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Sample records for diffuse intrinsic brainstem

  1. The role of hypofractionation radiotherapy for diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma in children: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, G.O.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Lindert, E.J. van; Oldenburger, F.R.; Erasmus, C.E.; Schouten-Meeteren, A.Y.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Most children with a diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the feasibility of a radical hypofractionation radiotherapy schedule, given over 3 weeks, as an alternative to the standard regimen (30 fractions over 6

  2. Intrinsic brainstem schwannoma – A rare clinical entity and a histological enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraparenchymal schwannomas arising in the brainstem are very rare, and only eight cases have been reported in literature till now. We report an intraparenchymal brainstem schwannoma presenting with the classical clinical presentation of an intrinsic brainstem lesion, and discuss its clinicoradiological characteristics and histological origins. We highlight the importance of an intraoperative frozen section diagnosis in such cases. Intraoperative tissue diagnosis significantly may alter the surgical strategy, which should be aimed at near total intracapsular decompression of the schwannoma.

  3. Respiratory neuron characterization reveals intrinsic bursting properties in isolated adult turtle brainstems (Trachemys scripta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen M.; Hedrick, Michael S.; Krause, Bryan M.; Nilles, Jacob P.; Chapman, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    It is not known whether respiratory neurons with intrinsic bursting properties exist within ectothermic vertebrate respiratory control systems. Thus, isolated adult turtle brainstems spontaneously producing respiratory motor output were used to identify and classify respiratory neurons based on their firing pattern relative to hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity. Most respiratory neurons (183/212) had peak activity during the expiratory phase, while inspiratory, post-inspiratory, and novel pre-expiratory neurons were less common. During synaptic blockade conditions, ~10% of respiratory neurons fired bursts of action potentials, with post-inspiratory cells (6/9) having the highest percentage of intrinsic burst properties. Most intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons were clustered at the level of the vagus (X) nerve root. Synaptic inhibition blockade caused seizure-like activity throughout the turtle brainstem, which shows that the turtle respiratory control system is not transformed into a network driven by intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons. We hypothesize that intrinsically bursting respiratory neurons are evolutionarily conserved and represent a potential rhythmogenic mechanism contributing to respiration in adult turtles. PMID:25462012

  4. Radiotherapy for diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Fang, Yuan; Hui, Xuhui; Jv, Yan; You, Chao

    2016-06-27

    Diffuse brainstem glioma is a devastating disease with very poor prognosis. The most commonly used radiological treatment is conventional fractionated radiation. So far, there is no meta-analysis or systematic review available that assesses the benefits or harms of radiation in people with diffuse brainstem glioma. To assess the effects of conventional fractionated radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) versus other therapies (including different radiotherapy techniques) for newly diagnosed diffuse brainstem gliomas in children and young adults aged 0 to 21 years. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE/PubMed, and EMBASE to 19 August 2015. We scanned conference proceedings from the International Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOP), International Symposium on Paediatric Neuro-Oncology (ISPNO), Society of Neuro-Oncology (SNO), and European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO) from 1 January 2010 to 19 August 2015. We searched trial registers including the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) Register, the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the register of the National Institutes of Health to 19 August 2015. We imposed no language restrictions. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials (QRCTs), or controlled clinical trials (CCTs) that compared conventional fractionated radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) versus other therapies (including different radiotherapy techniques) for newly diagnosed diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults aged 0 to 21 years. Two review authors independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed the risk of bias in each eligible trial, and conducted GRADE assessment of included studies. We resolved disagreements through discussion. We performed analyses according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of

  5. Pre-Clinical Models of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

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    Oren J Becher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG is a rare and incurable brain tumor that arises in the brainstem of children predominantly between the ages of six and eight. Its intricate morphology and involvement of normal pons tissue precludes surgical resection, and the standard of care today remains fractionated radiation alone. In the past 30 years, there have been no significant advances made in the treatment of DIPG. This is largely because we lack good models of DIPG and therefore have little biological basis for treatment. In recent years however, due to increased biopsy and acquisition of autopsy specimens, research is beginning to unravel the genetic and epigenetic drivers of DIPG. Insight gleaned from these studies has led to improvements in approaches to both model these tumors in the lab, as well as to potentially treat them in the clinic. This review will detail the initial strides towards modeling DIPG in animals, which included allograft and xenograft rodent models using non-DIPG glioma cells. Important advances in the field came with the development of in vitro cell and in vivo xenograft models derived directly from autopsy material of DIPG patients or from human embryonic stem cells. Lastly, we will summarize the progress made in the development of genetically engineered mouse models of DIPG. Cooperation of studies incorporating all of these modeling systems to both investigate the unique mechanisms of gliomagenesis in the brainstem and to test potential novel therapeutic agents in a preclinical setting will result in improvement in treatments for DIPG patients.

  6. A Novel Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Initiated in Pax3-Expressing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L. Misuraca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG is a rare and incurable brain tumor that arises predominately in children and involves the pons, a structure that along with the midbrain and medulla makes up the brainstem. We have previously developed genetically engineered mouse models of brainstem glioma using the RCAS/Tv-a system by targeting PDGF-B overexpression, p53 loss, and H3.3K27M mutation to Nestin-expressing brainstem progenitor cells of the neonatal mouse. Here we describe a novel mouse model targeting these same genetic alterations to Pax3-expressing cells, which in the neonatal mouse pons consist of a Pax3+/Nestin+/Sox2+ population lining the fourth ventricle and a Pax3+/NeuN+ parenchymal population. Injection of RCAS-PDGF-B into the brainstem of Pax3-Tv-a mice at postnatal day 3 results in 40% of mice developing asymptomatic low-grade glioma. A mixture of low- and high-grade glioma results from injection of Pax3-Tv-a;p53fl/fl mice with RCAS-PDGF-B and RCAS-Cre, with or without RCAS-H3.3K27M. These tumors are Ki67+, Nestin+, Olig2+, and largely GFAP− and can arise anywhere within the brainstem, including the classic DIPG location of the ventral pons. Expression of the H3.3K27M mutation reduces overall H3K27me3 as compared with tumors without the mutation, similar to what has been previously shown in human and mouse tumors. Thus, we have generated a novel genetically engineered mouse model of DIPG, which faithfully recapitulates the human disease and represents a novel platform with which to study the biology and treatment of this deadly disease.

  7. Diffusion in Intrinsic and Highly Doped III-V Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Stolwijk, N

    2002-01-01

    %title\\\\ \\\\Diffusion plays a key role in the fabrication of semiconductor devices. The diffusion of atoms in crystals is mediated by intrinsic point defects. Investigations of the diffusion behaviour of self- and solute atoms on the Ga sublattice of gallium arsenide led to the conclusion that in intrinsic and n-type material charged Ga vacancies are involved in diffusion processes whereas in p-type material diffusion if governed by charged Ga self-interstitials. Concerning the As sublattice of gallium arsenide there is a severe lack of reliable diffusion data. The few available literature data on intrinsic GaAs are not mutually consistent. A systematic study of the doping dependence of diffusion is completely missing. The most basic diffusion process - self-diffusion of As and its temperature and doping dependence - is practically not known. For GaP a similar statement holds.\\\\ \\\\The aim of the present project is to perform a systematic diffusion study of As diffusion in intrinsic and doped GaAs and in GaP. P...

  8. Intrinsic Location Parameter of a Diffusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-18

    intrins�que du filtre de Kalman , discut�e dans un autre article. Nous pr�sentons ici une simulation num�rique dÕune EDS non lin�aire, qui montre la pr...the construction of an intrinsic nonlinear analog to the Kalman Fil- ter. We present here a numerical simulation of a nonlinear SDE, showing how well

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging of the inferior colliculus and brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in preterm infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, Milla; Lehtonen, Liisa; Lapinleimu, Helena [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology and Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Johansson, Reijo [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turku (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, Satu K. [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Turku (Finland); Kujari, Harry [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Pathology, Turku (Finland); Haataja, Leena [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Turku (Finland)

    2009-08-15

    Preterm and low-birth-weight infants have an increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss. Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP) are an effective method to detect subtle deficits in impulse conduction in the auditory pathway. Abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been shown to be associated with perinatal white-matter injury and reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) has been reported in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. To evaluate the possibility of a correlation between BAEP and DTI of the inferior colliculus in preterm infants. DTI at term age and BAEP measurements were performed on all very-low-birth-weight or very preterm study infants (n=56). FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the inferior colliculus were measured from the DTI. Shorter BAEP wave I, III, and V latencies and I-III and I-V intervals and higher wave V amplitude correlated with higher FA of the inferior colliculus. The association between the DTI findings of the inferior colliculus and BAEP responses suggests that DTI can be used to assess the integrity of the auditory pathway in preterm infants. (orig.)

  10. A rare case of white pearls in brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanker Singh Mankotia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic brainstem epidermoid is extremely rare, and only 14 cases have been reported. Authors report a classic case of brainstem epidermoid in a 14-year-old male child presenting with symptoms of brainstem involvement. The child underwent a successful surgical excision. The lesion was intrinsic and caused diagnostic dilemma based on conventional radiological images. Based on our experience in this case and a thorough review of literature, we are of the opinion that diffusion-weighted images are very important in establishing the diagnosis. Such lesions are challenging and attempt to remove adherent tumor capsule may produce additional neurological deficits.

  11. Functionally-defined Therapeutic Targets in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Catherine S.; Tang, Yujie; Truffaux, Nathalene; Berlow, Noah E.; Liu, Lining; Debily, Marie-Anne; Quist, Michael J.; Davis, Lara E.; Huang, Elaine C.; Woo, Pamelyn J; Ponnuswami, Anitha; Chen, Spenser; Johung, Tessa B.; Sun, Wenchao; Kogiso, Mari; Du, Yuchen; Lin, Qi; Huang, Yulun; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Warren, Katherine E.; Dret, Ludivine Le; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mao, Hua; Quezado, Martha; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Abraham, Jinu; Fouladi, Maryam; Svalina, Matthew N.; Wang, Nicholas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Nazarian, Javad; Alonso, Marta M.; Raabe, Eric; Hulleman, Esther; Spellman, Paul T.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip; Grill, Jacques; Monje, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a fatal childhood cancer. We performed a chemical screen in patient-derived DIPG cultures along with RNAseq analyses and integrated computational modeling to identify potentially effective therapeutic strategies. The multi-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat demonstrated efficacy in vitro and in DIPG orthotopic xenograft models. Combination testing of panobinostat with histone demethylase inhibitor GSKJ4 revealed synergy. Together, these data suggest a promising therapeutic strategy for DIPG. PMID:25939062

  12. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

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    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Gajjar, Amar; Broniscer, Alberto [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Zhang, Yong [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Li Yimei [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Glenn, George R.; Kun, Larry E.; Ogg, Robert J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4-39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54-59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6-5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7-59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response in

  13. Detection of Histone H3 mutations in cerebrospinal fluid-derived tumor DNA from children with diffuse midline glioma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tina Y Huang; Andrea Piunti; Rishi R Lulla; Jin Qi; Craig M Horbinski; Tadanori Tomita; C David James; Ali Shilatifard; Amanda M Saratsis

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse midline gliomas (including diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, DIPG) are highly morbid glial neoplasms of the thalamus or brainstem that typically arise in young children and are not surgically resectable...

  14. Fetal diffusion tensor quantification of brainstem pathology in Chiari II malformation

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    Woitek, Ramona; Prayer, Daniela; Weber, Michael; Schoepf, Veronika; Furtner, Julia; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Kasprian, Gregor [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Amann, Gabriele [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Seidl, Rainer [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Bettelheim, Dieter [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    This prenatal MRI study evaluated the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics to identify changes in the midbrain of fetuses with Chiari II malformations compared to fetuses with mild ventriculomegaly, hydrocephalus and normal CNS development. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated from a region of interest (ROI) in the midbrain of 46 fetuses with normal CNS, 15 with Chiari II malformations, eight with hydrocephalus and 12 with mild ventriculomegaly. Fetuses with different diagnoses were compared group-wise after age-matching. Axial T2W-FSE sequences and single-shot echo planar DTI sequences (16 non-collinear diffusion gradient-encoding directions, b-values of 0 and 700 s/mm{sup 2}, 1.5 Tesla) were evaluated retrospectively. In Chiari II malformations, FA was significantly higher than in age-matched fetuses with a normal CNS (p =.003), while ADC was not significantly different. No differences in DTI metrics between normal controls and fetuses with hydrocephalus or vetriculomegaly were detected. DTI can detect and quantify parenchymal alterations of the fetal midbrain in Chiari II malformations. Therefore, in cases of enlarged fetal ventricles, FA of the fetal midbrain may contribute to the differentiation between Chiari II malformation and other entities. (orig.)

  15. Fetal diffusion tensor quantification of brainstem pathology in Chiari II malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitek, Ramona; Prayer, Daniela; Weber, Michael; Amann, Gabriele; Seidl, Rainer; Bettelheim, Dieter; Schöpf, Veronika; Brugger, Peter C; Furtner, Julia; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Kasprian, Gregor

    2016-05-01

    This prenatal MRI study evaluated the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics to identify changes in the midbrain of fetuses with Chiari II malformations compared to fetuses with mild ventriculomegaly, hydrocephalus and normal CNS development. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated from a region of interest (ROI) in the midbrain of 46 fetuses with normal CNS, 15 with Chiari II malformations, eight with hydrocephalus and 12 with mild ventriculomegaly. Fetuses with different diagnoses were compared group-wise after age-matching. Axial T2W-FSE sequences and single-shot echo planar DTI sequences (16 non-collinear diffusion gradient-encoding directions, b-values of 0 and 700 s/mm(2), 1.5 Tesla) were evaluated retrospectively. In Chiari II malformations, FA was significantly higher than in age-matched fetuses with a normal CNS (p = .003), while ADC was not significantly different. No differences in DTI metrics between normal controls and fetuses with hydrocephalus or vetriculomegaly were detected. DTI can detect and quantify parenchymal alterations of the fetal midbrain in Chiari II malformations. Therefore, in cases of enlarged fetal ventricles, FA of the fetal midbrain may contribute to the differentiation between Chiari II malformation and other entities. • FA in the fetal midbrain is elevated in Chiari II malformations. • FA is not elevated in hydrocephalus and mild ventriculomegaly without Chiari II. • Measuring FA may help distinguish different causes for enlarged ventricles prenatally. • Elevated FA may aid in the diagnosis of open neural tube defects. • Elevated FA might contribute to stratification for prenatal surgery in Chiari II.

  16. Imaging of adult brainstem gliomas

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    Purohit, Bela, E-mail: purohitbela@yahoo.co.in; Kamli, Ali A.; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •BSG are classified on MRI into diffuse low-grade, malignant, focal tectal and exophytic subtypes. •Their prognosis and treatment is variable and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. •This article illustrates the imaging of adult BSGs on MRI and FET-PET. •We also describe prognostic factors and the treatment options of these tumours. -- Abstract: Brainstem gliomas (BSGs) are uncommon in adults accounting for about 2% of all intracranial neoplasms. They are often phenotypically low-grade as compared to their more common paediatric counterparts. Since brainstem biopsies are rarely performed, these tumours are commonly classified according to their MR imaging characteristics into 4 subgroups: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas, (b) enhancing malignant gliomas, (c) focal tectal gliomas and (d) exophytic gliomas/other subtypes. The prognosis and treatment is variable for the different types and is almost similar to adult supratentorial gliomas. Radiotherapy (RT) with adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment of diffuse low-grade and malignant BSGs, whereas, surgical resection is limited to the exophytic subtypes. Review of previous literature shows that the detailed imaging of adult BSGs has not received significant attention. This review illustrates in detail the imaging features of adult BSGs using conventional and advanced MR techniques like diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), as well as {sup 18}F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FET/PET). We have discussed the pertinent differences between childhood and adult BSGs, imaging mimics, prognostic factors and briefly reviewed the treatment options of these tumours.

  17. Assessment of the corticospinal tract alterations before and after resection of brainstem lesions using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and tractography at 3 T

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    Kovanlikaya, Ilhami, E-mail: ilk2002@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Firat, Zeynep [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Kovanlikaya, Arzu [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Ulug, Aziz M. [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul (Turkey); Cihangiroglu, M. Mutlu [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); John, Majnu [Department of Public Health, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Bingol, Canan Aykut; Ture, Ugur [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Diffusion Tensor Tractography (DTT) on the corticospinal tract alterations due to space occupying lesions in the brainstem before and after surgical resection. Pre- and post-surgical DTI data were acquired in 14 patients undergoing surgical resection of brainstem lesions. Patterns of corticospinal tract (CST) alteration on DTT were compared with the neurological exams of the patients pre- and post-operatively. DTT, especially in 3D movie format, seemed very helpful for evaluating the relationship of the lesions with the corticospinal tracts for surgical approach. None of the patients developed additional motor deficit related to surgery except one patient who presented with cerebellar ataxia after surgery. All of the patients with normal CST on DTT presented without motor deficit on neurological exam. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of DTT before surgery were 100%, 63.6%, 42.9% and 100%, and the corresponding values after surgery were 100%, 96%, 75% and 100% respectively. Although it has low specificity before surgery, DTT is a potentially useful technique in evaluating the effects of brainstem lesions and surgical resection on the relevant corticospinal tracts with high negative predictive value and higher specificity after surgery.

  18. Discrepant longitudinal volumetric and metabolic evolution of diffuse intrinsic Pontine gliomas during treatment: implications for current response assessment strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebel, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Hwang, S.; Edwards, A.; Patay, Z. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States); Li, Y.; Li, X. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Broniscer, A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Pediatrics, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Based on clinical observations, we hypothesized that in infiltrative high-grade brainstem neoplasms, such as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), longitudinal metabolic evaluation of the tumor by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be more accurate than volumetric data for monitoring the tumor's biological evolution during standard treatment. We evaluated longitudinal MRS data and corresponding tumor volumes of 31 children with DIPG. We statistically analyzed correlations between tumor volume and ratios of Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr at key time points during the course of the disease through the end of the progression-free survival period. By the end of RT, tumor volume had significantly decreased from the baseline (P <.0001) and remained decreased through the last available follow-up magnetic resonance imaging study (P =.007632). However, the metabolic profile of the tumor tissue (Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr, and Cho/NAA ratios) did not change significantly over time. Our data show that longitudinal tumor volume and metabolic profile changes are dissociated in patients with DIPG during progression-free survival. Volume changes, therefore, may not accurately reflect treatment-related changes in tumor burden. This study adds to the existing body of evidence that the value of conventional MRI metrics, including volumetric data, needs to be reevaluated critically and, in infiltrative tumors in particular, may not be useful as study end-points in clinical trials. We submit that advanced quantitative MRI data, including robust, MRS-based metabolic ratios and diffusion and perfusion metrics, may be better surrogate markers of key end-points in clinical trials. (orig.)

  19. Diffusion Mechanism for Arsenic in Intrinsic and Extrinsic Conditions in HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenouilloux, T.; Ferron, A.; Péré-Laperne, N.; Mathiot, D.

    2017-09-01

    Due to its low diffusivity and high activation rate, arsenic has become the dopant of choice in p/n HgCdTe high operating temperature technology. Its diffusion mechanism, however, remains imprecise. In this work, arsenic diffusion was studied in molecular beam epitaxy HgCdTe structures consisting of alternatively As-doped and intrinsic layers grown on a CdZnTe substrate. The diffusion coefficient of As was extracted from secondary ion mass spectroscopy concentration profiles. Annealings were performed for different temperatures, mercury partial pressures ( P Hg), annealing times and cadmium atomic fractions. Fermi-level effect on diffusion was observed, indicating extrinsic conditions for diffusion at high As concentration. Based on the variation of As diffusivity with P Hg and As concentration, we propose that As diffusion occurs on both II and VI sublattices. Our results are consistent with the fact that AsVI diffusion is assisted by the Te interstitial, introducing donor levels in the bandgap, while AsII diffusion is assisted by the cation vacancy.

  20. Mesenchymal transition and PDGFRA amplification/mutation are key distinct oncogenic events in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Puget

    Full Text Available Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG is one of the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor and its prognosis is universaly fatal. No significant improvement has been made in last thirty years over the standard treatment with radiotherapy. To address the paucity of understanding of DIPGs, we have carried out integrated molecular profiling of a large series of samples obtained with stereotactic biopsy at diagnosis. While chromosomal imbalances did not distinguish DIPG and supratentorial tumors on CGHarrays, gene expression profiling revealed clear differences between them, with brainstem gliomas resembling midline/thalamic tumours, indicating a closely-related origin. Two distinct subgroups of DIPG were identified. The first subgroup displayed mesenchymal and pro-angiogenic characteristics, with stem cell markers enrichment consistent with the possibility to grow tumor stem cells from these biopsies. The other subgroup displayed oligodendroglial features, and appeared largely driven by PDGFRA, in particular through amplification and/or novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain. Patients in this later group had a significantly worse outcome with an hazard ratio for early deaths, ie before 10 months, 8 fold greater that the ones in the other subgroup (p = 0.041, Cox regression model. The worse outcome of patients with the oligodendroglial type of tumors was confirmed on a series of 55 paraffin-embedded biopsy samples at diagnosis (median OS of 7.73 versus 12.37 months, p = 0.045, log-rank test. Two distinct transcriptional subclasses of DIPG with specific genomic alterations can be defined at diagnosis by oligodendroglial differentiation or mesenchymal transition, respectively. Classifying these tumors by signal transduction pathway activation and by mutation in pathway member genes may be particularily valuable for the development of targeted therapies.

  1. Preclinical evaluation of convection-enhanced delivery of liposomal doxorubicin to treat pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma and thalamic high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewing, A Charlotte P; Lagerweij, Tonny; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Meel, Michaël H; Veringa, Susanna J E; Carcaboso, Angel M; Gaillard, Pieter J; Peter Vandertop, W; Wesseling, Pieter; Noske, David; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hulleman, Esther

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are primary brain tumors with high mortality and morbidity. Because of their poor brain penetrance, systemic chemotherapy regimens have failed to deliver satisfactory results; however, convection-enhanced delivery (CED) may be an alternative mode of drug delivery. Anthracyclines are potent chemotherapeutics that have been successfully delivered via CED in preclinical supratentorial glioma models. This study aims to assess the potency of anthracyclines against DIPG and pHGG cell lines in vitro and to evaluate the efficacy of CED with anthracyclines in orthotopic pontine and thalamic tumor models. METHODS The sensitivity of primary pHGG cell lines to a range of anthracyclines was tested in vitro. Preclinical CED of free doxorubicin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) to the brainstem and thalamus of naïve nude mice was performed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was determined based on the observation of clinical symptoms, and brains were analyzed after H & E staining. Efficacy of the MTD was tested in adult glioma E98-FM-DIPG and E98-FM-thalamus models and in the HSJD-DIPG-007-Fluc primary DIPG model. RESULTS Both pHGG and DIPG cells were sensitive to anthracyclines in vitro. Doxorubicin was selected for further preclinical evaluation. Convection-enhanced delivery of the MTD of free doxorubicin and PLD in the pons was 0.02 mg/ml, and the dose tolerated in the thalamus was 10 times higher (0.2 mg/ml). Free doxorubicin or PLD via CED was ineffective against E98-FM-DIPG or HSJD-DIPG-007-Fluc in the brainstem; however, when applied in the thalamus, 0.2 mg/ml of PLD slowed down tumor growth and increased survival in a subset of animals with small tumors. CONCLUSIONS Local delivery of doxorubicin to the brainstem causes severe toxicity, even at doxorubicin concentrations that are safe in the thalamus. As a consequence, the authors could not establish a therapeutic

  2. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  3. Rapid and fulminant leptomeningeal spread following radiotherapy in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkle, Christopher L; Orr, Brent A; Lucas, John T; Klimo, Paul; Patay, Zoltan; Baker, Suzanne J; Broniscer, Alberto; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2017-01-13

    A 4-year-old male presented with rapid-onset cranial nerve palsy and ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a pontine mass lesion with discordant conventional and advanced imaging. A stereotactic core biopsy revealed glioblastoma with immunostaining suggestive of histone H3K27M and TP53 mutation, consistent with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. MRI 3 months after radiotherapy revealed extensive new leptomeningeal metastatic disease involving both the supra- and infratentorial brain, as well as the imaged portion of the spine. Tissue procured at the time of needle biopsy has undergone striking in vivo expansion as an orthotopic xenograft.

  4. Brainstem disconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, Curtis; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L. [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jocson, Jennifer [University of California Davis, Medical Center and UC Davis Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Brainstem disconnection is a very rare neonatal abnormality, with only seven cases reported. We report a unique case of a neonate who presented at delivery with hypertonia, dysmorphic facial features, and respiratory distress, as well as numerous musculoskeletal and genitourinary abnormalities. MRI of the brain showed disconnection between the pons and medulla with cerebellar hypoplasia and absent cerebellar peduncles. It aided in the description of the neurological and vascular anomalies associated with this diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Longitudinal evaluation of corticospinal tract in patients with resected brainstem cavernous malformations using high-definition fiber tractography and diffusion connectometry analysis: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Amir H; Abhinav, Kumar; Jarbo, Kevin; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Shin, Samuel S; Pathak, Sudhir; Hirsch, Barry E; Schneider, Walter; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Friedlander, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs) are challenging due to a higher symptomatic hemorrhage rate and potential morbidity associated with their resection. The authors aimed to preoperatively define the relationship of CMs to the perilesional corticospinal tracts (CSTs) by obtaining qualitative and quantitative data using high-definition fiber tractography. These data were examined postoperatively by using longitudinal scans and in relation to patients' symptomatology. The extent of involvement of the CST was further evaluated longitudinally using the automated "diffusion connectometry" analysis. Fiber tractography was performed with DSI Studio using a quantitative anisotropy (QA)-based generalized deterministic tracking algorithm. Qualitatively, CST was classified as being "disrupted" and/or "displaced." Quantitative analysis involved obtaining mean QA values for the CST and its perilesional and nonperilesional segments. The contralateral CST was used for comparison. Diffusion connectometry analysis included comparison of patients' data with a template from 90 normal subjects. Three patients (mean age 22 years) with symptomatic pontomesencephalic hemorrhagic CMs and varying degrees of hemiparesis were identified. The mean follow-up period was 37.3 months. Qualitatively, CST was partially disrupted and displaced in all. Direction of the displacement was different in each case and progressively improved corresponding with the patient's neurological status. No patient experienced neurological decline related to the resection. The perilesional mean QA percentage decreases supported tract disruption and decreased further over the follow-up period (Case 1, 26%-49%; Case 2, 35%-66%; and Case 3, 63%-78%). Diffusion connectometry demonstrated rostrocaudal involvement of the CST consistent with the quantitative data. Hemorrhagic brainstem CMs can disrupt and displace perilesional white matter tracts with the latter occurring in unpredictable directions. This requires the

  6. Diffusion tensor tractography of pyramidal tracts in patients with brainstem and intramedullary spinal cord tumors: Relationship with motor deficits and intraoperative MEP changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernicki, Tomasz; Maj, Edyta; Podgórska, Anna; Kunert, Przemysław; Prokopienko, Marek; Nowak, Arkadiusz; Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether pyramidal tracts course alterations observed in diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) in cases of brainstem and intramedullary spinal cord tumors reflect patient clinical status and prognosis. For this purpose, we assessed in 17 patients relationships between pyramidal tracts course alterations observed in DTT (classified into four categories: unaffected; displaced or interspaced; partially disintegrated and completely disintegrated) performed on a 1.5 Tesla scanner and the presence of preoperative motor deficits, changes observed in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) records at the beginning of the operation, deterioration of the MEPs records during the operation, and perioperative deterioration of muscle strength. We found that, if the picture of pyramidal tracts in DTT was worse, motor deficit was more common (P = 0.062). This observation was even more evident (P = 0.027), when cases with at least partially destroyed pyramidal tracts were compared with cases with normal or at most displaced or interspaced by tumor but still preserved pyramidal tracts. Significant relationships were also found between changes in DTT and abnormal MEP records at the beginning of the operation (P = 0.032) and perioperative deterioration of muscle strength (P = 0.0058). A close relationship was found between pyramidal tracts course alterations in DTT imaging and preoperative motor status and especially with changes in the MEP records at the beginning of the operation. DTT may be a method that allows the better planning of brainstem and intramedullary spinal cord tumors operations and may help in the risk assessment of postoperative motor deficits. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 4 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:715-723. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Effects of intrinsic stochasticity on delayed reaction-diffusion patterning systems

    KAUST Repository

    Woolley, Thomas E.

    2012-05-22

    Cellular gene expression is a complex process involving many steps, including the transcription of DNA and translation of mRNA; hence the synthesis of proteins requires a considerable amount of time, from ten minutes to several hours. Since diffusion-driven instability has been observed to be sensitive to perturbations in kinetic delays, the application of Turing patterning mechanisms to the problem of producing spatially heterogeneous differential gene expression has been questioned. In deterministic systems a small delay in the reactions can cause a large increase in the time it takes a system to pattern. Recently, it has been observed that in undelayed systems intrinsic stochasticity can cause pattern initiation to occur earlier than in the analogous deterministic simulations. Here we are interested in adding both stochasticity and delays to Turing systems in order to assess whether stochasticity can reduce the patterning time scale in delayed Turing systems. As analytical insights to this problem are difficult to attain and often limited in their use, we focus on stochastically simulating delayed systems. We consider four different Turing systems and two different forms of delay. Our results are mixed and lead to the conclusion that, although the sensitivity to delays in the Turing mechanism is not completely removed by the addition of intrinsic noise, the effects of the delays are clearly ameliorated in certain specific cases. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  8. Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas in children: Interest of robotic frameless assisted biopsy. A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca, H A; Cebula, H; Benmekhbi, M; Chenard, M P; Entz-Werle, N; Proust, F

    2016-12-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) constitute 10-15% of all brain tumors in the pediatric population; currently prognosis remains poor, with an overall survival of 7-14 months. Recently the indication of DIPG biopsy has been enlarged due to the development of molecular biology and various ongoing clinical and therapeutic trials. Classically a biopsy is performed using a stereotactic frame assisted procedure but the workflow may sometimes be heavy and more complex especially in children. In this study the authors present their experience with frameless robotic-guided biopsy of DIPG in a pediatric population. Retrospective study on a series of five consecutive pediatric patients harboring DIPG treated over a 4-year period. All patients underwent frameless robotic-guided biopsy via a transcerebellar approach. Among the 5 patients studied 3 were male and 2 female with a median age of 8.6 years [range 5 to 13 years]. Clinical presentation included ataxia, hemiparesis and cranial nerve palsy in all patients. MRI imaging of the lesion showed typical DIPG features (3 of them located in the pons) with hypo-intensity on T1 and hyper-intensity signal on T2 sequences and diffuse gadolinium enhancement. The mean procedure time was 56minutes (range 45 to 67minutes). No new postoperative neurological deficits were recorded. Histological diagnosis was achieved in all cases as follows: two anaplastic astrocytomas (grade III), two glioblastomas, and one diffuse astrocytoma (grade III). Frameless robotic assisted biopsy of DIPG in pediatric population is an easier, effective, safe and highly accurate method to achieve diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Diffusion tensor tractography of the brainstem pyramidal tract; A study on the optimal reduction factor in parallel imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yun Jung; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheol Kyu [Dept. of of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Parallel imaging mitigates susceptibility artifacts that can adversely affect diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) of the pons depending on the reduction (R) factor. We aimed to find the optimal R factor for DTT of the pons that would allow us to visualize the largest possible number of pyramidal tract fibers. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed on 10 healthy subjects at 3 Tesla based on single-shot echo-planar imaging using the following parameters: b value, 1000 s/mm{sup 2}; gradient direction, 15; voxel size, 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3}; and R factors, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. DTT of the right and left pyramidal tracts in the pons was conducted in all subjects. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image distortion, and the number of fibers in the tracts were compared across R factors. SNR, image distortion, and fiber number were significantly different according to R factor. Maximal SNR was achieved with an R factor of 2. Image distortion was minimal with an R factor of 5. The number of visible fibers was greatest with an R factor of 3. R factor 3 is optimal for DTT of the pontine pyramidal tract. A balanced consideration of SNR and image distortion, which do not have the same dependence on the R factor, is necessary for DTT of the pons.

