at energies of 40 or 40+120 keV with fluences of 1x10 21 , 2x10 21 , or 3x10 21 D + /m 2 . Pole figures of the Cu phase in the coatings prior to and after implantation indicated no effect of implantation on the fibrous texture. Triaxial stress analysis indicated the surface normal stress component to be negligible in Cu and slightly tensile in CuAl 2 under all conditions. Furthermore, under all conditions, the in-plane residual stresses in both phases were found to be compressive and nearly isotropic. The magnitude of the isotropic compressive stress was always higher in CuAl 2 as compared to Cu. The compressive residual stresses in the Cu phase changed only mildly with increasing coating weight, ion energy, and fluence. However, in the CuAl 2 phase the compressive residual stresses changed markedly with increasing ion energy (initial decrease followed by leveling off) and increasing ion fluence (initial decrease followed by an increase), but remained unaffected by increasing coating weight. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  8. Study of cerium diffusion in undoped lithium-6 enriched glass with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xzhang39@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Moore, Michael E.; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lukosi, Eric D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Hayward, Jason P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, TN 37996 (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Undoped lithium-6 enriched glasses coated with pure cerium (99.9%) with a gold protection layer on top were heated at three different temperatures (500, 550, and 600 °C) for varied durations (1, 2, and 4 h). Diffusion profiles of cerium in such glasses were obtained with the conventional Rutherford backscattering technique. Through fitting the diffusion profiles with the thin-film solution of Fick’s second law, diffusion coefficients of cerium with different annealing temperatures and durations were solved. Then, the activation energy of cerium for the diffusion process in the studied glasses was found to be 114 kJ/mol with the Arrhenius equation.

  9. Study of cerium diffusion in undoped lithium-6 enriched glass with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Moore, Michael E.; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lukosi, Eric D.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Undoped lithium-6 enriched glasses coated with pure cerium (99.9%) with a gold protection layer on top were heated at three different temperatures (500, 550, and 600 °C) for varied durations (1, 2, and 4 h). Diffusion profiles of cerium in such glasses were obtained with the conventional Rutherford backscattering technique. Through fitting the diffusion profiles with the thin-film solution of Fick's second law, diffusion coefficients of cerium with different annealing temperatures and durations were solved. Then, the activation energy of cerium for the diffusion process in the studied glasses was found to be 114 kJ/mol with the Arrhenius equation.

  10. Effect of Carbon Coating on Li4TiO12 of Anode Material for Hybrid Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Kyu; Lee, Byung-Gwan; Yoon, Jung-Rag

    2015-11-01

    The carbon-coated Li4Ti5O12 of anode material for hybrid capacitor was prepared by controlling carbonization time at 700 degrees C in nitrogen. With increasing of carbonization time, the discharge capacity and capacitance were decreased, while the equivalent series resistance was not changed remarkably. The rate capability and cycle performance of carbon-coated Li4Ti5O12 were larger than that of Li4Ti5O12. Carbon coating improved conductivity as well as Li-ion diffusion, and thus also resulted in good rate capabilities and cycle stability. The effects of carbon coating on the gas generation of hybrid capacitor were also discussed.

  11. Deposition and Characterization of TRISO Coating Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Min Woo; Lee, Hyeon Keun; Choi, Doo Jin; Kim, Jun Kyu; Cho, Sung Hyuk

    2008-03-01

    Both ZrC and SiC layers are crucial layers in TRISO coated fuel particles since they prevent diffusion of fission products and provide mechanical strength for the fuel particle. However, each layer has its own defects, so the purpose of this study is to complement such defects of these layers. In this study, we carried out thermodynamic simulations before actual experiments. With these simulation results, we deposited the ZrC layers on SiC/graphite substrates through CVD process. SiC films on graphite have different microstructures which are a hemispherical angular, domed top and faceted structure at different deposition temperature, respectively. According to the microstructures of SiC, preferred orientation, hardness and elastic modules of deposited ZrC layer were changed. TRISO particles. The fracture the SiC coating layer occurred by the tensile stress due to the traditional pressure vessel failure criteria. It is important to find fracture stress of SiC coating layer by the internal pressurization test method. The finite-element analysis was carried out to obtain the empirical equation of strength evaluation. By using this empirical equation, the mechanical properties of several types of SiC coating film with different microstructure and thicknesses will discussed

