WorldWideScience

Sample records for diffuse nitrogen loadings

  1. Nitrogen diffusion in zirconium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmaison, J.G.; Smeltzer, W.W.

    1977-01-01

    Nitrogen diffusion in polycrystalline ZrN/sub 0.71-0.79/ spheres, 60 and 90 μm diameter, was studied by the gas-solid exchange technique using 15 N as a tracer at a nitrogen pressure of 220 torr and 1000 to 1200 0 C. These specimens were characterized by chemical analyses, density, lattice parameter, and structural measurements. The tracer diffusion coefficient can be expressed as D* (cm 2 /S) = 3.0 x 10 -10 exp (-23,000/RT). This result, when compared to a previous determination obtained in the same conditions with 254 μm thick plates, confirms that nitrogen transport in this polycrystalline solid at temperatures less than 1200 0 C is associated with a short-circuit diffusion mechanism

  2. Molecular diffusion in monolayer and submonolayer nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    2001-01-01

    The orientational and translational motions in a monolayer fluid of physisorbed molecular nitrogen are treated using molecular dynamics simulations. Dynamical response functions and several approximations to the coefficient of translational diffusion are determined for adsorption on the basal plane...

  3. Diffusion Indexes with Sparse Loadings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    The use of large-dimensional factor models in forecasting has received much attention in the literature with the consensus being that improvements on forecasts can be achieved when comparing with standard models. However, recent contributions in the literature have demonstrated that care needs...... to the problem by using the LASSO as a variable selection method to choose between the possible variables and thus obtain sparse loadings from which factors or diffusion indexes can be formed. This allows us to build a more parsimonious factor model which is better suited for forecasting compared...... it to be an important alternative to PC....

  4. Forest fuel reduces the nitrogen load - calculations of nitrogen flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstroem, F.; Johansson, Jan.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen deposition in Sweden has increased strongly during recent decades, particularly in southern Sweden. Nitrogen appears to be largely accumulated in biomass and in the soil. It is therefore desirable to check the accumulation of nitrogen in the forest. The most suitable way of doing this is to remove more nitrogen-rich biomass from the forest, i.e., increase the removal of felling residues from final fellings and cleanings. An ecological condition for intensive removal of fuel is that the ashes are returned. The critical load for nitrogen, CL(N), indicates the level of nitrogen deposition that the forest can withstand without leading to ecological changes. Today, nitrogen deposition is higher than the CL(N) in almost all of Sweden. CL(N) is calculated in such a manner that nitrogen deposition should largely be balanced by nitrogen losses through harvesting during a forest rotation. The value of CL(N) thus largely depends on how much nitrogen is removed with the harvested biomass. When both stems and felling residues are harvested, the CL(N) is about three times higher than in conventional forestry. The increase is directly related to the amount of nitrogen in the removed biofuel. Use of biofuel also causes a certain amount of nitrogen emissions. From the environmental viewpoint there is no difference between the sources of the nitrogen compounds. An analysis of the entire fuel chain shows that, compared with the amount of nitrogen removed from the forest with the fuel, about 5 % will be emitted as nitrogen oxides or ammonia during combustion, and a further ca 5 % during handling and transports. A net amount of about 90 % of biomass nitrogen is removed from the system and becomes inert nitrogen (N 2 ). 60 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs, 11 appendices

  5. Diffusion Indexes With Sparse Loadings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    2017-01-01

    The use of large-dimensional factor models in forecasting has received much attention in the literature with the consensus being that improvements on forecasts can be achieved when comparing with standard models. However, recent contributions in the literature have demonstrated that care needs...... to the problem by using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) as a variable selection method to choose between the possible variables and thus obtain sparse loadings from which factors or diffusion indexes can be formed. This allows us to build a more parsimonious factor model...... in forecasting accuracy and thus find it to be an important alternative to PC. Supplementary materials for this article are available online....

  6. Forest fuel reduces the nitrogen load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundborg, A.

    1993-03-01

    A study of the literature was made on the basis of the following hypothesis: ''If nitrogen-rich felling residues are removed from the forest, the nitrogen load on the forest ecosystem is decreased and the risk of nitrogen saturation also decreases''. The study was designed to provide information on how the nitrogen situation is influenced if felling residues are removed from nitrogen-loaded forests and used as fuel. Felling residues release very little nitrogen during the first years after felling. They can immobilize nitrogen from the surroundings, make up a considerable addition to the nitrogen store in the soil, but also release nitrogen in later stages of degradation. The slash has an influence on the soil climate and thus on soil processes. Often there is an increase in the mineralization of litter and humus below the felling residues. At the same time, nitrification is favoured, particularly if the slash is left in heaps. Felling residues contain easily soluble nutrients that stimulate the metabolization of organic matter that otherwise is rather resistant to degradation. The slash also inhibits the clear-cut vegetation and its uptake of nitrogen. These effects result in increased leaching of nitrogen and minerals if the felling residues are left on the site. (99 refs.)

  7. [Temporal-spatial distribution of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution and relationship with soil respiration and nitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ouyang; Cai, Guan-Qing; Huang, Hao-Bo; Geng, Xiao-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes play an important role on soil nitrogen transformation and diffuse nitrogen loading. These processes are also the chains for soil circle. In this study, the Zhegao watershed located north of Chaohu Lake was selected to explore the interactions of these processes with diffuse nitrogen pollution. The BaPS (Barometric Process Separation) was applied to analyze the soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes in farmland and forest. The SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) simulated the temporal and spatial pattern of diffuse nitrogen loading. As the expanding of farmland and higher level of fertilization, the yearly mean loading of diffuse nitrogen increased sustainably from 1980-1995 to 1996-2012. The monthly loading in 1996-2012 was also higher than that in the period of 1980-1995, which closely related to the precipitation. The statistical analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between two periods. The yearly averaged loading of the whole watershed in 1996-2012 was 10.40 kg x hm(-2), which was 8.10 kg x hm(-2) in 1980-1995. The variance analysis demonstrated that there was also a big difference between the spatial distributions of two periods. The forest soil had much higher soil respiration than the farmland soil. But the farmland had higher nitrification and denitrification rates. The more intensive nitrogen transformation in the farmland contributed to the less diffuse nitrogen loading. As the nitrification rate of farmland was higher than denitrification rate, agricultural diffuse nitrate nitrogen loading would increase and organic nitrogen loading would reduce. The analysis of soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification is helpful for the study of soil nitrogen circle form the aspect of soil biology, which also benefits the control of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution.

  8. Spectroscopic Investigation of Nitrogen Loaded ECR Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ullmann, F; Zschornack, G; Küchler, D; Ovsyannikov, V P

    1999-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy on ions in the plasma and magnetic q/A-analysis of the extracted ions were used to determine the plasmaproperties of nitrogen loaded ECR plasmas.As the beam expands from a limited plasma region and the ion extraction process alters the plasma properties in the extraction meniscus thebeam composition does not correspond to the bulk plasma composition. The analysis of measured spectra of characteristic X-rays delivers a method to determine the ion charge state distribution and the electron energy distribution inside the plasma and does not alter the plasma anddoes not depend on the extraction and transmission properties of the ion extraction and transport system. Hence this method seems to be moreaccurate than the traditional magnetic analysis and allows to analyse different plasma regions.A comparison between ion charge state distributions determined from X-ray spectra and such from q/A-analysis shows significant differencesfor the mean ion charge states in the source plasm...

  9. Prediction of future nitrogen loading to Lake Rotorua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, U.; Gordon, D.

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater that feeds streams and springs in the Lake Rotorua catchment has 15-130 years mean residence times in the aquifer. These long residence times of the water in the ground result in large time-delays of nitrogen loading from historical agricultural and urban development in the catchment. Currently observed increases in nitrogen loading in surface and groundwater are mostly due to the delayed impact of catchment development that occurred around 55 years ago. Further increases in nitrogen are expected. The time-dependence of the arrival of water to the lake that was recharged since landuse development in the 1950's was calculated using the age distribution of the water derived from tritium, CFC and SF 6 data. The arrival of post-landuse water over time was then used to estimate the nitrogen load to the lake for the time prior to landuse development, for the time since then, and for the future. Excellent matches between measured N loads over the last decades and predicted loads demonstrate the robustness of the approach, and that the model assumptions used for future predictions are reasonable. Future groundwater-derived nutrient loads are listed below. No changes are expected in phosphorus loads via groundwater as long as landuse-derived P continues to be absorbed by the volcanic soils in the catchment. The nitrogen loading to Lake Rotorua prior to major landuse development in the catchment in the 1950's was calculated to be 60 t/year. This has slowly increased to a present nitrogen load of 420 t/y, delayed by long travel times of the groundwater. The nitrogen loading is expected to further increase to 532 t/y in 50 years (25% increase from current), 572 t/y in 100 years (35% increase from current), and to 619 t/y at steady-state (47% increase from current). About 75% of the groundwater-derived nitrogen loading at steady-state enters Lake Rotorua via the nine major streams, and about 20% enters the lake from direct groundwater inflow to the lake bed. The

  10. Estimating Nitrogen Load Resulting from Biofuel Mandates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawaf, Mohammad; Douglas, Ellen; Ricciardi, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 were enacted to reduce the U.S. dependency on foreign oil by increasing the use of biofuels. The increased demand for biofuels from corn and soybeans could result in an increase of nitrogen flux if not managed properly. The objectives of this study are to estimate nitrogen flux from energy crop production and to identify the catchment areas with high nitrogen flux. The results show that biofuel production can result in an increase of nitrogen flux to the northern Gulf of Mexico from 270 to 1742 thousand metric tons. Using all cellulosic (hay) ethanol or biodiesel to meet the 2022 mandate is expected to reduce nitrogen flux; however, it requires approximately 25% more land when compared to other scenarios. Producing ethanol from switchgrass rather than hay results in three-times more nitrogen flux, but requires 43% less land. Using corn ethanol for 2022 mandates is expected to have double the nitrogen flux when compared to the EISA-specified 2022 scenario; however, it will require less land area. Shifting the U.S. energy supply from foreign oil to the Midwest cannot occur without economic and environmental impacts, which could potentially lead to more eutrophication and hypoxia. PMID:27171101

  11. Trends in nitrogen concentrations and load in 48 minor streams draining intensively farmed Danish catchments, 1990-2014. How can the observed trend be explained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windolf, Jørgen; Børgesen, Christen; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Kronvang, Brian; Larsen, Søren E.; Tornbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The total land-based nitrogen load to Danish coastal waters has decreased by 50% since 1990 through a reduction of the outlet of nitrogen from sewage point sources and diffuse sources. On a national scale nitrogen load from diffuse sources, has been reduced by 43% , mainly due to limitation of the amount of N input to different crops, rules for timing and application of manure, mandatory demands for catch crops and restoration of wetlands. The latter increasing the nitrogen retention capacity in surface waters. However, on a local scale huge variations exist in the reduction of the diffuse nitrogen load. Since 1990, an important part of the Danish national monitoring program on the aquatic environment (NOVANA) has been directed at quantifying the nitrogen concentrations and load in 48 minor streams draining small intensively farmed catchments. The 48 catchments have a mean size of 18 km2, farmed area constitutes more than 60% of the catchment area and the catchments have no significant outlets of sewage to the streams. The statistical trend results (based on a seasonal Mann-Kendall) from these 48 streams show a 9-65% reduction in the diffuse nitrogen load (mean: 48%). The large differences in trends in the diffuse N load are related to differences in catchment-specific variables such as nitrogen surpluses, nitrogen leaching from the root zone, hydrogeology and nitrogen retention in ground and surface waters.

  12. Oxygen and nitrogen diffusion in coal-molecular sieve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Doina Maria

    1996-01-01

    Recently, the air separation process based on selective adsorption of carbon-molecular sieves has been developed strongly. The separation is based on the system kinematics and depends on the oxygen diffusion in adsorber micropores. The oxygen is preferentially adsorbed and in given conditions it is possible to obtain nitrogen of high purity. Recent theoretical and experimental studies concerning the production of nitrogen by PSA process have shown that the obtained performances can not be described by a constant diffusion model. The paper present the 'dual' model assumed for O 2 and N 2 diffusion through molecular sieve as well as the experimental data obtained in the adsorption study on carbon material produced at ICIS to determine the diffusivity values in micropores

  13. Macrophyte Community Response to Nitrogen Loading and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empirical determination of nutrient loading thresholds that negatively impact seagrass communities have been elusive due to the multitude of factors involved. Using a mesocosm system that simulated Pacific Northwest estuaries, we evaluated macrophyte metrics across gradients of NO3 loading (0, 1.5, 3 and 6x ambient) and temperature (10 and 20 °C). Macroalgal growth, biomass, and C:N responded positively to increased NO3 load and floating algal mats developed at 20 ºC. Zostera japonica metrics, including C:N, responded more to temperature than to NO3 loading. Z. marina biomass exhibited a negative temperature effect and in some cases a negative NO3 effect, while growth rate increased with temperature. Shoot survival decreased at 20 ºC but was not influenced by NO3 loading. Wasting disease index exhibited a significant temperature by NO3 interaction consistent with increased disease susceptibility. Community shifts observed were consistent with the nutrient loading hypothesis at 20 ºC, but there was no evidence of other eutrophication symptoms due to the short residence time. The Nutrient Pollution Index tracked the NO3 gradient at 10 ºC but exhibited no response at 20 ºC. We suggest that systems characterized by cool temperatures, high NO3 loads, and short residence time may be resilient to many symptoms of eutrophication. Estuarine systems characterized by cool temperatures, high nutrient loads and rapid flushing may be resilient to some symptoms

  14. Potential nitrogen critical loads for northern Great Plains grassland vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symstad, Amy J.; Smith, Anine T.; Newton, Wesley E.; Knapp, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    The National Park Service is concerned that increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion and agricultural activities could adversely affect the northern Great Plains (NGP) ecosystems in its trust. The critical load concept facilitates communication between scientists and policy makers or land managers by translating the complex effects of air pollution on ecosystems into concrete numbers that can be used to inform air quality targets. A critical load is the exposure level below which significant harmful effects on sensitive elements of the environment do not occur. A recent review of the literature suggested that the nitrogen critical load for Great Plains vegetation is 10-25 kg N/ha/yr. For comparison, current atmospheric nitrogen deposition in NGP National Park Service (NPS) units ranges from ~4 kg N/ha/yr in the west to ~13 kg N/ha/yr in the east. The suggested critical load, however, was derived from studies far outside of the NGP, and from experiments investigating nitrogen loads substantially higher than current atmospheric deposition in the region.Therefore, to better determine the nitrogen critical load for sensitive elements in NGP parks, we conducted a four-year field experiment in three northern Great Plains vegetation types at Badlands and Wind Cave National Parks. The vegetation types were chosen because of their importance in NGP parks, their expected sensitivity to nitrogen addition, and to span a range of natural fertility. In the experiment, we added nitrogen at rates ranging from below current atmospheric deposition (2.5 kg N/ha/yr) to far above those levels but commensurate with earlier experiments (100 kg N/ha/yr). We measured the response of a variety of vegetation and soil characteristics shown to be sensitive to nitrogen addition in other studies, including plant biomass production, plant tissue nitrogen concentration, plant species richness and composition, non-native species abundance, and soil inorganic

  15. Nitrogen critical loads using biodiversity-related critical limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posch, Maximilian; Aherne, Julian; Hettelingh, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Critical loads are widely used in the effects-based assessment of emission reduction policies. While the impacts of acidification have diminished, there is increasing concern regarding the effects of nitrogen deposition on terrestrial ecosystems. In this context much attention has been focussed on empirical critical loads as well as simulations with linked geochemistry-vegetation models. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to adapt the widely used simple mass balance approach. This approach has the well-established benefit of easy regional applicability, while incorporating specified critical chemical criteria to protect specified receptors. As plant occurrence/biodiversity is related to both the nutrient and acidity status of an ecosystem, a single abiotic factor (chemical criterion) is not sufficient. Rather than an upper limit for deposition (i.e., critical load), linked nutrient nitrogen and acidity chemical criteria for plant occurrence result in an 'optimal' nitrogen and sulphur deposition envelope. - Highlights: → Mass balance critical load approaches for nutrient nitrogen remain useful. → Biodiversity-related limits are related to nutrient and acidity status. → Nutrient and acidity chemical criteria lead to optimal deposition envelopes. → Optimal loads support effects-based emission reduction policies. - Biodiversity-related critical limits lead to optimal nitrogen and sulphur deposition envelopes for plant species or species compositions.

  16. Liquid Nitrogen Dewar Loading at KSC for STS-71 Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen dewar loading at Kennedy Space Center for STS-71 flight with Stan Koszelak (right), University of California at Riverside, adn Tamara Chinareva (left), Russian Spacecraft Coporation-Energia. The picture shows Koszelak removing the insert from the transportation dewar.

  17. Nitrogen diffusion in hafnia and the impact of nitridation on oxygen and hydrogen diffusion: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh, E-mail: rajessat@in.ibm.com, E-mail: rajesh.sathiyanarayanan@gmail.com; Pandey, R. K.; Murali, K. V. R. M. [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, Bangalore 560045 (India)

    2015-01-21

    Using first-principles simulations, we have computed incorporation energies and diffusion barriers of ammonia, the nitrogen molecule and atomic nitrogen in monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}). Our calculations show that ammonia is likely to dissociate into an NH{sub 2} molecular unit, whereas the nitrogen molecule remains as a molecule either in the interstitial space or at an oxygen lattice site. The lowest energy pathway for the diffusion of atomic nitrogen interstitials consists of the hopping of the nitrogen interstitial between neighboring three-coordinated lattice oxygen atoms that share a single Hf atom, and the barrier for such hops is determined by a switching mechanism. The substitutional nitrogen atom shows a preference for diffusion through the doubly positive oxygen vacancy-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, we have investigated the impact of nitrogen atoms on the diffusion barriers of oxygen and hydrogen interstitials in m-HfO{sub 2}. Our results show that nitrogen incorporation has a significant impact on the barriers for oxygen and hydrogen diffusion: nitrogen atoms attract oxygen and hydrogen interstitials diffusing in the vicinity, thereby slowing down (reducing) their diffusion (diffusion length)

  18. Diffusion and bulk flow in phloem loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dölger, Julia; Rademaker, Hanna; Liesche, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Plants create sugar in the mesophyll cells of their leaves by photosynthesis. This sugar, mostly sucrose, has to be loaded via the bundle sheath into the phloem vascular system (the sieve elements), where it is distributed to growing parts of the plant. We analyze the feasibility of a particular...

  19. Determination of the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was determined from of the rate of retracting nitrogen from thin initially N-saturated coupons. Nitrogen saturated homogeneous foils of expanded austenite were obtained by nitriding AISI 304 and AISI 316 in pure...... in the composition range where nitrogen can be extracted by hydrogen gas at the diffusion temperature. Numerical simulation of the denitriding experiments shows that the thus determined concentration dependent diffusion coefficients are an accurate approximation of the actual diffusivity of nitrogen in expanded...... ammonia at 693 K and 718 K. Denitriding experiments were performed by equilibrating the foils with a successively lower nitrogen activity, as imposed by a gas mixture of ammonia and hydrogen. The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was approximated...

  20. Nitrogen spiraling in stream ecosystems spanning a gradient of chronic nitrogen loading

    OpenAIRE

    Earl, Stevan Ross

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of the relationships between nitrogen (N) availability and spiraling (the paired processes of nutrient cycling and advective transport) in stream ecosystems. Anthropogenic activities have greatly increased rates of N loading to aquatic ecosystems. However, streams may be important sites for retention, removal, and transformation of N. In order to identify controls on NO3-N spiraling in anthropogenically impacted streams, I examined relationships among NO3-N spi...

  1. Sediment diffusion method improves wastewater nitrogen removal in the receiving lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Sanni L; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Ropponen, Janne; Juntunen, Janne; Rissanen, Antti J; Tiirola, Marja

    2018-07-01

    Sediment microbes have a great potential to transform reactive N to harmless N 2 , thus decreasing wastewater nitrogen load into aquatic ecosystems. Here, we examined if spatial allocation of the wastewater discharge by a specially constructed sediment diffuser pipe system enhanced the microbial nitrate reduction processes. Full-scale experiments were set on two Finnish lake sites, Keuruu and Petäjävesi, and effects on the nitrate removal processes were studied using the stable isotope pairing technique. All nitrate reduction rates followed nitrate concentrations, being highest at the wastewater-influenced sampling points. Complete denitrification with N 2 as an end-product was the main nitrate reduction process, indicating that the high nitrate and organic matter concentrations of wastewater did not promote nitrous oxide (N 2 O) production (truncated denitrification) or ammonification (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium; DNRA). Using 3D simulation, we demonstrated that the sediment diffusion method enhanced the contact time and amount of wastewater near the sediment surface especially in spring and in autumn, altering organic matter concentration and oxygen levels, and increasing the denitrification capacity of the sediment. We estimated that natural denitrification potentially removed 3-10% of discharged wastewater nitrate in the 33 ha study area of Keuruu, and the sediment diffusion method increased this areal denitrification capacity on average 45%. Overall, our results indicate that sediment diffusion method can supplement wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) nitrate removal without enhancing alternative harmful processes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Diffusion of oxygen in nitrogen in the pores of graphite. Preliminary results on the effect of oxidation on diffusivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, G. F.; Sharratt, E. W.

    1962-10-15

    Preliminary results are reported from an experimental study of the effect of burnoff on the diffusivity of oxygen in nitrogen within the pores of graphite. It is found that the ratio of effective diffusivity to ''free gas'' diffusivity changes about four-fold in the range 0-9% total oxidation. The viscous permeability, B0, increases in almost the same proportion over the same range.

  3. Nitrogen diffusion in near-surface range of ion doped molybdenum

    CERN Document Server

    Zamalin, E Y

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of change in nitrogen near-the-surface concentration in the Mo ion-alloyed monocrystalline foil is studied through the Auger-electron spectroscopy and the secondary ion mass spectrometry. The implantation dose constituted 5 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 ion/cm sup 2 and the implantation energy equaled 50 and 100 keV. The samples diffusion annealing was performed at the temperature of 800-900 deg C. The evaluation of the nitrogen diffusion coefficient indicates the values by 3-5 orders lesser than the diffusion coefficient in the nitrogen solid-state solution in the molybdenum. At the same time the molybdenum self-diffusion coefficient value is by 3-5 orders lesser as compared to the obtained value. The supposition is made, the the surplus nitrogen relative to the solubility limit is deposited on the radiation defects and in the process of the diffusion annealing it nitrates together with them

  4. Statistically extracted fundamental watershed variables for estimating the loads of total nitrogen in small streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholm, Scott C.; Capel, Paul D.; Terziotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of total nitrogen loads is essential for evaluating conditions in the aquatic environment. Extrapolation of estimates beyond measured streams will greatly expand our understanding of total nitrogen loading to streams. Recursive partitioning and random forest regression were used to assess 85 geospatial, environmental, and watershed variables across 636 small (monitoring may be beneficial.

  5. Effects of nitrogen deposition and empirical nitrogen critical loads for ecoregions of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, L.H.; Fenn, M.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Geiser, L.H.; Driscoll, C.T.; Allen, E.B.; Baron, Jill S.; Bobbink, R.; Bowman, W.D.; Clark, C.M.; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, F.S.; Greaver, T.L.; Hall, S.J.; Lilleskov, E.A.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.A.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Perakis, S.S.; Robin-Abbott, M. J.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K.C.; Dennis, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has led to a significant increase in nitrogen (N) emissions and atmospheric deposition. This N deposition has reached a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations to the structure and function of many ecosystems across the United States. One approach for quantifying the deposition of pollution that would be harmful to ecosystems is the determination of critical loads. A critical load is defined as the input of a pollutant below which no detrimental ecological effects occur over the long-term according to present knowledge. The objectives of this project were to synthesize current research relating atmospheric N deposition to effects on terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems in the United States, and to estimate associated empirical N critical loads. The receptors considered included freshwater diatoms, mycorrhizal fungi, lichens, bryophytes, herbaceous plants, shrubs, and trees. Ecosystem impacts included: (1) biogeochemical responses and (2) individual species, population, and community responses. Biogeochemical responses included increased N mineralization and nitrification (and N availability for plant and microbial uptake), increased gaseous N losses (ammonia volatilization, nitric and nitrous oxide from nitrification and denitrification), and increased N leaching. Individual species, population, and community responses included increased tissue N, physiological and nutrient imbalances, increased growth, altered root : shoot ratios, increased susceptibility to secondary stresses, altered fire regime, shifts in competitive interactions and community composition, changes in species richness and other measures of biodiversity, and increases in invasive species. The range of critical loads for nutrient N reported for U.S. ecoregions, inland surface waters, and freshwater wetlands is 1-39 kg N.ha -1.yr -1, spanning the range of N deposition observed over most of the country. The empirical critical loads for N tend to

  6. Nitrogen diffusion and nitrogen depth profiles in expanded austenite: experimental assessment, numerical simulation and role of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    during gaseous nitriding, a qualitative discussion of the role of stress on local equilibrium conditions of growing expanded austenite and a discussion of the erroneous concentration dependent diffusivity of nitrogen in expanded austenite as obtained from applying the Boltzmann-Matano method...

  7. Diffuse nitrogen loss simulation and impact assessment of stereoscopic agriculture pattern by integrated water system model and consideration of multiple existence forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Gao, Yang; Yu, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    Agricultural nitrogen loss becomes an increasingly important source of water quality deterioration and eutrophication, even threatens water safety for humanity. Nitrogen dynamic mechanism is still too complicated to be well captured at watershed scale due to its multiple existence forms and instability, disturbance of agricultural management practices. Stereoscopic agriculture is a novel agricultural planting pattern to efficiently use local natural resources (e.g., water, land, sunshine, heat and fertilizer). It is widely promoted as a high yield system and can obtain considerable economic benefits, particularly in China. However, its environmental quality implication is not clear. In our study, Qianyanzhou station is famous for its stereoscopic agriculture pattern of Southern China, and an experimental watershed was selected as our study area. Regional characteristics of runoff and nitrogen losses were simulated by an integrated water system model (HEQM) with multi-objective calibration, and multiple agriculture practices were assessed to find the effective approach for the reduction of diffuse nitrogen losses. Results showed that daily variations of runoff and nitrogen forms were well reproduced throughout watershed, i.e., satisfactory performances for ammonium and nitrate nitrogen (NH4-N and NO3-N) loads, good performances for runoff and organic nitrogen (ON) load, and very good performance for total nitrogen (TN) load. The average loss coefficient was 62.74 kg/ha for NH4-N, 0.98 kg/ha for NO3-N, 0.0004 kg/ha for ON and 63.80 kg/ha for TN. The dominating form of nitrogen losses was NH4-N due to the applied fertilizers, and the most dramatic zones aggregated in the middle and downstream regions covered by paddy and orange orchard. In order to control diffuse nitrogen losses, the most effective practices for Qianyanzhou stereoscopic agriculture pattern were to reduce farmland planting scale in the valley by afforestation, particularly for orchard in the

  8. Nitrogen-system safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Department of Energy has primary responsibility for the safety of operations at DOE-owned nuclear facilities. The guidelines for the analysis of credible accidents are outlined in DOE Order 5481.1. DOE has requested that existing plant facilities and operations be reviewed for potential safety problems not covered by standard industrial safety procedures. This review is being conducted by investigating individual facilities and documenting the results in Safety Study Reports which will be compiled to form the Existing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report which is scheduled for completion in September, 1984. This Safety Study documents the review of the Plant Nitrogen System facilities and operations and consists of Section 4.0, Facility and Process Description, and Section 5.0, Accident Analysis, of the Final Safety Analysis Report format. The existing nitrogen system consists of a Superior Air Products Company Type D Nitrogen Plant, nitrogen storage facilities, vaporization facilities and a distribution system. The system is designed to generate and distribute nitrogen gas used in the cascade for seal feed, buffer systems, and for servicing equipment when exceptionally low dew points are required. Gaseous nitrogen is also distributed to various process auxiliary buildings. The average usage is approximately 130,000 standard cubic feet per day

  9. Boron diffusion into nitrogen doped silicon films for P{sup +} polysilicon gate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, Farida; Mahamdi, Ramdane; Jalabert, Laurent; Temple-Boyer, Pierre

    2003-06-23

    This paper deals with the study of the boron diffusion in nitrogen doped silicon (NIDOS) deposited from disilane Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and ammonia NH{sub 3} for the development of P{sup +} polysilicon gate metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices. NIDOS films with varied nitrogen content have been boron implanted, then annealed and finally analysed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In order to simulate the experimental SIMS of boron concentration profiles in the NIDOS films, a model adapted to the particular conditions of the samples elaboration, i.e. the very high boron concentration and the nitrogen content, has been established. The boron diffusion reduction in NIDOS films with increasing nitrogen rates has been evidenced by the profiles as well as by the obtained diffusion coefficients, which shows that the nitrogen incorporation reduces the boron diffusion. This has been confirmed by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements performed on MOS capacitors: the higher the nitrogen content, the lower the flat-band voltage. Finally, these results demonstrate that the improvement of the gate oxide quality occurs with the suppression of the boron penetration.

  10. Data for Macrophyte Community Response to Nitrogen Loading and Thermal Stressors in Rapidly Flushed Mesocosm Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data represent response variables from a series of mesocosm experiments to assess how estuarine macrophyte communities respond to nitrogen loading under two...

  11. Comprehensive trends assessment of nitrogen sources and loads to estuaries of the coterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sources of nitrogen and phosphorus to estuaries and estuarine watersheds of the coterminous United States have been compiled from a variety of publically available data sources (1985 – 2015). Atmospheric loading was obtained from two sources. Modelled and interpolated meas...

  12. effects of bud loading levels and different nitrogen doses on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... in 100 g samples, leaf area for physical properties; dry matter, ash, pH and titratable ... Keywords: Brined-grape leaves, nitrogen, bud loading level, narince grape cultivar, Turkey. ..... Agriculture Organization (2010). www.

  13. Global gray water footprint and water pollution levels related to anthropogenic nitrogen loads to fresh water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekonnen, Mesfin; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2015-01-01

    This is the first global assessment of nitrogen-related water pollution in river basins with a specification of the pollution by economic sector, and by crop for the agricultural sector. At a spatial resolution of 5 by 5 arc minute, we estimate anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loads to freshwater,

  14. A Web-Based Tool to Interpolate Nitrogen Loading Using a Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Shik Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Water quality data may not be collected at a high frequency, nor over the range of streamflow data. For instance, water quality data are often collected monthly, biweekly, or weekly, since collecting and analyzing water quality samples are costly compared to streamflow data. Regression models are often used to interpolate pollutant loads from measurements made intermittently. Web-based Load Interpolation Tool (LOADIN was developed to provide user-friendly interfaces and to allow use of streamflow and water quality data from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS via web access. LOADIN has a regression model assuming that instantaneous load is comprised of the pollutant load based on streamflow and the pollutant load variation within the period. The regression model has eight coefficients determined by a genetic algorithm with measured water quality data. LOADIN was applied to eleven water quality datasets from USGS gage stations located in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin states with drainage areas from 44 km2 to 1,847,170 km2. Measured loads were calculated by multiplying nitrogen data by streamflow data associated with measured nitrogen data. The estimated nitrogen loads and measured loads were evaluated using Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE and coefficient of determination (R2. NSE ranged from 0.45 to 0.91, and R2 ranged from 0.51 to 0.91 for nitrogen load estimation.

  15. Influence of nitrogen loading and plant nitrogen assimilation on nitrogen leaching and N₂O emission in forage rice paddy fields fertilized with liquid cattle waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riya, Shohei; Zhou, Sheng; Kobara, Yuso; Sagehashi, Masaki; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    Livestock wastewater disposal onto rice paddy fields is a cost- and labor-effective way to treat wastewater and cultivate rice crops. We evaluated the influence of nitrogen loading rates on nitrogen assimilation by rice plants and on nitrogen losses (leaching and N2O emission) in forage rice fields receiving liquid cattle waste (LCW). Four forage rice fields were subjected to nitrogen loads of 107, 258, 522, and 786 kg N ha(-1) (N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively) using basal fertilizer (chemical fertilizer) (50 kg N ha(-1)) and three LCW topdressings (each 57-284 kg N ha(-1)). Nitrogen assimilated by rice plants increased over time. However, after the third topdressing, the nitrogen content of the biomass did not increase in any treatment. Harvested aboveground biomass contained 93, 60, 33, and 31 % of applied nitrogen in N100, N250, N500, and N750, respectively. The NH4 (+) concentration in the pore water at a depth of 20 cm was less than 1 mg N L(-1) in N100, N250, and N500 throughout the cultivation period, while the NH4 (+) concentration in N750 increased to 3 mg N L(-1) after the third topdressing. Cumulative N2O emissions ranged from -0.042 to 2.39 kg N ha(-1); the highest value was observed in N750, followed by N500. In N750, N2O emitted during the final drainage accounted for 80 % of cumulative N2O emissions. This study suggested that 100-258 kg N ha(-1) is a recommended nitrogen loading rate for nitrogen recovery by rice plants without negative environmental impacts such as groundwater pollution and N2O emission.

  16. Nitrogen removal in shallow groundwater below three arable land systems in a high nitrogen loading region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X.; Zhou, W.

    2017-12-01

    The Taihu Lake region (TLR) is one of the most intensive agricultural regions with high nitrogen (N) loading in eastern China. Large inputs of synthetic N fertilizer have led to a series of environmental problems including eutrophication of surface waters, nitrate (NO3-) pollution of groundwater. To fully evaluate the risk of NO3- on groundwater environments, it is necessary to know the natural NO3- removal ability. In this study, denitrification capacity was assessed for two years through measuring the concentration of different N species (NO3-, NH4+, TN, excess N2 and dissolved N2O) in groundwater below three typical agricultural land-use types in the TLR. The results suggested that the conversion of paddy field (PF) to vineyard (VY) and vegetable (VF) significantly increased the groundwater NO3-N concentration, but denitrification consumed 76%, 83% and 65% of the groundwater NO3-N in VY, VF and PF, respectively. Because of the low O2 and high DOC concentrations in groundwater, denitrification activity was high in the study sites, resulting in high excess N2 accumulation in groundwater, and the concentration even exceeded the total active N in the deep layer. The large amounts of excess N2 observed in the VY and VF over all the sample times indicated that considerable N was stored as gaseous N2 in groundwater and should not be ignored in balancing N budgets in aquifers where denitrification is high. Our results also demonstrated that the indirect N2O emission factor (EF5-g) in VY (0.0052)and VF (0.0057)was significantly higher than PF (0.0011)as well as higher than the IPCC default values (0.0025. In view of the increasing trend of paddy fields being converted to uplands combined with the low GWT in the TLR, we thus concluded that the risk of NO3- contamination in groundwater and indirect N2O emission will intensify below arable land.

  17. Study of Nitrogen Effect on the Boron Diffusion during Heat Treatment in Polycrystalline Silicon/Nitrogen-Doped Silicon Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saci, Lynda; Mahamdi, Ramdane; Mansour, Farida; Boucher, Jonathan; Collet, Maéva; Bedel Pereira, Eléna; Temple-Boyer, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    The present paper studies the boron (B) diffusion in nitrogen (N) doped amorphous silicon (a-Si) layer in original bi-layer B-doped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)/in-situ N-doped Si layers (NIDOS) thin films deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technique. The B diffusion in the NIDOS layer was investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. A new extended diffusion model is proposed to fit the SIMS profile of the bi-layer films. This model introduces new terms which take into account the effect of N concentration on the complex diffusion phenomena of B atoms in bi-layer films. SIMS results show that B diffusion does not exceed one third of NIDOS layer thickness after annealing. The reduction of the B diffusion in the NIDOS layer is due to the formation of complex B-N as shown by infrared absorption measurements. Electrical measurements using four-probe and Hall effect techniques show the good conductivity of the B-doped poly-Si layer after annealing treatment.

  18. Macrophyte Community Response to Nitrogen Loading and Thermal Stressors in Rapidly Flushed Mesocosm Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased nitrogen loading has been directly linked to the proliferation of planktonic and macroalgal blooms at a global scale with negative impacts on estuarine ecology and human health. Under excessive anthropogenic nutrient loads, seagrass systems can be replaced by either ma...

  19. Cost effective reductions in the agricultural load of nitrogen to the Baltic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elofsson, K.

    1997-11-01

    To restore the health of the Baltic Sea, the Helsinki Commission, HELCOM, suggests that the nitrogen load should be reduced by 50%. The agricultural sector accounts for about 1/3 of the total load of nitrogen to the Baltic Sea, while point sources account for about 1/4. The remaining load reaches the Baltic as atmospheric deposition. The purpose of this study is to calculate cost effective reductions in the agricultural load of nitrogen to the Baltic Sea coastal waters. The Baltic Sea drainage basin is divided into 17 regions, which differ with respect to costs, leaching and nitrogen retention. For each region, cost functions are estimated for 11 nitrogen abatement measures in the agricultural sector. It is difficult to find reliable data on both costs and biological parameters for all regions included, and several assumptions are made to obtain the cost functions. In this paper the total cost of a 50% reduction of the nitrogen load from arable land is estimated to 11,700 million SEK per year. A decrease in the use of fertilizer nitrogen is the most important measure in a cost effective policy. Other measures included in the cost effective solution are changes in land-use and in manure management practices. If, instead, each country is required to reduce its load by 50%, the total cost will increase by nearly 60%. Three out of nine countries around the Baltic Sea would gain from separate reduction targets, while all others lose by such a policy. The results are sensitive to assumptions about the biological parameters and the shape of the cost functions for reductions in chemical fertilizer. 75 refs, 3 figs, 11 tabs

  20. Delay in catchment nitrogen load to streams following restrictions on fertilizer application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vervloet, Lidwien S. C.; Binning, Philip John; Borgesen, Christen D.

    2018-01-01

    A MIKE SHE hydrological-solute transport model including nitrate reduction is employed to evaluate the delayed response in nitrogen loads in catchment streams following the implementation of nitrogen mitigation measures since the 1980s. The nitrate transport lag times between the root zone...... and the streams for the period 1950-2011 were simulated for two catchments in Denmark and compared with observational data. Results include nitrogen concentration and mass discharge to streams. By automated baseflow separation, stream discharge was separated into baseflow and drain flow components...

  1. Impact of Cyclic Loading on Chloride Diffusivity and Mechanical Performance of RC Beams under Seawater Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Pang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted to investigate the impact of cyclic loading on the mechanical performance and chloride diffusivity of RC beams exposed to seawater wet-dry cycles. To induce initial damage to RC beam specimen, cyclic loading controlled by max load and cycles was applied. Then beam specimens underwent 240 wet-dry cycles of seawater. Results show that the chloride content increased as max load and cycle increased. The chloride content at steel surface increased approximatively linearly as average crack width increased. Moreover, the max load had more influence on chloride content at steel surface than cycle. The difference of average chloride diffusion coefficient between tension and compression concrete was little at uncracked position. Average chloride diffusion coefficient increased as crack width increased when crack width was less than 0.11 mm whereas the increasing tendency was weak when crack width exceeded 0.11 mm. The residual yield load and ultimate load of RC beams decreased as max load and cycle increased. Based on univariate analysis of variance, the max load had more adverse effect on yield load and ultimate load than cycle.

  2. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the des moines river, iowa using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km2 in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  3. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the Des Moines River, Iowa using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F

    2009-10-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km(2) in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed.

  4. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation and the Influence of Room Height and Heat Load Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Vilsbøll, Rasmus W; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse ceiling (inlet) ventilation is an air distribution system that supplies air from the entire ceiling surface, giving a low supply velocity. The flow pattern in the room is controlled by the heat sources. The system generates high mixing flow and the air velocities in the room are expected...... to be not much influenced by the flow rate to the room but dependent on the heat load. Previous studies have shown that diffuse ceiling ventilation has an ability to remove large heat loads without compromising the indoor climate. However, recent experiments indicate that the maximum accepted heat load decreases...... with a large room height and it decreases in connection with certain heat load distributions. Room geometries and heat load distributions that are optimal for diffuse ceiling ventilation are discussed. A simplified design procedure is introduced....

  5. Comprehensive Status and Trends of Nitrogen Loads to Estuaries in the Conterminous United States: Pacific Coast Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    We applied regional SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) models to estimate status and trends of potential nitrogen loads to estuaries of the conterminous United States. The original Regional SPARROW models predict average detrended loads by source ...

  6. Vegetation community change points suggest that critical loads of nutrient nitrogen may be too high

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Kayla; Aherne, Julian; Bleasdale, Andy

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that elevated nitrogen deposition can have detrimental effects on semi-natural ecosystems, including changes to plant diversity. Empirical critical loads of nutrient nitrogen have been recommended to protect many sensitive European habitats from significant harmful effects. In this study, we used Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis (TITAN) to investigate shifts in vegetation communities along an atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient for twenty-two semi-natural habitat types (as described under Annex I of the European Union Habitats Directive) in Ireland. Significant changes in vegetation community, i.e., change points, were determined for twelve habitats, with seven habitats showing a decrease in the number of positive indicator species. Community-level change points indicated a decrease in species abundance along a nitrogen deposition gradient ranging from 3.9 to 15.3 kg N ha-1 yr-1, which were significantly lower than recommended critical loads (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; V = 6, p < 0.05). These results suggest that lower critical loads of empirical nutrient nitrogen deposition may be required to protect many European habitats. Changes to vegetation communities may mean a loss of sensitive indicator species and potentially rare species in these habitats, highlighting how emission reductions policies set under the National Emissions Ceilings Directive may be directly linked to meeting the goal set out under the European Union's Biodiversity Strategy of "halting the loss of biodiversity" across Europe by 2020.

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions in salt marshes and their response to nitrogen loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Kroeger, K. D.; Morkeski, K.; Carey, J.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes play an important role in global and regional carbon and nitrogen cycling. Anthropogenic nitrogen loading may alter greenhouse gas (GHG, including CO2, CH4, and N2O) emissions and carbon sequestration in salt marshes. We measured GHG emissions biweekly for two growing seasons across a nitrogen-loading gradient of four Spartina salt marshes in Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts. In addition, we conducted nitrogen addition experiments in a pristine marsh by adding low and high nitrate bi-weekly during the summer. The GHG flux measurements were made in situ with a state-of-the-art mobile gas measurement system using the cavity ring down technology that consists of a CO2/CH4 analyzer (Picarro) and an N2O/CO analyzer (Los Gatos). We observed strong seasonal variations in greenhouse gas emissions. The differences in gas emissions across the nitrogen gradient (between 1 and 10 gN m-2y-1) were not significant, but strong pulse emissions of N2O were observed after nitrogen was artificially added to the marsh. We found that the studied salt marsh was a significant carbon sink (NEP ~ 380 gC m-2y-1). CH4 fluxes are 3 orders of magnitude less than CO2 fluxes in the salt marsh. Carbon fluxes are driven by light, salinity, tide, and temperature. We conclude that restoration or conservation of this carbon sink has a significant social benefit for carbon credit.

  8. Effects of nitrogen loading on greenhouse gas emissions in salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Kroeger, K. D.; Morkeski, K.; Mora, J.; Chen, X.; Carey, J.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes play an important role in global and regional carbon and nitrogen cycling. We tested the hypothesis that anthropogenic nitrogen loading alters greenhouse gas (GHG, including CO2, CH4, and N2O) emissions and carbon sequestration in salt marshes. We measured GHG emissions biweekly for two growing seasons across a nitrogen-loading gradient of four Spartina salt marshes in Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts. In addition, we conducted nitrogen addition experiments in a pristine marsh by adding low and high nitrate to triplicate plots bi-weekly during the summer. The GHG flux measurements were made in situ with a state-of-the-art mobile gas measurement system using the cavity ring down technology that consists of a CO2/CH4 analyzer (Picarro) and an N2O/CO analyzer (Los Gatos). We observed strong seasonal variations in greenhouse gas emissions. The differences in gas emissions across the nitrogen gradient were not significant, but strong pulse emissions of N2O were observed after nitrogen was artificially added to the marsh. Our results will facilitate model development to simulate GHG emissions in coastal wetlands and support methodology development to assess carbon credits in preserving and restoring coastal wetlands.

  9. Application of Watershed Scale Models to Predict Nitrogen Loading From Coastal Plain Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    George M. Chescheir; Glenn P Fernandez; R. Wayne Skaggs; Devendra M. Amatya

    2004-01-01

    DRAINMOD-based watershed models have been developed and tested using data collected from an intensively instrumented research site on Kendricks Creek watershed near Plymouth. NC. These models were applied to simulate the hydrology and nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N) loading from two other watersheds in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, the 11600 ha Chicod Creek watershed...

  10. Phosphorus and nitrogen loading depths in fluvial sediments following manure spill simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manure spills that enter streams can devastate the aquatic ecosystem. The depth of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loading in fluvial sediments following a manure spill have not been documented. Thus, the objectives of this study were (i) to determine the depth of N and P contamination as a result o...

  11. Effects of bud loading levels and nitrogen doses on yield, physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of several bud loading levels in winter pruning and nitrogen doses on yield and physical and chemical properties of fresh vine-leaves of grape cultivar “Narince”. Vines trained with bilateral cordon system was pruned to yield 35000 to 53000 buds/ha (16 or 24 buds/vine) ...

  12. Derivation and Mapping of Critical Loads for Nitrogen and Trends in Their Exceedance in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Dieter Nagel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “critical load” means a quantitative estimate of an exposure to one or more pollutants below which significant harmful effects on specified sensitive elements of the environment do not occur, according to present knowledge. In the case of nitrogen, both oxidised and reduced compounds contribute to the total deposition of acidity, which exceeds critical loads in many forest ecosystems. These also cause negative effects through eutrophication. Critical loads of nitrogen were derived for forest soils (deciduous and coniferous forest, natural grassland, acid fens, heathland, and mesotrophic peat bogs. In Germany, a decrease in sulphur emissions over the past 15 years resulted in a reduced exceedance of critical loads for acid deposition. In the same period it was noted that reduction in the emissions of nitrogen oxides and ammonia remained insignificant. Therefore, emissions of nitrogen compounds have become relatively more important and will continue to threaten ecosystem function and stability. The risk of environmental damage remains at an unacceptable level. The German maps show the degree to which the critical loads are exceeded, and they present current developments and an expected future trend. Results indicate that recovery from pollutant stress occurs only gradually.

  13. Lichen-based critical loads for atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Western Oregon and Washington forests, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda H. Geiser; Sarah E. Jovan; Doug A. Glavich; Matthew K. Porter

    2010-01-01

    Critical loads (CLs) define maximum atmospheric deposition levels apparently preventative of ecosystem harm. We present first nitrogen CLs for northwestern North America's maritime forests. Using multiple linear regression, we related epiphytic-macrolichen community composition to: 1) wet deposition from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, 2) wet, dry,...

  14. Mapping critical loads of nitrogen deposition for aquatic ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanus, Leora; Clow, David W.; Saros, Jasmine E.; Stephens, Verlin C.; Campbell, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially explicit estimates of critical loads of nitrogen (N) deposition (CL Ndep ) for nutrient enrichment in aquatic ecosystems were developed for the Rocky Mountains, USA, using a geostatistical approach. The lowest CL Ndep estimates ( −1 yr −1 ) occurred in high-elevation basins with steep slopes, sparse vegetation, and abundance of exposed bedrock and talus. These areas often correspond with areas of high N deposition (>3 kg N ha −1 yr −1 ), resulting in CL Ndep exceedances ≥1.5 ± 1 kg N ha −1 yr −1 . CL Ndep and CL Ndep exceedances exhibit substantial spatial variability related to basin characteristics and are highly sensitive to the NO 3 − threshold at which ecological effects are thought to occur. Based on an NO 3 − threshold of 0.5 μmol L −1 , N deposition exceeds CL Ndep in 21 ± 8% of the study area; thus, broad areas of the Rocky Mountains may be impacted by excess N deposition, with greatest impacts at high elevations. - Highlights: ► Critical loads maps for nutrient enrichment effects of nitrogen deposition. ► Critical load estimates show spatial variability related to basin characteristics. ► Critical loads are sensitive to the nitrate threshold value for ecological effects. ► Broad areas of the Rocky Mountains may be impacted by excess nitrogen deposition. - Critical loads maps for nutrient enrichment effects of nitrogen deposition show that broad areas of the Rocky Mountains may be impacted by excess nitrogen deposition.

  15. An assessment of landscape characteristics affecting estuarine nitrogen loading in an urban watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojun

    2012-02-01

    Exploring the quantitative association between landscape characteristics and the ecological conditions of receiving waters has recently become an emerging area for eco-environmental research. While the landscape-water relationship research has largely targeted on inland aquatic systems, there has been an increasing need to develop methods and techniques that can better work with coastal and estuarine ecosystems. In this paper, we present a geospatial approach to examine the quantitative relationship between landscape characteristics and estuarine nitrogen loading in an urban watershed. The case study site is in the Pensacola estuarine drainage area, home of the city of Pensacola, Florida, USA, where vigorous urban sprawling has prompted growing concerns on the estuarine ecological health. Central to this research is a remote sensor image that has been used to extract land use/cover information and derive landscape metrics. Several significant landscape metrics are selected and spatially linked with the nitrogen loading data for the Pensacola bay area. Landscape metrics and nitrogen loading are summarized by equal overland flow-length rings, and their association is examined by using multivariate statistical analysis. And a stepwise model-building protocol is used for regression designs to help identify significant variables that can explain much of the variance in the nitrogen loading dataset. It is found that using landscape composition or spatial configuration alone can explain most of the nitrogen loading variability. Of all the regression models using metrics derived from a single land use/cover class as the independent variables, the one from the low density urban gives the highest adjusted R-square score, suggesting the impact of the watershed-wide urban sprawl upon this sensitive estuarine ecosystem. Measures towards the reduction of non-point source pollution from urban development are necessary in the area to protect the Pensacola bay ecosystem and its

  16. Enhanced nitrogen removal in single-chamber microbial fuel cells with increased gas diffusion areas

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Hengjing

    2012-11-23

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with nitrifiers pre-enriched at the air cathodes have previously been demonstrated as a passive strategy for integrating nitrogen removal into current-generating bioelectrochemical systems. To further define system design parameters for this strategy, we investigated in this study the effects of oxygen diffusion area and COD/N ratio in continuous-flow reactors. Doubling the gas diffusion area by adding an additional air cathode or a diffusion cloth significantly increased the ammonia and COD removal rates (by up to 115% and 39%), ammonia removal efficiency (by up to 134%), the cell voltage and cathode potentials, and the power densities (by a factor of approximately 2). When the COD/N ratio was lowered from 13 to 3, we found up to 244% higher ammonia removal rate but at least 19% lower ammonia removal efficiency. An increase of COD removal rate by up to 27% was also found when the COD/N ratio was lowered from 11 to 3. The Coulombic efficiency was not affected by the additional air cathode, but decreased by an average of 11% with the addition of a diffusion cloth. Ammonia removal by assimilation was also estimated to understand the ammonia removal mechanism in these systems. These results showed that the doubling of gas diffusion area enhanced N and COD removal rates without compromising electrochemical performance. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. First-principles simulations of iron with nitrogen: from surface adsorption to bulk diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M H; Liu, X H; Gu, J F; Jin, Z H

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption, absorption and diffusion pathways of nitrogen are studied for ferromagnetic body-centered cubic iron via spin-polarized density functional theory in combination with the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The computed data suggest that, depending on the coverage of N atoms, N prefers to stay on particular surface sites. Once pinned down well below the surface, N prefers to move into octahedral interstices rather than tetrahedral interstices. However, the tetrahedral interstices are crucial because they act as transition states and yield the saddle point energies of the corresponding minimum energy pathways. In comparison with carbon, we found that nitrogen prefers a different pathway from the (1 0 0) surface to the subsurface due to its strong repulsive interaction with Fe ions. (paper)

  18. Load-dependent surface diffusion model for analyzing the kinetics of protein adsorption onto mesoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbán, Gregorio; Ramírez-Montoya, Luis A; García, Héctor; Menéndez, J Ángel; Arenillas, Ana; Montes-Morán, Miguel A

    2018-02-01

    The adsorption of cytochrome c in water onto organic and carbon xerogels with narrow pore size distributions has been studied by carrying out transient and equilibrium batch adsorption experiments. It was found that equilibrium adsorption exhibits a quasi-Langmuirian behavior (a g coefficient in the Redlich-Peterson isotherms of over 0.95) involving the formation of a monolayer of cyt c with a depth of ∼4nm on the surface of all xerogels for a packing density of the protein inside the pores of 0.29gcm -3 . A load-dependent surface diffusion model (LDSDM) has been developed and numerically solved to fit the experimental kinetic adsorption curves. The results of the LDSDM show better fittings than the standard homogeneous surface diffusion model. The value of the external mass transfer coefficient obtained by numerical optimization confirms that the process is controlled by the intraparticle surface diffusion of cyt c. The surface diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing protein load down to zero for the maximum possible load. The decrease is steeper in the case of the xerogels with the smallest average pore diameter (∼15nm), the limit at which the zero-load diffusion coefficient of cyt c also begins to be negatively affected by interactions with the opposite wall of the pore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of feed loading on nitrogen balances and fish performance in replicated recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Suhr, Karin Isabel; Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of applying four fixed feed loadings to three replicated recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) on water quality changes, nitrogenous balances and growth performance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).Feed loadings ranged from 1.6 to 6.3kgfeed/m3 make-up...... water, with a constant make-up water renewal of 4.7% of total water volume per day in all twelve RAS. Fish densities ranged from 14 to 92kg/m3 during the prolonged trial of 10weeks. Selected water quality parameters were measured during two intensive sampling campaigns, evaluating biofilter...

  20. Transient hydrogen diffusion analyses coupled with crack-tip plasticity under cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotake, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Ryosuke; Taketomi, Shinya; Miyazaki, Noriyuki

    2008-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the material strengths of metals is known as the hydrogen embrittlement, which affects the structural integrity of a hydrogen energy system. In the present paper, we developed a computer program for a transient hydrogen diffusion-elastoplastic coupling analysis by combining an in-house finite element program with a general purpose finite element computer program to analyze hydrogen diffusion. In this program, we use a hypothesis that the hydrogen absorbed in the metal affects the yield stress of the metal. In the present paper, we discuss the effects of the cyclic loading on the hydrogen concentration near the crack tip. An important finding we obtained here is the fact that the hydrogen concentration near the crack tip greatly depends on the loading frequency. This result indicates that the fatigue lives of the components in a hydrogen system depend not only on the number of loading cycles but also on the loading frequency

  1. Nd Fe10 Mo2 alloys production through reduction-diffusion for nitrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilherme, Eneida da G.; Rechenberg, Hercilio R.

    1996-01-01

    In this work we have examined the effect of various processing variables on the Nd Fe 10 Mo 2 phase formation by reduction-diffusion calciothermic process (R D C). The best results were obtained for 4 hours treatment at 950 deg C with 40% excess content Nd Cl 3 and 50% excess content of Ca, for alloy Nd Fe 10.5 Mo 1.5 . Preliminary nitrogen absorption experiments have been done, without any further powder size reduction at temperatures between 300 and 350 deg C. (author)

  2. Effects of Anthropogenic Nitrogen Loading on Riverine Nitrogen Export in the Northeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, E. W.; Goodale, C. L.; Howarth, R. W.