  10. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, G.O.R.J.; Jansen, M.H.; Lauwers, S.J.; Nowak, P.J.; Oldenburger, F.R.; Bouffet, E.; Saran, F.; Kamphuis-van Ulzen, K.; Lindert, E.J. van; Schieving, J.H.; Boterberg, T.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Span, P.N.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Hargrave, D.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy give

  11. Bevacizumab Targeting Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: Results of 89Zr-Bevacizumab PET Imaging in Brain Tumor Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.H.; Lagerweij, T.; Sewing, A.C.; Vugts, D.J.; Vuurden, D.G. van; Molthoff, C.F.; Caretti, V.; Veringa, S.J.; Petersen, N.; Carcaboso, A.M.; Noske, D.P.; Vandertop, W.P.; Wesseling, P.; Dongen, G.A. van; Kaspers, G.J.; Hulleman, E.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab in the treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is unclear. We aim to study the biodistribution and uptake of zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled bevacizumab in DIPG mouse models. Human E98-FM, U251-FM glioma cells, and HSJD-DIPG-007-FLUC primary DIPG

  12. Investigating the Intrinsic Ethanol/Water Separation Capability of ZIF-8: An Adsorption and Diffusion Study

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ke

    2013-04-11

    Intrinsic ethanol/water separation capability of ZIF-8 is characterized by a detailed study of adsorption and diffusion of ethanol and water vapor in dodecahedral crystals with principle axis dimension of 324, 15.8, and 0.4 μm. ZIF-8 exhibits extremely low water uptakes. At 35 C and a relative pressure (P/Po) of 0.95, the water uptakes for 324, 15.8, and 0.4 μm ZIF-8 are 0.184, 0.197, and 0.503 mmol/g, respectively, all of which are less than 1 wt % increase relative to original sorbent mass (0.33, 0.35, 0.91 wt %). For ethanol adsorption, ZIF-8 exhibits an S-shape isotherm with low ethanol uptakes at P/Po up to 0.08 and the cage filling phenomenon occurs at P/P o higher than 0.08. The ethanol saturation uptake in ZIF-8 is as high as 30% of the sorbent weight. Because of the existence of the hydrophilic -N-H functionality introduced by the terminating imidazolate (Im) linker and the overall hydrophobicity of the inner network, the effect of outer surface area of ZIF-8 crystals is proved to be non-negligible as ZIF-8 crystals becomes smaller despite the extremely large inner surface area and pore volume, especially for water sorption. The variation of isosteric heats of adsorption for water reveals the existence of structural defect of ZIF-8 framework. Transport diffusivity and corrected diffusivity for water and ethanol in ZIF-8 are determined within the entire P/Po range. The ethanol/water separation performance in ZIF-8 is evaluated in terms of vapor-phase sorption selectivity and permselectivity. While ZIF-8 exhibits ample ethanol/water sorption selectivity, it is not effective for ethanol extraction as a membrane material from dilute ethanol aqueous solutions due to the unfavorable diffusion selectivity and the competitive water uptakes in the adsorbed ethanol phase. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma: is MRI surveillance improved by region of interest volumetry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Garan T. [University Hospital of North Tees, Department of General Radiology, North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust, Stockton-on-Tees, Cleveland (United Kingdom); Armitage, Paul A.; Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Batty, Ruth; Connolly, Daniel J.A. [Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Lee, Vicki [Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Oncology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); McMullan, John [Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neurosurgery, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-21

    Paediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is noteworthy for its fibrillary infiltration through neuroparenchyma and its resultant irregular shape. Conventional volumetry methods aim to approximate such irregular tumours to a regular ellipse, which could be less accurate when assessing treatment response on surveillance MRI. Region-of-interest (ROI) volumetry methods, using manually traced tumour profiles on contiguous imaging slices and subsequent computer-aided calculations, may prove more reliable. To evaluate whether the reliability of MRI surveillance of DIPGs can be improved by the use of ROI-based volumetry. We investigated the use of ROI- and ellipsoid-based methods of volumetry for paediatric DIPGs in a retrospective review of 22 MRI examinations. We assessed the inter- and intraobserver variability of the two methods when performed by four observers. ROI- and ellipsoid-based methods strongly correlated for all four observers. The ROI-based volumes showed slightly better agreement both between and within observers than the ellipsoid-based volumes (inter-[intra-]observer agreement 89.8% [92.3%] and 83.1% [88.2%], respectively). Bland-Altman plots show tighter limits of agreement for the ROI-based method. Both methods are reproducible and transferrable among observers. ROI-based volumetry appears to perform better with greater intra- and interobserver agreement for complex-shaped DIPG. (orig.)

  14. Single- and Multivoxel Proton Spectroscopy in Pediatric Patients With Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen-Smith, Emilie A. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Venzon, David J. [Biostatistics and Data Management Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bent, Robyn S. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Hipp, Sean J. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Warren, Katherine E., E-mail: warrenk@mail.nih.gov [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of two magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for treating pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) and to evaluate the relationship of metabolic profiles determined by each technique. Utility of each technique for improving patient management is also discussed. Methods and Materials: Children with DIPG (n = 36) were evaluated using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) during the same imaging session. Patients were followed longitudinally (n = 150 total studies). Technical feasibility was defined by sufficient water and lipid suppression for detection of metabolites. Correlation of metabolic data obtained by SVS and MRSI was determined using the Spearman rank method. Metabolite ratios, including choline:N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho:NAA) and Cho:creatine (Cho:Cr), were obtained from SVS and MRSI. Results: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible in >90% of studies. Maximum Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr from MRSI analysis were strongly associated with Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr obtained by SVS (r = 0.67 and 0.76, respectively). MRSI Cho:NAA values were more heterogeneous than Cho:Cr values within the same lesion, and a strong linear relationship between the range and maximum Cho:NAA values was observed. Conclusions: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible, with a strong correlation in metabolic data. Both techniques may improve diagnostic evaluation and management of DIPG. SVS is recommended for global assessment of tumor metabolism before and after therapy. MRSI showed heterogeneous patterns of metabolic activity within these tumors and is recommended for planning and monitoring targeted therapies and evaluating nearby tissue for tumor invasion.

  15. The intrinsic periodic fluctuation of forest: a theoretical model based on diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J.; Lin, G., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    Most forest dynamic models predict the stable state of size structure as well as the total basal area and biomass in mature forest, the variation of forest stands are mainly driven by environmental factors after the equilibrium has been reached. However, although the predicted power-law size-frequency distribution does exist in analysis of many forest inventory data sets, the estimated distribution exponents are always shifting between -2 and -4, and has a positive correlation with the mean value of DBH. This regular pattern can not be explained by the effects of stochastic disturbances on forest stands. Here, we adopted the partial differential equation (PDE) approach to deduce the systematic behavior of an ideal forest, by solving the diffusion equation under the restricted condition of invariable resource occupation, a periodic solution was gotten to meet the variable performance of forest size structure while the former models with stable performance were just a special case of the periodic solution when the fluctuation frequency equals zero. In our results, the number of individuals in each size class was the function of individual growth rate(G), mortality(M), size(D) and time(T), by borrowing the conclusion of allometric theory on these parameters, the results perfectly reflected the observed "exponent-mean DBH" relationship and also gave a logically complete description to the time varying form of forest size-frequency distribution. Our model implies that the total biomass of a forest can never reach a stable equilibrium state even in the absence of disturbances and climate regime shift, we propose the idea of intrinsic fluctuation property of forest and hope to provide a new perspective on forest dynamics and carbon cycle research.

  16. Gas Sorption, Diffusion and Permeation in a Polymer of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIM-7)

    KAUST Repository

    Alaslai, Nasser Y.

    2013-05-08

    The entire world including Saudi Arabia is dependent on natural gas to provide new energy supplies for the future. Conventional ways for gas separation are expensive, and, hence, it is very important to reduce the cost and lower the energy consumption. Membrane technology is a relatively new separation process for natural gas purification with large growth potential, specifically for off-shore applications. The economics of any membrane separation process depend primarily on the intrinsic gas permeation properties of the membrane materials. All current commercial membranes for natural gas separation are made from polymers, which have several drawbacks, including low permeability, moderate selectivity, and poor stability in acid gas and hydrocarbon environments. The recent development of polymeric materials called “polymers of intrinsic microporosity” (PIMs) provide a new class of high-performance membrane materials that are anticipated to be used in natural gas separation processes including, but not limited to, acid gas removal and separation of hydrocarbons from methane. PIM-7 is an excellent example of a material from the PIMs series for gas separation. It was selected for this work since it has not been extensively tested for its gas permeation properties to date. Specifically, sorption and mixed-gas permeation data were not available for PIM-7 prior to this work. Sorption isotherms of N2, O2, CH4, CO2, C2H6, C3H8 and n-C4H10 were determined over a range of pressures at 35 oC for PIM-7 using a custom-designed dual-volume pressure decay system. Condensable hydrocarbon gases, such as C3H8 and n-C4H10, show significantly higher solubility than the other less condensable gas of the test series due to their high affinity to the polymer matrix. Dual-mode sorption model parameters were determined from the sorption isotherms. Henry’s law solubility, Langmuir capacity constant and the affinity constant increased with gas condensability. Permeability coefficients

  17. Role of Early Postradiation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans in Children With Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Christine [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kaushal, Aradhana, E-mail: kaushala@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hammoud, Dima A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Steffen-Smith, Emilie A.; Bent, Robyn [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Citrin, Deborah; Camphausen, Kevin [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Warren, Katherine E. [Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine optimal timing of assessing postradiation radiographic response on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated on a prospective study at the National Cancer Institute (Protocol no. 06-C-0219) evaluating the effects of radiotherapy (RT). Standard RT was administered in standard fractionation over 6 weeks. Postradiation MRI scans were performed at 2 and 6-8 weeks. Results: Eleven patients with DIPG were evaluated. Median age was 6 years (range, 4-13 years). Patients were treated with external-beam RT to 55.8 Gy (n = 10) or 54 Gy (n = 1), with a gross tumor volume to planning target volume expansion of 1.8-2.0 cm. All patients received prescribed dose and underwent posttreatment MRI scans at 2 and 6-8 weeks. Pretreatment imaging revealed compression of fourth ventricle (n = 11); basilar artery encasement (n = 9); tumor extension outside the pons (n = 11); and tumor hemorrhage (n = 2). At the 2-week scan, basilar artery encasement improved in 7 of 9 patients, and extent of tumor was reduced in 5 of 11 patients. Fourth ventricle compression improved in 6 of 11 patients but worsened in 3 of 11 patients. Presumed necrosis was observed in 5 of 11 patients at 2 weeks and in 1 additional patient at 6-8 weeks. There was no significant difference in mean anteroposterior and transverse diameters of tumor between the 2- and 6-8-week time points. Six of 11 patients had increasing ventricular size, with no evidence of obstruction. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in tumor size of DIPG patients who have received standard RT when measured at 2 weeks vs. 6-8 weeks after RT. The majority of patients had the largest change in tumor size at the 2-week post-RT scan, with evolving changes documented on the 6-8-week scan. Six of 11 patients had progressive ventriculomegaly without obstruction, suggestive of communicating hydrocephalus. To the best

  18. A human brainstem glioma xenograft model enabled for bioluminescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Ozawa, Tomoko; Dinca, Eduard B.; Banerjee, Anuradha; Prados, Michael D.; James, Charles D.; Gupta, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    Despite the use of radiation and chemotherapy, the prognosis for children with diffuse brainstem gliomas is extremely poor. There is a need for relevant brainstem tumor models that can be used to test new therapeutic agents and delivery systems in pre-clinical studies. We report the development of a brainstem-tumor model in rats and the application of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy as part of this model. Luciferase-modified human glioblastoma...

  19. IMAGING WHITE MATTER IN HUMAN BRAINSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A Ford

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The human brainstem is critical for the control of many life-sustaining functions, such as consciousness, respiration, sleep, and transfer of sensory and motor information between the brain and the spinal cord. Most of our knowledge about structure and organization of white and gray matter within the brainstem is derived from ex vivo dissection and histology studies. However, these methods cannot be applied to study structural architecture in live human participants. Tractography from diffusion-weighted MRI may provide valuable insights about white matter organization within the brainstem in vivo. However, this method presents technical challenges in vivo due to susceptibility artifacts, functionally dense anatomy, as well as pulsatile and respiratory motion. To investigate the limits of MR tractography, we present results from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI of an intact excised human brainstem performed at 11.1T using isotropic resolution of 0.333, 1, and 2 mm, with the latter reflecting resolution currently used clinically. At the highest resolution, the dense fiber architecture of the brainstem is evident, but the definition of structures degrades as resolution decreases. In particular, the inferred corticopontine/corticospinal tracts (CPT/CST, superior (SCP and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP, and medial lemniscus (ML pathways are clearly discernable and follow known anatomical trajectories at the highest spatial resolution. At lower resolutions, the CST/CPT, SCP, and MCP pathways are artificially enlarged due to inclusion of collinear and crossing fibers not inherent to these three pathways. The inferred ML pathways appear smaller at lower resolutions, indicating insufficient spatial information to successfully resolve smaller fiber pathways. Our results suggest that white matter tractography maps derived from the excised brainstem can be used to guide the study of the brainstem architecture using diffusion MRI in vivo.

  20. Surgical considerations for ′intrinsic′ brainstem gliomas: Proposal of a modification in classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brainstem gliomas are highly heterogeneous tumors both in their clinical manifestation and in their pathology. Despite significant advances in the surgery for brainstem gliomas many aspects of this pathology are still unclear Objective: To evaluate the clinical, radiological and surgical outcome of 40 focal ′intrinsic′ brainstem gliomas and propose a surgical strategy-oriented classification. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 focal ′intrinsic′ ("expanding variety" tumors have been operated over a period of 8.5-years (January 1998-June 2007. Our criteria included patients with (1 well-defined gadolinium enhancing tumor; (2 relatively long duration of symptoms (> six months and (3 good neurological functional status and independent for all activities of daily living. The cutoff size of 2 cm was not rigidly adhered to. Results: The ′intrinsic′ brainstem tumors were classified into three types: Expanding, diffuse infiltrative and pure ventral varieties. Only patients with expanding variety of brainstem gliomas were subjected to surgery, mean age 19.2 years (range 4-55 years and male to female ration mean: 3:2. The tumor location included pons (n=19, midbrain (n=13 and medulla (n=8. Surgical approaches included midline suboccipital (n=28, retromastoid (n=7, subtemporal (n=3 and supracerebellar-infratentorial (n=2. Thirty-two cases with ′diffuse infiltrative′ and ′pure ventral′ variety were given radiotherapy only. Histology pathology revealed pilocytic variety (n=10, Grade II (n=17 and Grade III (n=13. There was one death in the surgical series (due to aspiration. Complications included meningitis (n=2, wound infection (n=1, chest infection (n=5 and transient mutism (n=1. Follow-up ranged from 3-68 months. Overall, 36 improved /remained same and three worsened in their clinical status at the time of discharge. Conclusion: The surgical management of intrinsic brainstem tumors presents a surgical challenge; radical

  1. Proceedings of the diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) Toronto Think Tank: advancing basic and translational research and cooperation in DIPG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Ute; Hawkins, Cynthia; Vézina, Gilbert; Kun, Larry; Souweidane, Mark; Bouffet, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) nearly exclusively affects children. The prognosis of DIPGs has remained grim despite more than three decades of clinical research and numerous clinical trials. More than 90% of the children with DIPG will succumb within 2 years of diagnosis. The tumor's incidence is still undefined, but data suggest 100-150 affected children annually in the US. The single proven effective treatment modality in DIPG remains radiation therapy. For the majority of patients however this treatment is only of transient effectiveness. Recent breakthroughs in the understanding of the molecular biology of DIPG have raised new hope and opened new avenues for therapeutic options. The advancement of basic and translational research and cooperation was the objective of the Toronto Think Tank, as new approaches are urgently needed.

  2. The Effect of Intrinsic Disorder and Self-association on the Translational Diffusion of Proteins: the Case of α-Casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, Daria L; Skirda, Vladimir Dmitrievich; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2017-03-27

    Translational diffusion is the major mode of macromolecular transport in leaving organisms and therefore it is vital to many biological and biotechnological processes. Although translational diffusion of proteins has received considerable theoretical and experimental scrutiny, much of that attention has been directed towards the description of globular proteins. The translational diffusion of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), however, is much less studied. Here, we use a pulsed-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance technique (PFG NMR) to investigate the translational diffusion of a disordered protein in a wide range of concentrations using α-casein that belongs to the class of natively disordered proteins as an example.

  3. A brainstem anosognosia of hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Abe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A woman had anosognosia for hemiplegia as a manifestation of brainstem infarction. She had no mental or neuropsychological disturbances, and had involvement of the brainstem in the frontal/parietal-subcortical circuits to the right cerebral hemisphere. Brainstem lesions that disrupt frontal/parietal-subcortical areas may affect anosognosia for hemiplegia.

  4. Pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the first report of pediatric brainstem oligodendroglioma, infiltrating midbrain, and medulla oblongata. The report details clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical steps. As this entity is exceedingly uncommon, the overall epidemiology, prognosis, and long-term outcome remain far from established.

  5. Consciousness and the Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Josef; Damasio, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical framework and set of hypotheses aimed at accounting for consciousness in neurobiological terms. Discusses the functional neuroanatomy of nuclei in the brainstem reticular formation. Notes that the views presented are compatible with the idea that the reticular formation modulates the electrophysiological activity of the…

  6. Biopsy of Brainstem Gliomas Using Flexible Endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Corzo, Jaime Gerardo; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Jose; Castillo-Rueda, Juan Lucino; Falcon-Escobedo, Reynaldo; Cervantes, Dominic; Rodriguez-Della Vecchia, Roberto; Vinas-Rios, Juan Manuel

    2015-07-01

    To describe our experience and the results obtained in performing transventricular brainstem biopsy with the use of flexible neuroendoscops. We identified patients who underwent a neuroendoscopic procedure with brainstem lesion biopsy to obtain histopathologic diagnosis and to treat obstructive hydrocephalus. All patients had follow-up examinations at months 1, 3, 6, and 12 postsurgery and then annually. Seven patients had a transventricular biopsy of the brainstem performed. Of those, five were pediatric patients. The median age was 10 years (range: 3-26 years). Five of them were female and two male. Four patients presented with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus. The main clinical presentations were intracranial hypertension syndrome in four patients, motor neuron disease in four patients, two with decreased state of alertness, two with gait ataxia, and one with Parinaud syndrome. The types of tumors found in the histopathology and their location were one ventral (pons) and one aqueductal anaplastic astrocytoma, two ventral, one aqueductal, and one attached to the floor of the fourth ventricle pilocytic astrocytoma and one ventral low-grade astrocytoma. The route taken to approach the ventral tumors was made through premammillary fenestration. The tumors of the aqueduct and floor of the fourth ventricle were approached transaqueductally. The use of flexible endoscops for biopsy of ventral, dorsal (tectum lamina quadrigemina), and diffuse brainstem tumors is a useful, effective, and safe procedure that also allows to treat obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to the tumors. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jansen, Marc H. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lauwers, Selmer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouffet, Eric [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Saran, Frank [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schieving, Jolanda H. [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Kaspers, Gertjan J. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hargrave, Darren [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3 to 4 weeks. A 1:1 matched-cohort analysis with conventional radiation therapy was performed to assess response and survival. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven children, aged 3 to 14, were treated according to 1 of 2 hypofractionation regimens over 3 to 4 weeks (39/3 Gy, n=16 or 44.8/2.8 Gy, n=11). All patients had symptoms for {<=}3 months, {>=}2 signs of the neurologic triad (cranial nerve deficit, ataxia, long tract signs), and characteristic features of DIPG on magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-seven patients fulfilling the same diagnostic criteria and receiving at least 50/1.8 to 2.0 Gy were eligible for the matched-cohort analysis. Results: With hypofractionation radiation therapy, the overall survival at 6, 9, and 12 months was 74%, 44%, and 22%, respectively. Progression-free survival at 3, 6, and 9 months was 77%, 43%, and 12%, respectively. Temporary discontinuation of steroids was observed in 21 of 27 (78%) patients. No significant difference in median overall survival (9.0 vs 9.4 months; P=.84) and time to progression (5.0 vs 7.6 months; P=.24) was observed between hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy, respectively. Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed DIPG, a hypofractionation regimen, given over 3 to 4 weeks, offers equal overall survival with less treatment burden compared with a conventional regimen of 6 weeks.

  8. Implementation of a multi-institutional diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma autopsy protocol and characterization of a primary cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretti, V; Jansen, M H A; van Vuurden, D G; Lagerweij, T; Bugiani, M; Horsman, I; Wessels, H; van der Valk, P; Cloos, J; Noske, D P; Vandertop, W P; Wesseling, P; Wurdinger, T; Hulleman, E; Kaspers, G J L

    2013-06-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a fatal paediatric malignancy. Tumour resection is not possible without serious morbidity and biopsies are rarely performed. The resulting lack of primary DIPG material has made preclinical research practically impossible and has hindered the development of new therapies for this disease. The aim of the current study was to address the lack of primary DIPG material and preclinical models by developing a multi-institutional autopsy protocol. An autopsy protocol was implemented in the Netherlands to obtain tumour material within a brief post mortem interval. A team of neuropathologists and researchers was available at any time to perform the autopsy and process the material harvested. Whole brain autopsy was performed and primary DIPG material and healthy tissue were collected from all affected brain areas. Finally, the study included systematic evaluation by parents. Five autopsies were performed. The mean time interval between death and time of autopsy was 3 h (range 2-4). All tumours were graded as glioblastoma. None of the parents regretted their choice to participate, and they all derived comfort in donating tissue of their child in the hope to help future DIPG patients. In addition, we developed and characterized one of the first DIPG cell cultures from post mortem material. Here we show that obtaining post mortem DIPG tumour tissue for research purposes is feasible with short delay, and that the autopsy procedure is satisfying for participating parents and can be suitable for the development of preclinical DIPG models. © 2012 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2012 British Neuropathological Society.

  9. A brainstem variant of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

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    Kitaguchi, H.; Tomimoto, H.; Terada, K. [Kyoto University, Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Miki, Y.; Yamamoto, A. [Kyoto University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Satoi, H.; Kanda, M. [Ijinkai Takeda General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuyama, H. [Kyoto University, Human Brain Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2005-09-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is caused by various heterogeneous factors, the commonest being hypertension, followed by nonhypertensive causes such as eclampsia, renal diseases and immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with RPLS exhibit bilateral white and gray matter abnormalities in the posterior aspects of the cerebral hemispheres. However, this syndrome may affect the brainstem predominantly, and these cases are designated as hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. We present here two patients with reversible brainstem encephalopathy: one with hypertension and the other without hypertension. These patients presented with swelling and diffuse hyperintensities of the brainstem in fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted MRI, but with relatively mild clinical symptoms. They recovered without major neurological deficits, but had residual lacunar lesions in the pons. Reversible brainstem encephalopathy with characteristic MRI features was found in both hypertensive and nonhypertensive patients. These patients were diagnosed with a brainstem variant of RPLS, which is potentially fully reversible after an adequate treatment, and therefore should be carefully differentiated from other brainstem disease conditions. (orig.)

  10. Craniofacial Pain: Brainstem Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Sessle

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent research advances in animals that have identified critical neural elements in the brainstem receiving and transmitting craniofacial nociceptive inputs, as well as some of the mechanisms involved in the modulation and plasticity of nociceptive transmission. Nociceptive neurones in the trigeminal (V brainstem sensory nuclear complex can be classified as nociceptive-specific (NS or wide dynamic range (WDR. Some of these neurones respond exclusively to sensory inputs evoked by stimulation of facial skin or oral mucosa and have features suggesting that they are critical neural elements involved in the ability to localize an acute superficial pain and sense its intensity and duration. Many of the V brainstem nociceptive neurones, however, receive convergent inputs from afferents supplying deep craniofacial tissues (eg, dural vessel, muscle and skin or mucosa. These neurones are likely involved in deep pain, including headache, because few nociceptive neurones receive inputs exclusively from afferents supplying these tissues. These extensive convergent input patterns also appear to be important factors in pain spread and referral, and in central mechanisms underlying neuroplastic changes in V neuronal properties that may occur with injury and inflammation. For example, application of the small fibre excitant and inflammatory irritant mustard oil into the temporomandibular joint, masseter or tongue musculature induces a prolonged but reversible enhancement of responses to cutaneous and deep afferent inputs of most WDR and NS neurones. These effects may be accompanied by increased electromyographic activity reflexly induced in the masticatory muscles by mustard oil, and involve endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate and opioid neurochemical mechanisms. Such peripherally induced modulation of brainstem nociceptive neuronal properties reflects the functional plasticity of the central V system, and may be involved in the development of

  11. Brainstem Tuberculoma in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A. Muin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a Somali refugee who presented in the second trimester of her first pregnancy with a four-week history of gradual right-sided sensomotoric hemisyndrome including facial palsy and left-sided paresis of the oculomotorius nerve causing drooping of the left eyelid and double vision. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solitary brainstem lesion. Upon detection of hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray (CXR, the diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis with involvement of the central nervous system was confirmed by PCR and treatment induced with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. The patient had a steady neurological improvement and a favorable pregnancy outcome.

  12. Congenital brainstem disconnection associated with a syrinx of the brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, P. G.; de Vries, L. S.; Nikkels, P. G. J.; Troost, D.

    We report a case of congenital brainstem disconnection including the second detailed autopsy. A full-term newborn presented with irreversible apnoea and died on the fifth day. MRI revealed disconnection of the brainstem. The autopsy included a series of transverse sections of the mesencephalon,

  13. Congenital brainstem disconnection associated with a syrinx of the brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, P. G.; de Vries, L. S.; Nikkels, P. G. J.; Troost, D.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of congenital brainstem disconnection including the second detailed autopsy. A full-term newborn presented with irreversible apnoea and died on the fifth day. MRI revealed disconnection of the brainstem. The autopsy included a series of transverse sections of the mesencephalon, medu

  14. Inverse activity of masticatory muscles with and without trismus: a brainstem syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelasic, F; Freitag, V

    1978-01-01

    Clinical and EMG findings in 10 cases of intrinsic brainstem lesions are reported with paradoxical activity of jaw closing muscles during jaw opening, with and without trismus. In five cases with trigeminal anaesthesia, the inverse activity of jaw closers is interpreted as a manifestation of disturbance in the central programming of mastication in the motor trigeminal area of the brainstem. Stretch reflex mechanisms and disinhibition of the trigeminal motor neurones play no part in the origin of inverse activity. The distinct brainstem syndrome can only be detected by EMG and the special clinical features. Images PMID:690651

  15. Inverse activity of masticatory muscles with and without trismus: a brainstem syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelasic, F; Freitag, V

    1978-09-01

    Clinical and EMG findings in 10 cases of intrinsic brainstem lesions are reported with paradoxical activity of jaw closing muscles during jaw opening, with and without trismus. In five cases with trigeminal anaesthesia, the inverse activity of jaw closers is interpreted as a manifestation of disturbance in the central programming of mastication in the motor trigeminal area of the brainstem. Stretch reflex mechanisms and disinhibition of the trigeminal motor neurones play no part in the origin of inverse activity. The distinct brainstem syndrome can only be detected by EMG and the special clinical features.

  16. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia of brainstem lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMario, F J; Bauer, L; Baxter, D

    1999-04-01

    In this pilot study we investigated the hypothesis that intrinsic and extrinsic brainstem lesions situated within the pontomedullary region would effect the integrity of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The study sample consisted of three patients with anatomic brainstem abnormalities associated with isolated Chiari I malformation, Chiari II malformation with syringobulbia, and achondroplasia with cervicomedullary compression. They were compared to an age- and sex-matched control group of nine patients. Each subject's electrocardiogram was recorded in a quiet room and digitized by a personal computer during five 1-minute periods. R-R intervals within each 1-minute period were converted to heart rate in 120 successive 0.5-second intervals. The resultant heartrate time series was converted to its underlying frequency composition by a fast Fourier transform and averaged across minutes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia was defined as the variability in the time series over a frequency range (0.096 to 0.48 Hz) corresponding to a range of respiratory rates from 6 to 30 breaths per minute. Analysis revealed a significant reduction in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (P < .05), defined as the summated area under the curve, with a mean for controls of 35.42+/-28.13 SD and for subjects of 17.20+/-11.50 SD. There was a gradient of abnormality noted, with the mildest deviation in respiratory sinus arrhythmia for the patient with isolated Chiari I malformation and maximum deviation seen in the patient with extrinsic cervicomedullary compression.

  17. FRAP analysis on red alga reveals the fluorescence recovery is ascribed to intrinsic photoprocesses of phycobilisomes than large-scale diffusion.

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    Lu-Ning Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phycobilisomes (PBsomes are the extrinsic antenna complexes upon the photosynthetic membranes in red algae and most cyanobacteria. The PBsomes in the cyanobacteria has been proposed to present high lateral mobility on the thylakoid membrane surface. In contrast, direct measurement of PBsome motility in red algae has been lacking so far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we investigated the dynamics of PBsomes in the unicellular red alga Porphyridium cruentum in vivo and in vitro, using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP. We found that part of the fluorescence recovery could be detected in both partially- and wholly-bleached wild-type and mutant F11 (UTEX 637 cells. Such partial fluorescence recovery was also observed in glutaraldehyde-treated and betaine-treated cells in which PBsome diffusion should be restricted by cross-linking effect, as well as in isolated PBsomes immobilized on the glass slide. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: On the basis of our previous structural results showing the PBsome crowding on the native photosynthetic membrane as well as the present FRAP data, we concluded that the fluorescence recovery observed during FRAP experiment in red algae is mainly ascribed to the intrinsic photoprocesses of the bleached PBsomes in situ, rather than the rapid diffusion of PBsomes on thylakoid membranes in vivo. Furthermore, direct observations of the fluorescence dynamics of phycoerythrins using FRAP demonstrated the energetic decoupling of phycoerythrins in PBsomes against strong excitation light in vivo, which is proposed as a photoprotective mechanism in red algae attributed by the PBsomes in response to excess light energy.

  18. FRAP Analysis on Red Alga Reveals the Fluorescence Recovery Is Ascribed to Intrinsic Photoprocesses of Phycobilisomes than Large-Scale Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-Ning; Aartsma, Thijs J.; Thomas, Jean-Claude; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    Background Phycobilisomes (PBsomes) are the extrinsic antenna complexes upon the photosynthetic membranes in red algae and most cyanobacteria. The PBsomes in the cyanobacteria has been proposed to present high lateral mobility on the thylakoid membrane surface. In contrast, direct measurement of PBsome motility in red algae has been lacking so far. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we investigated the dynamics of PBsomes in the unicellular red alga Porphyridium cruentum in vivo and in vitro, using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). We found that part of the fluorescence recovery could be detected in both partially- and wholly-bleached wild-type and mutant F11 (UTEX 637) cells. Such partial fluorescence recovery was also observed in glutaraldehyde-treated and betaine-treated cells in which PBsome diffusion should be restricted by cross-linking effect, as well as in isolated PBsomes immobilized on the glass slide. Conclusions/Significance On the basis of our previous structural results showing the PBsome crowding on the native photosynthetic membrane as well as the present FRAP data, we concluded that the fluorescence recovery observed during FRAP experiment in red algae is mainly ascribed to the intrinsic photoprocesses of the bleached PBsomes in situ, rather than the rapid diffusion of PBsomes on thylakoid membranes in vivo. Furthermore, direct observations of the fluorescence dynamics of phycoerythrins using FRAP demonstrated the energetic decoupling of phycoerythrins in PBsomes against strong excitation light in vivo, which is proposed as a photoprotective mechanism in red algae attributed by the PBsomes in response to excess light energy. PMID:19381335

  19. In vitro drug response and efflux transporters associated with drug resistance in pediatric high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna J E Veringa

    Full Text Available Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGG, including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG, are the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. While it is clear that surgery (if possible, and radiotherapy are beneficial for treatment, the role of chemotherapy for these tumors is still unclear. Therefore, we performed an in vitro drug screen on primary glioma cells, including three DIPG cultures, to determine drug sensitivity of these tumours, without the possible confounding effect of insufficient drug delivery. This screen revealed a high in vitro cytotoxicity for melphalan, doxorubicine, mitoxantrone, and BCNU, and for the novel, targeted agents vandetanib and bortezomib in pHGG and DIPG cells. We subsequently determined the expression of the drug efflux transporters P-gp, BCRP1, and MRP1 in glioma cultures and their corresponding tumor tissues. Results indicate the presence of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP1 in the tumor vasculature, and expression of MRP1 in the glioma cells themselves. Our results show that pediatric glioma and DIPG tumors per se are not resistant to chemotherapy. Treatment failure observed in clinical trials, may rather be contributed to the presence of drug efflux transporters that constitute a first line of drug resistance located at the blood-brain barrier or other resistance mechanism. As such, we suggest that alternative ways of drug delivery may offer new possibilities for the treatment of pediatric high-grade glioma patients, and DIPG in particular.

  20. ''Occult'' post-contrast signal enhancement in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma is the MRI marker of angiogenesis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Ashley E.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Li, Yimei; Yuan, Ying; Glass, John O.; Baker, Justin N.; Kun, Larry E.; Broniscer, Alberto; Patay, Zoltan [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2014-05-15

    In diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), subtracting pre-contrast from post-contrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) occasionally reveals subtle, ''occult'' enhancement. We hypothesized that this represents intravascular enhancement related to angiogenesis and hence that these tumors should have greater blood volume fractions than do non-enhancing tumors. We retrospectively screened MR images of 66 patients initially diagnosed with DIPG and analyzed pretreatment conventional and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI studies of 61 patients. To determine the incidence of occult enhancement, cerebral blood volume (CBV) values were compared in areas of occult enhancement (OcE), no enhancement (NE), and normal-appearing deep cerebellar white matter (DCWM). Tumors of 10 patients (16.4 %) had occult enhancement; those of 6 patients (9.8 %) had no enhancement at all. The average CBV in areas of occult enhancement was significantly higher than that in non-enhancing areas of the same tumor (P =.03), within DCWM in the same patient (P =.03), and when compared to anatomically paired/similar regions of interest (ROI) in patients with non-enhancing tumors (P =.005). Areas of OcE correspond to areas of higher CBV in DIPG, which may be an MRI marker for angiogenesis, but larger scale studies may be needed to determine its potential relevance to grading by imaging, treatment stratification, biopsy guidance, and evaluation of response to targeted therapy. (orig.)

  1. Lyme disease of the brainstem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalina, Peter [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Decker, Andrew [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Department of Neurology, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Kornel, Ezriel [Northern Westchester Hospital Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Mt. Kisco, NY (United States); Halperin, John J. [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Manhasset, NY (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement typically causes local inflammation, most commonly meningitis, but rarely parenchymal brain involvement. We describe a patient who presented with clinical findings suggesting a brainstem process. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) suggested a brainstem neoplasm. Prior to biopsy, laboratory evaluation led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. Clinical and imaging abnormalities improved markedly following antimicrobial therapy. We describe Lyme disease involvement of the cerebellar peduncles with hypermetabolism on PET. Although MRI is the primary imaging modality for most suspected CNS pathology, the practical applications of PET continue to expand. (orig.)