  12. Deposition and Characterization of TRISO Coating Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Min Woo; Lee, Hyeon Keun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Jin; Kim, Jun Kyu; Cho, Sung Hyuk [Younsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    Both ZrC and SiC layers are crucial layers in TRISO coated fuel particles since they prevent diffusion of fission products and provide mechanical strength for the fuel particle. However, each layer has its own defects, so the purpose of this study is to complement such defects of these layers. In this study, we carried out thermodynamic simulations before actual experiments. With these simulation results, we deposited the ZrC layers on SiC/graphite substrates through CVD process. SiC films on graphite have different microstructures which are a hemispherical angular, domed top and faceted structure at different deposition temperature, respectively. According to the microstructures of SiC, preferred orientation, hardness and elastic modules of deposited ZrC layer were changed. TRISO particles. The fracture the SiC coating layer occurred by the tensile stress due to the traditional pressure vessel failure criteria. It is important to find fracture stress of SiC coating layer by the internal pressurization test method. The finite-element analysis was carried out to obtain the empirical equation of strength evaluation. By using this empirical equation, the mechanical properties of several types of SiC coating film with different microstructure and thicknesses will discussed.

  13. Molybdeno-Aluminizing of Powder Metallurgy and Wrought Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys by Pack Cementation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsipas, Sophia A.; Gordo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Wear and high temperature oxidation resistance of some titanium-based alloys needs to be enhanced, and this can be effectively accomplished by surface treatment. Molybdenizing is a surface treatment where molybdenum is introduced into the surface of titanium alloys causing the formation of wear-resistant surface layers containing molybdenum, while aluminizing of titanium-based alloys has been reported to improve their high temperature oxidation properties. Whereas pack cementation and other surface modification methods have been used for molybdenizing or aluminizing of wrought and/or cast pure titanium and titanium alloys, such surface treatments have not been reported on titanium alloys produced by powder metallurgy (PM). Also a critical understanding of the process parameters for simultaneous one step molybdeno-aluminizing of titanium alloys by pack cementation and the predominant mechanism for this process have not been reported. The current research work describes the surface modification of titanium and Ti-6Al-4V prepared by PM by molybdeno-aluminizing and analyzes thermodynamic aspects of the deposition process. Similar coatings are also deposited to wrought Ti-6Al-4V and compared. Characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. For both titanium and Ti-6Al-4V, the use of a powder pack containing ammonium chloride as activator leads to the deposition of molybdenum and aluminium into the surface but also introduces nitrogen causing the formation of a thin titanium nitride layer. In addition, various titanium aluminides and mixed titanium aluminium nitrides are formed. The appropriate conditions for molybdeno-aluminizing as well as the phases expected to be formed were successfully determined by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. - Highlights: •Simultaneous co-deposition of Mo-Al onto powder metallurgy and wrought Ti alloy •Thermodynamic calculations were used to optimize deposition conditions

  14. Molybdeno-Aluminizing of Powder Metallurgy and Wrought Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloys by Pack Cementation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsipas, Sophia A., E-mail: stsipas@ing.uc3m.es; Gordo, Elena