    2001-05-01

    Human activities have greatly altered the nitrogen (N) cycle, accelerating the rate of N fixation in landscapes and delivery of N to water bodies. To examine the effects of anthropogenic N inputs on riverine N export, we quantified N inputs and riverine N loss for 16 catchments along a latitudinal profile from Maine to Virginia, which encompass a range of climatic variability and are major drainages to the coast of the North Atlantic Ocean. We quantified inputs of N to each catchment: atmospheric deposition, fertilizer application, agricultural and forest biological N fixation, and the net import of N in food and feed. We compared these inputs with N losses from the system in riverine export. The importance of the relative sources varies widely by watershed and is related to land use. Atmospheric deposition was the largest source (>60%) to the forested catchments of northern New England (e.g., Penobscot and Kennebec); import of N in food was the largest source of N to the more populated regions of southern New England (e.g., Charles and Blackstone); and agricultural inputs were the dominant N sources in the Mid-Atlantic region (e.g., Schuylkill and Potomac). Total N inputs to each catchment increased with percent cover in agriculture and urban land, and decreased with percent forest. Over the combined area of the catchments, net atmospheric deposition was the largest single source input (34%), followed by imports of N in food and feed (24%), fixation in agricultural lands (21%), fertilizer use (15%), and fixation in forests (6%). Riverine export of N is well correlated with N inputs, but it accounts for only a fraction (28%) of the total N inputs. This work provides an understanding of the sources of N in landscapes, and highlights how human activities impact N cycling in the northeast region.

  3. Deterministic fabrication of dielectric loaded waveguides coupled to single nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siampour, Hamidreza; Kumar, Shailesh; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    We report on the fabrication of dielectric-loaded-waveguides which are excited by single-nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds. The waveguides are deterministically written onto the pre-characterized nanodiamonds by using electron beam lithography of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist...... on silver-coated silicon substrate. Change in lifetime for NV-centers is observed after fabrication of waveguides and an antibunching in correlation measurement confirms that nanodiamonds contain single NV-centers....

  4. Short-term diffusive sampler for nitrogen dioxide monitoring in epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, J.P.; Quackenboss, J.

    1991-01-01

    An automated timed exposure diffusive sampler (TEDS) for sampling nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) was developed for use in epidemiological studies. The TEDS sequentially exposes four passive sampling devices (PSD) by microprocessor controlled valves while a pump and air flow guide prevent sampler starvation. Two TEDS units and two portable, real-time NO 2 monitors were tested for accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and linearity of response. The accuracy of the TEDS was within 10 percent of the means of the measured values. The TEDS sensitivity was 20 to 30 ppb-hour for NO 2 . Co-location of the TEDS with a chemiluminescent NO x monitor (EPA reference method) showed a similar responses to ambient NO 2 . TEDS allows better time resolution than traditional diffusive samplers (i.e., Palmes tube) while sharing their ability to sample a variety of gases

  5. Nitrogen removal in permeable woodchips filters affected by hydraulic loading rate and woodchips ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jacob Druedahl; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Hoffmann, Carl Christian

    2016-01-01

    response of mixed reactive media (woodchips-Seashells and woodchips-Filtralite mixtures) at two woodchips ratios (WR) to changes in the hydraulic loading rate (HLR). The tests implied continuous loading of aerated NO3-N spiked artificial drainage water and tritium (3H2O) breakthrough experiments. Flow...... normalized nitrate reduction rates were 0.35-3.97 g N m-3 L-1, corresponding to N- removal efficiencies of 5 to 74% depending on HLR and filter mixtures. At high HLR oxic conditions prevailed, thus N removal was restricted to the immobile domain, controlled by diffusion. At lower HLR, progressively lower...

  6. Loading an Optical Trap with Diamond Nanocrystals Containing Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers from a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and effective method of loading particles into an optical trap. Our primary application of this method is loading photoluminescent material, such as diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, for coupling the mechanical motion of the trapped crystal with the spin of the NV centers. Highly absorptive material at the trapping laser frequency, such as tartrazine dye, is used as media to attach nanodiamonds and burn into a cloud of air-borne particles as the material is swept near the trapping laser focus on a glass slide. Particles are then trapped with the laser used for burning or transferred to a second laser trap at a different wavelength. Evidence of successful loading diamond nanocrystals into the trap presented includes high sensitivity of the photoluminecscence (PL) to the excitation laser and the PL spectra of the optically trapped particles

  7. Nitrogen and phosphorus effluent loads from a paddy-field district adopting collective crop rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, T; Aoki, T; Osuga, K; Sugiyama, S; Iwasaki, D

    2012-01-01

    Japanese paddy rice systems commonly adopt the rotation of vegetables, wheat and soybeans with paddy rice. Crop rotation may, however, increase the nutrient load in effluent discharged from the district because more fertilizer is applied to the rotation crops than is applied to paddy crops. We investigated a paddy-field district subject to collective crop rotation and quantified the annual nutrient load of effluent from the district in three consecutive years. The total annual exports of nitrogen and phosphorus over the investigation period ranged from 30.3 to 40.6 kg N ha(-1) and 2.62 to 3.13 kg P ha(-1). The results suggest that rotation cropping increases the effluent nutrient load because applied fertilizer is converted to nitrate, and surface runoff is increased due to the absence of shuttering boards at the field outlets.

  8. Review of scenario analyses to reduce agricultural nitrogen and phosphorus loading to the aquatic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Fatemeh; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient loadings of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to aquatic environments are of increasing concern globally for managing ecosystems, drinking water supply and food production. There are often multiple sources of these nutrients in the landscape, and the different hydrological flow patterns...... nutrient loadings. Here we review 130 published papers extracted from Web of Science for 1995 to 2014 that have applied models to analyse scenarios of agricultural impacts on nutrients loadings at catchment scale. The review shows that scenario studies have been performed over a broad range of climatic...... processes. Few studies have considered spatially targeting measures in the landscape, and such studies are more recent. Spatially differentiated options include land cover/use modification and application of different land management options based on catchments characteristics, cropping conditions...

  9. The fate of fixed nitrogen in marine sediments with low organic loading: an in situ study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonaglia, Stefano; Hylén, Astrid; Rattray, Jane E.

    2017-01-01

    Given the increasing impacts of human activities on global nitrogen (N) cycle, investigations on N transformation processes in the marine environment have drastically increased in the last years. Benthic N cycling has mainly been studied in anthropogenically impacted estuaries and coasts, while its...... sediments worldwide (range 34–344 µmol N m−2 d−1). Anammox accounted for 18–26 % of the total N2 production. Absence of free hydrogen sulfide and low concentrations of dissolved iron in sediment pore waters suggested that denitrification and DNRA were driven by organic matter oxidation rather than...... chemolithotrophy. DNRA was as important as denitrification at a shallow, coastal station situated in the northern Bothnian Bay. At this pristine and fully oxygenated site, ammonium regeneration through DNRA contributed more than one third to the total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) diffusing from the sediment...

  10. Vulnerability of boreal zone for increased nitrogen loading due to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankinen, Katri; Holmberg, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The observed rapid warming of the boreal zone that has been observed in Finland (0.14 °C by decade) is expected to continue (http://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/wg1/). Also precipitation is assumed to increase in future. These changes may increase nitrogen (N) loading from terrestrial environments to water bodies by accelerating soil organic matter decay and by increasing runoff. Nitrogen is limiting nutrient in the Baltic Sea but also in some lakes, so increased loading may increase eutrophication. Further, high nitrate levels in drinking water may cause methaemoglobin anemia for humans, and nitrate is also connected to increased risk of diabetes and cancer. Thus EU has set upper limits to nitrate concentration in drinking water. MONIMET (LIFE12 ENV/FI/000409) is a project about Climate Change Indicators and Vulnerability of Boreal Zone. We simulated N loading from two boreal catchments to the receiving waters by the dynamic, catchment scale model INCA in different climate change and land use change scenarios. We calculated land use specific N loading values for these two well monitored catchments that belong to the LTER (The Long Term Ecological Research) monitoring network. We upscaled the results to the larger river basin, combining them with the information on drinking water supply to assess the vulnerability. Specific emphasis was paid on nitrate concentrations in soil water and groundwater. In general, land use change has higher influence on N loading than increase in precipitation and temperature alone. Peak runoff will sift from snow melting peak in April to late autumn and winter. Growing season will become longer allowing more efficient vegetation uptake of nutrients. Small groundwater aquifers and private wells in the middle of agricultural fields will be in the risk of increased N concentrations, if agricultural N loading increases due to changes in agricultural patterns and land use change.

  11. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  12. INCA Modelling of the Lee System: strategies for the reduction of nitrogen loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, N. J.; Paddison, T.; Whitehead, P. G.

    The Integrated Nitrogen Catchment model (INCA) was applied successfully to simulate nitrogen concentrations in the River Lee, a northern tributary of the River Thames for 1995-1999. Leaching from urban and agricultural areas was found to control nitrogen dynamics in reaches unaffected by effluent discharges and abstractions; the occurrence of minimal flows resulted in an upward trend in nitrate concentration. Sewage treatment works (STW) discharging into the River Lee raised nitrate concentrations substantially, a problem which was compounded by abstractions in the Lower Lee. The average concentration of nitrate (NO3) for the simulation period 1995-96 was 7.87 mg N l-1. Ammonium (NH4) concentrations were simulated less successfully. However, concentrations of ammonium rarely rose to levels which would be of environmental concern. Scenarios were run through INCA to assess strategies for the reduction of nitrate concentrations in the catchment. The conversion of arable land to ungrazed vegetation or to woodland would reduce nitrate concentrations substantially, whilst inclusion of riparian buffer strips would be unsuccessful in reducing nitrate loading. A 50% reduction in nitrate loading from Luton STW would result in a fall of up to 5 mg N l-1 in the reach directly affected (concentrations fell from maxima of 13 to 8 mg N l-1 , nearly a 40 % reduction), whilst a 20% reduction in abstractions would reduce maximum peaks in concentration in the lower Lee by up to 4 mg l-1 (from 17 to 13 mg N l-1, nearly a 25 % reduction),.

  13. INCA Modelling of the Lee System: strategies for the reduction of nitrogen loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Flynn

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Integrated Nitrogen Catchment model (INCA was applied successfully to simulate nitrogen concentrations in the River Lee, a northern tributary of the River Thames for 1995-1999. Leaching from urban and agricultural areas was found to control nitrogen dynamics in reaches unaffected by effluent discharges and abstractions; the occurrence of minimal flows resulted in an upward trend in nitrate concentration. Sewage treatment works (STW discharging into the River Lee raised nitrate concentrations substantially, a problem which was compounded by abstractions in the Lower Lee. The average concentration of nitrate (NO3 for the simulation period 1995-96 was 7.87 mg N l-1. Ammonium (NH4 concentrations were simulated less successfully. However, concentrations of ammonium rarely rose to levels which would be of environmental concern. Scenarios were run through INCA to assess strategies for the reduction of nitrate concentrations in the catchment. The conversion of arable land to ungrazed vegetation or to woodland would reduce nitrate concentrations substantially, whilst inclusion of riparian buffer strips would be unsuccessful in reducing nitrate loading. A 50% reduction in nitrate loading from Luton STW would result in a fall of up to 5 mg N l-1 in the reach directly affected (concentrations fell from maxima of 13 to 8 mg N l-1 , nearly a 40 % reduction, whilst a 20% reduction in abstractions would reduce maximum peaks in concentration in the lower Lee by up to 4 mg l-1 (from 17 to 13 mg N l-1, nearly a 25 % reduction,. Keywords: modelling, water quality, nitrogen, nitrate, ammonium, INCA, River Lee, River Thames, land-use.

  14. Management of regional German river catchments (REGFLUD) impact of nitrogen reduction measures on the nitrogen load in the River Ems and the River Rhine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, R; Bogena, H; Goemann, H; Kreins, P; Wendland, F

    2005-01-01

    The REGFLUD-project, commissioned by Germany's Federal Research Ministry (BMBF), addresses the problem of reducing diffuse pollution from agricultural production. The objective of the project is the development and application of multi-criteria scientific methods, which are able to predict diffuse pollution in river basins subject to economic feasibility and social acceptability. The selected river basins (Ems and Rhine basins) cover a variety of landscape units with different hydrological, hydrogeological and socio-economic characteristics. This paper focuses on the analysis of the effects of certain policy measures to reduce diffuse pollution by nitrogen. For this purpose a model system consisting of an agricultural sector model, a water balance model and a residence time/denitrification model was developed and applied. First results indicate a wide range of annual nitrogen surpluses for the rural areas between less than 10 kg N/ha up to 200 kg N/ha or more depending on the type and intensity of farming. Compared to the level of nitrogen surpluses the level of nitrogen inputs into the surface waters is relatively moderate because of degradation processes during transport in soil and groundwater. Policy impact analysis for a nitrogen tax and a limitation of the livestock density stress the importance of regionally tailored measures.

  15. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging platform for quantifying in vivo nanoparticle diffusion from drug loaded implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Stacey; Belz, Jodi; Kumar, Rajiv; Cormack, Robert A; Sridhar, Srinivas; Niedre, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Drug loaded implants are a new, versatile technology platform to deliver a localized payload of drugs for various disease models. One example is the implantable nanoplatform for chemo-radiation therapy where inert brachytherapy spacers are replaced by spacers doped with nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with chemotherapeutics and placed directly at the disease site for long-term localized drug delivery. However, it is difficult to directly validate and optimize the diffusion of these doped NPs in in vivo systems. To better study this drug release and diffusion, we developed a custom macroscopic fluorescence imaging system to visualize and quantify fluorescent NP diffusion from spacers in vivo. To validate the platform, we studied the release of free fluorophores, and 30 nm and 200 nm NPs conjugated with the same fluorophores as a model drug, in agar gel phantoms in vitro and in mice in vivo. Our data verified that the diffusion volume was NP size-dependent in all cases. Our near-infrared imaging system provides a method by which NP diffusion from implantable nanoplatform for chemo-radiation therapy spacers can be systematically optimized (eg, particle size or charge) thereby improving treatment efficacy of the platform.

  16. Response of Vallisneria natans to Increasing Nitrogen Loading Depends on Sediment Nutrient Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Gu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen (N loading may contribute to recession of submerged macrophytes in shallow lakes; yet, its influences vary depending on environmental conditions. In August 2013, we conducted a 28-day factorial-designed field mesocosm experiment in Lake Taihu at the Taihu Laboratory for Lake Ecosystem Research (TLLER to examine the effects of high N loading on the growth of Vallisneria natans in systems with contrasting sediment types. We ran the experiments with two levels of nutrient loading—present-day external nutrient loading (average P: 5 μg·L−1·day−1, N: 130 μg·L−1·day−1 and P: 5 μg·L−1·day−1, and with three times higher N loading (N: 390 μg·L−1·day−1 and used sediment with two contrasting nutrient levels. V. natans growth decreased significantly with increasing N loading, the effect being dependent, however, on the nutrient status of the sediment. In low nutrient sediment, relative growth rates, leaf biomass and root biomass decreased by 11.9%, 18.2% and 23.3%, respectively, at high rather than low N loading, while the decline was larger (44.0%, 32.7% and 41.8%, respectively when using high nutrient sediment. The larger effect in the nutrient-rich sediment may reflect an observed higher shading of phytoplankton and excess nutrient accumulation in plant tissue, though potential toxic effects of the high-nutrient sediment may also have contributed. Our study confirms the occurrence of a negative effect of increasing N loading on submerged plant growth in shallow nutrient-enriched lakes and further shows that this effect is augmented when the plants grow in nutrient-rich sediment. External N control may, therefore, help to protect or restore submerged macrophytes, especially when the sediment is enriched with nutrients and organic matter.

  17. Freshwater and Saline Loads of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen to Hood Canal and Lynch Cove, Western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Frans, Lonna M.; Noble, Marlene; Kendall, Carol; Josberger, Edward G.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2006-01-01

    Hood Canal is a long (110 kilometers), deep (175 meters) and narrow (2 to 4 kilometers wide) fjord of Puget Sound in western Washington. The stratification of a less dense, fresh upper layer of the water column causes the cold, saltier lower layer of the water column to be isolated from the atmosphere in the late summer and autumn, which limits reaeration of the lower layer. In the upper layer of Hood Canal, the production of organic matter that settles and consumes dissolved oxygen in the lower layer appears to be limited by the load of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN): nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia. Freshwater and saline loads of DIN to Hood Canal were estimated from available historical data. The freshwater load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal, which could be taken up by phytoplankton, came mostly from surface and ground water from subbasins, which accounts for 92 percent of total load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal. Although DIN in rain falling on land surfaces amounts to about one-half of the DIN entering Hood Canal from subbasins, rain falling directly on the surface of marine waters contributed only 4 percent of the load to the upper layer. Point-source discharges and subsurface flow from shallow shoreline septic systems contributed less than 4 percent of the DIN load to the upper layer. DIN in saline water flowing over the sill into Hood Canal from Admiralty Inlet was at least 17 times the total load to the upper layer of Hood Canal. In September and October 2004, field data were collected to estimate DIN loads to Lynch Cove - the most inland marine waters of Hood Canal that routinely contain low dissolved-oxygen waters. Based on measured streamflow and DIN concentrations, surface discharge was estimated to have contributed about one-fourth of DIN loads to the upper layer of Lynch Cove. Ground-water flow from subbasins was estimated to have contributed about one-half of total DIN loads to the upper layer. In autumn 2004, the relative

  18. Correction of the calculation of beam loading based in the RF power diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R. da.

    1980-01-01

    It is described an empirical correction based upon experimental datas of others authors in ORELA, GELINA and SLAC accelerators, to the calculation of the energy loss due to the beam loading effect as stated by the RF power diffusion equation theory an accelerating structure. It is obtained a dependence of this correction with the electron pulse full width half maximum, but independent of the electron energy. (author) [pt

  19. Characteristics of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Effluent Load from a Paddy-field District Implementing Crop Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Takehide; Aoki, Takeru; Osuga, Katsuyuki; Nakamura, Kimihito; Sugiyama, Sho; Kawashima, Shigeto

    Implementation of collective crop rotation in a paddy-field district may increase nutrients effluent load. We have investigated a paddy-field district implementing collective crop rotation of wheat and soybeans, measured temporal variations in nutrients concentration of drainage water and the amount of discharged water for consecutive three years, and estimated nutrients effluent load from the district during the irrigation and non-irrigation periods. As a result, the highest concentration of nutrients was observed during the non-irrigation period in every investigation year. It was shown that high nutrients concentration of drainage water during the non-irrigation period was caused by runoff of fertilizer applied to wheat because the peaks of nutrients concentration of drainage water were seen in rainy days after fertilizer application in the crop-rotation field. The effluent load during the non-irrigation periods was 16.9-22.1 kgN ha-1 (nitrogen) and 0.84-1.42 kgP ha-1 (phosphorus), which respectively accounted for 46-66% and 27-54% of annual nutrients effluent load.

  20. Accumulation of nitrogen - a critical parameter for the calculation of load limits from nitrogen in forests; Akkumulering av nitrogen - en kritisk parameter for beregning av taalegrenser for nitrogen i skog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogn, T A; Stuanes, A O; Abrahamsen, G

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper deals with the accumulation of nitrogen in forests in Norway. The level of accumulation is a critical factor for the calculation of load limits. The paper compares the average rapidity values of accumulation since the last glacial age with the calculated values from the more short-lasting period based on data from surveying programs of the State Pollution Control Authority, manuring experiments, and other relevant research programs in this field. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Influence of cold work on the diffusion of ion-implanted nitrogen in D9 steel using nuclear reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunkumar, J.; David, C.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    D9 steels and their modified versions are envisaged for use as fuel cladding and wrapper materials in the Indian fast breeder reactor (FBR) programme. The role played by interstitially dissolved nitrogen in steel matrices for the stabilization of austenitic phase, increase of strength and corrosion resistance is well known. Various factors: the role of grain boundaries and the their orientation, stress mediation, grain fragmentation and production of short circuit paths as a result of compressive stress are known to affect the diffusion of nitrogen. Basically, cold working produces plethora of defects throughout the sample as compared to its solution annealed state. Our earlier studies on 1 x10"1"5 and 5x10"1"5 N"1"5 implanted Solution Annealed D9 (SAD9) showed significant vacancy-nitrogen complexes for higher fluence. Hence, thermal diffusion behaviour of nitrogen was studied in 5 x10"1"5 -N"1"5 implanted samples in solution annealed state. In the present study, to understand the influence of cold work, similar thermal diffusion behaviour of nitrogen has been studied in Cold Worked D9 steel (CWD9) using nuclear reaction analysis

  2. Future Riverine Inorganic Nitrogen Load to the Baltic Sea From Sweden: An Ensemble Approach to Assessing Climate Change Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutschbein, C.; Sponseller, R. A.; Grabs, T.; Blackburn, M.; Boyer, E. W.; Hytteborn, J. K.; Bishop, K.

    2017-11-01

    The dramatic increase of bioreactive nitrogen entering the Earth's ecosystems continues to attract growing attention. Increasingly large quantities of inorganic nitrogen are flushed from land to water, accelerating freshwater, and marine eutrophication. Multiple, interacting, and potentially countervailing drivers control the future hydrologic export of inorganic nitrogen. In this paper, we attempt to resolve these land-water interactions across boreal/hemiboreal Sweden in the face of a changing climate with help of a versatile modeling framework to maximize the information value of existing measurement time series. We combined 6,962 spatially distributed water chemistry observations spread over 31 years with daily streamflow and air temperature records. An ensemble of climate model projections, hydrological simulations, and several parameter parsimonious regression models was employed to project future riverine inorganic nitrogen dynamics across Sweden. The median predicted increase in total inorganic nitrogen export from Sweden (2061-2090) due to climate change was 14% (interquartile range 0-29%), based on the ensemble of 7,500 different predictions for each study site. The overall export as well as the seasonal pattern of inorganic nitrogen loads in a future climate are mostly influenced by longer growing seasons and more winter flow, which offset the expected decline in spring flood. The predicted increase in inorganic nitrogen loading due to climate change means that the political efforts for reducing anthropogenic nitrogen inputs need to be increased if ambitions for reducing the eutrophication of the Baltic Sea are to be achieved.

  3. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  4. Effects of wood-ash addition on nitrogen turnover in a highly nitrogen loaded spruce site. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohrstedt, H.Oe.; Hoegbom, Lars; Nordlund, Sten

    2000-04-01

    During two consecutive years, it was studied how a fertilization with 4.2 tonnes pelleted bark ash per ha, made six-seven years earlier, affected soil chemistry, nitrogen turnover and soil-water chemistry on a Norway spruce site in SW Sweden. The actual site has a very acidic soil. At the same time, the supply of inorganic N is rich. Measures against soil acidification, e. g. addition of ash or lime, may significantly influence the turnover of N with a subsequent risk for increased leaching. Thus, there is a potential conflict between two urgent environmental goals, i. e. to decrease acidification and to decrease the N load on aquatic ecosystems. In the humus layer and the upper 5 cm of the mineral soil, pH(H 2 O) had increased with at the most 0.2 units because of the ash addition. The easily extractable amounts of Mg, P and nitrate were slightly increased. The potential nitrification in the humus layer was generally higher in the ash treatment, but the difference. was not statistically significant. The soil water at 50 cm depth was 0.1-0.2 pH-units more acidic where ash had been applied. Simultaneously, there were tendencies for higher concentrations of nitrate, Al and K. This is the first time in Sweden that ash fertilization of a closed forest has given clear indications of an increased N leaching. As expected, the ash fertilization decreased the acidity of the top soil. On the contrary, the runoff became more acidic and more rich in Al. Thus, the ash fertilization has counteracted one of its primary goals, i. e. to produce a runoff less toxic to aquatic life. The acidification of the runoff may partially be because of acid production during nitrification

  5. Effects and empirical critical loads of Nitrogen for ecoregions of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Linda H.; Robin-Abbott, Molly J.; Fenn, Mark E.; Goodale, Christine L.; Geiser, Linda H.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Allen, Edith B.; Baron, Jill S.; Bobbink, Roland; Bowman, William D.; Clark, C M; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, Frank S; Greaver, Tara L.; Hall, Sharon J; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Liu, Lingli; Lynch, Jason A.; Nadelhoffer, Knute J; Perakis, Steven; Stoddard, John L; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Dennis, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has increased nitrogen (N) deposition to a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations to the structure and function of many ecosystems across the United States. We synthesized current research relating atmospheric N deposition to effects on terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems in the United States, and estimated associated empirical critical loads of N for several receptors: freshwater diatoms, mycorrhizal fungi, lichens, bryophytes, herbaceous plants, shrubs, and trees. Biogeochemical responses included increased N mineralization and nitrification, increased gaseous N losses, and increased N leaching. Individual species, population, and community responses included increased tissue N, physiological and nutrient imbalances, increased growth, altered root-shoot ratios, increased susceptibility to secondary stresses, altered fire regime, shifts in competitive interactions and community composition, changes in species richness and other measures of biodiversity, and increases in invasive species. The range of critical loads of nutrient N reported for U.S. ecoregions, inland surface waters, and freshwater wetlands is 1–39 kg N ha−1 yr−1, spanning the range of N deposition observed over most of the country. The empirical critical loads of N tend to increase in the following sequence: diatoms, lichens and bryophytes, mycorrhizal fungi, herbaceous plants and shrubs, trees.

  6. Effects of nitrogen load on the function and diversity of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a boreal lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri MP Siljanen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. A major part of the total methane emissions from lake ecosystems are emitted from littoral wetlands. Methane emissions are significantly reduced by methanotrophs as they use methane as the sole energy and carbon source. Function of methanotrophs can be either activated or suppressed by nitrogen. However, the effects of nitrogen on methanotrophs in littoral wetlands are unknown. Here we report how nitrogen loading in situ affected the function and diversity of methanotrophs in a littoral wetland. Methanotrophic community composition and functional diversity were analyzed with particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA gene targeted microarray. Nitrogen load had no effects on methane oxidation potential and methane fluxes. Nitrogen load activated pmoA gene transcription of type I (Methylobacter, Methylomonas and LW21-freshwater phylotypes methanotrophs, but decreased the relative abundance of type II (Methylocystis, Methylosinus trichosporium and Methylosinus phylotypes methanotrophs. Hence, the overall activity of a methanotroph community in littoral wetlands is unlikely to be affected by nitrogen leached from the catchment area.

  7. Review of scenario analyses to reduce agricultural nitrogen and phosphorus loading to the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Fatemeh; Olesen, Jørgen E; Dalgaard, Tommy; Børgesen, Christen D

    2016-12-15

    Nutrient loadings of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to aquatic environments are of increasing concern globally for managing ecosystems, drinking water supply and food production. There are often multiple sources of these nutrients in the landscape, and the different hydrological flow patterns within stream or river catchments have considerable influence on nutrient transport, transformation and retention processes that all eventually affect loadings to vulnerable aquatic environments. Therefore, in order to address options to reduce nutrient loadings, quantitative assessment of their effects in real catchments need to be undertaken. This involves setting up scenarios of the possible nutrient load reduction measures and quantifying their impacts via modelling. Over the recent two decades there has been a great increase in the use of scenario-based analyses of strategies to combat excessive nutrient loadings. Here we review 130 published papers extracted from Web of Science for 1995 to 2014 that have applied models to analyse scenarios of agricultural impacts on nutrients loadings at catchment scale. The review shows that scenario studies have been performed over a broad range of climatic conditions, with a large focus on measures targeting land cover/use and land management for reducing the source load of N and P in the landscape. Some of the studies considered how to manage the flows of nutrients, or how changes in the landscape may be used to influence both flows and transformation processes. Few studies have considered spatially targeting measures in the landscape, and such studies are more recent. Spatially differentiated options include land cover/use modification and application of different land management options based on catchments characteristics, cropping conditions and climatic conditions. Most of the studies used existing catchment models such as SWAT and INCA, and the choice of the models may also have influenced the setup of the scenarios. The use of

  8. Regional variations in diffuse nitrogen losses from agriculture in the Nordic and Baltic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagstad, N.; Stålnacke, P.; Andersen, H.-E.; Deelstra, J.; Jansons, V.; Kyllmar, K.; Loigu, E.; Rekolainen, S.; Tumas, R.

    cannot explain the large regional differences observed in this study. The interactions between agricultural practices and basic catchment characteristics, including hydrological processes, determine the final losses of nitrogen to surface waters, hence it is necessary to understand these interactions to manage diffuse losses of agricultural nutrients efficiently.

  9. Mapping critical loads of nitrogen deposition for aquatic ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanus, Leora; Clow, David W.; Saros, Jasmine E.; Stephens, Verlin C.; Campbell, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially explicit estimates of critical loads of nitrogen (N) deposition (CLNdep) for nutrient enrichment in aquatic ecosystems were developed for the Rocky Mountains, USA, using a geostatistical approach. The lowest CLNdep estimates (-1 yr-1) occurred in high-elevation basins with steep slopes, sparse vegetation, and abundance of exposed bedrock and talus. These areas often correspond with areas of high N deposition (>3 kg N ha-1 yr-1), resulting in CLNdep exceedances ≥1.5 ± 1 kg N ha-1 yr-1. CLNdep and CLNdep exceedances exhibit substantial spatial variability related to basin characteristics and are highly sensitive to the NO3- threshold at which ecological effects are thought to occur. Based on an NO3- threshold of 0.5 μmol L-1, N deposition exceeds CLNdep in 21 ± 8% of the study area; thus, broad areas of the Rocky Mountains may be impacted by excess N deposition, with greatest impacts at high elevations.

  10. Nitrogen loading and nitrous oxide emissions from a river with multiple hydroelectric reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinsong; Cao, Wenzhi; Cao, Di; Huang, Zheng; Liang, Ying

    2015-05-01

    River networks receive a large fraction of the anthropogenic nitrogen applied to river catchments. The different impacts of the stream nitrogen (N) loading on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from various of aquatic ecosystems are still unknown. In this study, direct measurements of water-air interface N2O exchange in different water bodies were conducted. Results showed that the water-air interface N2O exchange from tributaries, hydropower station reservoirs, a main stream, and its estuary were 10.14 ± 13.51, 15.64 ± 10.72, 27.59 ± 20.99, and 15.98 ± 12.26 µg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1), respectively, indicating the strong impacts of human activities on N2O emission rates. The water NO2 (-)-N values predicted the dissolved N2O concentrations better than did the NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N values, indicating strong denitrification and nitrification processes. The dissolved inorganic N explained 36 % of the variations in the N2O emissions for the whole river network.

  11. Study of heat and hydraulic diffusions in clays under thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djeran, I.

    1993-01-01

    This study is a cost-sharing research programme on radioactive waste disposal and radioactive waste management. The thermal conductivity of clays is the fundamental parameter which governs the thermal diffusion and the pore pressure of the rock mass under thermal loading. Experiments have been undertaken in a reduced model, respecting representative boundary conditions. They show that the thermal conductivity depends on temperature in an unfavourable sense to the decrease of heat. On the other hand, the outflow of pore water, from the source to the exterior, has a low amplitude. A single model of porous medium allows the observations and illustrates the effects of the variation of conductivity on the behaviour of rock mass. Finally, thanks to the numerical formulations specially developed, we examine the incident of the particularities of proposed models on the thermohydromechanical behaviour of geometrically simple structures subjected to a given thermal loading

  12. Lichen-based critical loads for atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Western Oregon and Washington Forests, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiser, Linda H., E-mail: lgeiser@fs.fed.u [US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Air Resource Management Program, Siuslaw National Forest, PO Box 1148, Corvallis, OR 97339 (United States); Jovan, Sarah E. [US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program, Pacific Northwest Research Station, 620 SW Main St, Suite 400, Portland, OR 97205 (United States); Glavich, Doug A. [US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Air Resource Management Program, Siuslaw National Forest, PO Box 1148, Corvallis, OR 97339 (United States); Porter, Matthew K. [Laboratory for Atmospheric Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Critical loads (CLs) define maximum atmospheric deposition levels apparently preventative of ecosystem harm. We present first nitrogen CLs for northwestern North America's maritime forests. Using multiple linear regression, we related epiphytic-macrolichen community composition to: 1) wet deposition from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, 2) wet, dry, and total N deposition from the Communities Multi-Scale Air Quality model, and 3) ambient particulate N from Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE). Sensitive species declines of 20-40% were associated with CLs of 1-4 and 3-9 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} in wet and total deposition. CLs increased with precipitation across the landscape, presumably from dilution or leaching of depositional N. Tight linear correlation between lichen and IMPROVE data suggests a simple screening tool for CL exceedance in US Class I areas. The total N model replicated several US and European lichen CLs and may therefore be helpful in estimating other temperate-forest lichen CLs. - Lichen-based critical loads for N deposition in western Oregon and Washington forests ranged from 3 to 9 kg ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}, increasing with mean annual precipitation.

  13. A dynamic modelling approach for estimating critical loads of nitrogen based on plant community changes under a changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyazid, Salim; Kurz, Dani; Braun, Sabine; Sverdrup, Harald; Rihm, Beat; Hettelingh, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic model of forest ecosystems was used to investigate the effects of climate change, atmospheric deposition and harvest intensity on 48 forest sites in Sweden (n = 16) and Switzerland (n = 32). The model was used to investigate the feasibility of deriving critical loads for nitrogen (N) deposition based on changes in plant community composition. The simulations show that climate and atmospheric deposition have comparably important effects on N mobilization in the soil, as climate triggers the release of organically bound nitrogen stored in the soil during the elevated deposition period. Climate has the most important effect on plant community composition, underlining the fact that this cannot be ignored in future simulations of vegetation dynamics. Harvest intensity has comparatively little effect on the plant community in the long term, while it may be detrimental in the short term following cutting. This study shows: that critical loads of N deposition can be estimated using the plant community as an indicator; that future climatic changes must be taken into account; and that the definition of the reference deposition is critical for the outcome of this estimate. - Research highlights: → Plant community changes can be used to estimate critical loads of nitrogen. → Climate change is decisive for future changes of geochemistry and plant communities. → Climate change cannot be ignored in estimates of critical loads. → The model ForSAFE-Veg was successfully used to set critical loads of nitrogen. - Plant community composition can be used in dynamic modelling to estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition, provided the appropriate reference deposition, future climate and target plant communities are defined.

  14. Susceptibility of forests in the northeastern USA to nitrogen and sulfur deposition: critical load exceedance and forest health

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Duarte; L.H. Pardo; M.J. Robin-Abbott

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess susceptibility to acidification and nitrogen (N) saturation caused by atmospheric deposition to northeastern US forests, evaluate the benefits and shortcomings of making critical load assessments using regional data, and assess the relationship between expected risk (exceedance) and forest health. We calculated the critical...

  15. First-principles study on the interaction of nitrogen atom with α–uranium: From surface adsorption to bulk diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Qiulei; Deng, Huiqiu; Xiao, Shifang; Li, Xiaofan; Hu, Wangyu; Ao, Bingyun; Chen, Piheng

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies of nitriding on uranium surfaces show that the modified layers provide considerable protection against air corrosion. The bimodal distribution of nitrogen is affected by both its implantation and diffusion, and the diffusion of nitrogen during implantation is also governed by vacancy trapping. In the present paper, nitrogen adsorption, absorption, diffusion, and vacancy trapping on the surface of and in the bulk of α–uranium are studied with a first-principles density functional theory approach and the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The calculated results indicate that, regardless of the nitrogen coverage, a nitrogen atom prefers to reside at the hollow1 site and octahedral (Oct) site on and below the surface, respectively. The lowest energy barriers for on-surface and penetration diffusion occur at a coverage of 1/2 monolayer. A nitrogen atom prefers to occupy the Oct site in bulk α–uranium. High energy barriers are observed during the diffusion between neighboring Oct sites. A vacancy can capture its nearby interstitial nitrogen atom with a low energy barrier, providing a significant attractive nitrogen-vacancy interaction at the trapping center site. This study provides a reference for understanding the nitriding process on uranium surfaces

  16. Factors Controlling Nitrogen Loadings in Major River Basins Across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, E. W.; Alexander, R. B.; Galloway, J. N.; Golden, H. E.; Moore, R. B.; Schwarz, G. E.; Harvey, J. W.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Scott, D.; Clune, J.

    2017-12-01

    Inputs of reactive nitrogen (all N species except for N2) have been increasing worldwide, largely due to human activities associated with food production and energy consumption via the combustion of fossil fuels and biofuels. Despite the obvious essential benefits of a plentiful supply of food and energy, the adverse consequences associated with the accumulation of N in the environment are large. Most of the N created by human activities is released to the environment, often with unintended negative consequences. The greater the inputs of N to the landscape, the greater the potential for negative effects - caused by greenhouse gas production, ground level ozone, acid deposition, and N overload; which in turn can contribute to climate change, degradation of soils and vegetation, acidification of surface waters, coastal eutrophication, hypoxia, habitat loss, and loss of stratospheric ozone. Here we present a contemporary inventory of reactive N inputs to major water regions in the United States, and discuss accounting methods for quantifying N sources and transport. Furthermore, we quantify loadings of N from terrestrial headwaters downstream to coastal estuaries and embayments. N delivery to downstream waters is influenced by nutrient sources as well as coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes occurring along the river corridor (e.g., travel time distributions, denitrification, and storage) that scale with stream size and are affected by impoundments such as lakes and reservoirs. This underscores the need to account for the nonlinear interactions of aquatic transport processes with watershed nutrient sources, as well as cumulative effects, in developing efficient nutrient reduction strategies. Our work is useful as a benchmark of the current N situation against which future progress can be assessed in varying water regions of the country; amidst changing N inputs, policies, and management strategies. Our results stem from the EPA Integrated Nitrogen

  17. Working memory load and the retro-cue effect: A diffusion model account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherdson, Peter; Oberauer, Klaus; Souza, Alessandra S

    2018-02-01

    Retro-cues (i.e., cues presented between the offset of a memory array and the onset of a probe) have consistently been found to enhance performance in working memory tasks, sometimes ameliorating the deleterious effects of increased memory load. However, the mechanism by which retro-cues exert their influence remains a matter of debate. To inform this debate, we applied a hierarchical diffusion model to data from 4 change detection experiments using single item, location-specific probes (i.e., a local recognition task) with either visual or verbal memory stimuli. Results showed that retro-cues enhanced the quality of information entering the decision process-especially for visual stimuli-and decreased the time spent on nondecisional processes. Further, cues interacted with memory load primarily on nondecision time, decreasing or abolishing load effects. To explain these findings, we propose an account whereby retro-cues act primarily to reduce the time taken to access the relevant representation in memory upon probe presentation, and in addition protect cued representations from visual interference. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaschewski, O.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rate values of titanium, its compounds and alloys are summarized and tabulated. The individual chemical diffusion coefficients and self-diffusion coefficients of certain isotopes are given. Experimental methods are listed which were used for the determination of diffusion coefficients. Some values have been taken over from other studies. Also given are graphs showing the temperature dependences of diffusion and changes in the diffusion coefficient with concentration changes

  19. Nitrogen excess in slowly-rotating beta Cephei stars: deep mixing or diffusion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morel, T.; Butler, K.; Aerts, C.C.; Neiner, C.; Briquet, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of an NLTE abundance study of a small sample of beta Cephei stars, which point to the existence of a population of slowly-rotating B-type pulsators exhibiting a significant amount of nitrogen-enriched material at their surface. Although the origin of this nitrogen excess

  20. Nitrogen Source Inventory and Loading Tool: An integrated approach toward restoration of water-quality impaired karst springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Kirstin T; Katz, Brian G

    2017-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) from anthropogenic sources has contaminated groundwater used as drinking water in addition to impairing water quality and ecosystem health of karst springs. The Nitrogen Source Inventory and Loading Tool (NSILT) was developed as an ArcGIS and spreadsheet-based approach that provides spatial estimates of current nitrogen (N) inputs to the land surface and loads to groundwater from nonpoint and point sources within the groundwater contributing area. The NSILT involves a three-step approach where local and regional land use practices and N sources are evaluated to: (1) estimate N input to the land surface, (2) quantify subsurface environmental attenuation, and (3) assess regional recharge to the aquifer. NSILT was used to assess nitrogen loading to groundwater in two karst spring areas in west-central Florida: Rainbow Springs (RS) and Kings Bay (KB). The karstic Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) is the source of water discharging to the springs in both areas. In the KB study area (predominantly urban land use), septic systems and urban fertilizers contribute 48% and 22%, respectively, of the estimated total annual N load to groundwater 294,400 kg-N/yr. In contrast for the RS study area (predominantly agricultural land use), livestock operations and crop fertilizers contribute 50% and 13%, respectively, of the estimated N load to groundwater. Using overall groundwater N loading rates for the KB and RS study areas, 4.4 and 3.3 kg N/ha, respectively, and spatial recharge rates, the calculated groundwater nitrate-N concentration (2.1 mg/L) agreed closely with the median nitrate-N concentration (1.7 mg/L) from groundwater samples in agricultural land use areas in the RS study area for the period 2010-2014. NSILT results provide critical information for prioritizing and designing restoration efforts for water-quality impaired springs and spring runs affected by multiple sources of nitrogen loading to groundwater. The calculated groundwater N concentration for

  1. Mechanisms of basin-scale nitrogen load reductions under intensified irrigated agriculture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecka Törnqvist

    Full Text Available Irrigated agriculture can modify the cycling and transport of nitrogen (N, due to associated water diversions, water losses, and changes in transport flow-paths. We investigate dominant processes behind observed long-term changes in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN concentrations and loads of the extensive (465,000 km2 semi-arid Amu Darya River basin (ADRB in Central Asia. We specifically considered a 40-year period (1960-2000 of large irrigation expansion, reduced river water flows, increased fertilizer application and net increase of N input into the soil-water system. Results showed that observed decreases in riverine DIN concentration near the Aral Sea outlet of ADRB primarily were due to increased recirculation of irrigation water, which extends the flow-path lengths and enhances N attenuation. The observed DIN concentrations matched a developed analytical relation between concentration attenuation and recirculation ratio, showing that a fourfold increase in basin-scale recirculation can increase DIN attenuation from 85 to 99%. Such effects have previously only been observed at small scales, in laboratory experiments and at individual agricultural plots. These results imply that increased recirculation can have contributed to observed increases in N attenuation in agriculturally dominated drainage basins in different parts of the world. Additionally, it can be important for basin scale attenuation of other pollutants, including phosphorous, metals and organic matter. A six-fold lower DIN export from ADRB during the period 1981-2000, compared to the period 1960-1980, was due to the combined result of drastic river flow reduction of almost 70%, and decreased DIN concentrations at the basin outlet. Several arid and semi-arid regions around the world are projected to undergo similar reductions in discharge as the ADRB due to climate change and agricultural intensification, and may therefore undergo comparable shifts in DIN export as shown here

  2. Terricolous alpine lichens are sensitive to both load and concentration of applied nitrogen and have potential as bioindicators of nitrogen deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, Andrea J.; Fisher, Julia M.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of applied nitrogen (N) concentration and load on thallus chemistry and growth of five terricolous alpine lichen species was investigated in a three-month N addition study. Thallus N content was influenced by both concentration and load; but the relative importance of these parameters varied between species. Growth was most affected by concentration. Thresholds for effects observed in this study support a low critical load for terricolous lichen communities ( -1 y -1 ) and suggest that concentrations of N currently encountered in UK cloudwater may have detrimental effects on the growth of sensitive species. The significance of N concentration effects on sensitive species also highlights the need to avoid artificially high concentrations when designing N addition experiments. Given the sensitivity of some species to extremely low loads and concentrations of N we suggest that terricolous lichens have potential as indicators of deposition and impact in northern and alpine ecosystems. - Terricolous lichen species' N content responds to both applied N concentration and load while applied N concentration has greatest effects on growth.

  3. Terricolous alpine lichens are sensitive to both load and concentration of applied nitrogen and have potential as bioindicators of nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Andrea J., E-mail: a.britton@macaulay.ac.u [Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Fisher, Julia M. [Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    The influence of applied nitrogen (N) concentration and load on thallus chemistry and growth of five terricolous alpine lichen species was investigated in a three-month N addition study. Thallus N content was influenced by both concentration and load; but the relative importance of these parameters varied between species. Growth was most affected by concentration. Thresholds for effects observed in this study support a low critical load for terricolous lichen communities (<7.5 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}) and suggest that concentrations of N currently encountered in UK cloudwater may have detrimental effects on the growth of sensitive species. The significance of N concentration effects on sensitive species also highlights the need to avoid artificially high concentrations when designing N addition experiments. Given the sensitivity of some species to extremely low loads and concentrations of N we suggest that terricolous lichens have potential as indicators of deposition and impact in northern and alpine ecosystems. - Terricolous lichen species' N content responds to both applied N concentration and load while applied N concentration has greatest effects on growth.

  4. Diffusion and Gas Conversion Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells at Loads via AC Impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert U. Payne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impedance measurements were conducted under practical load conditions in solid oxide fuel cells of differing sizes. For a 2 cm2 button cell, impedance spectra data were separately measured for the anode, cathode, and total cell. Improved equivalent circuit models are proposed and applied to simulate each of measured impedance data. Circuit elements related to the chemical and physical processes have been added to the total-cell model to account for an extra relaxation process in the spectra not measured at either electrode. The processes to which elements are attributed have been deduced by varying cell temperature, load current, and hydrogen concentration. Spectra data were also obtained for a planar stack of five 61 cm2 cells and the individual cells therein, which were fitted to a simplified equivalent circuit model of the total button cell. Similar to the button cell, the planar cells and stack exhibit a pronounced low-frequency relaxation process, which has been attributed to concentration losses, that is, the combined effects of diffusion and gas conversion. The simplified total-cell model approximates well the dynamic behavior of the SOFC cells and the whole stack.

  5. Reducing uncertainty of estimated nitrogen load reductions to aquatic systems through spatially targeting agricultural mitigation measures using groundwater nitrogen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Fatemeh; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Jabloun, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    variation across the landscape in natural N-reduction (denitrification) of leached nitrate in the groundwater and surface water systems. A critical basis for including spatial targeting in regulation of N-load in Denmark is the uncertainty associated with the effect of spatially targeting measures, since......The need to further abate agricultural nitrate (N)-loadings to coastal waters in Denmark represents the main driver for development of a new spatially targeted regulation that focus on locating N-mitigation measures in agricultural areas with high N-load. This targeting makes use of the spatial...... the effect will be critically affected by uncertainty in the quantification of the spatial variation in N-reduction. In this study, we used 30 equally plausible N-reduction maps, at 100 m grid and sub-catchment resolutions, for the 85-km2 groundwater dominated Norsminde catchment in Denmark, applying set...

  6. Intra- and inter-annual trends in phosphorus loads and comparison with nitrogen loads to Rehoboth Bay, Delaware (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, J.A.; Scudlark, J.R.; Savidge, K.B.; Andres, A.S.; Stenger, R.J.; Ullman, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Monthly phosphorus loads from uplands, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater to Rehoboth Bay (Delaware) were determined from October 1998 to April 2002 to evaluate the relative importance of these three sources of P to the Bay. Loads from a representative subwatershed were determined and used in an areal extrapolation to estimate the upland load from the entire watershed. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and dissolved organic P (DOP) are the predominant forms of P in baseflow and P loads from the watershed are highest during the summer months. Particulate phosphorus (PP) becomes more significant in stormflow and during periods with more frequent or larger storms. Atmospheric deposition of P is only a minor source of P to Rehoboth Bay. During the period of 1998-2002, wastewater was the dominant external source of P to Rehoboth Bay, often exceeding all other P sources combined. Since 2002, however, due to technical improvements to the sole wastewater plant discharging directly to the Bay, the wastewater contribution of P has been significantly reduced and upland waters are now the principal source of P on an annualized basis. Based on comparison of N and P loads, primary productivity and biomass carrying capacity in Rehoboth Bay should be limited by P availability. However, due to the contrasting spatial and temporal patterns of N and P loading and perhaps internal cycling within the ecosystem, spatial and temporal variations in N and P-limitation within Rehoboth Bay are likely. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The simulated effects of wastewater-management actions on the hydrologic system and nitrogen-loading rates to wells and ecological receptors, Popponesset Bay Watershed, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    The discharge of excess nitrogen into Popponesset Bay, an estuarine system on western Cape Cod, has resulted in eutrophication and the loss of eel grass habitat within the estuaries. Septic-system return flow in residential areas within the watershed is the primary source of nitrogen. Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for nitrogen have been assigned to the six estuaries that compose the system, and local communities are in the process of implementing the TMDLs by the partial sewering, treatment, and disposal of treated wastewater at wastewater-treatment facilities (WTFs). Loads of waste-derived nitrogen from both current (1997–2001) and future sources can be estimated implicitly from parcel-scale water-use data and recharge areas delineated by a groundwater-flow model. These loads are referred to as “instantaneous” loads because it is assumed that the nitrogen from surface sources is delivered to receptors instantaneously and that there is no traveltime through the aquifer. The use of a solute-transport model to explicitly simulate the transport of mass through the aquifer from sources to receptors can improve implementation of TMDLs by (1) accounting for traveltime through the aquifer, (2) avoiding limitations associated with the estimation of loads from static recharge areas, (3) accounting more accurately for the effect of surface waters on nitrogen loads, and (4) determining the response of waste-derived nitrogen loads to potential wastewater-management actions. The load of nitrogen to Popponesset Bay on western Cape Cod, which was estimated by using current sources as input to a solute-transport model based on a steady-state flow model, is about 50 percent of the instantaneous load after about 7 years of transport (loads to estuary are equal to loads discharged from sources); this estimate is consistent with simulated advective traveltimes in the aquifer, which have a median of 5 years. Model-calculated loads originating from recharge areas reach 80

  8. Satellite Derived Water Quality Observations Are Related to River Discharge and Nitrogen Loads in Pensacola Bay, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Lehrter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between satellite-derived water quality variables and river discharges, concentrations and loads of nutrients, organic carbon, and sediments were investigated over a 9-year period (2003–2011 in Pensacola Bay, Florida, USA. These analyses were conducted to better understand which river forcing factors were the primary drivers of estuarine variability in several water quality variables. Remote sensing reflectance time-series data were retrieved from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS and used to calculate monthly and annual estuarine time-series of chlorophyll a (Chla, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, and total suspended sediments (TSS. Monthly MERIS Chla varied from 2.0 mg m−3 in the lower region of the bay to 17.2 mg m−3 in the upper bay. MERIS CDOM and TSS exhibited similar patterns with ranges of 0.51–2.67 (m−1 and 0.11–8.9 (g m−3. Variations in the MERIS-derived monthly and annual Chla, CDOM, and TSS time-series were significantly related to monthly and annual river discharge and loads of nitrogen, organic carbon, and suspended sediments from the Escambia and Yellow rivers. Multiple regression models based on river loads (independent variables and MERIS Chla, CDOM, or TSS (dependent variables explained significant fractions of the variability (up to 62% at monthly and annual scales. The most significant independent variables in the regressions were river nitrogen loads, which were associated with increased MERIS Chla, CDOM, and TSS concentrations, and river suspended sediment loads, which were associated with decreased concentrations. In contrast, MERIS water quality variations were not significantly related to river total phosphorus loads. The spatially synoptic, nine-year satellite record expanded upon the spatial extent of past field studies to reveal previously unseen system-wide responses to river discharge and loading variation. The results indicated that variations in Pensacola Bay Chla

  9. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  10. A rationalization of the Type IV loading dependence in the Kärger-Pfeifer classification of self-diffusivities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Kärger and Pfeifer (1987) [1] have listed five different types of dependencies of the self-diffusivities, Di,self, on the loading, Θi, of guest molecules in zeolites. Of these five types, the Type IV dependence is particularly intriguing because it displays a maximum in the Di,self − Θi dependence

  11. Diffusion of nitrogen in austenitic phase: Application to nitriding of stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torchane Lazhar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The nitriding treatment of the martensitic stainless steels aims to harden and to introduce compressive stresses on the surface of steel. Hardening is resulting of the martensitic transformation of the austenitic matrix enriched into nitrogen during cooling and of the germination and the nitride growth. In order to preserve the stainless character of the nitrided layer, it is imperative to control precipitation within the zone affected by the treatment. Our task consists in showing that is possible to control the composition of the gas atmosphere containing ammonia and argon and to carry out on the surface of nitrided samples at 1050°C two types of configuration of layers : a single phase layer made up by martensite enriched in nitrogen α’N and or a two phase layer made up by austenite γN and martensite α’N enriched in nitrogen.

  12. Evaluation and management of the impact of land use change on the nitrogen and phosphorus load delivered to surface waters: the export coefficient modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnes, P. J.

    1996-09-01

    A manageable, relatively inexpensive model was constructed to predict the loss of nitrogen and phosphorus from a complex catchment to its drainage system. The model used an export coefficient approach, calculating the total nitrogen (N) and total phosphorus (P) load delivered annually to a water body as the sum of the individual loads exported from each nutrient source in its catchment. The export coefficient modelling approach permits scaling up from plot-scale experiments to the catchment scale, allowing application of findings from field experimental studies at a suitable scale for catchment management. The catchment of the River Windrush, a tributary of the River Thames, UK, was selected as the initial study site. The Windrush model predicted nitrogen and phosphorus loading within 2% of observed total nitrogen load and 0.5% of observed total phosphorus load in 1989. The export coefficient modelling approach was then validated by application in a second research basin, the catchment of Slapton Ley, south Devon, which has markedly different catchment hydrology and land use. The Slapton model was calibrated within 2% of observed total nitrogen load and 2.5% of observed total phosphorus load in 1986. Both models proved sensitive to the impact of temporal changes in land use and management on water quality in both catchments, and were therefore used to evaluate the potential impact of proposed pollution control strategies on the nutrient loading delivered to the River Windrush and Slapton Ley.