  2. Craniospinal irradiation with concurrent temozolomide for primary metastatic pediatric high-grade or diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. A first report from the GPOH-HIT-HGG Study Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, K.; Schlamann, A.; Pietschmann, S.; Kortmann, R.D. [University Medical Center Leipzig, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Guckenberger, M. [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, M. [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Glueck, A. [Clinic for Radiation Oncology Schwabing, Muenchen (Germany); Wawer, A. [University Medical Center Muenchen Schwabing, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Muenchen (Germany); Kramm, C.; Bueren, A.O. von [University Medical Center Goettingen, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    High-grade (HGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) with primary metastatic spread are extremely rare and have a dismal prognosis. Analogous to simultaneous radiochemotherapy in non-metastatic HGG and DIPG, concurrent craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and metronomic temozolomide (metroTMZ) may represent a reasonable therapeutic approach. However, the antitumor efficacy and toxicity of this treatment still have to be investigated. Between March 2007 and December 2012, six children with primary metastatic HGG (n=4) or DIPG (n=2) received CSI and concurrent metroTMZ based on individual treatment recommendations and, in some cases, within the HIT-HGG 2007 multicenter trial. Outcome and treatment-related toxicities were evaluated. All patients received irradiation to the entire craniospinal axis (35.2 Gy, n=5; 36 Gy, n=1:) and 5 received a local boost to macroscopic tumor deposits. Simultaneously, metroTMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day, n=5; 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, n=1) was administered. Additionally, 1 patient received nimotuzumab once per week. Within a median follow-up of 10.0 months (range 6.5-18.7 months), all patients experienced disease progression and 5 patients died. Median progression-free survival was 4.0±0.8 months (range 2.4-10.7 months) and median overall survival was 7.6±3.5 months (range 4.0-17.6 months). Acute myelosuppression most severely limited application of this aggressive treatment strategy. Severe hematotoxicities (= grade 3) occurred in all patients and metroTMZ had to be interrupted or discontinued in 4 out of 6 cases. Concurrent CSI and metroTMZ might represent a feasible treatment approach for primary metastatic HGG and DIPG. On the basis of our experience, severe but manageable acute hematotoxicity has to be expected. An international effort is warranted to reassess the efficacy and toxicity of this approach within a prospective study. (orig.)

  3. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma treated with prolonged temozolomide and radiotherapy--results of a United Kingdom phase II trial (CNS 2007 04).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S; Howman, A; Wheatley, K; Wherton, D; Boota, N; Pizer, B; Fisher, D; Kearns, P; Picton, S; Saran, F; Gibson, M; Glaser, A; Connolly, D J A; Hargrave, D

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) has a dismal prognosis with no chemotherapy regimen so far resulting in any significant improvement over standard radiotherapy. In this trial, a prolonged regimen (21/28d) of temozolomide was studied with the aim of overcoming O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) mediated resistance. Forty-three patients with a defined clinico-radiological diagnosis of DIPG received radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)) after which up to 12 courses of 21d of adjuvant temozolomide (75-100mg/m(2)) were given 4 weekly. The trial used a 2-stage design and passed interim analysis. At diagnosis median age was 8 years (2-20 years), 81% had cranial nerve abnormalities, 76% ataxia and 57% long tract signs. Median Karnofsky/Lansky score was 80 (10-100). Patients received a median of three courses of adjuvant temozolomide, five received all 12 courses and seven did not start adjuvant treatment. Three patients were withdrawn from study treatment due to haematological toxicity and 10 had a dose reduction. No other significant toxicity related to temozolomide was noted. Overall survival (OS) (95% confidence interval (CI)) was 56% (40%, 69%) at 9 months, 35% (21%, 49%) at 1 year and 17% (7%, 30%) at 2 years. Median survival was 9.5 months (range 7.5-11.4 months). There were five 2-year survivors with a median age of 13.6 years at diagnosis. This trial demonstrated no survival benefit of the addition of dose dense temozolomide, to standard radiotherapy in children with classical DIPG. However, a subgroup of adolescent DIPG patients did have a prolonged survival, which needs further exploration.

  4. Dual Inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK Pathways Induces Synergistic Antitumor Effects in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Linda Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG is a devastating disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Recent studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR and its downstream effector pathway, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, are frequently amplified in DIPG, and potential therapies targeting this pathway have emerged. However, the addition of targeted single agents has not been found to improve clinical outcomes in DIPG, and targeting this pathway alone has produced insufficient clinical responses in multiple malignancies investigated, including lung, endometrial, and bladder cancers. Acquired resistance also seems inevitable. Activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, which shares many nodes of cross talk with the PI3K/AKT pathway, has been implicated in the development of resistance. In the present study, perifosine, a PI3K/AKT pathway inhibitor, and trametinib, a MEK inhibitor, were combined, and their therapeutic efficacy on DIPG cells was assessed. Growth delay assays were performed with each drug individually or in combination. Here, we show that dual inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways synergistically reduced cell viability. We also reveal that trametinib induced AKT phosphorylation in DIPG cells that could not be effectively attenuated by the addition of perifosine, likely due to the activation of other compensatory mechanisms. The synergistic reduction in cell viability was through the pronounced induction of apoptosis, with some effect from cell cycle arrest. We conclude that the concurrent inhibition of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways may be a potential therapeutic strategy for DIPG.

  5. Hyperekplexia and trismus due to brainstem encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, M.; Humphrey, P.; Tedman, B.; Steiger, M.

    1998-01-01

    The brainstem is said to be the generator of pathological startle responses due to reticular reflex myoclonus or hyperekplexia. A patient with facial weakness, nystagmus, and pyramidal tract signs had generalised reflex spasms in response to auditory, visual and tactile stimuli which clinically and neurophysiologically resembled hyperekplexia. The case is unusual because as well as hyperekplexia, the patient's initial presentation was with an equally rare manifestation of brainstem pathology—brainstem mediated trismus. The causes of brainstem trismus and exaggerated startle responses are discussed with respect to their underlying mechanisms. 

 PMID:9667574

  6. Brainstem injury in motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viano, David C; Parenteau, Chantal S

    2017-10-03

    This is a descriptive study of the frequency and risk for brainstem injury by crash type, belt use, and crash severity (delta-V). NASS-CDS electronic cases were reviewed to see whether the transition from vehicles without advanced airbags and seat belts and side airbags and curtains to vehicles with the safety technologies has influenced the risk for brainstem injury. 1994-2013 NASS-CDS was analyzed to determine the number of brainstem injuries in nonejected adults (15+ years old) in vehicle crashes. Crashes were grouped by front, side, rear, and rollover. The effect of belt use was investigated. Light vehicles were included with model year (MY) 1994+. Occupants with severe head injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] 4+) and Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS) 4+F injury were also determined. The risk for injury with standard errors was determined using the MAIS 0+F exposure by belt use and crash type. NASS-CDS electronic cases were studied with brainstem injury in 2001-2013 MY vehicles. NASS-CDS indicates there are 872 ± 133 cases of brainstem injury per year. About 16.0% of AIS 4+ head injury involves the brainstem. For belted occupants, the highest risk for brainstem injury was in side impacts at 0.065 ± 0.010%. In contrast, the highest risk for brainstem injury was 0.310 ± 0.291% in rear impacts and 0.310 ± 0.170% in rollovers for unbelted occupants. The risk for brainstem injury increased with crash severity. The highest risk for brainstem injury was 3.54 ± 1.45% in crashes with >72 km/h (>45 mph) delta-V. Exponential functions fit the change in risk with delta-V. Eighteen NASS-CDS electronic cases showed that brainstem injury occurred in very severe collisions where the occupant experienced multiple injuries from intrusion or impact on vehicle structures stiffened by deformation. The risk for brainstem injury in belted occupants has remained essentially constant over 20 years, whereas the risk for MAIS 4+F injury has declined 38.3%. The prevention

  7. Influence of general anaesthesia on the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, L; Fernández-Candil, J; León, A; Gambús, P L

    2017-03-01

    The exact role of the brainstem in the control of body functions is not yet well known and the same applies to the influence of general anaesthesia on brainstem functions. Nevertheless in all general anaesthesia the anaesthesiologist should be aware of the interaction of anaesthetic drugs and brainstem function in relation to whole body homeostasis. As a result of this interaction there will be changes in consciousness, protective reflexes, breathing pattern, heart rate, temperature or arterial blood pressure to name a few. Brainstem function can be explored using three different approaches: clinically, analyzing changes in brain electric activity or using neuroimaging techniques. With the aim of providing the clinician anaesthesiologist with a global view of the interaction between the anaesthetic state and homeostatic changes related to brainstem function, the present review article addresses the influence of anaesthetic drug effects on brainstem function through clinical exploration of cranial nerves and reflexes, analysis of electric signals such as electroencephalographic changes and what it is known about brainstem through the use of imaging techniques, more specifically functional magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a method to segment four brainstem structures (midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and superior cerebellar peduncle) from 3D brain MRI scans. The segmentation method relies on a probabilistic atlas of the brainstem and its neighboring brain structures. To build the atlas, we...... the brainstem structures in novel scans. Thanks to the generative nature of the scheme, the segmentation method is robust to changes in MRI contrast or acquisition hardware. Using cross validation, we show that the algorithm can segment the structures in previously unseen T1 and FLAIR scans with great accuracy...

  9. Current clinical management of brainstem cavernomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinov, Oliver; Hatano, Taketo; Sarnthein, Johannes; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2010-11-26

    Over the last two decades a favourable course for treated or nontreated brainstem cavernomas has become possible with enhanced diagnostic tools and clinical experience, as well as minimally invasive microsurgical improvements. Currently, brainstem cavernoma can be treated microsurgically with excellent results and an acceptable morbidity rate. The preferred surgical route has progressively shifted from a dorsal to a lateral approach, but this remains dependent on the location of the lesion in the brainstem. Surgical evaluation and management of all cases of this rare disease should be performed by experienced teams from the outset.

  10. Air pollution is associated with brainstem auditory nuclei pathology and delayed brainstem auditory evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; D’Angiulli, Amedeo; Kulesza, Randy J.; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Osnaya, Norma; Romero, Lina; Keefe, Sheyla; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane M.; Avila-Ramirez, Jose; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; González-González, Luis Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We assessed brainstem inflammation in children exposed to air pollutants by comparing brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) and blood inflammatory markers in children age 96.3± 8.5 months from highly polluted (n=34) versus a low polluted city (n=17). The brainstems of nine children with accidental deaths were also examined. Children from the highly polluted environment had significant delays in wave III (t(50)=17.038; p

  11. Correlation of (18)F-FDG PET and MRI Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram Metrics with Survival in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Fahey, Frederic H; Kocak, Mehmet; Brown, Douglas; Ricci, Kelsey I; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Fouladi, Maryam; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe baseline (18)F-FDG PET voxel characteristics in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and to correlate these metrics with baseline MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram metrics, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival. Methods: Baseline brain (18)F-FDG PET and MRI scans were obtained in 33 children from Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium clinical DIPG trials. (18)F-FDG PET images, postgadolinium MR images, and ADC MR images were registered to baseline fluid attenuation inversion recovery MR images. Three-dimensional regions of interest on fluid attenuation inversion recovery MR images and postgadolinium MR images and (18)F-FDG PET and MR ADC histograms were generated. Metrics evaluated included peak number, skewness, and kurtosis. Correlation between PET and MR ADC histogram metrics was evaluated. PET pixel values within the region of interest for each tumor were plotted against MR ADC values. The association of these imaging markers with survival was described. Results: PET histograms were almost always unimodal (94%, vs. 6% bimodal). None of the PET histogram parameters (skewness or kurtosis) had a significant association with PFS, although a higher PET postgadolinium skewness tended toward a less favorable PFS (hazard ratio, 3.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-16.28 [P = 0.11]). There was a significant association between higher MR ADC postgadolinium skewness and shorter PFS (hazard ratio, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.11-5.91 [P = 0.028]), and there was the suggestion that this also led to shorter overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.18; 95% CI, 0.95-5.04 [P = 0.067]). Higher MR ADC postgadolinium kurtosis tended toward shorter PFS (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.98-1.74 [P = 0.073]). PET and MR ADC pixel values were negatively correlated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Further, the level of PET and MR ADC correlation was significantly positively associated with PFS; tumors with higher

  12. Brainstem involvement in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The parieto-occipital region of the brain is most frequently and severely affected in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE. The basal ganglia, cerebellum and corpus callosum are less commonly involved. Brainstem involvement is rarely described in SSPE, and usually there is involvement of other regions of the brain. We describe a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with brain magnetic resonance imaging showing extensive brainstem involvement without significant involvement of other cortical structures. Though rarely described in SSPE, one should be aware of such brainstem and cerebellum involvement, and SSPE should be kept in mind when brainstem signal changes are seen in brain MRI with or without involvement of other regions of brain to avoid erroneous reporting.

  13. Resolving the Brainstem Contributions to Attentional Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jonathan C.W.; Davies, Wendy-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Previous human imaging studies manipulating attention or expectancy have identified the periaqueductal gray (PAG) as a key brainstem structure implicated in endogenous analgesia. However, animal studies indicate that PAG analgesia is mediated largely via caudal brainstem structures, such as the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and locus coeruleus (LC). To identify their involvement in endogenous analgesia, we used brainstem optimized, whole-brain imaging to record responses to concurrent thermal stimulation (left forearm) and visual attention tasks of titrated difficulty in 20 healthy subjects. The PAG, LC, and RVM were anatomically discriminated using a probabilistic atlas. Pain ratings disclosed the anticipated analgesic interaction between task difficulty and pain intensity (p pain intensity. Intersubject analgesia scores correlated to activity within a distinct region of the RVM alone. These results identify distinct roles for a brainstem triumvirate in attentional analgesia: with the PAG activated by attentional load; specific RVM regions showing pronociceptive and antinociceptive processes (in line with previous animal studies); and the LC showing lateralized activity during conflicting attentional demands. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attention modulates pain intensity, and human studies have identified roles for a network of forebrain structures plus the periaqueductal gray (PAG). Animal data indicate that the PAG acts via caudal brainstem structures to control nociception. We investigated this issue within an attentional analgesia paradigm with brainstem-optimized fMRI and analysis using a probabilistic brainstem atlas. We find pain intensity encoding in several forebrain structures, including the insula and attentional activation of the PAG. Discrete regions of the rostral ventromedial medulla bidirectionally influence pain perception, and locus coeruleus activity mirrors the interaction between attention and nociception. This approach has enabled the

  14. Brainstem auditory evoked response: application in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available The tecnique that we use for eliciting brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs is described. BAERs are a non-invasive and reliable clinical test when carefully performed. This test is indicated in the evaluation of disorders which may potentially involve the brainstem such as coma, multiple sclerosis posterior fossa tumors and others. Unsuspected lesions with normal radiologic studies (including CT-scan can be revealed by the BAER.

  15. Atomistic modeling of intrinsic and radiation-enhanced fission gas (Xe) diffusion in UO2 +/- x: Implications for nuclear fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanni Pastore; Michael R. Tonks; Derek R. Gaston; Richard L. Williamson; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-03-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, the diffusivity of fission gas atoms (Xe) in UO2 nuclear fuel has been calculated for a range of non-stoichiometry (i.e. UO2x), under both out-of-pile (no irradiation) and in-pile (irradiation) conditions. This was achieved by first deriving expressions for the activation energy that account for the type of trap site that the fission gas atoms occupy, which includes the corresponding type of mobile cluster, the charge state of these defects and the chemistry acting as boundary condition. In the next step DFT calculations were used to estimate migration barriers and internal energy contributions to the thermodynamic properties and calculations based on empirical potentials were used to estimate defect formation and migration entropies (i.e. pre-exponentials). The diffusivities calculated for out-of-pile conditions as function of the UO2x nonstoichiometrywere used to validate the accuracy of the diffusion models and the DFT calculations against available experimental data. The Xe diffusivity is predicted to depend strongly on the UO2x non-stoichiometry due to a combination of changes in the preferred Xe trap site and in the concentration of uranium vacancies enabling Xe diffusion, which is consistent with experiments. After establishing the validity of the modeling approach, it was used for studying Xe diffusion under in-pile conditions, for which experimental data is very scarce. The radiation-enhanced Xe diffusivity is compared to existing empirical models. Finally, the predicted fission gas diffusion rates were implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and fission gas release from a Risø fuel rod irradiation experiment was simulated. 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  16. Evidence for altered basal ganglia-brainstem connections in cervical dystonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne J Blood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been increasing interest in the interaction of the basal ganglia with the cerebellum and the brainstem in motor control and movement disorders. In addition, it has been suggested that these subcortical connections with the basal ganglia may help to coordinate a network of regions involved in mediating posture and stabilization. While studies in animal models support a role for this circuitry in the pathophysiology of the movement disorder dystonia, thus far, there is only indirect evidence for this in humans with dystonia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study we investigated probabilistic diffusion tractography in DYT1-negative patients with cervical dystonia and matched healthy control subjects, with the goal of showing that patients exhibit altered microstructure in the connectivity between the pallidum and brainstem. The brainstem regions investigated included nuclei that are known to exhibit strong connections with the cerebellum. We observed large clusters of tractography differences in patients relative to healthy controls, between the pallidum and the brainstem. Tractography was decreased in the left hemisphere and increased in the right hemisphere in patients, suggesting a potential basis for the left/right white matter asymmetry we previously observed in focal dystonia patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support the hypothesis that connections between the basal ganglia and brainstem play a role in the pathophysiology of dystonia.

  17. 三维适形放疗联合替莫唑胺化疗治疗弥漫性脑干胶质瘤%Safety and efficacy of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with temozolomide in treatment of diffuse brainstem gliomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方恒虎; 聂青; 康静波; 李方明; 蔡昌兰

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究三维适形放疗(3D-CRr)联合替莫唑胺化疗治疗弥漫性脑干胶质瘤的有效性和安全性。方法 对12例弥漫性脑干胶质瘤患者进行3D-CRT,分割方式为1.8 Gy/次,1次/d,5次/周,处方剂量为54 Gy,总治疗时间为6周。放疗期间每日口服替莫唑胺75 mg/m2,放疗结束后4周,继续给予替莫唑胺标准5 d方案辅助化疗6个周期,每个周期28 d。第1个周期替莫唑胺用量为150 mg/m2,连用5d,无明显血液学毒性后,从第2个周期始,替莫唑胺剂量增至200 mg/m2。对患者进行磁共振成像和实验室检查以评价疗效和不良反应。结果 12例弥漫性脑干胶质瘤患者中,完全缓解1例(8.3%),部分缓解6例(50.0%),稳定2例(16.7%),进展3例(25.0%)。全组患者的临床受益率为75.0%,6个月和1年疾病无进展生存率分别为75.0%和50.0%,1年生存率为75.0%。替莫唑胺治疗的不良反应发生率低,以轻度血液学毒性为主。结论 替莫唑胺联合同步放疗加后续单药辅助化疗治疗弥漫性脑干胶质瘤有较好的临床疗效,患者能够从中受益。%Objective To study the safety and efficacy of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide in treatment of patients with diffuse brainstem glioma. Methods Twelve patients with MRI-confirmed diffuse brainstem glioma received 54 Gy three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for 6 weeks with 1.8 Gy per fraction, 5 times per week. All of the patients were given daily oral temozolomide 75 mg/m2 during radiotherapy. Four weeks after radiotherapy, all of the patients received 6 cycles of temozolomide, each cycle lasted 5 days with 28 days interval between each two cycles. 150 mg/m2 of temozolomide was given for the first cycle for five days, followd by 200 mg/m2 of the drug for the rest of the cycles if no significant drug-related toxicities were observed. Magnetic resonance imaging and laboratory

  18. Brainstem reflexes in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Joel V; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-03-01

    Several distinctive clinical features of patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) including dysarthria and dysphagia suggest a developmental defect in brainstem reflexes. Our aim was to characterize the neurophysiological profile of brainstem reflexes in these patients. We studied the function of sensory and motor trigeminal tracts in 28 patients with FD. All were homozygous for the common mutation in the IKAP gene. Each underwent a battery of electrophysiological tests including; blink reflexes, jaw jerk reflex, masseter silent periods and direct stimulation of the facial nerve. Responses were compared with 25 age-matched healthy controls. All patients had significantly prolonged latencies and decreased amplitudes of all examined brainstem reflexes. Similar abnormalities were seen in the early and late components. In contrast, direct stimulation of the facial nerve revealed relative preservation of motor responses. The brainstem reflex abnormalities in FD are best explained by impairment of the afferent and central pathways. A reduction in the number and/or excitability of trigeminal sensory axons is likely the main problem. These findings add further evidence to the concept that congenital mutations of the elongator-1 protein (or IKAP) affect the development of afferent neurons including those carrying information for the brainstem reflex pathways. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gamma Knife Treatment of Brainstem Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Halloran E.; Larson, Erik W.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; MacKay, Alexander R.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Call, Jason A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S.; Peressini, Ben; Lee, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The management of brainstem metastases is challenging. Surgical treatment is usually not an option, and chemotherapy is of limited utility. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a promising palliative treatment modality in these cases. The goal of this study is to assess our single institution experience treating brainstem metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). This retrospective chart review studied 41 patients with brainstem metastases treated with GKRS. The most common primary tumors were lung, breast, renal cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Median age at initial treatment was 59 years. Nineteen (46%) of the patients received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) prior to or concurrent with GKRS treatment. Thirty (73%) of the patients had a single brainstem metastasis. The average GKRS dose was 17 Gy. Post-GKRS overall survival at six months was 42%, at 12 months was 22%, and at 24 months was 13%. Local tumor control was achieved in 91% of patients, and there was one patient who had a fatal brain hemorrhage after treatment. Karnofsky performance score (KPS) >80 and the absence of prior WBRT were predictors for improved survival on multivariate analysis (HR 0.60 (p = 0.02), and HR 0.28 (p = 0.02), respectively). GKRS was an effective treatment for brainstem metastases, with excellent local tumor control. PMID:24886816

  20. Gamma Knife Treatment of Brainstem Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halloran E. Peterson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of brainstem metastases is challenging. Surgical treatment is usually not an option, and chemotherapy is of limited utility. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as a promising palliative treatment modality in these cases. The goal of this study is to assess our single institution experience treating brainstem metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS. This retrospective chart review studied 41 patients with brainstem metastases treated with GKRS. The most common primary tumors were lung, breast, renal cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Median age at initial treatment was 59 years. Nineteen (46% of the patients received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT prior to or concurrent with GKRS treatment. Thirty (73% of the patients had a single brainstem metastasis. The average GKRS dose was 17 Gy. Post-GKRS overall survival at six months was 42%, at 12 months was 22%, and at 24 months was 13%. Local tumor control was achieved in 91% of patients, and there was one patient who had a fatal brain hemorrhage after treatment. Karnofsky performance score (KPS >80 and the absence of prior WBRT were predictors for improved survival on multivariate analysis (HR 0.60 (p = 0.02, and HR 0.28 (p = 0.02, respectively. GKRS was an effective treatment for brainstem metastases, with excellent local tumor control.

  1. Is enhanced MRI helpful in brainstem infarction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Y. M.; Shin, G. H.; Choi, W. S. [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To determine the role of MR contrast enhancement in evaluating time course of brainstem infarction. MR imaging with IV administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine was retrospectively reviewed in 43 patients with clinically and radiologically documented brainstem infarctions. The pattern of infarction was classified into spotty and patchy. Presence of parenchymal enhancement in infarction was evaluated. By location, there were 34 pontine, 3 midbrain, 6 medullary infarctions. The age of the infarctions ranged from 1 day to 9 months, with 5 patients scanned within 3 days and 10 scanned within 2 weeks of clinical ictus. Abnormalities on T2-weighted images were encountered in every case, with spotty pattern in 14 cases and patchy pattern in 29 cases. Parenchymal contrast enhancement was seen in 9 cases(20%), primarily occurring between days 8 and 20. MR contrast enhancement in brainstem infarction was infrequent that it may not be useful in the estimation of the age of infarction.

  2. Mode-locking neurodynamics predict human auditory brainstem responses to musical intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerud, Karl D; Almonte, Felix V; Kim, Ji Chul; Large, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    The auditory nervous system is highly nonlinear. Some nonlinear responses arise through active processes in the cochlea, while others may arise in neural populations of the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and higher auditory areas. In humans, auditory brainstem recordings reveal nonlinear population responses to combinations of pure tones, and to musical intervals composed of complex tones. Yet the biophysical origin of central auditory nonlinearities, their signal processing properties, and their relationship to auditory perception remain largely unknown. Both stimulus components and nonlinear resonances are well represented in auditory brainstem nuclei due to neural phase-locking. Recently mode-locking, a generalization of phase-locking that implies an intrinsically nonlinear processing of sound, has been observed in mammalian auditory brainstem nuclei. Here we show that a canonical model of mode-locked neural oscillation predicts the complex nonlinear population responses to musical intervals that have been observed in the human brainstem. The model makes predictions about auditory signal processing and perception that are different from traditional delay-based models, and may provide insight into the nature of auditory population responses. We anticipate that the application of dynamical systems analysis will provide the starting point for generic models of auditory population dynamics, and lead to a deeper understanding of nonlinear auditory signal processing possibly arising in excitatory-inhibitory networks of the central auditory nervous system. This approach has the potential to link neural dynamics with the perception of pitch, music, and speech, and lead to dynamical models of auditory system development.

  3. Anatomical parcellation of the brainstem and cerebellar white matter: a preliminary probabilistic tractography study at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Christophe; Cabanis, Emmanuel A. [UPMC Paris 6, Service de NeuroImagerie, Hopital des Quinze-Vingts, Paris (France)

    2007-10-15

    The aims of this study were: (1) to test whether higher spatial resolution diffusion tensor images and a higher field strength (3 T) enable a more accurate delineation of the anatomical tract within the brainstem, and, in particular, (2) to try to distinguish the different components of the corticopontocerebellar paths in terms of their cortical origins. The main tracts of the brainstem of four volunteers were studied at 3 T using a probabilistic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) axonal tracking. The resulting tractograms enabled anatomical well-delineated structures to be identified on the diffusion tensor coloured images. We tracked corticopontine, corticospinal, central tegmental, inferior and superior cerebellopeduncular, transverse, medial lemniscal and, possibly, longitudinal medial fibres. Moreover, DTI tracking allowed a broad delineation of the corticopontocerebellar paths. Diffusion tensor coloured images allow a rapid and reliable access to the white matter broad parcellation of the brainstem and of the cerebellum, which can be completed by fibre tracking. However, a more accurate and exhaustive depiction of the anatomical connectivity within the brainstem requires the application of more sophisticated techniques and tractography algorithms, such as diffusion spectrum imaging. (orig.)

  4. Right-sided dominance of the bilateral vestibular system in the upper brainstem and thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Marianne; Kirsch, V; Brandt, T

    2017-03-18

    MRI diffusion tensor imaging tractography was performed on the bilateral vestibular brainstem pathways, which run from the vestibular nuclei via the paramedian and posterolateral thalamic subnuclei to the parieto-insular vestibular cortex. Twenty-one right-handed healthy subjects participated. Quantitative analysis revealed a rope-ladder-like system of vestibular pathways in the brainstem with crossings at pontine and mesencephalic levels. Three structural types of right-left fiber distributions could be delineated: (1) evenly distributed pathways at the lower pontine level from the vestibular nuclei to the pontine crossing, (2) a moderate, pontomesencephalic right-sided lateralization between the pontine and mesencephalic crossings, and (3) a further increase of the right-sided lateralization above the mesencephalic crossing leading to the thalamic vestibular subnuclei. The increasing lateralization along the brainstem was the result of an asymmetric number of pontine and mesencephalic crossing fibers which was higher for left-to-right crossings. The dominance of the right vestibular meso-diencephalic circuitry in right-handers corresponds to the right-hemispheric dominance of the vestibular cortical network. The structural asymmetry apparent in the upper brainstem might be interpreted in relation to the different functions of the vestibular system depending on their anatomical level: a symmetrical sensorimotor reflex control of eye, head, and body mediated by the lower brainstem; a lateralized right-sided upper brainstem-thalamic function as part of the dominant right-sided cortical/subcortical vestibular system that enables a global percept of body motion and orientation in space.

  5. Analysis of the mechanisms of rabbit’s brainstem hemorrhage complicated with irritable changes in the alvine mucous membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue-Long; Zheng, Yang; Shen, Hai-Ming; Jing, Wen-Li; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Huang, Jian-Zhong; Tan, Qing-Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes in the pressure of the lateral ventricle during acute brainstem hemorrhage and the changes of neural discharge of vagus nerve under the load of intracranial hypertension, so as to analyze their effects on the congestive degree of intestinal mucous membrane and the morphologic changes of intestinal mucous membrane. METHODS: An operation was made to open the skull to obtain an acute brainstem hemorrhage animal model. Microcirculatory microscope photography device and video recording system were used to determine the changes continuously in the caliber of jejunal mesenteric artery during brainstem hemorrhage and the changes with time in the congestion of jejunal mucosal villi. We used HE stain morphology to analyze the changes of duodenal mucosal villi. A recording electrode was used to calculate and measure the electric discharge activities of cervical vagus nerve. RESULTS: (1) We observed that the pressure of lateral cerebral ventricle increased transiently during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (2) The caliber of the jejunal mesenteric artery increased during brainstem hemorrhage. Analysis of red color coordinate values indicated transient increase in the congestion of jejunal mucous membrane during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (3) Through the analysis of the pathologic slice, we found enlarged blood vessels, stagnant blood, and transudatory red blood cells in the duodenal submucous layer; (4) Electric discharge of vagus nerve increased and sporadic hemorrhage spots occurred in duodenal mucous and submucous layer, when the lateral ventricle was under pressure. CONCLUSION: Brainstem hemorrhage could cause intracranial hypertension, which would increase the neural discharge of vagus nerve and cause the transient congestion of jejunal mucous membrane. It could cause hyperemia and diffused hemorrhage in the duodenal submucous layer 48 h after brainstem hemorrhage. PMID:15786536

  6. Analysis of the mechanisms of rabbit's brainstem hemorrhage complicated with irritable changes in the alvine mucous membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Long Jin; Yang Zheng; Hai-Ming Shen; Wen-Li Jing; Zhao-Qiang Zhang; Jian-Zhong Huang; Qing-Lin Tan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes in the pressure of the lateral ventricle during acute brainstem hemorrhage and the changes of neural discharge of vagus nerve under the load of intracranial hypertension, so as to analyze their effects on the congestive degree of intestinal mucous membrane and the morphologic changes of intestinal mucous membrane.METHODS: An operation was made to open the skull to obtain an acute brainstem hemorrhage animal model.Microcirculatory microscope photography device and video recording system were used to determine the changes continuously in the caliber of jejunal mesenteric artery during brainstem hemorrhage and the changes with time in the congestion of jejunal mucosal villi. We used HE stain morphology to analyze the changes of duodenal mucosal villi. A recording electrode was used to calculate and measure the electric discharge activities of cervical vagus nerve.RESULTS: (1) We observed that the pressure of lateral cerebral ventricle increased transiently during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (2) The caliber of the jejunal mesenteric artery increased during brainstem hemorrhage.Analysis of red color coordinate values indicated transient increase in the congestion of jejunal mucous membrane during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (3) Through the analysis of the pathologic slice, we found enlarged blood vessels, stagnant blood, and transudatory red blood cells in the duodenal submucous layer; (4) Electric discharge of vagus nerve increased and sporadic hemorrhage spots occurred in duodenal mucous and submucous layer, when the lateral ventricle was under pressure.CONCLUSION: Brainstem hemorrhage could causeintracranial hypertension, which would increase the neural discharge of vagus nerve and cause the transient congestion of jejunal mucous membrane. It could cause hyperemia and diffused hemorrhage in the duodenal submucous layer 48 h after brainstem hemorrhage.

  7. Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis associated with typhoid fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Wali, G M

    1991-01-01

    A 14 year old boy developed the syndrome of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis during the course of bacteriologically proved typhoid fever. The clinical course and the results of various neurological investigations are detailed. This report adds a further manifestation to the published neuropsychiatric complications of typhoid fever.

  8. Neuromyelitis Optica Lesion Mimicking Brainstem Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl who presented with weakness of the left extremities and right sided sixth cranial nerve palsy had neuromyelitis optica (NMO mistaken for brainstem glioma on MRI, in a report from Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine,Seoul, Republic of KoreaNeuromyelitis Optica, Optic-Spinal Syndrome, Spectroscopy.

  9. Brainstem Encephalitis and ADEM Following Mumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestations of brainstem encephalitis (BSE with fever, decreased level of consciousness, and left facial and abducens paralysis developed 1 week after bilateral parotitis and mumps in a 4 year-old female child and were followed by symptoms of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM within 20 days of recovery from BSE.

  10. Ethylene/ethane permeation, diffusion and gas sorption properties of carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from the prototype ladder polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1)

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas, Octavio

    2016-01-05

    Fine-tuning the microporosity of PIM-1 by heat treatment was applied to develop a suitable carbon molecular sieve membrane for ethylene/ethane separation. Pristine PIM-1 films were heated from 400 to 800 °C under inert N2 atmosphere (< 2 ppm O2). At 400 °C, PIM-1 self-cross-linked and developed polar carbonyl and hydroxyl groups due to partial dioxane splitting in the polymer backbone. Significant degradation occurred at 600 °C due to carbonization of PIM-1 and resulted in 30% increase in cumulative surface area compared to its cross-linked predecessor. In addition, PIM-1-based CMS developed smaller ultramicropores with increasing pyrolysis temperature, which enhanced their molecular sieving capability by restricted diffusion of ethylene and ethane through the matrix due to microstructural carbon densification. Consequently, the pure-gas ethylene permeability (measured at 35 °C and 2 bar) decreased from 1600 Barrer for the pristine PIM-1 to 1.3 Barrer for the amorphous carbon generated at 800 °C, whereas the ethylene/ethane pure-gas selectivity increased significantly from 1.8 to 13.