    2016-08-15

    Wear and high temperature oxidation resistance of some titanium-based alloys needs to be enhanced, and this can be effectively accomplished by surface treatment. Molybdenizing is a surface treatment where molybdenum is introduced into the surface of titanium alloys causing the formation of wear-resistant surface layers containing molybdenum, while aluminizing of titanium-based alloys has been reported to improve their high temperature oxidation properties. Whereas pack cementation and other surface modification methods have been used for molybdenizing or aluminizing of wrought and/or cast pure titanium and titanium alloys, such surface treatments have not been reported on titanium alloys produced by powder metallurgy (PM). Also a critical understanding of the process parameters for simultaneous one step molybdeno-aluminizing of titanium alloys by pack cementation and the predominant mechanism for this process have not been reported. The current research work describes the surface modification of titanium and Ti-6Al-4V prepared by PM by molybdeno-aluminizing and analyzes thermodynamic aspects of the deposition process. Similar coatings are also deposited to wrought Ti-6Al-4V and compared. Characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. For both titanium and Ti-6Al-4V, the use of a powder pack containing ammonium chloride as activator leads to the deposition of molybdenum and aluminium into the surface but also introduces nitrogen causing the formation of a thin titanium nitride layer. In addition, various titanium aluminides and mixed titanium aluminium nitrides are formed. The appropriate conditions for molybdeno-aluminizing as well as the phases expected to be formed were successfully determined by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. - Highlights: •Simultaneous co-deposition of Mo-Al onto powder metallurgy and wrought Ti alloy •Thermodynamic calculations were used to optimize deposition conditions

  15. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2--2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni 5 Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results

  16. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Materials Engineering Dept.

    1997-06-05

    Iron-aluminum alloys with 28 at.% Al and 5 at.% Cr were shown to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement by exposure to both gaseous hydrogen and water vapor. This study examined the effect of the addition of zirconium and carbon on the moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement of an Fe{sub 3}Al,Cr alloy through the evaluation of tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance in hydrogen gas and moisture-bearing air. Susceptibility to embrittlement was found to vary with the zirconium content while the carbon addition was found to only affect the fracture toughness. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness, as measured in an inert environment, was found to increase with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. The combined addition of 0.5 at.% Zr and carbon only increased the fracture toughness. The addition of 1 at.% Zr and carbon was found to have no effect on the crack growth rate when compared to the base alloy. Susceptibility to embrittlement in moisture-bearing environments was found to decrease with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. In gaseous hydrogen, the threshold value of the Zr-containing alloys was found to increase above that found in the inert environment while the crack growth resistance was much lower. By varying the frequency of fatigue loading, it was shown that the corrosion fatigue component of the fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment displays a frequency dependence. Hydrogen transport in iron aluminides was shown to occur primarily by a dislocation-assisted transport mechanism. This mechanism, in conjunction with fractography, indicates that the zirconium-containing precipitates act as traps for the hydrogen that is carried along by the dislocations through the lattice.

  17. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Assisted Electrodeposition of Silver Dendrite Coating as a Catalytic Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT-coated indium tin oxide (ITO slide was used as a platform for the growth of a silver dendrite (Ag-D film using cyclic voltammetry. The particular dendritic nanostructures were formed by the diffusion-limited-aggregation model due to the potential difference between the MWCNTs and the ITO surface. The Ag-D-coated ITO film was then used for the catalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO and methylene blue (MB under static aqueous conditions. The network structure of the Ag-D allows the efficient diffusion of MO and MB, and consequently enhances the catalytic performance. Since the thin film is much easier to use for the post-treatment of powder catalysts, the proposed method shows great potential in many catalytic applications.

  18. Coating system to permit direct brazing of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadden, Charles H.; Hosking, F. Michael