  13. Long-term modelling of nitrogen turnover and critical loads in a forested catchment using the INCA model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-J. Langusch

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Many forest ecosystems in Central Europe have reached the status of N saturation due to chronically high N deposition. In consequence, the NO3 leaching into ground- and surface waters is often substantial. Critical loads have been defined to abate the negative consequences of the NO3 leaching such as soil acidification and nutrient losses. The steady state mass balance method is normally used to calculate critical loads for N deposition in forest ecosystems. However, the steady state mass balance approach is limited because it does not take into account hydrology and the time until the steady state is reached. The aim of this study was to test the suitability of another approach: the dynamic model INCA (Integrated Nitrogen Model for European Catchments. Long-term effects of changing N deposition and critical loads for N were simulated using INCA for the Lehstenbach spruce catchment (Fichtelgebirge, NE Bavaria, Germany under different hydrological conditions. Long-term scenarios of either increasing or decreasing N deposition indicated that, in this catchment, the response of nitrate concentrations in runoff to changing N deposition is buffered by a large groundwater reservoir. The critical load simulated by the INCA model with respect to a nitrate concentration of 0.4 mg N l–1 as threshold value in runoff was 9.7 kg N ha–1yr–1 compared to 10 kg ha–1yr–1 for the steady state model. Under conditions of lower precipitation (520 mm the resulting critical load was 7.7 kg N ha–1yr–1 , suggesting the necessity to account for different hydrological conditions when calculating critical loads. The INCA model seems to be suitable to calculate critical loads for N in forested catchments under varying hydrological conditions e.g. as a consequence of climate change. Keywords: forest ecosystem, N saturation, critical load, modelling, long-term scenario, nitrate leaching, critical loads reduction, INCA

  14. COMPARISON OF GENKENSIA DEMISSA (DILLWYN) POPULATIONS IN RHODE ISLAND FRINGE MARSHES WITH VARYING NITROGEN LOADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased residential development in coastal watersheds has led to increases in anthropogenic nitrogen inputs into estuaries. Sessile bivalves are good candidate organisms to examine animal condition in nutrient-enriched areas because they contribute significantly to energy flow...

  15. A Bayesian approach to infer nitrogen loading rates from crop and land-use types surrounding private wells in the Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Katherine M.; Bell, Andrew M.; Barber, Quinn E.; Kourakos, George; Harter, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    This study is focused on nitrogen loading from a wide variety of crop and land-use types in the Central Valley, California, USA, an intensively farmed region with high agricultural crop diversity. Nitrogen loading rates for several crop types have been measured based on field-scale experiments, and recent research has calculated nitrogen loading rates for crops throughout the Central Valley based on a mass balance approach. However, research is lacking to infer nitrogen loading rates for the broad diversity of crop and land-use types directly from groundwater nitrate measurements. Relating groundwater nitrate measurements to specific crops must account for the uncertainty about and multiplicity in contributing crops (and other land uses) to individual well measurements, and for the variability of nitrogen loading within farms and from farm to farm for the same crop type. In this study, we developed a Bayesian regression model that allowed us to estimate land-use-specific groundwater nitrogen loading rate probability distributions for 15 crop and land-use groups based on a database of recent nitrate measurements from 2149 private wells in the Central Valley. The water and natural, rice, and alfalfa and pasture groups had the lowest median estimated nitrogen loading rates, each with a median estimate below 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Confined animal feeding operations (dairies) and citrus and subtropical crops had the greatest median estimated nitrogen loading rates at approximately 269 and 65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. In general, our probability-based estimates compare favorably with previous direct measurements and with mass-balance-based estimates of nitrogen loading. Nitrogen mass-balance-based estimates are larger than our groundwater nitrate derived estimates for manured and nonmanured forage, nuts, cotton, tree fruit, and rice crops. These discrepancies are thought to be due to groundwater age mixing, dilution from infiltrating river water, or denitrification

  16. Organic Matter Loading Modifies the Microbial Community Responsible for Nitrogen Loss in Estuarine Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbin, Andrew R; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2016-04-01

    Coastal marine sediments, as locations of substantial fixed nitrogen loss, are very important to the nitrogen budget and to the primary productivity of the oceans. Coastal sediment systems are also highly dynamic and subject to periodic natural and anthropogenic organic substrate additions. The response to organic matter by the microbial community involved in nitrogen loss processes was evaluated using mesocosms of Chesapeake Bay sediments. Over the course of a 50-day incubation, rates of anammox and denitrification were measured weekly using (15)N tracer incubations, and samples were collected for genetic analysis. Rates of both nitrogen loss processes and gene abundances associated with them corresponded loosely, probably because heterogeneities in sediments obscured a clear relationship. The rates of denitrification were stimulated more, and the fraction of nitrogen loss attributed to anammox slightly reduced, by the higher organic matter addition. Furthermore, the large organic matter pulse drove a significant and rapid shift in the denitrifier community composition as determined using a nirS microarray, indicating that the diversity of these organisms plays an essential role in responding to anthropogenic inputs. We also suggest that the proportion of nitrogen loss due to anammox in these coastal estuarine sediments may be underestimated due to temporal dynamics as well as from methodological artifacts related to conventional sediment slurry incubation approaches.

  17. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baksht, E Kh; Burachenko, A G; Lomaev, M I; Panchenko, A N; Tarasenko, V F [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ∼4 ns and a rise time of ∼2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 – 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Panchenko, A. N.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-04-01

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ~4 ns and a rise time of ~2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 - 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr.

  19. Collision and diffusion in microwave breakdown of nitrogen gas in and around microgaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J. D.; Lenters, G. T.; Bowman, A.; Remillard, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    The microwave induced breakdown of N 2 gas in microgaps was modeled using the collision frequency between electrons and neutral molecules and the effective electric field concept. Low pressure breakdown at the threshold electric field occurs outside the gap, but at high pressures it is found to occur inside the microgap with a large threshold breakdown electric field corresponding to a very large electron oscillation amplitude. Three distinct pressure regimes are apparent in the microgap breakdown: a low pressure multipactor branch, a mid-pressure Paschen branch, both of which occur in the space outside the microgap, and a high pressure diffusion-drift branch, which occurs inside the microgap. The Paschen and diffusion-drift branches are divided by a sharp transition and each separately fits the collision frequency model. There is evidence that considerable electron loss to the microgap faces accompanies the diffusion-drift branch in microgaps

  20. Nitrogen-doped carbonaceous catalysts for gas-diffusion cathodes for alkaline aluminum-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, E. S.; Atamanyuk, I. N.; Ilyukhin, A. S.; Shkolnikov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Cobalt tetramethoxyphenyl porphyrin and polyacrylonitrile - based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction were synthesized and characterized by means of SEM, TEM, XPS, BET, limited evaporation method, rotating disc and rotating ring-disc electrode methods. Half-cell and Al-air cell tests were carried out to determine the characteristics of gas-diffusion cathodes. Effect of active layer thickness and its composition on the characteristics of the gas-diffusion cathodes was investigated. Power density of 300 mW cm-2 was achieved for alkaline Al-air cell with an air-breathing polyacrylonitrile-based cathode.

  1. La formation de l'oxyde azotique dans les flammes de diffusion de gaz naturel Nitrogen. Oxyde Formation in Natural-Gas Diffusion Flams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portrait L. M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'étude de la formation de l'oxyde azotique dans des flammes de diffusion de ga naturel est effectuée depuis deux ans sur le four expérimental du Groupe d'Etude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel situé à Toulouse. Un certain nombre de variables ont été explorées : type de flamme, excès d'air, préchauffage de l'air, teneur en oxygène du comburant, puissance calorifique, et débit de moment cinétique. L'étude a mis en évidence une corrélation générale, quelle que soit la variable considérée, entre la quantité maximale d'oxyde d'azote formé et la température maximale de la flamme. Certains des résultats précédents ont été exploités à l'Institut Français du Pétrole, en vue d'établir une équation de vitesse de formation de NO applicable aux flammes axiales de diffusion de gaz naturel. Les calculs s'appuient sur les connaissances obtenues lors de l'étude cinétique de formation de NO effectuée au Laboratoire d'Aérothermique Fondamentale. Les résultats du calcul théorique confirment ceux de l'étude sur le four expérimental en ce qui concerne l'influence prépondérante de la température sur la formation de l'oxyde azotique. Par ailleurs, le calcul théorique retrouve bien les résultats obtenus lors de l'étude fondamentale, selon lesquels la cinétique de formation de NO évolue le long de la flamme depuis le front de flamme jusqu'aux gaz brûlés. La généralisation à un grand nombre de flammes de l'équation cinétique expérimentale obtenue nécessite maintenant de prendre en compte certains phénomènes de diffusion négligés jusqu'à présent. Research on the formation of nitrogen oxide in natural-gas diffusion flammes has been going on for two years in the experimental furnace of the Groupe d'Etude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel located in Toulouse. Different variables have been investigoted such as type of flamme, air excess, air preheating, oxygen content in the oxidant, heating power and kinetic moment output

  2. Modelling mitigation options to reduce diffuse nitrogen water pollution from agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouraoui, Fayçal; Grizzetti, Bruna

    2014-01-15

    Agriculture is responsible for large scale water quality degradation and is estimated to contribute around 55% of the nitrogen entering the European Seas. The key policy instrument for protecting inland, transitional and coastal water resources is the Water Framework Directive (WFD). Reducing nutrient losses from agriculture is crucial to the successful implementation of the WFD. There are several mitigation measures that can be implemented to reduce nitrogen losses from agricultural areas to surface and ground waters. For the selection of appropriate measures, models are useful for quantifying the expected impacts and the associated costs. In this article we review some of the models used in Europe to assess the effectiveness of nitrogen mitigation measures, ranging from fertilizer management to the construction of riparian areas and wetlands. We highlight how the complexity of models is correlated with the type of scenarios that can be tested, with conceptual models mostly used to evaluate the impact of reduced fertilizer application, and the physically-based models used to evaluate the timing and location of mitigation options and the response times. We underline the importance of considering the lag time between the implementation of measures and effects on water quality. Models can be effective tools for targeting mitigation measures (identifying critical areas and timing), for evaluating their cost effectiveness, for taking into consideration pollution swapping and considering potential trade-offs in contrasting environmental objectives. Models are also useful for involving stakeholders during the development of catchments mitigation plans, increasing their acceptability. © 2013.

  3. Fe and N diffusion in nitrogen-rich FeN measured using neutron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E-mail: mgupta@csr.ernet.in. Abstract. Grazing incidence neutron reflectometry provides an opportunity to measure the depth profile of a thin film sample with a resolution <1 nm, in a non-destructive way. In this way the diffusion across the interfaces can also be measured. In addition, neutrons have contrast among the ...

  4. Quantifying nitrogen leaching from diffuse agricultural and forest sources in a large heterogeneous catchment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáček, Jiří; Hejzlar, Josef; Posch, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 115, 1-3 (2013), s. 149-165 ISSN 0168-2563. [ASLO 2013. New Orleans, 17.02.2013-22.02.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1218 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 244121 - REFRESH Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : reactive nitrogen * mass budgets * agricultural land * forest * modelling Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2013

  5. Minority carrier diffusion, defects, and localization in InGaAsN, with 2% nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Allerman, A. A.; Seager, C. H.; Sieg, R. M.; Jones, E. D.

    2000-01-01

    Electron and hole transport in compensated InGaAsN (≅2% N) are examined through Hall mobility, photoconductivity, and solar cell photoresponse measurements. Short minority carrier diffusion lengths, photoconductive-response spectra, and doping dependent, thermally activated Hall mobilities reveal a broad distribution of localized states. At this stage of development, lateral carrier transport appears to be limited by large scale (>> mean free path) material inhomogeneities, not a random alloy-induced mobility edge. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Loading-Dependent Diffusion of CO2, SO2, CH4, and Their Binary Mixtures in ZIF-10: The Role of Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yang, Deshuai; Fisher, Trevor R; Qiao, Qi; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Na; Chen, Xiangshu; Huang, Liangliang

    2017-10-24

    The loading-dependent diffusion behavior of CH 4 , CO 2 , SO 2 , and their binary mixtures in ZIF-10 has been investigated in detail by using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulation results demonstrate that the self-diffusion coefficient D i of CH 4 molecules decreases sharply and monotonically with the loading while those of both CO 2 and SO 2 molecules initially display a slight increase at low uptakes and follow a slow decrease at high uptakes. Accordingly, the interaction energies between CH 4 molecules and ZIF-10 remain nearly constant regardless of the loading due to the absence of hydrogen bonds (HBs), while the interaction energies between CO 2 (or SO 2 ) and ZIF-10 decease rapidly with the loading, especially at small amounts of gas molecules. Such different loading-dependent diffusion and interaction mechanisms can be attributed to the relevant HB behavior between gas molecules and ZIF-10. At low loadings, both the number and strength of HBs between CO 2 (or SO 2 ) molecules and ZIF-10 decrease obviously as the loading increases, which is responsible for the slight increase of their diffusion coefficients. However, at high loadings, their HB strength increases with the loading. Similar loading-dependent phenomena of diffusion, interaction, and HB behavior can be observed for CH 4, CO 2 , and SO 2 binary mixtures in ZIF-10, only associated with some HB competition between CO 2 and SO 2 molecules in the case of the CO 2 /SO 2 mixture.

  7. Simulation of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Load Runoff by a GIS-based Distributed Model for Chikugo River Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Haruka; Hiramatsu, Kazuaki; Harada, Masayoshi

    A distributed model was developed in order to simulate the process of nitrogen and phosphorus load runoff in the semi-urban watershed of the Chikugo River, Japan. A grid of cells 1km in size was laid over the study area, and several input variables for each cell area including DEM, land use and statistical data were extracted by GIS. In the process of water runoff, hydrograph calculated at Chikugo Barrage was in close agreement with the observed one, which achieved Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of 0.90. In addition, the model simulated reasonably well the movement of TN and TP at each station. The model was also used to analyze three scenarios based on the watershed management: (1) reduction of nutrient loads from livestock farm, (2) improvement of septic tanks' wastewater treatment system and (3) application of purification function of paddy fields. As a result, effectiveness of management strategy in each scenario depended on land use patterns. The reduction rates of nutrient load effluent in scenarios (1) and (3) were higher than that in scenario (2). The present result suggests that an appropriate management of livestock farm together with the effective use of paddy environment would have significant effects on the reduction of nutrient loads. A suitable management strategy should be planned based on the land use pattern in the watershed.

  8. A complex-systems approach to predicting effects of sea level rise and nitrogen loading on nitrogen cycling in coastal wetland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Moseman, Serena; Santoro, Alyson; Hopfensperger, Kristine; Burgin, Amy

    2010-01-01

    To effectively manage coastal ecosystems, we need an improvedunderstanding of how tidal marsh ecosystem services will respond to sea-level rise and increased nitrogen (N) loading to coastal areas. Here we review existing literature to better understand how these interacting perturbations s will likely impact N removal by tidal marshes. We propose that the keyy factors controlling long-term changes in N removal are plant-community changes, soil accretion rates, surface-subsurface flow paths, marsh geomorphology microbial communities, and substrates for microbial reactions. Feedbacks affecting relative elevations and sediment accretion ratess will serve as dominant controls on future N removal throughout the marsh. Given marsh persistence, we hypothesize that the processes dominating N removal will vary laterally across the marsh and longitudinallyalong the estuarine gradient. In salt marsh interiors, where nitrate reduction rates are often limited by delivery of nitrate to bacterial communities, reductions in groundwater discharge due to sea level rise may trigger a net reduction in N removal. In freshwater marshes, we expect a decreasee in N removal efficiency due to increased sulfide concentrations. Sulfide encroachment will increase the relative importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and lead to greater bacterial nitrogen immobilization, ultimately resulting in an ecosystem that retains more N and is less effective at permanent N removal from the watershed. In contrast, we predict that sealevel–driven expansion of the tidal creek network and the degree of surface-subsurface exchange flux through tidal creek banks will result in greater N-removal efficiency from these locations.

  9. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition and critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pinho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N has emerged in recent years as a key factor associated with global changes, with impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human health. In order to ameliorate the effects of excessive N, safety thresholds such as critical loads (deposition fluxes and levels (concentrations can be established. Few studies have assessed these thresholds for semi-natural Mediterranean ecosystems. Our objective was therefore to determine the critical loads of N deposition and long-term critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands. We have considered changes in epiphytic lichen communities, one of the most sensitive comunity indicators of excessive N in the atmosphere. Based on a classification of lichen species according to their tolerance to N we grouped species into response functional groups, which we used as a tool to determine the critical loads and levels. This was done for a Mediterranean climate in evergreen cork-oak woodlands, based on the relation between lichen functional diversity and modelled N deposition for critical loads and measured annual atmospheric ammonia concentrations for critical levels, evaluated downwind from a reduced N source (a cattle barn. Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and annual atmospheric ammonia concentration showed the critical level to be below 1.9 μg m−3, in agreement with recent studies for other ecosystems. Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and N deposition showed that the critical load was lower than 26 kg (N ha−1 yr−1, which is within the upper range established for other semi-natural ecosystems. Taking into account the high sensitivity of lichen communities to excessive N, these values should aid development of policies to protect Mediterranean woodlands from the initial effects of excessive N.

  10. Runoff load estimation of particulate and dissolved nitrogen in Lake Inba watershed using continuous monitoring data on turbidity and electric conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Nagano, Y; Furumai, H

    2012-01-01

    Easy-to-measure surrogate parameters for water quality indicators are needed for real time monitoring as well as for generating data for model calibration and validation. In this study, a novel linear regression model for estimating total nitrogen (TN) based on two surrogate parameters is proposed based on evaluation of pollutant loads flowing into a eutrophic lake. Based on their runoff characteristics during wet weather, electric conductivity (EC) and turbidity were selected as surrogates for particulate nitrogen (PN) and dissolved nitrogen (DN), respectively. Strong linear relationships were established between PN and turbidity and DN and EC, and both models subsequently combined for estimation of TN. This model was evaluated by comparison of estimated and observed TN runoff loads during rainfall events. This analysis showed that turbidity and EC are viable surrogates for PN and DN, respectively, and that the linear regression model for TN concentration was successful in estimating TN runoff loads during rainfall events and also under dry weather conditions.

  11. Spatial optimization of watershed management practices for nitrogen load reduction using a modeling-optimization framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best management practices (BMPs) are perceived as being effective in reducing nutrient loads transported from non-point sources (NPS) to receiving water bodies. The objective of this study was to develop a modeling-optimization framework that can be used by watershed management p...

  12. Modelling the flow of nitrogen and phosphorus in Europe: From loads to coastal seas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepper O; Beusen AHW; Meinardi CR; CIM; LWD; LBG

    1995-01-01

    A model is described that aims at predicting surface water quality from N- and P-inputs on a European scale. The model combines a GIS-based approach to estimate loads, geohydrological data to define model structure and statistical techniques to estimate parameter values. The model starts with an

  13. Comparison of the Performance of Chilled Beam with Swirl Jet and Diffuse Ceiling Air Supply: Impact of Heat Load Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertheussen, Bård; Mustakallio, Panu; Kosonen, Risto

    2013-01-01

    The impact of heat load strength and positioning on the indoor environment generated by diffuse ceiling air supply and chilled beam with radial swirl jet was studied and compared. An office room with two persons and a meeting room with six persons were simulated in a test room (4.5 x 3.95 x 3.5 m3......) and Category B thermal environment in the meeting room at high heat load of 94 W∙m−2. The air distribution pattern was influenced by the convective flows from the heat sources. The maximum local velocity in the occupied zone was 0.23–0.26 m∙s−1. The diffuse ceiling supply did not ensure complete mixing...... temperature was controlled at 24 °C. The quality of the generated indoor environment as defined in ISO standard 7730 (2005) was assessed based on comprehensive physical measurements. The systems created Category A thermal environment in cooling situations at heat load of 50 W∙m−2 and 78 W∙m−2 (office room...

  14. Contribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to diffuse pollution in a typical hilly red soil catchment in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianlin; Liu, Jieyun; Li, Yong; Li, Yuyuan; Wang, Yi; Liu, Xuejun; Wu, Jinshui

    2014-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is currently high and meanwhile diffuse N pollution is also serious in China. The correlation between N deposition and riverine N export and the contribution of N deposition to riverine N export were investigated in a typical hilly red soil catchment in southern China over a two-year period. N deposition was as high as 26.1 to 55.8kgN/(ha·yr) across different land uses in the studied catchment, while the riverine N exports ranged from 7.2 to 9.6kgN/(ha·yr) in the forest sub-catchment and 27.4 to 30.3kgN/(ha·yr) in the agricultural sub-catchment. The correlations between both wet N deposition and riverine N export and precipitation were highly positive, and so were the correlations between NH4(+)-N or NO3(-)-N wet deposition and riverine NH4(+)-N or NO3(-)-N exports except for NH4(+)-N in the agricultural sub-catchment, indicating that N deposition contributed to riverine N export. The monthly export coefficients of atmospheric deposited N from land to river in the forest sub-catchment (with a mean of 14%) presented a significant positive correlation with precipitation, while the monthly contributions of atmospheric deposition to riverine N export (with a mean of 18.7% in the agricultural sub-catchment and a mean of 21.0% in the whole catchment) were significantly and negatively correlated with precipitation. The relatively high contribution of N deposition to diffuse N pollution in the catchment suggests that efforts should be done to control anthropogenic reactive N emissions to the atmosphere in hilly red soil regions in southern China. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Bacterial structure of aerobic granules is determined by aeration mode and nitrogen load in the reactor cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated how the microbial composition of biomass and kinetics of nitrogen conversions in aerobic granular reactors treating high-ammonium supernatant depended on nitrogen load and the number of anoxic phases in the cycle. Excellent ammonium removal and predomination of full nitrification was observed in the reactors operated at 1.1 kg TKN m(-3) d(-1) and with anoxic phases in the cycle. In all reactors, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria predominated, comprising between 90.14% and 98.59% of OTUs. Extracellular polymeric substances-producing bacteria, such as Rhodocyclales, Xanthomonadaceae, Sphingomonadales and Rhizobiales, were identified in biomass from all reactors, though in different proportions. Under constant aeration, bacteria capable of autotrophic nitrification were found in granules, whereas under variable aeration heterotrophic nitrifiers such as Pseudomonas sp. and Paracoccus sp. were identified. Constant aeration promoted more even bacteria distribution among taxa; with 1 anoxic phase, Paracoccus aminophilus predominated (62.73% of OTUs); with 2 phases, Corynebacterium sp. predominated (65.10% of OTUs). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aggravated phosphorus limitation on biomass production under increasing nitrogen loading: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Niu, Shuli; Yu, Guirui

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), either individually or in combination, have been demonstrated to limit biomass production in terrestrial ecosystems. Field studies have been extensively synthesized to assess global patterns of N impacts on terrestrial ecosystem processes. However, to our knowledge, no synthesis has been done so far to reveal global patterns of P impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, especially under different nitrogen (N) levels. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of impacts of P addition, either alone or with N addition, on aboveground (AGB) and belowground biomass production (BGB), plant and soil P concentrations, and N : P ratio in terrestrial ecosystems. Overall, our meta-analysis quantitatively confirmed existing notions: (i) colimitation of N and P on biomass production and (ii) more P limitation in tropical forest than other ecosystems. More importantly, our analysis revealed new findings: (i) P limitation on biomass production was aggravated by N enrichment and (ii) plant P concentration was a better indicator of P limitation than soil P availability. Specifically, P addition increased AGB and BGB by 34% and 13%, respectively. The effect size of P addition on biomass production was larger in tropical forest than grassland, wetland, and tundra and varied with P fertilizer forms, P addition rates, or experimental durations. The P-induced increase in biomass production and plant P concentration was larger under elevated than ambient N. Our findings suggest that the global limitation of P on biomass production will become severer under increasing N fertilizer and deposition in the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. External load application in gait and posture reeducation after diffuse axonal injury of the corpus callosum. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Zawadka

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury caused car accidents is the one of the most common causes of diffuse axonal injury typically located at the grey-white matter junction, in the corpus callosum. A 58-year-old female patient Caucasian race was admitted to the Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Unit with head injury, broken right ulnar bone, numerous broken ribs and broken right iliac crest. Neurological examination resulted in right-sided hemiparesis. There were also coordination and balance disorders while sitting and standing. The patient was unable to walk. After physiotherapy treatment included external load application (ankle weights and rucksack with weights in gait and posture reeducation, patient has improved balance, locomotion and body posture. However, application of external loads during walk and posture reeducation needs to be further investigated with greater number of participants and control group.

  18. [Analysis on nitrogen and phosphorus loading of non-point sources in Shiqiao river watershed based on L-THIA model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Zeng, Fan-Tang; Fang, Huai-Yang; Lin, Shu

    2013-11-01

    Based on the Long-term Hydrological Impact Assessment (L-THIA) model, the effect of land use and rainfall change on nitrogen and phosphorus loading of non-point sources in Shiqiao river watershed was analyzed. The parameters in L-THIA model were revised according to the data recorded in the scene of runoff plots, which were set up in the watershed. The results showed that the distribution of areas with high pollution load was mainly concentrated in agricultural land and urban land. Agricultural land was the biggest contributor to nitrogen and phosphorus load. From 1995 to 2010, the load of major pollutants, namely TN and TP, showed an obviously increasing trend with increase rates of 17.91% and 25.30%, respectively. With the urbanization in the watershed, urban land increased rapidly and its area proportion reached 43.94%. The contribution of urban land to nitrogen and phosphorus load was over 40% in 2010. This was the main reason why pollution load still increased obviously while the agricultural land decreased greatly in the past 15 years. The rainfall occurred in the watershed was mainly concentrated in the flood season, so the nitrogen and phosphorus load of the flood season was far higher than that of the non-flood season and the proportion accounting for the whole year was over 85%. Pearson regression analysis between pollution load and the frequency of different patterns of rainfall demonstrated that rainfall exceeding 20 mm in a day was the main rainfall type causing non-point source pollution.

  19. Critical Loads of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition for Aquatic Ecosystems in Yosemite and Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanus, L.; Clow, D. W.; Sickman, J. O.

    2016-12-01

    High-elevation aquatic ecosystems in Yosemite (YOSE) and Sequoia and Kings Canyon (SEKI) National Parks are impacted by atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition associated with local and regional air pollution. Documented effects include elevated surface water nitrate concentrations, increased algal productivity, and changes in diatom species assemblages. Annual wet inorganic N deposition maps, developed at 1-km resolution for YOSE and SEKI to quantify N deposition to sensitive high-elevation ecosystems, range from 1.0 to over 5.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Critical loads of N deposition for nutrient enrichment of aquatic ecosystems were quantified and mapped using a geostatistical approach, with N deposition, topography, vegetation, geology, and climate as potential explanatory variables. Multiple predictive models were created using various combinations of explanatory variables; this approach allowed us to better quantify uncertainty and more accurately identify the areas most sensitive to atmospherically deposited N. The lowest critical loads estimates and highest exceedances identified within YOSE and SEKI occurred in high-elevation basins with steep slopes, sparse vegetation, and areas of neoglacial till and talus. These results are consistent with previous analyses in the Rocky Mountains, and highlight the sensitivity of alpine ecosystems to atmospheric N deposition.

  20. Empirical and simulated critical loads for nitrogen deposition in California mixed conifer forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenn, M.E.; Jovan, S.; Yuan, F.; Geiser, L.; Meixner, T.; Gimeno, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Empirical critical loads (CL) for N deposition were determined from changes in epiphytic lichen communities, elevated NO 3 - leaching in streamwater, and reduced fine root biomass in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) at sites with varying N deposition. The CL for lichen community impacts of 3.1 kg ha -1 year -1 is expected to protect all components of the forest ecosystem from the adverse effects of N deposition. Much of the western Sierra Nevada is above the lichen-based CL, showing significant changes in lichen indicator groups. The empirical N deposition threshold and that simulated by the DayCent model for enhanced NO 3 - leaching were 17 kg N ha -1 year -1 . DayCent estimated that elevated NO 3 - leaching in the San Bernardino Mountains began in the late 1950s. Critical values for litter C:N (34.1), ponderosa pine foliar N (1.1%), and N concentrations (1.0%) in the lichen Letharia vulpina ((L.) Hue) are indicative of CL exceedance. - Critical loads for N deposition effects on lichens, trees and nitrate leaching provide benchmarks for protecting California forests

  1. Empirical and simulated critical loads for nitrogen deposition in California mixed conifer forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenn, M.E. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)], E-mail: mfenn@fs.fed.us; Jovan, S. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, 620 SW Main, Suite 400, Portland, OR 97205 (United States); Yuan, F. [Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Geiser, L. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Air Resource Management Program, PO Box 1148, Corvallis, OR 97339 (United States); Meixner, T. [Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Gimeno, B.S. [Ecotoxicology of Air Pollution, CIEMAT (ed. 70), Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    Empirical critical loads (CL) for N deposition were determined from changes in epiphytic lichen communities, elevated NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching in streamwater, and reduced fine root biomass in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) at sites with varying N deposition. The CL for lichen community impacts of 3.1 kg ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} is expected to protect all components of the forest ecosystem from the adverse effects of N deposition. Much of the western Sierra Nevada is above the lichen-based CL, showing significant changes in lichen indicator groups. The empirical N deposition threshold and that simulated by the DayCent model for enhanced NO{sub 3}{sup -}leaching were 17 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}. DayCent estimated that elevated NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching in the San Bernardino Mountains began in the late 1950s. Critical values for litter C:N (34.1), ponderosa pine foliar N (1.1%), and N concentrations (1.0%) in the lichen Letharia vulpina ((L.) Hue) are indicative of CL exceedance. - Critical loads for N deposition effects on lichens, trees and nitrate leaching provide benchmarks for protecting California forests.

  2. Stochastic interpretation of the advection-diffusion equation and its relevance to bed load transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancey, C.; Bohorquez, P.; Heyman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The advection-diffusion equation is one of the most widespread equations in physics. It arises quite often in the context of sediment transport, e.g., for describing time and space variations in the particle activity (the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area). Phenomenological laws are usually sufficient to derive this equation and interpret its terms. Stochastic models can also be used to derive it, with the significant advantage that they provide information on the statistical properties of particle activity. These models are quite useful when sediment transport exhibits large fluctuations (typically at low transport rates), making the measurement of mean values difficult. Among these stochastic models, the most common approach consists of random walk models. For instance, they have been used to model the random displacement of tracers in rivers. Here we explore an alternative approach, which involves monitoring the evolution of the number of particles moving within an array of cells of finite length. Birth-death Markov processes are well suited to this objective. While the topic has been explored in detail for diffusion-reaction systems, the treatment of advection has received no attention. We therefore look into the possibility of deriving the advection-diffusion equation (with a source term) within the framework of birth-death Markov processes. We show that in the continuum limit (when the cell size becomes vanishingly small), we can derive an advection-diffusion equation for particle activity. Yet while this derivation is formally valid in the continuum limit, it runs into difficulty in practical applications involving cells or meshes of finite length. Indeed, within our stochastic framework, particle advection produces nonlocal effects, which are more or less significant depending on the cell size and particle velocity. Albeit nonlocal, these effects look like (local) diffusion and add to the intrinsic particle diffusion (dispersal due

  3. Nitrogen concentrations and loads for the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam, Connecticut, computed with the use of autosampling and continuous measurements of water quality for water years 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, John R.; Martin, Joseph W.; Morrison, Jonathan

    2018-03-20

    The daily and annual loads of nitrate plus nitrite and total nitrogen for the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam, Connecticut, were determined for water years 2009 to 2014. The analysis was done with a combination of methods, which included a predefined rating curve method for nitrate plus nitrite and total nitrogen for water years 2009 to 2011 and a custom rating curve method that included sensor measurements of nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen concentration and turbidity along with mean daily flow to determine total nitrogen loads for water years 2011 to 2014. Instantaneous concentrations of total nitrogen were estimated through the use of a regression model based on sensor measurements at 15-minute intervals of nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen and turbidity for water years 2011 to 2014.Annual total nitrogen loads at the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam ranged from 12,900 to 19,200 metric tons, of which about 42 to 49 percent was in the form of nitrate plus nitrite. The mean 95-percent prediction intervals on daily total nitrogen load estimates were smaller from the custom model, which used sensor data, than those calculated by the predefined model.Annual total nitrogen load estimates at the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam were compared with the upstream load estimates at the Connecticut River at Thompsonville, Conn. Annual gains in total nitrogen loads between the two stations ranged from 3,430 to 6,660 metric tons. These increases between the two stations were attributed to the effects of increased urbanization and to combined annual discharges of 1,540 to 2,090 metric tons of nitrogen from 24 wastewater treatment facilities in the drainage area between the two stations. The contribution of total nitrogen from wastewater discharge between the two stations had declined substantially before the beginning of this study and accounted for from 31 to 52 percent of the gain in nitrogen load between the Thompsonville and Middle Haddam sites.

  4. Ecological ranges for the pH and NO3 of syntaxa: a new basis for the estimation of critical loads for acid and nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Goedhart, P.W.; Malinowska, A.H.; Frissel, J.Y.; Wegman, R.M.A.; Slim, P.A.; Dobben, van H.F.

    2011-01-01

    Question: Can the abiotic ranges of syntaxonomic units (associations) in terms of pH and nitrate concentration be estimated and then in principle be used to estimate critical loads for acid and nitrogen deposition? Location: Europe. Methods: Using splines, abiotic ranges of syntaxonomic units were

  5. Modeling heterogeneous populations of thermostatically controlled loads using diffusion-advection PDEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moura, Scott; Ruiz, Victor; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing a partial differential equation (PDE)-based model and parameter identification scheme for heterogeneous populations of thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs). First, a coupled two-state hyperbolic PDE model for homogenous TCL populations is derived. This model i...

  6. Diffusion and bulk flow in phloem loading: A theoretical analysis of the polymer trap mechanism for sugar transport in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölger, Julia; Rademaker, Hanna; Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander; Bohr, Tomas

    2014-10-01

    Plants create sugar in the mesophyll cells of their leaves by photosynthesis. This sugar, mostly sucrose, has to be loaded via the bundle sheath into the phloem vascular system (the sieve elements), where it is distributed to growing parts of the plant. We analyze the feasibility of a particular loading mechanism, active symplasmic loading, also called the polymer trap mechanism, where sucrose is transformed into heavier sugars, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the intermediary-type companion cells bordering the sieve elements in the minor veins of the phloem. Keeping the heavier sugars from diffusing back requires that the plasmodesmata connecting the bundle sheath with the intermediary cell act as extremely precise filters, which are able to distinguish between molecules that differ by less than 20% in size. In our modeling, we take into account the coupled water and sugar movement across the relevant interfaces, without explicitly considering the chemical reactions transforming the sucrose into the heavier sugars. Based on the available data for plasmodesmata geometry, sugar concentrations, and flux rates, we conclude that this mechanism can in principle function, but that it requires pores of molecular sizes. Comparing with the somewhat uncertain experimental values for sugar export rates, we expect the pores to be only 5%-10% larger than the hydraulic radius of the sucrose molecules. We find that the water flow through the plasmodesmata, which has not been quantified before, contributes only 10%-20% to the sucrose flux into the intermediary cells, while the main part is transported by diffusion. On the other hand, the subsequent sugar translocation into the sieve elements would very likely be carried predominantly by bulk water flow through the plasmodesmata. Thus, in contrast to apoplasmic loaders, all the necessary water for phloem translocation would be supplied in this way with no need for additional water uptake across the plasma membranes of the

  7. Five years of nitrogen dioxide measurement with diffusion tube samplers at over 1000 sites in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ken; Bush, Tony; Mooney, Diane

    In 1993, a large (>1000 monitoring sites) co-ordinated monitoring network for nitrogen dioxide, using diffusion tube samplers, was established in urban areas throughout the UK. The primary aim of this network is to assess the spatial and temporal distribution of NO 2 throughout the UK and highlight areas of high concentration which may require more detailed monitoring with automatic analysers. This paper presents a summary of the results for the first 5-years of monitoring, 1993-1997 inclusive. The network has shown that highest concentrations occur in London and urban areas of Yorkshire and Humberside and the East and West Midlands of the UK. Averaged over the whole of the UK, NO 2 concentrations have been remarkably similar for most of the 5 years, though a significant decrease was observed at urban background locations in 1997. Overall, average NO 2 concentrations during 1997 were 23 ppb at kerbside locations and 13 ppb at urban background locations. The results of the network have been used by the Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions as one of the criteria for the selection of priority areas for expansion of the UK Automatic Urban Network in recent years. Extensive quality assurance and control procedures incorporated into the network ensure that the estimated accuracy of the data is broadly comparable with the accuracy requirement for indicative monitoring specified in the EU "daughter" Directive for NO2 (±25%) . The complete dataset of results for the network can be found on the world wide web at http://www.environment.detr.gov.uk/airq/aqinfo.htm.

  8. Forms and subannual variability of nitrogen and phosphorus loading to global river networks over the 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Mogollón, José M.; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Bouwman, Alexander F.

    2018-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) play a major role in the biogeochemical functioning of aquatic systems. N and P transfer to surface freshwaters has amplified during the 20th century, which has led to widespread eutrophication problems. The contribution of different sources, natural and anthropogenic, to total N and P loading to river networks has recently been estimated yearly using the Integrated Model to Assess the Global Environment - Global Nutrient Model (IMAGE-GNM). However, eutrophic events generally result from a combination of physicochemical conditions governed by hydrological dynamics and the availability of specific nutrient forms that vary at subyearly timescales. In the present study, we define for each simulated nutrient source: i) its speciation, and ii) its subannual temporal pattern. Thereby, we simulate the monthly loads of different N (ammonium, nitrate + nitrite, and organic N) and P forms (dissolved and particulate inorganic P, and organic P) to global river networks over the whole 20th century at a half-degree spatial resolution. Results indicate that, together with an increase in the delivery of all nutrient forms to global rivers, the proportion of inorganic forms in total N and P inputs has risen from 30 to 43% and from 56 to 65%, respectively. The high loads originating from fertilized agricultural lands and the increasing proportion of sewage inputs have led to a greater proportion of DIN forms (ammonium and nitrate), that are usually more bioavailable. Soil loss from agricultural lands, which delivers large amounts of particle-bound inorganic P to surface freshwaters, has become the dominant P source, which is likely to lead to an increased accumulation of legacy P in slow flowing areas (e.g., lakes and reservoirs). While the TN:TP ratio of the loads has remained quite stable, the DIN:DIP molar ratio, which is likely to affect algal development the most, has increased from 18 to 27 globally. Human activities have also affected the

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Estradiol-Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles Using Homogenization-Solvent Diffusion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Dinarvand

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The inherent shortcomings of conventional drug delivery systems containing estrogens and the potential of nanoparticles (NPs have offered tremendous scope for investigation. Although polymeric NPs have been used as drug carriers for many active agents, the use of appropriate polymer and method of NP preparation to overcome different challenges is very important. Materials and methods: Poly lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA NPs containing estradiol valerate were prepared by the modified spontaneous emulsification solvent diffusion method. Several parameters including the drug/polymer ratios in range of 2.5-10%, poly vinyl alcohol (PVA in concentration of 0-4% as stabilizer and internal phase volume and composition were examined to optimize formulation. The size distribution and morphology of the NPs, encapsulation efficacy and in vitro release profile in phosphate buffer medium (pH 7.4 during 12 hrs were then investigated. Results: The NPs prepared in this study were spherical with a relatively mono-dispersed size distribution. By adjustment of the process parameters, the size and the drug encapsulation efficacy as well as the drug release kinetics can be optimally controlled. The mean particle size of the best formula with encapsulation efficiency of 100% was 175 ± 19, in which release profile was best fitted to Higuchi's model of release which showed that release mechanism was mainly controlled by diffusion of the drug to the release medium. Conclusion: According to the size and surface properties of the prepared particles, it may be concluded that they are a good formulation for non-parenteral routes of administration.

  10. Total maximum allocated load calculation of nitrogen pollutants by linking a 3D biogeochemical-hydrodynamic model with a programming model in Bohai Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Aiquan; Li, Keqiang; Ding, Dongsheng; Li, Yan; Liang, Shengkang; Li, Yanbin; Su, Ying; Wang, Xiulin

    2015-12-01

    The equal percent removal (EPR) method, in which pollutant reduction ratio was set as the same in all administrative regions, failed to satisfy the requirement for water quality improvement in the Bohai Sea. Such requirement was imposed by the developed Coastal Pollution Total Load Control Management. The total maximum allocated load (TMAL) of nitrogen pollutants in the sea-sink source regions (SSRs) around the Bohai Rim, which is the maximum pollutant load of every outlet under the limitation of water quality criteria, was estimated by optimization-simulation method (OSM) combined with loop approximation calculation. In OSM, water quality is simulated using a water quality model and pollutant load is calculated with a programming model. The effect of changes in pollutant loads on TMAL was discussed. Results showed that the TMAL of nitrogen pollutants in 34 SSRs was 1.49×105 ton/year. The highest TMAL was observed in summer, whereas the lowest in winter. TMAL was also higher in the Bohai Strait and central Bohai Sea and lower in the inner area of the Liaodong Bay, Bohai Bay and Laizhou Bay. In loop approximation calculation, the TMAL obtained was considered satisfactory for water quality criteria as fluctuation of concentration response matrix with pollutant loads was eliminated. Results of numerical experiment further showed that water quality improved faster and were more evident under TMAL input than that when using the EPR method

  11. Estimating nitrogen loading and far-field dispersal potential from background sources and coastal finfish aquaculture: A simple framework and case study in Atlantic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, R.; Milewski, I.; Loucks, R.; Smith, R.

    2018-05-01

    Far-field nutrient impacts associated with finfish aquaculture have been identified as a topic of concern for regulators, managers, scientists, and the public for over two decades but disentangling aquaculture impacts from those caused by other natural and anthropogenic sources has impeded the development of monitoring metrics and management plans. We apply a bulk, steady-state nitrogen loading model (NLM) framework to estimate the annual input of Total Dissolved Nitrogen (TDN) from point and non-point sources to the watershed surrounding Port Mouton Bay, Nova Scotia (Canada). We then use the results of the NLM together with estimates of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) loading from a sea-cage trout farm in the Bay and progressive vector diagrams to illustrate potential patterns of DIN dispersal from the trout farm. Our estimated anthropogenic nitrogen contribution to Port Mouton Bay from all terrestrial and atmospheric sources is ∼211,703 kg TDN/year with atmospheric deposition accounting for almost all (98.6%). At a stocking level of ∼400,000 rainbow trout, the Port Mouton Bay sea-cage farm increases the annual anthropogenic TDN loading to the bay by 14.4% or 30,400 kg. Depending on current flow rates, nitrogen flux from the trout farm can be more than double the background concentrations of TDN near the farm site. Although it is unlikely that nitrogen loading from this single fish farm is saturating the DIN requirements of the entire bay, progressive vector diagrams suggest that the dispersal potential may be insufficient to mitigate potential symptoms of eutrophication associated with nitrogen fluxes. We present an accessible and user-friendly tool for managers to estimate baseline nutrient loading in relation to aquaculture and our use of progressive vector diagrams illustrate a practical and simple method for characterizing potential nutrient dispersal based on local conditions and spatial scales. Our study joins numerous studies which have highlighted

  12. The estimation of the load of non-point source nitrogen and phosphorus based on observation experiments and export coefficient method in Three Gorges Reservoir Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, X. X.; Hu, B.; Xu, W. S.; Liu, J. G.; Zhang, P. C.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) was chosen to be the study area, the export coefficients of different land-use type were calculated through the observation experiments and literature consultation, and then the load of non-point source (NPS) nitrogen and phosphorus of different pollution sources such as farmland pollution sources, decentralized livestock and poultry breeding pollution sources and domestic pollution sources were estimated. The results show as follows: the pollution load of dry land is the main source of farmland pollution. The order of total nitrogen load of different pollution sources from high to low is livestock breeding pollution, domestic pollution, land use pollution, while the order of phosphorus load of different pollution sources from high to low is land use pollution, livestock breeding pollution, domestic pollution, Therefore, reasonable farmland management, effective control methods of dry land fertilization and sewage discharge of livestock breeding are the keys to the prevention and control of NPS nitrogen and phosphorus in TGRA.

  13. Spatial analysis of instream nitrogen loads and factors controlling nitrogen delivery to streams in the southeastern United States using spatially referenced regression on watershed attributes (SPARROW) and regional classification frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, Anne B.; McMahon, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how nitrogen transport across the landscape varies with landscape characteristics is important for developing sound nitrogen management policies. We used a spatially referenced regression analysis (SPARROW) to examine landscape characteristics influencing delivery of nitrogen from sources in a watershed to stream channels. Modelled landscape delivery ratio varies widely (by a factor of 4) among watersheds in the southeastern United States—higher in the western part (Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi) than in the eastern part, and the average value for the region is lower compared to other parts of the nation. When we model landscape delivery ratio as a continuous function of local-scale landscape characteristics, we estimate a spatial pattern that varies as a function of soil and climate characteristics but exhibits spatial structure in residuals (observed load minus predicted load). The spatial pattern of modelled landscape delivery ratio and the spatial pattern of residuals coincide spatially with Level III ecoregions and also with hydrologic landscape regions. Subsequent incorporation into the model of these frameworks as regional scale variables improves estimation of landscape delivery ratio, evidenced by reduced spatial bias in residuals, and suggests that cross-scale processes affect nitrogen attenuation on the landscape. The model-fitted coefficient values are logically consistent with the hypothesis that broad-scale classifications of hydrologic response help to explain differential rates of nitrogen attenuation, controlling for local-scale landscape characteristics. Negative model coefficients for hydrologic landscape regions where the primary flow path is shallow ground water suggest that a lower fraction of nitrogen mass will be delivered to streams; this relation is reversed for regions where the primary flow path is overland flow.

  14. Spatial characterization of T1 and T2 relaxation times and the water apparent diffusion coefficient in rabbit Achilles tendon subjected to tensile loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, J; Helmer, K G; Grigg, P; Sotak, C H

    2005-03-01

    Tendons exhibit viscoelastic mechanical behavior under tensile loading. The elasticity arises from the collagen chains that form fibrils, while the viscous response arises from the interaction of the water with the solid matrix. Therefore, an understanding of the behavior of water in response to the application of a load is crucial to the understanding of the origin of the viscous response. Three-dimensional MRI mapping of rabbit Achilles tendons was performed at 2.0 T to characterize the response of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water to tensile loading. The ADC was measured in directions both parallel (ADC( parallel)) and perpendicular (ADC( perpendicular)) to the long axis of the tendon. At a short diffusion time (5.8 ms) MR parameter maps showed the existence of two regions, here termed "core" and "rim", that exhibited statistically significant differences in T(1), T(2), and ADC( perpendicular) under the baseline loading condition. MR parameter maps were also generated at a second loading condition of approximately 1 MPa. At a diffusion time of 5.8 ms, there was a statistically significant increase in the rim region for both ADC( perpendicular) (57.5%) and ADC( parallel) (20.5%) upon tensile loading. The changes in core ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)), as well as the relaxation parameters in both core and rim regions, were not statistically significant. The effect of diffusion time on the ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values was investigated by creating maps at three additional diffusion times (50.0, 125.0, 250.0 ms) using a diffusion-weighted, stimulated-echo (DW-STE) pulse sequence. At longer diffusion times, ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values increased rather than approaching a constant value. This observation was attributed to T(1) spin-editing during the DW-STE pulse sequence, which resulted in the loss of short-T(1) components (with correspondingly lower ADCs) at longer diffusion times

  15. Assessing pharmacokinetics of indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticle in tumor with a dynamic diffuse fluorescence tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqi; Yin, Guoyan; Zhao, Huijuan; Ma, Wenjuan; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Limin

    2018-02-01

    Real-time and continuous monitoring of drug release in vivo is an important task in pharmaceutical development. Here, we devoted to explore a real-time continuous study of the pharmacokinetics of free indocyanine green (ICG) and ICG loaded in the shell-sheddable nanoparticles in tumor based on a dynamic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) system: A highly-sensitive dynamic DFT system of CT-scanning mode generates informative and instantaneous sampling datasets; An analysis procedure extracts the pharmacokinetic parameters from the reconstructed time curves of the mean ICG concentration in tumor, using the Gauss-Newton scheme based on two-compartment model. Compared with the pharmacokinetic parameters of free ICG in tumor, the ICG loaded in the shell-sheddable nanoparticles shows efficient accumulation in tumor. The results demonstrate our proposed dynamic-DFT can provide an integrated and continuous view of the drug delivery of the injected agents in different formulations, which is helpful for the development of diagnosis and therapy for tumors.

  16. Regulation of respiration and the oxygen diffusion barrier in soybean protect symbiotic nitrogen fixation from chilling-induced inhibition and shoots from premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, Philippus D R; Kiddle, Guy; Pellny, Till K; Mokwala, Phatlane W; Jordaan, Anine; Strauss, Abram J; de Beer, Misha; Schlüter, Urte; Kunert, Karl J; Foyer, Christine H

    2008-09-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is sensitive to dark chilling (7 degrees C-15 degrees C)-induced inhibition in soybean (Glycine max). To characterize the mechanisms that cause the stress-induced loss of nodule function, we examined nodule structure, carbon-nitrogen interactions, and respiration in two soybean genotypes that differ in chilling sensitivity: PAN809 (PAN), which is chilling sensitive, and Highveld Top (HT), which is more chilling resistant. Nodule numbers were unaffected by dark chilling, as was the abundance of the nitrogenase and leghemoglobin proteins. However, dark chilling decreased nodule respiration rates, nitrogenase activities, and NifH and NifK mRNAs and increased nodule starch, sucrose, and glucose in both genotypes. Ureide and fructose contents decreased only in PAN nodules. While the chilling-induced decreases in nodule respiration persisted in PAN even after return to optimal temperatures, respiration started to recover in HT by the end of the chilling period. The area of the intercellular spaces in the nodule cortex and infected zone was greatly decreased in HT after three nights of chilling, an acclimatory response that was absent from PAN. These data show that HT nodules are able to regulate both respiration and the area of the intercellular spaces during chilling and in this way control the oxygen diffusion barrier, which is a key component of the nodule stress response. We conclude that chilling-induced loss of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in PAN is caused by the inhibition of respiration coupled to the failure to regulate the oxygen diffusion barrier effectively. The resultant limitations on nitrogen availability contribute to the greater chilling-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in PAN than in HT.

  17. Incomplete Loading of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid Micelles Within the Diffusion Layers of Dispersed Drug Particles During Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, Kendra; Socki, Michael; Socia, Adam; Harmon, Paul A

    2018-01-01

    Poorly water soluble drug candidates have been common in developmental pipelines over the last several decades. This has fueled considerable research around understanding how bile salt and model micelles can improve drug particle dissolution rates and human drug exposure levels. However, in the pharmaceutical context only a single mechanism of how micelles load solute has been assumed, that being the direct loading mechanism put forth by Cussler and coworkers (Am Inst Chem Eng J. 1976;22(6):1006-1012) 40 years ago. In this model, micelles load at the particle surface and will be loaded to their equilibrium loading values. More recently, Kumar and Gandhi and coworkers (Langmuir. 2003;19:4014-4026) developed a comprehensive theory of micelle solubilization which also features an indirect loading mechanism which they argue should operate in ionic surfactant systems. In this mechanism, micelles cannot directly load at the solute particle surface and thus may not reach equilibrium loading values within the particle diffusion layer. In this work, we endeavor to understand if the indirect micelle loading mechanism represents a plausible description in the pharmaceutical context. The overall data in SLS and FaSSIF systems obtained here, as well as several other previously published datasets, can be described by the indirect micelle loading mechanism. Implications for pharmaceutical development of poorly soluble compounds are discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Nutrient additions in pristine Patagonian Sphagnum bog vegetation: can phosphorus addition alleviate (the effects of) increased nitrogen loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, C; van Dijk, G; Smolders, A J P; Pancotto, V A; Elzenga, T J T M; Roelofs, J G M; Grootjans, A P

    2012-05-01

    Sphagnum-bog ecosystems have a limited capability to retain carbon and nutrients when subjected to increased nitrogen (N) deposition. Although it has been proposed that phosphorus (P) can dilute negative effects of nitrogen by increasing biomass production of Sphagnum mosses, it is still unclear whether P-addition can alleviate physiological N-stress in Sphagnum plants. A 3-year fertilisation experiment was conducted in lawns of a pristine Sphagnum magellanicum bog in Patagonia, where competing vascular plants were practically absent. Background wet deposition of nitrogen was low (≈ 0.1-0.2 g · N · m(-2) · year(-1)). Nitrogen (4 g · N · m(-2) · year(-1)) and phosphorus (1 g · P · m(-2) · year(-1)) were applied, separately and in combination, six times during the growing season. P-addition substantially increased biomass production of Sphagnum. Nitrogen and phosphorus changed the morphology of Sphagnum mosses by enhancing height increment, but lowering moss stem density. In contrast to expectations, phosphorus failed to alleviate physiological stress imposed by excess nitrogen (e.g. amino acid accumulation, N-saturation and decline in photosynthetic rates). We conclude that despite improving growth conditions by P-addition, Sphagnum-bog ecosystems remain highly susceptible to nitrogen additions. Increased susceptibility to desiccation by nutrients may even worsen the negative effects of excess nitrogen especially in windy climates like in Patagonia. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Nutrient additions in pristine Patagonian Sphagnum bog vegetation : can phosphorus addition alleviate (the effects of) increased nitrogen loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritz, C.; Dijk, G. van; Smolders, A.J.P.; Pancotto, V.A.; Elzenga, J.T.M.; Roelofs, J.G.M.; Grootjans, A.P.

    Sphagnum-bog ecosystems have a limited capability to retain carbon and nutrients when subjected to increased nitrogen (N) deposition. Although it has been proposed that phosphorus (P) can dilute negative effects of nitrogen by increasing biomass production of Sphagnum mosses, it is still unclear

  20. Application of modified export coefficient method on the load estimation of non-point source nitrogen and phosphorus pollution of soil and water loss in semiarid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Gao, Jian-en; Ma, Xiao-yi; Li, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Chinese Loess Plateau is considered as one of the most serious soil loss regions in the world, its annual sediment output accounts for 90 % of the total sediment loads of the Yellow River, and most of the Loess Plateau has a very typical characteristic of "soil and water flow together", and water flow in this area performs with a high sand content. Serious soil loss results in nitrogen and phosphorus loss of soil. Special processes of water and soil in the Loess Plateau lead to the loss mechanisms of water, sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus are different from each other, which are greatly different from other areas of China. In this study, the modified export coefficient method considering the rainfall erosivity factor was proposed to simulate and evaluate non-point source (NPS) nitrogen and phosphorus loss load caused by soil and water loss in the Yanhe River basin of the hilly and gully area, Loess Plateau. The results indicate that (1) compared with the traditional export coefficient method, annual differences of NPS total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) load after considering the rainfall erosivity factor are obvious; it is more in line with the general law of NPS pollution formation in a watershed, and it can reflect the annual variability of NPS pollution more accurately. (2) Under the traditional and modified conditions, annual changes of NPS TN and TP load in four counties (districts) took on the similar trends from 1999 to 2008; the load emission intensity not only is closely related to rainfall intensity but also to the regional distribution of land use and other pollution sources. (3) The output structure, source composition, and contribution rate of NPS pollution load under the modified method are basically the same with the traditional method. The average output structure of TN from land use and rural life is about 66.5 and 17.1 %, the TP is about 53.8 and 32.7 %; the maximum source composition of TN (59 %) is farmland; the maximum source

  1. Predictions of nitrogen oxides production in diffusion turbulent flames; Predictions de la production des oxydes d`azote dans les flammes turbulentes de diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, H.; Gokalp, I. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Laboratoire de Combustion Systemes Reactifs

    1996-12-31

    The suitability of the turbulent combustion flamelets model in order to predict the index of NO{sub x} production in turbulent flames of hydrogen diffusion is analyzed. In the flamelet approach, the turbulent flame is equivalent to a group of laminar flames submitted to a mechanical stretching which generates a chemical disequilibrium. This effect can be described by the stretching or by the scalar dissipation ratio. A numerical modeling is performed in order to evaluate the advantages of both approaches and to compare the behaviour of the NO{sub x} emission index with the experiments of Chen and Driscoll. This study shows that predictions of NO{sub x} emission indexes have a correct behaviour with respect to the Damkoehler number only when the scalar dissipation ratio is used as a parameter to describe the chemical state outside equilibrium. Predictions of the flamelet models are improving when the Damkoehler number increases. On the other hand, the absolute NO{sub x} concentrations are overestimated and can be due to the effects of differential diffusion. (J.S.) 14 refs.