  11. A multi-view time-domain non-contact diffuse optical tomography scanner with dual wavelength detection for intrinsic and fluorescence small animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Eric; Pichette, Julien; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner with multi-view detection (over 360°) for localizing fluorescent markers in scattering and absorbing media, in particular small animals. It relies on time-domain detection after short pulse laser excitation. Ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting and photomultiplier tubes are used for time-domain measurements. For light collection, seven free-space optics non-contact dual wavelength detection channels comprising 14 detectors overall are placed around the subject, allowing the measurement of time point-spread functions at both excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. The scanner is endowed with a stereo camera pair for measuring the outer shape of the subject in 3D. Surface and DOT measurements are acquired simultaneously with the same laser beam. The hardware and software architecture of the scanner are discussed. Phantoms are used to validate the instrument. Results on the localization of fluorescent point-like inclusions immersed in a scattering and absorbing object are presented. The localization algorithm relies on distance ranging based on the measurement of early photons arrival times at different positions around the subject. This requires exquisite timing accuracy from the scanner. Further exploiting this capability, we show results on the effect of a scattering hetereogenity on the arrival time of early photons. These results demonstrate that our scanner provides all that is necessary for reconstructing images of small animals using full tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which will be the next step. Through its free-space optics design and the short pulse laser used, our scanner shows unprecedented timing resolution compared to other multi-view time-domain scanners.

  12. Hearing Restoration with Auditory Brainstem Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKATOMI, Hirofumi; MIYAWAKI, Satoru; KIN, Taichi; SAITO, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) technology attempts to restore hearing in deaf patients caused by bilateral cochlear nerve injury through the direct stimulation of the brainstem, but many aspects of the related mechanisms remain unknown. The unresolved issues can be grouped into three topics: which patients are the best candidates; which type of electrode should be used; and how to improve restored hearing. We evaluated our experience with 11 cases of ABI placement. We found that if at least seven of eleven electrodes of the MED-EL ABI are effectively placed in a patient with no deformation of the fourth ventricle, open set sentence recognition of approximately 20% and closed set word recognition of approximately 65% can be achieved only with the ABI. Appropriate selection of patients for ABI placement can lead to good outcomes. Further investigation is required regarding patient selection criteria and methods of surgery for effective ABI placement. PMID:27464470

  13. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

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    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  14. Outer Membrane Permeability of Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Studies of Passive Diffusion of Small Organic Nutrients Reveal the Absence of Classical Porins and Intrinsically Low Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowata, Hikaru; Tochigi, Saeko; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kojima, Seiji

    2017-10-01

    permeable to organic nutrients, with >20-fold lower permeability than the outer membrane of Escherichia coli Such permeability appears to fit the cyanobacterial lifestyle, in which the diffusion pathway for inorganic solutes may suffice to sustain the autotrophic physiology, illustrating a link between outer membrane permeability and the cellular lifestyle. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Leucoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate: quantitative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenweg, Marianne E; Pouwels, Petra J W; Wolf, Nicole I; van Wieringen, Wessel N; Barkhof, Frederik; van der Knaap, Marjo S

    2011-11-01

    Leucoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and elevated lactate is a white matter disorder caused by DARS2 mutations. The pathology is unknown. We observed striking discrepancies between improvement on longitudinal conventional magnetic resonance images and clinical deterioration and between large areas of high signal on diffusion-weighted imaging and small areas with low apparent diffusion coefficient values. These observations prompted a longitudinal and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study. We investigated eight patients (two males, mean age 27 years). Maps of T(2) relaxation times, fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficients, signal on diffusion-weighted imaging, and axial and radial diffusivities were generated. Brain metabolites, obtained by chemical shift imaging, were quantified. Data analysis focused on: (i) white matter with low apparent diffusion coefficient; (ii) white matter with high T(2) values; (iii) white matter with intermediate T(2) values; and (iv) normal-appearing white matter. The areas were compared with similarly located areas in eight matched controls. In five patients, T(2)-weighted images, spectroscopy, apparent diffusion coefficient maps and diffusion-weighted imaging maps were compared with those obtained 5-7 years ago. In white matter with low apparent diffusion coefficient, axial and radial diffusivities were decreased and fractional anisotropy was high. T(2) values were intermediate. These areas with truly restricted diffusion were small and often observed at the periphery of areas with high T(2) values. In the white matter with high and intermediate T(2) values, apparent diffusion coefficients and axial and radial diffusivities were increased and fractional anisotropy decreased. The signal on diffusion-weighted imaging was highest in white matter with high T(2) values, an effect of T(2) shinethrough. Chemical shift imaging in both white matter types showed increased lactate, increased myo

  16. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (ppain modulation circuitry provides a framework for the future investigations into the neural mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of persistent pain conditions thought to involve altered analgesic circuitry.

  17. Brainstem: neglected locus in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea T Grinberg

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with protein TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP. Neuropathologically, NDs are characterized by abnormal intracellular and extracellular protein deposits and by disease-specific neuronal death. Practically all terminal stages of NDs are clinically associated with dementia. Therefore, major attention was directed to protein deposits and neuron loss in supratentorial (telencephalic brain regions in the course of NDs. This was also true for PD, although the pathological hallmark of PD is degeneration of pigmented neurons of the brainstem’s substantia nigra. However, PD pathophysiology was explained by dopamine depletion in the telencephalic basal ganglia due to insufficiency and degeneration of the projection neurons located in substantia nigra. In a similar line of argumentation AD- and FTLD-related clinical deficits were exclusively explained by supratentorial allo- and neocortical laminar neuronal necrosis. Recent comprehensive studies in AD and PD early stages found considerable and unexpected involvement of brainstem nuclei, which could have the potential to profoundly change our present concepts on origin, spread, and early clinical diagnosis of these diseases. In contrast with PD and AD, few studies addressed brainstem involvement in the course of the different types of FTLD-TDP. Some of the results, including ours, disclosed a higher and more widespread pathology than anticipated. The present review will focus mainly on the impact of brainstem changes during the course of the most frequent NDs including PD, AD, and FTLD-TDP, with special emphasis on the need for more comprehensive research on FTLDs.

  18. Exploring brainstem function in multiple sclerosis by combining brainstem reflexes, evoked potentials, clinical and MRI investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnano, Immacolata; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Pilurzi, Giovanna; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Ginatempo, Francesca; Giaconi, Elena; Tolu, Eusebio; Achene, Antonio; Salis, Antonio; Rothwell, John C; Conti, Maurizio; Deriu, Franca

    2014-11-01

    To investigate vestibulo-masseteric (VMR), acoustic-masseteric (AMR), vestibulo-collic (VCR) and trigemino-collic (TCR) reflexes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); to relate abnormalities of brainstem reflexes (BSRs) to multimodal evoked potentials (EPs), clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings. Click-evoked VMR, AMR and VCR were recorded from active masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles, respectively; TCR was recorded from active sternocleidomastoid muscles, following electrical stimulation of the infraorbital nerve. EPs and MRI were performed with standard techniques. Frequencies of abnormal BSRs were: VMR 62.1%, AMR 55.1%, VCR 25.9%, TCR 58.6%. Brainstem dysfunction was identified by these tests, combined into a four-reflex battery, in 86.9% of cases, by EPs in 82.7%, MRI in 71.7% and clinical examination in 37.7% of cases. The sensitivity of paired BSRs/EPs (93.3%) was significantly higher than combined MRI/clinical testing (70%) in patients with disease duration ⩽6.4years. BSR alterations significantly correlated with clinical, EP and MRI findings. The four-BSR battery effectively increases the performance of standard EPs in early detection of brainstem impairment, otherwise undetected by clinical examination and neuroimaging. Multiple BSR assessment usefully supplements conventional testing and monitoring of brainstem function in MS, especially in newly diagnosed patients. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurodynamics, tonality, and the auditory brainstem response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Edward W; Almonte, Felix V

    2012-04-01

    Tonal relationships are foundational in music, providing the basis upon which musical structures, such as melodies, are constructed and perceived. A recent dynamic theory of musical tonality predicts that networks of auditory neurons resonate nonlinearly to musical stimuli. Nonlinear resonance leads to stability and attraction relationships among neural frequencies, and these neural dynamics give rise to the perception of relationships among tones that we collectively refer to as tonal cognition. Because this model describes the dynamics of neural populations, it makes specific predictions about human auditory neurophysiology. Here, we show how predictions about the auditory brainstem response (ABR) are derived from the model. To illustrate, we derive a prediction about population responses to musical intervals that has been observed in the human brainstem. Our modeled ABR shows qualitative agreement with important features of the human ABR. This provides a source of evidence that fundamental principles of auditory neurodynamics might underlie the perception of tonal relationships, and forces reevaluation of the role of learning and enculturation in tonal cognition.

  20. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  1. Changes of brainstem auditory and somatosensory evoked

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the characteristics and clinical value of evoked potentials in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy. Methods: Brainstem auditory, and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 6 patients, and compared with the results of CT scan. Results: All of the 6 patients had abnormal results of BAEP and MNSEP. The main abnormal parameters in BAEP were latency prolongation in wave I, inter-peak latency prolongation in Ⅰ-Ⅲ and Ⅰ-Ⅴ. The abnormal features of MNSEP were low amplitude and absence of wave N9, inter-Peak latency prolongation in Ng-N13 and N13-N20, but no significant change of N20 amplitude. The results also revealed that abnormal changes in BAEP and MNSEP were earlier than that in CT. Conclusion: The detection of BAEP and MNSEP in late infantile form of metachromatic leukodystrophy might early reveal the abnormality of conductive function in nervous system and might be a useful method in diagnosis.

  2. Intracranial neurenteric cyst traversing the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurenteric cysts (NECs, also called enterogenous cysts, are rare benign endodermal lesions of the central nervous system that probably result from separation failure of the notochord and upper gastrointestinal tract. Most frequently they are found in the lower cervical spine or the upper thoracic spine. Intracranial occurrence is rare and mostly confined to infratentorial compartment, in prepontine region [51%]. Other common locations are fourth ventricle and cerebellopontine angle. There are few reports of NEC in medulla or the cerebellum. Because of the rarity of the disease and common radiological findings, they are misinterpreted as arachnoid or simple cysts until the histopathological confirmation, unless suspected preoperatively. We herein report a rare yet interesting case of intracranial NEC traversing across the brainstem.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging differential diagnosis of brainstem lesions in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo Cosimo Quattrocchi; Yuri Errante; Maria Camilla Rossi Espagnet; Stefania Galassi; Sabino Walter Della Sala; Bruno Bernardi; Giuseppe Fariello; Daniela Longo

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of brainstem lesions,either isolated or in association with cerebellar and supra-tentorial lesions,can be challenging. Knowledge of the structural organization is crucial for the differential diagnosis and establishment of prognosis of pathologies with involvement of the brainstem. Familiarity with the location of the lesions in the brainstem is essential,especially in the pediatric population. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) is the most sensitive and specific imaging technique for diagnosing disorders of the posterior fossa and,particularly,the brainstem. High magnetic static field MRI allows detailed visualization of the morphology,signal intensity and metabolic content of the brainstem nuclei,together with visualization of the normal development and myelination. In this pictorial essay we review the brainstem pathology in pediatric patients and consider the MR imaging patterns that may help the radiologist to differentiate among vascular,toxico-metabolic,infectiveinflammatory,degenerative and neoplastic processes. Helpful MR tips can guide the differential diagnosis: These include the location and morphology of lesions,the brainstem vascularization territories,gray and white matter distribution and tissue selective vulnerability.

  4. Enterovirus 71 Brainstem Encephalitis and Cognitive and Motor Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Follow-up studies were conducted in 63 previously healthy children with enterovirus 71 brainstem encephalitis (49 stage II, 7 stage Ilia, and 7 stage Illb at National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.

  5. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis.

  6. Brainstem cysticercose simulating cystic tumor lesion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the case of a 37 year-old man with a solitary cysticercus cyst in the brainstem (pons successfully removed through a suboccipital craniectomy. Surgery in neurocysticercosis has been indicated in patients with hydrocephalus and/or large cystic lesions. Cystic lesions in the brainstem and spinal cord may have indication for surgery for two reasons: (1 diagnosis; and (2 treatment. Aspects related to differential diagnosis and therapeutic alternatives are discussed.

  7. The auditory brainstem is a barometer of rapid auditory learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoe, E; Krizman, J; Spitzer, E; Kraus, N

    2013-07-23

    To capture patterns in the environment, neurons in the auditory brainstem rapidly alter their firing based on the statistical properties of the soundscape. How this neural sensitivity relates to behavior is unclear. We tackled this question by combining neural and behavioral measures of statistical learning, a general-purpose learning mechanism governing many complex behaviors including language acquisition. We recorded complex auditory brainstem responses (cABRs) while human adults implicitly learned to segment patterns embedded in an uninterrupted sound sequence based on their statistical characteristics. The brainstem's sensitivity to statistical structure was measured as the change in the cABR between a patterned and a pseudo-randomized sequence composed from the same set of sounds but differing in their sound-to-sound probabilities. Using this methodology, we provide the first demonstration that behavioral-indices of rapid learning relate to individual differences in brainstem physiology. We found that neural sensitivity to statistical structure manifested along a continuum, from adaptation to enhancement, where cABR enhancement (patterned>pseudo-random) tracked with greater rapid statistical learning than adaptation. Short- and long-term auditory experiences (days to years) are known to promote brainstem plasticity and here we provide a conceptual advance by showing that the brainstem is also integral to rapid learning occurring over minutes.

  8. Long-term potentiation of intrinsic excitability in trigeminal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Reiko; Enomoto, Akifumi; Koizumi, Hidehiko; Tanaka, Susumu; Ishihama, Kohji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2010-02-02

    Trigeminal motoneurons (TMNs) relay the final output signals generated within the oral-motor pattern-generating circuits to the jaw muscles for execution of various patterns of motor activity. Activity-dependent plasticity, referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP), in the central nervous system has been the subject of many studies. The mechanisms of plasticity in the trigeminal system, an important component of the oral-motor system underlying mastication, swallowing, and other behaviors, remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated long-term potentiation of intrinsic excitability (LTP-IE) in TMNs. Experiments were performed using extracellular recording and whole-cell patch-clamp recording to assess the intrinsic excitability of TMNs. Intrinsic response properties were examined using an induction pulse with ionotropic transmission blocked. The output of the trigeminal motor branch exhibited long-lasting potentiation of intrinsic neuronal excitability following induction. Applying brainstem transection techniques to the neonatal rat brainstem in vitro, we found that the activity of the motoneuron population recorded from the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve exhibited LTP-IE. We thus demonstrated the usefulness of this type of preparation for the study of rudimentary oral-motor activity and observed changes in TMN excitability. In addition, on testing with the whole-cell patch-clamp method, TMNs exhibited a significant increase in excitability with a leftward shift in F-I curves generated with depolarizing current injections, whereas resting membrane potential and input resistance exhibited no remarkable changes. These findings indicate that TMNs exhibit LTP of intrinsic excitability.

  9. Immediate, irreversible, posttraumatic coma: a review indicating that bilateral brainstem injury rather than widespread hemispheric damage is essential for its production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, William I

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury may result in immediate long-lasting coma. Much attention has been given to predicting this outcome from the initial examination because these predictions can guide future treatment and interactions with the patient's family. Reports of diffuse axonal injury in these cases have ascribed the coma to widespread damage in the deep white matter that disconnects the hemispheres from the ascending arousal system (AAS). However, brainstem lesions are also present in such cases, and the AAS may be interrupted at the brainstem level. This review examines autopsy and imaging literature that assesses the presence, extent, and predictive value of lesions in both sites. The evidence suggests that diffuse injury to the deep white matter is not the usual cause of immediate long-lasting posttraumatic coma. Instead, brainstem lesions in the rostral pons or midbrain are almost always the cause but only if the lesions are bilateral. Moreover, recovery is possible if critical brainstem inputs to the AAS are spared. The precise localization of the latter is subject to ongoing investigation with advanced imaging techniques using magnets of very high magnetic gradients. Limited availability of this equipment plus the need to verify the findings continue to require meticulous autopsy examination.

  10. Uremic encephalopathy with isolated brainstem involvement revealed by magnetic resonance image: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Li-Jing; Qu, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Tian, Yu-Juan; Wang, Ying

    2017-08-08

    Uremic Encephalopathy (UE) is a neurological complication associated with acute or chronic renal failure. Imaging findings of UE may present involvement of the basal ganglia, cortical or subcortical regions, and white matter. We report a rare case of UE caused by neurogenic bladder with isolated brainstem involvement revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Immediate therapy resulted in full recovery of neurological signs and changes on MRI. A 14-year-old Han Chinese woman with a history of chronic renal failure caused by neurogenic bladder. On admission, she was unconscious and her pupils presented different sizes, while her vital signs were normal. MRI showed high signal in the dorsal pontine base and in the mid brain on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) imaging and on T2-weighted imaging while the signal was normal on diffusion-weighted images (DWI). Blood analysis revealed renal failure and acidosis. After urinary retention treatment and acidosis correction, the patient soon recovered. Follow-up MRI 2 months after the discharge revealed complete resolution of UE in the brainstem. We reported a rare case of a patient with UE that had unusual imaging manifestations for whom timely diagnosis and treatment assured recovery.

  11. Brainstem as a developmental gateway to social attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Ronny; Dital, Ayelet; Ramon, Dan; Yarmolovsky, Jessica; Gidron, Maor; Kuint, Jacob

    2017-05-15

    Evolution preserves social attention due to its key role in supporting survival. Humans are attracted to social cues from infancy, but the neurobiological mechanisms for the development of social attention are unknown. An evolutionary-based, vertical-hierarchical theoretical model of self-regulation suggests that neonatal brainstem inputs are key for the development of well-regulated social attention. Neonates born preterm (N = 44, GA 34 w.) were recruited and diagnosed at birth as a function of their auditory brainstem evoked responses (ABR). Participants enrolled in a prospective 8-year-long, double-blind, follow-up study comparing participants with brainstem dysfunctions and well-matched controls. Groups had comparable fetal, neonatal, and familial characteristics. Methods incorporated EEG power analysis and gaze tracking during the Attention Network Test (ANT, four cue types, and two targets) and a Triadic Gaze Engagement task (TGE, three social cue levels). Results showed that neonatal brainstem compromise is related to long-term changes in Alpha- and Theta-band power asymmetries (p < .034, p < .016, respectively), suggesting suppressed bottom-up input needed to alert social attention. Gaze tracking indicated dysregulated arousal-modulated attention (p < .004) and difficulty in gaze engagement to socially neutral compared to nonsocial cues (p < .012). Integrating models of Autism and cross-species data with current long-term follow-up of infants with discrete neonatal brainstem dysfunction suggests neonatal brainstem input as a gateway for bottom-up regulation of social attention. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  12. [Speech evoked auditory brainstem response and cognitive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M; Wang, N Y

    2016-12-07

    Speech evoked auditory brainstem response(s-ABR)is evoked by compound syllable, and those stimulus are similar to the daily language which convey both semantic information and non-semantic information. Speech coding program can take place at brainstem. As a new method, s-ABR may reveal the mystery of speech coding program. Many tests have proved that s-ABR is somehow related to cognitive ability. We mainly illustrated the possibility of grading the cognitive ability using s-ABR, the abnormal test result from those cognitive disorders, and the family factors that contribute to cognitive disorder.

  13. Toluene alters p75NTR expression in the rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Jesús; Morón, Lena; Zárate, Jon; Gutiérrez, Arantza; Churruca, Itziar; Echevarría, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    Toluene is a neurotoxic organic solvent widely used in industry. Acute toluene administration in rats induced a significant increase in the numbers of neural cells immunostained for p75NTR in several brainstem regions, such as the raphe magnus and the nucleus of the solitary tract, as well as in the lateral reticular, gigantocellular, vestibular and ventral cochlear nuclei, without any in the facial and spinal trigeminal nuclei and the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. These data suggest that p75NTR could be involved in toluene-induced neurotoxic efffects in the rat brainstem.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions LTBL leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Close All Description Leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate ( LTBL ) is a disorder that affects the ...

  15. [Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) associated with swelling in the brainstem: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hiroki; Nakajima, Hideto; Yamane, Kazushi; Ohnishi, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Fumiharu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a rare central nervous system inflammatory disease characterized by the punctate gadolinium enhancement peppering the pons and the cerebellar peduncles as neuroimaging. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who presented with CLIPPERS associated with swelling in the brainstem. She was hospitalized because of gait ataxia and consciousness disturbance. MRI of the brain showed FLAIR hyperintense lesions in the pons, cerebellar peduncles, cerebellum and the subcortical white matter lesion in the right occipital lobe with significant swelling in the brainstem. Diffusion-weighted MRI did not show an abnormal signal, indicating vasogenic edema. Post-contrast T1-weighted MRI showed enhanced area in the right occipital lobe and panctate gadolinium enhancement peppering brainstem. Treatment with steroids led to rapid improvement. However, she showed exacerbation of clinical and radiological findings during the tapering schedule of steroid. The biopsy from the occipital lobe revealed intense perivascular and parenchymal lymphocytic infiltrates composed of primarily T cells, B cells and macrophages. The patient was diagnosed with CLIPPERS, and treatment with increased dose of corticosteroid induced a clinical improvement. Previous reports well described a characteristic MRI finding of punctate enhancement peppering the pons. In addition, the pons and cerebellar peduncles swelling can occur in this disorder.

  16. Intrinsic-Density Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, J

    2006-01-01

    The Hohenberg-Kohn theorem and Kohn-Sham procedure are extended to functionals of the localized intrinsic density of a self-bound system such as a nucleus. After defining the intrinsic-density functional, we modify the usual Kohn-Sham procedure slightly to evaluate the mean-field approximation to the functional, and carefully describe the construction of the leading corrections for a system of fermions in one dimension with a spin-degeneracy equal to the number of particles N. Despite the fact that the corrections are complicated and nonlocal, we are able to construct a local Skyrme-like intrinsic-density functional that, while different from the exact functional, shares with it a minimum value equal to the exact ground-state energy at the exact ground-state intrinsic density, to next-to-leading order in 1/N. We briefly discuss implications for real Skyrme functionals.

  17. Brainstem involvement as a cause of central sleep apnea: pattern of microstructural cerebral damage in patients with cerebral microangiopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Duning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exact underlying pathomechanism of central sleep apnea with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSA-CSR is still unclear. Recent studies have demonstrated an association between cerebral white matter changes and CSA. A dysfunction of central respiratory control centers in the brainstem was suggested by some authors. Novel MR-imaging analysis tools now allow far more subtle assessment of microstructural cerebral changes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and what severity of subtle structural cerebral changes could lead to CSA-CSR, and whether there is a specific pattern of neurodegenerative changes that cause CSR. Therefore, we examined patients with Fabry disease (FD, an inherited, lysosomal storage disease. White matter lesions are early and frequent findings in FD. Thus, FD can serve as a "model disease" of cerebral microangiopathy to study in more detail the impact of cerebral lesions on central sleep apnea. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Genetically proven FD patients (n = 23 and age-matched healthy controls (n = 44 underwent a cardio-respiratory polysomnography and brain MRI at 3.0 Tesla. We applied different MR-imaging techniques, ranging from semiquantitative measurement of white matter lesion (WML volumes and automated calculation of brain tissue volumes to VBM of gray matter and voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI analysis. RESULTS: In 5 of 23 Fabry patients (22% CSA-CSR was detected. Voxel-based DTI analysis revealed widespread structural changes in FD patients when compared to the healthy controls. When calculated as a separate group, DTI changes of CSA-CSR patients were most prominent in the brainstem. Voxel-based regression analysis revealed a significant association between CSR severity and microstructural DTI changes within the brainstem. CONCLUSION: Subtle microstructural changes in the brainstem might be a neuroanatomical correlate of CSA-CSR in patients at risk of WML. DTI is more sensitive and specific than

  18. Brainstem death: A comprehensive review in Indian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanwate, Anant Dattatray

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, the cardiopulmonary definition of death lost its significance in favor of brain death. Brain death is a permanent cessation of all functions of the brain in which though individual organs may function but lack of integrating function of the brain, lack of respiratory drive, consciousness, and cognition confirms to the definition that death is an irreversible cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole. In spite of medical and legal acceptance globally, the concept of brain death and brain-stem death is still unclear to many. Brain death is not promptly declared due to lack of awareness and doubts about the legal procedure of certification. Many brain dead patients are kept on life supporting systems needlessly. In this comprehensive review, an attempt has been made to highlight the history and concept of brain death and brain-stem death; the anatomical and physiological basis of brain-stem death, and criteria to diagnose brain-stem death in India. PMID:25249744

  19. Stance disturbance in multiple sclerosis: brainstem lesions and posturographic assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schalek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. Balance disorders are commonly evidenced during the course of multiple sclerosis (MS. The aim of this study is to report characteristics of MS patient stance control disorders, measured by means of posturography and related to the brainstem lesions.

    Methods. Thirty-eight patients affected by MS, mildly to moderately disable according to Kurtzke’s Expanded Disability Status Scale, underwent a complete clinical neurological and vestibular evaluation and brain MRI scanning. All patients were then tested on a static posturography platform (Tetrax, Israel in four conditions: eyes open and closed standing on a firm surface and on a foam pad.

    Results. Clinical and/or MRI evidence of brainstem involvement was observed in 55.3 % of patients. When brainstem lesion was detected, Fourier analysis showed a typical pattern characterized by inversion of the  0- 0.1 Hz and  0.1 - 0.25 Hz. frequency bands.

    Conclusions. MS leads to pervasive postural disturbances in the majority of subjects, including the visuo-vestibular loops and proprioception involving vestibulo-spinal pathways in at least 55.3 % of patients. Our results may also suggest the presence of Fourier inversion in patients with brainstem lesions.


  20. Brainstem death: A comprehensive review in Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Dattatray Dhanwate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, the cardiopulmonary definition of death lost its significance in favor of brain death. Brain death is a permanent cessation of all functions of the brain in which though individual organs may function but lack of integrating function of the brain, lack of respiratory drive, consciousness, and cognition confirms to the definition that death is an irreversible cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole. In spite of medical and legal acceptance globally, the concept of brain death and brain-stem death is still unclear to many. Brain death is not promptly declared due to lack of awareness and doubts about the legal procedure of certification. Many brain dead patients are kept on life supporting systems needlessly. In this comprehensive review, an attempt has been made to highlight the history and concept of brain death and brain-stem death; the anatomical and physiological basis of brain-stem death, and criteria to diagnose brain-stem death in India.

  1. Brainstem death: A comprehensive review in Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanwate, Anant Dattatray

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, the cardiopulmonary definition of death lost its significance in favor of brain death. Brain death is a permanent cessation of all functions of the brain in which though individual organs may function but lack of integrating function of the brain, lack of respiratory drive, consciousness, and cognition confirms to the definition that death is an irreversible cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole. In spite of medical and legal acceptance globally, the concept of brain death and brain-stem death is still unclear to many. Brain death is not promptly declared due to lack of awareness and doubts about the legal procedure of certification. Many brain dead patients are kept on life supporting systems needlessly. In this comprehensive review, an attempt has been made to highlight the history and concept of brain death and brain-stem death; the anatomical and physiological basis of brain-stem death, and criteria to diagnose brain-stem death in India.

  2. The auditory brainstem response in two lizard species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittan-Powell, Elizabeth F; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tang, Yezhong

    2010-01-01

    Although lizards have highly sensitive ears, it is difficult to condition them to sound, making standard psychophysical assays of hearing sensitivity impractical. This paper describes non-invasive measurements of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in both Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko; nocturnal...... in most bird species....

  3. Intraparenchymal papillary meningioma of brainstem: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiao-Bing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both intraparenchymal papillary meningioma and papillary meningioma with cyst formation of brainstem have never been reported. The authors present an extremely rare case of patient with intraparenchymal papillary meningioma of brainstem. A 23-year-old Chinese male presented with a 4-month history of progressive left upper limb and facial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic-solid, heterogeneously enhancing mass in pons and right cerebral peduncle with no dural attachment. The tumor was totally removed via subtemporal approach. During surgery, the lesion was found to be completely intraparenchymal. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations were compatible with the diagnosis of papillary meningioma. The lesion recurred nine months after primary surgery, a second surgery followed by radiotherapy was performed. Till to now (nearly 2 years after the treatment, the patient is tumor free survival. Intraparenchymal meningioma of brainstem with cystic formation is very rare, however, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a brainstem neoplasm. The present case strongly recommended that postoperative radiotherapy was essential for the patients with papillary meningiomas.

  4. Mapping of CGRP in the alpaca (Lama pacos) brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Eliana; Coveñas, Rafael; Yi, Pedro; Aguilar, Luís Angel; Lerma, Luís; Andrade, Roy; Mangas, Arturo; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Narváez, José Angel

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the presence of immunoreactive structures containing calcitonin gene-related peptide in the alpaca brainstem. This is the first time that a detailed mapping of the cell bodies and fibers containing this neuropeptide in the alpaca brainstem has been carried out using an immunocytochemical technique. Immunoreactive cell bodies and fibers were widely distributed throughout the alpaca brainstem. A high density of calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive perikarya was found in the superior colliculus, the dorsal nucleus of the raphe, the trochlear nucleus, the lateral division of the marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, the motor trigeminal nucleus, the facial nucleus, the pons reticular formation, the retrofacial nucleus, the rostral hypoglossal nucleus, and in the motor dorsal nucleus of the vagus, whereas a high density of fibers containing calcitonin gene-related peptide was observed in the lateral division of the marginal nucleus of the brachium conjunctivum, the parvocellular division of the alaminar spinal trigeminal nucleus, the external cuneate nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, the laminar spinal trigeminal nucleus, and in the area postrema. This widespread distribution indicates that the neuropeptide studied might be involved in multiple functions in the alpaca brainstem.

  5. Preparation and Culture of Chicken Auditory Brainstem Slices

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Jason T.; Seidl, Armin H.; Rubel, Edwin W; Barria, Andres

    2011-01-01

    The chicken auditory brainstem is a well-established model system that has been widely used to study the anatomy and physiology of auditory processing at discreet periods of development 1-4 as well as mechanisms for temporal coding in the central nervous system 5-7.

  6. Construction of Hindi Speech Stimuli for Eliciting Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammad Shamim; Rangasayee, R

    2016-12-01

    Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses (spABRs) provide considerable information of clinical relevance to describe auditory processing of complex stimuli at the sub cortical level. The substantial research data have suggested faithful representation of temporal and spectral characteristics of speech sounds. However, the spABR are known to be affected by acoustic properties of speech, language experiences and training. Hence, there exists indecisive literature with regards to brainstem speech processing. This warrants establishment of language specific speech stimulus to describe the brainstem processing in specific oral language user. The objective of current study is to develop Hindi speech stimuli for recording auditory brainstem responses. The Hindi stop speech of 40 ms containing five formants was constructed. Brainstem evoked responses to speech sound |da| were gained from 25 normal hearing (NH) adults having mean age of 20.9 years (SD = 2.7) in the age range of 18-25 years and ten subjects (HI) with mild SNHL of mean 21.3 years (SD = 3.2) in the age range of 18-25 years. The statistically significant differences in the mean identification scores of synthesized for speech stimuli |da| and |ga| between NH and HI were obtained. The mean, median, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and 95 % confidence interval for the discrete peaks and V-A complex values of electrophysiological responses to speech stimulus were measured and compared between NH and HI population. This paper delineates a comprehensive methodological approach for development of Hindi speech stimuli and recording of ABR to speech. The acoustic characteristic of stimulus |da| was faithfully represented at brainstem level in normal hearing adults. There was statistically significance difference between NH and HI individuals. This suggests that spABR offers an opportunity to segregate normal speech encoding from abnormal speech processing at sub cortical level, which implies that

  7. Revealing the functional neuroanatomy of intrinsic alertness using fMRI: methodological peculiarities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clemens

    Full Text Available Clinical observations and neuroimaging data revealed a right-hemisphere fronto-parietal-thalamic-brainstem network for intrinsic alertness, and additional left fronto-parietal activity during phasic alertness. The primary objective of this fMRI study was to map the functional neuroanatomy of intrinsic alertness as precisely as possible in healthy participants, using a novel assessment paradigm already employed in clinical settings. Both the paradigm and the experimental design were optimized to specifically assess intrinsic alertness, while at the same time controlling for sensory-motor processing. The present results suggest that the processing of intrinsic alertness is accompanied by increased activity within the brainstem, thalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, right insula, and right parietal cortex. Additionally, we found increased activation in the left hemisphere around the middle frontal gyrus (BA 9, the insula, the supplementary motor area, and the cerebellum. Our results further suggest that rather minute aspects of the experimental design may induce aspects of phasic alertness, which in turn might lead to additional brain activation in left-frontal areas not normally involved in intrinsic alertness. Accordingly, left BA 9 activation may be related to co-activation of the phasic alertness network due to the switch between rest and task conditions functioning as an external warning cue triggering the phasic alertness network. Furthermore, activation of the intrinsic alertness network during fixation blocks due to enhanced expectancy shortly before the switch to the task block might, when subtracted from the task block, lead to diminished activation in the typical right hemisphere intrinsic alertness network. Thus, we cautiously suggest that--as a methodological artifact--left frontal activations might show up due to phasic alertness involvement and intrinsic alertness activations might be weakened due to contrasting with fixation blocks

  8. Revealing the functional neuroanatomy of intrinsic alertness using fMRI: methodological peculiarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Benjamin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Sack, Alexander T; Sack, Alexander; Heinecke, Armin; Willmes, Klaus; Sturm, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Clinical observations and neuroimaging data revealed a right-hemisphere fronto-parietal-thalamic-brainstem network for intrinsic alertness, and additional left fronto-parietal activity during phasic alertness. The primary objective of this fMRI study was to map the functional neuroanatomy of intrinsic alertness as precisely as possible in healthy participants, using a novel assessment paradigm already employed in clinical settings. Both the paradigm and the experimental design were optimized to specifically assess intrinsic alertness, while at the same time controlling for sensory-motor processing. The present results suggest that the processing of intrinsic alertness is accompanied by increased activity within the brainstem, thalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, right insula, and right parietal cortex. Additionally, we found increased activation in the left hemisphere around the middle frontal gyrus (BA 9), the insula, the supplementary motor area, and the cerebellum. Our results further suggest that rather minute aspects of the experimental design may induce aspects of phasic alertness, which in turn might lead to additional brain activation in left-frontal areas not normally involved in intrinsic alertness. Accordingly, left BA 9 activation may be related to co-activation of the phasic alertness network due to the switch between rest and task conditions functioning as an external warning cue triggering the phasic alertness network. Furthermore, activation of the intrinsic alertness network during fixation blocks due to enhanced expectancy shortly before the switch to the task block might, when subtracted from the task block, lead to diminished activation in the typical right hemisphere intrinsic alertness network. Thus, we cautiously suggest that--as a methodological artifact--left frontal activations might show up due to phasic alertness involvement and intrinsic alertness activations might be weakened due to contrasting with fixation blocks, when assessing the

  9. LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE SHAPES PROCESSING OF PITCH RELEVANT INFORMATION IN THE HUMAN BRAINSTEM AND AUDITORY CORTEX: ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T

    2014-12-01

    -term experience shapes this adaptive process wherein the top-down connections provide selective gating of inputs to both cortical and subcortical structures to enhance neural responses to specific behaviorally-relevant attributes of the stimulus. A theoretical framework for a neural network is proposed involving coordination between local, feedforward, and feedback components that can account for experience-dependent enhancement of pitch representations at multiple levels of the auditory pathway. The ability to record brainstem and cortical pitch relevant responses concurrently may provide a new window to evaluate the online interplay between feedback, feedforward, and local intrinsic components in the hierarchical processing of pitch relevant information.