    2003-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a ceramic component that enables direct brazing using a non-active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a ceramic component to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by using this brazing method. The ceramic can be high purity alumina. The method comprises applying a first coating of a silicon-bearing oxide material (e.g. silicon dioxide or mullite (3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.2SiO.sub.2) to the ceramic. Next, a thin coating of active metal (e.g. Ti or V) is applied. Finally, a thicker coating of a non-active metal (e.g. Au or Cu) is applied. The coatings can be applied by physical vapor deposition (PVD). Alternatively, the active and non-active metals can be co-deposited (e.g. by sputtering a target made of mullite). After all of the coatings have been applied, the ceramic can be fired at a high temperature in a non-oxidizing environment to promote diffusion, and to enhance bonding of the coatings to the substrate. After firing, the metallized ceramic component can be brazed to other components using a conventional non-active braze alloy. Alternatively, the firing and brazing steps can be combined into a single step. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  19. Enhanced propellant performance via environmentally friendly curable surface coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface coating of granular propellants is widely used in a multiplicity of propellants for small, medium and large caliber ammunition. All small caliber ball propellants exhibit burning progressivity due to application of effective deterrent coatings. Large perforated propellant grains have also begun utilizing plasticizing and impregnated deterrent coatings with the purpose of increasing charge weights for greater energy and velocity for the projectile. The deterrent coating and impregnation process utilizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs which results in propellants that need to be forced air dried which impacts air quality. Propellants undergo temperature fluctuations during their life. Diffusion coefficients vary exponentially with variations in temperature. A small temperature increase can induce a faster migration, even over a short period of time, which can lead to large deviations in the concentration. This large concentration change in the ammunition becomes a safety or performance liability. The presence of both polymeric deterrents and nitroglycerin(NG in the nitrocellulose matrix and organic solvents leads to higher diffusion rates. This results in continued emissions of VOCs and HAPs. Conventional polymers tend to partition within the propellant matrix. In other words, localized mixing can occur between the polymer and underlying propellant. This is due to solvent induced softening of the polymer vehicle over the propellant grain. In effect this creates a path where migration can occur. Since nitrate esters, like NG, are relatively small, it can exude to the surface and create a highly unstable and dangerous situation for the warfighter. Curable polymers do not suffer from this partitioning due to “melting” because no VOC solvents are present. They remain surface coated. The small scale characterization testing, such as closed bomb testing, small scale sensitivity, thermal stability, and

  20. Iron oxide coating films in soda-lime glass by triboadhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, J. O.; Arjona, M. J. [Boulevard Bahia s/n esq. Ignacio Comonfort, Chetumal (Mexico); Rodriguez-Lelis, J. M. [Interior Internado Palmira s/n, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-04-15

    In the triboadhesion process the coating material is passed through a rotating cotton mop and the substrate to be coated. The cotton mop rotates at high velocity and exerts pressure on the surface of the substrate. The combined effect of pressure and velocity of the coating mop on the substrate increases its temperature close to the melting point, allowing deposition and diffusion of the coating material within the substrate. After it is deposited, its particles are embedded within the base material forming a thin film composite. The amount of the coating material deposited on the substrate has its maximum at the surface and then decreases as a function of the local temperature within the base material. Bearing this in mind, in the present work, triboadhesion is employed to deposit iron oxide in a substrate of soda-lime glass, with the purpose of determining the feasibility of using this technique for solar control coatings. It was found, through electronic scan microscopy, that a composite material film is formed following the coating direction. Reflectance and transmittance tests were carried out on the glass samples. A 20% difference was found in the visible spectral region (VIS), and a reduction between 10 and 20% in the Near Infrared Region (NIR). These results showed that the triboadhesion is a promising technique for the application of thin films for solar control or solar cells

  1. Iron oxide coating films in soda-lime glass by triboadhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, J. O.; Arjona, M. J.; Rodriguez-Lelis, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    In the triboadhesion process the coating material is passed through a rotating cotton mop and the substrate to be coated. The cotton mop rotates at high velocity and exerts pressure on the surface of the substrate. The combined effect of pressure and velocity of the coating mop on the substrate increases its temperature close to the melting point, allowing deposition and diffusion of the coating material within the substrate. After it is deposited, its particles are embedded within the base material forming a thin film composite. The amount of the coating material deposited on the substrate has its maximum at the surface and then decreases as a function of the local temperature within the base material. Bearing this in mind, in the present work, triboadhesion is employed to deposit iron oxide in a substrate of soda-lime glass, with the purpose of determining the feasibility of using this technique for solar control coatings. It was found, through electronic scan microscopy, that a composite material film is formed following the coating direction. Reflectance and transmittance tests were carried out on the glass samples. A 20% difference was found in the visible spectral region (VIS), and a reduction between 10 and 20% in the Near Infrared Region (NIR). These results showed that the triboadhesion is a promising technique for the application of thin films for solar control or solar cells

  2. Failure Mechanism of a Stellite Coating on Heat-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhao, Haixing; Wang, Huang; Li, Yuyan; Liu, Xia; He, Guo