  2. Synoptic monitoring as an approach to discriminating between point and diffuse source contributions to zinc loads in mining impacted catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, V J; Palumbo-Roe, B

    2010-09-01

    One of the global legacies of industrialisation is the environmental impacts of historic mineral exploitation. Recent national initiatives to manage the impacts on ground and surface waters have driven the need to develop better techniques for assessing understanding of the catchment-scale distribution and characterisation of the relative contribution of point and diffuse contaminant sources. The benefits of a detailed, multidisciplinary investigation are highlighted through a case study focused on the Rookhope Burn, a tributary of the River Wear, which falls within a significantly mine impacted area of the North Pennines Orefield, UK. Zinc (Zn) has been identified as the contaminant of concern within this catchment, which is judged by the Environment Agency to be at risk of failing to achieve good water quality status in the context of the Water Framework Directive. The results of synoptic flow monitoring and sampling for chemical determinations of major and trace elements have been used to calculate mass balances of instream and inflow chemical loads in the Rookhope Burn. Despite a dominant impact on the water quality from a mine outburst (especially Zn [1.45 to 2.42 mg/l], Fe [2.18 to 3.97 mg/l], Mn [3.69 to 6.77 mg/l], F [3.99 to 4.80 mg/l] and SO(4) [178 to 299 mg/l]), mass balance calculations combined with geological mapping have facilitated the identification of significant, previously unknown, subsurface contributions of Zn contaminated groundwater (with Zn concentrations in excess of 0.4 to 0.9 mg/l and 0.18 to 0.36 mg/l) to the Burn. The subsurface contributions exhibit spatial correspondence to mine workings with associated mineral veins and adits, or to points of suspected karst groundwater resurgence. These findings reiterate the challenges posed in decision making with respect to remediation, in this case in the context of the management of significant subsurface contributions.

  3. Effects of simultaneous ozone exposure and nitrogen loads on carbohydrate concentrations, biomass, and growth of young spruce trees (Picea abies)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.F.D.; Braun, S.; Flueckiger, W.

    2005-01-01

    Spruce saplings were grown under different nitrogen fertilization regimes in eight chamberless fumigation systems, which were fumigated with either charcoal-filtered (F) or ambient air (O 3 ). After the third growing season trees were harvested for biomass and non-structural carbohydrate analysis. Nitrogen had an overall positive effect on the investigated plant parameters, resulting in increased shoot elongation, biomass production, fine root soluble carbohydrate concentrations, and also slightly increased starch concentrations of stems and roots. Only needle starch concentrations and fine root sugar alcohol concentrations were decreased. Ozone fumigation resulted in needle discolorations and affected most parameters negatively, including decreased shoot elongation and decreased starch concentrations in roots, stems, and needles. In fine roots, however, soluble carbohydrate concentrations remained unaffected or increased by ozone fumigation. The only significant interaction was an antagonistic effect on root starch concentrations, where higher nitrogen levels alleviated the negative impact of ozone. - Simultaneous ozone fumigation and nitrogen fertilization have no synergistic impacts on carbohydrate concentrations, biomass, or growth of Picea abies saplings

  4. Global hindcasts and future projections of coastal nitrogen and phosphorus loads due to shellfish and seaweed aquaculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, A.F.; Pawlowski, M.; Liu, C.; Beusen, A.H.W.; Shumway, S.E.; Glibert, P.M.; Overbeek, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    A model was developed to estimate nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for aquaculture production of crustaceans, bivalves, gastropods, and seaweed, using country production data for the 1970–2006 period from the Food and Agriculture Organization and scenarios based on the Millenium Assessment for

  5. Estimating effects of reforestation on nitrogen and phosphorus load reductions in the Lower Yazoo River Watershed, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Ouyang; Theodor D. Leininger; Matt Moran

    2015-01-01

    Surface water quality in the Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB) and the adjacent Gulf of Mexico has degraded over the past several decades primarily due to deforestation to agricultural lands and the loss of wetlands. This study investigated the benefits of reforestation upon nitrate–nitrogen (NO-3---N) and orthophosphate (PO3-...

  6. Forms and subannual variability of nitrogen and phosphorus loading to global river networks over the 20th century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Mogollón, José M.; Beusen, Arthur H.W.; Bouwman, Alexander F.

    2018-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) play a major role in the biogeochemical functioning of aquatic systems. N and P transfer to surface freshwaters has amplified during the 20th century, which has led to widespread eutrophication problems. The contribution of different sources, natural and

  7. Global Hindcasts and Future Projections of Coastal Nitrogen and Phosphorus Loads Due to Shellfish and Seaweed Aquaculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, A.F.; Pawlowski, M.; Liu, C.; Beusen, A.W.H.; Shumway, S.E.; Glibert, P.M.; Overbeek, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    A model was developed to estimate nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for aquaculture production of crustaceans, bivalves, gastropods, and seaweed, using country production data for the 1970–2006 period from the Food and Agriculture Organi- zation and scenarios based on the Millenium Assessment for

  8. A MONTÉ CARLO MODEL FOR SIMULATING THE NITROGEN DIFFUSION EFFECT INTO B-LPCVD-NIDOS POLYCRYSTALLINE THIN FILMS

    OpenAIRE

    S ALLAG; S MERABET; M BOUKEZZATA

    2012-01-01

    The principal objective of our current work, is to study the influence of different treatment from surface which makes it possible to improve the properties of materials by technique of beam of ions (diffusion – implantation), on the distribution of the particles in a semiconductor the prone polycrystalline Silicon of our study, largely used in micro-electronics.  The interest of this study is related to the ceaseless requirements in industry for increasingly reduced, powerful materials and w...

  9. Total nitrogen and suspended-sediment loads and identification of suspended-sediment sources in the Laurel Hill Creek watershed, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, water years 2010-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Gellis, Allen C.; Galeone, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Laurel Hill Creek is a watershed of 125 square miles located mostly in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, with small areas extending into Fayette and Westmoreland Counties. The upper part of the watershed is on the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection 303(d) list of impaired streams because of siltation, nutrients, and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The objectives of this study were to (1) estimate the annual sediment load, (2) estimate the annual nitrogen load, and (3) identify the major sources of fine-grained sediment using the sediment-fingerprinting approach. This study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was done in cooperation with the Somerset County Conservation District. Discharge, suspended-sediment, and nutrient data were collected at two streamflow-gaging stations—Laurel Hill Creek near Bakersville, Pa., (station 03079600) and Laurel Hill Creek at Ursina, Pa., (station 03080000)—and one ungaged stream site, Laurel Hill Creek below Laurel Hill Creek Lake at Trent (station 03079655). Concentrations of nutrients generally were low. Concentrations of ammonia were less than 0.2 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and concentrations of phosphorus were less than 0.3 mg/L. Most concentrations of phosphorus were less than the detection limit of 0.02 mg/L. Most water samples had concentrations of nitrate plus nitrite less than 1.0 mg/L. At the Bakersville station, concentrations of total nitrogen ranged from 0.63 to 1.3 mg/L in base-flow samples and from 0.57 to 1.5 mg/L in storm composite samples. Median concentrations were 0.88 mg/L in base-flow samples and 1.2 mg/L in storm composite samples. At the Ursina station, concentrations of total nitrogen ranged from 0.25 to 0.92 mg/L in base-flow samples; the median concentration was 0.57 mg/L. The estimated total nitrogen load at the Bakersville station was 262 pounds (lb) for 11 months of the 2010 water year (November 2009 to September 2010) and 266 lb for the 2011 water year. Most of the total

  10. Diffusion of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Across the Sediment-Water Interface and In Seawater at Aquaculture Areas of Daya Bay, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangju Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the yearly increasing marine culture activities in floating cages in Daya Bay, China, the effects of pollution may overlap and lead to more severe water environmental problems. In order to track the impacts of the marine culture in floating cages on water environment, sediments and overlying water were sampled by cylindrical samplers at three representative aquaculture areas of Daya Bay. The water content, porosity, density of sediments as well as the vertical distributions of ammonia nitrogen and active phosphate in pore water along sediments depth were measured. The release rate and annual released quantity of the nutrients across sediment-water interface were calculated using Fick’s Law. A horizontal two-dimensional mathematical model was developed to compute the spatial and temporal distributions of the nutrients in seawater after being released across the sediment-water interface. The results showed that the sediments, with a high content and a large annual released quantity of nitrogen and phosphorus, constitute a potential inner source of seawater pollution. Influenced by tide and water depth, the scope of diffusion and migration of the nutrients appears as a long belt which is about 1 km long and 50 m wide. Seawater in this area is vulnerable to eutrophication.

  11. Modified chloride diffusion model for concrete under the coupling effect of mechanical load and chloride salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Mingfeng; Lin, Dayong; Liu, Jianwen; Shi, Chenghua; Ma, Jianjun; Yang, Weichao; Yu, Xiaoniu

    2018-03-01

    For the purpose of investigating lining concrete durability, this study derives a modified chloride diffusion model for concrete based on the odd continuation of boundary conditions and Fourier transform. In order to achieve this, the linear stress distribution on a sectional structure is considered, detailed procedures and methods are presented for model verification and parametric analysis. Simulation results show that the chloride diffusion model can reflect the effects of linear stress distribution of the sectional structure on the chloride diffusivity with reliable accuracy. Along with the natural environmental characteristics of practical engineering structures, reference value ranges of model parameters are provided. Furthermore, a chloride diffusion model is extended for the consideration of multi-factor coupling of linear stress distribution, chloride concentration and diffusion time. Comparison between model simulation and typical current research results shows that the presented model can produce better considerations with a greater universality.

  12. Climate change effects on nitrogen loading from cultivated catchments in Europe: implications for nitrogen retention, ecological state of lakes and adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Erik; Kronvang, Brian; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2011-01-01

    and changes in cropping patterns. Scenario (IPCC, A2) analyses using a number of models of various complexity for Danish streams and lakes suggest an increase in runoff and N transport on an annual basis (higher during winter and typically lower during summer) in streams, a slight increase in N concentrations...... shifts from clear to turbid in a warmer North European temperate climate. However, it must be emphasised that the prediction of N transport and thus effects is uncertain as the prediction of regional precipitation and changes in land-use is uncertain. By contrast, N loading is expected to decline in warm...... agricultural practices for reducing the loss of nutrients to surface waters, to improve sewage treatment and to reduce the storm-water nutrient runoff. In north temperate zones adaptations may also include re-establishment of artificial and natural wetlands, introduction of riparian buffer zones and re...

  13. Influence of temperature, cold deformation and a constant mechanical load on the microstructural stability of a nitrogen alloyed duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrodt-Reisch, A.; Brummer, M.; Hadler, B.; Wolbank, B.; Werner, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of temperature, cold deformation and constant mechanical load on the microstructural stability and the kinetics of phase decomposition of a nitrogen-alloyed duplex stainless steel (0.34 wt.% N) was investigated. Calculation of the phase equilibria was done with THERMOCALC using the steel database TCFE3 in order to predict the stability of the phases and to estimate the influence of temperature on the fraction and chemical composition of the phases. Various ageing treatments between 800 deg. C and 1300 deg. C were performed for different time intervals with controlled heating and cooling rates. In order to determine the influence of deformation, annealing at 800 deg. C after cold deformation as well as dilatometry experiments were performed under a constant mechanical compressive load at 800 deg. C and 900 deg. C. Microstructural characterization was carried out by means of light microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. It was found that the microstructural evolution under a thermal load alone in the temperature range above 950 deg. C concerns mainly the transformation of austenite to ferrite, while below 950 deg. C ferrite decomposition and precipitation of nitrides occur. Since duplex stainless steels possess a microstructure consisting of paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, the kinetics of ferrite decomposition can be determined easily by magnetic inductive measurements. The results of the microstructural investigations and the measurements of the saturation magnetization show that there is a satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predictions based on THERMOCALC. Ferrite decomposition is significantly accelerated by strain introduced during cold deformation. Furthermore, even under a small mechanical load the kinetics of phase decomposition behaviour at 900 deg. C is drastically changed. Whereas during short annealing times the microstructure remains nearly stable the same annealing conditions under a constant

  14. Synthesis and loading-dependent characteristics of nitrogen-doped graphene foam/carbon nanotube/manganese oxide ternary composite electrodes for high performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Yu, Baozhi; Cao, Linli; Tan, Huiyun; Li, Xinghua; Zheng, Xinliang; Li, Weilong; Ren, Zhaoyu; Bai, Jinbo

    2017-09-01

    The ternary composite electrodes, nitrogen-doped graphene foam/carbon nanotube/manganese dioxide (NGF/CNT/MnO 2 ), have been successfully fabricated via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and facile hydrothermal method. The morphologies of the MnO 2 nanoflakes presented the loading-dependent characteristics and the nanoflake thickness could also be tuned by MnO 2 mass loading in the fabrication process. The correlation between their morphology and electrochemical performance was systematically investigated by controlling MnO 2 mass loading in the ternary composite electrodes. The electrochemical properties of the flexible ternary electrode (MnO 2 mass loading of 70%) exhibited a high areal capacitance of 3.03F/cm 2 and a high specific capacitance of 284F/g at the scan rate of 2mV/s. Moreover, it was interesting to find that the capacitance of the NGF/CNT/MnO 2 composite electrodes showed a 51.6% increase after 15,000 cycles. The gradual increase in specific capacitance was due to the formation of defective regions in the MnO 2 nanostructures during the electrochemical cycles of the electrodes, which further resulted in increased porosity, surface area, and consequently increased electrochemical capacity. This work demonstrates a rarely reported conclusion about loading-dependent characteristics for the NGF/CNT/MnO 2 ternary composite electrodes. It will bring new perspectives on designing novel ternary or multi-structure for various energy storage applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of the cross-compliance standard 5.2 'buffer strips' on protecting freshwater against diffuse nitrogen pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Gumiero

    2016-02-01

    .2 of Cross-compliance, located in different areas and climate contexts, were monitored for a period of two years. It was done in order to quantify their effectiveness in removing dissolved inorganic nitrogen conveyed through sub- surface flow from field crops with different cultural practices. Except for two case studies (sites: Lodi and Metaponto in all monitored systems has been confirmed an outflow, permanent or temporary, through the buffer systems, with flow rates ranging from 919 to 8590 m3y-1 every 100 meters of buffer stip. The differences in flow rate were mainly due to different sizes of agricultural basins related to buffer systems, which in the case studies ranging from 3.6 to 33.3%. Based on the mass balance, was found percentages of applied inorganic nitrogen, flowing from cultivated fields to the buffer systems, varied between 1.6 and 29.4%. In most of the sites was estimated nitrogen reduction between inlet and outlet of BS, with percentages ranging from 33 to 61.9%. The exceptions were the systems with groundwater that: or have no interaction with the rhizosphere (deep flow or not crossing the buffer zone. Low percentages of removal shall be justified by the young stage of the monitored sites, being in many cases recently converted to buffer strip. This study confirms the extreme variability of these systems efficiency and the key role of hydrology drives its effectiveness.

  16. Effectiveness of the cross-compliance Standard 5.2 'buffer strips' on protecting freshwater against diffuse nitrogen pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Gumiero

    2016-02-01

    .2 of Cross-compliance, located in different areas and climate contexts, were monitored for a period of two years. It was done in order to quantify their effectiveness in removing dissolved inorganic nitrogen conveyed through sub- surface flow from field crops with different cultural practices. Except for two case studies (sites: Lodi and Metaponto in all monitored systems has been confirmed an outflow, permanent or temporary, through the buffer systems, with flow rates ranging from 919 to 8590 m3y-1 every 100 meters of buffer stip. The differences in flow rate were mainly due to different sizes of agricultural basins related to buffer systems, which in the case studies ranging from 3.6 to 33.3%. Based on the mass balance, was found percentages of applied inorganic nitrogen, flowing from cultivated fields to the buffer systems, varied between 1.6 and 29.4%. In most of the sites was estimated nitrogen reduction between inlet and outlet of BS, with percentages ranging from 33 to 61.9%. The exceptions were the systems with groundwater that: or have no interaction with the rhizosphere (deep flow or not crossing the buffer zone. Low percentages of removal shall be justified by the young stage of the monitored sites, being in many cases recently converted to buffer strip. This study confirms the extreme variability of these systems efficiency and the key role of hydrology drives its effectiveness.

  17. Soil Respiration and Belowground Carbon Stores Among Salt Marshes Subjected to Increasing Watershed Nitrogen Loadings in Southern New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal salt marshes are ecosystems located between the uplands and sea, and because of their location are subject to increasing watershed nutrient loadings and rising sea levels. Residential development along the coast is intense, and there is a significant relationship between...

  18. A MONTÉ CARLO MODEL FOR SIMULATING THE NITROGEN DIFFUSION EFFECT INTO B-LPCVD-NIDOS POLYCRYSTALLINE THIN FILMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S ALLAG

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of our current work, is to study the influence of different treatment from surface which makes it possible to improve the properties of materials by technique of beam of ions (diffusion – implantation, on the distribution of the particles in a semiconductor the prone polycrystalline Silicon of our study, largely used in micro-electronics.  The interest of this study is related to the ceaseless requirements in industry for increasingly reduced, powerful materials and with the weakest possible cost price.       We thus have, makes a nitriding in gas phase during the phase of deposit LPCVD of polycrystalline Silicon, then one made an ionic implantation with the Bore ions.  The results obtained, starting from a simulation based on the Monte Carlo method, although they are carried out with amounts much lower than the really introduced amounts, being given the limitation of the machine used, satisfied the predictions established at the beginning and encourage us to continue this study from the point of view of the use of this material in particular in varied fields.

  19. The importance of excretion by Chironomus larvae on the internal loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in a small eutrophic urban reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Henry

    Full Text Available Measurements of ammonium and phosphate excretion by the Chironomus larvae were conducted in order to evaluate the importance of these chironomids for the internal loads of a small eutrophic urban reservoir. Ammonium and phosphate excretion rates by Chironomus larvae of small size (6-10 mm total length were significantly higher than those of the Chironomids having medium (9-11 mm and large (11-16 mm sizes. A dependence in relation to temperature was recorded for the ammonium and phosphate excretions that was significantly higher at 25 °C than at 20 and 15 °C. Through a linear relation between biomass (dry weight and total length and, between excretion and biomass and, data on chironomids densities, after an intense sampling in 33 sites distributed all along the reservoir bottom, the mean phosphate and ammonium excretion rates corresponded to 2,014 ± 5,134 µg.m-2/day and 1,643 ± 3,974 µg.m-2/day, respectively. Considering the mean biomass (34 mg.m-2 of Chironomus, the lake area (88,156 m² and the mean excretion rates, the contribution of benthic chironomids to the internal loads would be 181 KgP and 147 KgN. for the sampling months (October-November 1998. These values showed that the internal loads by excretion from Chironomus larvae correspond to approximately 33% of the external loads of phosphorus in the lake and, in the case of nitrogen, to only 5%.

  20. Climate change adaptation in arable land use, and impact on nitrogen load at catchment scale in northern agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Rankinen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Prolongation of the growing season due to a warming climate could represent new opportunities for northern agriculture. Climatic and biotic constraints may challenge future crop production. The objective of this study was to speculate how a range of arable land use patterns, resulting from various policy driven choices, could be introduced into a farming system, and how they would affect the risks associated with nutrient leaching. We found that while adaptation to climate change must include consideration of crop choices, there are conflicts associated with allocations and rotations for various market and policy situations. The expected increase in nutrient loading in the simulations caused by climate change was moderate. The increase can partly be compensated for by changes in farmland use, more in the shorter term than in the longer term to mid-century. In the future, adaptation at cropping system level is potentially an efficient way to manage nutrient load risks.

  1. Long-term dynamic and pseudo-state modeling of complete partial nitrification process at high nitrogen loading rates in a sequential batch reactor (SBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Moomen; Eldyasti, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Recently, partial nitrification has been adopted widely either for the nitrite shunt process or intermediate nitrite generation step for the Anammox process. However, partial nitrification has been hindered by the complexity of maintaining stable nitrite accumulation at high nitrogen loading rates (NLR) which affect the feasibility of the process for high nitrogen content wastewater. Thus, the operational data of a lab scale SBR performing complete partial nitrification as a first step of nitrite shunt process at NLRs of 0.3-1.2kg/(m 3 d) have been used to calibrate and validate a process model developed using BioWin® in order to describe the long-term dynamic behavior of the SBR. Moreover, an identifiability analysis step has been introduced to the calibration protocol to eliminate the needs of the respirometric analysis for SBR models. The calibrated model was able to predict accurately the daily effluent ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, alkalinity concentrations and pH during all different operational conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Satellite Derived Water Quality Observations Are Related to River Discharge and Nitrogen Loads in Pensacola Bay, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    John C. Lehrter; John C. Lehrter; Chengfeng Le

    2017-01-01

    Relationships between satellite-derived water quality variables and river discharges, concentrations and loads of nutrients, organic carbon, and sediments were investigated over a 9-year period (2003–2011) in Pensacola Bay, Florida, USA. These analyses were conducted to better understand which river forcing factors were the primary drivers of estuarine variability in several water quality variables. Remote sensing reflectance time-series data were retrieved from the MEdium Resolution Imaging ...

  3. Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from rice paddy fields under different nitrogen fertilization loads in Chongming Island, Eastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xianxian; Yin, Shan; Li, Yinsheng; Zhuang, Honglei; Li, Changsheng

    2014-01-01

    Rice is one of the major crops of southern China and Southeast Asia. Rice paddies are one of the largest agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources in this region because of the application of large quantities of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to the plants. In particular, the production of methane (CH 4 ) is a concern. Investigating a reasonable amount of fertilizers to apply to plants is essential to maintaining high yields while reducing GHG emissions. In this study, three levels of fertilizer application [high (300 kg N/ha), moderate (210 kg N/ha), and low (150 kg N/ha)] were designed to examine the effects of variation in N fertilizer application rate on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from the paddy fields in Chongming Island, Shanghai, China. The high level (300 kg N/ha) represented the typical practice adopted by the local farmers in the area. Maximum amounts of CH 4 and N 2 O fluxes were observed upon high-level fertilizer application in the plots. Cumulative N 2 O emissions of 23.09, 40.10, and 71.08 mg N 2 O/m 2 were observed over the growing season in 2011 under the low-, moderate-, and high-level applications plots, respectively. The field data also indicated that soil temperatures at 5 and 10 cm soil depths significantly affected soil respiration; the relationship between Rs and soil temperature in this study could be described by an exponential model. Our study showed that reducing the high rate of fertilizer application is a feasible way of attenuating the global-warming potential while maintaining the optimum yield for the studied paddy fields. - Highlights: • In Chongming Island, Shanghai, GHG emissions were measured under different nitrogen fertilizer rates from the paddy. • Low nitrogen fertilizer application reduced CH 4 and N 2 O emissions. • The study showed that 210 kg N/ha was the suitable fertilizer application rate

  4. Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from rice paddy fields under different nitrogen fertilization loads in Chongming Island, Eastern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianxian [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yin, Shan, E-mail: yinshan@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Yinsheng [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhuang, Honglei [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Key Laboratory for Urban Agriculture (South), Ministry of Agriculture, PR China, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Changsheng [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Research Centre for Low Carbon Agriculture, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Rd. 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall, College Road, NH 03824-3525 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Rice is one of the major crops of southern China and Southeast Asia. Rice paddies are one of the largest agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources in this region because of the application of large quantities of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to the plants. In particular, the production of methane (CH{sub 4}) is a concern. Investigating a reasonable amount of fertilizers to apply to plants is essential to maintaining high yields while reducing GHG emissions. In this study, three levels of fertilizer application [high (300 kg N/ha), moderate (210 kg N/ha), and low (150 kg N/ha)] were designed to examine the effects of variation in N fertilizer application rate on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from the paddy fields in Chongming Island, Shanghai, China. The high level (300 kg N/ha) represented the typical practice adopted by the local farmers in the area. Maximum amounts of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were observed upon high-level fertilizer application in the plots. Cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions of 23.09, 40.10, and 71.08 mg N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2} were observed over the growing season in 2011 under the low-, moderate-, and high-level applications plots, respectively. The field data also indicated that soil temperatures at 5 and 10 cm soil depths significantly affected soil respiration; the relationship between Rs and soil temperature in this study could be described by an exponential model. Our study showed that reducing the high rate of fertilizer application is a feasible way of attenuating the global-warming potential while maintaining the optimum yield for the studied paddy fields. - Highlights: • In Chongming Island, Shanghai, GHG emissions were measured under different nitrogen fertilizer rates from the paddy. • Low nitrogen fertilizer application reduced CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions. • The study showed that 210 kg N/ha was the suitable fertilizer application rate.

  5. The nature and role of advection in advection-diffusion equations used for modelling bed load transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancey, Christophe; Bohorquez, Patricio; Heyman, Joris

    2016-04-01

    The advection-diffusion equation arises quite often in the context of sediment transport, e.g., for describing time and space variations in the particle activity (the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area). Stochastic models can also be used to derive this equation, with the significant advantage that they provide information on the statistical properties of particle activity. Stochastic models are quite useful when sediment transport exhibits large fluctuations (typically at low transport rates), making the measurement of mean values difficult. We develop an approach based on birth-death Markov processes, which involves monitoring the evolution of the number of particles moving within an array of cells of finite length. While the topic has been explored in detail for diffusion-reaction systems, the treatment of advection has received little attention. We show that particle advection produces nonlocal effects, which are more or less significant depending on the cell size and particle velocity. Albeit nonlocal, these effects look like (local) diffusion and add to the intrinsic particle diffusion (dispersal due to velocity fluctuations), with the important consequence that local measurements depend on both the intrinsic properties of particle displacement and the dimensions of the measurement system.

  6. Formation of nitrous oxide in a gradient of oxygenation and nitrogen loading rate during denitrification of nitrite and nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, You-Kui; Peng, Yong-Zhen [School of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China); Yang, Qing, E-mail: gykren@163.com [School of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China); Wu, Wei-Min [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150090 (China); Wang, Shu-Ying [School of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The correlation of DO to N{sub 2}O emission under denitrification via nitrite was confirmed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The higher nitrite ratio in NO{sub x} (nitrite and nitrate) caused the more N{sub 2}O emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reactor feed mode and nitrite loading rate had significant impact on N{sub 2}O emission which was related to nitrite level. - Abstract: Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emission has been observed during denitrification of nitrate via nitrite as intermediate. With a laboratory-scale reactor (2.4 L), the N{sub 2}O emission was characterized under a gradient of DO concentration from 0 to 0.7 mg/L, different ratio of nitrite versus nitrate and different nitrite feed mode. The N{sub 2}O emission was influenced by the level of dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrite accumulation. The higher DO level and the higher ratio of nitrite versus nitrate resulted in the higher N{sub 2}O emission. Using nitrite as sole electron acceptor at the same loading rate, the sequence of N{sub 2}O emission with three different feed modes was: pulse > step-wise > continuous feed. The N{sub 2}O emitted in pulse feed reactors was 3.1-4.2 and 8.2-11.7 folds of that in the step-wise feed and continuous feed reactors, respectively. With continuous feed mode, the impact of DO concentration on the mass of N{sub 2}O emitted was limited while the higher N{sub 2}O emission occurred at the higher nitrite loading rate.

  7. Efficient Transdermal Delivery of Alendronate, a Nitrogen-Containing Bisphosphonate, Using Tip-Loaded Self-Dissolving Microneedle Arrays for the Treatment of Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Tanaka, Yutaro; Hitomi, Kaori; Liu, Shu; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2017-08-17

    To improve the transdermal bioavailability and safety of alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, we developed self-dissolving microneedle arrays (MNs), in which ALN is loaded only at the tip portion of micron-scale needles by a dip-coating method (ALN(TIP)-MN). We observed micron-scale pores in rat skin just after application of ALN(TIP)-MN, indicating that transdermal pathways for ALN were created by MN. ALN was rapidly released from the tip of MNs as observed in an in vitro release study. The tip portions of MNs completely dissolved in the rat skin within 5 min after application in vivo. After application of ALN(TIP)-MN in mice, the plasma concentration of ALN rapidly increased, and the bioavailability of ALN was approximately 96%. In addition, the decrease in growth plate was effectively suppressed by this efficient delivery of ALN in a rat model of osteoporosis. Furthermore, no skin irritation was observed after application of ALN(TIP)-MN and subcutaneous injection of ALN, while mild skin irritation was induced by whole-ALN-loaded MN (ALN-MN)-in which ALN is contained in the whole of the micron-scale needles fabricated from hyaluronic acid-and intradermal injection of ALN. These findings indicate that ALN(TIP)-MN is a promising transdermal formulation for the treatment of osteoporosis without skin irritation.

  8. Dynamic seasonal nitrogen cycling in response to anthropogenic N loading in a tropical catchment, Athi-Galana-Sabaki River, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwick, T. R.; Tamooh, F.; Ogwoka, B.; Teodoru, C.; Borges, A. V.; Darchambeau, F.; Bouillon, S.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a broader study on the riverine biogeochemistry in the Athi-Galana-Sabaki (A-G-S) River catchment (Kenya), we present data constraining the sources, transit and transformation of multiple nitrogen (N) species as they flow through the A-G-S catchment (~47 000 km2). The data set was obtained in August-September 2011, November 2011, and April-May 2012, covering the dry season, short rain season and long rain season respectively. Release of (largely untreated) wastewater from the city of Nairobi had a profound impact on the biogeochemistry of the upper Athi River, leading to low dissolved oxygen (DO) saturation levels (36-67%), high ammonium (NH4+) concentrations (123-1193 μmol L-1), and high dissolved methane (CH4) concentrations (3765-6729 nmol L-1). Riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN; sum of NH4+ and nitrate (NO3-); nitrite was not measured) concentration at the most upstream site on the Athi River was highest during the dry season (1195 μmol L-1), while DIN concentration was an order of magnitude lower during the short and long rain seasons (212 and 193 μmol L-1, respectively). During the rain seasons, low water residence time led to relatively minimal in-stream N cycling prior to discharge to the ocean, whereas during the dry season we speculate that prolonged residence time creates two differences comparative to wet season, where (1) intense N cycling and removal of DIN is possible in the upper to mid-catchment and leads to significantly lower concentrations at the outlet during the dry season, and (2) as a result this leads to the progressive enrichment of 15N in the particulate N (PN) pool, highlighting the dominance of untreated wastewater as the prevailing source of riverine DIN. The rapid removal of NH4+ in the upper reaches during the dry season was accompanied by a quantitatively similar production of NO3- and nitrous oxide (N2O) downstream, pointing towards strong nitrification over this reach during the dry season. Nitrous oxide

  9. Atmospheric dry and wet deposition of sulphur and nitrogen species and assessment of critical loads of acidic deposition exceedance in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J. Piketh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that acidic atmospheric pollution deposition, originating from the South African central industrial area, poses an environmental threat across a larger region within the dispersal footprint. A network of 37 passive monitoring sites to measure SO2 and NO2 was operated from August 2005 to September 2007. The area extended over the entire northern and eastern interior of South Africa. Monitoring locations were chosen to avoid direct impacts from local sources such as towns, mines and highways. Dry deposition rates of SO2 and NO2 were calculated from the measured concentrations. Concentrations of sulphur and nitrogen species in wet deposition from a previous study were used in conjunction with measured rainfall for the years 2006 and 2007 to estimate the wet deposition over the region. The calculated total (non-organic acidic deposition formed the basis for an assessment of exceedance of critical loads based on sensitivity of the regional soils. Regional soil sensitivity was determined by combining two major soil attributes available in the World Inventory of Soil Emission Potentials (International Soil Reference and Information Centre. Results indicate that certain parts of the central pollution source area on the South African Highveld have the potential for critical load exceedance, while limited areas downwind show lower levels of exceedance. Areas upwind and remote areas up and downwind, including forested areas of the Drakensberg escarpment, do not show any exceedance of the critical loads.

  10. Multiscale Framework for Assessing Critical Loads of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition for Aquatic Ecosystems in Wilderness Areas of the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanus, Leora; Clow, David; Saros, Jasmine; McMurray, Jill; Blett, Tamara; Sickman, James

    2017-04-01

    High-elevation aquatic ecosystems in Wilderness areas of the western United States are impacted by current and historic atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition associated with local and regional air pollution. Documented effects include elevated surface water nitrate concentrations, increased algal productivity, and changes in diatom species assemblages. A predictive framework was developed for sensitive high-elevation basins across the western United States at multiple spatial scales including the Rocky Mountain Region (Rockies), the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA), and Yosemite (YOSE) and Sequoia & Kings Canyon (SEKI) National Parks. Spatial trends in critical loads of N deposition for nutrient enrichment of aquatic ecosystems were quantified and mapped using a geostatistical approach, with modeled N deposition, topography, vegetation, geology, and climate as potential explanatory variables. Multiple predictive models were created using various combinations of explanatory variables; this approach allowed for better quantification of uncertainty and identification of areas most sensitive to high atmospheric N deposition (> 3 kg N ha-1 yr-1). For multiple spatial scales, the lowest critical loads estimates (1.5 + 1 kg N ha-1 yr-1) correspond with areas of high N deposition and vary spatially ranging from less than 20% to over 40% of the study area for the Rockies, GYA, YOSE, and SEKI. These predictive models and maps identify sensitive aquatic ecosystems that may be impacted by excess atmospheric N deposition and can be used to help protect against future anthropogenic disturbance. The approach presented here may be transferable to other remote and protected high-elevation ecosystems at multiple spatial scales that are sensitive to adverse effects of pollutant loading in the US and around the world.

  11. Long-term reactive nitrogen loading alters soil carbon and microbial community properties in a subalpine forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Claudia M.; Hall, Ed K.; Denef, Karolien; Baron, Jill S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition due to increased fossil fuel combustion and agricultural practices has altered global carbon (C) cycling. Additions of reactive N to N-limited environments are typically accompanied by increases in plant biomass. Soil C dynamics, however, have shown a range of different responses to the addition of reactive N that seem to be ecosystem dependent. We evaluated the effect of N amendments on biogeochemical characteristics and microbial responses of subalpine forest organic soils in order to develop a mechanistic understanding of how soils are affected by N amendments in subalpine ecosystems. We measured a suite of responses across three years (2011–2013) during two seasons (spring and fall). Following 17 years of N amendments, fertilized soils were more acidic (control mean 5.09, fertilized mean 4.68), and had lower %C (control mean 33.7% C, fertilized mean 29.8% C) and microbial biomass C by 22% relative to control plots. Shifts in biogeochemical properties in fertilized plots were associated with an altered microbial community driven by reduced arbuscular mycorrhizal (control mean 3.2 mol%, fertilized mean 2.5 mol%) and saprotrophic fungal groups (control mean 17.0 mol%, fertilized mean 15.2 mol%), as well as a decrease in N degrading microbial enzyme activity. Our results suggest that decreases in soil C in subalpine forests were in part driven by increased microbial degradation of soil organic matter and reduced inputs to soil organic matter in the form of microbial biomass.

  12. Stream Water, Carbon and Total Nitrogen Load Responses to a Simulated Emerald Ash Borer Infestation in Black Ash Dominated Headwater Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Grinsven, M. J.; Shannon, J.; Noh, N. J.; Kane, E. S.; Bolton, N. W.; Davis, J.; Wagenbrenner, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Kolka, R.; Pypker, T. G.

    2017-12-01

    The rapid and extensive expansion of emerald ash borer (EAB) is considered an important ecological and economic disturbance, and will likely affect critical ecosystem services associated with black ash wetlands. It is unknown how EAB-induced disturbance in wetlands dominated with black ash will impact stream water, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) export dynamics. We hypothesized that loads of water, DOC and TDN exported from black ash wetlands would be elevated following an EAB-induced disturbance. Stream water, DOC and TDN loads exiting two black ash wetlands in headwater watersheds in Michigan were quantified over a four-year period, and were combined with wetland soil temperature and soil decomposition rate monitoring to better understand the biogeochemical implications of an EAB-induced disturbance. After a two-year baseline monitoring period, an EAB disturbance was simulated by felling (ash-cut) all black ash trees with diameters greater than 2.5-cm in one wetland. When compared to the unaltered control, stream water DOC and TDN concentrations exiting the ash-cut wetland were significantly larger by 39% and 38%, respectively during the post-treatment study period. The significantly elevated DOC and TDN concentrations were likely associated with the higher soil temperatures and increased rates of soil decomposition detected in the ash-cut site during the post-treatment period. No significant mean daily stream discharge differences were detected between treatments during the pre-treatment period, however the 0.46 mm d-1 mean daily stream discharge exiting the ash-cut wetland was significantly smaller than the 1.07 mm d-1 exiting the unaltered control during the post-treatment study period. The significantly smaller daily stream discharge in the ash-cut site likely contributed to the fact no significant differences between treatments for either mean daily DOC loads or TDN loads were detected during the post-treatment period

  13. Local Control of Lung Derived Tumors by Diffusing Alpha-Emitting Atoms Released From Intratumoral Wires Loaded With Radium-224

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooks, Tomer; Schmidt, Michael; Bittan, Hadas; Lazarov, Elinor; Arazi, Lior; Kelson, Itzhak; Keisari, Yona

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DART) is a new form of brachytherapy enabling the treatment of solid tumors with alpha radiation. The present study examines the antitumoral effects resulting from the release of alpha emitting radioisotopes into solid lung carcinoma (LL2, A427, and NCI-H520). Methods and Materials: An in vitro setup tested the dose-dependent killing of tumor cells exposed to alpha particles. In in vivo studies, radioactive wires (0.3 mm diameter, 5 mm long) with 224 Ra activities in the range of 21-38 kBq were inserted into LL/2 tumors in C57BL/6 mice and into human-derived A427 or NCI-H520 tumors in athymic mice. The efficacy of the short-lived daughters of 224 Ra to produce tumor growth retardation and prolong life was assessed, and the spread of radioisotopes inside tumors was measured using autoradiography. Results: The insertion of a single DART wire into the center of 6- to 7-mm tumors had a pronounced retardation effect on tumor growth, leading to a significant inhibition of 49% (LL2) and 93% (A427) in tumor development and prolongations of 48% (LL2) in life expectancy. In the human model, more than 80% of the treated tumors disappeared or shrunk. Autoradiographic analysis of the treated sectioned tissue revealed the intratumoral distribution of the radioisotopes, and histological analysis showed corresponding areas of necrosis. In vitro experiments demonstrated a dose-dependent killing of tumors cells exposed to alpha particles. Conclusions: Short-lived diffusing alpha-emitters produced tumor growth retardation and increased survival in mice bearing lung tumor implants. These results justify further investigations with improved dose distributions.

  14. Effects of wood-ash addition on nitrogen turnover in a highly nitrogen loaded spruce site. Final project report; Effekter av askaaterfoering paa kvaeveomsaettningen i ett kvaeverikt granbestaand i Halland. Slutrapport foer projektet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohrstedt, H.Oe.; Hoegbom, Lars; Nordlund, Sten [Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    During two consecutive years, it was studied how a fertilization with 4.2 tonnes pelleted bark ash per ha, made six-seven years earlier, affected soil chemistry, nitrogen turnover and soil-water chemistry on a Norway spruce site in SW Sweden. The actual site has a very acidic soil. At the same time, the supply of inorganic N is rich. Measures against soil acidification, e. g. addition of ash or lime, may significantly influence the turnover of N with a subsequent risk for increased leaching. Thus, there is a potential conflict between two urgent environmental goals, i. e. to decrease acidification and to decrease the N load on aquatic ecosystems. In the humus layer and the upper 5 cm of the mineral soil, pH(H{sub 2}O) had increased with at the most 0.2 units because of the ash addition. The easily extractable amounts of Mg, P and nitrate were slightly increased. The potential nitrification in the humus layer was generally higher in the ash treatment, but the difference. was not statistically significant. The soil water at 50 cm depth was 0.1-0.2 pH-units more acidic where ash had been applied. Simultaneously, there were tendencies for higher concentrations of nitrate, Al and K. This is the first time in Sweden that ash fertilization of a closed forest has given clear indications of an increased N leaching. As expected, the ash fertilization decreased the acidity of the top soil. On the contrary, the runoff became more acidic and more rich in Al. Thus, the ash fertilization has counteracted one of its primary goals, i. e. to produce a runoff less toxic to aquatic life. The acidification of the runoff may partially be because of acid production during nitrification.

  15. Novel thin/tunable gas diffusion electrodes with ultra-low catalyst loading for hydrogen evolution reactions in proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhenye; Yang, Gaoqiang; Mo, Jingke; Li, Yifan; Yu, Shule; Cullen, David A.; Retterer, Scott T.; Toops, Todd J.; Bender, Guido; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Green, Johney B.; Zhang, Feng-Yuan

    2018-05-01

    Proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs) have received great attention for hydrogen/oxygen production due to their high efficiencies even at low-temperature operation. Because of the high cost of noble platinum-group metal (PGM) catalysts (Ir, Ru, Pt, etc.) that are widely used in water splitting, a PEMEC with low catalyst loadings and high catalyst utilizations is strongly desired for its wide commercialization. In this study, the ultrafast and multiscale hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) phenomena in an operating PEMEC is in-situ observed for the first time. The visualization results reveal that the HER and hydrogen bubble nucleation mainly occur on catalyst layers at the rim of the pores of the thin/tunable liquid/gas diffusion layers (TT-LGDLs). This indicates that the catalyst material of the conventional catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) that is located in the middle area of the LGDL pore is underutilized/inactive. Based on this discovery, a novel thin and tunable gas diffusion electrode (GDE) with a Pt catalyst thickness of 15 nm and a total thickness of about 25 um has been proposed and developed by taking advantage of advanced micro/nano manufacturing. The novel thin GDEs are comprehensively characterized both ex-situ and in-situ, and exhibit excellent PEMEC performance. More importantly, they achieve catalyst mass activity of up to 58 times higher than conventional CCM at 1.6 V under the operating conditions of 80 degrees C and 1 atm. This study demonstrates a promising concept for PEMEC electrode development, and provides a direction of future catalyst designs and fabrications for electrochemical devices.

  16. Enhanced performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell by introducing nitrogen-doped CNTs in both catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hou, S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is significantly improved through introducing nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) into the catalyst layer (CL) and microporous layer (MPL) of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA...

  17. Nitrogen retention in river corridors: European perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycock, N [Dept. of Agriculture and Water Management, Silsoe College, Cranfield Institute of Technology (United Kingdom); Pinay, G [CERR/CNRS, Toulouse (France); Walker, Charles [SBEG, Inst. of Ecology, Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    1993-01-01

    The problem of nitrogen pollution in European surface- and groundwaters has become a focus of recent European and Scandinavian directives, with legislation calling for a 50% reduction of N losses by the years 1995 and 2000, respectively. This paper provides a conceptual framework upon which management strategies to reduce losses of diffuse nitrogen pollution to surface waters may be based. The control of nitrogen pollution may take place through an increase in the complexity of the landscape, not throughout the catchment area, but rather in specific zones, the river corridor in particular. Within river corridors, riparian areas have been recognized globally for their value as nutrient removal ''buffer systems''. Studies have identified vegetation uptake and microbial denitrification as the primary mechanisms responsible for N removal in these systems. For these processes to function optimally on an annual basis, both vegetation and water regime must be managed. The establishment and management of riparian buffer zones in suitable places within river corridors, will provide a stable and sustainable water-protection function. This will complement future nitrogen input control strategies, needed for both the long-term protection of groundwater and surface waters in Europe as a whole, and for the proposed 50% reduction in nitrogen loading to the Baltic and North Sea coastal waters by the turn of the century. 52 refs, 5 figs

  18. Nd Fe{sub 10} Mo{sub 2} alloys production through reduction-diffusion for nitrogenation; Obtencao de ligas NdFe{sub 10}Mo{sub 2} por reducao-difusao para posterior nitrogenacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilherme, Eneida da G. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rechenberg, Hercilio R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1996-12-31

    In this work we have examined the effect of various processing variables on the Nd Fe{sub 10} Mo{sub 2} phase formation by reduction-diffusion calciothermic process (R D C). The best results were obtained for 4 hours treatment at 950 deg C with 40% excess content Nd Cl{sub 3} and 50% excess content of Ca, for alloy Nd Fe{sub 10.5} Mo{sub 1.5}. Preliminary nitrogen absorption experiments have been done, without any further powder size reduction at temperatures between 300 and 350 deg C. (author) 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Nitrogen balance for a plantation forest drainage canal on the North Carolina Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy W. Appelboom; George M. Chescheir; R. Wayne Skaggs; J. Wendell Gilliam; Devendra M. Amatya

    2009-01-01

    Human alteration of the nitrogen cycle has led to increased riverine nitrogen loads, contributing to the eutrophication of lakes, streams, estuaries, and near-coastal oceans. These riverine nitrogen loads are usually less...

  20. Evaluation of the nitrogen load of the sludge liquor from the band filters of the sewage treatment plant of Pinedo (Valencia); Nitrogeno aportado por el licor del fango de los filtros banda a la linea de retorno en la EDAR de Pinedo (Valencia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bes Pia, A.; Mendoza Roca, J. A. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The sludge treatment in a sewage treatment plant generates liquid effluents called sludge liquors that are pumped to the plant entrance. These effluents provide a pollution load that must be considered in the design of the sewage treatment plant, outstanding, all and above the nitrogen load produced by the sludge dewatering after its anaerobic digestion. In the present research the mentioned liquor is studied and characterized in order to determine the nitrogen load recirculated to the entrance of the old-established line of the Pinedo sewage treatment plant (Valencia). (Author) 3 refs.

  1. The Load of Lightning-induced Nitrogen Oxides and Its Impact on the Ground-level Ozone during Summertime over the Mountain West States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-induced nitrogen oxides (LNOX), in the presence of sunlight, volatile organic compounds and water, can be a relatively large but uncertain source for ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH) in the atmosphere. Using lightning flash data from the National Lightning Detection...

  2. Thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) and its thermal contact resistance with fuel cell gas diffusion layers: Effect of compression, PTFE, micro porous layer (MPL), BPP out-of-flatness and cyclic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza; Djilali, Ned; Bahrami, Majid

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on measurements of thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) as a function of temperature and its thermal contact resistance (TCR) with treated and untreated gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The thermal conductivity of the BPP decreases with temperature and its thermal contact resistance with GDLs, which has been overlooked in the literature, is found to be dominant over a relatively wide range of compression. The effects of PTFE loading, micro porous layer (MPL), compression, and BPP out-of-flatness are also investigated experimentally. It is found that high PTFE loadings, MPL and even small BPP out-of-flatness increase the BPP-GDL thermal contact resistance dramatically. The paper also presents the effect of cyclic load on the total resistance of a GDL-BPP assembly, which sheds light on the behavior of these materials under operating conditions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  3. Calcium-loaded 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid blocks cell-to-cell diffusion of carboxyfluorescein in staminal hairs of Setcreasea purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, E B

    1990-08-01

    The effect of microinjected calcium-loaded 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (CaBAPTA) on cell-to-cell diffusion of carboxyfluorescein (CF) was examined in staminal hairs of S. purpurea Boom. The CaBAPTA was microinjected into the cytoplasm of the staminal hairs either with CF or prior to a subsequent microinjection of CF. The cell-to-cell diffusion of CF along the hair was monitored using enhanced-fluorescence video microscopy. Cytoplasmic streaming stopped in cells treated with CaBAPTA, indicating that intracellular Ca(2+) had increased. Cell-to-cell diffusion of CF was blocked in cells treated with Ca-BAPTA. An inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming and cell-to-cell diffusion was observed in the cells adjoining the CaBAPTA-microinjected cell, indicating that the Ca-BAPTA appeared to pass through plasmodesmata. While cytoplasmic streaming resumed 5-10 min after CaBAPTA treatment, cell-to-cell diffusion did not resume until 30-120 min later. These data support an involvement of calcium in the regulation of cell-to-cell communication in plants.

  4. Using Noise and Fluctuations for In Situ  Measurements of Nitrogen Diffusion Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Samoila

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In manufacturing processes involving diffusion (of C, N, S, etc., the evolution of the layer depth is of the utmost importance: the success of the entire process depends on this parameter. Currently, nitriding is typically either calibrated using a “post process” method or controlled via indirect measurements (H2, O2, H2O + CO2. In the absence of “in situ” monitoring, any variation in the process parameters (gas concentration, temperature, steel composition, distance between sensors and furnace chamber can cause expensive process inefficiency or failure. Indirect measurements can prevent process failure, but uncertainties and complications may arise in the relationship between the measured parameters and the actual diffusion process. In this paper, a method based on noise and fluctuation measurements is proposed that offers direct control of the layer depth evolution because the parameters of interest are measured in direct contact with the nitrided steel (represented by the active electrode. The paper addresses two related sets of experiments. The first set of experiments consisted of laboratory tests on nitrided samples using Barkhausen noise and yieded a linear relationship between the frequency exponent in the Hooge equation and the nitriding time. For the second set, a specific sensor based on conductivity noise (at the nitriding temperature was built for shop‐floor experiments. Although two different types of noise were measured in these two sets of experiments, the use of the frequency exponent to monitor the process evolution remained valid.

  5. Diffusion or bulk flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous...

  6. Salt marsh as a coastal filter for the oceans: changes in function with experimental increases in nitrogen loading and sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joanna L; Zavaleta, Erika S

    2012-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes are among Earth's most productive ecosystems and provide a number of ecosystem services, including interception of watershed-derived nitrogen (N) before it reaches nearshore oceans. Nitrogen pollution and climate change are two dominant drivers of global-change impacts on ecosystems, yet their interacting effects at the land-sea interface are poorly understood. We addressed how sea-level rise and anthropogenic N additions affect the salt marsh ecosystem process of nitrogen uptake using a field-based, manipulative experiment. We crossed simulated sea-level change and ammonium-nitrate (NH(4)NO(3))-addition treatments in a fully factorial design to examine their potentially interacting effects on emergent marsh plants in a central California estuary. We measured above- and belowground biomass and tissue nutrient concentrations seasonally and found that N-addition had a significant, positive effect on a) aboveground biomass, b) plant tissue N concentrations, c) N stock sequestered in plants, and d) shoot:root ratios in summer. Relative sea-level rise did not significantly affect biomass, with the exception of the most extreme sea-level-rise simulation, in which all plants died by the summer of the second year. Although there was a strong response to N-addition treatments, salt marsh responses varied by season. Our results suggest that in our site at Coyote Marsh, Elkhorn Slough, coastal salt marsh plants serve as a robust N trap and coastal filter; this function is not saturated by high background annual N inputs from upstream agriculture. However, if the marsh is drowned by rising seas, as in our most extreme sea-level rise treatment, marsh plants will no longer provide the ecosystem service of buffering the coastal ocean from eutrophication.

  7. Salt marsh as a coastal filter for the oceans: changes in function with experimental increases in nitrogen loading and sea-level rise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna L Nelson

    Full Text Available Coastal salt marshes are among Earth's most productive ecosystems and provide a number of ecosystem services, including interception of watershed-derived nitrogen (N before it reaches nearshore oceans. Nitrogen pollution and climate change are two dominant drivers of global-change impacts on ecosystems, yet their interacting effects at the land-sea interface are poorly understood. We addressed how sea-level rise and anthropogenic N additions affect the salt marsh ecosystem process of nitrogen uptake using a field-based, manipulative experiment. We crossed simulated sea-level change and ammonium-nitrate (NH(4NO(3-addition treatments in a fully factorial design to examine their potentially interacting effects on emergent marsh plants in a central California estuary. We measured above- and belowground biomass and tissue nutrient concentrations seasonally and found that N-addition had a significant, positive effect on a aboveground biomass, b plant tissue N concentrations, c N stock sequestered in plants, and d shoot:root ratios in summer. Relative sea-level rise did not significantly affect biomass, with the exception of the most extreme sea-level-rise simulation, in which all plants died by the summer of the second year. Although there was a strong response to N-addition treatments, salt marsh responses varied by season. Our results suggest that in our site at Coyote Marsh, Elkhorn Slough, coastal salt marsh plants serve as a robust N trap and coastal filter; this function is not saturated by high background annual N inputs from upstream agriculture. However, if the marsh is drowned by rising seas, as in our most extreme sea-level rise treatment, marsh plants will no longer provide the ecosystem service of buffering the coastal ocean from eutrophication.

  8. Fifth Baltic Sea pollution load compilation (PLC-5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuuttila, S.; Svendsen, L. M.; Staaf, H.; Kotilainen, P.; Boutrup, S.; Pyhala, M.; Durkin, M.

    2011-07-01

    This report includes the main results from the Fifth Pollution Load Compilation abbreviated PLC-5. It includes quantified annual waterborne total loads (from rivers, unmonitored and coastal areas as well as direct point and diffuse sources discharging directly to the Baltic Sea) from 1994 to 2008 to provide a basis for evaluating any decreasing (or increasing) trends in the total waterborne inputs to the Baltic Sea. Chapter 1 contains the objectives of PLC and the framework on classification of inputs and sources. Chapter 2 includes a short description of the Baltic Sea catchment area, while the methods for quantification and analysis together with quality assurance topics are briefly introduced in Chapter 3. More detailed information on methodologies is presented in the PLC-5 guidelines (HELCOM 2006). Chapter 4 reports the total inputs to the Baltic Sea of nutrients and selected heavy metals. Furthermore, the results of the quatification of discharges and losses of nitrogen and phosphorus from point and diffuse sources into inland surface waters within the Baltic Sea catchment area (source-oriented approach or gross loads) as well as the total load to the maritime area (load-oriented approarch or net loads) in 2006 are shown. Typically, results are presented by country and by main Baltic Sea sub-region. In Chapter 5, flow normalization is introduced and the results of trend analyses on 1994-2008 time series data on total waterborne loads of nitrogen and phosphorus are given together with a first evaluation of progress in obtaining the provisional reduction targets by country and by main Baltic Sea sub-region. Chapter 6 includes discussion of some of the main conclusions and advice for future PLCs. The annexes contain the flow-normalized annual load data and figures and tables with results from the PLC-5.

  9. A reactive nitrogen budget for Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reactive nitrogen budget for Lake Michigan was reviewed and updated, making use of recent estimates of watershed and atmospheric nitrogen loads. The updated total N load to Lake Michigan was approximately double the previous estimate from the Lake Michigan Mass Balance study ...

  10. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.C.; Engel, L.