  10. Spin concentration grating and electron spin ambipolar diffusion in intrinsic GaAs multiple quantum wells%自旋密度光栅和本征 GaAs 量子阱中的电子自旋双极扩散

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余华梁; 陈曦矅; 狄俊安

    2013-01-01

    为研究空穴对自旋极化电子扩散的影响,提出用自旋密度光栅方法来观察电子自旋扩散过程。由飞秒激光在本征GaAs多量子阱中激发产生瞬态自旋光栅和瞬态自旋密度光栅,并用于研究电子自旋扩散和电子自旋双极扩散。实验测得自旋双极扩散系数Das =25.4 cm 2/s,低于自旋扩散系数Ds =113.0 cm 2/s,表明自旋密度光栅中电子自旋扩散受到空穴的显著影响。%In order to research the effect of holes on the spin electron diffusion , a method of resonant spin am-plication called“Spin Concentration Grating(SCG)” is adopt to observe the process of electron spin diffusion . Transient spin grating and spin concentration grating excited by femtosecond laser beams are used to investigate electron spin diffusion and “electron spin ambipolar diffusion” in intrinsic GaAs multiple quantum wells .The measured coefficient of “electron spin ambipolar diffusion” Das =25.4 cm 2? s-1 is lower than that of electron spin diffusion Ds=113.0 cm 2? s-1 , which indicates that the influence of holes on electron spin diffusion in spin concentration grating is notable .

  11. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  12. Lorentz invariant intrinsic decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Milburn, G J

    2003-01-01

    Quantum decoherence can arise due to classical fluctuations in the parameters which define the dynamics of the system. In this case decoherence, and complementary noise, is manifest when data from repeated measurement trials are combined. Recently a number of authors have suggested that fluctuations in the space-time metric arising from quantum gravity effects would correspond to a source of intrinsic noise, which would necessarily be accompanied by intrinsic decoherence. This work extends a previous heuristic modification of Schr\\"{o}dinger dynamics based on discrete time intervals with an intrinsic uncertainty. The extension uses unital semigroup representations of space and time translations rather than the more usual unitary representation, and does the least violence to physically important invariance principles. Physical consequences include a modification of the uncertainty principle and a modification of field dispersion relations, in a way consistent with other modifications suggested by quantum grav...

  13. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ita, Eyo Eyo; Yu, Hoi-Lai

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental canonical commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  14. Intrinsic contractures of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksima, Nader; Besh, Basil R

    2012-02-01

    Contractures of the intrinsic muscles of the fingers disrupt the delicate and complex balance of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, which allows the hand to be so versatile and functional. The loss of muscle function primarily affects the interphalangeal joints but also may affect etacarpophalangeal joints. The resulting clinical picture is often termed, intrinsic contracture or intrinsic-plus hand. Disruption of the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic muscles has many causes and may be secondary to changes within the intrinsic musculature or the tendon unit. This article reviews diagnosis, etiology, and treatment algorithms in the management of intrinsic contractures of the fingers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Predicting Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation can be predicted from participants' perceptions of the social environment and the task environment (Ryan & Deci, 2000)in terms of control, relatedness and competence. To determine the degree of independence of these factors 251 students in higher vocational education (physiotherapy and hotel management) indicated the extent to…

  16. A parallel cholinergic brainstem pathway for enhancing locomotor drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Roy; Juvin, Laurent; Dubuc, Réjean; Alford, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The brainstem locomotor system is believed to be organized serially from the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) to reticulospinal neurons, which in turn, project to locomotor neurons in the spinal cord. In contrast, we now identify in lampreys, brainstem muscarinoceptive neurons receiving parallel inputs from the MLR and projecting back to reticulospinal cells to amplify and extend durations of locomotor output. These cells respond to muscarine with extended periods of excitation, receive direct muscarinic excitation from the MLR, and project glutamatergic excitation to reticulospinal neurons. Targeted block of muscarine receptors over these neurons profoundly reduces MLR-induced excitation of reticulospinal neurons and markedly slows MLR-evoked locomotion. Their presence forces us to rethink the organization of supraspinal locomotor control, to include a sustained feedforward loop that boosts locomotor output. PMID:20473293

  17. Mosaic Evolution of Brainstem Motor Nuclei in Catarrhine Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth D. Dobson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial motor nucleus volume coevolves with both social group size and primary visual cortex volume in catarrhine primates as part of a specialized neuroethological system for communication using facial expressions. Here, we examine whether facial nucleus volume also coevolves with functionally unrelated brainstem motor nuclei (trigeminal motor and hypoglossal due to developmental constraints. Using phylogenetically informed multiple regression analyses of previously published brain component data, we demonstrate that facial nucleus volume is not correlated with the volume of other motor nuclei after controlling for medulla volume. Our results show that brainstem motor nuclei can evolve independently of other developmentally linked structures in association with specific behavioral ecological conditions. This finding provides additional support for the mosaic view of brain evolution.

  18. Hemicrania continua secondary to an ipsilateral brainstem lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Marcelo M; Andrade-Valença, Luciana P A; da Silva, Wilson Farias; Dodick, David W

    2007-03-01

    We describe a 47-year-old woman with a 3-year history of a continuum mild-moderate right-side headache, with exacerbations, associated with stabbing volleys of pain on right orbit-temporal region (10/10) and right eye ptosis and lacrimation with conjunctival injection. The pain was completely abolished with indomethacin (100 mg per day). The diagnosis of hemicrania continua was made according to the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria. The headache presentation was precipitated by a stroke and a right-side brainstem lesion was present at magnetic resonance imaging. This case report shows anatomoclinical evidence of the involvement of brainstem structures on the pathophysiology of hemicrania continua.

  19. The Superior Transvelar Approach to the Fourth Ventricle and Brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Ezer, Haim; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Bollam, Papireddy; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Objective The superior transvelar approach is used to access pathologies located in the fourth ventricle and brainstem. The surgical path is below the venous structures, through the superior medullary velum. Following splitting the tentorial edge, near the tentorial apex, the superior medullary velum is split in the cerebello-mesencephalic fissure. Using the supracerebellar infratentorial, transtentorial or parietal interhemispheric routes, the superior medullary velum is approached. Splittin...

  20. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldonate, J; Mercuri, C; Reta, J; Biurrun, J; Bonell, C; Gentiletti, G; Escobar, S; Acevedo, R [Laboratorio de Ingenieria en Rehabilitacion e Investigaciones Neuromusculares y Sensoriales (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Ruta 11 - Km 10, Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  1. Adaptive hypofractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for a large brainstem metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinclair, Georges; Bartek, Jiri; Martin, Heather

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To demonstrate how adaptive hypofractionated radiosurgery by gamma knife (GK) can be successfully utilized to treat a large brainstem metastasis - a novel approach to a challenging clinical situation. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 42-year-old woman, diagnosed with metastatic nonsmall cell lung...... adaptive hypofractionation proved to be effective to achieve tumor control while limiting local adverse reactions. This surgical modality should be considered when managing larger brain lesions in critical areas....

  2. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldonate, J.; Mercuri, C.; Reta, J.; Biurrun, J.; Bonell, C.; Gentiletti, G.; Escobar, S.; Acevedo, R.

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  3. Quality of life after brainstem cavernoma surgery in 71 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukatz, Thomas; Sarnthein, Johannes; Sitter, Helmut; Bozinov, Oliver; Benes, Ludwig; Sure, Ulrich; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-09-01

    Symptomatic patients with a brainstem cavernoma are treated surgically with increasing frequency. Generally, the patient's benefit from this difficult surgical intervention is quantified by the assessment of neurological symptoms. To document the beneficial effect of surgery in a larger patient population by assessing the postoperative quality of life (QoL). In a series of 71 surgically treated patients, a detailed neurological status was assessed by Patzold Rating and Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Patients rated their QoL with the Short Form 36 Health Survey. To document the effect of surgery on QoL, we devised a supplementary questionnaire. The last 24 patients completed Short Form 36 Health Survey pre- and postoperatively. Karnofsky Performance Status Scale improved in 44 of 71 surgical patients (62%), remained unchanged in 19 (27%), and deteriorated in 8 (11%) individuals. Patzold Rating showed a more detailed picture of the neurological symptoms. It correlated significantly with Karnofsky Performance Status Scale, which underscores its usefulness for patients with brainstem lesions. In the Short Form 36 Health Survey score, the Mental Component Summary improved with surgery (paired test, P = .015). In addition, 58 individuals (82%) declared a clear subjective benefit of surgery. The results of this large series support the notion that microsurgical removal of a brainstem cavernoma represents an effective therapy in experienced hands and is generally associated with good clinical outcome, both neurologically and in terms of QoL.

  4. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  5. Reflections on the brainstem dysfunction in neurologically disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki

    2009-08-01

    This article deals with the neurological basis of brainstem-related symptoms in disabled children. Synaptic interactions of respiratory and swallowing centers, which are briefly reviewed in this study, highlight the significance of the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) in the stereotyped motor events. Coordination mechanisms between these two central pattern generators are also studied with a focus on the inhibitory action of decrementing expiratory neurons that terminate the inspiratory activity and become activated during swallowing. Dorsal brainstem lesions in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) affect the area including NTS, and result in symptoms of apneusis, facial nerve paresis, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, and laryngeal stridor. Leigh syndrome patients with similar distributions of medullary lesions show increased sighs, post-sigh apnea, hiccups, and vomiting in addition to the symptoms of HIE, suggesting pathologically augmented vagal reflex pathways. The present article also discusses the pathophysiology of laryngeal dystonia in xeroderma pigmentosum group A, self-mutilation in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, and sudden unexpected death in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Close observation and logical assessment of brainstem dysfunction symptoms should be encouraged in order to achieve better understanding and management of these symptoms in disabled children.

  6. Diffusion-weighted MRI of maple syrup urine disease encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalleri, F.; Mavilla, L. [Servizio di Neuroradiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Policlinico, Modena (Italy); Berardi, A.; Ferrari, F. [Servizio di Neonatologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Policlinico, Modena (Italy); Burlina, A.B. [Dipartimento di Pediatria, Azienda Ospedaliera, Universita di Padova, Padua (Italy)

    2002-06-01

    We report the case of a newborn child with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), diagnosed at 10 days of life. Diffusion-weighted echoplanar MRI showed marked hyperintensity of the cerebellar white matter, the brainstem, the cerebral peduncles, the thalami, the dorsal limb of the internal capsule and the centrum semiovale, while conventional dual-echo sequence evidenced only a weak diffuse T2 hyperintensity in the cerebellar white matter and in the dorsal brainstem. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of these regions was markedly (>80%) decreased. Therefore, in agreement with current hypotheses on MSUD pathogenesis, MSUD oedema proves to be a cytotoxic oedema. Diffusion-weighted MRI may be a valuable tool, more sensitive than conventional spin-echo techniques, to assess the extent and progression of cytotoxicity in MSUD, as well as the effectiveness of the therapeutic interventions. (orig.)

  7. Functional imaging of the human brainstem during somatosensory input and autonomic output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Anthony Henderson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half a century, many experimental animal investigations have explored the role of various brainstem regions in a variety of conditions. Despite the accumulation of a considerable body of knowledge in primarily anaesthetized preparations, relatively few investigations have explored brainstem function in awake humans. It is important that human brainstem function is explored given that many neurological conditions, from obstructive sleep apnea, chronic pain and hypertension, likely involve significant changes in the processing of information within the brainstem. Recent advances in the collection and processing of magnetic resonance images, has resulted in the possibility of exploring brainstem activity changes in awake healthy individuals and in those with various clinical conditions. We and others have begun to explore changes in brainstem activity in humans during a number of challenges, including during cutaneous and muscle pain, as well as during challenges that evoke increases in sympathetic activity. More recently we have successfully recorded sympathetic nerve activity concurrently with fMRI of the brainstem, which will allow us, for the first time to explore brainstem sites directly responsible for conditions such as hypertension. Since many conditions will involve changes in brainstem function and structure, defining brainstem changes will likely result in a greater ability to develop more effective treatment regimes.

  8. A rabbit model of graded primary mechanical injury to brainstem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong-min; WANG Xiao-wei; XUE Hai-bin; XIA Peng; LI Hong-wei; DAI Guo-xin; JI Xiao-yuan; ZHAO Hui; YIN Zhi-yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To introduce a new animal model of graded mechanical primary brainstem injury (BSI).Methods:Altogether 45 rabbits were subjected to BSI by type Ⅱ biological impact machine designed by the Third Military Medical University.The animals were divided into 4 experimental groups (n=10) and 1 control group (n=5) according to different magnitudes of impact pressure imposed on the occipital nodule:Group 1,500-520 kPa; Group 2,520-540 kPa; Group 3,540-560 kPa; Group 4,560-580 kPa and Group 5,0 kPa with 20 kPa increase in each grade.The impact depth was a constant 0.5 cm.After injury,the clinical symptoms and signs as well as pathological changes were observed.Results:Rabbits in Group 1 revealed mild physiological reaction of BSI.They had localized cerebral contusion with punctate hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was limited to the peripheral tissues at the impact area.In Group 2,obvious physiological reaction was observed.Local pathological lesions reached the superficial layer ofbrainstem tissues; focal hemorrhage and girdleshaped SAH in basilar pon were observed under microscope.In Group 3,BSI was more severe with a long respiratory depression.Pathological lesions reached the inner portion of brainstem with massive hemorrhage and the whole brainstem was wrapped by subarachnoid hematoma.In Group 4,most rabbits died due to severe BSI.Pathological lesions deepened to the central brainstem with wide pathological change,rapture of the medulla oblongata central canal.Group 5 was the control group,with normal brainstem structure and no lesion observed.Conclusion:This model successfully simulates different levels ofbrainstem mechanical injury and clearly shows the subsequent pathological changes following injury.It takes two external parameters (impact pressure and depth) and has a similar injury mechanism to clinical accelerating BSI.Moreover it is reproducible and stable,thus being beneficial for exploring pathophysiological mechanism,diagnosis and

  9. Architectural organization of the african elephant diencephalon and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseko, Busisiwe C; Patzke, Nina; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the organization of the diencephalon and brainstem of the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) - a region of the elephant brain that has not been examined for at least 50 years. The current description, employing material amenable for use with modern neuroanatomical methods, shows that, for the most part, the elephant diencephalon and brainstem are what could be considered typically mammalian, with subtle differences in proportions and topology. The variations from these previous descriptions, where they occurred, were related to four specific aspects of neural information processing: (1) the motor systems, (2) the auditory and vocalization systems, (3) the orexinergic satiety/wakefulness centre of the hypothalamus and the locus coeruleus, and (4) the potential neurogenic lining of the brainstem. For the motor systems, three specific structures exhibited interesting differences in organization - the pars compacta of the substantia nigra, the facial motor nerve nucleus, and the inferior olivary nuclear complex, all related to the timing and learning of movements and likely related to the control of the trunk. The dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra appear to form distinct islands separated from each other by large fibre pathways, an appearance unique to the elephant. Each island may send topologically organized projections to the striatum forming a dopaminergic innervation mosaic that may relate to trunk movements. At least five regions of the combined vocalization production and auditory/seismic reception system were specialized, including the large and distinct nucleus ellipticus of the periaqueductal grey matter, the enlarged lateral superior olivary nucleus, the novel transverse infrageniculate nucleus of the dorsal thalamus, the enlarged dorsal column nuclei and the ventral posterior inferior nucleus of the dorsal thalamus. These specializations, related to production and reception of infrasound, allow the proposal of a

  10. Isolated in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations remain important tools in respiratory neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen M; Turner, Sara M; Huxtable, Adrianne G; Ben-Mabrouk, Faiza

    2012-01-15

    Isolated in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations are used extensively in respiratory neurobiology because the respiratory network in the pons and medulla is intact, monosynaptic descending inputs to spinal motoneurons can be activated, brainstem and spinal cord tissue can be bathed with different solutions, and the responses of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spinal motoneurons to experimental perturbations can be compared. The caveats and limitations of in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations are well-documented. However, isolated brainstem-spinal cords are still valuable experimental preparations that can be used to study neuronal connectivity within the brainstem, development of motor networks with lethal genetic mutations, deleterious effects of pathological drugs and conditions, respiratory spinal motor plasticity, and interactions with other motor behaviors. Our goal is to show how isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparations still have a lot to offer scientifically and experimentally to address questions within and outside the field of respiratory neurobiology.

  11. Auditory evoked potentials and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in evaluation of brainstem lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Anita; Nesek Mađarić, Vesna; Starčević, Katarina; Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Gabelić, Tereza; Adamec, Ivan; Habek, Mario

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the roles of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) in the evaluation of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS). Altogether 32 patients with the diagnosis of MS participated in the study. The following data was collected from all patients: age, gender, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, brainstem functional system score (BSFS) (part of the EDSS evaluating brainstem symptomatology), and involvement of the brainstem on the brain MRI. AEP and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) were studied in all patients. BSFS, MRI, AEP, oVEMP and cVEMP involvement of the brainstem was evident in 9 (28.1%), 14 (43.8%), 7 (21.9%), 12 (37.5%) and 10 (31.0%) patients, respectively. None of the tests used showed statistically significant advantage in the detection of brainstem lesions. When combining oVEMP and cVEMP 18 (56.3%) patients showed brainstem involvement. This combination showed brainstem involvement in greater percentage than BSFS or AEP, with statistical significance (p=0.035 and p=0.007, respectively). VEMP is a reliable method in detection of brainstem involvement in MS. It is comparable with MRI, but superior to clinical examination or AEP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Brown, Emery N; Kinney, Hannah C; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-12-01

    Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm(3) multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal.

  13. Toward an In Vivo Neuroimaging Template of Human Brainstem Nuclei of the Ascending Arousal, Autonomic, and Motor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi, Nicola; Edlow, Brian L.; Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Brown, Emery N.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brainstem nuclei (Bn) in humans play a crucial role in vital functions, such as arousal, autonomic homeostasis, sensory and motor relay, nociception, sleep, and cranial nerve function, and they have been implicated in a vast array of brain pathologies. However, an in vivo delineation of most human Bn has been elusive because of limited sensitivity and contrast for detecting these small regions using standard neuroimaging methods. To precisely identify several human Bn in vivo, we employed a 7 Tesla scanner equipped with multi-channel receive-coil array, which provided high magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity, and a multi-contrast (diffusion fractional anisotropy and T2-weighted) echo-planar-imaging approach, which provided complementary contrasts for Bn anatomy with matched geometric distortions and resolution. Through a combined examination of 1.3 mm3 multi-contrast anatomical images acquired in healthy human adults, we semi-automatically generated in vivo probabilistic Bn labels of the ascending arousal (median and dorsal raphe), autonomic (raphe magnus, periaqueductal gray), and motor (inferior olivary nuclei, two subregions of the substantia nigra compatible with pars compacta and pars reticulata, two subregions of the red nucleus, and, in the diencephalon, two subregions of the subthalamic nucleus) systems. These labels constitute a first step toward the development of an in vivo neuroimaging template of Bn in standard space to facilitate future clinical and research investigations of human brainstem function and pathology. Proof-of-concept clinical use of this template is demonstrated in a minimally conscious patient with traumatic brainstem hemorrhages precisely localized to the raphe Bn involved in arousal. PMID:26066023

  14. The Trouble with Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.T. DeHoff

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenological formalism, which yields Fick's Laws for diffusion in single phase multicomponent systems, is widely accepted as the basis for the mathematical description of diffusion. This paper focuses on problems associated with this formalism. This mode of description of the process is cumbersome, defining as it does matrices of interdiffusion coefficients (the central material properties that require a large experimental investment for their evaluation in three component systems, and, indeed cannot be evaluated for systems with more than three components. It is also argued that the physical meaning of the numerical values of these properties with respect to the atom motions in the system remains unknown. The attempt to understand the physical content of the diffusion coefficients in the phenomenological formalism has been the central fundamental problem in the theory of diffusion in crystalline alloys. The observation by Kirkendall that the crystal lattice moves during diffusion led Darken to develop the concept of intrinsic diffusion, i.e., atom motion relative to the crystal lattice. Darken and his successors sought to relate the diffusion coefficients computed for intrinsic fluxes to those obtained from the motion of radioactive tracers in chemically homogeneous samples which directly report the jump frequencies of the atoms as a function of composition and temperature. This theoretical connection between tracer, intrinsic and interdiffusion behavior would provide the basis for understanding the physical content of interdiffusion coefficients. Definitive tests of the resulting theoretical connection have been carried out for a number of binary systems for which all three kinds of observations are available. In a number of systems predictions of intrinsic coefficients from tracer data do not agree with measured values although predictions of interdiffusion coefficients appear to give reasonable agreement. Thus, the complete

  15. Intrinsic Depletion or Not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Bruun, Sara; Hansen, Søren;

    with an AFM (2).    The intuitive explanation for the depletion based on "hydrophobic mismatch" between the obviously hydrophilic bulk phase of water next to the hydrophobic polymer. It would thus be an intrinsic property of all interfaces between non-matching materials. The detailed physical interaction path......  The presence of a depletion layer of water along extended hydrophobic interfaces, and a possibly related formation of nanobubbles, is an ongoing discussion. The phenomenon was initially reported when we, years ago, chose thick films (~300-400Å) of polystyrene as cushions between a crystalline...

  16. Brainstem and limbic encephalitis with paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Khaled; Lin, David J; Matiello, Marcelo; Chew, Sheena; Morganstern, Daniel; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of disorders associated with anti-neuromyelitis optica (NMO) antibody is being extended to include infrequent instances associated with cancer. We describe a patient with brainstem and limbic encephalitis from NMO-immunoglobulin G in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the context of newly diagnosed breast cancer. The neurological features markedly improved with excision of her breast cancer and immune suppressive therapy. This case further broadens the NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) by an association between NMOSD and cancer and raises the question of coincidental occurrence and the appropriate circumstances to search for a tumor in certain instances of NMO.

  17. Stereotactic LINAC radiosurgery for the treatment of brainstem cavernomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuetsch, M.; El Majdoub, F.; Hoevels, M.; Sturm, V.; Maarouf, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-04-15

    Background: The management of deep-seated cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) is still controversial. Although surgery remains the treatment of choice in patients with recurrent hemorrhage, patients with CCMs located in the brainstem are in many cases not eligible for resection due to high procedure-related morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the long-term outcome of LINAC radiosurgery (LINAC-RS) for the treatment of brainstem CCMs. Patients and methods: Between December 1992 and March 2008, 14 patients (6 men, 8 women) harboring brainstem CCMs underwent LINAC-RS. Pretreatment neuroimaging showed no associated developmental venous angiomas (DVAs) in any of our patients. Prior to treatment, all patients suffered at least from one symptomatic hemorrhage (median 1.8, range 1-3). A median follow-up of 7.1 years (range 2.0-16.8 years) could be obtained in 12 patients. We applied a median tumor surface dose of 13.9 Gy (range 11-18 Gy; median tumor volume 1.6 ml, range 0.4-4.3 ml). Results: Following LINAC-RS, neurological outcome improved in 4 (33.3%) and remained unchanged in 8 patients (66.7%). Rebleeding with subsequent transient neurological status deterioration occurred in 4 patients (33.3%), leading to additional surgical resection in 2 patients (16.7%). The corresponding annual hemorrhage rate was 4.8% (4/82.8 patient-years). Adverse radiation effects (ARE, defined by perilesional hyperintensity on T{sub 2}-weighted MR images) were revealed in 3 patients (25%), leading to transient neurological deficits in 2 patients (16.7%). There were no procedure-related complications leading to either permanent morbidity or mortality. Conclusion: Our results support the role of LINAC-RS as an efficient and safe treatment to significantly reduce the annual hemorrhage rate in patients suffering from brainstem CCMs not eligible to microsurgery. Compared with radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), the intervention-related morbidity is higher. (orig.)

  18. Dysarthria in children with cerebellar or brainstem tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, M; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E; Yousef-Bak, E; Paquier, P F; van Dongen, H R

    1998-05-01

    Speech features were perceptually analyzed in two groups of children. The first group (n = 6) had undergone cerebellar tumor resection, and the second group (n = 6) included children with brainstem tumors. Children belonging to the first group became dysarthric after a postoperative mute phase. Slow speech rate was a specific feature, but scanning speech and irregular articulatory breakdown (i.e., prominent characteristics in adult ataxic dysarthria) were not observed. In the second group, hypernasality was a prominent characteristic and resembled flaccid dysarthria in adults. These findings suggest that acquired childhood dysarthria needs a proper classification.

  19. Lissencephaly with brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia and congenital cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumansour, Iman S; Wrogemann, Jens; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Salman, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Classical lissencephaly may be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia and when significant cerebellar abnormalities occur, defects in proteins encoded by TUBA1A, RELN, and very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) genes have been reported. We present a neonate with a severe neurologic phenotype associated with hypotonia, oropharyngeal incoordination that required a gastric tube for feeding, intractable epilepsy, and congenital cataracts. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed classical lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, globular and vertical hippocampi, and severe cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. She died at 6 weeks of age. No specific molecular diagnosis was made. This likely represents a previously undescribed genetic lissencephaly syndrome.

  20. Metastatic Brainstem Glioma in Children: A Case Report and Review

    OpenAIRE

    Castaño González, Alexandra; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Angarita Ribero, Claudia Tatiana; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Guzmán Cruz, Paula Carolina; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a 33 months old patient, with failure to thrive, alterations in gait and swallow. Brain and spine magnetic resonance showed masses at medulla and pons, venous thrombosis in the left transverse sinus and metastatic masses to spinal cord. Unresectable metastatic brainstem glioma was diagnosed. Oncology started treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy having a survival time of more than 3 years. En este artículo se presenta el caso de un bebé de 33 meses de edad con ...

  1. Intrinsically Disordered Energy Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebaro, Yassmine; Ballard, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Debayan; Wales, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) reveals an underlying multifunnel structure for the energy landscape. We suggest that such ‘intrinsically disordered’ landscapes, with a number of very different competing low-energy structures, are likely to characterise IDPs, and provide a useful way to address their properties. In particular, IDPs are present in many cellular protein interaction networks, and several questions arise regarding how they bind to partners. Are conformations resembling the bound structure selected for binding, or does further folding occur on binding the partner in a induced-fit fashion? We focus on the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) protein, which adopts an -helical conformation when bound to its partner, and is involved in the activation of apoptosis. Recent experimental evidence shows that folding is not necessary for binding, and supports an induced-fit mechanism. Using a variety of computational approaches we deduce the molecular mechanism behind the instability of the PUMA peptide as a helix in isolation. We find significant barriers between partially folded states and the helix. Our results show that the favoured conformations are molten-globule like, stabilised by charged and hydrophobic contacts, with structures resembling the bound state relatively unpopulated in equilibrium.

  2. Auditory Brainstem Responses in Children Treated with Cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kamali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In view of improvement in therapeutic outcome of cancer treatment in children resulting in increased survival rates and the importance of hearing in speech and language development, this research project was intended to assess the effects of cisplatin group on hearing ability in children aged 6 months to 12 years.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, hearing of 10 children on cisplatin group medication for cancer who met the inclusion criteria was examined by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABR using the three stimulants of click and 4 and 8 kHz tone bursts. All children were examined twice: before drug administration and within 72 hours after receiving the last dose. Then the results were compared with each other.Results: There was a significant difference between hearing thresholds before and after drug administration (p<0.05. Right and left ear threshold comparison revealed no significant difference.Conclusion: Ototoxic effects of cisplatin group were confirmed in this study. Insignificant difference observed in comparing right and left ear hearing thresholds could be due to small sample size. auditory brainstem responses test especially with frequency specificity proved to be a useful method in assessing cisplatin ototoxicity.

  3. AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES IN SENILE PRESBYCUSIS PATIENTS OVER 90 YEARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Aiting; LIANG Sichao; ZHANG Ruining; GUO Weiwei; ZHOU Qiyou; JI Fei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in presbycusis patients el-der than 90 years. Methods Fourteen presbycusis patients elder than 90 years (presbycusis group, 91.1.4 ± 1.3 years, 26 ears) and 9 normal-hearing young adults (control group, 22.7 ± 1.2 years, 18 ears) participated in the study. Alternative click-evoked ABRs were recorded in both groups. The peak latency (PL) of peak I,Ⅲ, and V, and the inter-peak latency (IPI) of I-Ⅲ,Ⅲ-V, and I-V were compared between groups. Results In elder presbycusis patients, the occurrence rate of peak I andⅢwere both 76.9%, and that of peak V was 84.6%. In presbycusis group, the peak latencies of I, Ⅲ, V were significantly longer than that of control group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference between groups in the IPI of peak I-IⅢ (P=0.298, peakⅢ-V (P=0.254) and peak I-V (P=0.364). Conclusions Auditory brainstem responses in presbycusis pa-tients elder than 90 years showed worse wave differentiation.

  4. A case of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Youn Kim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE is a rare disease diagnosed by specific clinical features such as 'progressive, relatively symmetric external ophthalmoplegia and ataxia by 4 weeks' and 'disturbance of consciousness or hyperreflexia' after the exclusion of other diseases involving the brain stem. Anti-ganglioside antibodies (GM, GD and GQ in the serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are sometimes informative for the diagnosis of BBE because of the rarity of positive findings in other diagnositic methods: brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, routine CSF examination, motor nerve conduction study, and needle electromyography. We report a rare case of childhood BBE with elevated anti-GM1 antibodies in the serum, who had specific clinical symptoms such as a cranial polyneuropathy presenting as ophthalmoplegia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and facial weakness; progressive motor weakness; altered mental status; and ataxia. However, the brain MRI, routine CSF examination, nerve conduction studies, electromyography, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials were normal. BBE was suspected and the patient was successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulins.

  5. Brainstem auditory evoked potential abnormalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharat Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus represents a syndrome complex in which multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system, are affected. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the changes in the brainstem auditory evoked potentials in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 126 diabetic males, aged 35-50 years, and 106 age-matched, healthy male volunteers. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were recorded and the results were analyzed statistically using student′s unpaired t-test. The data consisted of wave latencies I, II, III, IV, V and interpeak latencies I-III, III-V and I-V, separately for both ears. Results: The latency of wave IV was significantly delayed only in the right ear, while the latency of waves III, V and interpeak latencies III-V, I-V showed a significant delay bilaterally in diabetic males. However, no significant difference was found between diabetic and control subjects as regards to the latency of wave IV unilaterally in the left ear and the latencies of waves I, II and interpeak latency I-III bilaterally. Conclusion: Diabetes patients have an early involvement of central auditory pathway, which can be detected with fair accuracy with auditory evoked potential studies.

  6. Development of Brainstem-Evoked Responses in Congenital Auditory Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tillein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the development of the auditory system in hearing and completely acoustically deprived animals, naive congenitally deaf white cats (CDCs and hearing controls (HCs were investigated at different developmental stages from birth till adulthood. The CDCs had no hearing experience before the acute experiment. In both groups of animals, responses to cochlear implant stimulation were acutely assessed. Electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses (E-ABRs were recorded with monopolar stimulation at different current levels. CDCs demonstrated extensive development of E-ABRs, from first signs of responses at postnatal (p.n. day 3 through appearance of all waves of brainstem response at day 8 p.n. to mature responses around day 90 p.n.. Wave I of E-ABRs could not be distinguished from the artifact in majority of CDCs, whereas in HCs, it was clearly separated from the stimulus artifact. Waves II, III, and IV demonstrated higher thresholds in CDCs, whereas this difference was not found for wave V. Amplitudes of wave III were significantly higher in HCs, whereas wave V amplitudes were significantly higher in CDCs. No differences in latencies were observed between the animal groups. These data demonstrate significant postnatal subcortical development in absence of hearing, and also divergent effects of deafness on early waves II–IV and wave V of the E-ABR.