    2017-09-01

    The Stellite 21 coating on the heat-resistant steel X12CrMoWVNbN10-1-1 (so-called COSTE) used in a steam turbine valve was found to be fatigue broken after service at around 873 K (600 °C) for about 8 years. In order to investigate the failure mechanism, a fresh Stellite 21 coating was also prepared on the same COSTE steel substrate by using the similar deposition parameters for comparison. It was found that the Stellite 21 coating was significantly diluted by the steel, resulting in a thin Fe-rich layer in the coating close to the fusion line. Such high Fe concentration together with the incessant Fe diffusion from the steel substrate to the coating during the service condition (about 873 K (600 °C) for long time) induced the eutectoid decomposition of the fcc α-Co(Fe,Cr,Mo) solid solution, forming an irregular eutectoid microstructure that was composed of the primitive cubic α'-FeCo(Cr,Mo) phase and the tetragonal σ-CrCo(Fe,Mo) phase. The brittle nature of such α'/ σ eutectoid microstructure contributed to the fatigue fracture of the Stellite 21 coating, resulting in an intergranular rupture mode.

  3. High-temperature resistant MeCrAlY+Al coatings obtained by ARC-PVD method on Ni Base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swadzba, L.; Maciejny, A.; Mendala, B.; Supernak, W.

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of obtaining high temperature coatings on the Ni base superalloys by the ARC-PVD method, using exothermic reaction processes between Ni and Al with NiAl intermetallic formation are presented in the article. By the diffusion heating at 1050 o C NiAl high temperature diffusion coating containing 21% at. Al and 50 μm thick was obtained. In the next stage coatings with more complex chemical composition NiCoCrAlY were formed. The two targets were applied for formation of complex NiCoCrAlY coatings. The good consistence between the chemical composition of the targets and the coatings and an uniform distribution of elements in the coatings were shown. Then the surface was covered with aluminium also by the ARC-PVD method. In the vacuum chamber of the equipment a synthesis reaction between NiCoCrAlY and Al with the formation NiAl intermetallics of high Co, Cr, Y content was initiated by the changes in process parameters. The final heat treatment of coatings was conducted in the air and vacuum at 1050 o C. The strong segregation of yttrium in to the oxide scale in the specimens heated in the air was shown. It was possible to obtain NiAl intermetallic phase coatings modified by Co, Cr and Y by the ARC-PVD method. An example of the application of this method for the aircraft engine turbine blades was presented. Method of ARC-PVD gives the possibility chemical composition and high resistance to oxidizing and hot corrosion. (author)

  4. A study of strontium doped calcium phosphate coatings on AZ31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Satish S.; Roy, Abhijit; Lee, Boeun E.; Ohodnicki, John; Loghmanian, Autrine; Banerjee, Ipsita; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings have been studied to tailor the uncontrolled non-uniform corrosion of Mg based alloys while simultaneously enhancing bioactivity. The use of immersion techniques to deposit CaP coatings is attractive due to the ability of the approach to coat complex structures. In the current study, AZ31 substrates were subjected to various pretreatment conditions prior to depositing Sr 2+ doped and undoped CaP coatings. It was hypothesized that the bioactivity and corrosion protection of CaP coatings could be improved by doping with Sr 2+ . Heat treatment to elevated temperatures resulted in the diffusion of alloying elements, Mg and Zn, into the pretreated layer. Sr 2+ doped and undoped CaP coatings formed on the pretreated substrates consisted of biphasic mixtures of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA). Electrochemical corrosion experiments indicated that the extent of Sr 2+ doping and pretreatment both influenced the corrosion protection. Cytotoxicity was evaluated with MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). For both cell types, proliferation decreased upon increasing the Sr 2+ concentration. However, both osteogenic gene and protein expression significantly increased upon increasing Sr 2+ concentration. These results suggest that Sr 2+ doped coatings are capable of promoting osteogenic differentiation on degradable Mg alloys, while also enhancing corrosion protection, in comparison to undoped CaP coatings