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion. 88 refs

  11. Experimental identification of nitrogen-vacancy complexes in nitrogen implanted silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Lahir Shaik; Law, Mark E.; Szpala, Stanislaw; Simpson, P. J.; Lawther, Derek; Dokumaci, Omer; Hegde, Suri

    2001-07-01

    Nitrogen implantation is commonly used in multigate oxide thickness processing for mixed signal complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor and System on a Chip technologies. Current experiments and diffusion models indicate that upon annealing, implanted nitrogen diffuses towards the surface. The mechanism proposed for nitrogen diffusion is the formation of nitrogen-vacancy complexes in silicon, as indicated by ab initio studies by J. S. Nelson, P. A. Schultz, and A. F. Wright [Appl. Phys. Lett. 73, 247 (1998)]. However, to date, there does not exist any experimental evidence of nitrogen-vacancy formation in silicon. This letter provides experimental evidence through positron annihilation spectroscopy that nitrogen-vacancy complexes indeed form in nitrogen implanted silicon, and compares the experimental results to the ab initio studies, providing qualitative support for the same.

  12. Calibration and validation of SWAT model for estimating water balance and nitrogen losses in a small agricultural watershed in central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarzyńska Karolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT ver. 2005 was applied to study water balance and nitrogen load pathways in a small agricultural watershed in the lowlands of central Poland. The natural flow regime of the Zgłowiączka River was strongly modified by human activity (deforestation and installation of a subsurface drainage system to facilitate stable crop production. SWAT was calibrated for daily and monthly discharge and monthly nitrate nitrogen load. Model efficiency was tested using manual techniques (subjective and evaluation statistics (objective. Values of Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE, coefficient of determination (R2 and percentage of bias for daily/monthly discharge simulations and monthly load indicated good or very good fit of simulated discharge and nitrate nitrogen load to the observed data set. Model precision and accuracy of fit was proved in validation. The calibrated and validated SWAT was used to assess water balance and nitrogen fluxes in the watershed. According to the results, the share of tile drainage in water yield is equal to 78%. The model analysis indicated the most significant pathway of NO3-N to surface waters in the study area, namely the tile drainage combined with lateral flow. Its share in total NO3-N load amounted to 89%. Identification of nitrogen fluxes in the watershed is crucial for decision makers in order to manage water resources and to implement the most effective measures to limit diffuse pollution from arable land to surface waters.

  13. Microhardness of boron, titanium, and nitrogen implanted steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, M.; Szyszko, W.; Sielanko, J.; Glusiec, L.

    1989-01-01

    Mechanically polished steel (1H18N9T) and (15GTM) samples are implanted with boron, titanium, and nitrogen ions, with dose ranging from 10 16 to 10 17 ions/cm 2 . The implantation energy varied from 100 to 250 keV. Implanted samples are heat-treated at 400 to 800 0 C in vacuum. The microhardness of implanted samples is measured by using a Hanneman tester with loads ranging from 2 to 40 g. The influence of annealing temperature on microhardness of the implanted layers is determined. The diffusion of boron from the implanted layers is also investigated by using the secondary ion mass spectrometer. The diffusion coefficients of boron in steel are determined. (author)

  14. A coupled diffusion-fluid pressure model to predict cell density distribution for cells encapsulated in a porous hydrogel scaffold under mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feihu; Vaughan, Ted J; Mc Garrigle, Myles J; McNamara, Laoise M

    2017-10-01

    Tissue formation within tissue engineering (TE) scaffolds is preceded by growth of the cells throughout the scaffold volume and attachment of cells to the scaffold substrate. It is known that mechanical stimulation, in the form of fluid perfusion or mechanical strain, enhances cell differentiation and overall tissue formation. However, due to the complex multi-physics environment of cells within TE scaffolds, cell transport under mechanical stimulation is not fully understood. Therefore, in this study, we have developed a coupled multiphysics model to predict cell density distribution in a TE scaffold. In this model, cell transport is modelled as a thermal conduction process, which is driven by the pore fluid pressure under applied loading. As a case study, the model is investigated to predict the cell density patterns of pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-e1 cells under a range of different loading regimes, to obtain an understanding of desirable mechanical stimulation that will enhance cell density distribution within TE scaffolds. The results of this study have demonstrated that fluid perfusion can result in a higher cell density in the scaffold region closed to the outlet, while cell density distribution under mechanical compression was similar with static condition. More importantly, the study provides a novel computational approach to predict cell distribution in TE scaffolds under mechanical loading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. META-ANALYSIS OF NITROGEN REMOVAL IN RIPARIAN BUFFERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riparian buffer zones, the vegetated region adjacent to streams and wetlands, are thought to be effective at intercepting and controlling nitrogen loads entering water bodies. Riparian buffer width may be positively related to nitrogen removal effectiveness by influencing nitrog...

  16. Formulation, characterization and in vitro evaluation of theophylline-loaded Eudragit RS 100 microspheres prepared by an emulsion-solvent diffusion/evaporation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgari, Mitra; Barar, Jaleh; Valizadeh, Hadi; Shadrou, Sanam; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to prepare theophylline-loaded Eudragit RS 100 microsphere to achieve sustained release pattern with relatively high production yield. To this end, microspheres were prepared by oil/oil solvent evaporation method using an acetone-methanol mixture and liquid paraffin system containing aluminum tristearate. Drug release profiles were determined at pH 1.2 and 7.4. Morphology and solid state of microspheres were examined using SEM, DSC, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and FT-IR. As the ratio of acetone/methanol increased during the preparation of microspheres the size of microsphere was reduced. The highest drug loading efficiency (87.21%) was obtained for the microsphere containing a high ratio of polymer to drug (6:1) and high volume of acetone. SEM studies showed that the microspheres are almost spherical with a few pores and cracks at surfaces. The FT-IR, XRPD and DSC results ruled out any chemical interaction between theophylline and Eudragit. The microspheres prepared with low ratio of polymer to drug (1:2) showed faster dissolution rate than those with high polymer to drug ratio. The ratio of polymer to drug and the volume of polymer solvent were found to be the key factors affecting the release profile which could lead to microspheres with desired release behavior.

  17. Batch and semi-continuous anaerobic co-digestion of goose manure with alkali solubilized wheat straw: A case of carbon to nitrogen ratio and organic loading rate regression optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad; Ding, Weimin; Umar, Muhammad; Rasool, Ghulam

    2017-04-01

    The present study focused on carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) and organic loading rate (OLR) optimization of goose manure (GM) and wheat straw (WS). Dealing the anaerobic digestion of poultry manure on industrial scale; the question of optimum C/N (mixing ratio) and OLR (daily feeding concentration) have significant importance still lack in literature. Therefore, Batch and CSTR co-digestion experiments of the GM and WS were carried out at mesophilic condition. The alkali (NaOH) solubilization pretreatment for the WS had greatly enhanced its anaerobic digestibility. The highest methane production was evaluated between the C/N of 20-30 during Batch experimentation while for CSTRs; the second applied OLR of (3g.VS/L.d) was proved as the optimum with maximum methane production capability of 254.65ml/g.VS for reactor B at C/N of 25. The C/N and OLR regression optimization models were developed for their commercial scale usefulness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    primary ions were used and negative secondary ions were detected. A difference in the distribution of the CrN and the alleged N signal was observed and attributed to CrN acting as a diffusion barrier for nitrogen diffusion. It may be noted here that nitrogen does not form stable elemental negative ions [2] and is thus.

  19. Effect of a short-term HAART on SIV load in macaque tissues is dependent on time of initiation and antiviral diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand-Gasselin Lucie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV reservoirs are rapidly established after infection, and the effect of HAART initiated very early during acute infection on HIV reservoirs remains poorly documented, particularly in tissue known to actively replicate the virus. In this context, we used the model of experimental infection of macaques with pathogenic SIV to assess in different tissues: (i the effect of a short term HAART initiated at different stages during acute infection on viral dissemination and replication, and (ii the local concentration of antiviral drugs. Results Here, we show that early treatment with AZT/3TC/IDV initiated either within 4 hours after intravenous infection of macaques with SIVmac251 (as a post exposure prophylaxis or before viremia peak (7 days post-infection [pi], had a strong impact on SIV production and dissemination in all tissues but did not prevent infection. When treatment was initiated after the viremia peak (14 days pi or during early chronic infection (150 days pi, significant viral replication persists in the peripheral lymph nodes and the spleen of treated macaques despite a strong effect of treatment on viremia and gut associated lymphoid tissues. In these animals, the level of virus persistence in tissues was inversely correlated with local concentrations of 3TC: high concentrations of 3TC were measured in the gut whereas low concentrations were observed in the secondary lymphoid tissues. IDV, like 3TC, showed much higher concentration in the colon than in the spleen. AZT concentration was below the quantification threshold in all tissues studied. Conclusions Our results suggest that limited antiviral drug diffusion in secondary lymphoid tissues may allow persistent viral replication in these tissues and could represent an obstacle to HIV prevention and eradication.

  20. Nitrogen system for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAshan, M.; Thirumaleshwar, M.; Abramovich, S.; Ganni, V.

    1992-10-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider consists of two parallel magnet rings, each 87,120 m in circumference, constructed in a tunnel 25 m to 74 m below ground level. They are operated at a controlled low helium temperature in order to maintain the magnet windings in the superconducting state. To obtain this condition, the magnet cryostat is designed with a high-quality insulation obtained by a high vacuum chamber, multilayer insulation, and thermal shields at nominal temperatures of 84 K and 20 K. Thermal radiation and the conduction heat load through the supports are intercepted and absorbed by the 84-K shield. Liquid nitrogen provides the refrigeration for these loads. The 84-K shield is anchored to two 63.5-mm stainless-steel tubes. One of the tubes, the ''liquid line,'' serves as a conduit in the distribution system of liquid nitrogen. The other tube, the ''vapor line,'' is used to collect the nitrogen vapor generated in the cooling process and to supply this vapor to,the helium refrigerators for precooling. The vapor line may also be used as a continuous cooler by injecting controlled amounts of liquid nitrogen. The nitrogen system consists of nitrogen supplies; ten nitrogen dewars for the collider and two for the High Energy Booster located on the ground at the main shaft entrances; liquid and vapor transfer lines through the shaft to connect the surface and the tunnel systems; and transfer lines to bypass warm equipment sections of the collider. The nitrogen system is expected to operate at steady state condition except for cooldown, warmup, and system repair, for which transients are expected. During normal operation and standby modes of the collider, temperature, pressure, and mass flow are expected to be constant in all circuits of the nitrogen system. The conceptual design requirements for various flow schemes and the engineering considerations are presented in this report

  1. Greater nitrogen load in rivers and fjords

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaste, Oeyvind; Engen-Skaugen, Torill

    2005-01-01

    The article presents results from river and fjord climate simulations. Climatic changes may be amplified by hydrologic, water chemical and biologic systems. Connecting model systems, interpreting results and uncertainties are discussed

  2. Nitrogen Research Programme STOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erisman, J.W.; Van der Eerden, L.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution is one of the main threats to the environment now in the Netherlands as well as other parts of Europe. In order to address the main gaps on the issues of nitrogen pollution related to the local scale, the Ministries of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment (VROM) and of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries (LNV) have initiated a research programme, the Dutch Nitrogen Research Programme (STOP), which aims to provide a scientific basis to develop and implement policy on a local scale for the realisation and conservation of the EHS ('Dutch Mainframe of Natural Landscapes'). The results of the programme show that the description of emissions from manure in the field is difficult to describe and show large uncertainties. On the contrary, emissions from housings could be modelled well, if local actual data were available. The OPS model to describe the dispersion and deposition was evaluated with the measurements and the limitations were quantified. It appears that the model works well on the long term, whereas on the short term (hours) and short distance (tenths of meters) there is large uncertainty, especially in complex terrain. Critical loads for nitrogen for ecosystems were evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of management options was quantified. A method to determine critical loads as a function of soil conditions, such as acidification and water availability was derived. This resulted in a combination of the soil model SMART and the so-called 'nature planner' (Natuurplanner). It was concluded that the combination of SMART, the nature planner and OPS provide a good tool to develop and support policy on the local scale. 4 refs

  3. Determinação não destrutiva do nitrogênio total em plantas por espectroscopia de reflectância difusa no infravermelho próximo Non-destructive determination of total nitrogen in plants by diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio M. G. Lima

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse reflectance near-infrared (DR-NIR spectroscopy associated with partial least squares (PLS multivariate calibration is proposed for a direct, non-destructive, determination of total nitrogen in wheat leaves. The procedure was developed for an Analytical Instrumental Analysis course, carried out at the Institute of Chemistry of the State University of Campinas. The DR-NIR results are in good agreement with those obtained by the Kjeldhal standard procedure, with a relative error of less than ± 3% and the method may be used for teaching purposes as well as for routine analysis.

  4. The nitrogen abatement cost in wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystroem, Olof

    1998-01-01

    The costs of abating agricultural nitrogen pollution in wetlands are estimated. By linking costs for construction of wetlands to the denitrification capacity of wetlands, an abatement cost function can be formed. A construction-cost function and a denitrification function for wetlands is estimated empirically. This paper establishes a link between abatement costs and the nitrogen load on wetlands. Since abatement costs fluctuate with nitrogen load, ignoring this link results in incorrect estimates of abatement costs. The results demonstrate that wetlands have the capacity to provide low cost abatement of nitrogen compounds in runoff. For the Kattegatt region in Sweden, marginal abatement costs for wetlands are shown to be lower than costs of land use changing measures, such as extended land under fallow or cultivation of fuel woods, but higher than the marginal costs of reducing nitrogen fertilizer

  5. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  6. 84 K nitrogen system for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAshan, M.; Thirumaleshwar, M.; Abramovich, S.; Ganni, V.; Scheidemantle, A.

    1992-01-01

    The nitrogen system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is designed to provide the 84 K (nominal) shield refrigeration for the collider rings. Liquid nitrogen is supplied to the collider tunnel from one, two, or more locations on the surface through the service shafts and is distributed along, the 87 km of both rings by the 84 K shield lines. Additional design requirements for the nitrogen distribution system include precooling, fluid supply to the helium plants, supplying makeup liquid nitrogen to the reservoirs located at the entrance of the main shafts, and providing an efficient cooldown means for the cold mass from 300 K to 90 K. The operational modes and possible emergency and maintenance conditions of the collider are taken into account for the nitrogen system design. The status of our work, including design considerations that address thermal aspects (heat load, recooling scheme, etc.) and hydraulic aspects (pressures, elevations, distances, etc.) of the nitrogen system will be discussed

  7. Conservative diffusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlen, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    In Nelson's stochastic mechanics, quantum phenomena are described in terms of diffusions instead of wave functions. These diffusions are formally given by stochastic differential equations with extremely singular coefficients. Using PDE methods, we prove the existence of solutions. This reult provides a rigorous basis for stochastic mechanics. (orig.)

  8. Study of the temperature dependent nitrogen retention in tungsten surfaces by XPS-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, Ulrike [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Schellingstrasse 4, D-80799 Muenchen (Germany); Meisl, Gerd; Hoeschen, Till [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To reduce the power load on the divertor of fusion experiments, nitrogen (N) is puffed into the plasma. As a side effect, nitrogen gets implanted into the tungsten (W) walls of the reactor and forms nitride layers. Their formation and, therefore, the N accumulation in W showed an unexpected temperature dependence in previous experiments. To study the nitrogen retention, we implanted N ions with an energy of 300 eV into W and observed the evolution of the surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We find that the N content does not change when the sample is annealed up to 800 K after implantation at lower temperatures. In contrast, the N concentration decreases with increasing implantation temperature. At 800 K implantation temperature, the N saturation level is about 5 times lower compared to 300 K implantation. A possible explanation for this difference is an enhanced diffusion during ion bombardment due to changes in the structure or in the chemical state of the tungsten nitride system. Ongoing tungsten nitride erosion experiments shall help to clarify whether the strong temperature dependence is the result of enhanced diffusion or of phase changes.

  9. Model of diffusers / permeators for hydrogen processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, W. D.; Hang, T.

    2008-01-01

    Palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) diffusers are mainstays of hydrogen processing. Diffusers separate hydrogen from inert species such as nitrogen, argon or helium. The tubing becomes permeable to hydrogen when heated to more than 250 C and a differential pressure is created across the membrane. The hydrogen diffuses better at higher temperatures. Experimental or experiential results have been the basis for determining or predicting a diffuser's performance. However, the process can be mathematically modeled, and comparison to experimental or other operating data can be utilized to improve the fit of the model. A reliable model-based diffuser system design is the goal which will have impacts on tritium and hydrogen processing. A computer model has been developed to solve the differential equations for diffusion given the operating boundary conditions. The model was compared to operating data for a low pressure diffuser system. The modeling approach and the results are presented in this paper. (authors)

  10. nitrogen saturation in stream ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Earl, S. R.; Valett, H. M.; Webster, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of nitrogen (N) saturation has organized the assessment of N loading in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we extend the concept to lotic ecosystems by coupling Michaelis-Menten kinetics and nutrient spiraling. We propose a series of saturation response types, which may be used to characterize the proximity of streams to N saturation. We conducted a series of short-term N releases using a tracer ((NO3)-N-15-N) to measure uptake. Experiments were conducted in streams spanning a gradient ...

  11. The Modeling of Nitrogen Mass Transport in CoCr Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petraitienė Akvilė

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of plasma nitriding of CoCr alloy below temperatures of nitrides formation and mechanisms of nitrogen penetration are analyzed by proposed kinetic modeling in this article. Proposed nitrogen diffusion model is based on the trapping – detrapping (TD model and developed taking into account the effect of the concentration dependent diffusivity of nitrogen, nitrogen adsorption on the surface of alloy and surface swelling process. The model indicates the influence of chromium atoms to nitrogen atoms diffusivity. The model consists of time and depth dependent diffusion, which is described by a partial differential equation, and it is solved by using Crank – Nicolson finite difference method. By fitting of experimental nitrogen depth profiles, it is shown that nitrogen diffusion coefficient varies with nitrogen concentration according to Einstein-Smoluchowski relation. Nitrogen depth profiles in plasma nitrided medical grade CoCr alloy (ISO 5831 – 12 at T = 400 °C for 1, 4 and 20 hours calculated on the basis of this model are in good agreement with experimental nitrogen profiles. Furthermore, the swelling process is showed and analyzed, derived the dependency of swelling rate on nitriding duration – the swelling rate is inversely proportional to the square root of nitriding duration. The obtained diffusion coefficient value and the swelling process rates satisfy the experimental data form Ref. The derived model explains physical processes during plasma nitriding and allows obtaining nitrogen depth profiles for any requisite nitriding duration.

  12. Fractional Diffusion Equations and Anomalous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto; Kaminski Lenzi, Ervin

    2018-01-01

    Preface; 1. Mathematical preliminaries; 2. A survey of the fractional calculus; 3. From normal to anomalous diffusion; 4. Fractional diffusion equations: elementary applications; 5. Fractional diffusion equations: surface effects; 6. Fractional nonlinear diffusion equation; 7. Anomalous diffusion: anisotropic case; 8. Fractional Schrödinger equations; 9. Anomalous diffusion and impedance spectroscopy; 10. The Poisson–Nernst–Planck anomalous (PNPA) models; References; Index.

  13. Tightening the nitrogen cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, B.T.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of nitrogen to crop plants is a universally important aspect of soil quality, and often nitrogen represents the immediate limitation to crop productivity in modern agriculture. Nitrogen is decisive for the nutritive value of plant products and plays a key role in the environmental impact of agricultural production. The fundamental doctrine of nitrogen management is to optimise the nitrogen use efficiency of both introduced and native soil nitrogen by increasing the temporal a...

  14. Chemical diffusion on solid surfaces. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, J.B.

    1980-12-01

    The techniques of surface science have been applied to the problem of the measurement of the surface diffusion rate of an adsorbed species over the surface of a chemically dissimilar material. Studies were carried out for hydrogen and nitrogen adatoms on a Ni(100) surface and for silver adatoms on a sapphire surface. Positive results were obtained only for the case of nitrogen on Ni(100). In this system the diffusivity is characterized by the expression D = D 0 exp (/sup -ΔH//RT), with D 0 = 0.25 cm 2 /sec and ΔH = 28kcal/mol

  15. Diffusion and evaporation of a liquid droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, K. N.

    1980-06-01

    The process of evaporation and diffusion of a spherical liquid droplet in an atmosphere of noncondensable gas is studied theoretically. An equation for the shrinkage of the radius of the droplet is derived on the basis of continuity and momentum equations. Further, a conjugate problem consisting of the energy and mass balance for the gaseous environment is formulated. An approximation of thin thermal and diffusion boundary-layers is introduced to simplify the analysis. Results are presented for methanol-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen, and sodium-argon systems. It has been observed that the droplet of highly viscous fluid exhibits rapid contraction.

  16. Nitrogen Removal from Milking Center Wastewater via Simultaneous Nitrification and Denitrification Using a Biofilm Filtration Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Gun Won

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Milking center wastewater (MCW has a relatively low ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio, which should be separately managed from livestock manure due to the negative impacts of manure nutrients and harmful effects on down-stream in the livestock manure process with respect to the microbial growth. Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND is linked to inhibition of the second nitrification and reduces around 40% of the carbonaceous energy available for denitrification. Thus, this study was conducted to find the optimal operational conditions for the treatment of MCW using an attached-growth biofilm reactor; i.e., nitrogen loading rate (NLR of 0.14, 0.28, 0.43, and 0.58 kg m−3 d−1 and aeration rate of 0.06, 0.12, and 0.24 m3 h−1 were evaluated and the comparison of air-diffuser position between one-third and bottom of the reactor was conducted. Four sand packed-bed reactors with the effective volume of 2.5 L were prepared and initially an air-diffuser was placed at one third from the bottom of the reactor. After the adaptation period of 2 weeks, SND was observed at all four reactors and the optimal NLR of 0.45 kg m−3 d−1 was found as a threshold value to obtain higher nitrogen removal efficiency. Dissolved oxygen (DO as one of key operational conditions was measured during the experiment and the reactor with an aeration rate of 0.12 m3 h−1 showed the best performance of NH4-N removal and the higher total nitrogen removal efficiency through SND with appropriate DO level of ~0.5 mg DO L−1. The air-diffuser position at one third from the bottom of the reactor resulted in better nitrogen removal than at the bottom position. Consequently, nitrogen in MCW with a low C/N ratio of 2.15 was successfully removed without the addition of external carbon sources.

  17. The transport parameters of an electron swarm in nitrogen at elevated E/N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevin, H.A.; Fletcher, J.; Reid, I.D.

    1980-06-01

    Values of the electron drift velocity, the longitudonal diffusion coefficient and the transverse diffusion coefficient for electron swarms in nitrogen over the range 50 Td <= E/N <500 Td have been determined by a method of counting and analysing the photons produced by such an electron swarm in a drift tube. A measure of the Nitrogen E state deactivation rate is presented

  18. Mapping of nitrogen risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Andersen, Hans Estrup; Carstensen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    risk mapping part of the tool, we combined a modelled root zone N leaching with a catchment-specific N reduction factor which in combination determines the N load to the marine recipient. N leaching was calculated using detailed information of agricultural management from national databases as well...... will be more effective if they are implemented in N loss hot spots or risk areas. Additionally, the highly variable N reduction in groundwater and surface waters needs to be taken into account as this strongly influences the resulting effect of mitigation measures. The objectives of this study were to develop...... and apply an N risk tool to the entire agricultural land area in Denmark. The purpose of the tool is to identify high risk areas, i.e. areas which contribute disproportionately much to diffuse N losses to the marine recipient, and to suggest cost-effective measures to reduce losses from risk areas. In the N...

  19. Strengthening Hadfield steel welds by nitrogen alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, C.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2009-01-01

    Strengthening Hadfield steel weld repairs by introducing nitrogen into the weld region was proven to be feasible via two welding techniques. The first technique required a pure Hadfield steel filler material to be diffusion treated in a high pressure nitrogen gas environment, and subsequently used during tungsten inert gas welding with a pure argon shielding gas. The second technique used a Hadfield steel filler material, and a 10% nitrogen containing argon shielding gas during tungsten inert gas welding. Both techniques increased the yield strength, the hardening rate, and the ultimate strength of the weld region. Using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy, we determined that the increased strength of the weld region resulted from a combination of nitrogen alloying and microstructural refinement

  20. Influence of Three Permeable Pavement Surfaces on Nitrogen Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen is a stressor of concern in many nutrient sensitive watersheds often associated with algal blooms and resulting fish kills. Communities are increasingly installing green infrastructure stormwater control measures (SCMs) to reduce pollutant loads associated with stormwat...

  1. Enhancing nitrogen removal in stormwater treatment facilities for transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Stormwater from roadways is a point source of pollution. State DOTs must comply with Total Maximum : Daily Load (TMDL) regulations for nutrients such as nitrogen, which causes water quality impairment. Existing stormwater treatment technologies, such...

  2. Single molecule studies of solvent-dependent diffusion and entrapment in poly(dimethylsiloxane) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey J; Culbertson, Christopher T; Higgins, Daniel A

    2008-12-15

    Single molecule microscopic and spectroscopic methods are employed to probe the mobility and physical entrapment of dye molecules in dry and solvent-loaded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) films. PDMS films of approximately 220 nm thickness are prepared by spin casting dilute solutions of Sylgard 184 onto glass coverslips, followed by low temperature curing. A perylene diimide dye (BPPDI) is used to probe diffusion and molecule-matrix interactions. Two classes of dye-loaded samples are investigated: (i) those incorporating dye dispersed throughout the films ("in film" samples) and (ii) those in which the dye is restricted primarily to the PDMS surface ("on film" samples). Experiments are performed under dry nitrogen and at various levels of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) loading from the vapor phase. A PDMS-coated quartz-crystal microbalance is employed to monitor solvent loading and drying of the PDMS and to ensure equilibrium conditions are achieved. Single molecules are shown to be predominantly immobile under dry conditions and mostly mobile under IPA-saturated conditions. Quantitative methods for counting the fluorescent spots produced by immobile single molecules in optical images of the samples demonstrate that the population of mobile molecules increases nonlinearly with IPA loading. Even under IPA saturated conditions, the population of fixed molecules is found to be greater than zero and is greatest for "in film" samples. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is used to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient for the mobile molecules, yielding a mean value of D = 1.4(+/-0.4) x 10(-8) cm(2)/s that is virtually independent of IPA loading and sample class. It is concluded that a nonzero population of dye molecules is physically entrapped within the PDMS matrix under all conditions. The increase in the population of mobile molecules under high IPA conditions is attributed to the filling of film micropores with solvent, rather than by incorporation of molecularly

  3. Genotypic variation of nitrogen use efficiency in Indian mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Altaf; Khan, Ishrat; Abrol, Yash P.; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the variation of nitrogen efficiency (NE), nitrogen uptake efficiency (UE), physiological nitrogen use efficiency (PUE) among Indian mustard genotypes, grown under N-insufficient and N-sufficient conditions. Nitrogen efficiency varied from 52.7 to 92.8. Seed yield varied from 1.14 t ha -1 to 3.21 t ha -1 under N-insufficient condition, while 2.14 t ha -1 -3.33 t ha -1 under N-sufficient condition. Physiological basis of this difference was explained in terms of nitrogen uptake efficiency and physiological nitrogen use efficiency, and their relationship with the growth and yield characteristics. While nitrogen uptake efficiency was positively correlated with plant biomass (0.793**), leaf area index (0.664*), and leaf nitrogen content (0.783**), physiological nitrogen use efficiency is positively correlated with photosynthetic rate (0.689**) and yield (0.814**). This study suggests that genotype having high nitrogen uptake efficiency and high physiological nitrogen use efficiency might help in reducing the nitrogen load on soil without any penalty on the yield. - Nitrogen efficient crop plants may help in reducing environmental contamination of nitrate without any penalty on seed yield

  4. Load forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, H.

    1995-01-01

    Slides used in a presentation at The Power of Change Conference in Vancouver, BC in April 1995 about the changing needs for load forecasting were presented. Technological innovations and population increase were said to be the prime driving forces behind the changing needs in load forecasting. Structural changes, market place changes, electricity supply planning changes, and changes in planning objectives were other factors discussed. It was concluded that load forecasting was a form of information gathering, that provided important market intelligence

  5. Discharge and Nitrogen Transfer Modelling in the Berze River: A HYPE Setup and Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veinbergs Arturs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on water quality and quantity modelling in the Berze River basin located in the Zemgale region of Latvia. The contributing basin area of 872 km2 is furthermore divided into 15 sub-basins designated according to the characteristics of hydrological network and water sampling programme. The river basin of interest is a spatially complex system with agricultural land and forests as two predominant land use types. Complexity of the system reflects in the discharge intensity and diffuse pollution of nitrogen compounds into the water bodies of the river basin. The presence of urban area has an impact as the load from the existing wastewater treatment plants consist up to 76 % of the total nitrogen load in the Berze River basin. Representative data sets of land cover, agricultural field data base for crop distribution analysis, estimation of crop management, soil type map, digital elevation model, drainage conditions, network of water bodies and point sources were used for the modelling procedures. The semi-distributed hydro chemical model HYPE has a setup to simulate discharge and nitrogen transfer. In order to make the model more robust and appropriate for the current study the data sets previously stated were classified by unifying similar spatially located polygons. The data layers were overlaid and 53 hydrological response units (SLCs were created. Agricultural land consists of 48 SLCs with the details of soils, drainage conditions, crop types, and land management practices. Manual calibration procedure was applied to improve the performance of discharge simulation. Simulated discharge values showed good agreement with the observed values with the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.82 and bias of −6.6 %. Manual calibration of parameters related to nitrogen leakage simulation was applied to test the most sensitive parameters.

  6. Discharge and Nitrogen Transfer Modelling in the Berze River: A HYPE Setup and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinbergs, Arturs; Lagzdins, Ainis; Jansons, Viesturs; Abramenko, Kaspars; Sudars, Ritvars

    2017-05-01

    This study is focused on water quality and quantity modelling in the Berze River basin located in the Zemgale region of Latvia. The contributing basin area of 872 km2 is furthermore divided into 15 sub-basins designated according to the characteristics of hydrological network and water sampling programme. The river basin of interest is a spatially complex system with agricultural land and forests as two predominant land use types. Complexity of the system reflects in the discharge intensity and diffuse pollution of nitrogen compounds into the water bodies of the river basin. The presence of urban area has an impact as the load from the existing wastewater treatment plants consist up to 76 % of the total nitrogen load in the Berze River basin. Representative data sets of land cover, agricultural field data base for crop distribution analysis, estimation of crop management, soil type map, digital elevation model, drainage conditions, network of water bodies and point sources were used for the modelling procedures. The semi-distributed hydro chemical model HYPE has a setup to simulate discharge and nitrogen transfer. In order to make the model more robust and appropriate for the current study the data sets previously stated were classified by unifying similar spatially located polygons. The data layers were overlaid and 53 hydrological response units (SLCs) were created. Agricultural land consists of 48 SLCs with the details of soils, drainage conditions, crop types, and land management practices. Manual calibration procedure was applied to improve the performance of discharge simulation. Simulated discharge values showed good agreement with the observed values with the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.82 and bias of -6.6 %. Manual calibration of parameters related to nitrogen leakage simulation was applied to test the most sensitive parameters.

  7. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  8. Strain-dependent diffusion behavior of H within tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Wenyi; He, Haiyan; Liu, Changsong; Ding, Rui; Chen, Junling; Pan, Bicai

    2014-01-01

    The diffusion behaviors of H in tungsten, a promising material serving as the first wall facing the plasma in nuclear reactors, under either biaxial strain or isotropic strain are theoretically studied. We find that under the isotropic strain, an individual H atom may diffuse along all pathways, and under the biaxial strain, it preferably migrates along the direction perpendicular to the loaded strain. Moreover, in the case of either the isotropic or the biaxial strain, the loaded compressive strain weakens the diffusion of H, while the loaded tensile strain enhances the diffusion of H in bulk W.

  9. Strain-dependent diffusion behavior of H within tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wenyi; He, Haiyan [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu, Changsong [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Ding, Rui; Chen, Junling [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Pan, Bicai, E-mail: bcpan@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-06-15

    The diffusion behaviors of H in tungsten, a promising material serving as the first wall facing the plasma in nuclear reactors, under either biaxial strain or isotropic strain are theoretically studied. We find that under the isotropic strain, an individual H atom may diffuse along all pathways, and under the biaxial strain, it preferably migrates along the direction perpendicular to the loaded strain. Moreover, in the case of either the isotropic or the biaxial strain, the loaded compressive strain weakens the diffusion of H, while the loaded tensile strain enhances the diffusion of H in bulk W.

  10. Multipassage diffuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalis, A.; Rouviere, R.; Simon, G.

    1976-01-01

    A multipassage diffuser having 2p passages comprises a leak-tight cylindrical enclosure closed by a top cover and a bottom end-wall, parallel porous tubes which are rigidly assembled in sectors between tube plates and through which the gas mixture flows, the tube sectors being disposed at uniform intervals on the periphery of the enclosure. The top tube plates are rigidly fixed to an annular header having the shape of a half-torus and adapted to communicate with the tubes of the corresponding sector. Each passage is constituted by a plurality of juxtaposed sectors in which the mixture circulates in the same direction, the header being divided into p portions limited by radial partition-walls and each constituting two adjacent passages. The diffuser is provided beneath the bottom end-wall with p-1 leak-tight chambers each adapted to open into two different portions of the header, and with two collector-chambers each fitted with a nozzle for introducing the gas mixture and discharging the fraction of the undiffused mixture. By means of a central orifice formed in the bottom end-wall the enclosure communicates with a shaft for discharging the diffused fraction of the gas mixture

  11. Isotope exchange investigation of nitrogen redistribution in expanded austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, T.L.; Drouet, M.; Martinavičius, A.; Somers, M.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Sequential plasma and gaseous nitriding of Fe–18Cr–10Ni–3Mo stainless steel at 390 °C with 14 N and 15 N isotopes followed by denitriding in flowing hydrogen was investigated. Redistribution of plasma-inserted nitrogen atoms ( 15 N) by subsequent gaseous nitriding ( 14 N) was observed. Denitriding after plasma- and gaseous nitriding resulted in predominant retraction of 14 N, and only a minor amount of 15 N. The nitrogen isotope diffusion behaviour is explained by two different states of nitrogen bonding and short-range ordering between nitrogen and chromium

  12. Quantum diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, S.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ''quantum diffusion'' terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source

  13. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  14. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  15. Reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) production in a liquid fuel-oil diffusion flame by acoustic excitation; Reduction de la production des oxydes d`azote (NO{sub x}) dans une flamme de diffusion a fioul liquide par excitation acoustique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabroy, O.; Haile, E.; Veynante, D.; Lacas, F.; Candel, S. [Ecole Centrale de Paris, Laboratoire EM2C. CNRS, 92 - Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    1996-12-31

    The control of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions will become a major challenge in the forthcoming years, in the domain of automotive industry or industrial burners. Pulsed combustion offers an imaginative solution which does not affect the combustion efficiency. In this paper, the efficiency of this method is demonstrated using the burner of a 20 kW domestic boiler. The actuator is simply installed on the air intake. Two types of actuators have been tested successfully: a loudspeaker and a rotative valve. Both can produce 100 to 1000 Hz frequencies and can lead to a reduction of 20% of NO{sub x} emissions. The feasibility of the concept is also demonstrated on a 840 kW liquid fuel-oil burner. The mechanisms involved during an excitation are explained using the CH{sup *} radical imaging. Results show an important reorganization of the flow and of the flame structure. During each excitation cycle, an annular swirl occurs at the leading edge of the flame catching and develops during downflow convection. These results give precious information on this new concept of nitrogen oxides reduction using acoustic excitation. (J.S.) 18 refs.

  16. Self-diffusion of plutonium in uranium-plutonium mononitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Matzke, H.

    1978-01-01

    In the following, first data on the tracer diffusion of Pu-238 in (Usub(0.8)Pusub(0.2)N are reported and some aspects of the diffusion mechanism are discussed. Two sets of specimens with different non-metal to metal ratios were used, and on one of the materials the Pu diffusion rates were measured as a function of nitrogen partial pressure at three different temperatures

  17. Beam loading

    OpenAIRE

    Boussard, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superco...

  18. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: geographic and anthropogenic variability

    OpenAIRE

    González-Viana, I. (Inés); Bode, A. (Antonio)

    2013-01-01

    Proyectos ANILE (CTM2009-08396 and CTM2010-08804-E) del Plan Nacional de I+D+i y RADIALES del Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO). I.G.V. recibió un contrato FPI del Ministerio de Economía y Competividad Growing human population add to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. As the excess nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass anthropogenic and natural nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N). In this study δ15N was dete...

  19. A nitrogen mass balance for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptzin, D.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    , requires a net influx of N in feed to the state. In terms of exports, the riverine N loads are smaller than many more mesic climates. Because many of the large population centers are on the coast, N discharged directly from wastewater treatment plants into the ocean is almost four times greater than the N discharge of all of the watersheds in the state combined. Gas losses are estimated through a combination of bottom up approaches using field data, emissions inventories, and numerical models. The largest uncertainties are in emissions of N2 and NH3. Calculated by difference, groundwater N loading represents the largest loss term in the mass balance. Contamination of groundwater with nitrates is a serious concern in many areas of the state. Given the long residence time of groundwater in many aquifers like the Central Valley the current and past N inputs to groundwater pose a hazard to drinking water supplies for decades to come. These calculations along with the analysis of management and policy tools will help elucidate the spatial location or activities that would be best to target to reduce the negative consequences of human alteration of the nitrogen cycle.

  20. Modeling nitrogen fluxes in Germany - where does the nitrogen go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Laura; Bach, Martin; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    According to the latest inventory of the EU Water Framework Directive, 26.3% of German groundwater bodies are in a poor chemical state regarding nitrate. Additionally, the EU initiated infringement proceedings against Germany for not meeting the quality standards of the EU Nitrate Directive. Agriculture has been determined as the main source of nitrate pollution due to over-fertilization and regionally high density of livestock farming. The nitrogen balance surplus is commonly used as an indicator characterizing the potential of nitrate leaching into groundwater bodies and thus also serves as a foundation to introduce legislative restrictions or to monitor the success of mitigation measures. Currently, there is an ongoing discussion which measures are suitable for reducing the risk of nitrate leaching and also to what extent. However, there is still uncertainty about just how much the nitrogen surplus has to be reduced to meet the groundwater quality standards nationwide. Therefore, the aims of our study were firstly to determine the level of the nitrogen surplus that would be acceptable at the utmost and secondly whether the currently discussed target value of 30 kg N per hectare agricultural land for the soil surface nitrogen balance would be sufficient. The models MONERIS (Modeling Nutrient Emissions in River System) and MoRE (Modelling of Regionalized Emissions), the latter based on the first, are commonly used for estimating nitrogen loads into the river system in Germany at the mesoscale, as well as the effect of mitigation measures in the context of the EU directive 2008/105/EC (Environmental quality standards applicable to surface water). We used MoRE to calculate nitrate concentration for 2759 analytical units in Germany. Main factors are the surplus of the soil surface nitrogen balance, the percolation rate and an exponent representing the denitrification in the vadose zone. The modeled groundwater nitrate concentrations did not correspond to the regional

  1. Marine nitrogen cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    ) such as the Marine nitrogen cycle The marine nitrogen cycle. ‘X’ and ‘Y’ are intra-cellular intermediates that do not accumulate in water column. (Source: Codispoti et al., 2001) Page 1 of 3Marine nitrogen cycle - Encyclopedia of Earth 11/20/2006http://www... and nitrous oxide budgets: Moving targets as we enter the anthropocene?, Sci. Mar., 65, 85-105, 2001. Page 2 of 3Marine nitrogen cycle - Encyclopedia of Earth 11/20/2006http://www.eoearth.org/article/Marine_nitrogen_cycle square6 Gruber, N.: The dynamics...

  2. Liquid nitrogen dewar for protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar apparatus developed by Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine for use aboard Mir and the International Space Station allows large quantities of protein samples to be crystallized in orbit. The specimens are contained either in plastic tubing (heat-sealed at each end). Biological samples are prepared with a precipitating agent in either a batch or liquid-liquid diffusion configuration. The samples are then flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen before crystallization can start. On orbit, the Dewar is placed in a quiet area of the station and the nitrogen slowly boils off (it is taken up by the environmental control system), allowing the proteins to thaw to begin crystallization. The Dewar is returned to Earth after one to four months on orbit, depending on Shuttle flight opportunities. The tubes then are analyzed for crystal presence and quality

  3. Studies on nitrogen mapping by various CR-39 track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, G.; Varga, Zs.; Hunyadi, I.; Freyer, K.; Treutler, H.Ch.

    1986-01-01

    The use of CR-39 track detectors for nitrogen distribution measurements via the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction is studied. The proton detection properties of different CR-39 products have been analyzed. The variation of background track density induced in the bulk of detectors is examined under different conditions of neutron irradiation. Analysis of our experimental data has led to the conclusion that the sources of proton background tracks are the fast neutron component of the neutron source, chlorine impurities in the detector and nitrogen diffused from the air into the upper layer of the detector. Efforts have been made to decrease the nitrogen content of diffusion origin by removing the upper detector layer and by outgassing the CR-39 sheet in vacuum before irradiation. Finally the ''signal/noise'' ratio for a steel specimen and the sensitivity of nitrogen determination are given.

  4. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  5. Beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed. (author)

  6. Tile drainage as karst: Conduit flow and diffuse flow in a tile-drained watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.; Helmers, M.

    2008-01-01

    The similarity of tiled-drained watersheds to karst drainage basins can be used to improve understanding of watershed-scale nutrient losses from subsurface tile drainage networks. In this study, short-term variations in discharge and chemistry were examined from a tile outlet collecting subsurface tile flow from a 963 ha agricultural watershed. Study objectives were to apply analytical techniques from karst springs to tile discharge to evaluate water sources and estimate the loads of agricultural pollutants discharged from the tile with conduit, intermediate and diffuse flow regimes. A two-member mixing model using nitrate, chloride and specific conductance was used to distinguish rainwater versus groundwater inputs. Results indicated that groundwater comprised 75% of the discharge for a three-day storm period and rainwater was primarily concentrated during the hydrograph peak. A contrasting pattern of solute concentrations and export loads was observed in tile flow. During base flow periods, tile flow consisted of diffuse flow from groundwater sources and contained elevated levels of nitrate, chloride and specific conductance. During storm events, suspended solids and pollutants adhered to soil surfaces (phosphorus, ammonium and organic nitrogen) were concentrated and discharged during the rapid, conduit flow portion of the hydrograph. During a three-day period, conduit flow occurred for 5.6% of the time but accounted for 16.5% of the total flow. Nitrate and chloride were delivered primarily with diffuse flow (more than 70%), whereas 80-94% of total suspended sediment, phosphorus and ammonium were exported with conduit and intermediate flow regimes. Understanding the water sources contributing to tile drainage and the manner by which pollutant discharge occurs from these systems (conduit, intermediate or diffuse flow) may be useful for designing, implementing and evaluating non-point source reduction strategies in tile-drained landscapes. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All

  7. Adapted diffusion processes for effective forging dies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, H.; Nienhaus, A.; Brunotte, K.; Petersen, T.; Siegmund, M.; Lippold, L.; Weber, M.; Mejauschek, M.; Landgraf, P.; Braeuer, G.; Behrens, B.-A.; Lampke, T.

    2018-05-01

    Hot forging is an effective production method producing safety relevant parts with excellent mechanical properties. The economic efficiency directly depends on the occurring wear of the tools, which limits service lifetime. Several approaches of the presenting research group aim at minimizing the wear caused by interacting mechanical and thermal loads by using enhanced nitriding technology. Thus, by modifying the surface zone layer it is possible to create a resistance against thermal softening provoking plastic deformation and pronounced abrasive wear. As a disadvantage, intensely nitrided surfaces may possibly include the risk of increased crack sensitivity and therefore feature the chipping of material at the treated surface. Recent projects (evaluated in several industrial applications) show the high technological potential of adapted treatments: A first approach evaluated localized treatments by preventing areas from nitrogen diffusion with applied pastes or other coverages. Now, further ideas are to use this principle to structure the surface with differently designed patterns generating smaller ductile zones beneath nitrided ones. The selection of suitable designs is subject to certain geo-metrical requirements though. The intention of this approach is to prevent the formation and propagation of cracks under thermal shock conditions. Analytical characterization methods for crack sensitivity of surface zone layers and an accurate system of testing rigs for thermal shock conditions verified the treatment concepts. Additionally, serial forging tests using adapted testing geometries and finally, tests in the industrial production field were performed. Besides stabilizing the service lifetime and decreasing specific wear mechanisms caused by thermal influences, the crack behavior was influenced positively. This leads to a higher efficiency of the industrial production process and enables higher output in forging campaigns of industrial partners.

  8. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  9. Load sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ende, D.; Almeida, P.M.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a load sensor comprising a polymer matrix and a piezo-ceramic material such as PZT, em not bedded in the polymer matrix, which together form a compos not ite, wherein the polymer matrix is a liquid crystalline resin, and wherein the piezo-ceramic material is a PZT powder

  10. Carbohydrate Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  11. Atmospheric deposition as an important nitrogen load to a typical agro-ecosystem in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain. 2. Seasonal and inter-annual variations and their implications (2008-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Zhang, Jiabao; Ma, Donghao; Wen, Zhaofei; Wu, Shengjun; Garland, Gina; Pereira, Engil Isadora Pujol; Zhu, Anning; Xin, Xiuli; Zhang, Congzhi

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition, an important N source to agro-ecosystems, has increased intensively in China during recent decades. However, knowledge on temporal variations of total N deposition and their influencing factors is limited due to lack of systematic monitoring data. In this study, total N deposition, including dry and wet components, was monitored using the water surrogate surface method for a typical agro-ecosystem with a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and summer maize (Zea mays L.) rotation system in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain from May 2008 to April 2012. The results indicated that annual total N deposition ranged from 23.8 kg N ha-1 (2009-2010) to 40.3 kg N ha-1 (2008-2009) and averaged 31.8 kg N ha-1. Great inter-annual variations were observed during the sampling period, due to differences in annual rainfall and gaseous N losses from farmlands. Monthly total N deposition varied greatly, from less than 0.6 kg N ha-1 (January, 2010) to over 8.0 kg N ha-1 (August, 2008), with a mean value of 2.6 kg N ha-1. In contrast to wet deposition, dry portions generally contributed more to the total, except in the precipitation-intensive months, accounting for 65% in average. NH4+ -N was the dominant species in N deposition and its contribution to total deposition varied from 6% (December, 2009) to 79% (July, 2008), averaging 53%. The role of organic N (O-N) in both dry and wet deposition was equal to or even greater than that of NO3- -N. Influencing factors such as precipitation and its seasonal distribution, reactive N sources, vegetation status, field management practices, and weather conditions were responsible for the temporal variations of atmospheric N deposition and its components. These results are helpful for reducing the knowledge gaps in the temporal variations of atmospheric N deposition and their influencing factors in different ecosystems, to improve the understandings on N budget in the typical agro-ecosystem, and to provide references

  12. Thermal diffusion and separation of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Andre

    1944-01-01

    After a review of the various processes used to separate isotopes or at least to obtain mixes with a composition different from the natural proportion, this research addresses the use of thermal diffusion. The author reports a theoretical study of gas thermal diffusion and of the Clusius-Dickel method. In the second part, he reports the enrichment of methane with carbon-13, and of ammoniac with nitrogen-15. The next part reports the experimental study of thermal diffusion of liquids and solutions, and the enrichment of carbon tetra-chloride with chlorine-37. The author then proposes an overview of theories of thermal diffusion in liquid phase (hydrodynamic theory, kinetic theory, theory of caged molecules)

  13. Nitrogen gas supply device in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Masami

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a nitrogen gas supply device in a nuclear power plant for supplying nitrogen gases to a reactor container and equipments working with the nitrogen gas as the load. A liquid nitrogen storage pool is disposed to a concrete nuclear buildings and has a two-vessel structure of inner and outer vessels, in which heat insulators are disposed between the inner and the outer vessels. Further, the nitrogen gas supply mechanism is disposed in an evaporation chamber disposed in adjacent with the liquid nitrogen storage pool in the reator building. Accordingly, since liquid nitrogen is stored in the liquid nitrogen storage pool having a structure surrounded by concrete walls, direct sunlight is completely interrupted, thereby enabling to prevent the heat caused by the direct sunlight from conducting to the liquid nitrogen. Further, since the outer vessel is not exposed to the surrounding atmosphere, heat conduction rate relative to the external air is small. This can reduce the amount of liquid nitrogen released to the atmospheric air due to natural evaporation. (I.N.)

  14. Liquid phase diffusion bonding of A1070 by using metal formate coated Zn sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, K.; Koyama, S.; shohji, I.

    2017-05-01

    Aluminium alloy have high strength and easily recycle due to its low melting point. Therefore, aluminium is widely used in the manufacturing of cars and electronic devices. In recent years, the most common way for bonding aluminium alloy is brazing and friction stir welding. However, brazing requires positional accuracy and results in the formation of voids by the flax residue. Moreover, aluminium is an excellent heat radiating and electricity conducting material; therefore, it is difficult to bond together using other bonding methods. Because of these limitations, liquid phase diffusion bonding is considered to the suitable method for bonding aluminium at low temperature and low bonding pressure. In this study, the effect of metal formate coating processing of zinc surface on the bond strength of the liquid phase diffusion bonded interface of A1070 has been investigated by SEM observation of the interfacial microstructures and fractured surfaces after tensile test. Liquid phase diffusion bonding was carried out under a nitrogen gas atmosphere at a bonding temperature of 673 K and 713 K and a bonding load of 6 MPa (bonding time: 15 min). As a result of the metal formate coating processing, a joint having the ultimate tensile strength of the base aluminium was provided. It is hypothesized that this is because metallic zinc is generated as a result of thermal decomposition of formate in the bonded interface at lower bonding temperatures.

  15. An application of gold diffusion for defect investigation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feklisova, O.V.; Yakimov, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    The application of gold diffusion for defect investigation in Si is illustrated by the diffusion experiments carried out on crystals containing grown-in or specially introduced defects. The efficiency of gold diffusion experiments for monitoring the concentration and spatial distribution of these defects is shown. The effect of vacancy type defects on gold diffusion is illustrated by investigations of nitrogen-doped FZ Si and of Cz Si after rapid thermal annealing. In both these cases the gold depth profile is distinctive for trap limited diffusion. The effect of sinks for self-interstitials on gold diffusion is illustrated by the results obtained on the plastically deformed Si. It is shown that in silicon deformed at relatively low temperatures the gold diffusion is to a great extent determined by the defects in the dislocation trails while in high temperature deformed Si the sinks for self-interstitials are associated with dislocations themselves.

  16. Diffusion of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusiewicz, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in niobium was investigated over the temperature range 148 to 500 degrees Kelvin, using measurements of the elastic after effect caused by long range diffusion (the Gorsky Effect). Relaxation curves for pure annealed niobium were generally not of the single exponential form expected from the Gorsky Effect theory, but were described well by a sum of two exponential curves with different amplitudes and relaxation times. The effects of oxygen and nitrogen interstitials on the diffusion were studied and were not in agreement with conventional trapping models. Deuterium and tritium diffusion in niobium were also studied, and a non-classical isotope effect was observed. Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in several Nb-Ta alloys were measured, and the diffusivity in all these alloys exhibited a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. Experimental results were compared to several models for diffusion and trapping. A model is presented which can account for the form of the relaxation curves observed in pure, annealed niobium

  17. Growth of nitrogen-doped graphene on copper: Multiscale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, P.; Schoenhalz, A. L.; Moskovkin, P.; Lucas, S.; Henrard, L.

    2016-02-01

    We used multiscale simulations to model the growth of nitrogen-doped graphene on a copper substrate by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Our simulations are based on ab-initio calculations of energy barriers for surface diffusion, which are complemented by larger scale Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. Our results indicate that the shape of grown doped graphene flakes depends on the temperature and deposition flux they are submitted during the process, but we found no significant effect of nitrogen doping on this shape. However, we show that nitrogen atoms have a preference for pyridine-like sites compared to graphite-like sites, as observed experimentally.

  18. Nitrogen transport during ion nitriding of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parascandola, S.

    2001-09-01

    The work is structured as follows: In Chapter 2 fundamental transport concepts and phenomena and approaches to transport modeling are introduced. In Chapter 3 details are presented concerning the material under investigation, the material modification process, and the ion beam analytical techniques. In Chapter 4 experimental and modeling results are presented and discussed. Issues that are directly addressed include: The structural nature of the nitrogen enriched layer. The diffusion mechanism of nitrogen. The role of potential incorporation and release mechanisms. The evolution of the thickness of the nitrogen enriched layer. The role of the surface oxide layer. (orig.)

  19. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Excess Entropy and Diffusivity. Excess entropy scaling of diffusivity (Rosenfeld,1977). Analogous relationships also exist for viscosity and thermal conductivity.

  20. Thermal behaviour of nitrogen implanted into zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, S.; Ikeyama, M.; Saitoh, K.; Nakao, S.; Niwa, H.; Tanemura, S.; Miyagawa, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Zirconium films were implanted with 15 N ions of energy 50keV to a total fluence of 1x10 18 ionscm -2 in an attempt to study the formation process and thermal stability of ZrN layers produced by high fluence implantation of nitrogen. Subsequent to the implantation at room temperature, samples were annealed at temperatures of 300 C-900 C. The depth profiles of the implanted nitrogen were measured by nuclear reaction analysis using the 15 N(p,αγ) 12 C at E R =429keV, and the surfaces were examined by thin film X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy. There were many blisters 0.2-0.4μm in diameter on the surface of the as-implanted samples and double peaks were observed in the nitrogen depth profiles; they were in both sides of the mean projected range. It was found that most of the blisters became extinct after annealing above 400 C, and the XRD peak (111) intensity was increased with the increase in the annealing temperature. Moreover, 14 N and 15 N implantations were superimposed on Zr samples in order to study the atomic migration of nitrogen at each stage of high fluence implantation. It was found that the decrease in the peak at the deeper layers was related to blister extinction and nitrogen diffusion into underling zirconium which could be correlated with radiation damage induced by post-implanted ions. ((orig.))

  1. Diffusion zinc plating of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Goncharov, Ivan; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    The report deals with the research on diffusion zinc plating of structural steels when replacing their cyanide cadmium plating. The results of the experiments in the open air, in vacuum, in the inert atmosphere, under various temperatures (300 - 500 deg.C) for different steel brands are presented. It is shown that diffusion zinc plating in argon or nitrogen atmosphere ensures obtaining the qualitative anticorrosion coating with insignificant change of mechanical properties of steels. The process is simple, reliable, ecology pure and cost-effective. (authors)

  2. Load sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Ende, D.; Almeida, P.M.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a load sensor comprising a polymer matrix and a piezo-ceramic material such as PZT, em not bedded in the polymer matrix, which together form a compos not ite, wherein the polymer matrix is a liquid crystalline resin, and wherein the piezo-ceramic material is a PZT powder forming 30-60% by volume of the composite, and wherein the PZT powder forms 40-50% by volume of the composite.