  7. Experimental results obtained in the vibrating intrinsic reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank; Boudenot, Jean-Claude; Etten, van Wim

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been performed in a vibrating intrinsic reverberation chamber (VIRC). This chamber has varying angles between wall, floor and ceiling. Inside the VIRC a diffuse, statistically uniform electromagnetic field is created without the use of a mechanical rotating mode stirrer. In compari

  8. The Role of the Auditory Brainstem in Processing Linguistically-Relevant Pitch Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the brainstem has been neglected as a part of the brain involved in language processing. We review recent evidence of language-dependent effects in pitch processing based on comparisons of native vs. nonnative speakers of a tonal language from electrophysiological recordings in the auditory brainstem. We argue that there is enhancing…

  9. Endoscopic approaches to brainstem cavernous malformations: Case series and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil R Nayak

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The endoscope is a promising adjunct to the neurosurgeon′s ability to approach difficult to access brainstem cavernous malformations. It allows the surgeon to achieve well-illuminated, panoramic views, and by combining approaches, can provide minimally invasive access to most regions of the brainstem.

  10. Gaussian Intrinsic Entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišta, Ladislav; Tatham, Richard

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a cryptographically motivated quantifier of entanglement in bipartite Gaussian systems called Gaussian intrinsic entanglement (GIE). The GIE is defined as the optimized mutual information of a Gaussian distribution of outcomes of measurements on parts of a system, conditioned on the outcomes of a measurement on a purifying subsystem. We show that GIE vanishes only on separable states and exhibits monotonicity under Gaussian local trace-preserving operations and classical communication. In the two-mode case, we compute GIE for all pure states as well as for several important classes of symmetric and asymmetric mixed states. Surprisingly, in all of these cases, GIE is equal to Gaussian Rényi-2 entanglement. As GIE is operationally associated with the secret-key agreement protocol and can be computed for several important classes of states, it offers a compromise between computable and physically meaningful entanglement quantifiers.

  11. Intrinsic Time Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi Lai

    2016-01-01

    Correct identification of the true gauge symmetry of General Relativity being 3d spatial diffeomorphism invariant(3dDI) (not the conventional infinite tensor product group with principle fibre bundle structure), together with intrinsic time extracted from clean decomposition of the canonical structure yields a self-consistent theory of quantum gravity. A new set of fundamental commutation relations is also presented. The basic variables are the eight components of the unimodular part of the spatial dreibein and eight SU(3) generators which correspond to Klauder's momentric variables that characterize a free theory of quantum gravity. The commutation relations are not canonical, but have well defined group theoretical meanings. All fundamental entities are dimensionless; and the quantum wave functionals are preferentially in the dreibein representation. The successful quantum theory of gravity involves only broad spectrum of knowledge and deep insights but no exotic idea.

  12. Cellular and molecular bases of neuroplasticity: brainstem effects after cochlear damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Loyzaga, Pablo; Carricondo, Francisco; Bartolomé, Maria V; Iglesias, Mari C; Rodríguez, Fernando; Poch-Broto, Joaquin

    2010-03-01

    After a cochlear lesion or auditory nerve damage, afferent connections from auditory ganglia can be highly altered. This results in a clear reduction of auditory input and an alteration of connectivity of terminals on cochlear nuclei neurons. Such a process could stimulate the reorganization of the neural circuits and neuroplasticity. Cochlea removal has been demonstrated to be a good model in which to analyse brainstem neuroplasticity, particularly with regard to the cochlear nuclei. After cochlea removal three main periods of degeneration and regeneration were observed. Early effects, during the first week post lesion, involved acute degeneration with nerve ending oedema and degeneration. During the second and, probably, the third post lesion weeks, degeneration was still present, even though a limited and diffuse expression of GAP-43 started. Around 1 month post lesion, degeneration at the cochlear nuclei progressively disappeared and a relevant GAP-43 expression was found. We conclude that neuroplasticity leads neurons to modify their activity and/or their synaptic tree as a consequence of animal adaptation to learning and memory. For the human being neuroplasticity is involved in language learning and comprehension, particularly the acquisition of a second language. Neuroplasticity is important for therapeutic strategies, such as hearing aids and cochlear implants.

  13. The impact of severity of hypertension on auditory brainstem responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdev Lal Goyal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory brainstem response is an objective electrophysiological method for assessing the auditory pathways from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. The aim of this study was to correlate and to assess the degree of involvement of peripheral and central regions of brainstem auditory pathways with increasing severity of hypertension, among the patients of essential hypertension. Method: This study was conducted on 50 healthy age and sex matched controls (Group I and 50 hypertensive patients (Group II. Later group was further sub-divided into - Group IIa (Grade 1 hypertension, Group IIb (Grade 2 hypertension, and Group IIc (Grade 3 hypertension, as per WHO guidelines. These responses/potentials were recorded by using electroencephalogram electrodes on a root-mean-square electromyography, EP MARC II (PC-based machine and data were statistically compared between the various groups by way of one-way ANOVA. The parameters used for analysis were the absolute latencies of Waves I through V, interpeak latencies (IPLs and amplitude ratio of Wave V/I. Result: The absolute latency of Wave I was observed to be significantly increased in Group IIa and IIb hypertensives, while Wave V absolute latency was highly significantly prolonged among Group IIb and IIc, as compared to that of normal control group. All the hypertensives, that is, Group IIa, IIb, and IIc patients were found to have highly significant prolonged III-V IPL as compared to that of normal healthy controls. Further, intergroup comparison among hypertensive patients revealed a significant prolongation of Wave V absolute latency and III-V IPL in Group IIb and IIc patients as compared to Group IIa patients. These findings suggest a sensory deficit along with synaptic delays, across the auditory pathways in all the hypertensives, the deficit being more markedly affecting the auditory processing time at pons to midbrain (IPL III-V region of auditory pathways among Grade 2 and 3

  14. Synaptic plasticity in inhibitory neurons of the auditory brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kevin J; Trussell, Laurence O

    2011-04-01

    There is a growing appreciation of synaptic plasticity in the early levels of auditory processing, and particularly of its role in inhibitory circuits. Synaptic strength in auditory brainstem and midbrain is sensitive to standard protocols for induction of long-term depression, potentiation, and spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Differential forms of plasticity are operative at synapses onto inhibitory versus excitatory neurons within a circuit, and together these could serve to tune circuits involved in sound localization or multisensory integration. Such activity-dependent control of synaptic function in inhibitory neurons may also be expressed after hearing loss and could underlie persistent neuronal activity in patients with tinnitus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Synaptic Plasticity & Interneurons'.

  15. Non-invasive brainstem monitoring: the ocular microtremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James; Timmons, Shelly

    2007-10-01

    The ocular microtremor (OMT) is mediated by the oculomotor area of the brainstem and is altered in several pathologic states, including traumatic brain injury, general anesthesia, brain death, coma, Parkinsonism and multiple sclerosis. The EYETECT tremor monitor is a non-invasive means of measuring the frequency and amplitude of this microscopic tremor. It has been clinically tested in these clinical scenarios and has been found to be a reliable means of detecting the depth of anesthesia, and has been useful in predicting outcome in coma and traumatic brain injury patients and in confirming brain death. This paper reviews the scientific literature on the EYETECT OMT monitor, describes the underlying physiology and discusses the potential for future works and clinical use of this innovative technology.

  16. Modeling auditory evoked brainstem responses to transient stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Dau, Torsten; Harte, James

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative model is presented that describes the formation of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to tone pulses, clicks and rising chirps as a function of stimulation level. The model computes the convolution of the instantaneous discharge rates using the “humanized” nonlinear auditory...... of tone-pulse evoked wave-V latency with frequency but underestimates the level dependency of the tone-pulse as well as click-evoked latency values. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the nonlinear wave-V amplitude behavior in response to the chirp stimulation both as a function of chirp sweeping...... rate and level. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that the pattern of ABR generation is strongly affected by the nonlinear and dispersive processes in the cochlea....

  17. How the brainstem controls orofacial behaviors comprised of rhythmic actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey D.; Kleinfeld, David; Wang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Mammals perform a multitude of well-coordinated orofacial behaviors such as breathing, sniffing, chewing, licking, swallowing, vocalizing, and in rodents, whisking. The coordination of these actions must occur without fault to prevent fatal blockages of the airway. Deciphering the neuronal circuitry that controls even a single action requires understanding the integration of sensory feedback and executive commands. A far greater challenge is to understand the coordination of multiple actions. Here we focus on brainstem circuits that drive rhythmic orofacial actions. We discuss three neural computational mechanisms that may enable circuits for different actions to operate without interfering with each other. We conclude with proposed experimental programs for delineating the neural control principles that have evolved to coordinate orofacial behaviors. PMID:24890196

  18. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  19. Brainstem tegmental lesions in neonates with hypoxicischemic encephalopathy: Magnetic resonance diagnosis and clinical outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo Cosimo Quattrocchi; Giuseppe Fariello; Daniela Longo

    2016-01-01

    Lesions of the brainstem have been reported in the clinical scenarios of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy(HIE), although the prevalence of these lesions is probably underestimated. Neuropathologic studies have demonstrated brainstem involvement in severely asphyxiated infants as an indicator of poor outcome. Among survivors to HIE, the most frequent clinical complaints that may be predicted by brainstem lesions include feeding problems, speech, language and communication problems and visual impairments. Clinical series, including vascular and metabolic etiologies, have found selective involvement of the brainstem with the demonstration of symmetric bilateral columnar lesions of the tegmentum. The role of brainstem lesions in HIE is currently a matter of debate, especially when tegmental lesions are present in the absence of supratentorial lesions. Differential diagnosis of tegmental lesions in neonates and infants include congenital metabolic syndromes and drug-related processes. Brainstem injury with the presence of supratentorial lesions is a predictor of poor outcome and high rates of mortality and morbidity. Further investigation will be conducted to identify specific sites of the brainstem that are vulnerable to hypoxic-ischemic and toxic-metabolic insults.

  20. Neuropathological changes in auditory brainstem nuclei in cattle with experimentally induced bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, S; Okada, H; Arai, S; Yokoyama, T; Mohri, S

    2011-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is characterized by the appearance of spongy lesions in the brain, particularly in the brainstem nuclei. This study evaluated the degenerative changes observed in the central auditory brainstem of BSE-challenged cattle. The neuropathological changes in the auditory brainstem nuclei were assessed by determining the severity of vacuolation and the presence of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Sixteen female Holstein-Friesian calves, 2-4 months of age, were inoculated intracerebrally with BSE agent. BSE-challenged animals developed the characteristic clinical signs of BSE approximately 18 months post inoculation (mpi) and advanced neurological signs after 22 mpi. Before the appearance of clinical signs (i.e. at 3, 10, 12 and 16 mpi), vacuolar change was absent or mild and PrP(Sc) deposition was minimal in the auditory brainstem nuclei. The two cattle sacrificed at 18 and 19 mpi had no clinical signs and showed mild vacuolar degeneration and moderate amounts of PrP(Sc) accumulation in the auditory brainstem pathway. In the animals challenged with BSE agent that developed clinical sings (i.e. after 20 mpi), spongy changes were more prominent in the nucleus of the inferior colliculus compared with the other nuclei of the auditory brainstem and the medial geniculate body. Neuropathological changes characterized by spongy lesions accompanied by PrP(Sc) accumulation in the auditory brainstem nuclei of BSE-infected cattle may be associated with hyperacusia.

  1. Time generated by intrinsic observers

    CERN Document Server

    Svozil, Karl

    2009-01-01

    We shortly review the construction of knowledge by intrinsic observers. Intrinsic observers are embedded in a system and are inseparable parts thereof. The intrinsic viewpoint has to be contrasted with an extrinsic, "God's eye" viewpoint, from which the system can be observed externally without in any way changing it. This epistemological distinction has concrete, formalizable consequences. One consequence is the emergence of "complementarity" for intrinsic observers, even if the underlying system is totally deterministic (computable). Another consequence is the appearence of time and inertial frames for intrinsic observers. The necessary operational techniques are developed in the context of Cellular Automata. We finish with a somewhat speculative question. Given space-time frames generated by clocks which use sound waves for synchronization; why could supersonic travel not cause time paradoxes?

  2. Tractography from HARDI using an intrinsic unscented Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guang; Salehian, Hesamoddin; Forder, John R; Vemuri, Baba C

    2015-01-01

    A novel adaptation of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) was recently introduced in literature for simultaneous multitensor estimation and fiber tractography from diffusion MRI. This technique has the advantage over other tractography methods in terms of computational efficiency, due to the fact that the UKF simultaneously estimates the diffusion tensors and propagates the most consistent direction to track along. This UKF and its variants reported later in literature however are not intrinsic to the space of diffusion tensors. Lack of this key property can possibly lead to inaccuracies in the multitensor estimation as well as in the tractography. In this paper, we propose a novel intrinsic unscented Kalman filter (IUKF) in the space of diffusion tensors which are symmetric positive definite matrices, that can be used for simultaneous recursive estimation of multitensors and propagation of directional information for use in fiber tractography from diffusion weighted MR data. In addition to being more accurate, IUKF retains all the advantages of UKF mentioned above. We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method via experiments publicly available phantom data from the fiber cup-challenge (MICCAI 2009) and diffusion weighted MR scans acquired from human brains and rat spinal cords.

  3. Recent progress on intrinsic charm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, T. J.

    2017-03-01

    Over the past ˜10 years, the topic of the nucleon's nonperturbative or intrinsic charm (IC) content has enjoyed something of a renaissance, largely motivated by theoretical developments involving quark modelers and PDF-fitters. In this talk I will briefly describe the importance of intrinsic charm to various issues in high-energy phenomenology, and survey recent progress in constraining its overall normalization and contribution to the momentum sum rule of the nucleon. I end with the conclusion that progress on the side of calculation has now placed the onus on experiment to unambiguously resolve the proton's intrinsic charm component.

  4. Intrinsic time geometrodynamics: explicit examples

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Huei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic time quantum geometrodynamics resolved `the problem of time' and bridged the deep divide between quantum mechanics and canonical quantum gravity with a Schrodinger equation which describes evolution in intrinsic time variable. In this formalism, Einstein's general relativity is a particular realization of a wider class of theories. Explicit classical black hole and cosmological solutions and the motion of test particles are derived and analyzed in this work in the context of constant three-curvature solutions in intrinsic time geometrodynamics; and we exemplify how this formalism yields results which agree with the predictions of Einstein's theory.

  5. Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. For momentum sources, there is direct drive from neutral beam injection, lower hybrid and ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves (including mode conversion flow drive), as well as indirect \\mathbf{j}× \\mathbf{B} forces from fast ion and electron orbit shifts, and toroidal magnetic field ripple loss. Counteracting rotation drive are sinks, such as from neutral drag and toroidal viscosity. Many of these observations are in agreement with the predictions of neo-classical theory while others are not, and some cases of intrinsic rotation remain puzzling. In contrast to particle and heat fluxes which depend on the relevant diffusivity and convection, there is an additional term in the momentum flux, the residual stress, which can act as the momentum source for intrinsic rotation. This term is independent of the velocity or its gradient, and its divergence constitutes an intrinsic torque. The residual stress, which ultimately responds to the underlying turbulence, depends on the confinement regime and is a complicated function of collisionality, plasma shape, and profiles of density, temperature, pressure and current density. This leads to the rich intrinsic rotation phenomenology. Future areas of study include integration of these many effects, advancement of quantitative explanations for intrinsic rotation and development of strategies for velocity profile control.

  6. Type-2 diabetes mellitus and auditory brainstem response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheelu S Siddiqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus (DM causes pathophysiological changes at multiple organ system. With evoked potential techniques, the brain stem auditory response represents a simple procedure to detect both acoustic nerve and central nervous system pathway damage. The objective was to find the evidence of central neuropathy in diabetes patients by analyzing brainstem audiometry electric response obtained by auditory evoked potentials, quantify the characteristic of auditory brain response in long standing diabetes and to study the utility of auditory evoked potential in detecting the type, site, and nature of lesions. Design: A total of 25 Type-2 DM [13 (52% males and 12 (48% females] with duration of diabetes over 5 years and aged over 30 years. The brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA was performed by universal smart box manual version 2.0 at 70, 80, and 90 dB. The wave latency pattern and interpeak latencies were estimated. This was compared with 25 healthy controls (17 [68%] males and 8 [32%] females. Result: In Type-2 DM, BERA study revealed that wave-III representing superior olivary complex at 80 dB had wave latency of (3.99 ± 0.24 ms P < 0.001, at 90 dB (3.92 ± 0.28 ms P < 0.001 compared with control. The latency of wave III was delayed by 0.39, 0.42, and 0.42 ms at 70, 80, and 90 dB, respectively. The absolute latency of wave V representing inferior colliculus at 70 dB (6.05 ± 0.27 ms P < 0.001, at 80 dB (5.98 ± 0.27 P < 0.001, and at 90 dB (6.02 ± 0.30 ms P < 0.002 compared with control. The latency of wave-V was delayed by 0.48, 0.47, and 0.50 ms at 70, 80, and 90 dB, respectively. Interlatencies I-III at 70 dB (2.33 ± 0.22 ms P < 0.001, at 80 dB (2.39 ± 0.26 ms P < 0.001, while at 90 dB (2.47 ± 0.25 ms P < 0.001 when compared with control. Interlatencies I-V at 70 dB (4.45 ± 0.29 ms P < 0.001 at 80 dB (4.39 ± 0.34 ms P < 0.001, and at 90 dB (4.57 ± 0.31 ms P < 0.001 compared with control. Out of 25 Type-2 DM, 13 (52

  7. Methylmercury Exposure Reduces the Auditory Brainstem Response of Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata )

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolf, Sarah E; Swaddle, John P; Cristol, Daniel A; Buchser, William J

    2017-01-01

    ...) by studying their auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Zebra finches exposed to mercury exhibited elevated hearing thresholds, decreased amplitudes, and longer latencies in the ABR, the first evidence of mercury-induced hearing impairment in birds...

  8. A comparison of commercially available auditory brainstem response stimuli at a neurodiagnostic intensity level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keesling, Devan A; Parker, Jordan Paige; Sanchez, Jason Tait

    2017-01-01

    iChirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) yield a larger wave V amplitude at low intensity levels than traditional broadband click stimuli, providing a reliable estimation of hearing sensitivity...

  9. Regional differences in age-related lipofuscin accumulation in the female hamster brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, Peter O.; Kortekaas, Rudie; de Weerd, Henk; Veening, Jan G.; van der Want, Johannes J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Lipofuscin accumulation is a characteristic feature of senescent postmitotic neuronal cells but estrogen may have protecting effects by inhibiting its formation. In the present ultrastructural study, lipofuscin accumulation was studied in 2 estrogen-alpha-receptive brainstem areas: nucleus pararetro

  10. Herpetic brainstem encephalitis: report of a post-mortem case studied electron microscopically and immunohisiochemically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eymard Homem Pitella

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available A post-mortem examined case of herpetic brainstem encephalitis is presented. Clinically, the patient had cephalea followed by ataxia, drowsiness and multiple palsies of some cranial nerves, developing into death in eight days. The pathologic examination of the brain showed necrotizing encephalitis in multiple foci limited to the brainstem, more distinctly in the pons and medula oblongata. The technique of immunoperoxidase revealed rare glial cells with intranuclear immunoreactivity for herpes antigen. Rare viral particles with the morphological characteristics of the herpesvirus were identified in the nuclei of neurons in 10% formol fixed material. This is the second reported case of herpetic brainstem encephalitis confirmed by post-mortem examination. The pathway used by the virus to reach the central nervous system and its posterior dissemination to the oral cavity, the orbitofrontal region and the temporal lobes as well as to the brainstem, after a period of latency and reactivation, are discussed.

  11. Intrinsic motivation and learning dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zgonnikov, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of intrinsic motivation on the dynamics of learning processes. We construct a simple model of a single agent adapting to unknown environment. Performing a repeated choice between a number of initially unexplored alternatives, the agent gains rewards for each selected alternative and in doing so gradually comprehends the environment. In our model the agent choice is governed by two stimuli. The traditional extrinsic motive inclines the agent to maximize the cumulative payoff throughout the process, while the second, intrinsic one, biases the agent towards the novel options that she inherently likes. We show that the intrinsic motivation can induce an instability and periodic dynamics of the learning process which is always stationary in the case of selfish, rational agent. Interestingly, the opposite effect can arise as well: when the impact of intrinsic motivation on the agent choice is strong, the equiprobable choice equilibrium strategy becomes stable. Based on the presented resul...

  12. Combined CMV- and HSV-1 brainstem encephalitis restricted to medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchanov, J; Branding, G; Stocker, H

    2014-04-15

    We report a very rare case of a combined CMV- and HSV-1 isolated brainstem encephalitis restricted to medulla oblongata in a patient with advanced HIV disease. Neither limbic nor general ventricular involvement was detected on neuroimaging. The case highlights the importance of testing for HSV-1 and CMV in HIV-infected patients presenting with an isolated brainstem syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression and significance of sonic hedgehog signaling pathway-related components in brainstem and supratentorial astrocytomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Yu; HAO Shu-yu; TIAN Yong-ji; ZHANG Jun-ting; WU Zhen; WAN Hong; LI Jun-hua; JIANG Jian; ZHANG Li-wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that abnormal activation of the sonic hedgehog pathway is closely related to tumorigenesis in central nervous system.This study aimed to investigate the role of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in the occurrence of brainstem and supratentorial glioma.Methods Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of sonic hedgehog-related components in 5 specimens of normal brain tissue,10 of grade Ⅱ brainstem glioma,and 10 of grade Ⅱ supratentorial glioma.The significance of differences between two groups was determined using the Mann-Whitney U test or the two-sample test according to the results of normality distribution tests.Results The mRNA expression levels of sonic hedgehog-related genes were higher in brainstem astrocytomas than in supratentorial astrocytomas and normal brain tissue.The level of protein patched homolog 1 (PTCH1) was significantly higher in brainstem astrocytomas than in supratentorial astrocytomas and normal brain tissue (P <0.01).Immunohistochemistry semi-quantitative analysis was consistent with the qRT-PCR result that PTCH1 expression was increased significantly in brainstem astrocytomas at the protein level (P <0.05).Conclusions Enhanced PTCH1 expression and activation of the sonic hedgehog pathway are involved in brainstem glioma.This may be related to the difference in malignant biological behavior between brainstem and hemispheric glioma,and could be an ideal therapeutic target in brainstem glioma.

  14. Prodominant hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy with supratentorial involvement: Case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hee; Park, Sung Tae; Lim, Hyun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae; Cha, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brainstem and cerebellar edema are uncommon in association with typical supratentorial changes. We experienced three cases of atypical hypertensive encephalopathy involving brainstem and cerebellum as well as cerebral white matter, which showed characteristic alternating linear bright and low signals in the pons, the so-called 'stripe sign'. We report these cases here with a brief literature review.

  15. Diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  16. Harmonic structures and intrinsic torsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Diego; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the construction of Sp(2)Sp(1)-structures whose fundamental form is closed. In particular, we find 10 new examples of 8-dimensional nilmanifolds that admit an invariant closed 4-form with stabiliser Sp(2) Sp(1). Our constructions entail the notion of SO(4)-structures on 7-manifolds. We...... present a thorough investigation of the intrinsic torsion of such structures, leading to the construction of explicit Lie group examples with invariant intrinsic torsion....

  17. Harmonic structures and intrinsic torsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Diego; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    We discuss the construction of 8-manifolds with harmonic Sp(2)Sp(1)-structures. In particular, we find 10 new examples of nilmanifolds that admit a closed 4-form Omega whose stabiliser is Sp(2)Sp(1). Our constructions entail the notion of SO(4)-structures on 7-manifolds. We present a thorough inv...... investigation of the intrinsic torsion of such structures; in addition to the construction of harmonic structures, this analysis leads to explicit Lie group examples with invariant intrinsic torsion....

  18. A clinical study of brainstem infarction identified on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Takahashi, Akira (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Arahata, Yutaka; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Furuse, Masahiro

    1993-04-01

    We conducted a clinical study of 155 cases that were confirmed to have brainstem infarctions on MRI (T[sub 1]-weighted image showed a low signal and T[sub 2]-weighted image showed a high signal, measuring in excess of 2 x 2 mm). The majority of the brainstem infarction was located in the pontine base in 132 cases (85.2%). Of these, 19 cases had double lesions including infarctions in the pontine base. Second infarctions frequently occurred in the cerebral peduncle or medical medulla oblongata, unilateral to the pontine infarctions. In addition to 98 symptomatic cases, there were 57 cases of 'asymptomatic' brainstem infarction. They comprised 24 cases accompanying other symptomatic cerebrovascular diseases in the supratentorium and 33 cases of transient subjective complaints such as headache or vertigo-dizziness. Complication by supratentorial infarctions was significantly frequent in cases of brainstem infarction (p<0.001), 122 of 155 cases (78.7%), especially in the pontine base (88.6%); while in the control cases (without brainstem infarction) only 65 of 221 cases (29.4%). These findings are considered to show the widespread progress of arteriosclerosis in brainstem infarction, especially in ones in the pontine base. (author).

  19. Lifelong expression of apolipoprotein D in the human brainstem: correlation with reduced age-related neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Navarro

    Full Text Available The lipocalin apolipoprotein D (Apo D is upregulated in peripheral nerves following injury and in regions of the central nervous system, such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, during aging and progression of certain neurological diseases. In contrast, few studies have examined Apo D expression in the brainstem, a region necessary for survival and generally less prone to age-related degeneration. We measured Apo D expression in whole human brainstem lysates by slot-blot and at higher spatial resolution by quantitative immunohistochemistry in eleven brainstem nuclei (the 4 nuclei of the vestibular nuclear complex, inferior olive, hypoglossal nucleus, oculomotor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, and Roller`s nucleus. In contrast to cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, apolipoprotein D was highly expressed in brainstem tissue from subjects (N = 26, 32-96 years of age with no history of neurological disease, and expression showed little variation with age. Expression was significantly stronger in somatomotor nuclei (hypoglossal, oculomotor, facial than visceromotor or sensory nuclei. Both neurons and glia expressed Apo D, particularly neurons with larger somata and glia in the periphery of these brainstem centers. Immunostaining was strongest in the neuronal perinuclear region and absent in the nucleus. We propose that strong brainstem expression of Apo D throughout adult life contributes to resistance against neurodegenerative disease and age-related degeneration, possibly by preventing oxidative stress and ensuing lipid peroxidation.

  20. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-07-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  1. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with lead exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia de Freitas Alvarenga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earlier studies have demonstrated an auditory effect of lead exposure in children, but information on the effects of low chronic exposures needs to be further elucidated. Objective: To investigate the effect of low chronic exposures of the auditory system in children with a history of low blood lead levels, using an auditory electrophysiological test. Methods: Contemporary cross-sectional cohort. Study participants underwent tympanometry, pure tone and speech audiometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, and brainstem auditory evoked potentials, with blood lead monitoring over a period of 35.5 months. The study included 130 children, with ages ranging from 18 months to 14 years, 5 months (mean age 6 years, 8 months ± 3 years, 2 months. Results: The mean time-integrated cumulative blood lead index was 12 µg/dL (SD ± 5.7, range:2.433. All participants had hearing thresholds equal to or below 20 dBHL and normal amplitudes of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. No association was found between the absolute latencies of waves I, III, and V, the interpeak latencies I-III, III-V, and I-V, and the cumulative lead values. Conclusion: No evidence of toxic effects from chronic low lead exposures was observed on the auditory function of children living in a lead contaminated area.

  2. Pain fiber anesthetic reduces brainstem Fos after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badral, B; Davies, A J; Kim, Y H; Ahn, J S; Hong, S D; Chung, G; Kim, J S; Oh, S B

    2013-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that pain-sensing neurons in the trigeminal system can be selectively anesthetized by co-application of QX-314 with the TRPV1 receptor agonist, capsaicin (QX cocktail). Here we examined whether this new anesthetic strategy can block the neuronal changes in the brainstem following molar tooth extraction in the rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received infiltration injection of anesthetic 10 min prior to lower molar tooth extraction. Neuronal activation was determined by immunohistochemistry for the proto-oncogene protein c-Fos in transverse sections of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). After tooth extraction, c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) detected in the dorsomedial region of bilateral Sp5C was highest at 2 hrs (p tooth extraction; reduced Fos-LI was also observed with the conventional local anesthetic lidocaine. Pulpal anesthesia by infiltration injection was confirmed by inhibition of the jaw-opening reflex in response to electrical tooth pulp stimulation. Our results suggest that the QX cocktail anesthetic is effective in reducing neuronal activation following tooth extraction. Thus, a selective pain fiber 'nociceptive anesthetic' strategy may provide an effective local anesthetic option for dental patients in the clinic.

  3. Foramen Magnum Meningioma with Brainstem Compression During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhri, Omar; Ravikumar, Vinod K; Gephart, Melanie Hayden

    2016-07-01

    Meningiomas can present during pregnancy as the result of hormonal as well as fluid changes. Foramen magnum meningiomas are particularly rare. We present the first reported case successfully treated during pregnancy. A 34-year-old female patient in her second trimester of pregnancy presented with a several-week history of neck pain, clonus, and right-sided upper extremity weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated a 3.5-cm foramen magnum meningioma causing severe compression of the cervicomedullary junction. The patient underwent a far lateral craniotomy with successful decompression of the brainstem, resection of the tumor, and no permanent postoperative neurologic deficits. She made an excellent recovery and delivered a normal baby at 38 weeks with no complications. A small residual tumor engulfing the vertebral artery was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery 3 months postpartum. Diagnostic and treatment challenges unique to this case are discussed. Large skull base tumors symptomatic in pregnancy can be safely treated with careful planning and close monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A comparison of auditory brainstem responses across diving bird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sara E.; Berlin, Alicia; Carr, Catherine E; Olsen, Glenn H.; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2015-01-01

    There is little biological data available for diving birds because many live in hard-to-study, remote habitats. Only one species of diving bird, the black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), has been studied in respect to auditory capabilities (Wever et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 63:676–680, 1969). We, therefore, measured in-air auditory threshold in ten species of diving birds, using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The average audiogram obtained for each species followed the U-shape typical of birds and many other animals. All species tested shared a common region of the greatest sensitivity, from 1000 to 3000 Hz, although audiograms differed significantly across species. Thresholds of all duck species tested were more similar to each other than to the two non-duck species tested. The red-throated loon (Gavia stellata) and northern gannet (Morus bassanus) exhibited the highest thresholds while the lowest thresholds belonged to the duck species, specifically the lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis). Vocalization parameters were also measured for each species, and showed that with the exception of the common eider (Somateria mollisima), the peak frequency, i.e., frequency at the greatest intensity, of all species' vocalizations measured here fell between 1000 and 3000 Hz, matching the bandwidth of the most sensitive hearing range.

  5. Auditory brainstem potentials in children with protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Dursun; Caksen, Hüseyin; Sar, Sakir; Tombul, Temel; Kisli, Mesude; Tuncer, Oğuz; Yuca, Köksal; Yilmaz, Cahide

    2005-07-01

    In this study, auditory brainstem potentials (ABPs) were studied in children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) to determine the effects of PEM on the developing brain in children. A total of 31 children, aged 3-36 months with moderate/severe PEM and 25 healthy children, aged 3-48 months were included in the study. Nutritional status of the children was assessed by the Gomez classification. Recordings of ABPs were performed by using Nihon Kohden Neuropack 2 device. Of 31 children, 22 (71%) had severe malnutrition, 9 (29%) had moderate malnutrition. Additionally, 8 (26%) and 9 (29%) children had iron deficiency anemia and hypoalbuminemi, respectively. There were significant differences in the mean latencies of the waves I-V on the right and left ears and in the mean interpeak latencies (IPLs) of the waves III-V and I-V on the right ear between the study and control groups (Pmalnutrition and iron deficiency anemia. We think that more extensive studies should be performed to determine whether or not there was a relationship between these parameters.

  6. Brainstem acoustic areas in the marine catfish, Arius felis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, C A

    2001-03-01

    The marine catfish Arius felis produces low frequency sounds for communication and obstacle detection. It was hypothesized that the utriculus of the inner ear might play an important role in these behaviors. In the current study, brainstem acoustic areas were studied to reveal possible neuroanatomical specializations in utricular processing areas. The first-order octaval nuclei in Arius were identical in number, anatomical characteristics, and organization of saccular, lagenar, and utricular inputs to previous reports of these features in Ictalurus, a closely related species of catfish that does not exhibit the specialized acoustic behaviors present in Arius. Similarly, injections of neural tracer in the acoustic midbrain (nucleus centralis) of Arius revealed afferent and retrograde pathways almost identical to those previously reported in Ictalurus. It is suggested that areas within the primary and higher-order octaval nuclei that utilize utricular input in acoustic processing are likely identical in Arius and Ictalurus. Two sets of higher-order connections in Arius differ from those in Ictalurus. First, Arius apparently lacks the direct input from the anterior octaval nucleus to nucleus centralis reported in Ictalurus. Second, in Arius nucleus centralis projects bilaterally to a strip of neurons positioned ventral to the ventral boundary of the torus semicircularis. This projection is apparently absent in Ictalurus and in the related species Carassius (goldfish), but has been previously reported in Porichthyes, a sound-producing species belonging to a different teleost taxon.

  7. Auditory Brainstem Responses and EMFs Generated by Mobile Phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, Shilpa; Sood, Archana; Sood, Sanjay

    2013-12-01

    There has been a manifold increase in the number of mobile phone users throughout the world with the current number of users exceeding 2 billion. However this advancement in technology like many others is accompanied by a progressive increase in the frequency and intensity of electromagnetic waves without consideration of the health consequences. The aim of our study was to advance our understanding of the potential adverse effects of GSM mobile phones on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). 60 subjects were selected for the study and divided into three groups of 20 each based on their usage of mobile phones. Their ABRs were recorded and analysed for latency of waves I-V as well as interpeak latencies I-III, I-V and III-V (in ms). Results revealed no significant difference in the ABR parameters between group A (control group) and group B (subjects using mobile phones for maximum 30 min/day for 5 years). However the latency of waves was significantly prolonged in group C (subjects using mobile phones for 10 years for a maximum of 30 min/day) as compared to the control group. Based on our findings we concluded that long term exposure to mobile phones may affect conduction in the peripheral portion of the auditory pathway. However more research needs to be done to study the long term effects of mobile phones particularly of newer technologies like smart phones and 3G.