  5. Fluidized bed deposition and evaluation of silicon carbide coatings on microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federer, J.I.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel element for the HTGR is an array of closely packed fuel microspheres in a carbonaceous matrix. A coating of dense silicon carbide (SiC), along with pyrocarbon layers, is deposited on the fueled microspheres to serve as a barrier against diffusion of fission products. The microspheres are coated with silicon carbide in a fluidized bed by reaction of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 or MTS) and hydrogen at elevated temperatures. The principal variables of coating temperature and reactant gas composition (H 2 /MTS ratio) have been correlated with coating rate, morphology, stoichiometry, microstructure, and density. The optimum temperature for depositing highly dense coatings is in the range 1475 to 1675 0 C. Lower temperatures result in silicon-rich deposits, while higher temperatures may cause unacceptable porosity. The optimum H 2 /MTS ratio for highly dense coatings is 20 or more (approximately 5% MTS or less). The amount of grown-in porosity increases as the H 2 /MTS ratio decreases below 20. The requirement that the H 2 /MTS ratio be about 20 or more imposes a practical restraint on coating rate, since increasing the total flow rate would eventually expel microspheres from the coating tube. Evaluation of stoichiometry, morphology, and microstructure support the above mentioned optimum conditions of temperature and reactant gas composition. 18 figures, 3 tables

  6. Microstructural and electrical characterization of Mn-Co spinel protective coatings for solid oxide cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, S.; Sabato, A. G.; Bindi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition, thermal co-evaporation and RF magnetron sputtering methods are used for the preparation of Mn-Co based ceramic coatings for solid oxide fuel cell steel interconnects. Both thin and relatively thick coatings (1–15 μm) are prepared and characterised for their potential...... protective behaviour. Mn-Co coated Crofer22APU samples are electrically tested for 5000 h at 800 °C under a 500 mA cm−2 current load to determine their Area Specific Resistance increase due to a growing chromia scale. After tests, samples are analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy....... Analysis is focused on the potential chromium diffusion to or through the coating, the oxide scale thickness and possible reactions at the interfaces. The relationships between the coating type, thickness and effectiveness are reviewed and discussed. Out of the three Mn-Co coatings compared in this study...

  7. A photo-tunable membrane based on inter-particle crosslinking for decreasing diffusion rates

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song; Moosa, Basem; Chen, Ye; Li, Wengang; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    %. To prove the applicability of the designed system, the composite membrane was coated on a model drug reservoir tablet. Upon irradiating the tablet with UV light, the original permeability decreased by 57%, and consequently the diffusion rate of the cargo

  8. Characterization of Ta–Si–N coatings prepared using direct current magnetron co-sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yung-I, E-mail: yichen@mail.ntou.edu.tw; Lin, Kun-Yi; Wang, Hsiu-Hui; Cheng, Yu-Ru

    2014-06-01

    Ta–Si–N coatings were prepared using reactive direct current magnetron co-sputtering on silicon substrates. When the sputtering powers and N{sub 2} flow ratio were varied, Ta–Si–N coatings exhibited various chemical compositions and crystalline characteristics. The high-Si-content Ta–Si–N coatings exhibited an amorphous phase in the as-deposited states, whereas the low-Si-content coatings exhibited a face-centered cubic phase or an amorphous phase depending on the N content. This study evaluated the application of amorphous Ta–Si–N coatings, such as the protective coatings on glass molding dies, in high-temperature and oxygen-containing atmospheres for longed operation durations. To explore the oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of the Ta–Si–N coatings, annealing treatments were conducted in a 1%O{sub 2}–99%Ar atmosphere at 600 °C for 4–100 h. The material characteristics and oxidation behavior of the annealed Ta–Si–N coatings were examined using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and a nanoindentation tester. The Si oxidized preferentially in the Ta–Si–N coatings. The in-diffusion of oxygen during 600 °C annealing was restricted by the formation of an amorphous oxide scale consisting of Si and O.