  3. Developments in nitrogen generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, C.L.; Abrardo, J.M.; Himmelberger, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three process cycles for the production of nitrogen by the cryogenic separation of air are described in detail. These cycles are: (1) a waste expander cycle; (2) an air expander cycle; and (3) a cycle for producing large quantities of gaseous nitrogen. Each cycle has distinct advantages for various production ranges and delivery pressures. A dicussion of key parameters that must be considered when selecting a cycle to meet specific product requirements is presented. The importance of high plant reliability and a dependable liquid nitrogen back up system is also presented. Lastly, a discussion of plant safety dealing with the hazards of nitrogen, enriched oxygen, and hydrocarbons present in the air is reviewed

  4. Nitrogen implantation into silicon at 700-1100 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, G.A.; Tyschenko, I.E.; Popov, V.P.; Tijs, S.A.; Plotnikov, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogen ions 130-140 kW potential accelerated were implanted in silicon heated up to Ti=700-1100 deg C. Densities of ion current were 1-5 mcA/cm 2 , doses did not exceed 5x10 17 cm -2 . Initial stages of nitride formation in buried layers are investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering, layer-by-layer Augerspctroscopy and electron microscopy. It is determind, that Ti growth from 700 up to 900 deg C is accompanied by essential reduction of defectiveness of silicon near-the-surface layer at nitrogen retention within the limits of the calculation profile of ion ranges. At Ti=900 deg C nitrogen is rather mobile and at ∼5x10 16 cm -2 dose it is drown to α-Si 3 N 4 crystalling extraction in R p range. Beginning from Ti ≅1000 deg C nitrogen is not retained in the furied layer and diffuses to the surface. No essenstial losses of nitrogen due to evaporation or inside diffusion are observed. It is noted, that critical Ti, when nitrogen is accumulated in the buried layer, correspond to critical temperatures, when light ions introduce essential structure distortions. Conclusion is made, that irradition-introduced distortions of structure represent centres of initiation and growth of nitride phase. At 1150 deg C additional annaling during 3 hs nitrogen, occurring outside the stable extraction, is redistributed between th surface and furied layers, sintering in narrow concentration peaks

  5. Uptake of fertilizer nitrogen and soil nitrogen by rice using 15N-labelled nitrogen fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, K.R.; Patrick, W.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data from five field experiments using labelled nitrogen fertilizer were used to determine the relative effects of soil nitrogen and fertilizer nitrogen on rice yield. Yield of grain was closely correlated with total aboveground nitrogen uptake (soil + fertilizer), less closely correlated with soil nitrogen uptake and not significantly correlated with fertilizer nitrogen uptake. When yield increase rather than yield was correlated with fertilizer nitrogen uptake, the correlation coefficient was statistically significant. (orig.)

  6. Solid state alloying by plasma nitriding and diffusion annealing treatment for austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo, C.E.; Vatavuk, J.; Oliveira, S.D. de; Tschiptschin, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrogen has been added to stainless steels to improve mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. High nitrogen steel production is limited by high gas pressure requirements and low nitrogen solubility in the melt. One way to overcome this limitation is the addition of nitrogen in solid state because of its higher solubility in austenite. However, gas and salt bath nitriding have been done at temperatures around 550 C, where nitrogen solubility in the steel is still very low. High temperature nitriding has been, thus proposed to increase nitrogen contents in the steel but the presence of oxide layers on top of the steel is a barrier to nitrogen intake. In this paper a modified plasma nitriding process is proposed. The first step of this process is a hydrogen plasma sputtering for oxide removal, exposing active steel surface improving nitrogen pickup. This is followed by a nitriding step where high nitrogen contents are introduced in the outermost layer of the steel. Diffusion annealing is then performed in order to allow nitrogen diffusion into the core. AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was plasma nitrided and diffusion annealed at 1423K, for 6 hours, with 0.2 MPa nitrogen pressure. The nitrided steel presented ∝60 μm outermost compact layer of (Fe,Cr) 3 N and (Fe,Cr) 4 N with 11 wt.% N measured by surface depth profiling chemical analysis - GDS system. During the annealing treatment the nitride layer was dissolved and nitrogen diffused to the core of the sample leaving more even nitrogen distribution into the steel. Using this technique one-millimetre thick sample were obtained having high nitrogen content and uniform distribution through the thickness. (orig.)

  7. Studies of matrix diffusion in gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartikainen, K.; Timonen, J.; Vaeaetaeinen, K.; Pietarila, H.

    1994-03-01

    The diffusion of solutes from fractures into rock matrix is an important factor in the safety analysis of disposal of radioactive waste. Laboratory measurements are needed to complement field investigations for a reliable determination of the necessary transport parameters. Measurements of diffusion coefficients in tight rock samples are usually time consuming because the diffusion processes are slow. On the other hand it is well known that diffusion coefficients in the gas phase are roughly four orders of magnitude larger than those in the liquid phase. Therefore, for samples whose structures do not change much upon drying, it is possible to estimate the diffusion properties of the liquid phase when the properties of the gas phase are known. Advantages of the gas method are quick and easy measurements. In the measurements nitrogen was used as the carrier gas and helium as the tracer gas, and standard techniques have been used for helium detection. Techniques have been developed for both channel flow and through-diffusion measurements. The breakthrough curves have been measured in every experiment and all measurements have been modelled by using appropriate analytical models. As a result matrix porosities and effective diffusion coefficients in the gas phase have been determined. (12 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.)

  8. Nitrogen trading tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  9. Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for communications about resource use efficiency and for measures to increase the use efficiency of nutrients in relation to food production. This holds especially for nitrogen. Nitrogen (N) is essential for life and a main nutrient element. It is needed in relatively large

  10. Unexpected consequences of bedload diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devauchelle, O.; Abramian, A.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2017-12-01

    Sedimentary grains transported as bedload bump and bounce on the rough bed of the river that entrains them. The succession of these random events causes bedload particles to diffuse across the flow, towards the less active areas of the bed. In a fashion reminiscent of that proposed by Parker (1978) for suspended load, this mechanism opposes gravity to maintain the banks of alluvial rivers. In fact, diffusion is so tightly linked to bedload that it appears in the most basic sediment transport experiment--the straight channel we use to calibrate transport laws. Indeed, the fixed sides of the channel cause the flow, and thus the bed shear stress, to vary across the flume. This variation induces bedload diffusion, which in turn deforms the bed. As a consequence, to reliably calibrate a transport law, we need to measure the full profiles of shear stress and bedload transport, rather than bulk-average these quantities. Unfortunately, using a larger channel does not solve the problem, as a large aspect ratio favors the growth of streaks caused by a diffusion-induced instability. Based on these observations, we propose a different design for sediment transport experiments.

  11. Nitrogen in Chinese coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D.; Lei, J.; Zheng, B.; Tang, X.; Wang, M.; Hu, Jiawen; Li, S.; Wang, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and six coal samples were taken from main coal mines of twenty-six provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China, according to the resource distribution and coal-forming periods as well as the coal ranks and coal yields. Nitrogen was determined by using the Kjeldahl method at U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), which exhibit a normal frequency distribution. The nitrogen contents of over 90% Chinese coal vary from 0.52% to 1.41% and the average nitrogen content is recommended to be 0.98%. Nitrogen in coal exists primarily in organic form. There is a slight positive relationship between nitrogen content and coal ranking. ?? 2011 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  12. Enhancing biological nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danso, S.K.A.; Eskew, D.L. (Joint FAO/IAEA Div. of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, Vienna (Austria))

    1984-06-01

    Several co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) conducted by the Soil Fertility, Irrigation and Crop Production Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division have concentrated on finding the most efficient way of applying nitrogen fertilizers to various crops, using nitrogen-15 (/sup 15/N) as a tracer. The findings of these studies have been adopted in many countries around the world, resulting in savings of nitrogen fertilizers worth many millions of dollars every year. More recently, the Section's CRPs have focused on enhancing the natural process of biological di-nitrogen fixation. The /sup 15/N isotope technique has proven to be very valuable in studies of the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis, allowing many more experiments than before to be done and yielding much new practical information. The Soils Section is now working to extend the use of the technique to other nitrogen-fixing symbioses.

  13. Diffusing diffusivity: Rotational diffusion in two and three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rohit; Sebastian, K. L.

    2017-06-01

    We consider the problem of calculating the probability distribution function (pdf) of angular displacement for rotational diffusion in a crowded, rearranging medium. We use the diffusing diffusivity model and following our previous work on translational diffusion [R. Jain and K. L. Sebastian, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 3988 (2016)], we show that the problem can be reduced to that of calculating the survival probability of a particle undergoing Brownian motion, in the presence of a sink. We use the approach to calculate the pdf for the rotational motion in two and three dimensions. We also propose new dimensionless, time dependent parameters, αr o t ,2 D and αr o t ,3 D, which can be used to analyze the experimental/simulation data to find the extent of deviation from the normal behavior, i.e., constant diffusivity, and obtain explicit analytical expressions for them, within our model.

  14. Diffusion in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, G.P.; Kale, G.B.; Patil, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    The article presents a brief survey of process of diffusion in solids. It is emphasised that the essence of diffusion is the mass transfer through the atomic jumps. To begin with formal equations for diffusion coefficient are presented. This is followed by discussions on mechanisms of diffusion. Except for solutes which form interstitial solid solution, diffusion in majority of cases is mediated through exchange of sites between an atom and its neighbouring vacancy. Various vacancy parameters such as activation volume, correlation factor, mass effect etc are discussed and their role in establishing the mode of diffusion is delineated. The contribution of dislocations and grain boundaries in diffusion process is brought out. The experimental determination of different types of diffusion coefficients are described. Finally, the pervasive nature of diffusion process in number of commercial processes is outlined to show the importance of diffusion studies in materials science and technology. (author)

  15. The influence of nitrogen entrainment on argon plasmas created by the 'Torche à Injection Axiale' (TIA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, J.; Hartgers, A.; Selen, L.J.M.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.; Schram, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    When a plasma is sustained in the open air, nitrogen will diffuse into the plasma. Especially for plasmas sustained by the `Torche à Injection Axiale' (TIA) this appears to be the case, since this turbulent jet draws gases from the surroundings. In the argon plasma the entrained nitrogen is probably

  16. Practical Hydrogen Loading of Air Silica Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm

    2005-01-01

    A method for hydrogen-loading air-silica optical fibres has been developed allowing out-diffusion times comparable to standard step-index fibres. Examples of the first grating written in Ge-doped air-silica fibres using a 266nm UV-laser are shown.......A method for hydrogen-loading air-silica optical fibres has been developed allowing out-diffusion times comparable to standard step-index fibres. Examples of the first grating written in Ge-doped air-silica fibres using a 266nm UV-laser are shown....

  17. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  18. A seasonal nitrogen deposition budget for Rocky Mountain National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, K B; Carrico, C M; Kreidenweis, S M; Schichtel, B; Malm, W C; Collett, J L

    2013-07-01

    Nitrogen deposition is a concern in many protected ecosystems around the world, yet few studies have quantified a complete reactive nitrogen deposition budget including all dry and wet, inorganic and organic compounds. Critical loads that identify the level at which nitrogen deposition negatively affects an ecosystem are often defined using incomplete reactive nitrogen budgets. Frequently only wet deposition of ammonium and nitrate are considered, despite the importance of other nitrogen deposition pathways. Recently, dry deposition pathways including particulate ammonium and nitrate and gas phase nitric acid have been added to nitrogen deposition budgets. However, other nitrogen deposition pathways, including dry deposition of ammonia and wet deposition of organic nitrogen, still are rarely included. In this study, a more complete seasonal nitrogen deposition budget was constructed based on observations during a year-long study period from November 2008 to November 2009 at a location on the east side of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), Colorado, USA. Measurements included wet deposition of ammonium, nitrate, and organic nitrogen, PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm, nitrate, and ammonium) concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, and organic nitrogen, and atmospheric gas phase concentrations of ammonia, nitric acid, and NO2. Dry deposition fluxes were determined from measured ambient concentrations and modeled deposition velocities. Total reactive nitrogen deposition by all included pathways was found to be 3.65 kg N x ha(-1) yr(-1). Monthly deposition fluxes ranged from 0.06 to 0.54 kg N x ha(-1)yr(-1), with peak deposition in the month of July and the least deposition in December. Wet deposition of ammonium and nitrate were the two largest deposition pathways, together contributing 1.97 kg N x ha(-1)yr(-1) or 54% of the total nitrogen deposition budget for this region. The next two largest deposition pathways were wet

  19. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring — perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial d...

  20. Regulatory Drivers of Multimedia Reactive Nitrogen Research (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E.; Kumar, N.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of nitrogenous compounds can impact biogeochemical processes in the atmosphere, oceans and freshwater, and land surfaces. As a result, a number of regulations exist that are intended to control the amount and forms of nitrogen present in the environment. These range from the newly proposed Transport Rule, both the primary and secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for nitrogen oxide targeted at ozone and particulate matter formation and nitrogen deposition, and waterbody requirements such as the Total Maximum Daily Load. This talk will cover a subset of research activities at EPRI that inform environmental nitrogen concerns. A multimedia modeling framework has facilitated effect studies of atmospheric loadings on ecosystems. Improvements in emissions estimates, such as for mobile sources, suggest large current underestimates that will substantially impact air quality modeling of nitrogen oxides. Analyses of wintertime nitrate formation in the northern U.S. are demonstrating the roles of NH3 and NOx in particle formation there. Novel measurements of power plant stack emissions suggest operating configurations can influence the isotopic composition of emitted NOx. Novel instruments for ambient measurements of nitrogen, and suggestions for improved deposition estimates, are being developed. EPRI results suggest that multimedia solutions across multiple economic sectors, such as electrification of a wide variety of engines and water quality treatment and trading, have the potential to improve environmental quality effectively.

  1. Thermal diffusion and separation of isotopes; Diffusion thermique et separation d'isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Andre

    1944-03-30

    After a review of the various processes used to separate isotopes or at least to obtain mixes with a composition different from the natural proportion, this research addresses the use of thermal diffusion. The author reports a theoretical study of gas thermal diffusion and of the Clusius-Dickel method. In the second part, he reports the enrichment of methane with carbon-13, and of ammoniac with nitrogen-15. The next part reports the experimental study of thermal diffusion of liquids and solutions, and the enrichment of carbon tetra-chloride with chlorine-37. The author then proposes an overview of theories of thermal diffusion in liquid phase (hydrodynamic theory, kinetic theory, theory of caged molecules)

  2. The nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-08

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seasonal variations of nitrogen and phosphorus retention in an agricultural drainage river in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dingjiang; Lu, Jun; Wang, Hailong; Shen, Yena; Kimberley, Mark O

    2010-02-01

    Riverine retention decreases loads of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in running water. It is an important process in nutrient cycling in watersheds. However, temporal riverine nutrient retention capacity varies due to changes in hydrological, ecological, and nutrient inputs into the watershed. Quantitative information of seasonal riverine N and P retention is critical for developing strategies to combat diffuse source pollution and eutrophication in riverine and coastal systems. This study examined seasonal variation of riverine total N (TN) and total P (TP) retention in the ChangLe River, an agricultural drainage river in east China. Water quality, hydrological parameters, and hydrophyte coverage were monitored along the ChangLe River monthly during 2004-2006. Nutrient export loads (including chemical fertilizer, livestock, and domestic sources) entering the river from the catchment area were computed using an export coefficient model based on estimated nutrient sources. Riverine TN and TP retention loads (RNRL and RPRL) were estimated using mass balance calculations. Temporal variations in riverine nutrient retention were analyzed statistically. Estimated annual riverine retention loads ranged from 1,538 to 2,127 t year(-1) for RNRL and from 79.4 to 90.4 t year(-1) for RPRL. Monthly retention loads varied from 6.4 to 300.8 t month(-1) for RNRL and from 1.4 to 15.3 t month(-1) for RPRL. Both RNRL and RPRL increased with river flow, water temperature, hydrophyte coverage, monthly sunshine hours, and total TN and TP inputs. Dissolved oxygen concentration and the pH level of the river water decreased with RNRL and RPRL. Riverine nutrient retention ratios (retention as a percentage of total input) were only related to hydrophyte coverage and monthly sunshine hours. Monthly variations in RNRL and RPRL were functions of TN and TP loads. Riverine nutrient retention capacity varied with environmental conditions. Annual RNRL and RPRL accounted for 30.3-48.3% and 52

  4. Muonium quantum diffusion and localization in cryocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storchak, V. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Brewer, J.H.; Morris, G.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1995-08-01

    The authors review their recent study of atomic muonium ({mu}{sup +}e{sup {minus}} or Mu, a light isotope of the hydrogen atom) diffusion in the simplest solids--Van der Walls cryocrystals. They give experimental evidence of the quantum-mechanical nature of the Mu diffusion in these solids. The results are compared with the current theories of quantum diffusion in insulators. The predicted T{sup {+-}7} power-law temperature dependence of the Mu hop rate is observed directly for the first time in solid nitrogen ({delta}-N{sub 2}) and is taken as confirmation of a two-phonon scattering mechanism. In solid xenon and krypton, by contrast, the one-phonon interaction is dominant in the whole temperature range under investigation due to the extremely low values of the Debye temperatures in those solids. Particular attention is devoted to processes of inhomogeneous quantum diffusion and Mu localization. It is shown that at low temperatures static crystal disorder results in an inhomogeneity of the Mu quantum diffusion which turns out to be inconsistent with diffusion models using a single correlation time {tau}{sub c}. Conventional trapping mechanisms are shown to be ineffective at low temperatures in insulators. Muonium localization effects are studied in detail in solid Kr. In all the cryocrystals studied, muonium atoms turn out to be localized at the lowest temperatures.

  5. Muonium quantum diffusion and localization in cryocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, V.; Brewer, J.H.; Morris, G.D.

    1995-08-01

    We review our recent study of atomic muonium (μ + e - or Mu, a light isotope of the hydrogen atom) diffusion in the simplest solids - Van der Waals cryocrystals. We give experimental evidence of the quantum-mechanical nature of the Mu diffusion in these solids. The results are compared with the current theories of quantum diffusion in insulators. The predicted T ±7 power-law temperature dependence of the Mu hop rate is observed directly for the first time in solid nitrogen (s-N 2 ) and is taken as confirmation of a two-phonon scattering mechanism. In solid xenon and krypton, by contrast, the one-phonon interaction is dominant in the whole temperature range under investigation due to the extremely low values of the Debye temperatures in those solids. Particular attention is devoted to processes of inhomogeneous quantum diffusion and Mu localization. It is shown that at low temperatures static crystal disorder results in an inhomogeneity of the Mu quantum diffusion which turns out to be inconsistent with diffusion models using a single correlation time t c . Conventional trapping mechanisms are shown to be ineffective at low temperatures in insulators. Muonium localization effects are studied in detail in solid Kr. In all the cryocrystals studied, muonium atoms turn out to be localized at the lowest temperatures. (author)

  6. Rapid startup and high rate nitrogen removal from anaerobic sludge digester liquor using a SNAP process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Sen; Nishiyama, Takashi; Fujii, Tatsuo; Bhatti, Zafar; Furukawa, Kenji

    2012-02-01

    In this study, a single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal reactor, packed with a novel acrylic fiber biomass carrier material (Biofix), was applied for nitrogen removal from sludge digester liquor. For rapid start-up, conventional activated sludge was added to the reactor soon after the attachment of anammox biomass on the Biofix carriers, which allowed conventional activated sludge to form a protective layer of biofilm around the anammox biomass. The Nitrogen removal efficiency reached 75% within 1 week at a nitrogen loading rate of 0.46 kg-N/m(3)/day for synthetic wastewater treatment. By the end of the synthetic wastewater treatment period, the maximum nitrogen removal rate had increased to 0.92 kg-N/m(3)/day at a nitrogen loading rate of 1.0 kg-N/m(3)/day. High nitrogen removal rate was also achieved during the actual raw digester liquor treatment with the highest nitrogen removal rate being 0.83 kg-N/m(3)/day at a nitrogen loading rate of 0.93 kg-N/m(3)/day. The thick biofilm on Biofix carriers allowed anammox bacteria to survive under high DO concentration of 5-6 mg/l resulting in stable and high nitrogen removal performance. FISH and CLSM analysis demonstrated that anammox bacteria coexisted and surrounded by ammonium oxidizing bacteria.

  7. Spin-diffusions and diffusive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Brittan; Luskin, Mitchell; Plecháč, Petr; Simpson, Gideon

    2017-12-01

    Metastable configurations in condensed matter typically fluctuate about local energy minima at the femtosecond time scale before transitioning between local minima after nanoseconds or microseconds. This vast scale separation limits the applicability of classical molecular dynamics (MD) methods and has spurned the development of a host of approximate algorithms. One recently proposed method is diffusive MD which aims at integrating a system of ordinary differential equations describing the likelihood of occupancy by one of two species, in the case of a binary alloy, while quasistatically evolving the locations of the atoms. While diffusive MD has shown itself to be efficient and provide agreement with observations, it is fundamentally a model, with unclear connections to classical MD. In this work, we formulate a spin-diffusion stochastic process and show how it can be connected to diffusive MD. The spin-diffusion model couples a classical overdamped Langevin equation to a kinetic Monte Carlo model for exchange amongst the species of a binary alloy. Under suitable assumptions and approximations, spin-diffusion can be shown to lead to diffusive MD type models. The key assumptions and approximations include a well-defined time scale separation, a choice of spin-exchange rates, a low temperature approximation, and a mean field type approximation. We derive several models from different assumptions and show their relationship to diffusive MD. Differences and similarities amongst the models are explored in a simple test problem.

  8. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  9. Commercial Nitrogen Fertilizer Purchased

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Amounts of fertilizer nitrogen (N) purchased by states in individual years 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009 and 2011, and the % change in average amounts purchased per year...

  10. Load testing circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A load testing circuit a circuit tests the load impedance of a load connected to an amplifier. The load impedance includes a first terminal and a second terminal, the load testing circuit comprising a signal generator providing a test signal of a defined bandwidth to the first terminal of the load...

  11. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  12. Field Scale Groundwater Nitrate Loading Model for the Central Valley, California, 1945-Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, T.; Dzurella, K.; Bell, A.; Kourakos, G.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic groundwater nitrate contamination in the Central Valley aquifer system, California, is widespread, with over 40% of domestic wells in some counties exceeding drinking water standards. Sources of groundwater nitrate include leaky municipal wastewater systems, municipal wastewater recharge, onsite wastewater treatment (septic) systems, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, animal farming, application of organic waste materials (sludge, biosolids, animal manure) to agricultural lands, and synthetic fertilizer. At the site or field scale, nitrogen inputs to the landscape are balanced by plant nitrogen uptake and harvest, atmospheric nitrogen losses, surface runoff of nitrogen, soil nitrogen storage changes, and leaching to groundwater. Irrigated agriculture is a dominant player in the Central Valley nitrogen cycle: The largest nitrogen fluxes are synthetic fertilizer and animal manure applications to cropland, crop nitrogen uptake, and groundwater nitrogen losses. We construct a historic field/parcel scale groundwater nitrogen loading model distinguishing urban and residential areas, individual animal farming areas, leaky wastewater lagoons, and approximately 50 different categories of agricultural crops. For non-agricultural landuses, groundwater nitrate loading is based on reported leaching values, animal population, and human population. For cropland, groundwater nitrate loading is computed from mass balance, taking into account diverse and historically changing management practices between different crops. Groundwater nitrate loading is estimated for 1945 to current. Significant increases in groundwater nitrate loading are associated with the expansion of synthetic fertilizer use in the 1950s to 1970s. Nitrate loading from synthetic fertilizer use has stagnated over the past 20 years due to improvements in nutrient use efficiency. However, an unbroken 60 year exponential increase in dairy production until the late 2000s has significantly impacted the

  13. Generation of various radicals in nitrogen plasma and their behavior in media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Han S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on the generation of radicals in nitrogen plasma shows that the most dominant radicals are excited nitrogen molecules in the metastable state of N 2 (A 3 ∑ u + ). Hydroxyl molecules are generated from the dissociation of water molecules upon contact with excited nitrogen molecules. The estimated densities of various radicals in nitrogen plasma with an electron temperature of 1 eV are presented in this study. The behavior of these radicals in media is also investigated. Excited nitrogen molecules in the N 2 (A 3 ∑ u + ) state from a plasma jet are injected into water, after which the molecules disappear instantaneously within a few tens of nm, producing hydroxyl molecules. Hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen dioxide, and nitrogen monoxide molecules can diffuse much deeper into water, implying the possibility that a chemical reaction between hydrogen dioxide and nitrogen monoxide molecules produces hydroxyl molecules in deep water, even though density in this case may not be very high

  14. Diffusion in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, G.B.; Smirnov, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The monograph contains a brief description of the principles underlying the theory of diffusion, as well as modern methods of studying diffusion. Data on self-diffusion and diffusion of impurities in a nuclear fuel and fissionable materials (uranium, plutonium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, hafnium, niobium, molybdenum, tungsten, beryllium, etc.) is presented. Anomalous diffusion, diffusion of components, and interdiffusion in binary and ternary alloys were examined. The monograph presents the most recent reference material on diffusion. It is intended for a wide range of researchers working in the field of diffusion in metals and alloys and attempting to discover new materials for application in nuclear engineering. It will also be useful for teachers, research scholars and students of physical metallurgy

  15. Benthic Uptake Rate due to Hyporheic Exchange: The Effects of Streambed Morphology for Constant and Sinusoidally Varying Nutrient Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tonina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyporheic exchange carries reactive solutes, which may include biological oxygen demand (BOD, dissolved oxygen (DO and reactive dissolved inorganic nitrogen (Nr, into the sediment, where biochemical reactions consume DO. Here, we study the impact of streambed morphology, stream-reactive solute loads and their diel oscillations on the DO benthic uptake rate (BUR due to hyporheic processes. Our model solves the hyporheic flow field and the solute transport equations analytically, within a Lagrangian framework, considering advection, longitudinal diffusion and reactions modeled as first order kinetics. The application of the model to DO field measurements over a gravel bar-pool sequence shows a good match with measured DO concentrations with an overall agreement of 58% and a kappa index of 0.46. We apply the model to investigate the effects of daily constant and sinusoidally time varying stream BOD, DO and Nr loads and of the morphodynamic parameters on BUR. Our modeling results show that BUR varies as a function of bedform size and of nutrient loads and that the hyporheic zone may consume up to 0.06% of the stream DO at the pool-riffle bedform scale. Daily oscillations of stream BOD and DO loads have small effects on BUR, but may have an important influence on local hyporheic processes and organisms’ distribution.

  16. Creep effects in diffusion bonding of oxygen-free copper

    CERN Document Server

    Moilanen, Antti

    Diffusion is the transport of atoms or particles through the surrounding material. Various microstructural changes in metals are based on the diffusion phenomena. In solid metals the diffusion is closely related to crystallographic defects. In single-component metals the dominant mechanism of diffusion is the vacancy mechanism. Diffusion bonding is a direct technological application of diffusion. It is an advanced solidstate joining process in which the surfaces of two components are brought to contact with each other and heated under a pressing load in a controlled environment. During the process, the contact surfaces are bonded by atomic diffusion across the interface and as a result, one solid piece is formed. The condition of high temperature and low applied stress combined with relatively long process duration enables the creep effects to take place in bonded metals. Furthermore, creep causes unwanted permanent deformations in the bonded components. Some authors suggest that there could be a threshold fo...

  17. Phosphorus and nitrogen in the eutrophication of waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, S.; Frisk, T.; Kaermeniemi, T.; Niemi, J.; Pitkaenen, H.; Silvo, K.; Vuoristo, H.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a summary of the contribution of nitrogen and phosphorus in the eutrophication process of inland and coastal waters. Special attention was paid to the mechanisms of these nutrients in regulating biological processes and to the methods available in estimating their effects in the eutrophication of water bodies. The report includes five chapters which are entitled: Introduction, which is a general background to the subject with special attention to the requirements of the Finnish Water Act. Phosphorus and nitrogen as factors regulating biological processes. The topics included are: definition of eutrophication, forms of phosphorus and nitrogen and their sources to inland and coastal waters, effects of these nutrients as growth factors of phytoplankton and macrophytes and consequences of eutrophication. Estimation of the effects of phosphorus and nitrogen. The topics discussed from the point of view of the tasks of the National Board of Waters and the Environment are: estimation of the effects of phosphorus and nitrogen in the planning and supervision of industry, fish farming, peat production, municipalities, agriculture and forestry. A brief state-of-the art of the research carried out in the National Board of Waters and the Environment is given. Methods of estimating the effects of phosphorus and nitrogen loading in waters. The topics are: relationships between phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations in waters, material balances, water quality models, classification of waters and different groups of organisms as indicators of water quality. Conclusions for the estimation of the effects of phosphorus and nitrogen in receiving waters

  18. The fate of experimentally deposited nitrogen in mesocosms from two Canadian peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blodau, Christian; Basiliko, Nathan; Mayer, Bernhard; Moore, Tim R.

    2006-01-01

    In large regions of Europe and North America, peatlands have been exposed to elevated rates of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition. We investigated the fate of experimentally added N (NH 4 15 NO3) at two different N loads (1.2 and 4.7 g N m -2 yr -1 ) and water tables (1 and 32 cm) in intact cores from two peatlands, located in Central and Eastern Canada. The sites receive an estimated total N load of 0.6 g m -2 a -1 and 1.5 g m -2 yr -1 , excluding nitrogen fixation. In all treatments, experimentally added nitrate (NO 3 - ) was fully (96-99%) and ammonium (NH 4 + ) mostly (81-97%) retained by the plant cover, mainly consisting of Sphagnum mosses, or in the unsaturated zone below. However, on average only 48% of the 15 N were recovered from the plant cover, and substantial amounts were found in depth layers of 2-6 cm (21-46%) and 8-12 cm (1.4-10.8%) below the moss surface. The amount of 15 N retained also significantly decreased with a lower water table from 56 ± 9% to 40 ± 10%. These findings document a substantial mobility of N, particularly during water table drawdown. Analysis of 15 N by a sequential diffusion procedure revealed a transfer of 15 N from NO 3 - into NH 4 + and dissolved organic N (DON), but the contents of 15 N in these pools accounted for less than 1% of the total N, natural background subtracted. The mass flux of dissolved 15 N into the peat was small compared to the total mass flux of 15 N. The accumulation of 15 N in the bulk peat must have been caused by a mechanism that was not investigated, possibly by transport of particulate organic N

  19. Diffusion in flowing gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reus, K.W.

    1979-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the back-diffusion method of calculating the mutual diffusion coefficient of two gases. The applicability of this method for measuring diffusion coefficients at temperatures up to 1300 K is considered. A further aim of the work was to make a contribution to the description of the interatomic potential energy of noble gases at higher energies as a function of the internuclear distance. This was achieved with the measured diffusion coefficients, especially with those for high temperatures. (Auth.)

  20. Diffusion Under Geometrical Constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Naohisa

    2014-01-01

    Here we discus the diffusion of particles in a curved tube. This kind of transport phenomenon is observed in biological cells and porous media. To solve such a problem, we discuss the three dimensional diffusion equation with a confining wall forming a thinner tube. We find that the curvature appears in a effective diffusion coefficient for such a quasi-one-dimensional system. As an application to higher dimensional case, we discuss the diffusion in a curved surface with ...

  1. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: Geographic and anthropogenic variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Inés G.; Bode, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Growing human population adds to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. Both anthropogenic and natural nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass, and these different nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of the ratio of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ 15 N). In this study δ 15 N was determined in two species of macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and in nitrate and ammonium to determine the relative importance of anthropogenic versus natural sources of nitrogen along the coast of NW Spain. Both algal species and nitrogen sources showed similar isotopic enrichment for a given site, but algal δ 15 N was not related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or δ 15 N in the water samples. The latter suggests that inorganic nitrogen inputs are variable and do not always leave an isotopic trace in macroalgae. However, a significant linear decrease in macroalgal δ 15 N along the coast is consistent with the differential effect of upwelling. Besides this geographic variability, the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen sources is evidenced by higher δ 15 N in macroalgae from rias and estuaries compared to those from open coastal areas and in areas with more than 15 × 10 3 inhabitants in the watershed. These results indicate that, in contrast with other studies, macroalgal δ 15 N is not simply related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or human population size but depends on other factors as the upwelling or the efficiency of local waste treatment systems. - Highlights: ► Anthropogenic versus upwelling nitrogen effect on macroalgal δ 15 N was studied. ► The influence of populations and upwelling has not been made before on macroalgal δ 15 N. ► Natural variability has not been taken into account in most biomonitoring studies. ► Upwelling explains most of the variability in δ 15 N in macroalgae

  2. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: Geographic and anthropogenic variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Inés G., E-mail: ines.gonzalez@co.ieo.es; Bode, Antonio

    2013-01-15

    Growing human population adds to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. Both anthropogenic and natural nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass, and these different nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of the ratio of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ{sup 15}N). In this study δ{sup 15}N was determined in two species of macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and in nitrate and ammonium to determine the relative importance of anthropogenic versus natural sources of nitrogen along the coast of NW Spain. Both algal species and nitrogen sources showed similar isotopic enrichment for a given site, but algal δ{sup 15}N was not related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or δ{sup 15}N in the water samples. The latter suggests that inorganic nitrogen inputs are variable and do not always leave an isotopic trace in macroalgae. However, a significant linear decrease in macroalgal δ{sup 15}N along the coast is consistent with the differential effect of upwelling. Besides this geographic variability, the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen sources is evidenced by higher δ{sup 15}N in macroalgae from rias and estuaries compared to those from open coastal areas and in areas with more than 15 × 10{sup 3} inhabitants in the watershed. These results indicate that, in contrast with other studies, macroalgal δ{sup 15}N is not simply related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or human population size but depends on other factors as the upwelling or the efficiency of local waste treatment systems. - Highlights: ► Anthropogenic versus upwelling nitrogen effect on macroalgal δ{sup 15}N was studied. ► The influence of populations and upwelling has not been made before on macroalgal δ{sup 15}N. ► Natural variability has not been taken into account in most biomonitoring studies. ► Upwelling explains most of the variability in δ{sup 15}N in macroalgae.

  3. Load Carriage Induced Alterations of Pulmonary Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    pulmonar , function reductions are directh’ related to the backpack load carried due to the mechanical constraint it imposes on the thoracic cage.2 To...and Fish- man. A.P.. 1965. The regulation of venttlation in diffuse Agostor. E.. D’Angelc, E. and Piolini, M., 1978. Breathing pulmonary fibrosis . J

  4. Diffuse ceiling ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen

    Diffuse ceiling ventilation is an innovative ventilation concept where the suspended ceiling serves as air diffuser to supply fresh air into the room. Compared with conventional ventilation systems, diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk due to the low...

  5. Loads and loads and loads: The influence of prospective load, retrospective load, and ongoing task load in prospective memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat eMeier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In prospective memory tasks different kinds of load can occur. Adding a prospective memory task can impose a load on ongoing task performance. Adding ongoing task load can affect prospective memory performance. The existence of multiple target events increases prospective load and adding complexity to the to-be-remembered action increases retrospective load. In two experiments, we systematically examined the effects of these different types of load on prospective memory performance. Results showed an effect of prospective load on costs in the ongoing task for categorical targets (Experiment 2, but not for specific targets (Experiment 1. Retrospective load and ongoing task load both affected remembering the retrospective component of the prospective memory task. We suggest that prospective load can enhance costs in the ongoing task due to additional monitoring requirements. Retrospective load and ongoing task load seem to impact the division of resources between the ongoing task and retrieval of the retrospective component, which may affect disengagement from the ongoing task. In general, the results demonstrate that the different types of load affect prospective memory differentially.

  6. Fluxes of oxidised and reduced nitrogen above a mixed coniferous forest exposed to various nitrogen emission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neirynck, J. [Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium)]. E-mail: johan.neirynck@inbo.be; Kowalski, A.S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicida, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Calle Fuentenueva, SP-18071 Granada (Spain); Carrara, A. [Fundacion CEAM, Parque Technologico, Calle Charles H. Darwin 14, SP-46980 Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Genouw, G. [Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Gaverstraat 4, B-9500 Geraardsbergen (Belgium); Berghmans, P. [Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Ceulemans, R. [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Antwerp) (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    Concentrations of nitrogen gases (NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, NO, HONO and HNO{sub 3}) and particles (pNH{sub 4} and pNO{sub 3}) were measured over a mixed coniferous forest impacted by high nitrogen loads. Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) represented the main nitrogen form, followed by nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}). A combination of gradient method (NH{sub 3} and NO {sub x} ) and resistance modelling techniques (HNO{sub 3}, HONO, pNH{sub 4} and pNO{sub 3}) was used to calculate dry deposition of nitrogen compounds. Net flux of NH{sub 3} amounted to -64 ng N m{sup -2} s{sup -1} over the measuring period. Net fluxes of NO {sub x} were upward (8.5 ng N m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) with highest emission in the morning. Fluxes of other gases or aerosols substantially contributed to dry deposition. Total nitrogen deposition was estimated at -48 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} and consisted for almost 80% of NH {sub x} . Comparison of throughfall nitrogen with total deposition suggested substantial uptake of reduced N ({+-}15 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) within the canopy. - Reduced nitrogen was found to be the main contributor to total deposition which was predominantly governed by dry deposition.

  7. Fluxes of oxidised and reduced nitrogen above a mixed coniferous forest exposed to various nitrogen emission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neirynck, J.; Kowalski, A.S.; Carrara, A.; Genouw, G.; Berghmans, P.; Ceulemans, R.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of nitrogen gases (NH 3 , NO 2 , NO, HONO and HNO 3 ) and particles (pNH 4 and pNO 3 ) were measured over a mixed coniferous forest impacted by high nitrogen loads. Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) represented the main nitrogen form, followed by nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH 3 ). A combination of gradient method (NH 3 and NO x ) and resistance modelling techniques (HNO 3 , HONO, pNH 4 and pNO 3 ) was used to calculate dry deposition of nitrogen compounds. Net flux of NH 3 amounted to -64 ng N m -2 s -1 over the measuring period. Net fluxes of NO x were upward (8.5 ng N m -2 s -1 ) with highest emission in the morning. Fluxes of other gases or aerosols substantially contributed to dry deposition. Total nitrogen deposition was estimated at -48 kg N ha -1 yr -1 and consisted for almost 80% of NH x . Comparison of throughfall nitrogen with total deposition suggested substantial uptake of reduced N (±15 kg N ha -1 yr -1 ) within the canopy. - Reduced nitrogen was found to be the main contributor to total deposition which was predominantly governed by dry deposition

  8. Investigations on the nitrogen storage property of LaNi5 powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, F.N.; Yamasue, E.; Okumura, H.; Ishihara, K.N.

    2011-01-01

    The nitrogen absorption and desorption property of LaNi 5 was investigated using NH 3 and N 2 as nitrogen sources. It was found that both as purchased and milling processed LaNi 5 powder can absorb and desorb nitrogen using NH 3 as the nitrogen source, while milled LaNi 5 powder can absorb and desorb more. XRD, cross sectional SEM and EPMA were performed to elucidate the nitrogen stored phases. When N 2 gas was used as the nitrogen source, it was found that the amount of absorbed nitrogen significantly decreased. By using high pressure for the absorption treatment or performing an activation treatment using hydrogen absorption/desorption before the nitrogen absorption treatment, milled LaNi 5 was found to absorb nitrogen of 0.1 mol/mol Finally, the mechanism of the nitrogen absorption was discussed from the EPMA and kinetic data of the nitrogen absorption, and it was suggested that the mechanism of the nitrogen absorption might be explained by a combined model of a diffusion controlled process and an interface controlled process.

  9. Nitrogen surplus: An environmental performance indicator for sustainable food supply chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen pollution and negative impacts on human and environmental health are embodied in crop commodities traded domestically and internationally. Food supply chain companies can play a catalytic role in reducing that burden by helping to decrease the environmental nitrogen load from agriculture. T...

  10. Thermal diffusion (1963); Diffusion thermique (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemarechal, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    This report brings together the essential principles of thermal diffusion in the liquid and gaseous phases. The macroscopic and molecular aspects of the thermal diffusion constant are reviewed, as well as the various measurement method; the most important developments however concern the operation of the CLUSIUS and DICKEL thermo-gravitational column and its applications. (author) [French] Ce rapport rassemble les principes essentiels de la diffusion thermique en phase liquide et en phase gazeuse. Les aspects macroscopique et moleculaire de la constante de diffusion thermique sont passes en revue ainsi que ses differentes methodes de mesure; mais les developpements les plus importants concernent le fonctionnement de ls colonne thermogravitationnelle de CLUSIUS et DICKEL et ses applications. (auteur)

  11. Fractional diffusion equations and anomalous diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Anomalous diffusion has been detected in a wide variety of scenarios, from fractal media, systems with memory, transport processes in porous media, to fluctuations of financial markets, tumour growth, and complex fluids. Providing a contemporary treatment of this process, this book examines the recent literature on anomalous diffusion and covers a rich class of problems in which surface effects are important, offering detailed mathematical tools of usual and fractional calculus for a wide audience of scientists and graduate students in physics, mathematics, chemistry and engineering. Including the basic mathematical tools needed to understand the rules for operating with the fractional derivatives and fractional differential equations, this self-contained text presents the possibility of using fractional diffusion equations with anomalous diffusion phenomena to propose powerful mathematical models for a large variety of fundamental and practical problems in a fast-growing field of research.

  12. Assessing atmospheric nitrogen deposition to natural and semi-natural ecosystems – experience from Danish studies using the DAMOS system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Ole; Geels, Camilla; Frohn, Lise

    2013-01-01

    and ammonium (reaction products of nitrogen oxides and ammonia), but also dry deposition of other reactive nitrogen compounds (mainly nitrogen oxides in the form of gas phase nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide). In Denmark's environmental management of the sensitive terrestrial ecosystems modelling tools...... are required that account for both the local and the long-range transported contributions. This motivated development of the Danish Ammonia MOdelling System (DAMOS) that has been successfully applied to the assessment of atmospheric nitrogen loadings to sensitive Danish ecosystems. We present here three...... different examples of such assessments. Our results show that ecosystems located in Western Denmark (Case 1) receive the highest loads of atmospheric nitrogen depositions which generally exceed the critical load. This part of the country has the highest livestock density. In the Eastern part of the country...

  13. Polystyrene cryostat facilitates testing tensile specimens under liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogan, R. P.; Skalka, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    Lightweight cryostat made of expanded polystyrene reduces eccentricity in a tensile system being tested under liquid nitrogen. The cryostat is attached directly to the tensile system by a special seal, reducing misalignment effects due to cryostat weight, and facilitates viewing and loading of the specimens.

  14. Enhanced electrochemical performances of mesoporous carbon microsphere/selenium composites by controlling the pore structure and nitrogen doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lei; Wei, Yanju; Zhang, Chuanfang; Zhang, Chuan; Li, Xu; Wang, Jitong; Ling, Licheng; Qiao, Wenming; Long, Donghui

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Mesoporous carbon microspheres (MCMs) with tunable pore sizes have been prepared via a high-throughput spray drying-assisted hard template method and used as the hosts to load selenium (Se) for Li-Se batteries. - Abstract: Mesoporous carbon microspheres (MCMs) with tunable pore sizes have been prepared via a high-throughput spray drying-assisted hard template method and used as the hosts to load selenium (Se) for lithium-selenium (Li-Se) batteries. The pore size control of the MCMs (3.8, 5, 6.5, 9.5 nm) was achieved by in-situ polymerized colloid silica templates with different sizes, thus prompting us to focus on tracing the effects of mesopore size on electrochemical performance of MCMs/Se cathodes. The results reveal that relative higher capacity and better cycling performance are presented in MCMs with smaller pores size due to the more effective confinement effect. At an optimal pore size of 3.8 nm, the MCMs/Se with 50% Se loading delivers an initial capacity of 513 mAh g −1 and capacity retention of 300 mAh g −1 after 100 cycles at 0.5 C. Furthermore, it is concluded that nitrogen doping could assist MCMs to retard the diffusion of polyselenide species possibly via an enhanced surface adsorption. The composites thus increase the reversible capacity by 30% after 100 cycles compared with the nitrogen-free composite. These results indicate that controlling pore structure and surface chemistry are good strategies to optimize the electrochemical performance of C/Se based cathodes for Li–Se batteries

  15. Dominance patterns in macroalgal and phytoplankton biomass under different nutrient loads in subtropical coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Páez-Osuna, F.; Piñón-Gimate, A.; Ochoa-Izaguirre, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Nine macroalgal blooms were examined in five lagoons from SE Gulf of California. • Shrimp farms were the main point source of nutrients loads to the lagoons. • Biomass as phytoplankton ranged 40–792 mg m −2 and macroalgal of 1–296 g m −2 . • Biomass (phytoplankton + macroalgae) was the same tendency that nutrient loads. • Phytoplankton and macroalgal biomass were a significant correlation with N:P ratio. -- Abstract: Nine macroalgal blooms were studied in five coastal lagoons of the SE Gulf of California. The nutrient loads from point and diffuse sources were estimated in the proximity of the macroalgal blooms. Chlorophyll a and macroalgal biomass were measured during the dry, rainy and cold seasons. Shrimp farms were the main point source of nitrogen and phosphorus loads for the lagoons. High biomasses were found during the dry season for phytoplankton at site 6 (791.7 ± 34.6 mg m −2 ) and during the rainy season for macroalgae at site 4 (296.0 ± 82.4 g m −2 ). Depending on the season, the phytoplankton biomass ranged between 40.0 and 791.7 mg m −2 and the macroalgal biomass between 1 and 296.0 g m −2 . The bulk biomass (phytoplankton + macroalgal) displayed the same tendency as the nutrient loads entering the coastal lagoons. Phytoplankton and macroalgal biomass presented a significant correlation with the atomic N:P ratio

  16. Plutonium diffusion in advanced fuels (U,Pu)(C,O) and (U,Pu)(C,N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Matzke, H.

    1983-01-01

    The self-diffusion of 238 Pu was measured in an oxicarbide (U,Pu)(C,O) and a carbonitride (U,Pu) (C,N). The activation enthalpies were 447 and 347 kJ mol -1 , respectively. The carbonitrides were confirmed to fall into three classes: carbide-like compositions with less than 30% nitrogen in the metalloid lattice, nitride-like composition with more than 70% nitrogen and with reduced atomic mobilities, and carbonitrides with about 50% nitrogen showing an intermediate behavior. The oxicarbide showed diffusion coefficients slightly larger than those of pure carbides

  17. Diffusion in molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, M.; Mehrer, H.

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion behaviour of the high-temperature material molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) was completely unknown until recently. In this paper we present studies of Mo self-diffusion and compare our present results with our already published studies of Si and Ge diffusion in MoSi 2 . Self-diffusion of molybdenum in monocrystalline MoSi 2 was studied by the radiotracer technique using the radioisotope 99 Mo. Deposition of the radiotracer and serial sectioning after the diffusion anneals to determine the concentration-depth profiles was performed using a sputtering device. Diffusion of Mo is a very slow process. In the entire temperature region investigated (1437 to 2173 K), the 99 Mo diffusivities in both principal directions of the tetragonal MoSi 2 crystals obey Arrhenius laws, where the diffusion perpendicular to the tetragonal axis is faster by two to three orders of magnitude than parallel to it. The activation enthalpies for diffusion perpendicular and parallel to the tetragonal axis are Q perpendicular to = 468 kJ mol -1 (4.85 eV) and Q parallel = 586 kJ mol -1 (6.07 eV), respectively. Diffusion of Si and its homologous element Ge is fast and is mediated by thermal vacancies of the Si sublattice of MoSi 2 . The diffusion of Mo is by several orders of magnitude slower than the diffusion of Si and Ge. This large difference suggests that Si and Mo diffusion are decoupled and that the diffusion of Mo likely takes place via vacancies on the Mo sublattice. (orig.)

  18. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  19. Ammonia production in nitrogen seeded plasma discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, V., E-mail: Volker.Rohde@ipp.mpg.de; Oberkofler, M.

    2015-08-15

    In present tokamaks nitrogen seeding is used to reduce the power load onto the divertor tiles. Some fraction of the seeded nitrogen reacts with hydrogen to form ammonia. The behaviour of ammonia in ASDEX Upgrade is studied by mass spectrometry. Injection without plasma shows strong absorption at the inner walls of the vessel and isotope exchange reactions. During nitrogen seeding in H-mode discharges the onset of a saturation of the nitrogen retention is observed. The residual gas consists of strongly deuterated methane and ammonia with almost equal amounts of deuterium and protium. This confirms the role of surface reactions in the ammonia formation. The results are consistent with findings in previous investigations. A numerical decomposition of mass spectra is under development and will be needed for quantitative evaluation of the results obtained.

  20. Reducing nitrogen export from the corn belt to the Gulf of Mexico: agricultural strategies for remediating hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Eileen; Robertson, Dale M.; Schilling, Keith; Tomer, Mark; Kostel, Jill; Smith, Douglas G.; King, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    SPAtially Referenced Regression on Watershed models developed for the Upper Midwest were used to help evaluate the nitrogen-load reductions likely to be achieved by a variety of agricultural conservation practices in the Upper Mississippi-Ohio River Basin (UMORB) and to compare these reductions to the 45% nitrogen-load reduction proposed to remediate hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Our results indicate that nitrogen-management practices (improved fertilizer management and cover crops) fall short of achieving this goal, even if adopted on all cropland in the region. The goal of a 45% decrease in loads to the GoM can only be achieved through the coupling of nitrogen-management practices with innovative nitrogen-removal practices such as tile-drainage treatment wetlands, drainage–ditch enhancements, stream-channel restoration, and floodplain reconnection. Combining nitrogen-management practices with nitrogen-removal practices can dramatically reduce nutrient export from agricultural landscapes while minimizing impacts to agricultural production. With this approach, it may be possible to meet the 45% nutrient reduction goal while converting less than 1% of cropland in the UMORB to nitrogen-removal practices. Conservationists, policy makers, and agricultural producers seeking a workable strategy to reduce nitrogen export from the Corn Belt will need to consider a combination of nitrogen-management practices at the field scale and diverse nitrogen-removal practices at the landscape scale.

  1. Strong lithium polysulfide chemisorption on electroactive sites of nitrogen-doped carbon composites for high-performance lithium-sulfur battery cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiangxuan; Gordin, Mikhail L; Xu, Terrence; Chen, Shuru; Yu, Zhaoxin; Sohn, Hiesang; Lu, Jun; Ren, Yang; Duan, Yuhua; Wang, Donghai

    2015-03-27

    Despite the high theoretical capacity of lithium-sulfur batteries, their practical applications are severely hindered by a fast capacity decay, stemming from the dissolution and diffusion of lithium polysulfides in the electrolyte. A novel functional carbon composite (carbon-nanotube-interpenetrated mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon spheres, MNCS/CNT), which can strongly adsorb lithium polysulfides, is now reported to act as a sulfur host. The nitrogen functional groups of this composite enable the effective trapping of lithium polysulfides on electroactive sites within the cathode, leading to a much improved electrochemical performance (1200 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles). The enhancement in adsorption can be attributed to the chemical bonding of lithium ions by nitrogen functional groups in the MNCS/CNT framework. Furthermore, the micrometer-sized spherical structure of the material yields a high areal capacity (ca. 6 mAh cm(-2)) with a high sulfur loading of approximately 5 mg cm(-2), which is ideal for practical applications of the lithium-sulfur batteries. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: geographic and anthropogenic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Inés G; Bode, Antonio

    2013-01-15

    Growing human population adds to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. Both anthropogenic and natural nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass, and these different nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of the ratio of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ(15)N). In this study δ(15)N was determined in two species of macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and in nitrate and ammonium to determine the relative importance of anthropogenic versus natural sources of nitrogen along the coast of NW Spain. Both algal species and nitrogen sources showed similar isotopic enrichment for a given site, but algal δ(15)N was not related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or δ(15)N in the water samples. The latter suggests that inorganic nitrogen inputs are variable and do not always leave an isotopic trace in macroalgae. However, a significant linear decrease in macroalgal δ(15)N along the coast is consistent with the differential effect of upwelling. Besides this geographic variability, the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen sources is evidenced by higher δ(15)N in macroalgae from rias and estuaries compared to those from open coastal areas and in areas with more than 15×10(3) inhabitants in the watershed. These results indicate that, in contrast with other studies, macroalgal δ(15)N is not simply related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or human population size but depends on other factors as the upwelling or the efficiency of local waste treatment systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Behaviour of uranium dioxide in liquid nitrogen tetraoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobets, L.V.; Klavsut', G.N.; Dolgov, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Interaction kinetics of uranium dioxide with liquid nitrogen tetroxide at 25-150 deg C has been studied. It is shown that in the temperature range studied NO[UO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 ] is the final product of the reaction. With the increase of specific surface of uranium dioxide and with the temperature increase the degree of oxide transformation increases. Uranium dioxide-liquid N 2 O 4 interaction proceeds in the diffusion region. Seeming activation energies and rate constants of the mentioned processes are calculated. Effect of nitrogen trioxide additions on transformation kinetics is considered

  4. Preparation of raspberry-like γ-Fe2O3/crackled nitrogen-doped carbon capsules and their application as supports to improve catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junshuai; Yao, Tongjie; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xiao; Wu, Jie

    2016-11-10

    In this manuscript, we have introduced a novel method to improve the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles via optimizing the support structure. To this end, raspberry-like γ-Fe 2 O 3 /crackled nitrogen-doped carbon (CNC) capsules were prepared by a two-step method. Compared with traditional magnetic capsules, in γ-Fe 2 O 3 /CNC capsules, the γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles were embedded in a CNC shell; therefore, they neither occupied the anchoring sites for metal nanoparticles nor came into contact with them, which was beneficial for increasing the metal nanoparticle loading. Numerous tiny cracks appeared on the porous CNC shell, which effectively improved the mass diffusion and transport in catalytic reactions. Additionally, the coordination interaction could be generated between the precursor metal ions and doped-nitrogen atoms in the capsule shell. With the help of these structural merits, γ-Fe 2 O 3 /CNC capsules were ideal supports for Pd nanoparticles, because they were beneficial for improving the Pd loading, reducing the nanoparticle size, increasing their dispersity and maximizing the catalytic performance of Pd nanoparticles anchored on the inner shell surface. As expected, γ-Fe 2 O 3 /CNC@Pd catalysts exhibited a dramatically enhanced catalytic activity towards hydrophilic 4-nitrophenol and hydrophobic nitrobenzene. The reaction rate constant k was compared with recent work and the corresponding reference samples. Moreover, they could be easily recycled by using a magnet and reused without an obvious loss of catalytic activity.