  8. Brainstem gliomas - A clinicopathological study of 45 cases with p53 immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badhe Prerna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brainstem tumors represent 10% of central nervous system tumors, accounting for 30% of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. AIMS: The aim of this study was to clinicopathologically correlate 45 cases of brain stem gliomas and determine the occurrence and prognostic significance of p53 expression. MATERIALS AND METHOD: 45 cases of brain stem gliomas encountered during a 19-year period. 30 were diagnosed by surgical biopsy and 15 at autopsy. In 25 cases p53 immunohistochemistry (Avidin Biotinylated technique was performed. The WHO brain tumor classification and Stroink's CT classification were applied. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Chi square test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: 51 % of gliomas were observed in the first decade of life. The female to male ratio was 1.04: 1. The commonest presenting features were cranial nerve palsies (33% and cerebellar signs (29.8%. 55.55% of cases were located in the pons, 31.01% in the medulla and 13.33% in the midbrain. Diffuse astrocytomas were seen in 40 cases (5% were Grade I, 47.5%Grade II, 32.5% Grade III and 15% Grade IV and pilocytic astrocytomas in 5 cases. Grade IV patients had 2- 3 mitoses /10 high power fields and had a poorer survival rate. Grade II astrocytomas were treated with excision and radiotherapy, while grade III and IV tumors were treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy (CCNU. Improvement was noted in 20% of patients postoperatively. The outcome was better in patients who were treated surgically. p53 is a frequently mutated gene in brain stem astrocytomas. It was found in 50 % of glioblastoma multiforme, 28.57% of grade III astrocytoma and 12.5% of grade II astrocytoma, while grade 1 astrocytomas failed to express p53 protein. p53 positivity was more in high grade lesions, decreasing significantly in lower grade lesions.

  9. Physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception: An fMRI study at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Laura H; Sprenger, Christian; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem is a major site of processing and modulation of nociceptive input and plays a key role in the pathophysiology of various headache disorders. However, human imaging studies on brainstem function following trigeminal nociceptive stimulation are scarce as brainstem specific imaging approaches have to address multiple challenges such as magnetic field inhomogeneities and an enhanced level of physiological noise. In this study we used a viable protocol for brainstem fMRI of standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimulation to achieve detailed insight into physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception. We conducted a study of 21 healthy participants using a nociceptive ammonia stimulation of the left nasal mucosa with an optimized MR acquisition protocol for high resolution brainstem echoplanar imaging in combination with two different noise correction techniques. Significant BOLD responses to noxious ammonia stimulation were observed in areas typically involved in trigeminal nociceptive processing such as the spinal trigeminal nuclei (sTN), thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex and cerebellum as well as in a pain modulating network including the periaqueductal gray area, hypothalamus (HT), locus coeruleus and cuneiform nucleus (CNF). Activations of the left CNF were positively correlated with pain intensity ratings. Employing psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis we found enhanced functional connectivity of the sTN with the contralateral sTN and HT following trigeminal nociception. We also observed enhanced functional connectivity of the CNF with the RVM during painful stimulation thus implying an important role of these two brainstem regions in central pain processing. The chosen approach to study trigeminal nociception with high-resolution fMRI offers new insight into human pain processing and might thus lead to a better understanding of headache pathophysiology.

  10. The clinic discuss of prognosis and treatment or brainstem infarction combined coma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Junying; Wanglei; YinShimin; Zheng Yishan; Shijie Qu; Zhanfen

    2000-01-01

    Objective Discuss the relationship between the position, bound of brainstem infarction and .consciousness clog,determinan the prognosis and curative effect. Background and Methods Total brainstem infarction 14 patients,9 male and 5 female,43 to 80 years old.all patients had been checked by CT or MRI,brainstem foliun scanning 6 cases,checked by MRI 8 canes micbrain infarction 2 cases,pon infarction 5 cases,medulla infasction 7 cases the midbrain infarction were rise rapid,inmediately coma,the mydrasis in defect side,opposite body mucsle tension heighten.then both lower limbs straight,both pathology sign masculine.the two cases are all alive .tocked-in syndrom has appeared in 1 case of pon infarction ,and died of combined illness 1 year later. 1 case defect affect centrum of breath and hearlbeat, coma,breath rhythm malajustment,breath stop.threr were no consciousness clog in the other 3 cases ,vertigo,force head position to trouble side, nystagmus, trouble side face hypalgesia,and all cureed .2 cases of medulla infarction appeared quactriplegia ,swallow hardness,anarthriad and so on, 5 others were hemi Watlenberg syndrom,all wcre cured. Results and Discussion coma or no in brainstem infaciton was related with position.it is reparted that midbrain infarction coma was 7.6 persent of brainstem infarction. consciousness clog is distinctness which defect position in midbrain lateral-back, pon ventro defect, not involved ARAS ,lwas locked-in synxdom. brainstem infarction combined combined with freedom breath clog,in medulla was 16.1percent,midorain was 1 1.6 percent, pons ws 83.96 percent the prognosis was.all right in lightly brainsterm infarction, lf involved in both medulla, ventro pon,the prognosis was bad, and lose quadriplegia. CT brainstern foliun scanning would enhanced scanning lay, and helpful for chech up the pathological chanoes of brainstem.

  11. Participation of brainstem monoaminergic nuclei in behavioral depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Sarfraz, Yasmeen; Jensen, Ashley; Dunn, Adrian J; Stone, Eric A

    2011-12-01

    Several lines of research have now suggested the controversial hypothesis that the central noradrenergic system acts to exacerbate depression as opposed to having an antidepressant function. If correct, lesions of this system should increase resistance to depression, which has been partially but weakly supported by previous studies. The present study reexamined this question using two more recent methods to lesion noradrenergic neurons in mice: intraventricular (ivt) administration of either the noradrenergic neurotoxin, DSP4, or of a dopamine-β-hydroxylase-saporin immunotoxin (DBH-SAP ITX) prepared for mice. Both agents given 2 weeks prior were found to significantly increase resistance to depressive behavior in several tests including acute and repeated forced swims, tail suspension and endotoxin-induced anhedonia. Both agents also increased locomotor activity in the open field. Cell counts of brainstem monoaminergic neurons, however, showed that both methods produced only partial lesions of the locus coeruleus and also affected the dorsal raphe or ventral tegmental area. Both the cell damage and the antidepressant and hyperactive effects of ivt DSP4 were prevented by a prior i.p. injection of the NE uptake blocker, reboxetine. The results are seen to be consistent with recent pharmacological experiments showing that noradrenergic and serotonergic systems function to inhibit active behavior. Comparison with previous studies utilizing more complete and selective LC lesions suggest that mouse strain, lesion size or involvement of multiple neuronal systems are critical variables in the behavioral and affective effects of monoaminergic lesions and that antidepressant effects and hyperactivity may be more likely to occur if lesions are partial and/or involve multiple monoaminergic systems.

  12. The superior transvelar approach to the fourth ventricle and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Haim; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Bollam, Papireddy; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Objective The superior transvelar approach is used to access pathologies located in the fourth ventricle and brainstem. The surgical path is below the venous structures, through the superior medullary velum. Following splitting the tentorial edge, near the tentorial apex, the superior medullary velum is split in the cerebello-mesencephalic fissure. Using the supracerebellar infratentorial, transtentorial or parietal interhemispheric routes, the superior medullary velum is approached. Splitting this velum provides a detailed view of the fourth ventricle and its floor. Materials and Methods A total of 10 formalin-fixed specimens were dissected in a stepwise manner to simulate the superior transvelar approach to the fourth ventricle. The exposure gained the distance from the craniotomy site and the ease of access was assessed for each of the routes. We also present an illustrative case, operated by the senior author (AN). Results The superior transvelar approach provides access to the entire length of the fourth ventricle floor, from the aqueduct to the obex, when using the parietal interhemispheric route. In addition, this approach provides access to the entire width of the floor of the fourth ventricle; however, this requires retracting the superior cerebellar peduncle. Using the supracerebellar infratentorial route gives a limited exposure of the superior part of the fourth ventricle. The occipital interhemispheric route is a compromise between these two. Conclusion The superior transvelar approach to the fourth ventricle provides a route for approaching the fourth ventricle from above. This approach does not require opening the posterior fossa in the traditional way, and provides a reasonable alternative for accessing the superior fourth ventricle.

  13. Brainstem auditory-evoked potential in Boxer dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Isa Poci Palumbo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP has been widely used for different purposes in veterinary practice and is commonly used to identify inherited deafness and presbycusis. In this study, 43 Boxer dogs were evaluated using the BAEP. Deafness was diagnosed in 3 dogs (2 bilateral and 1 unilateral allowing the remaining 40 Boxers to be included for normative data analysis including an evaluation on the influence of age on the BAEP. The animals were divided into 2 groups of 20 Boxers each based on age. The mean age was 4.54 years (range, 1-8 in group I, and 9.83 years (range, 8.5-12 in group II. The mean latency for I, III, and V waves were 1.14 (±0.07, 2.64 (±0.11, and 3.48 (±0.10 ms in group I, and 1.20 (±0.12, 2.73 (±0.15, and 3.58 (±0.22 ms in group II, respectively. The mean inter-peak latencies for the I-III, III-V and I-V intervals were 1.50 (±0.15, 0.84 (±0.15, and 2.34 (±0.11 ms in group I, and 1.53 (±0.16, 0.85 (±0.15, and 2.38 (±0.19 ms in group II, respectively. Latencies of waves I and III were significant different between group I and II. For the I-III, III-V and I-V intervals, no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups. As far as we know, this is the first normative study of BAEP obtained from Boxer dogs.

  14. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response through hearing aid stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellier, Ludovic; Veuillet, Evelyne; Vesson, Jean-François; Bouchet, Patrick; Caclin, Anne; Thai-Van, Hung

    2015-07-01

    Millions of people across the world are hearing impaired, and rely on hearing aids to improve their everyday life. Objective audiometry could optimize hearing aid fitting, and is of particular interest for non-communicative patients. Speech Auditory Brainstem Response (speech ABR), a fine electrophysiological marker of speech encoding, is presently seen as a promising candidate for implementing objective audiometry; yet, unlike lower-frequency auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) such as cortical AEPs or auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), aided-speech ABRs (i.e., speech ABRs through hearing aid stimulation) have almost never been recorded. This may be due to their high-frequency components requesting a high temporal precision of the stimulation. We assess here a new approach to record high-quality and artifact-free speech ABR while stimulating directly through hearing aids. In 4 normal-hearing adults, we recorded speech ABR evoked by a /ba/ syllable binaurally delivered through insert earphones for quality control or through hearing aids. To assess the presence of a potential stimulus artifact, recordings were also done in mute conditions with the exact same potential sources of stimulus artifacts as in the main runs. Hearing aid stimulation led to artifact-free speech ABR in each participant, with the same quality as when using insert earphones, as shown with signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements. Our new approach consisting in directly transmitting speech stimuli through hearing aids allowed for a perfect temporal precision mandatory in speech ABR recordings, and could thus constitute a decisive step in hearing impairment investigation and in hearing aid fitting improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Brainstem auditory-evoked potentials in two meditative mental states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Practicing mental repetition of "OM" has been shown to cause significant changes in the middle latency auditory-evoked potentials, which suggests that it facilitates the neural activity at the mesencephalic or diencephalic levels. Aims: The aim of the study was to study the brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP in two meditation states based on consciousness, viz. dharana, and dhyana. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects were selected, with ages ranging from 20 to 55 years (M=29.1; ±SD=6.5 years who had a minimum of 6 months experience in meditating "OM". Each subject was assessed in four sessions, i.e. two meditation and two control sessions. The two control sessions were: (i ekagrata, i.e. single-topic lecture on meditation and (ii cancalata, i.e. non-targeted thinking. The two meditation sessions were: (i dharana, i.e. focusing on the symbol "OM" and (ii dhyana, i.e. effortless single-thought state "OM". All four sessions were recorded on four different days and consisted of three states, i.e. pre, during and post. Results: The present results showed that the wave V peak latency significantly increased in cancalata, ekagrata and dharana, but no change occurred during the dhyana session. Conclusions: These results suggested that information transmission along the auditory pathway is delayed during cancalata, ekagrata and dharana, but there is no change during dhyana. It may be said that auditory information transmission was delayed at the inferior collicular level as the wave V corresponds to the tectum.

  16. Localization of the brainstem GABAergic neurons controlling paradoxical (REM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sapin

    Full Text Available Paradoxical sleep (PS is a state characterized by cortical activation, rapid eye movements and muscle atonia. Fifty years after its discovery, the neuronal network responsible for the genesis of PS has been only partially identified. We recently proposed that GABAergic neurons would have a pivotal role in that network. To localize these GABAergic neurons, we combined immunohistochemical detection of Fos with non-radioactive in situ hybridization of GAD67 mRNA (GABA synthesis enzyme in control rats, rats deprived of PS for 72 h and rats allowed to recover after such deprivation. Here we show that GABAergic neurons gating PS (PS-off neurons are principally located in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and the dorsal part of the deep mesencephalic reticular nucleus immediately ventral to it (dDpMe. Furthermore, iontophoretic application of muscimol for 20 min in this area in head-restrained rats induced a strong and significant increase in PS quantities compared to saline. In addition, we found a large number of GABAergic PS-on neurons in the vlPAG/dDPMe region and the medullary reticular nuclei known to generate muscle atonia during PS. Finally, we showed that PS-on neurons triggering PS localized in the SLD are not GABAergic. Altogether, our results indicate that multiple populations of PS-on GABAergic neurons are distributed in the brainstem while only one population of PS-off GABAergic neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDpMe region exist. From these results, we propose a revised model for PS control in which GABAergic PS-on and PS-off neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDPMe region play leading roles.

  17. Intrinsic energy partition in fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirea M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic energy partition between two complementary fission fragments is investigated microscopically. The intrinsic excitation energy of fission fragments is dynamically evaluated in terms of the time-dependent pairing equations. These equations are corroborated with two conditions. One of them fixes the number of particles and the other separates the pairing active spaces associated to the two fragments in the vicinity of the scission configuration. The excitation energy in a wide distribution of fission fragments is calculated for the 234U parent nucleus.

  18. Differentiating cerebellar and brainstem lesions with ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Hung; Young, Yi-Ho

    2011-06-01

    This study applied both ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) tests in patients with cerebellar disorders to determine whether VEMP test can differentiate between cerebellar and brainstem lesions. A total of 12 patients with cerebellar disorder, including extended cerebellar lesion (involving the brainstem) in 8 and localized cerebellar lesion (excluding the brainstem) in 4, were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent caloric, visual suppression, and oVEMP and cVEMP tests via bone-conducted vibration stimuli. The abnormal rates for the caloric, visual suppression, and oVEMP and cVEMP tests were 62, 83, 88 and 75% in patients with extended cerebellar lesion and 0, 25, 0 and 0% in those with localized cerebellar lesion, respectively. The rate of abnormal oVEMP results significantly differed between the two groups, but caloric, visual suppression and cVEMP test results did not differ. In another ten healthy subjects, characteristic parameters of oVEMPs obtained under light and dark conditions did not significantly differ. In conclusion, ocular VEMP test can differentiate between cerebellar and brainstem lesions. Abnormal oVEMPs in patients with cerebellar disorder may indicate adjacent brainstem involvement.

  19. Impairments in musical abilities reflected in the auditory brainstem: evidence from congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Skoe, Erika; Moreau, Patricia; Peretz, Isabelle; Kraus, Nina

    2015-07-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic condition, characterized by a deficit in music perception and production, not explained by hearing loss, brain damage or lack of exposure to music. Despite inferior musical performance, amusics exhibit normal auditory cortical responses, with abnormal neural correlates suggested to lie beyond auditory cortices. Here we show, using auditory brainstem responses to complex sounds in humans, that fine-grained automatic processing of sounds is impoverished in amusia. Compared with matched non-musician controls, spectral amplitude was decreased in amusics for higher harmonic components of the auditory brainstem response. We also found a delayed response to the early transient aspects of the auditory stimulus in amusics. Neural measures of spectral amplitude and response timing correlated with participants' behavioral assessments of music processing. We demonstrate, for the first time, that amusia affects how complex acoustic signals are processed in the auditory brainstem. This neural signature of amusia mirrors what is observed in musicians, such that the aspects of the auditory brainstem responses that are enhanced in musicians are degraded in amusics. By showing that gradients of music abilities are reflected in the auditory brainstem, our findings have implications not only for current models of amusia but also for auditory functioning in general.

  20. Neonatal neurological disorders involving the brainstem: neurosonographic approaches through the squamous suture and the foramen magnum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yi-Fang [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan); Chen, Cheng-Yu [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Lin, Yuh-Jey [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); Chang, Ying-Chao [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Children Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); Huang, Chao-Ching [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan)

    2005-09-01

    Brainstem damage which often indicates a critical condition is usually underestimated by trans-anterior-fontanel neurosonography (NS) owing to the far-field limitations. Instead, NS alternately scanning through the squamous suture of the temporal bones and the foramen magnum could provide a better visualization of the brainstem structures. The NS characteristics of brainstem lesions caused by various neonatal neurological disorders, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), metabolic encephalopathy, birth trauma and bacterial meningoencephalitis, can be depicted at the acute stage. An echogenic change in the midbrain was found in patients with HIE or metabolic encephalopathy. In addition to the echogenic change, bilateral transtentorial temporal lobe herniation distorting the contour of the midbrain was observed in a patient with group B streptococcus meningoencephalitis, whereas echogenic changes at the level of the pons and/or the medulla oblongata, mainly localized in the dorsal part, could be observed in newborns with severe HIE, maple syrup urine disease or birth trauma. In this pictorial assay, we demonstrate the feasibility of NS imaging in evaluating the entire brainstem structure of critically ill neonates in the near field and illustrate the characteristic features of brainstem involvement in various neonatal neurological disorders along with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging correlation. (orig.)

  1. Diffusion processes in -Zr(Al) phase: a thermodynamic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Laik; K Bhanumurthy; G B Kale

    2005-06-01

    The diffusion behaviour in the -Zr(Al) solid solution phase was investigated in the temperature range 1203–1323 K using a thermodynamic approach. The Boltzmann–Matano relation used for determining interdiffusion coefficients and the Darken’s equations used for evaluating the intrinsic diffusion coefficients from velocity of movement of markers in diffusion couples were modified suitably. The composition dependent thermodynamic interdiffusion coefficients were evaluated using chemical potential gradient. Composition and temperature dependence of the thermodynamic interdiffusion coefficients were also established. The thermodynamic intrinsic diffusion coefficients of Al and Zr and their temperature dependence were determined using the modified Darken’s equations.

  2. Intrinsic Motivation in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Benjamin; Nambiar, Nathan; Hemphill, Caroline; Devietti, Elizabeth; Massengale, Alexandra; McCredie, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This article describes ways in which educators can use Harter's perceived competence motivation theory, the achievement goal theory, and self-determination theory to develop students' intrinsic motivation to maintain physical fitness, as demonstrated by the Sound Body Sound Mind curriculum and proven effective by the 2013 University of…

  3. Correlation of Acute and Late Brainstem Toxicities With Dose-Volume Data for Pediatric Patients With Posterior Fossa Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Ronica H; Ganju, Rohit G; Schreibmann, Edward; Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao; Jegadeesh, Naresh; Cassidy, Richard; Deng, Claudia; Eaton, Bree R; Esiashvili, Natia

    2017-06-01

    Radiation-induced brainstem toxicity after treatment of pediatric posterior fossa malignancies is incompletely understood, especially in the era of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The rates of, and predictive factors for, brainstem toxicity after photon RT for posterior fossa tumors were examined. After institutional review board approval, 60 pediatric patients treated at our institution for nonmetastatic infratentorial ependymoma and medulloblastoma with IMRT were included in the present analysis. Dosimetric variables, including the mean and maximum dose to the brainstem, the dose to 10% to 90% of the brainstem (in 10% increments), and the volume of the brainstem receiving 40, 45, 50, and 55 Gy were recorded for each patient. Acute (onset within 3 months) and late (>3 months of RT completion) RT-induced brainstem toxicities with clinical and radiographic correlates were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Patients aged 1.4 to 21.8 years underwent IMRT or volumetric arc therapy postoperatively to the posterior fossa or tumor bed. At a median clinical follow-up period of 2.8 years, 14 patients had developed symptomatic brainstem toxicity (crude incidence 23.3%). No correlation was found between the dosimetric variables examined and brainstem toxicity. Vascular injury or ischemia showed a strong trend toward predicting brainstem toxicity (P=.054). Patients with grade 3 to 5 brainstem toxicity had undergone treatment to significant volumes of the posterior fossa. The results of the present series demonstrate a low, but not negligible, risk of brainstem radiation necrosis for pediatric patients with posterior fossa malignancies treated with IMRT. No specific dose-volume correlations were identified; however, modern treatment volumes might help limit the incidence of severe toxicity. Additional work investigating inherent biologic sensitivity might also provide further insight into this clinical problem. Copyright

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of glutamate transporter EAAC1 in the brainstem of adult rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fu-xing; LIU Tao; ZHAO Jing-wei; LI Jin-lian; DONG Yu-lin; LI Ji-shuo

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the distribution of EAAC1, a subtype of glutamate transporters, in the brainstem of adult rat. Methods: Immunocytochemical staining with avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method was employed. Results:EAAC1 was widely distributed throughout the brainstem. In many regions, the EAAC1-like immunoreactivity was primarily distributed in the neuropil. Cell body staining was observed in the prepositus hypoglossal nucleus, external cortex of the inferior colliculus, red nucleus, substantia nigra, mesencephalic raphe nuclei, ventral tegmental nucleus, superior olivary complex, nucleus of the trapezoid body, cochlear nucleus, sensory trigeminal complex, Barrington's nucleus,trigeminal motor nucleus, parabrachial nuclei, dorsal nucleus of vagus, hypoglossal nucleus, locus coeruleus, lateral and superior vestibular nuclei, lateral paragigantocellular nucleus and dorsal paragigantocellular nucleus. Conclusion: Glutamate transporter EAAC 1 is widely distributed throughout the brainstem of adult rat, which may play an important role in excitatory activities of the neurons induced by glutamate.

  5. Loss of pons-to-hypothalamic white matter tracks in brainstem obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, J Q; Lahna, D L; Samuels, M H; Rooney, W D; Hoffman, W F

    2014-12-01

    Hyperphagia and obesity have been reported following damage to the hypothalamus in humans. Other brain sites are also postulated to be involved in the control of food intake and body weight regulation, such as the amygdala and brainstem. The brainstem, however, is thought to primarily integrate short-term meal-related signals but not affect long-term alterations in body weight, which is controlled by higher centers. The objective of this study was to identify structural pathways damaged in a patient with a brainstem cavernoma who experienced sudden onset of hyperphagia and >50 kg weight gain in obesity' and adds to the brain regions that can determine the long-term body weight set point in humans.

  6. Congenital Trismus From Brainstem Dysgenesis: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chris J; Caulley, Lisa; Kohlert, Scott; Graham, Gail E; McMillan, Hugh J; Michaud, Jean; Vaccani, Jean-Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Trismus refers to any condition inducing limited mouth opening and may present as a result of acquired or congenital pathology. We present the case of a newborn who presented with severe, congenital trismus due to brainstem dysgenesis. We describe the course of his investigations, and a multidisciplinary approach to the management of his care and follow-up. To our knowledge, this is one of the earliest reported cases of congenital trismus attributable to brainstem dysgenesis. A literature review was conducted to provide an overview of the differential pathogenesis as it presents in congenital cases and discuss the complexity of managing congenital trismus due to brainstem dysgenesis in a neonate and infant. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Vaneless diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  8. Surface electromyographic characteristics of swallowing in dysphagia secondary to brainstem stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, M A; Baldwin, B O

    1997-01-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) provides an noninvasive avenue for evaluating swallowing physiology. This report describes SEMG characteristics associated with swallow attempts in 6 dysphagic patients who had suffered brainstem stroke compared with 6 age and gender-matched controls. Results indicated that patients with dysphagia secondary to brainstem stroke differed in both amplitude and timing aspects of swallowing attempts from asymptomatic controls. Specifically, the results indicated that during swallow attempts, dysphagic patients produced more muscle activity over a shorter duration and with less coordination than controls. Potential physiological mechanisms of these results are discussed.

  9. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in leukodystrophies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patay, Zoltan [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Radiology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-01

    Leukodystrophies are genetically determined metabolic diseases, in which the underlying biochemical abnormality interferes with the normal build-up and/or maintenance of myelin, which leads to hypo- (or arrested) myelination, or dysmyelination with resultant demyelination. Although conventional magnetic resonance imaging has significantly contributed to recent progress in the diagnostic work-up of these diseases, diffusion-weighted imaging has the potential to further improve our understanding of underlying pathological processes and their dynamics through the assessment of normal and abnormal diffusion properties of cerebral white matter. Evaluation of conventional diffusion-weighted and ADC map images allows the detection of major diffusion abnormalities and the identification of various edema types, of which the so-called myelin edema is particularly relevant to leukodystrophies. Depending on the nature of histopathological changes, stage and progression gradient of diseases, various diffusion-weighted imaging patterns may be seen in leukodystrophies. Absent or low-grade myelin edema is found in mucopolysaccharidoses, GM gangliosidoses, Zellweger disease, adrenomyeloneuropathy, L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, classical phenylketonuria, Van der Knaap disease and the vanishing white matter, medium grade myelin edema in metachromatic leukodystrophy, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and HMG coenzyme lyase deficiency and high grade edema in Krabbe disease, Canavan disease, hyperhomocystinemias, maple syrup urine disease and leukodystrophy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate. (orig.)

  10. The organization of the brainstem and spinal cord of the mouse : Relationships between monoaminergic, cholinergic, and spinal projection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM; Ulfhake, B

    2006-01-01

    Information regarding the organization of the CNS in terms of neurotransmitter systems and spinal connections in the mouse is sparse, especially at the level of the brainstem. An overview is presented of monoaminergic and cholinergic systems in the brainstem and spinal cord that were visualized immu

  11. Functional Ear (A)Symmetry in Brainstem Neural Activity Relevant to Encoding of Voice Pitch: A Precursor for Hemispheric Specialization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Ananthakrishnan, Saradha; Bidelman, Gavin M.; Smalt, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Pitch processing is lateralized to the right hemisphere; linguistic pitch is further mediated by left cortical areas. This experiment investigates whether ear asymmetries vary in brainstem representation of pitch depending on linguistic status. Brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) were elicited by monaural stimulation of the left and…

  12. Harmonic structures and intrinsic torsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Diego; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    We discuss the construction of 8-manifolds with harmonic Sp(2)Sp(1)-structures. In particular, we find 10 new examples of nilmanifolds that admit a closed 4-form Omega whose stabiliser is Sp(2)Sp(1). Our constructions entail the notion of SO(4)-structures on 7-manifolds. We present a thorough inv...... investigation of the intrinsic torsion of such structures; in addition to the construction of harmonic structures, this analysis leads to explicit Lie group examples with invariant intrinsic torsion.......We discuss the construction of 8-manifolds with harmonic Sp(2)Sp(1)-structures. In particular, we find 10 new examples of nilmanifolds that admit a closed 4-form Omega whose stabiliser is Sp(2)Sp(1). Our constructions entail the notion of SO(4)-structures on 7-manifolds. We present a thorough...

  13. Harmonic structures and intrinsic torsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Diego; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the construction of Sp(2)Sp(1)-structures whose fundamental form is closed. In particular, we find 10 new examples of 8-dimensional nilmanifolds that admit an invariant closed 4-form with stabiliser Sp(2) Sp(1). Our constructions entail the notion of SO(4)-structures on 7-manifolds. We...... present a thorough investigation of the intrinsic torsion of such structures, leading to the construction of explicit Lie group examples with invariant intrinsic torsion.......We discuss the construction of Sp(2)Sp(1)-structures whose fundamental form is closed. In particular, we find 10 new examples of 8-dimensional nilmanifolds that admit an invariant closed 4-form with stabiliser Sp(2) Sp(1). Our constructions entail the notion of SO(4)-structures on 7-manifolds. We...

  14. Population calcium imaging of spontaneous respiratory and novel motor activity in the facial nucleus and ventral brainstem in newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Karin; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-01-01

    The brainstem contains rhythm and pattern forming circuits, which drive cranial and spinal motor pools to produce respiratory and other motor patterns. Here we used calcium imaging combined with nerve recordings in newborn mice to reveal spontaneous population activity in the ventral brainstem...... and in the facial nucleus. In Fluo-8AM loaded brainstem-spinal cord preparations, respiratory activity on cervical nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventrolateral brainstem surface. Individual ventrolateral neurons at the level of the parafacial respiratory group showed perfect or partial...... synchrony with respiratory nerve bursts. In brainstem-spinal cord preparations, cut at the level of the mid-facial nucleus, calcium signals were recorded in the dorsal, lateral and medial facial subnuclei during respiratory activity. Strong activity initiated in the dorsal subnucleus, followed by activity...

  15. Distributional behaviors of time-averaged observables in the Langevin equation with fluctuating diffusivity: Normal diffusion but anomalous fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Takuma; Yamamoto, Eiji

    2016-06-01

    We consider the Langevin equation with dichotomously fluctuating diffusivity, where the diffusion coefficient changes dichotomously over time, in order to study fluctuations of time-averaged observables in temporally heterogeneous diffusion processes. We find that the time-averaged mean-square displacement (TMSD) can be represented by the occupation time of a state in the asymptotic limit of the measurement time and hence occupation time statistics is a powerful tool for calculating the TMSD in the model. We show that the TMSD increases linearly with time (normal diffusion) but the time-averaged diffusion coefficients are intrinsically random when the mean sojourn time for one of the states diverges, i.e., intrinsic nonequilibrium processes. Thus, we find that temporally heterogeneous environments provide anomalous fluctuations of time-averaged diffusivity, which have relevance to large fluctuations of the diffusion coefficients obtained by single-particle-tracking trajectories in experiments.

  16. Intrinsic and scattering attenuation images of Usu volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudencio, J.; Taira, T.; Aoki, Y.; Aoyama, H.; Onizawa, S.

    2017-04-01

    We present intrinsic- and scattering-Q attenuation images for Usu volcano (Japan) by analyzing over 1800 vertical seismograms. By fitting the observed envelopes to the diffusion model, we obtained intrinsic and scattering attenuation values at three different frequency bands. Using a back-projection method and assuming a Gaussian-type weighting function, we obtained the 2D images of intrinsic and scattering attenuation. Resolution tests confirm the robustness and reliability of the obtained images. We found that scattering attenuation is the dominant process of energy loss in the frequency range analyzed, which suggests strong spatial heterogeneity. The resultant scattering attenuation images show an increase of attenuation toward the southwest from Toya caldera, which may correspond to deepening of the basement. We also identify an area of low intrinsic and scattering attenuation at the summit of Usu volcano which could be associated with old magma intrusions. Our results demonstrate a strong spatial relation between structural heterogeneities and attenuation processes in volcanic areas and confirm the efficiency of the method which can be used together with conventional imaging techniques.

  17. Intrinsic Patterns of Human Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven

    2003-03-01

    Activity is one of the defining features of life. Control of human activity is complex, being influenced by many factors both extrinsic and intrinsic to the body. The most obvious extrinsic factors that affect activity are the daily schedule of planned events, such as work and recreation, as well as reactions to unforeseen or random events. These extrinsic factors may account for the apparently random fluctuations in human motion observed over short time scales. The most obvious intrinsic factors are the body clocks including the circadian pacemaker that influences our sleep/wake cycle and ultradian oscillators with shorter time scales [2, 3]. These intrinsic rhythms may account for the underlying regularity in average activity level over longer periods of up to 24 h. Here we ask if the known extrinsic and intrinsic factors fully account for all complex features observed in recordings of human activity. To this end, we measure activity over two weeks from forearm motion in subjects undergoing their regular daily routine. Utilizing concepts from statistical physics, we demonstrate that during wakefulness human activity possesses previously unrecognized complex dynamic patterns. These patterns of activity are characterized by robust fractal and nonlinear dynamics including a universal probability distribution and long-range power-law correlations that are stable over a wide range of time scales (from minutes to hours). Surprisingly, we find that these dynamic patterns are unaffected by changes in the average activity level that occur within individual subjects throughout the day and on different days of the week, and between subjects. Moreover, we find that these patterns persist when the same subjects undergo time-isolation laboratory experiments designed to account for the phase of the circadian pacemaker, and control the known extrinsic factors by restricting behaviors and manipulating scheduled events including the sleep/wake cycle. We attribute these newly

  18. Case of neuro-Behcet syndrome with brainstem lesions confirmed by MRI. Relationship between X-ray CT and MRI findings and neurological symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Shunya; Haida, Munetaka; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Takagi, Shigeharu; Shinohara, Yukito

    1988-03-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with a 30-year history of oral and genital aphthous ulcers and joint pain. One day before his admission he developed double vision and weakness in the right extremities. Neurological examination revealed right 5th nerve palsy, left 6th to 18th nerve palsy, left Horner's sign, and motor and sensory impairment in the right upper and lower extremities. X-ray CT showed diffuse, weak, low-density areas in the brainstem. T1 weighted images showed low signals in the left side of the mid-pons, the left tegmentum and the right basis of the upper pons, and the left tegmentum of the midbrain. T2 weighted images showed high signals in the whole pons and the left side of the midbrain. MRI allowed the differentiation of reversible lesions, such as brain edema, and irreversible lesions, such as necrosis and demyelination of the tissue. (Namekawa, K.).