  9. Preparation and voltammetric characterization of electrodes coated with Langmuir-Schaefer ultrathin films of Nafion®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertoncello Paolo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrathin films of Nafion® perfluorinated polymer were deposited on indium-tin oxide electrodes (ITO by using Langmuir-Schaefer (LS technique, after optimization of the subphase composition conditions. Morphological characteristics of these coatings were obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Nafion® LS films showed a good uniformity and complete coverage of the electrode surface, however a different organization degree of the polymer layer was evidenced with respect to thin films deposited by spin-coating. ITO electrodes modified with Nafion® LS coatings preconcentrate by ion-exchange electroactive cations, such as Ru[(NH36]3+, dissolved in diluted solutions. The electroactive species is retained by the Nafion® LS coated ITO also after transfer of the modified electrode into pure supporting electrolyte. This allowed the use of the ruthenium complex as voltammetric probe to test diffusion phenomena within the Nafion® LS films. Apparent diffusion coefficients (Dapp of Ru[(NH36]3+ incorporated in Nafion® LS films were obtained by voltammetric measurements. Dapp values decrease slightly by increasing the amount of ruthenium complex incorporated in the ultrathin film. They are significantly lower than values typical for recasted Nafion® films, in agreement with the highly condensed nature of the Nafion® LS fims.

  10. Oxidative Attack of Carbon/Carbon Substrates through Coating Pinholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Leonhardt, Todd; Curry, Donald; Rapp, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    A critical issue with oxidation protected carbon/carbon composites used for spacecraft thermal protection is the formation of coating pinholes. In laboratory experiments, artificial pinholes were drilled through SiC-coatings on a carbon/carbon material and the material was oxidized at 600, 1000, and 1400 C at reduced pressures of air. The attack of the carbon/carbon was quantified by both weight loss and a novel cross-sectioning technique. A two-zone, one dimensional diffusion control model was adapted to analyze this problem. Agreement of the model with experiment was reasonable at 1000 and 1400 C; however results at lower temperatures show clear deviations from the theory suggesting that surface reaction control plays a role.

  11. Anti-listerial activity of a polymeric film coated with hybrid coatings doped with Enterocin 416K1 for use as bioactive food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseppi, Ramona; Pilati, Francesco; Marini, Michele; Toselli, Maurizio; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Guerrieri, Elisa; Messi, Patrizia; Sabia, Carla; Manicardi, Giuliano; Anacarso, Immacolata; Bondi, Moreno

    2008-04-30

    In this study, Enterocin 416K1, a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus casseliflavus IM 416K1, was entrapped in an organic-inorganic hybrid coating applied to a LDPE (low-density polyethylene) film for its potential use in the active food packaging field. The antibacterial activity of the coated film was evaluated against Listeria monocytogenes NCTC 10888 by qualitative modified agar diffusion assay, quantitative determination in listeria saline solution suspension and direct contact with artificially contaminated food samples (frankfurters and fresh cheeses) stored at room and refrigeration temperatures. All investigations demonstrated that enterocin-activated coatings have a good anti-listeria activity. Qualitative tests showed a clear zone of inhibition in the indicator lawn in contact with and around the coated film. During the quantitative antibacterial evaluation the L. monocytogenes viable counts decreased to 1.5 log units compared to the control. The inhibitory capability was confirmed also in food-contact assays. In all food samples packed with coated films we observed a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes viable counts in the first 24 h compared to the control. This difference was generally maintained up to the seventh day and then decreased, with the exception of the cheese samples stored at refrigeration temperature.

  12. Application of Molecular Adsorber Coatings in Chamber A for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2017-01-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground-based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This presentation describes the application of the MAC technology for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone-based diffusion pump oil, from within JSCs cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This presentation summarizes the background, fabrication, installation, chemical analysis test results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination. As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground-based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This presentation describes the application of the MAC technology for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone-based diffusion pump oil, from within JSCs cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test

  13. The free growth criterion for grain initiation in TiB 2 inoculated γ-titanium aluminide based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosslar, D.; Günther, R.