  5. Molecular nitrogen fixation and nitrogen cycle in nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, A I

    1952-01-01

    The origin of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere is discussed. Evidently only a small proportion of the nitrate-and nitrite-nitrogen found in the precipitation is formed through electric discharges from molecular nitrogen, photochemical nitrogen fixation being probably of greater importance. Formation of nitrate nitrogen through atmospheric oxidation of nitrous oxide (N/sub 2/O) evaporating from the soil is also considered likely. Determination of nitrogen compounds at different altitudes is indispensable for gaining information of the N/sub 2/-fixation in the atmosphere and, in general, of the origin of nitrogen oxides and their decomposition. International cooperation is needed for this as well as for the quantitative determination of the nitrogen compounds removed from the soil by leaching and brought by waters into the seas.

  6. Distribution load estimation (DLE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, A; Lehtonen, M [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    The load research has produced customer class load models to convert the customers` annual energy consumption to hourly load values. The reliability of load models applied from a nation-wide sample is limited in any specific network because many local circumstances are different from utility to utility and time to time. Therefore there is a need to find improvements to the load models or, in general, improvements to the load estimates. In Distribution Load Estimation (DLE) the measurements from the network are utilized to improve the customer class load models. The results of DLE will be new load models that better correspond to the loading of the distribution network but are still close to the original load models obtained by load research. The principal data flow of DLE is presented

  7. Metric diffusion along foliations

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Szymon M

    2017-01-01

    Up-to-date research in metric diffusion along compact foliations is presented in this book. Beginning with fundamentals from the optimal transportation theory and the theory of foliations; this book moves on to cover Wasserstein distance, Kantorovich Duality Theorem, and the metrization of the weak topology by the Wasserstein distance. Metric diffusion is defined, the topology of the metric space is studied and the limits of diffused metrics along compact foliations are discussed. Essentials on foliations, holonomy, heat diffusion, and compact foliations are detailed and vital technical lemmas are proved to aide understanding. Graduate students and researchers in geometry, topology and dynamics of foliations and laminations will find this supplement useful as it presents facts about the metric diffusion along non-compact foliation and provides a full description of the limit for metrics diffused along foliation with at least one compact leaf on the two dimensions.

  8. Nitrogen Fixation in Cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that are widespread in marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments and many of them are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. But ironically, nitrogenase, the enzyme that is responsible for the reduction of N2, is extremely sensitive to O2.

  9. Replaceable liquid nitrogen piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasujima, Yasuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Sato, Masataka; Hongo, Toshio

    1982-01-01

    This liquid nitrogen piping with total length of about 50 m was made and installed to supply the liquid nitrogen for heat insulating shield to three superconducting magnets for deflection and large super-conducting magnet for detection in the π-meson beam line used for high energy physics experiment in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The points considered in the design and manufacture stages are reported. In order to minimize the consumption of liquid nitrogen during transport, vacuum heat insulation method was adopted. The construction period and cost were reduced by the standardization of the components, the improvement of welding works and the elimination of ineffective works. For simplifying the maintenance, spare parts are always prepared. The construction and the procedure of assembling of the liquid nitrogen piping are described. The piping is of double-walled construction, and its low temperature part was made of SUS 316L. The super-insulation by aluminum vacuum evaporation and active carbon were attached on the external surface of the internal pipe. The final leak test and the heating degassing were performed. The tests on evacuation, transport capacity and heat entry are reported. By making the internal pipe into smaller size, the piping may be more efficient. (Kako, I.)

  10. Nitrogen availability for nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria upon growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120 is able to convert dinitrogen to ammonia in the absence of combined nitrogen. The expression of 20% of coding sequences from all major metabolic categories was examined in nitrogen fixing and non-nitrogen fixing growth conditions. The expression data were correlated ...

  11. Correlated diffusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alexander; Glaister, Jeffrey; Cameron, Andrew; Haider, Masoom

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the male population. Fortunately, the prognosis is excellent if detected at an early stage. Hence, the detection and localization of prostate cancer is crucial for diagnosis, as well as treatment via targeted focal therapy. New imaging techniques can potentially be invaluable tools for improving prostate cancer detection and localization. In this study, we introduce a new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging, where the tissue being imaged is characterized by the joint correlation of diffusion signal attenuation across multiple gradient pulse strengths and timings. By taking into account signal attenuation at different water diffusion motion sensitivities, correlated diffusion imaging can provide improved delineation between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue when compared to existing diffusion imaging modalities. Quantitative evaluation using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tissue class separability analysis, and visual assessment by an expert radiologist were performed to study correlated diffusion imaging for the task of prostate cancer diagnosis. These results are compared with that obtained using T2-weighted imaging and standard diffusion imaging (via the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)). Experimental results suggest that correlated diffusion imaging provide improved delineation between healthy and cancerous tissue and may have potential as a diagnostic tool for cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. A new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI) was developed for the purpose of aiding radiologists in cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Preliminary results show CDI shows considerable promise as a diagnostic aid for radiologists in the detection and localization of prostate cancer

  12. Gaseous diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, G.A.; Shacter, J.

    1978-01-01

    A gaseous diffusion system is described comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of the diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof

  13. Distribution load estimation - DLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, A. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The load research project has produced statistical information in the form of load models to convert the figures of annual energy consumption to hourly load values. The reliability of load models is limited to a certain network because many local circumstances are different from utility to utility and time to time. Therefore there is a need to make improvements in the load models. Distribution load estimation (DLE) is the method developed here to improve load estimates from the load models. The method is also quite cheap to apply as it utilises information that is already available in SCADA systems

  14. Distribution load estimation - DLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, A [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The load research project has produced statistical information in the form of load models to convert the figures of annual energy consumption to hourly load values. The reliability of load models is limited to a certain network because many local circumstances are different from utility to utility and time to time. Therefore there is a need to make improvements in the load models. Distribution load estimation (DLE) is the method developed here to improve load estimates from the load models. The method is also quite cheap to apply as it utilises information that is already available in SCADA systems

  15. Low capacity Linde-Hampson nitrogen liquefier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedegard, K.; Atkins, E.; Walker, G.

    1990-01-01

    A closed-cycle Linde-Hampson nitrogen liquefier was developed incorporating a new, non-clogging, demand flow Joule-Thomson nozzle. The flow area of the nozzle, a tapered annular orifice, is regulated by a very rugged load-sensitive differential thermal expansion scheme and by a manually adjustable micrometer mechanism. Labyrinth flow spoilers within the orifice provide turbulent voids which break up and clear contaminants from the flow. The system's four-stage compressor features sealed, oil-free compression spaces and a very compact nested piston configuration with a minimum of moving parts and drive complexity. The drive mechanism is a rolling Scotch yoke which minimizes piston side forces and seal wear for prolonged operating life. The closed-cycled system is controlled by an innovative load-responsive electronic feedback circuit which further reduces wear and input power. 6 refs

  16. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  17. Diffusion in compacted betonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Rantanen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this report is to collect the literature bearing on the diffusion in compacted betonite, which has been suggested as possible buffer material for the disposal of spent fuel. Diffusion in a porous, water-saturated material is usually described as diffusion in the pore-water where sorption on the solid matter can delay the migration in the instationary state. There are also models which take into consideration that the sorbed molecules can also move while being sorbed. Diffusion experiments in compacted bentonite have been reported by many authors. Gases, anions, cations and actinides have been used as diffusing molecules. The report collects the results and the information on the measurement methods. On the basis of the results can be concluded that different particles possibly follow different diffusion mechanisms. The parameters which affect the diffusion seem to be for example the size, the electric charge and the sorption properties of the diffusing molecule. The report also suggest the parameters to be used in the diffusion calculation of the safety analyses of spent fuel disposal. (author)

  18. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Once upon a time nitrogen did not exist. Today it does. In the intervening time the universe was formed, nitrogen was created, the Earth came into existence, and its atmosphere and oceans were formed! In this analysis of the Earth's nitrogen cycle, I start with an overview of these important events relative to nitrogen and then move on to the more traditional analysis of the nitrogen cycle itself and the role of humans in its alteration.The universe is ˜15 Gyr old. Even after its formation, there was still a period when nitrogen did not exist. It took ˜300 thousand years after the big bang for the Universe to cool enough to create atoms; hydrogen and helium formed first. Nitrogen was formed in the stars through the process of nucleosynthesis. When a star's helium mass becomes great enough to reach the necessary pressure and temperature, helium begins to fuse into still heavier elements, including nitrogen.Approximately 10 Gyr elapsed before Earth was formed (˜4.5 Ga (billion years ago)) by the accumulation of pre-assembled materials in a multistage process. Assuming that N2 was the predominate nitrogen species in these materials and given that the temperature of space is -270 °C, N2 was probably a solid when the Earth was formed since its boiling point (b.p.) and melting point (m.p.) are -196 °C and -210 °C, respectively. Towards the end of the accumulation period, temperatures were probably high enough for significant melting of some of the accumulated material. The volcanic gases emitted by the resulting volcanism strongly influenced the surface environment. Nitrogen was converted from a solid to a gas and emitted as N2. Carbon and sulfur were probably emitted as CO and H2S (Holland, 1984). N2 is still the most common nitrogen volcanic gas emitted today at a rate of ˜2 TgN yr-1 (Jaffee, 1992).Once emitted, the gases either remained in the atmosphere or were deposited to the Earth's surface, thus continuing the process of biogeochemical cycling. The rate of

  19. Development of a load cell for mechanical testing in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanical testing in hydrogen environments is performed on materials to determine hydrogen compatibility. Many tests are performed on small test samples in pressure vessels where monitoring of actual sample load is difficult. A method was developed to monitor small samples by placing inside the vessel a miniature load cell which is capable of measuring loads of less than 100 lbs. The load cell monitors load by means of a Wheatstone Bridge circuit composed of four strain gages. Two of the gages are mounted on a stainless steel stub which becomes part of the vessel load string; the others are wired outside the pressure vessel. Previously, load cells have been short-lived because of hydrogen diffusion into the epoxy-phenolic adhesive used to attach the strain gages to the stub. The use of a flame-sprayed ceramic, however, rather than an organic epoxy to mount the strain gages appears to produce a load cell resistant to the hydrogen test environment

  20. Controlled surface diffusion in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, W C; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the growth of GaN nanowires by controlling the surface diffusion of Ga species on sapphire in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, Ga has a tendency to adsorb on the substrate surface diffusing to nanowires to contribute to their growth. The significance of surface diffusion on the growth of nanowires is dependent on the environment of the nanowire on the substrate surface as well as the gas phase species and compositions. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, the growth rate is strongly dependent on the surface diffusion of gallium, but the addition of 5% hydrogen in nitrogen plasma instantly diminishes the surface diffusion effect. Gallium desorbs easily from the surface by reaction with hydrogen. On the other hand, under gallium-rich growth conditions, nanowire growth is shown to be dominated by the gas phase deposition, with negligible contribution from surface diffusion. This is the first study reporting the inhibition of surface diffusion effects by hydrogen addition, which can be useful in tailoring the growth and characteristics of nanowires. Without any evidence of direct deposition on the nanowire surface, gallium and nitrogen are shown to dissolve into the catalyst for growing the nanowires at 900 deg. C.

  1. Effects of diluents on soot surface temperature and volume fraction in diluted ethylene diffusion flames at pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Kailasanathan, Ranjith Kumar Abhinavam; Zhang, Ji; Fang, Tiegang; Roberts, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Soot surface temperature and volume fraction are measured in ethylene/air coflowing laminar diffusion flames at high pressures, diluted with one of four diluents (argon, helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) using a two-color technique. Both

  2. Nitrogen saturation in stream ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Stevan R; Valett, H Maurice; Webster, Jackson R

    2006-12-01

    The concept of nitrogen (N) saturation has organized the assessment of N loading in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we extend the concept to lotic ecosystems by coupling Michaelis-Menten kinetics and nutrient spiraling. We propose a series of saturation response types, which may be used to characterize the proximity of streams to N saturation. We conducted a series of short-term N releases using a tracer (15NO3-N) to measure uptake. Experiments were conducted in streams spanning a gradient of background N concentration. Uptake increased in four of six streams as NO3-N was incrementally elevated, indicating that these streams were not saturated. Uptake generally corresponded to Michaelis-Menten kinetics but deviated from the model in two streams where some other growth-critical factor may have been limiting. Proximity to saturation was correlated to background N concentration but was better predicted by the ratio of dissolved inorganic N (DIN) to soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), suggesting phosphorus limitation in several high-N streams. Uptake velocity, a reflection of uptake efficiency, declined nonlinearly with increasing N amendment in all streams. At the same time, uptake velocity was highest in the low-N streams. Our conceptual model of N transport, uptake, and uptake efficiency suggests that, while streams may be active sites of N uptake on the landscape, N saturation contributes to nonlinear changes in stream N dynamics that correspond to decreased uptake efficiency.

  3. Nitrogen removal by denitrification in the sediments of a shallow lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijn, van F.

    1997-01-01

    Most surface waters in the Netherlands are highly eutrophicated due to high loadings with the nutrients nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). To improve the water quality of lakes often the phosphorus loading is reduced. Due to phosphorus release from the sediments the success of the recovery of

  4. Position-Dependent Dynamics Explain Pore-Averaged Diffusion in Strongly Attractive Adsorptive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekelberg, William P; Siderius, Daniel W; Shen, Vincent K; Truskett, Thomas M; Errington, Jeffrey R

    2017-12-12

    Using molecular simulations, we investigate the relationship between the pore-averaged and position-dependent self-diffusivity of a fluid adsorbed in a strongly attractive pore as a function of loading. Previous work (Krekelberg, W. P.; Siderius, D. W.; Shen, V. K.; Truskett, T. M.; Errington, J. R. Connection between thermodynamics and dynamics of simple fluids in highly attractive pores. Langmuir 2013, 29, 14527-14535, doi: 10.1021/la4037327) established that pore-averaged self-diffusivity in the multilayer adsorption regime, where the fluid exhibits a dense film at the pore surface and a lower density interior pore region, is nearly constant as a function of loading. Here we show that this puzzling behavior can be understood in terms of how loading affects the fraction of particles that reside in the film and interior pore regions as well as their distinct dynamics. Specifically, the insensitivity of pore-averaged diffusivity to loading arises from the approximate cancellation of two factors: an increase in the fraction of particles in the higher diffusivity interior pore region with loading and a corresponding decrease in the particle diffusivity in that region. We also find that the position-dependent self-diffusivities scale with the position-dependent density. We present a model for predicting the pore-average self-diffusivity based on the position-dependent self-diffusivity, which captures the unusual characteristics of pore-averaged self-diffusivity in strongly attractive pores over several orders of magnitude.

  5. [Nitrogen non-point source pollution identification based on ArcSWAT in Changle River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ou-Ping; Sun, Si-Yang; Lü, Jun

    2013-04-01

    The ArcSWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) model was adopted for Non-point source (NPS) nitrogen pollution modeling and nitrogen source apportionment for the Changle River watershed, a typical agricultural watershed in Southeast China. Water quality and hydrological parameters were monitored, and the watershed natural conditions (including soil, climate, land use, etc) and pollution sources information were also investigated and collected for SWAT database. The ArcSWAT model was established in the Changle River after the calibrating and validating procedures of the model parameters. Based on the validated SWAT model, the contributions of different nitrogen sources to river TN loading were quantified, and spatial-temporal distributions of NPS nitrogen export to rivers were addressed. The results showed that in the Changle River watershed, Nitrogen fertilizer, nitrogen air deposition and nitrogen soil pool were the prominent pollution sources, which contributed 35%, 32% and 25% to the river TN loading, respectively. There were spatial-temporal variations in the critical sources for NPS TN export to the river. Natural sources, such as soil nitrogen pool and atmospheric nitrogen deposition, should be targeted as the critical sources for river TN pollution during the rainy seasons. Chemical nitrogen fertilizer application should be targeted as the critical sources for river TN pollution during the crop growing season. Chemical nitrogen fertilizer application, soil nitrogen pool and atmospheric nitrogen deposition were the main sources for TN exported from the garden plot, forest and residential land, respectively. However, they were the main sources for TN exported both from the upland and paddy field. These results revealed that NPS pollution controlling rules should focus on the spatio-temporal distribution of NPS pollution sources.

  6. Improved antimicrobial property and controlled drug release kinetics of silver sulfadiazine loaded ordered mesoporous silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Jangra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the loading of silver sulfadiazine into ordered mesoporous silica material by post-impregnation method and its effect on the in vitro release kinetics and antimicrobial property of the drug. The formulated SBA-15 silica material with rope-like morphology and SBA-15-silver sulfadiazine (SBA-AgSD were characterized by UV–visible spectrophotometer, small and wide-angle powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of SBA-AgSD revealed a high loading amount of 52.87%. Nitrogen adsorption–desorption analysis confirmed the drug entrapment into host material by revealing a reduced surface area (214 m2/g and pore diameter (6.7 nm of the SBA-AgSD. The controlled release of silver sulfadiazine drug from the mesoporous silica to simulated gastric, intestinal and body fluids was evaluated. The Korsmeyer–Peppas model fits the drug release data with the non-Fickian diffusion model and zero order kinetics of SBA-AgSD. The antibacterial performance of the SBA-AgSD was evaluated with respect to Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The controlled drug delivery of the SBA-AgSD revealed improved antibacterial activity, thus endorsing its applicability in effective wound dressing.

  7. Longitudinal Loading and Nutrient Compositional Gradients in an Agriculturally Managed Watershed in West-Central Wisconsin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James, William F; Ruiz, Carlos E; Barko, John W; Eakin, Harry L

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe and quantify biologically labile and refractory nitrogen and phosphorus species, transformations, and loads along the longitudinal axis of a river draining...

  8. Discrimination of thermal diffusivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Materials such as wood or metal which are at equal temperatures are perceived to be of different ‘coldness’ due to differences in thermal properties, such as the thermal diffusivity. The thermal diffusivity of a material is a parameter that controls the rate with which heat is extracted from the

  9. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  10. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  11. Adaptation and Cultural Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormrod, Richard K.

    1992-01-01

    Explores the role of adaptation in cultural diffusion. Explains that adaptation theory recognizes the lack of independence between innovations and their environmental settings. Discusses testing and selection, modification, motivation, and cognition. Suggests that adaptation effects are pervasive in cultural diffusion but require a broader, more…

  12. Modelling of Innovation Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Kijek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the Bass model in 1969, research on the modelling of the diffusion of innovation resulted in a vast body of scientific literature consisting of articles, books, and studies of real-world applications of this model. The main objective of the diffusion model is to describe a pattern of spread of innovation among potential adopters in terms of a mathematical function of time. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art in mathematical models of innovation diffusion and procedures for estimating their parameters. Moreover, theoretical issues related to the models presented are supplemented with empirical research. The purpose of the research is to explore the extent to which the diffusion of broadband Internet users in 29 OECD countries can be adequately described by three diffusion models, i.e. the Bass model, logistic model and dynamic model. The results of this research are ambiguous and do not indicate which model best describes the diffusion pattern of broadband Internet users but in terms of the results presented, in most cases the dynamic model is inappropriate for describing the diffusion pattern. Issues related to the further development of innovation diffusion models are discussed and some recommendations are given. (original abstract

  13. Thermal diffusion (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarechal, A.

    1963-01-01

    This report brings together the essential principles of thermal diffusion in the liquid and gaseous phases. The macroscopic and molecular aspects of the thermal diffusion constant are reviewed, as well as the various measurement method; the most important developments however concern the operation of the CLUSIUS and DICKEL thermo-gravitational column and its applications. (author) [fr

  14. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Brodsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion.Methods: This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method. It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB.Results: Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others.Discussion: Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected.

  15. Factors affecting stream nutrient loads: A synthesis of regional SPARROW model results for the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Stephen D.; Alexander, Richard B.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    We compared the results of 12 recently calibrated regional SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) models covering most of the continental United States to evaluate the consistency and regional differences in factors affecting stream nutrient loads. The models - 6 for total nitrogen and 6 for total phosphorus - all provide similar levels of prediction accuracy, but those for major river basins in the eastern half of the country were somewhat more accurate. The models simulate long-term mean annual stream nutrient loads as a function of a wide range of known sources and climatic (precipitation, temperature), landscape (e.g., soils, geology), and aquatic factors affecting nutrient fate and transport. The results confirm the dominant effects of urban and agricultural sources on stream nutrient loads nationally and regionally, but reveal considerable spatial variability in the specific types of sources that control water quality. These include regional differences in the relative importance of different types of urban (municipal and industrial point vs. diffuse urban runoff) and agriculture (crop cultivation vs. animal waste) sources, as well as the effects of atmospheric deposition, mining, and background (e.g., soil phosphorus) sources on stream nutrients. Overall, we found that the SPARROW model results provide a consistent set of information for identifying the major sources and environmental factors affecting nutrient fate and transport in United States watersheds at regional and subregional scales. ?? 2011 American Water Resources Association. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Diffusive retention of atmospheric gases in chert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, E.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Schaller, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Throughout Earth's history, the volatile contents (N2, CO2, Ar) of both deep and shallow terrestrial reservoirs has been dynamic. Volatiles are important chemical constituents because they play a significant role in regulating Earth's climate, mediating the evolution of complex life, and controlling the properties of minerals and rocks. Estimating levels of atmospheric volatiles in the deep geological past requires interrogation of materials that have acquired and retained a chemical memory from that time. Cherts have the potential to trap atmospheric components during formation and later release those gases for analysis in the laboratory. However, cherts have been underexploited in this regard, partly because their ability to retain a record of volatile components has not been adequately evaluated. Before cherts can be reliably used as indicators of past levels of major atmospheric gases, it is crucial that we understand the diffusive retentiveness of these cryptocrystalline silica phases. As the first step toward quantifying the diffusivity and solubility of carbon dioxide and nitrogen in chert, we have performed 1-atmosphere diffusive-uptake experiments at temperatures up to 450°C. Depth profiles of in-diffusing gases are measured by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) to help us understand the molecular-scale transport of volatiles and thus the validity of using chert-bound volatiles to record information about Earth history. Data collected to date suggest that at least some cherts are ideal storage containers and can retain volatiles for a geologically long time. In addition to these diffusion experiments, preliminary online-crush fast-scan measurements using a quadrupole mass spectrometer indicate that atmospheric volatiles are released upon crushing various chert samples. By coupling such volatile-release measurements made by mass spectrometry with diffusion experiments, we are uniquely able to address the storage and fidelity of volatiles bound in crustal

  17. Shot loading platform analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, B.F.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the wind/seismic analysis and evaluation for the shot loading platform. Hand calculations were used for the analysis. AISC and UBC load factors were used in this evaluation. The results show that the actual loads are under the allowable loads and all requirements are met

  18. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  19. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  20. Degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations

    CERN Document Server

    Favini, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to include in a uniform presentation style several topics related to the theory of degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations, treated in the mathematical framework of evolution equations with multivalued m-accretive operators in Hilbert spaces. The problems concern nonlinear parabolic equations involving two cases of degeneracy. More precisely, one case is due to the vanishing of the time derivative coefficient and the other is provided by the vanishing of the diffusion coefficient on subsets of positive measure of the domain. From the mathematical point of view the results presented in these notes can be considered as general results in the theory of degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations. However, this work does not seek to present an exhaustive study of degenerate diffusion equations, but rather to emphasize some rigorous and efficient techniques for approaching various problems involving degenerate nonlinear diffusion equations, such as well-posedness, periodic solutions, asympt...

  1. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  2. The fertilizer nitrogen problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R A; Halstead, E H

    1974-07-01

    A world-wide fossil fuel crisis has surfaced in the past year by reason of shortage and high cost, which is felt throughout all segments of human society. Nor has the agriculture sector, with its very high demand for energy to supply its power, machinery, fertilizer, processing and transport, escaped the energy crisis. Among the agricultural inputs, fertilizer nitrogen is one of major concern. This commodity is currently in extremely short supply, world prices having more than doubled in the past year alone. Serious as this situation is to agricultural production in the highly developed countries of the world, it is a real disaster to the production potential of the developing countries. The birth of the 'Green Revolution' in those countries in the last ten years came about from an amalgamation of higher yielding varieties, improved pest and disease control, better crop watering practices, and the introduction of fertilizer nitrogen. Shortcomings in any one of these requisites invalidates the entire package. (author)

  3. The fertilizer nitrogen problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.A.; Halstead, E.H.

    1974-01-01

    A world-wide fossil fuel crisis has surfaced in the past year by reason of shortage and high cost, which is felt throughout all segments of human society. Nor has the agriculture sector, with its very high demand for energy to supply its power, machinery, fertilizer, processing and transport, escaped the energy crisis. Among the agricultural inputs, fertilizer nitrogen is one of major concern. This commodity is currently in extremely short supply, world prices having more than doubled in the past year alone. Serious as this situation is to agricultural production in the highly developed countries of the world, it is a real disaster to the production potential of the developing countries. The birth of the 'Green Revolution' in those countries in the last ten years came about from an amalgamation of higher yielding varieties, improved pest and disease control, better crop watering practices, and the introduction of fertilizer nitrogen. Shortcomings in any one of these requisites invalidates the entire package. (author)

  4. Oxygen diffusion in monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Nakamura, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2004-09-01

    We report measurements of oxygen diffusion in natural monazites under both dry, 1-atm conditions and hydrothermal conditions. For dry experiments, 18O-enriched CePO4 powder and monazite crystals were sealed in Ag-Pd capsules with a solid buffer (to buffer at NNO) and annealed in 1-atm furnaces. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels, where monazite grains were encapsulated with 18O-enriched water. Following the diffusion anneals, oxygen concentration profiles were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 18O(p,α)15N. Over the temperature range 850-1100 °C, the Arrhenius relation determined for dry diffusion experiments on monazite is given by: Under wet conditions at 100 MPa water pressure, over the temperature range 700-880 °C, oxygen diffusion can be described by the Arrhenius relationship: Oxygen diffusion under hydrothermal conditions has a significantly lower activation energy for diffusion than under dry conditions, as has been found the case for many other minerals, both silicate and nonsilicate. Given these differences in activation energies, the differences between dry and wet diffusion rates increase with lower temperatures; for example, at 600 °C, dry diffusion will be more than 4 orders of magnitude slower than diffusion under hydrothermal conditions. These disparate diffusivities will result in pronounced differences in the degree of retentivity of oxygen isotope signatures. For instance, under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust) and high lower-crustal temperatures (∼800 °C), monazite cores of 70-μm radii will preserve O isotope ratios for about 500,000 years; by comparison, they would be retained at this temperature under wet conditions for about 15,000 years.

  5. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Domankova; Katarína Bártová; Ivan Slatkovský; Peter Pinke

    2016-01-01

    The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with ...

  6. Is nitrogen the next carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battye, William; Aneja, Viney P.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2017-09-01

    Just as carbon fueled the Industrial Revolution, nitrogen has fueled an Agricultural Revolution. The use of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and the cultivation of nitrogen-fixing crops both expanded exponentially during the last century, with most of the increase occurring after 1960. As a result, the current flux of reactive, or fixed, nitrogen compounds to the biosphere due to human activities is roughly equivalent to the total flux of fixed nitrogen from all natural sources, both on land masses and in the world's oceans. Natural fluxes of fixed nitrogen are subject to very large uncertainties, but anthropogenic production of reactive nitrogen has increased almost fivefold in the last 60 years, and this rapid increase in anthropogenic fixed nitrogen has removed any uncertainty on the relative importance of anthropogenic fluxes to the natural budget. The increased use of nitrogen has been critical for increased crop yields and protein production needed to keep pace with the growing world population. However, similar to carbon, the release of fixed nitrogen into the natural environment is linked to adverse consequences at local, regional, and global scales. Anthropogenic contributions of fixed nitrogen continue to grow relative to the natural budget, with uncertain consequences.

  7. Substitution the water by nitrogen; Substituicao da agua por nitrogenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidalgo Junior, Paulo Jose [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Navarro, Antonio Reinaldo [Faculdade Taboao da Serra, SP (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The use of nitrogen in the removal from service for maintenance of pressurized equipment, resulted an excellent process alternative in relation to the traditional injection of water. The advantages of the use of nitrogen can be evidenced in a more significant way, when the operation of maintenance is done in big load pressure equipment, such as gas spheres and horizontal storage tanks. We can mention some important advantages such as: no water consumption, smaller costs, smaller time for equipment removal from service, smaller residues generation, smaller structural efforts in the equipment and better quality of the fluid used in the process. (author)

  8. Reduction of nitrogen: Finnish state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, Markku

    1987-01-01

    In Finland nitrogen has been considered of importance as a limiting growth factor in some coastal areas and heavily polluted lakes. For the present, however, the usefulness of nitrogen removal in municipal wastewater treatment has not beep clear enough and requirements concerning removal of total nitrogen have not been set. The need for nitrogen removal depends mainly on the local conditions. On the coastal regions, nitrogen removal should be started first in the biggest of those municipalities which are loading the Gulf of Finland and the Archipelago Sea. The city of Helsinki has to be prepared for nitrogen removal before the end of the next decade. The adverse effects of ammonia are apparent in many inland water courses. In recent years reduction of ammonia nitrogen in wastewater treatment has been required in some cases, mainly in order to prevent oxygen depletion caused by nitrification in receiving waters. Other important reasons for ammonia reduction have been the adverse effects of ammonia in water supply and the toxic effects of molecular ammonia on fish. In practice, ammonia removal has been performed by nitrification in connection with the activated sludge process. The choice of process combinations and design values have always been based on pilot plant or full scale experiments. In order to reach a sludge retention time long enough during the cold season, the design values of sludge load have been 0.06-0.08 kg BOD 7 /kg MLSS·d in combined carbon oxidation and nitrification processes. At new nitrification plants, denitrification has been used for diminishing the operation costs. (author)

  9. Restrictive liquid-phase diffusion and reaction in bidispersed catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Seader, J.D.; Tsai, C.H.; Massoth, F.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of bidispersed pore-size distribution on liquid-phase diffusion and reaction in NiMo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts is investigated by applying two bidispersed-pore-structure models, the random-pore model and a globular-structure model, to extensive experimental data, which were obtained from sorptive diffusion measurements at ambient conditions and catalytic reaction rate measurements on nitrogen-containing compounds. Transport of the molecules in the catalysts was found to be controlled by micropore diffusion, in accordance with the random-pore model, rather than macropore diffusion as predicted by the globular-structure model. A qualitative criterion for micropore-diffusion control is proposed: relatively small macroporosity and high catalyst pellet density. Since most hydrotreating catalysts have high density, diffusion in these types of catalysts may be controlled by micropore diffusion. Accordingly, it is believed in this case that increasing the size of micropores may be more effective to reduce intraparticle diffusion resistance than incorporating macropores alone

  10. Soil and fertilizer nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winteringham, F.P.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of the intensified practices and effectively diminishing land resources per capita, increasing weights of both native soil- and added fertilizer-nitrogen will be lost to agriculture and its products, and will find their way into the environment. Soil-nitrogen levels and contingent productivity can nevertheless be maintained in the face of these losses on the basis of improved soil-N management. In some local situations nitrate levels in water for drinking purposes are likely to continue rising. In some cases agriculture and clearance practices are only one of several sources. In others they are clearly mainly responsible. In developing countries these losses represent those of a relatively increasingly costly input. This is due to the fact that industrial fertilizer nitrogen production is a particularly high energy-consuming process. In the more advanced industrialized countries they represent an addition to the problems and costs of environmental quality and health protection. The programmes, information and data reviewed here suggest that these problems can be contained by improved and extended soil and water management in agriculture on the basis of existing technology. In particular there appears to be enormous scope for the better exploitation of existing legumes both as non-legume crop alternatives or as biofertilizers which also possess more desirable C:N ratios than chemical fertilizer

  11. A comparison of Fick and Maxwell-Stefan diffusion formulations in PEMFC gas diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Michael; Wetton, Brian

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the mathematical formulations of Fick and Maxwell-Stefan diffusion in the context of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathode gas diffusion layers. The simple Fick law with a diagonal diffusion matrix is an approximation of Maxwell-Stefan. Formulations of diffusion combined with mass-averaged Darcy flow are considered for three component gases. For this application, the formulations can be compared computationally in a simple, one dimensional setting. Despite the models' seemingly different structure, it is observed that the predictions of the formulations are very similar on the cathode when air is used as oxidant. The two formulations give quite different results when the Nitrogen in the air oxidant is replaced by helium (this is often done as a diagnostic for fuel cells designs). The two formulations also give quite different results for the anode with a dilute Hydrogen stream. These results give direction to when Maxwell-Stefan diffusion, which is more complicated to implement computationally in many codes, should be used in fuel cell simulations.

  12. Neutron spectroscopy of fast hydrogen diffusion in BCC transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.; Lottner, V.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering reveals microscopic details of both the time and space development of the H-diffusion process on an atomic scale. After outlining the method on the example of PdH/sub x/, new results on the jump geometry in bcc metals are surveyed. In particular, the anomalous diffusion behavior of H in Nb, Ta, and V at elevated temperature is emphasized, where correlated jump processes are important. The influence of impurities on the H-diffusion process is demonstrated by experiments performed on NbH/sub x/ doped with nitrogen impurities, which act as trapping centers for the diffusing hydrogen. The results are discussed in terms of a two-state random walk model which includes multiple trapping and detrapping processes. The concentration and temperature dependence of the capture and escape rates of traps are obtained

  13. Computation of diffusion coefficients for waters of Gauthami Godavari estuary using one-dimensional advection-diffusion model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothi, D.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sarma, V.V.; Rao, D.P.

    conditions. As the pollutant load on the estuary increases, the. water quality may deteriorate rapidly and therefore the scientific interests are centered on the analysis of water quality. The pollutants will be subjected to a number of physical, chemical... study we have applied one-dimensional advection-diffusion model for the waters of Gauthami Godavari estuary to determine the axial diffusion coefficients and thereby to predict the impact assessment. The study area (Fig. 1) is the lower most 32 km...

  14. Nitrogen utilization and biomass yield in trickle bed air biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daekeun; Sorial, George A

    2010-10-15

    Nitrogen utilization and subsequent biomass yield were investigated in four independent lab-scale trickle bed air biofilters (TBABs) fed with different VOCs substrate. The VOCs considered were two aromatic (toluene, styrene) and two oxygenated (methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK)). Long-term observations of TBABs performances show that more nitrogen was required to sustain high VOC removal, but the one fed with a high loading of VOC utilized much more nitrogen for sustaining biomass yield. The ratio N(consumption)/N(growth) was an effective indicator in evaluating nitrogen utilization in the system. Substrate VOC availability in the system was significant in determining nitrogen utilization and biomass yield. VOC substrate availability in the TBAB system was effectively identified by using maximum practical concentrations in the biofilm. Biomass yield coefficient, which was driven from the regression analysis between CO(2) production rate and substrate consumption rate, was effective in evaluating the TBAB performance with respect to nitrogen utilization and VOC removal. Biomass yield coefficients (g biomass/g substrate, dry weight basis) were observed to be 0.668, 0.642, 0.737, and 0.939 for toluene, styrene, MEK, and MIBK, respectively. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Loads and loads and loads: the influence of prospective load, retrospective load, and ongoing task load in prospective memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Beat; Zimmermann, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    In prospective memory tasks different kinds of load can occur. Adding a prospective memory task can impose a load on ongoing task performance. Adding ongoing task load (OTL) can affect prospective memory performance. The existence of multiple target events increases prospective load (PL) and adding complexity to the to-be-remembered action increases retrospective load (RL). In two experiments, we systematically examined the effects of these different types of load on prospective memory performance. Results showed an effect of PL on costs in the ongoing task for categorical targets (Experiment 2), but not for specific targets (Experiment 1). RL and OTL both affected remembering the retrospective component of the prospective memory task. We suggest that PL can enhance costs in the ongoing task due to additional monitoring requirements. RL and OTL seem to impact the division of resources between the ongoing task and retrieval of the retrospective component, which may affect disengagement from the ongoing task. In general, the results demonstrate that the different types of load affect prospective memory differentially. PMID:26082709

  16. Loads and loads and loads: the influence of prospective load, retrospective load, and ongoing task load in prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Beat; Zimmermann, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    In prospective memory tasks different kinds of load can occur. Adding a prospective memory task can impose a load on ongoing task performance. Adding ongoing task load (OTL) can affect prospective memory performance. The existence of multiple target events increases prospective load (PL) and adding complexity to the to-be-remembered action increases retrospective load (RL). In two experiments, we systematically examined the effects of these different types of load on prospective memory performance. Results showed an effect of PL on costs in the ongoing task for categorical targets (Experiment 2), but not for specific targets (Experiment 1). RL and OTL both affected remembering the retrospective component of the prospective memory task. We suggest that PL can enhance costs in the ongoing task due to additional monitoring requirements. RL and OTL seem to impact the division of resources between the ongoing task and retrieval of the retrospective component, which may affect disengagement from the ongoing task. In general, the results demonstrate that the different types of load affect prospective memory differentially.

  17. Diffuse interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The author defines and discusses the nature of diffuse interstellar clouds. He discusses how they contribute to the general extinction of starlight. The atomic and molecular species that have been identified in the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared regions of the spectrum of a diffuse cloud are presented. The author illustrates some of the practical considerations that affect absorption line observations of interstellar atoms and molecules. Various aspects of the theoretical description of diffuse clouds required for a full interpretation of the observations are discussed

  18. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  19. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  20. The defect chemistry of nitrogen in oxides: A review of experimental and theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polfus, Jonathan M.; Norby, Truls; Haugsrud, Reidar

    2013-01-01

    Incorporation of nitrogen into oxides has in recent years received increased attention as a variable for tuning their functional properties. A vast number of reports have been devoted to improving the photocatalytic properties of TiO 2 , p-type charge carrier concentration in ZnO and the ionic transport properties of ZrO 2 by nitrogen doping. In comparison, the fundamentals of the nitrogen related defect chemistry for a wider range of oxides have been less focused upon. In the present contribution, we review experimental and computational investigations of the nitrogen related defect chemistry of insulating and semiconducting oxides. The interaction between nitrogen and protons is important and emphasized. Specifically, the stability of nitrogen defects such as N O / , NH O × and (NH 2 ) O • is evaluated under various conditions and their atomistic and electronic structure is presented. A final discussion is devoted to the role of nitrogen with respect to transport properties and photocatalytic activity of oxides. - Graphical abstract: Experimental and theoretical investigations of the nitrogen related defect chemistry of a range of wide band gap oxides is reviewed. The interaction between nitrogen dopants and protons is emphasized and described through the atomistic and electronic structure as well as defect chemical processes involving NH and NH 2 defects. Consequently, the physical properties of oxides containing such species are discussed with respect to e.g., diffusion and photocatalytic properties. Highlights: ► Experimental and theoretical investigations of the nitrogen and hydrogen related defect chemistry of wide band gap oxides is reviewed. ► The interaction between nitrogen dopants and protons is important and emphasized. ► Diffusion and photocatalytic properties of N-doped oxides are discussed.

  1. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  2. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. 862.1515... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine...

  3. Using spatially detailed water-quality data and solute-transport modeling to improve support total maximum daily load development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton-Day, Katherine; Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially detailed mass-loading studies and solute-transport modeling using OTIS (One-dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage) demonstrate how natural attenuation and loading from distinct and diffuse sources control stream water quality and affect load reductions predicted in total maximum daily loads (TMDLs). Mass-loading data collected during low-flow from Cement Creek (a low-pH, metal-rich stream because of natural and mining sources, and subject to TMDL requirements) were used to calibrate OTIS and showed spatially variable effects of natural attenuation (instream reactions) and loading from diffuse (groundwater) and distinct sources. OTIS simulations of the possible effects of TMDL-recommended remediation of mine sites showed less improvement to dissolved zinc load and concentration (14% decrease) than did the TMDL (53-63% decrease). The TMDL (1) assumed conservative transport, (2) accounted for loads removed by remediation by subtracting them from total load at the stream mouth, and (3) did not include diffuse-source loads. In OTIS, loads were reduced near their source; the resulting concentration was decreased by natural attenuation and increased by diffuse-source loads during downstream transport. Thus, by not including natural attenuation and loading from diffuse sources, the TMDL overestimated remediation effects at low flow. Use of the techniques presented herein could improve TMDLs by incorporating these processes during TMDL development.

  4. Enzyme loading dependence of cellulose hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Martín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated sugarcane bagasse, either delignified or non-delignified, was studied as a function of enzyme loading. Hydrolysis experiments were carried out using five enzyme loadings (2.5 to 20 FPU/g cellulose and the concentration of solids was 2% for both materials. Alkaline delignification improved cellulose hydrolysis by increasing surface area. For both materials, glucose concentrations increased with enzyme loading. On the other hand, enzyme loadings higher than 15 FPU/g did not result in any increase in the initial rate, since the excess of enzyme adsorbed onto the substrate restricted the diffusion process through the structure.

  5. Nitrogen supply of crops by biological nitrogen fixation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.S.; Andersen, A.J.; Soerensen, H.; Thomsen, J.D.

    1985-02-01

    In the present work the contributions from combined N-sources and symbiotic nitrogen fixation to the nitrogen supply of field-grown peas and field beans were evaluated by means of 15 N fertilizer dilution. The effect of N-fertilizer, supplied at sowing and at different stages of plant development, on nitrogen fixation, yield and protein production in peas, was studied in pot experiments. (author)

  6. The effect of impeller–diffuser interactions on diffuser performance in a centrifugal compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady phenomenon abounds in centrifugal compressors and significantly affects the compressor performance. In this paper, unsteady simulations are carried out to investigate the aerodynamic performance of a process-unshrouded centrifugal compressor and the unsteady mechanism in the vaned diffuser. The predicted stage performance and pressure fluctuations at some locations are in good agreement with experimental data. The predicted main pressure fluctuation frequency spectrums at the diffuser inlet and outlet are consistent with the measured results. The results indicate that at the inlet of the diffuser there are two pressure peaks in a passage cycle. The higher pressure peak relates to the impeller wake and the lower peak is connected with the vortex generated at the diffuser’s leading edge. With a decrease in the mass flow coefficient, the vortex core region becomes larger and the lower pressure peak becomes more pronounced. The change in circumferential flow angle at the diffuser inlet is mainly responsible for the unsteadiness in the diffuser flow field, which in turn affects the inlet incidence of the diffuser vane and the vane loading distributions.

  7. Diffusion of Wilson loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, A.M.; Lenz, F.; Thies, M.; Negele, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the distribution of Wilson loops in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is presented in which Wilson loop distributions are described as the result of a diffusion process on the group manifold. It is shown that, in the absence of forces, diffusion implies Casimir scaling and, conversely, exact Casimir scaling implies free diffusion. Screening processes occur if diffusion takes place in a potential. The crucial distinction between screening of fundamental and adjoint loops is formulated as a symmetry property related to the center symmetry of the underlying gauge theory. The results are expressed in terms of an effective Wilson loop action and compared with various limits of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory

  8. Diffusion between evolving interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juntunen, Janne; Merikoski, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion in an evolving environment is studied by continuous-time Monte Carlo simulations. Diffusion is modeled by continuous-time random walkers on a lattice, in a dynamic environment provided by bubbles between two one-dimensional interfaces driven symmetrically towards each other. For one-dimensional random walkers constrained by the interfaces, the bubble size distribution dominates diffusion. For two-dimensional random walkers, it is also controlled by the topography and dynamics of the interfaces. The results of the one-dimensional case are recovered in the limit where the interfaces are strongly driven. Even with simple hard-core repulsion between the interfaces and the particles, diffusion is found to depend strongly on the details of the dynamical rules of particles close to the interfaces.

  9. On Diffusion and Permeation

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2009-01-01

    concentrations they form a nearly rigid porous glass through which the fluid permeates. The theoretically determined pressure drop is nonlinear in the diffusion regime and linear in the permeation regime, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements

  10. Diffusing Best Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Baskerville, Richard

    2014-01-01

    approach. The study context is a design case in which an organization desires to diffuse its best practices across different groups. The design goal is embodied in organizational mechanisms to achieve this diffusion. The study used Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a kernel theory. The artifacts...... resulting from the design were two-day training workshops conceptually anchored to TBP. The design theory was evaluated through execution of eight diffusion workshops involving three different groups in the same company. The findings indicate that the match between the practice and the context materialized...... that the behavior will be effective). These two factors were especially critical if the source context of the best practice is qualitatively different from the target context into which the organization is seeking to diffuse the best practice....

  11. Detection of diffusible substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warembourg, M [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France)

    1976-12-01

    The different steps of a radioautographic technique for the detection of diffusible substances are described. Using this radioautographic method, the topographic distribution of estradiol-concentrating neurons was studied in the nervous system and pituitary of the ovariectomized mouse and guinea-pig. A relatively good morphological preservation of structures can be ascertained on sections from unfixed, unembedded tissues prepared at low temperatures and kept-under relatively low humidity. The translocation or extraction of diffusible substances is avoided by directly mounting of frozen sections on dried photographic emulsion. Since no solvent is used, this technique excludes the major sources of diffusion artifacts and permits to be in favourable conditions for the localization of diffusible substances.

  12. On Diffusion and Permeation

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion and permeation are discussed within the context of irreversible thermodynamics. A new expression for the generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is obtained which links the permeability to the diffusivity of a two-component solution and contains the poroelastic Biot-Willis coefficient. The theory is illustrated by predicting the concentration and pressure profiles during the filtration of a protein solution. At low concentrations the proteins diffuse independently while at higher concentrations they form a nearly rigid porous glass through which the fluid permeates. The theoretically determined pressure drop is nonlinear in the diffusion regime and linear in the permeation regime, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. © 2009 Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, New York.

  13. Behavior and Release of Nitrogen at Mines and Quarries in Nordic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Teemu; Neitola, Raisa; Jermakka, Johannes; Merta, Elina; Mroueh, Ulla-Maija

    2015-04-01

    The increased extraction of mineral resources and mining activities creates added pressure on the environmental issues and a proper water management in mining areas in Finland. Among others, nitrogen compounds released from explosives or from mining processes can have a detrimental effect on the environment. Thus, this project aimed at comprehensive understanding on the nitrogen issue in the extractive industry. The project collected essential data on nitrogen compounds present in the environments of mines and quarries, and generated better understanding of the discharge and behaviour of nitrogen compounds in mining areas. The sources and balances of explosives-originated nitrogen compounds at mines and quarries of different sizes were investigated and compared. Additionally, the focus was in 'nitrogen smudging' problem of waste rocks and the intensity, as well as evolution and chemical characteristics of their nitrogen contamination. According to the results, the total load of potential nitrogen to the environment depends on the scale and type of the activity as well as the type of explosives used. The main emission sources of nitrogen are process and dewatering waters. A lysimeter study showed that the explosives originated nitrogen content of left over stones from natural stone quarrying is relatively low and ca. half of the nitrogen is leached within the first weeks after detonation. The "nitrogen smudging" of natural stone quarrying left over stones is relatively low to begin with and enhanced by the rapid flushing by rainwater, thus the residues of explosives should not be considered to prevent the utilization of otherwise mineralogically inert waste rocks of good technical quality. The overall nitrogen management should take into account the background concentrations and sensitivity of the local ecosystem. The research project "Solution for Control of Nitrogen Discharges at Mines and Quarries, (MINIMAN)" was realized during years 2012-2014 as a cooperative

  14. Modelling and simulation of diffusive processes methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, SK

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses the key issues in the modeling and simulation of diffusive processes from a wide spectrum of different applications across a broad range of disciplines. Features: discusses diffusion and molecular transport in living cells and suspended sediment in open channels; examines the modeling of peristaltic transport of nanofluids, and isotachophoretic separation of ionic samples in microfluidics; reviews thermal characterization of non-homogeneous media and scale-dependent porous dispersion resulting from velocity fluctuations; describes the modeling of nitrogen fate and transport

  15. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  16. Whole-ecosystem nitrogen effects research in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    There has been an enormous increase during the past few years in the amount of research being conducted in Europe on the effects of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen on aquatic, and especially terrestrial, ecosystems. Nitrogen deposition increases the emissions of N 2 O from forest soils and may decrease CH 4 uptake. Both increased N 2 O production and decreased CH 4 consumption would increase the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Thus there are important linkages between nitrogen deposition (and consequent ecosystem effects) and the release of greenhouse gases that have been implicated in potential global climate change. This paper summarises some of the European research that has been carried out in recent years. The experimental approach has shifted heavily into whole-ecosystem experimental manipulations, which are being conducted across gradients of atmospheric deposition and other environmental factors. Manipulations are focused primarily on coniferous forest ecosystems and involve increasing ambient deposition of sulfur and nitrogen; excluding ambient deposition via the construction of roofs over entire forested plots or catchments; and manipulating climatic factors, especially water availability. Experiments are designed to continue for long periods (i.e., 5-10 years) and are augmented by detailed, process-level studies at the manipulation sites. Results of the broad-scale and detailed studies are being used to build, test, and validate mathematical models that simulate nitrogen processing, nutrient cycling, and water regulation in coniferous forest ecosystems under varying depositional and climatic regimes. Ultimately, these models will be used to predict nitrogen saturation, estimate the critical loads of nitrogen for European forests, and specify emission controls needed to protect European forests and surface waters from the detrimental effects of excess nitrogen deposition. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 photos

  17. Implementing a Voluntary, Nonregulatory Approach to Nitrogen Management in Tampa Bay, FL: A Public/Private Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Greening

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Participants in the Tampa Bay Estuary Program have agreed to adopt nitrogen-loading targets for Tampa Bay based on the water-quality and related light requirements of underwater seagrasses. Based on modeling results, it appears that light levels can be maintained at necessary levels by “holding the line” at existing nitrogen loadings; however, this goal may be difficult to achieve given the 20% increase in the watershed’s human population and associated 7% increase in nitrogen loading that are projected to occur over the next 20 years. To address the long-term management of nitrogen sources, a nitrogen management consortium of local electric utilities, industries, and agricultural interests, as well as local governments and regulatory agency representatives, has developed a consortium action plan to address the target load reduction needed to “hold the line” at 1992 to 1994 levels. To date, implemented and planned projects collated in the Consortium Action Plan meet and exceed the agreed-upon nitrogen-loading reduction goal. An example of the success of the private partnership aspect of this program can be seen in three phosphate fertilizer mining and manufacturing companies with facilities located on Tampa Bay. These companies are participants in the Estuary Program and the Nitrogen Management Consortium to provide support and input for a program that advocates voluntary, nonregulatory cooperation to reach environmental goals.

  18. Performance assessment of an LNA used as active cold load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2015-01-01

    in various campaigns in very different environments. Primary calibration sources are a traditional hot load along with a noise diode, and the calibration quality is verified prior to almost each flight using a liquid Nitrogen cooled target. EMIRAD-2 also features a commercial-off-the-shelf (Miteq) low noise...

  19. Energetic Nitrogen Ions within the Inner Magnetosphere of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; Richardson, J. D.; Jurac, S.; Moore, M.; Cooper, J. F.; Mauk, B. H.; Smith, H. T.; Michael, M.; Paranicus, C.; Armstrong, T. P.; Tsurutani, B.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    2003-05-01

    Titan's interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere will result in the energetic ejection of atomic nitrogen atoms into Saturn's magnetosphere due to dissociation of N2 by electrons, ions, and UV photons. The ejection of N atoms into Saturn's magnetosphere will form a nitrogen torus around Saturn with mean density of about 4 atoms/cm3 with source strength of 4.5x1025 atoms/sec. These nitrogen atoms are ionized by photoionization, electron impact ionization and charge exchange reactions producing an N+ torus of 1-4 keV suprathermal ions centered on Titan's orbital position. We will show Voyager plasma observations that demonstrate presence of a suprathermal ion component within Saturn's outer magnetosphere. The Voyager LECP data also reported the presence of inward diffusing energetic ions from the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, which could have an N+ contribution. If so, when one conserves the first and second adiabatic invariant the N+ ions will have energies in excess of 100 keV at Dione's L shell and greater than 400 keV at Enceladus' L shell. Energetic charged particle radial diffusion coefficients are also used to constrain the model results. But, one must also consider the solar wind as another important source of keV ions, in the form of protons and alpha particles, for Saturn's outer magnetosphere. Initial estimates indicate that a solar wind source could dominate in the outer magnetosphere, but various required parameters for this estimate are highly uncertain and will have to await Cassini results for confirmation. We show that satellite sweeping and charged particle precipitation within the middle and outer magnetosphere will tend to enrich N+ ions relative to protons within Saturn's inner magnetosphere as they diffuse radially inward for radial diffusion coefficients that do not violate observations. Charge exchange reactions within the inner magnetosphere can be an important loss mechanism for O+ ions, but to a lesser degree for N+ ions. Initial LECP

  20. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The

  1. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  2. Now consider diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dungey, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The authors want to talk about future work, but first he will reply to Stan Cowley's comment on his naivety in believing in the whole story to 99% confidence in '65, when he knew about Fairfield's results. Does it matter whether you make the right judgment about theories? Yes, it does, particularly for experimentalists perhaps, but also for theorists. The work you do later depends on the judgment you've made on previous work. People have wasted a lot of time developing on insecure or even wrong foundations. Now for future work. One mild surprise the authors have had is that they haven't heard more about diffusion, in two contexts. Gordon Rostoker is yet to come and he may talk about particles getting into the magnetosphere by diffusion. Lots of noise is observed and so diffusion must happen. If time had not been short, the authors were planning to discuss in a handwaving way what sort of diffusion mechanisms one might consider. The other aspect of diffusion he was going to talk about is at the other end of things and is velocity diffusion, which is involved in anomalous resistivity

  3. Nitrogen Control in VIM Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, P. D.; Hawk, J. A.

    NETL has developed a design and control philosophy for the addition of nitrogen to austenitic and ferritic steels. The design approach uses CALPHAD as the centerpiece to predict the level to which nitrogen is soluble in both the melt and the solid. Applications of this technique have revealed regions of "exclusion" in which the alloy, while within specification limits of prescribed, cannot be made by conventional melt processing. Furthermore, other investigations have found that substantial retrograde solubility of nitrogen exists, which can become problematic during subsequent melt processing and/or other finishing operations such as welding. Additionally, the CALPHAD method has been used to adjust primary melt conditions. To that end, nitrogen additions have been made using chrome nitride, silicon nitride, high-nitrogen ferrochrome as well as nitrogen gas. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach will be discussed and NETL experience in this area will be summarized with respect to steel structure.

  4. Wind Loads on Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrbye, Claes; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Wind loads have to be taken into account when designing civil engineering structures. The wind load on structures can be systematised by means of the wind load chain: wind climate (global), terrain (wind at low height), aerodynamic response (wind load to pressure), mechanical response (wind...... pressure to structural response) and design criteria. Starting with an introduction of the wind load chain, the book moves on to meteorological considerations, atmospheric boundary layer, static wind load, dynamic wind load and scaling laws used in wind-tunnel tests. The dynamic wind load covers vibrations...... induced by wind turbulence, vortex shedding, flutter and galloping. The book gives a comprehensive treatment of wind effects on structures and it will be useful for consulting engineers designing wind-sensitive structures. It will also be valuable for students of civil engineering as textbook...

  5. Carbohydrate-Loading Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grape juice (12 ounces) 55 225 Lunch Milk, chocolate, reduced fat (12 ounces) 45 285 4 slices ... usual during carbohydrate loading to get the same benefits as a man does. Despite carbohydrate loading, you ...

  6. Autonomous Propellant Loading Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Propellant Loading (APL) project consists of three activities. The first is to develop software that will automatically control loading of...

  7. Fuel pellet loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for loading a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets into nuclear fuel elements and particularly for the automatic loading of fuel pellets from within a sealed compartment. (author)

  8. Exceedance of critical loads and of critical limits impacts tree nutrition across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldner, P.; Thimonier, A.; Graf Pannatier, E.

    2015-01-01

    solution tended to be related to less favourable nutritional status. Context Forests have been exposed to elevated atmospheric deposition of acidifying and eutrophying sulphur and nitrogen compounds for decades. Critical loads have been identified, below which damage due to acidification and eutrophication...... are not expected to occur. Aims We explored the relationship between the exceedance of critical loads and inorganic nitrogen concentration, the base cation to aluminium ratio in soil solutions, as well as the nutritional status of trees. Methods We used recent data describing deposition, elemental concentrations....... Conclusion The findings support the hypothesis that elevated nitrogen and sulphur deposition can lead to imbalances in tree nutrition....

  9. Temperature sensitivity of nitrogen productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ladanai, Svetlana; Ågren, Göran

    2002-01-01

    Environmental conditions control physiological processes in plants and thus their growth. The predicted global warming is expected to accelerate tree growth. However, the growth response is a complex function of several processes. To circumvent this problem we have used the nitrogen productivity (dry matter production per unit of nitrogen in the plant), which is an aggregate parameter. Data on needle dry matter, production, and nitrogen content in needles of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) from...

  10. The dilution effect on the extinction of wall diffusion flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiti Nadjib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic process of the interaction between a turbulent jet diffusion methane flame and a lateral wall was experimentally studied. The evolution of the flame temperature field with the Nitrogen dilution of the methane jet flame was examined. The interaction between the diffusion flame and the lateral wall was investigated for different distance between the wall and the central axes of the jet flame. The dilution is found to play the central role in the flame extinction process. The flame response as the lateral wall approaches from infinity and the increasing of the dilution rate make the flame extinction more rapid than the flame without dilution, when the nitrogen dilution rate increase the flame temperature decrease.

  11. Limit loads in nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouain, N.

    1983-01-01

    The static method for the evaluation of the limit loads of a perfectly elasto-plastic structure is presented. Using the static theorem of Limit Analysis and the Finite Element Method, a lower bound for the colapso load can be obtained through a linear programming problem. This formulation if then applied to symmetrically loaded shells of revolution and some numerical results of limit loads in nozzles are also presented. (Author) [pt

  12. Modelling of long term nitrogen retention in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbfaß, S.; Gebel, M.; Bürger, S.

    2010-12-01

    In order to derive measures to reduce nutrient loadings into waters in Saxony, we calculated nitrogen inputs with the model STOFFBILANZ on the regional scale. Thereby we have to compare our modelling results to measured loadings at the river basin outlets, considering long term nutrient retention in surface waters. The most important mechanism of nitrogen retention is the denitrification in the contact zone of water and sediment, being controlled by hydraulic and micro-biological processes. Retention capacity is derived on the basis of the nutrient spiralling concept, using water residence time (hydraulic aspect) and time-specific N-uptake by microorganisms (biological aspect). Short time related processes of mobilization and immobilization are neglected, because they are of minor importance for the derivation of measures on the regional scale.

  13. Tunnel nitrogen spill experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageyev, A.I.; Alferov, V.N.; Mulholland, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Energy Saver Safety Analysis Report (SAR) found the tunnel oxygen deficiency considerations emphasized helium spills. These reports concluded the helium quickly warms and because of its low denisty, rises to the apex of the tunnel. The oxygen content below the apex and in all but the immediate vicinity of the helium spill is essentially unchanged and guarantees an undisturbed source of oxygen especially important to fallen personnel. In contrast nitrogen spills warm slower than helium due to the ratio of the enthalpy changes per unit volume spilled spread more uniformly across the tunnel cross-section when warmed because of the much smaller density difference with air, and generally provides a greater hazard than helium spills as a result. In particular there was concern that personnel that might fall to the floor for oxygen deficiency or other reasons might find less, and not more, oxygen with dire consequences. The SAR concluded tunnel nitrogen spills were under-investigated and led to this work

  14. Difficulties in preparing a standard sample of uranium metal having traces of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toteja, R.S.D.; Jangida, B.L.; Sundaresan, M.

    1991-01-01

    Normally in the analysis of uranium for nitrogen, the nitrides are hydrolysed to give NH 3 and that for standardisation purposes to approximate the closest conditions of analysis of ammonia, NH 4 Cl is added to the sample and the recovery is tested. An appropriate method will be to have a standard sample of uranium with known amounts of nitrogen to be used as reference sample. The present work describes the efforts made in the preparation of such a reference sample and a general assessment of such methods available. In present work, known microamounts of nitrogen in an enclosed volume were allowed to react at a temperature of 773 K with a fixed amount of uranium metal of nitrogen content determined chemically. As the reaction of nitrogen with uranium is essentially a surface reaction, a sample had to be homogenised by allowing the nitrided sample to melt at about 1500 K and allow the nitrogen to diffuse through so that the concentration gradient along the profile will disappear. Attempts were made to prepare such samples in the range to 40 to 100 ppm of nitrogen. The density differences of uranium nitride and uranium metal made this diffusion and homogenisation process difficult. The prepared samples were analysed by the micro-kjeldahl's method and the recoveries tested. The equipment used for the preparation of the nitrided samples, for homogenisation and analysis of the results obtained are detailed in the paper together with the assessment of the general methods. (author). 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Nitrogen cycling in a flooded-soil ecosystem planted to rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, K.R.

    1982-01-01

    15 N studies of various aspects of the nitrogen cycle in a flooded rice ecosystem on Crowley silt loam soil in Louisiana were reviewed to construct a mass balance model of the nitrogen cycle for this system. Nitrogen transformations modeled included 1) net ammonification (0.22 mg NH 4+ -N kg dry soil - 1 day - 1 ). 2) net nitrification (207 mg NO 3- -N kg dry soil - 1 day - 1 ). 3) denitrification (0.37 mg N kg dry soil - 1 day - 1 ), and 4) biological N 2 fixation (0.16 mg N kg dry soil - 1 day - 1 ). Nitrogen inputs included 1) application of fertilizers, 2) incorporation of crop residues, 3) biological N 2 fixation, and 4) deposition. Nitrogen outputs included 1) crop removal, 2) gaseous losses from NH 3 volatilization and simultaneous occurrence of nitrification-denitrification, and 3) leaching and runoff. Mass balance calculations indicated that 33% of the available inorganic nitrogen was recovered by rice, and the remaining nitrogen was lost from the system. Losses of N due to ammonia volatilization were minimal because fertilizer-N was incorporated into the soil. A significant portion of inorganic-N was lost by ammonium diffusion from the anaerobic layer to the aerobic layer in response to a concentration gradient and subsequent nitrification in the aerobic layer followed by nitrate diffusion into the anaerobic layer and denitrification into gaseous end products. Leaching and surface runoff losses were minimal. (orig.)

  16. Nitrogen transformations in wetlands: Effects of water flow patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidsson, T.

    1997-11-01

    In this thesis, I have studied nitrogen turnover processes in water meadows. A water meadow is a wetland where water infiltrates through the soil of a grassland field. It is hypothesized that infiltration of water through the soil matrix promotes nutrient transformations compared to surface flow of water, by increasing the contact between water, nutrients, soil organic matter and bacteria. I have studied how the balance between nitrogen removal (denitrification, assimilative uptake, adsorption) and release (mineralization, desorption) processes are affected by water flow characteristics. Mass balance studies and direct denitrification measurements at two field sites showed that, although denitrification was high, net nitrogen removal in the water meadows was poor. This was due to release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from the soils. In laboratory studies, using {sup 15}N isotope techniques, I have shown that nitrogen turnover is considerably affected by hydrological conditions and by soil type. Infiltration increased virtually all the nitrogen processes, due to deeper penetration of nitrate and oxygen, and extended zones of turnover processes. On the contrary, soils and sediments with surface water flow, diffusion is the main transfer mechanism. The relation between release and removal processes sometimes resulted in shifts towards net nitrogen production. This occurred in infiltration treatments when ammonium efflux was high in relation to denitrification. It was concluded that ammonium and DON was of soil origin and hence not a product of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium. Both denitrification potential and mineralization rates were higher in peaty than in sandy soil. Vertical or horizontal subsurface flow is substantial in many wetland types, such as riparian zones, tidal salt marshes, fens, root-zone systems and water meadows. Moreover, any environment where aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems meet, and where water level fluctuates

  17. Lead diffusion in monazite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardes, E.

    2006-06-01

    Proper knowledge of the diffusion rates of lead in monazite is necessary to understand the U-Th-Pb age anomalies of this mineral, which is one of the most used in geochronology after zircon. Diffusion experiments were performed in NdPO 4 monocrystals and in Nd 0.66 Ca 0.17 Th 0.17 PO 4 polycrystals from Nd 0.66 Pb 0.17 Th 0.17 PO 4 thin films to investigate Pb 2+ + Th 4+ ↔ 2 Nd 3+ and Pb 2+ ↔ Ca 2+ exchanges. Diffusion annealings were run between 1200 and 1500 Celsius degrees, at room pressure, for durations ranging from one hour to one month. The diffusion profiles were analysed using TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy). The diffusivities extracted for Pb 2+ + Th 4+ ↔ 2 Nd 3+ exchange follow an Arrhenius law with parameters E equals 509 ± 24 kJ mol -1 and log(D 0 (m 2 s -1 )) equals -3.41 ± 0.77. Preliminary data for Pb 2+ ↔ Ca 2+ exchange are in agreement with this result. The extrapolation of our data to crustal temperatures yields very slow diffusivities. For instance, the time necessary for a 50 μm grain to lose all of its lead at 800 Celsius degrees is greater than the age of the Earth. From these results and other evidence from the literature, we conclude that most of the perturbations in U-Th-Pb ages of monazite cannot be attributed to lead diffusion, but rather to interactions with fluids. (author)

  18. Shift of the circumstances in effluent pollutant loads and water pollution in the Seto Inland Sea; Setonaikai ni okeru odaku fukaryo to suishitsu no hensen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, T. [Hiroshima Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environment, Hiroshima (Japan); Komai, Y. [Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Environmental Science, Kobe (Japan); Koyama, T. [Wakayama Prefectural Research Center of Environment and Public Health, Wakayama (Japan); Nagafuchi, O. [Fukuoka Institute of Health and Environment Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Hino, Y. [Kagawa Prefecture Environmental Research Center, Kagawa (Japan); Murakami, K. [Okayama Prefectural Institute for Environmental and Public Health, Okayama (Japan)

    1998-11-10

    The relationship between the shift of the amount of effluent pollutant loads and the quality of water in and after the 1970s is studied for the verification of the effect of wastewater control and pollution measures for the Seto Inland Sea. The pollution loads are analyzed using the population, sewerage system diffusion rate, industrial production amount, number of farm animals, etc., gathered from existing data, and the quality of water is analyzed using the surface layer data collected at 124 sites. Although population as the source of pollutant loads has enlarged, the enlargement does not bring about a significant change in the loads, this partly due to the diffusion of sewerage systems. The rates of reduction in the 1979-1994 period of COD (chemical oxygen demand), T-N (total nitrogen), and T-P (total phosphorus) are 25.2%, 5.3%, and 30.3%, respectively. COD has returned to the previous level, but transparency has turned poorer. T-N and T-P worsened in the 1985-1989 period, and have not yet returned to the levels of 1980-1984. Pollution is in progress in Osaka Bay, Hiroshima Bay, and some others. In some sea areas, transparency is improving, with COD and Chl.a on the increase. From the nutrient salt and Chl.a scatter diagrams, the potential of algal growth relative to the concentration of nutrient salts may be estimated. Organic pollution is affected by algal growth. The organic matters produced in the inland sea are approximately 20 times as much as the organic matters produced on land. 18 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A liquid nitrogen cooled polyethylene moderator for the Harwell Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boland, B.C.; Hey, P.D.; Houzego, P.J.; Mack, B.; Mildner, D.F.R.; Sinclair, R.N.

    1978-09-01

    A 40 mm thick polyethylene block has been maintained at a temperature close to 80 K by using a liquid nitrogen cryostat, and used to moderate neutrons from pulsed source. The assembly has been tested with a dummy heat load of 400W. The cryostat and cooling system was installed on the Harwell 45 MeV electron linac, and enabled the production of sharper pulses in the thermal neutron energy range. The design, safety considerations and performance are described. (author)

  20. Nitrogen accumulation and residual effects of nitrogen catch crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The nitrogen accumulation in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) and tansy phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia L.), under- or aftersown as nitrogen catch crops to spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and field pea (Pisum s...

  1. Spatial electric load forecasting

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, H Lee

    2002-01-01

    Spatial Electric Load Forecasting Consumer Demand for Power and ReliabilityCoincidence and Load BehaviorLoad Curve and End-Use ModelingWeather and Electric LoadWeather Design Criteria and Forecast NormalizationSpatial Load Growth BehaviorSpatial Forecast Accuracy and Error MeasuresTrending MethodsSimulation Method: Basic ConceptsA Detailed Look at the Simulation MethodBasics of Computerized SimulationAnalytical Building Blocks for Spatial SimulationAdvanced Elements of Computerized SimulationHybrid Trending-Simulation MethodsAdvanced

  2. Cognitive Load and Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Felix Sebastian; Piovesan, Marco; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2017-01-01

    We study the effect of intuitive and reflective processes on cooperation using cognitive load. Compared with time constraint, which has been used in the previous literature, cognitive load is a more direct way to block reflective processes, and thus a more suitable way to study the link between...... intuition and cooperation. Using a repeated public goods game, we study the effect of different levels of cognitive load on contributions. We show that a higher cognitive load increases the initial level of cooperation. In particular, subjects are significantly less likely to fully free ride under high...... cognitive load....

  3. Pre- and post-impoundment nitrogen in the lower Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dale W.; Wilkison, Donald H.; Niesen, Shelley L.

    2013-01-01

    Large water-sample sets collected from 1899 through 1902, 1907, and in the early 1950s allow comparisons of pre-impoundment and post-impoundment (1969 through 2008) nitrogen concentrations in the lower Missouri River. Although urban wastes were not large enough to detectably increase annual loads of total nitrogen at the beginning of the 20th century, carcass waste, stock-yard manure, and untreated human wastes measurably increased ammonia and organic-nitrogen concentrations during low flows. Average total-nitrogen concentrations in both periods were about 2.5 mg/l, but much of the particulate-organic nitrogen, which was the dominant form of nitrogen around 1900, has been replaced by nitrate. This change in speciation was caused by the nearly 80% decrease in suspended-sediment concentrations that occurred after impoundment, modern agriculture, drainage of riparian wetlands, and sewage treatment. Nevertheless, bioavailable nitrogen has not been low enough to limit primary production in the Missouri River since the beginning of the 20th century. Nitrate concentrations have increased more rapidly from 2000 through 2008 (5 to 12% per year), thus increasing bioavailable nitrogen delivered to the Mississippi River and affecting Gulf Coast hypoxia. The increase in nitrate concentrations with distance downstream is much greater during the post-impoundment period. If strategies to decrease total-nitrogen loads focus on particulate N, substantial decreases will be difficult because particulate nitrogen is now only 23% of total nitrogen in the Missouri River. A strategy aimed at decreasing particulates also could further exacerbate land loss along the Gulf of Mexico, which has been sediment starved since Missouri River impoundment. In contrast, strategies or benchmarks aimed at decreasing nitrate loads could substantially decrease nitrogen loadings because nitrates now constitute over half of the Missouri's nitrogen input to the Mississippi. Ongoing restoration and creation

  4. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  5. Bicarbonate diffusion through mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, E H; Miller, J; Engel, E

    1995-09-01

    The mucus layer overlying duodenal epithelium maintains a pH gradient against high luminal acid concentrations. Despite these adverse conditions, epithelial surface pH remains close to neutrality. The exact nature of the gradient-forming barrier remains unknown. The barrier consists of mucus into which HCO3- is secreted. Quantification of the ability of HCO3- to establish and maintain the gradient depends on accurate measurement of this ion's diffusion coefficient through mucus. We describe new experimental and mathematical methods for diffusion measurement and report diffusion coefficients for HCO3- diffusion through saline, 5% mucin solutions, and rat duodenal mucus. The diffusion coefficients were 20.2 +/- 0.10, 3.02 +/- 0.31, and 1.81 +/- 0.12 x 10(-6) cm2/s, respectively. Modeling of the mucobicarbonate layer with this latter value suggests that for conditions of high luminal acid strength the neutralization of acid by HCO3- occurs just above the epithelial surface. Under these conditions the model predicts that fluid convection toward the lumen could be important in maintaining the pH gradient. In support of this hypothesis we were able to demonstrate a net luminal fluid flux of 5 microliters.min-1.cm-2 after perfusion of 0.15 N HCl in the rat duodenum.

  6. Estimates of critical acid loads and exceedances for forest soils across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven G. McNulty; Erika C. Cohen; Jennifer A. Moore Myers; Timothy J. Sullivan; Harbin Li

    2007-01-01

    Concern regarding the impacts of continued nitrogen and sulfur deposition on ecosystem health has prompted the development of critical acid load assessments for forest soils. A critical acid load is a quantitative estimate of exposure to one or more pollutants at or above which harmful acidification-related effects on sensitive elements of the environment occur. A...

  7. Identifying the limitations of conventional biofiltration of diffuse methane emissions at long-term operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cuervo, S; Hernández, J; Omil, F

    2016-08-01

    There is growing international concern about the increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, particularly CO2 and methane. The emissions of methane derived from human activities are associated with large flows and very low concentrations, such as those emitted from landfills and wastewater treatment plants, among others. The present work was focused on the biological methane degradation at diffuse concentrations (0.2% vv(-1)) in a conventional biofilter using a mixture of compost, perlite and bark chips as carrier. An extensive characterization of the process was carried out at long-term operation (250 days) in a fully monitored pilot plant, achieving stable conditions during the entire period. Operational parameters such as waterings, nitrogen addition and inlet loads and contact time influences were evaluated. Obtained results indicate that empty bed residence times within 4-8 min are crucial to maximize elimination rates. Waterings and the type of nitrogen supplied in the nutrient solution (ammonia or nitrate) have a strong impact on the biofilter performance. The better results compatible with a stable operation were achieved using nitrate, with elimination capacities up to 7.6 ± 1.1 g CH4 m(-3 )h(-1). The operation at low inlet concentrations (IC) implied that removal rates obtained were quite limited (ranging 3-8 g CH4 m(-3 )h(-1)); however, these results could be significantly increased (up to 20.6 g CH4 m(-3) h(-1)) at higher IC, which indicates that the mass transfer from the gas to the liquid layer surrounding the biofilm is a key limitation of the process.

  8. Package characterization by laboratory leaching and diffusion experiments using radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    The leaching of solid inorganic waste from loaded concrete or cement by incoming water can be described in terms of a steady-state outward diffusion of the saturated solution, formed inside the pores. In this paper, the derived equations permit the prediction of long-term leaching behavior. Radiotracer experiments enable the determination of the parameters involved

  9. Diffuse Ceiling Inlet Systems and the Room Air Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Rong, Li

    2010-01-01

    A diffuse ceiling inlet system is an air distribution system which is supplying the air through the whole ceiling. The system can remove a large heat load without creating draught in the room. The paper describes measurements in the case of both cooling and heating, and CFD predictions are given...

  10. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of 137 Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of 137 Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000 0 C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ΔE of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon) 0 exp [-ΔE/RT] are about 4 x 10 -2 cm 2 /s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively

  11. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nierenberg, W.A.; Pontius, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes is described which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane

  12. Diffusion in flexible pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogaard Kristensen, S.

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work done on modelling and simulation of the complex diffusion of gas through the wall of a flexible pipe. The diffusion and thus the pressure in annulus depends strongly on the diffusion and solubility parameters of the gas-polymer system and on the degree of blocking of the outer surface of the inner liner due to pressure reinforcements. The report evaluates the basis modelling required to describe the complex geometries and flow patterns. Qualitatively results of temperature and concentration profiles are shown in the report. For the program to serve any modelling purpose in 'real life' the results need to be validated and possibly the model needs corrections. Hopefully, a full-scale test of a flexible pipe will provide the required temperatures and pressures in annulus to validate the models. (EHS)

  13. Distributed Control Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2007-01-01

    . Programming a modular, self-reconfigurable robot is however a complicated task: the robot is essentially a real-time, distributed embedded system, where control and communication paths often are tightly coupled to the current physical configuration of the robot. To facilitate the task of programming modular....... This approach allows the programmer to dynamically distribute behaviors throughout a robot and moreover provides a partial abstraction over the concrete physical shape of the robot. We have implemented a prototype of a distributed control diffusion system for the ATRON modular, self-reconfigurable robot......, self-reconfigurable robots, we present the concept of distributed control diffusion: distributed queries are used to identify modules that play a specific role in the robot, and behaviors that implement specific control strategies are diffused throughout the robot based on these role assignments...

  14. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    cooling capacity, energy saving, low investment cost and low noise level; while the limitations include condensation risk and the limit on the room geometry. Furthermore, the crucial design parameters are summarized and their effects on the system performance are discussed. In addition to the stand...... is not well structured with this system. These become the motivations in developing the design guide. This design guide aims to establish a systematic understanding of diffuse ceiling ventilation and provide assistance in designing of such a system. The guide is targeted at design engineers, architects...... and manufacturers and the users of diffuse ceiling technology. The design guide introduces the principle and key characteristics of room air distribution with diffuse ceiling ventilation. It provides an overview of potential benefit and limitations of this technology. The benefits include high thermal comfort, high...

  15. Diffusion and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Vrentas, James S

    2013-01-01

    The book first covers the five elements necessary to formulate and solve mass transfer problems, that is, conservation laws and field equations, boundary conditions, constitutive equations, parameters in constitutive equations, and mathematical methods that can be used to solve the partial differential equations commonly encountered in mass transfer problems. Jump balances, Green’s function solution methods, and the free-volume theory for the prediction of self-diffusion coefficients for polymer–solvent systems are among the topics covered. The authors then use those elements to analyze a wide variety of mass transfer problems, including bubble dissolution, polymer sorption and desorption, dispersion, impurity migration in plastic containers, and utilization of polymers in drug delivery. The text offers detailed solutions, along with some theoretical aspects, for numerous processes including viscoelastic diffusion, moving boundary problems, diffusion and reaction, membrane transport, wave behavior, sedime...

  16. Diffusion in flexible pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogaard Kristensen, S

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work done on modelling and simulation of the complex diffusion of gas through the wall of a flexible pipe. The diffusion and thus the pressure in annulus depends strongly on the diffusion and solubility parameters of the gas-polymer system and on the degree of blocking of the outer surface of the inner liner due to pressure reinforcements. The report evaluates the basis modelling required to describe the complex geometries and flow patterns. Qualitatively results of temperature and concentration profiles are shown in the report. For the program to serve any modelling purpose in 'real life' the results need to be validated and possibly the model needs corrections. Hopefully, a full-scale test of a flexible pipe will provide the required temperatures and pressures in annulus to validate the models. (EHS)

  17. Swivel Joint For Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Swivel joint allows liquid-nitrogen pipe to rotate through angle of 100 degree with respect to mating pipe. Functions without cracking hard foam insulation on lines. Pipe joint rotates on disks so mechanical stress not transmitted to thick insulation on pipes. Inner disks ride on fixed outer disks. Disks help to seal pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through joint.

  18. The role of power plant atmospheric emissions in the deposition of nitrogen to the Chesapeake Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Maryland Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) has sponsored research on several aspects of atmospheric nitrogen emissions, source attribution, deposition estimation and impact assessment since the mid-eighties. The results of these studies will be presented and discussed in the context of power plant emissions control impact on nitrogen loadings to the Chesapeake Bay and watershed. Information needs with respect to power plant contribution and emission control policy will be identified and discussed from the perspective of PPRP

  19. Effects of changes in nutrient loading and composition on hypoxia dynamics and internal nutrient cycling of a stratified coastal lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yafei; McCowan, Andrew; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2017-10-01

    The effects of changes in catchment nutrient loading and composition on the phytoplankton dynamics, development of hypoxia and internal nutrient dynamics in a stratified coastal lagoon system (the Gippsland Lakes) were investigated using a 3-D coupled hydrodynamic biogeochemical water quality model. The study showed that primary production was equally sensitive to changed dissolved inorganic and particulate organic nitrogen loads, highlighting the need for a better understanding of particulate organic matter bioavailability. Stratification and sediment carbon enrichment were the main drivers for the hypoxia and subsequent sediment phosphorus release in Lake King. High primary production stimulated by large nitrogen loading brought on by a winter flood contributed almost all the sediment carbon deposition (as opposed to catchment loads), which was ultimately responsible for summer bottom-water hypoxia. Interestingly, internal recycling of phosphorus was more sensitive to changed nitrogen loads than total phosphorus loads, highlighting the potential importance of nitrogen loads exerting a control over systems that become phosphorus limited (such as during summer nitrogen-fixing blooms of cyanobacteria). Therefore, the current study highlighted the need to reduce both total nitrogen and total phosphorus for water quality improvement in estuarine systems.

  20. Effects of changes in nutrient loading and composition on hypoxia dynamics and internal nutrient cycling of a stratified coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of changes in catchment nutrient loading and composition on the phytoplankton dynamics, development of hypoxia and internal nutrient dynamics in a stratified coastal lagoon system (the Gippsland Lakes were investigated using a 3-D coupled hydrodynamic biogeochemical water quality model. The study showed that primary production was equally sensitive to changed dissolved inorganic and particulate organic nitrogen loads, highlighting the need for a better understanding of particulate organic matter bioavailability. Stratification and sediment carbon enrichment were the main drivers for the hypoxia and subsequent sediment phosphorus release in Lake King. High primary production stimulated by large nitrogen loading brought on by a winter flood contributed almost all the sediment carbon deposition (as opposed to catchment loads, which was ultimately responsible for summer bottom-water hypoxia. Interestingly, internal recycling of phosphorus was more sensitive to changed nitrogen loads than total phosphorus loads, highlighting the potential importance of nitrogen loads exerting a control over systems that become phosphorus limited (such as during summer nitrogen-fixing blooms of cyanobacteria. Therefore, the current study highlighted the need to reduce both total nitrogen and total phosphorus for water quality improvement in estuarine systems.

  1. The Trouble with Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.T. DeHoff

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenological formalism, which yields Fick's Laws for diffusion in single phase multicomponent systems, is widely accepted as the basis for the mathematical description of diffusion. This paper focuses on problems associated with this formalism. This mode of description of the process is cumbersome, defining as it does matrices of interdiffusion coefficients (the central material properties that require a large experimental investment for their evaluation in three component systems, and, indeed cannot be evaluated for systems with more than three components. It is also argued that the physical meaning of the numerical values of these properties with respect to the atom motions in the system remains unknown. The attempt to understand the physical content of the diffusion coefficients in the phenomenological formalism has been the central fundamental problem in the theory of diffusion in crystalline alloys. The observation by Kirkendall that the crystal lattice moves during diffusion led Darken to develop the concept of intrinsic diffusion, i.e., atom motion relative to the crystal lattice. Darken and his successors sought to relate the diffusion coefficients computed for intrinsic fluxes to those obtained from the motion of radioactive tracers in chemically homogeneous samples which directly report the jump frequencies of the atoms as a function of composition and temperature. This theoretical connection between tracer, intrinsic and interdiffusion behavior would provide the basis for understanding the physical content of interdiffusion coefficients. Definitive tests of the resulting theoretical connection have been carried out for a number of binary systems for which all three kinds of observations are available. In a number of systems predictions of intrinsic coefficients from tracer data do not agree with measured values although predictions of interdiffusion coefficients appear to give reasonable agreement. Thus, the complete

  2. Nonlinear diffusion equations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu Zhuo Qun; Li Hui Lai; Zhao Jun Ning

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear diffusion equations, an important class of parabolic equations, come from a variety of diffusion phenomena which appear widely in nature. They are suggested as mathematical models of physical problems in many fields, such as filtration, phase transition, biochemistry and dynamics of biological groups. In many cases, the equations possess degeneracy or singularity. The appearance of degeneracy or singularity makes the study more involved and challenging. Many new ideas and methods have been developed to overcome the special difficulties caused by the degeneracy and singularity, which

  3. Phase transformation and diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, G B; Dey, G K

    2008-01-01

    Given that the basic purpose of all research in materials science and technology is to tailor the properties of materials to suit specific applications, phase transformations are the natural key to the fine-tuning of the structural, mechanical and corrosion properties. A basic understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms of phase transformation is therefore of vital importance. Apart from a few cases involving crystallographic martensitic transformations, all phase transformations are mediated by diffusion. Thus, proper control and understanding of the process of diffusion during nucleation, g

  4. Ambipolar diffusion in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.L. da.

    1987-01-01

    Is this thesis, a numerical method for the solution of the linear diffusion equation for a plasma containing two types of ions, with the possibility of charge exchange, has been developed. It has been shown that the decay time of the electron and ion densities is much smaller than that in a plasma containing only a single type of ion. A non-linear diffusion equation, which includes the effects of an external electric field varying linearly in time, to describe a slightly ionized plasma has also been developed. It has been verified that the decay of the electron density in the presence of such an electric field is very slow. (author)

  5. Towards spatially differentiated regulation of nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer Højberg, Anker; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt

    EU member states are challenged by nitrogen loads to estuaries and inland freshwater systems impeding the achievement of good ecological status as required by the Water Framework Directive (WFD). In Denmark nitrate leaching from the root zone has been reduced by 50% since 1987, but additional...... reductions of 30-50% are required to meet the objectives of the WFD. Achieving such abatements by uniform restrictions for all areas, would be very costly and inefficient as studies have shown that reduction varies spatially depending on the local hydrogeological conditions, the presence and dynamics...... of drains and hydro-biogeochemical conditions in associated riparian lowlands. Hence, a shift of paradigm in regulation practice is needed, whit a cost-effective regulation accounting for this variability and differentiate the regulations/restrictions between resilient and vulnerable areas. However...

  6. Optimisation of load control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, P.

    1998-01-01

    Electricity cannot be stored in large quantities. That is why the electricity supply and consumption are always almost equal in large power supply systems. If this balance were disturbed beyond stability, the system or a part of it would collapse until a new stable equilibrium is reached. The balance between supply and consumption is mainly maintained by controlling the power production, but also the electricity consumption or, in other words, the load is controlled. Controlling the load of the power supply system is important, if easily controllable power production capacity is limited. Temporary shortage of capacity causes high peaks in the energy price in the electricity market. Load control either reduces the electricity consumption during peak consumption and peak price or moves electricity consumption to some other time. The project Optimisation of Load Control is a part of the EDISON research program for distribution automation. The following areas were studied: Optimization of space heating and ventilation, when electricity price is time variable, load control model in power purchase optimization, optimization of direct load control sequences, interaction between load control optimization and power purchase optimization, literature on load control, optimization methods and field tests and response models of direct load control and the effects of the electricity market deregulation on load control. An overview of the main results is given in this chapter

  7. Optimisation of load control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, P [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    Electricity cannot be stored in large quantities. That is why the electricity supply and consumption are always almost equal in large power supply systems. If this balance were disturbed beyond stability, the system or a part of it would collapse until a new stable equilibrium is reached. The balance between supply and consumption is mainly maintained by controlling the power production, but also the electricity consumption or, in other words, the load is controlled. Controlling the load of the power supply system is important, if easily controllable power production capacity is limited. Temporary shortage of capacity causes high peaks in the energy price in the electricity market. Load control either reduces the electricity consumption during peak consumption and peak price or moves electricity consumption to some other time. The project Optimisation of Load Control is a part of the EDISON research program for distribution automation. The following areas were studied: Optimization of space heating and ventilation, when electricity price is time variable, load control model in power purchase optimization, optimization of direct load control sequences, interaction between load control optimization and power purchase optimization, literature on load control, optimization methods and field tests and response models of direct load control and the effects of the electricity market deregulation on load control. An overview of the main results is given in this chapter

  8. Diffuse axonal injury: detection of changes in anisotropy of water diffusion by diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, J.H.M.; Tsui, E.Y.K.; Yuen, M.K.; Peh, W.C.G.; Fong, D.; Fok, K.F.; Leung, K.M.; Fung, K.K.L.

    2003-01-01

    Myelinated axons of white matter demonstrate prominent directional differences in water diffusion. We performed diffusion-weighted imaging on ten patients with head injury to explore the feasibility of using water diffusion anisotropy for quantitating diffuse axonal injury. We showed significant decrease in diffusion anisotropy indices in areas with or without signal abnormality on T2 and T2*-weighted images. We conclude that the water diffusion anisotropy index a potentially useful, sensitive and quantitative way of diagnosing and assessing patients with diffuse axonal injury. (orig.)

  9. Niche differentiation in nitrogen metabolism among methanotrophs within an operational taxonomic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefman, Sven; van der Ha, David; Boon, Nico; Vandamme, Peter; De Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim

    2014-04-04

    The currently accepted thesis on nitrogenous fertilizer additions on methane oxidation activity assumes niche partitioning among methanotrophic species, with activity responses to changes in nitrogen content being dependent on the in situ methanotrophic community structure Unfortunately, widely applied tools for microbial community assessment only have a limited phylogenetic resolution mostly restricted to genus level diversity, and not to species level as often mistakenly assumed. As a consequence, intragenus or intraspecies metabolic versatility in nitrogen metabolism was never evaluated nor considered among methanotrophic bacteria as a source of differential responses of methane oxidation to nitrogen amendments. We demonstrated that fourteen genotypically different Methylomonas strains, thus distinct below the level at which most techniques assign operational taxonomic units (OTU), show a versatile physiology in their nitrogen metabolism. Differential responses, even among strains with identical 16S rRNA or pmoA gene sequences, were observed for production of nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate or ammonium, nitrogen fixation and tolerance to high levels of ammonium, nitrate, and hydroxylamine. Overall, reduction of nitrate to nitrite, nitrogen fixation, higher tolerance to ammonium than nitrate and tolerance and assimilation of nitrite were general features. Differential responses among closely related methanotrophic strains to overcome inhibition and toxicity from high nitrogen loads and assimilation of various nitrogen sources yield competitive fitness advantages to individual methane-oxidizing bacteria. Our observations proved that community structure at the deepest phylogenetic resolution potentially influences in situ functioning.

  10. Effects of policy measures implemented in Denmark on nitrogen pollution of the aquatic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronvang, Brian; Andersen, Hans Estrup; Børgesen, Christen Duus

    2008-01-01

    Since 1985, seven national Action Plans (AP) have been implemented in Denmark to reduce nitrogen discharges from point sources and nitrogen losses from agriculture. The instruments applied include regulations on point source discharges from waste water treatment plants, area-related measures, e.g...... to delays in travel time in groundwater. Until now, the regulation has been performed on a national scale. A more regional or local approach is believed to be necessary in future to meet the demands of the EU Water Framework Directive......Since 1985, seven national Action Plans (AP) have been implemented in Denmark to reduce nitrogen discharges from point sources and nitrogen losses from agriculture. The instruments applied include regulations on point source discharges from waste water treatment plants, area-related measures, e...... indicators were defined: nitrogen discharges from point sources, nitrogen surplus in agriculture, nitrogen leaching from agricultural land and nitrogen concentrations and loads in surface waters. Since the introduction of mitigation programmes, discharges of nitrogen from point sources have been reduced...

  11. Nitrogen Removal from Landfill Leachate by Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sérgio F. L.; Gonçalves, Ana L.; Moreira, Francisca C.; Silva, Tânia F. C. V.; Vilar, Vítor J. P.; Pires, José C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Landfill leachates result from the degradation of solid residues in sanitary landfills, thus presenting a high variability in terms of composition. Normally, these effluents are characterized by high ammoniacal-nitrogen (N–NH4+) concentrations, high chemical oxygen demands and low phosphorus concentrations. The development of effective treatment strategies becomes difficult, posing a serious problem to the environment. Phycoremediation appears to be a suitable alternative for the treatment of landfill leachates. In this study, the potential of Chlorella vulgaris for biomass production and nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) removal from different compositions of a landfill leachate was evaluated. Since microalgae also require phosphorus for their growth, different loads of this nutrient were evaluated, giving the following N:P ratios: 12:1, 23:1 and 35:1. The results have shown that C. vulgaris was able to grow in the different leachate compositions assessed. However, microalgal growth was higher in the cultures presenting the lowest N–NH4+ concentration. In terms of nutrients uptake, an effective removal of N–NH4+ and phosphorus was observed in all the experiments, especially in those supplied with phosphorus. Nevertheless, N–NO3− removal was considered almost negligible. These promising results constitute important findings in the development of a bioremediation technology for the treatment of landfill leachates. PMID:27869676

  12. Capabilities of nitrogen admixed cryogenic deuterium pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, Igor; Sergeev, Vladimir [SPU, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lang, Peter; Ploeckl, Bernhard; Cavedon, Marco [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kocsis, Gabor; Szepesi, Tamas [Wigner RCP RMI, Budapest (Hungary); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    Operation at high core density with high energy confinement - as foreseen in a future fusion reactor like DEMO - is being investigated at ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The efficiency of pellet fuelling from the high-field side usually increases with increasing injection speed. Due to the fragile nature of the deuterium ice, however, the increment of pellet mass losses and subsequent pellet fragmentations take place when the speed is increased. Studies show, that admixing of a small amount of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into D{sub 2} gas can be favorable for the mechanical stability of pellets. This might be helpful for deeper pellet penetration. Besides, seeding by N{sub 2} can enhance plasma performance due to both increasing the energy confinement time and reducing the divertor heat load in the envisaged ELMy H-mode plasma scenario. Fuelling efficiency of N{sub 2}-admixed solid D{sub 2} pellets and their nitrogen seeding capabilities were investigated. It was found that both the overall plasma density increase and the measured averaged pellet penetration depth were smaller in case of the admixed (1% mol. in the gas resulting in about 0.8% in the ice) pellet fuelling. Possibility of the N{sub 2}-seeding by admixed pellets was confirmed by CXRS measurements of N{sup 7+} content in plasma.

  13. Nitrogen turnover and effects in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erisman, J.W.; De Vries, W.

    1999-10-01

    Apart from effects on the crown condition, atmospheric deposition also affects the nutritional status of forests. This refers specifically to the impact of N deposition that has gained in importance since the last decades due to steady decline in S emissions over that period. Preliminary data of bulk deposition and throughfall at some 60 Intensive Monitoring (level II) plots suggest that the average input of N and S is about equal. At low N deposition, an increase may be beneficial for forest growth, whereas the reverse may be true at elevated deposition. The relative contribution of the different fluxes in the nitrogen cycle is reasonably well known, with the exception of denitrification. The quantification of the input and output fluxes and the allocation of deposited nitrogen in the forest ecosystem prove to be difficult. Although knowledge on the response of forest ecosystems to N inputs has increased over the last decade, there is still a lack of information on the dynamics in critical N loads over a large range of environmental conditions. Furthermore, a European wide perspective of N saturation is still lacking. 132 refs

  14. Anisotropy in "isotropic diffusion" measurements due to nongaussian diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Olesen, Jonas Lynge; Ianuş, Andrada

    2017-01-01

    Designing novel diffusion-weighted NMR and MRI pulse sequences aiming to probe tissue microstructure with techniques extending beyond the conventional Stejskal-Tanner family is currently of broad interest. One such technique, multidimensional diffusion MRI, has been recently proposed to afford...... model-free decomposition of diffusion signal kurtosis into terms originating from either ensemble variance of isotropic diffusivity or microscopic diffusion anisotropy. This ability rests on the assumption that diffusion can be described as a sum of multiple Gaussian compartments, but this is often...

  15. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  16. Efficiency of nitrogen fertilizers for rice

    OpenAIRE

    Roger, Pierre-Armand; Grant, I.F.; Reddy, P.M.; Watanabe, I.

    1987-01-01

    The photosynthetic biomass that develops in the floodwater of wetland rice fields affects nitrogen dynamics in the ecosystem. This review summarizes available data on the nature, productivity, and composition of the photosynthetic aquatic biomass, and its major activities regarding the nitrogen cycle, i.e., nitrogen fixation by free living blue-green algae and #Azolla$, nitrogen trapping, nitrogen accumulation at the soil surface, its effect on nitrogen losses by ammonia volatilization, nitro...

  17. Cleaning of niobium surface by plasma of diffuse discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Erofeev, M. V.; Shulepov, M. A.; Ripenko, V. S.

    2017-07-01

    Elements composition of niobium surface before and after plasma treatment by runaway electron preionized diffuse discharge was investigated in atmospheric pressure nitrogen flow by means of an Auger electron spectroscopy. Surface characterizations obtained from Auger spectra show that plasma treatment by diffuse discharge after exposure of 120000 pulses provides ultrafine surface cleaning from carbon contamination. Moreover, the surface free energy of the treated specimens increased up to 3 times, that improve its adhesion property.

  18. [Rapid startup and nitrogen removal characteristic of anaerobic ammonium oxidation reactor in packed bed biofilm reactor with suspended carrier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Sun, De-zhi; Yu, Guang-lu

    2010-03-01

    Packed bed biofilm reactor with suspended carrier was used to cultivate ANAMMOX bacteria with sludge inoculums from WWTP secondary settler. The startup of ANAMMOX reactor was comparatively studied using high nitrogen loading method and low nitrogen loading method with aerobically biofilmed on the carrier, and the nitrogen removal characteristic was further investigated. The results showed that the reactor could be started up successfully within 90 days using low nitrogen loading method, the removal efficiencies of ammonium and nitrite were nearly 100% and the TN removal efficiencywas over 75% , however, the high nitrogen loading method was proved unsuccessfully for startup of ANAMMOX reactor probably because of the inhibition effect of high concentration of ammonium and nitrite. The pH value of effluent was slightly higher than the influent and the pH value can be used as an indicator for the process of ANAMMOX reaction. The packed bed ANAMMOX reactor with suspended carrier showed good characteristics of high nitrogen loading and high removal efficiency, 100% of removal efficiency could be achieved when the influent ammonium and nitrite concentration was lower than 800 mg/L.

  19. Production of nitrogen oxides in air pulse-periodic discharge with apokamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panarin, Victor A.; Skakun, Victor S.; Sosnin, Eduard A.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2018-05-01

    The decomposition products of pulse-periodic discharge atmospheric pressure plasma in apokamp, diffuse and corona modes were determined by optical and chemical methods. It is shown that apokamp discharge formation starts at a critical value of dissipation power in a discharge channel. Simultaneously, due to the thermochemical reactions, plasma starts to efficiently produce nitrogen oxides.

  20. Critical acidity loads in France; Charges critiques d`acidite en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probst, A.; Party, J.P.; Fevrier, C. [Centre de Geochimie de la Surface (UPR 06251 du CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France); Dambrine, E. [Centre de Recherches Forestieres, INRA, 45 - Orleans (France); Thomas, A.L.; King, D. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomique (INRA), 45 - ORDON (France); Stussi, J.M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1997-12-31

    Based on results from several systematic forest and surface water monitoring programs, carried out in various parts of France as well as in Europe, acidity critical loads have been calculated for soils and surface waters; critical loads are presented for water and soils in crystalline mountainous regions such as Ardennes, Vosges and Massif Central; links with geochemistry, ecosystems and types of trees are discussed and perspectives are given for the calculation of acid and nitrogen critical loads on the whole France

  1. Diffusion in building wakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-03-01

    Straight-line Gaussian models adequately describe atmospheric diffusion for many applications. They have been modified for use in estimating diffusion in building wakes by adding terms that include projected building area and by redefining the diffusion coefficients so that the coefficients have minimum values that are related to building dimensions. In a recent study, Ramsdell reviewed the building-wake dispersion models used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its control room habitability assessments. The review included comparison of model estimates of centerline concentrations with concentrations observed in experiments at seven nuclear reactors. In general, the models are conservative in that they tend to predict concentrations that are greater than those actually observed. However, the models show little skill in accounting for variations in the observed concentrations. Subsequently, the experimental data and multiples linear regression techniques have been used to develop a new building wake diffusion model. This paper describes the new building wake model and compares it with other models. 8 refs., 2 figs

  2. Osmosis and Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  3. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  4. Bronnen van diffuse bodembelasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijzen JPA; Ekelenkamp A; LBG; DGM/BO

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to support the policy on preventive soil protection with information on the diffuse (non-local) emissions to soil and the influence on future soil quality. This study is related to inventories on (potential) sources of local soil pollution (e.g. industrial areas,

  5. Diffusion in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, A S

    1991-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectromertry technique (RBS) was used to characterize and investigate the depth distribution profiles of Ca-impurities of Ca-doped soda-time glass. The purposely added Ca-impurities were introduced inti the glass matrix by a normal ion exchange diffusion process. The measurements and analysis were performed using 2 MeV {sup 2}He{sup +} ions supplied from the University of Jordan Van de Graff acceierator (JOVAG). The normalized concetration versus depth profile distributions for the Ca-imourities were determined, both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical treatment was carried out by setting up and soiving the diffusion equation under the conditions of the experiment. The resulting profiles are characterized by a compiementary error function. the theoretical treeatment was extended to include the various methods of enhancing the diffusion process, e.g. using an electric field. The diffusion coefficient, assumed constant, of the Ca-impurities exchanged in the soda-lime glass was determined to be 1.23 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. A comparison between theoretically and experimentally determined profiles is made and commented at, where several conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future work are mentioned. (author). 38 refs., 21 figs., 10 Tabs.

  6. Multienergy anomalous diffuse scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, Miloš; Fábry, Jan; Kub, Jiří; Lausi, A.; Busetto, E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 19 (2008), 195504/1-195504/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100529 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : diffuse scattering * x-rays * structure determination Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  7. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    with conventional ventilation systems (mixing or displacement ventilation), diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk in the occupied zone. Moreover, this ventilation system presents a promising opportunity for energy saving, because of the low pressure loss, extended free...

  8. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    As a novel air distribution system, diffuse ceiling ventilation combines the suspended acoustic ceiling with ventilation supply. Due to the low-impulse supply from the large ceiling area, the system does not generate draught when supplying cold air. However, heat sources play an important role...

  9. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  10. Estimation of tile drainage contribution to streamflow and nutrient loads at the watershed scale based on continuously monitored data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Amado, A; Schilling, K E; Jones, C S; Thomas, N; Weber, L J

    2017-09-01

    Nitrogen losses from artificially drained watersheds degrade water quality at local and regional scales. In this study, we used an end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) together with high temporal resolution water quality and streamflow data collected in the 122 km 2 Otter Creek watershed located in northeast Iowa. We estimated the contribution of three end-members (groundwater, tile drainage, and quick flow) to streamflow and nitrogen loads and tested several combinations of possible nitrate concentrations for the end-members. Results indicated that subsurface tile drainage is responsible for at least 50% of the watershed nitrogen load between April 15 and November 1, 2015. Tiles delivered up to 80% of the stream N load while providing only 15-43% of the streamflow, whereas quick flows only marginally contributed to N loading. Data collected offer guidance about areas of the watershed that should be targeted for nitrogen export mitigation strategies.

  11. Modeling the Response of Primary Production and Sedimentation to Variable Nitrate Loading in the Mississippi River Plume

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Green, Rebecca E; Breed, Greg A; Dagg, Michael J; Lohrenz, Steven E

    2008-01-01

    ...% reduction in annual nitrogen discharge into the Gulf of Mexico. We developed an ecosystem model for the Mississippi River plume to investigate the response of organic matter production and sedimentation to variable nitrate loading...

  12. Nitrogen in rock: Occurrences and biogeochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of bedrock in global nitrogen cycling and potential for increased ecosystem sensitivity to human impacts in terrains with elevated background nitrogen concentrations. Nitrogen-bearing rocks are globally distributed and comprise a potentially large pool of nitrogen in nutrient cycling that is frequently neglected because of a lack of routine analytical methods for quantification. Nitrogen in rock originates as organically bound nitrogen associated with sediment, or in thermal waters representing a mixture of sedimentary, mantle, and meteoric sources of nitrogen. Rock nitrogen concentrations range from trace levels (>200 mg N kg -1) in granites to ecologically significant concentrations exceeding 1000 mg N kg -1 in some sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks. Nitrate deposits accumulated in arid and semi-arid regions are also a large potential pool. Nitrogen in rock has a potentially significant impact on localized nitrogen cycles. Elevated nitrogen concentrations in water and soil have been attributed to weathering of bedrock nitrogen. In some environments, nitrogen released from bedrock may contribute to nitrogen saturation of terrestrial ecosystems (more nitrogen available than required by biota). Nitrogen saturation results in leaching of nitrate to surface and groundwaters, and, where soils are formed from ammonium-rich bedrock, the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate may result in soil acidification, inhibiting revegetation in certain ecosystems. Collectively, studies presented in this article reveal that geologic nitrogen may be a large and reactive pool with potential for amplification of human impacts on nitrogen cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Restoration and Purification of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen by Bacteria and Phytoremediation in Shallow Eutrophic Lakes Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yue, Yi

    2018-06-01

    Endogenous organic nitrogen loadings in lake sediments have increased with human activity in recent decades. A 6-month field study from two disparate shallow eutrophic lakes could partly reveal these issues by analysing seasonal variations of biodegradation and phytoremediation in the sediment. This paper describes the relationship between oxidation reduction potential, temperature, microbial activity and phytoremediation in nitrogen cycling by calculation degradative index of dissolved organic nitrogen and amino acid decomposition. The index was being positive in winter and negative in summer while closely positive correlated with biodegradation. Our analysis revealed that rather than anoxic condition, biomass is the primary factor to dissolved organic nitrogen distribution and decomposition. Some major amino acids statistics also confirm the above view. The comparisons of organic nitrogen and amino acid in abundance and seasons in situ provides that demonstrated plants cue important for nitrogen removal by their roots adsorption and immobilization. In conclusion, enhanced microbial activity and phytoremediation with the seasons will reduce the endogenous nitrogen loadings by the coupled mineralization and diagenetic process.

  14. Nitrogen removal and microbial communities in a three-stage system simulating a riparian environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyuan; Wang, Zhixin; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-01

    The riparian zone is an active interface for nitrogen removal, in which nitrogen transformations by microorganisms have not been valued. In this study, a three-stage system was constructed to simulate the riparian zone environments, and nitrogen removal as well as the microbial community was investigated in this 'engineered riparian system'. The results demonstrated that stage 1 of this system accounted for 41-51 % of total nitrogen removal. Initial ammonium loading and redox potential significantly impacted the nitrogen removal performances. Stages 1 and 2 were both composed of an anoxic/oxic (A/O) zone and an anaerobic column. The A/O zone removed most of the ammonium load (6.8 g/m(2)/day), while the anaerobic column showed a significant nitrate removal rate (11.1 g/m(2)/day). Molecular biological analysis demonstrated that bacterial diversity was high in the A/O zones, where ammonium-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria accounted for 8.42 and 3.32 % of the bacterial population, respectively. The denitrifying bacteria Acidovorax sp. and the nitrifying bacteria Nitrosospira/Nitrosomonas were the predominant microorganisms in this engineered riparian system. This three-stage system was established to achieve favorable nitrogen removal and the microbial community in the system was also retained. This investigation should deepen our understanding of biological nitrogen removal in engineered riparian zones.

  15. Concentrated loads on concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Karen Grøndahl; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas are devel......This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas...

  16. Critical Axial Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Wells

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective in this paper is to solve a second order differential equation for a long, simply supported column member subjected to a lateral axial load using Heun's numerical method. We will use the solution to find the critical load at which the column member will fail due to buckling. We will calculate this load using Euler's derived analytical approach for an exact solution, as well as Euler's Numerical Method. We will then compare the three calculated values to see how much they deviate from one another. During the critical load calculation, it will be necessary to calculate the moment of inertia for the column member.

  17. Load regulating expansion fixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located there between. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig

  18. Laterally loaded masonry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun Gottfredsen, F.

    In this thesis results from experiments on mortar joints and masonry as well as methods of calculation of strength and deformation of laterally loaded masonry are presented. The strength and deformation capacity of mortar joints have been determined from experiments involving a constant compressive...... stress and increasing shear. The results show a transition to pure friction as the cohesion is gradually destroyed. An interface model of a mortar joint that can take into account this aspect has been developed. Laterally loaded masonry panels have also been tested and it is found to be characteristic...... that laterally loaded masonry exhibits a non-linear load-displacement behaviour with some ductility....

  19. Electrical load modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valgas, Helio Moreira; Pinto, Roberto del Giudice R.; Franca, Carlos [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lambert-Torres, Germano; Silva, Alexandre P. Alves da; Pires, Robson Celso; Costa, Junior, Roberto Affonso [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    Accurate dynamic load models allow more precise calculations of power system controls and stability limits, which are critical mainly in the operation planning of power systems. This paper describes the development of a computer program (software) for static and dynamic load model studies using the measurement approach for the CEMIG system. Two dynamic load model structures are developed and tested. A procedure for applying a set of measured data from an on-line transient recording system to develop load models is described. (author) 6 refs., 17 figs.

  20. Nitrogen and phosphorus removed from a subsurface flow multi-stage filtration system purifying agricultural runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yaqi; Huang, Lei; Chen, Yucheng

    2018-07-01

    Agricultural nonpoint source pollution has been increasingly serious in China since the 1990s. The main causes were excessive inputs of nitrogen fertilizer and pesticides. A multi-stage filtration system was built to test the purification efficiencies and removal characteristics of nitrogen and phosphorus when treating agricultural runoff. Simulated runoff pollution was prepared by using river water as source water based on the monitoring of local agricultural runoff. Experimental study had been performed from September to November 2013, adopting 12 h for flooding and 12 h for drying. The results showed that the system was made adaptive to variation of inflow quality and quantity, and had good removal for dissolved total nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved total phosphorus (DTP), and total phosphorus, and the average removal rate was 27%, 36%, 32%, and 48%, respectively. Except nitrate ([Formula: see text]), other forms of nitrogen and phosphorus all decreased with the increase of stages. Nitrogen was removed mainly in particle form the first stage, and mostly removed in dissolved form the second and third stage. Phosphorus was removed mainly in particulate during the first two stages, but the removal of particulate phosphorus and DTP were almost the same in the last stage. An approximate logarithmic relationship between removal loading and influent loading to nitrogen and phosphorus was noted in the experimental system, and the correlation coefficient was 0.78-0.94. [Formula: see text]: ammonium; [Formula: see text]: nitrite; [Formula: see text]: nitrate; DTN: dissolved total nitrogen; TN: total nitrogen; DTP: dissolved total phosphorus; TP: total phosphorus; PN: particulate nitrogen; PP: particulate phosphorus.