    2014-02-01

    γ-titanium aluminide (γ-TiAl) based alloys enable for the design of light-weight and high-temperature resistant engine components. This work centers on a numerical study of the condition for grain initiation during solidification of TiB2 inoculated γ-TiAl based alloys. Grain initiation is treated according to the so-called free growth criterion. This means that the free growth barrier for grain initiation is determined by the maximum interfacial mean curvature between a nucleus and the melt. The strategy presented in this paper relies on iteratively increasing the volume of a nucleus, which partially wets a hexagonal TiB2 crystal, minimizing the interfacial energy and calculating the corresponding interfacial curvature. The hereby obtained maximum curvature yields a scaling relation between the size of TiB2 crystals and the free growth barrier. Comparison to a prototypical TiB2 crystal in an as cast γ-TiAl based alloy allowed then to predict the free growth barrier prevailing under experimental conditions. The validity of the free growth criterion is discussed by an interfacial energy criterion.

  14. Antithrombogenicity of Fluorinated Diamond-Like Carbon Films Coated Nano Porous Polyethersulfone (PES) Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihandana, Gunawan S.; Sanada, Ippei; Ito, Hikaru; Noborisaka, Mayui; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Miki, Norihisa

    2013-01-01

    A nano porous polyethersulfone (PES) membrane is widely used for aspects of nanofiltration, such as purification, fractionation and dialysis. However, the low-blood-compatibility characteristic of PES membrane causes platelets and blood cells to stick to the surface of the membrane and degrades ions diffusion through membrane, which further limits its application for dialysis systems. In this study, we deposited the fluorinated-diamond-like-carbon (F-DLC) onto the finger like structure layer of the PES membrane. By doing this, we have the F-DLC films coating the membrane surface without sacrificing the membrane permeability. In addition, we examined antithrombogenicity of the F-DLC/PES membranes using a microfluidic device, and experimentally found that F-DLC drastically reduced the amount of blood cells attached to the surface. We have also conducted long-term experiments for 24 days and the diffusion characteristics were found to be deteriorated due to fouling without any surface modification. On the other hand, the membranes coated by F-DLC film gave a consistent diffusion coefficient of ions transfer through a membrane porous. Therefore, F-DLC films can be a great candidate to improve the antithrombogenic characteristics of the membrane surfaces in hemodialysis systems. PMID:28788333

  15. Characteristics and defluoridation performance of granular activated carbons coated with manganese oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yue; Wang Shuguang; Fan Maohong; Gong Wenxin; Gao Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    Using a redox process, granular activated carbon (GAC) was coated with manganese oxides to enhance its ability to adsorb fluoride from an aqueous solution. Compared with plain GAC, the fluoride adsorption capacity of this new adsorbent was improved and at least three times greater than that of uncoated GAC. The surface characteristics of coated GAC were observed with scanning electron microscopy. The surface area of the new adsorbent was calculated using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. X-ray diffraction revealed that manganese oxides are amorphous. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that manganese existed primarily in the oxidation state +IV. Kinetic and equilibrium adsorption data showed that the adsorption process follows the pseudo-second order kinetic and Freundlich equation models. The sorption data also indicated that the removal of fluoride by adsorption is a highly complex process, involving both boundary layer diffusion and intra-particle diffusion. The pH value of solution influences fluoride removal, and the optimum equilibrium pH value of fluoride adsorption is 3.0.

  16. A study for preparation of Ti-Fe coating by high temperature sintering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yonghai

    1995-03-01

    A new technology for preparation of Ti-Fe alloy coating on the steel substrate was investigated by high temperature sintering method. The pulp of titanium hydride powder was coated on the cleaned steel substrate, then heated in vacuum for desorption of hydrogen and sintered at high temperature in argon atmosphere for forming Ti-Fe alloy coating. The electron probe analysis shows a strong coherent diffusion layer formed between the elements of titanium and iron. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the coating consists of α-Ti, TiFe and TiFe 2 three phases. The wear resistance of the coating is twice as large as that of grey cast iron and the hardness determined can reach 7300∼7800 N/mm 2 . The coating is almost porous free. The corrosion potential increases with the time and the corrosion resistance is near to that of pure titanium. The working life of ridge-type diaphragm valve coated by Ti-Fe alloy for carbonization tower of alkali factories is five times higher than that of valve made of grey cast iron. Therefore, this new technology can be widely used in metallurgical, chemical and nuclear industries. (9 figs., 10 tabs.)

  17. Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development: palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom

    2012-01-01

    We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without t