  19. Brainstem response audiometry in the determination of low-frequency hearing loss : a study of various methods for frequency-specific ABR-threshold assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.G.J. Conijn

    1992-01-01

    textabstractBrainstem Electric Response Audiometry (BERA) is a method to visualize some of the electric activity generated in the auditory nerve and the brainstem during the processing of sound. The amplitude of the Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) is very small (0.05-0.5 flV). The potentials origi

  20. Diffusion in isotopically controlled semiconductor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracht, H.

    1999-12-01

    Isotopically controlled heterostructures of 28Si/natSi and Al71GaAs/Al69GaAs/71GaAs have been used to study the self-diffusion process in this elemental and compound semiconductor material. The directly measured Si self-diffusion coefficient is compared with the self-interstitial and vacancy contribution to self-diffusion which were deduced from metal diffusion experiments. The remarkable agreement between the Si self-diffusion coefficients and the individual contributions to self-diffusion shows that both self-interstitials and vacancies mediate Si self-diffusion. The Ga self-diffusion in undoped AlGaAs was found to decrease with increasing Al concentration. The activation enthalpy of Ga and Al diffusion in GaAs and of Ga diffusion in AlGaAs all lie in the range of (3.6±0.1) eV, but with different pre-exponential factors. The doping dependence of Ga self-diffusion reveals a retardation (enhancement) of Ga diffusion under p-type (n-type) doping compared to intrinsic conditions. All experimental results on the group-III atom diffusion are accurately described if vacancies on the group-III sublattice are assumed to mediate the Ga self- and Al-Ga interdiffusion in undoped AlGaAs and the Ga self-diffusion in Be- and Si-doped GaAs with an active dopant concentration of 3×1018 cm-3. The doping dependence of Ga self-diffusion in GaAs provides strong evidence that neutral, singly and doubly charged Ga vacancies govern the self-diffusion process.

  1. Job assignments, intrinsic motivation and explicit incentives

    OpenAIRE

    Nafziger, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the interplay of job assignments with the intrinsic and extrinsic motivation of an agent. Job assignments influence the self confidence of the agent, and thereby his intrinsic motivation. Monetary reward allow the principal to complement intrinsic motivation with extrinsic incentives. The main result is that the principal chooses an inefficient job assignment rule to enhance the agent's intrinsic motivation even though she can motivate him with monetary rewards. This show...

  2. Identification of Intrinsic Axon Growth Modulators for Intact CNS Neurons after Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathren L. Fink

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI because axons in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS fail to regenerate. However, modest levels of spontaneous functional recovery are typically observed after trauma and are thought to be mediated by the plasticity of intact circuitry. The mechanisms underlying intact circuit plasticity are not delineated. Here, we characterize the in vivo transcriptome of sprouting intact neurons from Ngr1 null mice after partial SCI. We identify the lysophosphatidic acid signaling modulators LPPR1 and LPAR1 as intrinsic axon growth modulators for intact corticospinal motor neurons after adjacent injury. Furthermore, in vivo LPAR1 inhibition or LPPR1 overexpression enhances sprouting of intact corticospinal tract axons and yields greater functional recovery after unilateral brainstem lesion in wild-type mice. Thus, the transcriptional profile of injury-induced sprouting of intact neurons reveals targets for therapeutic enhancement of axon growth initiation and new synapse formation.

  3. Low-frequency versus high-frequency synchronisation in chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, Filip Munch; Gøtsche-Rasmussen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the frequency specific contribution to the auditory brainstem response (ABR) of chirp stimuli. Frequency rising chirps were designed to compensate for the cochlear traveling wave delay, and lead to larger wave-V amplitudes than for click stimuli as more auditory nerve fibr...

  4. Ascending mechanisms of stress integration: Implications for brainstem regulation of neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Brent; Scheimann, Jessie R; Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Herman, James P

    2017-03-01

    In response to stress, defined as a real or perceived threat to homeostasis or well-being, brain systems initiate divergent physiological and behavioral processes that mobilize energy and promote adaptation. The brainstem contains multiple nuclei that engage in autonomic control and reflexive responses to systemic stressors. However, brainstem nuclei also play an important role in neuroendocrine responses to psychogenic stressors mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Further, these nuclei integrate neuroendocrine responses with stress-related behaviors, significantly impacting mood and anxiety. The current review focuses on the prominent brainstem monosynaptic inputs to the endocrine paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), including the periaqueductal gray, raphe nuclei, parabrachial nuclei, locus coeruleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). The NTS is a particularly intriguing area, as the region contains multiple cell groups that provide neurochemically-distinct inputs to the PVN. Furthermore, the NTS, under regulatory control by glucocorticoid-mediated feedback, integrates affective processes with physiological status to regulate stress responding. Collectively, these brainstem circuits represent an important avenue for delineating interactions between stress and health.

  5. Survival with concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy in pediatric brainstem glioma with relation to the tumor volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shachi Jain Taran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brainstem gliomas account for approximately 25% of all posterior fossa tumors. In pediatric age group, it constitutes about 10% of all brain tumors. Brainstem glioma is an aggressive and lethal type of malignancy with poor outcome despite all treatments. Aim: We studied the incidence and treatment outcome in pediatric patients with brainstem glioma depending on their tumor volume presenting in our institution in last 5 years. Brain tumors comprised 2.95% of all cancers and brainstem gliomas were 8% of all brain tumors. Materials and Methods: Nine pediatric patients were included in this analysis, who were treated with localized external radiotherapy 54–59.4 Gy along with temozolomide 75 mg/m2 during the whole course of radiotherapy. Results: The median survival in all these patients was 20 months and the overall 2 years survival is 44.4% (4/9. The median survival of patients with primary disease volume <40cc is 26 months whereas when the volume is more than 40cc the median survival is 13.5 months as calculated by Chi-square test. Conclusion: As this study includes a small number of patients with unknown histology and treated on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging findings, no definite opinion can be given as some patients may have a low-grade tumor. More studies are required to establish the relation of size of the tumor with survival.

  6. Demonstration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-like immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Matsuyama, T.; Strosberg, A.D.; Traber, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein (mAChR) in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem was described by using a monoclonal antibody (M35) raised against mAChR purified from bovine forebrain homogenates. A method is investigated for light microscopic (LM) and electronmicroscop

  7. Evidence for Atypical Auditory Brainstem Responses in Young Children with Suspected Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daphne Ari-Even; Muchnik, Chava; Shabtai, Esther; Hildesheimer, Minka; Henkin, Yael

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to characterize the auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) of young children with suspected autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and compare them with the ABRs of children with language delay and with clinical norms. Method: The ABRs of 26 children with suspected ASDs (21 males, five females; mean age 32.5 mo) and an age-…

  8. The Impact of Clinical History on the Threshold Estimation of Auditory Brainstem Response Results for Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitoun, Maha; Cumming, Steven; Purcell, Alison; O'Brien, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the impact of patient clinical history on audiologists' performance when interpreting auditory brainstem response (ABR) results. Method: Fourteen audiologists' accuracy in estimating hearing threshold for 16 infants through interpretation of ABR traces was compared on 2 occasions at least 5 months apart. On the 1st…

  9. Neural correlates of consonance, dissonance, and the hierarchy of musical pitch in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2009-10-21

    Consonant and dissonant pitch relationships in music provide the foundation of melody and harmony, the building blocks of Western tonal music. We hypothesized that phase-locked neural activity within the brainstem may preserve information relevant to these important perceptual attributes of music. To this end, we measured brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) from nonmusicians in response to the dichotic presentation of nine musical intervals that varied in their degree of consonance and dissonance. Neural pitch salience was computed for each response using temporally based autocorrelation and harmonic pitch sieve analyses. Brainstem responses to consonant intervals were more robust and yielded stronger pitch salience than those to dissonant intervals. In addition, the ordering of neural pitch salience across musical intervals followed the hierarchical arrangement of pitch stipulated by Western music theory. Finally, pitch salience derived from neural data showed high correspondence with behavioral consonance judgments (r = 0.81). These results suggest that brainstem neural mechanisms mediating pitch processing show preferential encoding of consonant musical relationships and, furthermore, preserve the hierarchical pitch relationships found in music, even for individuals without formal musical training. We infer that the basic pitch relationships governing music may be rooted in low-level sensory processing and that an encoding scheme that favors consonant pitch relationships may be one reason why such intervals are preferred behaviorally.

  10. Satisfaction and quality of life in users of auditory brainstem implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Nayara Freitas; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Magalhães, Ana Tereza De Matos; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; De Brito, Rubens Vuono; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate satisfaction and quality of life of users of Auditory Implant Brainstem. Methods This is a cross-sectional and descriptive study conducted at Divisão de Clínica Otorrinolaringológica of Hospital das Clínicas of Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. For the research, 19 users of an Auditory Brainstem Implant answered the following questionnaires: KINDLR (Questionnaire for Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents), for children and adolescents, their parents and/or caregivers; WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, for adult participants; and the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire culturally adapted to Brazilian Portuguese. Results The quality of life of children using Auditory Brainstem Implant from the perspective of their parents showed global results above average, as for most domains, except for the emotional well-being domain. Adults showed results above average for all domains. Regarding satisfaction with the device, the adult users of auditory brainstem implant were satisfied in general, except with regard to personal image. The parents of the children showed dissatisfaction in all subscales, except for the subscale of services and cost. Conclusion The results indicated that although patients are dissatisfied with the device in some aspects, overall the quality of life was rated as good for most of the aspects assessed.

  11. Localization of CGRP receptor components and receptor binding sites in rhesus monkey brainstem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Roberts, Rhonda; Chen, Tsing-Bau

    2016-01-01

    that several regions in the brainstem may be involved in CGRP signaling. Interestingly, we found receptor expression and antagonist binding in some areas that are not protected by the blood-brain barrier, which suggests that drugs inhibiting CGRP signaling may not be able to penetrate the central nervous...

  12. The human premotor oculomotor brainstem system - can it help to understand oculomotor symptoms in Huntington's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, U.; Heinsen, H.; Brunt, E. R.; Landwehrmeyer, B.; Den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Gierga, K.; Deller, T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in oculomotor research has enabled new insights into the functional neuroanatomy of the human premotor oculomotor brainstem network. In the present review, we provide an overview of its functional neuroanatomy and summarize the broad range of oculomotor dysfunctions that may occur in

  13. BRAIN-STEM INFLUENCES ON BICEPS REFLEX ACTIVITY AND MUSCLE TONE IN THE ANESTHETIZED RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JUCH, PJW; SCHAAFSMA, A; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1992-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of electrical stimulation of the locus coeruleus (LC) and adjacent brainstem structures on the tonic reflex (TVR), the tonic stretch reflex (TSR) and on muscle tone (MT) in anaesthetized rat. Increases in TVR. TSR and MT of the m. biceps were evoked from regions

  14. Investigation of auditory brainstem function in elderly diabetic patients with presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacií, Jelena; Lajtman, Zoran; Ozegović, Ivan; Knezević, Predrag; Carić, Tomislav; Vlasić, Ana

    2009-01-01

    We performed brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) examinations in 100 patients older than 60 years and having type I diabetes mellitus and presbycusis. The aim of our investigation was to compare the BAEP results of this group with those of healthy controls with presbycusis and to look for possible correlations between alteration of the auditory brainstem function and the aging of elderly diabetic patients. Absolute and interpeak latencies of all waves were prolonged significantly in the study group of diabetic patients. The amplitudes of all waves I through V were diminished in the study group as compared to those in the control group, with statistical significance present for all waves. Analysis of the latencies (waves I, II, I, and V), interpeak latencies (I-V), and amplitudes (I, II, III, and V) of BAEP revealed a significant difference between those of diabetics and those of healthy elderly controls with presbycusis. These data support a hypothesis that there is a brainstem neuropathy in diabetes mellitus that can be assessed with auditory brainstem response testing even in the group of elderly patients with sensorineural hearing loss.

  15. Developmental alterations of the auditory brainstem centers--pathogenetic implications in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Ottaviani, Giulia; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-10-15

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), despite the success of campaigns to reduce its risks, is the leading cause of infant death in the Western world. Even though the pathogenesis remains unexplained, brainstem abnormalities of the neuronal network that mediates breathing and protective responses to asphyxia, particularly in the arousal phase from sleep, are believed to play a fundamental role. This is the first study to identify, in SIDS, developmental defects of specific brainstem centers involved in hearing pathways, particularly in the cochlear and vestibular nuclei, in the superior olivary complex and in the inferior colliculus, suggesting a possible influence of the acoustic system on respiratory activity. In 49 SIDS cases and 20 controls an in-depth anatomopathological examination of the autonomic nervous system was performed, with the main aim of detecting developmental alterations of brainstem structures controlling both the respiratory and auditory activities. Overall, a significantly higher incidence of cytoarchitectural alterations of both the auditory and respiratory network components were observed in SIDS victims compared with matched controls. Even if there is not sufficient evidence to presume that developmental defects of brainstem auditory structures can affect breathing, our findings, showing that developmental deficit in the control respiratory areas are frequently accompanied by alterations of auditory structures, highlight an additional important element for the understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of SIDS.

  16. Neurochemical abnormalities in the brainstem of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machaalani, Rita; Waters, Karen A

    2014-12-01

    The brainstem has been a focus in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) research for 30 years. Physiological and animal model data show that cardiorespiratory, sleep, and arousal mechanisms are abnormal after exposure to SIDS risk factors or in infants who subsequently die from SIDS. As the brainstem houses the regulatory centres for these functions, it is the most likely site to find abnormalities. True to this hypothesis, data derived over the last 30 years shows that the brainstem of infants who died from SIDS exhibits abnormalities in a number of major neurotransmitter and receptor systems including: catecholamines, neuropeptides, acetylcholinergic, indole amines (predominantly serotonin and its receptors), amino acids (predominantly glutamate), brain derived neurotrophic growth factor (BDNF), and some cytokines. A pattern is emerging of particular brainstem nuclei being consistently affected including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), arcuate nucleus (AN) and raphe. We discuss the implications of these findings and directions that this may lead in future research.

  17. Brainstem mediates diazepam enhancement of palatability and feeding: microinjections into fourth ventricle versus lateral ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciña, S; Berridge, K C

    1996-07-15

    The hypothesis that benzodiazepine-induced hyperphagia is due to a specific enhancement of the palatability of foods has been supported by previous 'taste reactivity' studies of affective (hedonic and aversive) reactions to taste palatability. Diazepam and chlordiazepoxide enhance hedonic reactions of rats (rhythmic tongue protrusions, etc.) to sweet tastes in a receptor-specific fashion. A role for brainstem circuits has been indicated by a previous demonstration of the persistence of the taste reactivity enhancement by diazepam after midbrain decerebration. The present study examined whether benzodiazepine brainstem receptors are the chief substrates for palatability enhancement even in intact brains. We compared the effectiveness of benzodiazepine microinjections to elicit feeding and enhance hedonic reactions when delivered into either the lateral ventricle (forebrain) or the fourth ventricle (brainstem) of rats. The results show diazepam is reliably more effective at eliciting feeding and enhancing positive hedonic reactions to oral sucrose when microinjections are made in the fourth ventricle than in the lateral ventricle. We conclude that brainstem neural systems containing benzodiazepine-GABA receptors are likely to be the chief substrates for benzodiazepine-induced palatability enhancement.

  18. Ventilation induced apnea and its effect on dorsal brainstem inspiratory neurones in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Balnave, Ron J.; Chow, Chin M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of mechanical ventilation (MV) on inherent breathing and on dorsal brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) respiratory cell function. In pentobarbitone-anaesthetised rats, application of MV at combined high frequencies and volumes (representing

  19. Microvascular changes in estrogen-alpha sensitive brainstem structures of aging female hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, Peter O.; de Weerd, Henk; van der Want, Johannes J. L.; Kortekaas, Rudie; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Veening, Jan G.

    2010-01-01

    Structural neuronal plasticity is present in the nucleus para-retroambiguus (NPRA) and the commissural nucleus of the solitary tract/A2 group (NTScom/A2) in female hamsters. Both brainstem nuclei play a role in estrous cycle related autonomic adaptations. We investigated how aging affects the capill

  20. Towards an optimal paradigm for simultaneously recording cortical and brainstem auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2015-02-15

    Simultaneous recording of brainstem and cortical event-related brain potentials (ERPs) may offer a valuable tool for understanding the early neural transcription of behaviorally relevant sounds and the hierarchy of signal processing operating at multiple levels of the auditory system. To date, dual recordings have been challenged by technological and physiological limitations including different optimal parameters necessary to elicit each class of ERP (e.g., differential adaptation/habitation effects and number of trials to obtain adequate response signal-to-noise ratio). We investigated a new stimulus paradigm for concurrent recording of the auditory brainstem frequency-following response (FFR) and cortical ERPs. The paradigm is "optimal" in that it uses a clustered stimulus presentation and variable interstimulus interval (ISI) to (i) achieve the most ideal acquisition parameters for eliciting subcortical and cortical responses, (ii) obtain an adequate number of trials to detect each class of response, and (iii) minimize neural adaptation/habituation effects. Comparison between clustered and traditional (fixed, slow ISI) stimulus paradigms revealed minimal change in amplitude or latencies of either the brainstem FFR or cortical ERP. The clustered paradigm offered over a 3× increase in recording efficiency compared to conventional (fixed ISI presentation) and thus, a more rapid protocol for obtaining dual brainstem-cortical recordings in individual listeners. We infer that faster recording of subcortical and cortical potentials might allow more complete and sensitive testing of neurophysiological function and aid in the differential assessment of auditory function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Boxing sparring complicated by an acute subdural haematoma and brainstem haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G; Trivedi, Rikin A; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2012-10-01

    A professional boxer developed an acute subdural haematoma after boxing sparring. Despite timely surgical decompression, he had a poor overall outcome predominantly from a delayed brainstem haematoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to elucidate the pathophysiology of the patients' injury and clinical condition.

  2. Stochastic Intrinsic Kriging for Simulation Metamodelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehdad, E.; Kleijnen, Jack P.C.

    2014-01-01

    We derive intrinsic Kriging, using Matherons intrinsic random functions which eliminate the trend in classic Kriging. We formulate this intrinsic Kriging as a metamodel in deterministic and random simulation models. For random simulation we derive an experimental design that also specifies the numbe

  3. Intrinsic chemosensitivity of individual nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and locus coeruleus (LC) neurons from neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L; Hartzler, Lynn K; Conrad, Susan C; Dean, Jay B; Putnam, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Chemosensitive (CS) neurons are found in discrete brainstem regions, but whether the CS response of these neurons is due to intrinsic chemosensitivity of individual neurons or is mediated by changes in chemical and/or electrical synaptic input is largely unknown. We studied the effect of synaptic blockade (11.4 mM Mg2+/0.2mM Ca2+) solution (SNB) and a gap junction uncoupling agent carbenoxolone (CAR--100 microM) on the response of neurons from two CS brainstem regions, the NTS and the LC. In NTS neurons, SNB decreased spontaneous firing rate (FR). We calculated the magnitude of the FR response to hypercapnic acidosis (HA; 15% CO2) using the Chemosensitivity Index (CI). The percentage of NTS neurons activated and CI were the same in the absence and presence of SNB. Blocking gap junctions with CAR did not significantly alter spontaneous FR. CAR did not alter the CI in NTS neurons and resulted in a small decrease in the percentage of activated neurons, which was most evident in NTS neurons from rats younger than postnatal day 10. In LC neurons, SNB resulted in an increase in spontaneous FR. As with NTS neurons, SNB did not alter the percentage of activated neurons or the CI in LC neurons. CAR resulted in a small increase in spontaneous FR in LC neurons. In contrast, CAR had a marked effect on the response of LC neurons to HA: a reduced percentage of CS LC neurons and decreased CI. In summary, both NTS and LC neurons appear to contain intrinsically CS neurons. CS neurons from the two regions receive different tonic input in slices (excitatory for NTS and inhibitory for LC); however, blocking chemical synaptic input does not affect the CS response in either region. In NTS neurons, gap junction coupling plays a small role in the CS response, but gap junctions play a major role in the chemosensitivity of many LC neurons.

  4. Robust Machine Learning-Based Correction on Automatic Segmentation of the Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun Yi; Ngo, Michael M; Hessl, David; Hagerman, Randi J; Rivera, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Automated segmentation is a useful method for studying large brain structures such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, automated segmentation may lead to inaccuracy and/or undesirable boundary. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether SegAdapter, a machine learning-based method, is useful for automatically correcting large segmentation errors and disagreement in anatomical definition. We further assessed the robustness of the method in handling size of training set, differences in head coil usage, and amount of brain atrophy. High resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 30 healthy controls scanned with either an 8-channel or 32-channel head coil. Ten patients, who suffered from brain atrophy because of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, were scanned using the 32-channel head coil. The initial segmentations of the cerebellum and brainstem were generated automatically using Freesurfer. Subsequently, Freesurfer's segmentations were both manually corrected to serve as the gold standard and automatically corrected by SegAdapter. Using only 5 scans in the training set, spatial overlap with manual segmentation in Dice coefficient improved significantly from 0.956 (for Freesurfer segmentation) to 0.978 (for SegAdapter-corrected segmentation) for the cerebellum and from 0.821 to 0.954 for the brainstem. Reducing the training set size to 2 scans only decreased the Dice coefficient ≤0.002 for the cerebellum and ≤ 0.005 for the brainstem compared to the use of training set size of 5 scans in corrective learning. The method was also robust in handling differences between the training set and the test set in head coil usage and the amount of brain atrophy, which reduced spatial overlap only by segmentation and corrective learning provides a valuable method for accurate and efficient segmentation of the cerebellum and brainstem, particularly in large-scale neuroimaging studies, and potentially for segmenting other neural regions as

  5. Neurochemical organization of the vestibular brainstem in the common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizer, Joan S; Paolone, Nicholas A; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R

    2013-11-01

    Chimpanzees are one of the closest living relatives of humans. However, the cognitive and motor abilities of chimpanzees and humans are quite different. The fact that humans are habitually bipedal and chimpanzees are not implies different uses of vestibular information in the control of posture and balance. Furthermore, bipedal locomotion permits the development of fine motor skills of the hand and tool use in humans, suggesting differences between species in the structures and circuitry for manual control. Much motor behavior is mediated via cerebro-cerebellar circuits that depend on brainstem relays. In this study, we investigated the organization of the vestibular brainstem in chimpanzees to gain insight into whether these structures differ in their anatomy from humans. We identified the four nuclei of vestibular nuclear complex in the chimpanzee and also looked at several other precerebellar structures. The size and arrangement of some of these nuclei differed between chimpanzees and humans, and also displayed considerable inter-individual variation. We identified regions within the cytoarchitectonically defined medial vestibular nucleus visualized by immunoreactivity to the calcium-binding proteins calretinin and calbindin as previously shown in other species including human. We have found that the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis, which is identified in the human but not in macaque monkeys, is present in the chimpanzee brainstem. However, the arcuate nucleus, which is present in humans, was not found in chimpanzees. The present study reveals major differences in the organization of the vestibular brainstem among Old World anthropoid primate species. Furthermore, in chimpanzees, as well as humans, there is individual variability in the organization of brainstem nuclei.

  6. High-resolution MR imaging of the human brainstem in vivo at 7 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eDeistung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The human brainstem, which comprises a multitude of axonal nerve fibers and nuclei, plays an important functional role in the human brain. Depicting its anatomy non-invasively with high spatial resolution may thus in turn help to better relate normal and pathological anatomical variations to medical conditions as well as neurological and peripheral functions. We explored the potential of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 7T for depicting the intricate anatomy of the human brainstem in vivo by acquiring and generating images with multiple contrasts: T2-weighted images, quantitative maps of longitudinal relaxation rate (R1-maps and effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*-maps, magnetic susceptibility maps, and direction-encoded track-density images. Images and quantitative maps were compared with histological stains and anatomical atlases to identify nerve nuclei and nerve fibers. Among the investigated contrasts, susceptibility maps displayed the largest number of brainstem structures. Contrary to R1 maps and T2-weighted images, which showed rather homogeneous contrast, R2* maps, magnetic susceptibility maps and track-density images clearly displayed a multitude of smaller and larger fiber bundles. Several brainstem nuclei were identifiable in sections covering the pons and medulla oblongata, including the spinal trigeminal and the reticulotegmental nucleus on magnetic susceptibility maps as well as the inferior olive on R1, R2*, and susceptibility maps. The substantia nigra and red nuclei were visible in all contrasts. In conclusion, high-resolution, multi-contrast MR imaging at 7 Tesla is a versatile tool to non-invasively assess the individual anatomy and tissue composition of the human brainstem.

  7. Alternative oblique head CT scanning technique reduces bone artifact and improves interpretability of brainstem anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Douglas Kampondeni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem pathology due to infections, infarcts and tumors are common in developing countries, but neuroimaging technology in these resource-poor settings is often limited to single slice, and occasionally spiral, CT. Unlike multislice CT and MRI, single slice and spiral CT are compromised by bone artifacts in the posterior fossa due to the dense petrous bones, often making imaging of the brainstem non-diagnostic. With appropriate head positioning, the petrous ridges can be avoided with 40˚ sagittal oblique scans parallel to either petrous ridge. We describe an alternative sagittal oblique scanning technique that significantly reduces brainstem CT artifacts thereby improving clarity of anatomy. With Inst­itutional Ethical approval, 13 adult patients were enrolled (5 males; 39%. All patients had routine axial brain CT and sagittal oblique scans with no lesions found. Images were read by 2 readers who gave a score for amount of artefact and clarity of structures in the posterior fossa. The mean artifact score was higher for routine axial images compared to sagittal oblique (2.92 vs. 1.23; P<0.0001. The mean anatomical certainty scores for the brainstem were significantly better in the sagittal oblique views compared to routine axial (1.23 vs. 2.77; P<0.0001. No difference was found between the two techniques with respect to the fourth ventricle or the cerebellum (axial vs. sag oblique: 1.15 vs. 1.27; P=0.37. When using single slice CT, the sagittal oblique scanning technique is valuable in improving clarity of anatomy in the brainstem if axial images are non-diagnostic due to bone artifacts.

  8. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  9. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials induced by air-conducted sound in patients with acute brainstem lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Jong-Min; Shin, Byoung-Soo; Hwang, Seung-Bae; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Kim, Chanmi; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2013-04-01

    The ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), a recently documented otolith-ocular reflex, is considered to reflect the central projections of the primary otolithic afferent fibers to the oculomotor nuclei. The aim of our study is to define air-conducted sound oVEMP abnormality in patients with acute brainstem lesions and to determine the brainstem structures involved in the generation of oVEMPs. In response to air-conducted tone burst sounds (ACS), oVEMP was measured in 52 patients with acute brainstem lesions. Individualized brainstem lesions were analyzed by means of MRI-based voxel-wise lesion-behavior mapping, and the probabilistic lesion maps were constructed. More than half (n=28, 53.8%) of the patients with acute brainstem lesions showed abnormal oVEMP in response to ACS. The majority of patients with abnormal oVEMPs had lesions in the dorsomedial brainstem that contains the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF), the crossed ventral tegmental tract (CVTT), and the oculomotor nuclei and nerves. MLF, CVTT, and the oculomotor nuclei and nerves appear to be responsible for otolith-ocular responses in the brainstem. Complemented to cervical VEMP for the uncrossed otolith-spinal function, oVEMP to ACS may be applied to evaluate the crossed otolith-ocular function in central vestibulopathies. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Presymplectic structures and intrinsic Lagrangians

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that a Lagrangian induces a compatible presymplectic form on the equation manifold (stationary surface, understood as a submanifold of the respective jet-space). Given an equation manifold and a compatible presymplectic form therein, we define the first-order Lagrangian system which is formulated in terms of the intrinsic geometry of the equation manifold. It has a structure of a presymplectic AKSZ sigma model for which the equation manifold, equipped with the presymplectic form and the horizontal differential, serves as the target space. For a wide class of systems (but not all) we show that if the presymplectic structure originates from a given Lagrangian, the proposed first-order Lagrangian is equivalent to the initial one and hence the Lagrangian per se can be entirely encoded in terms of the intrinsic geometry of its stationary surface. If the compatible presymplectic structure is generic, the proposed Lagrangian is only a partial one in the sense that its stationary surface contains the...

  11. Intrinsic Alignments in the Illustris Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Peter; Springel, Volker; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We study intrinsic alignments (IA) of galaxy image shapes within the Illustris cosmic structure formation simulations. We investigate how IA correlations depend on observable galaxy properties such as stellar mass, apparent magnitude, redshift, and photometric type, and on the employed shape measurement method. The correlations considered include the matter density-intrinsic ellipticity (mI), galaxy density-intrinsic ellipticity (dI), gravitational shear-intrinsic ellipticity (GI), and intrinsic ellipticity-intrinsic ellipticity (II) correlations. We find stronger correlations for more massive and more luminous galaxies, as well as for earlier photometric types, in agreement with observations. Moreover, shape measurement methods that down-weight the outer parts of galaxy images produce much weaker IA signals on intermediate and large scales than methods employing flat radial weights. Thus, the expected contribution of intrinsic alignments to the observed ellipticity correlation in tomographic cosmic shear sur...

  12. Relativistic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  13. Dissociation of spontaneous seizures and brainstem seizure thresholds in mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B; Ferland, Russell J

    2017-03-01

    C57BL/6J mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized clonic seizures exhibit a change in seizure phenotype following a 28-day incubation period and subsequent flurothyl rechallenge. Mice now develop a complex seizure semiology originating in the forebrain and propagating into the brainstem seizure network (a forebrain→brainstem seizure). In contrast, this phenotype change does not occur in seizure-sensitive DBA/2J mice. The underlying mechanism(s) was the focus of these studies. DBA2/J mice were exposed to eight flurothyl-induced seizures (1/day) followed by 24-hour video-electroencephalographic recordings for 28-days. Forebrain and brainstem seizure thresholds were determined in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice following one or eight flurothyl-induced seizures, or after eight flurothyl-induced seizures, a 28-day incubation period, and final flurothyl rechallenge. Similar to C57BL/6J mice, DBA2/J mice expressed spontaneous seizures. However, unlike C57BL/6J mice, DBA2/J mice continued to have spontaneous seizures without remission. Because DBA2/J mice do not express forebrain→brainstem seizures following flurothyl rechallenge after a 28-day incubation period, this indicated that spontaneous seizures were not sufficient for the evolution of forebrain→brainstem seizures. Therefore, we determined whether brainstem seizure thresholds were changing during this repeated-flurothyl model and whether this could account for the expression of forebrain→brainstem seizures. Brainstem seizure thresholds were not different between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice on day one or on the last induction seizure trial (day eight). However, brainstem seizure thresholds did differ significantly on flurothyl rechallenge (day 28) with DBA/2J mice showing no lowering of their brainstem seizure thresholds. These results demonstrated that DBA/2J mice exposed to the repeated-flurothyl model develop spontaneous seizures without evidence of seizure remission and provide a new model of

  14. Intrinsic Hydrophobicity of Rammed Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, M.; Stone, C.; Balintova, M.; Grul, R.

    2015-11-01

    Rammed earth is well known for its vapour diffusion properties, its ability to regulate humidity within the built environment. Rammed earth is also an aesthetically iconic material such as marble or granite and therefore is preferably left exposed. However exposed rammed earth is often coated with silane/siloxane water repellents or the structure is modified architecturally (large roof overhangs) to accommodate for the hydrophilic nature of the material. This paper sets out to find out optimal hydrophobicity for rammed earth based on natural composite fibres and surface coating without adversely affecting the vapour diffusivity of the material. The material is not required to be waterproof, but should resist at least driving rain. In order to evaluate different approaches to increase hydrophobicity of rammed earth surface, peat fibres and four types of repellents were used.

  15. Understanding and predicting profile structure and parametric scaling of intrinsic rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. X.; Grierson, B. A.; Ethier, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Diamond, P. H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports on a recent advance in developing physical understanding and a first-principles-based model for predicting intrinsic rotation profiles in magnetic fusion experiments. It is shown for the first time that turbulent fluctuation-driven residual stress (a non-diffusive component of momentum flux) along with diffusive momentum flux can account for both the shape and magnitude of the observed intrinsic toroidal rotation profile. Both the turbulence intensity gradient and zonal flow E ×B shear are identified as major contributors to the generation of the k∥-asymmetry needed for the residual stress generation. The model predictions of core rotation based on global gyrokinetic simulations agree well with the experimental measurements of main ion toroidal rotation for a set of DIII-D ECH discharges. The validated model is further used to investigate the characteristic dependence of residual stress and intrinsic rotation profile structure on the multi-dimensional parametric space covering the turbulence type, q-profile structure, and up-down asymmetry in magnetic geometry with the goal of developing the physics understanding needed for rotation profile control and optimization. It is shown that in the flat-q profile regime, intrinsic rotations driven by ITG and TEM turbulence are in the opposite direction (i.e., intrinsic rotation reverses). The predictive model also produces reversed intrinsic rotation for plasmas with weak and normal shear q-profiles.

  16. The intrinsically disordered RNR inhibitor Sml1 is a dynamic dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsson, Jens; Liljedahl, Leena; Ba´ra´ny-Wallje, Elsa

    2008-01-01

    . Sml1 belongs to the class of intrinsically disordered proteins with a high degree of dynamics and very little stable structure. Earlier suggestions for a dimeric structure of Sml1 were confirmed, and from translation diffusion NMR measurements, a dimerization dissociation constant of 0.1 mM at 4...... natively disordered proteins....

  17. Intrinsic optimization using stochastic nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Brian; Camsari, Kerem Yunus; Behin-Aein, Behtash; Datta, Supriyo

    2017-01-01

    This paper draws attention to a hardware system which can be engineered so that its intrinsic physics is described by the generalized Ising model and can encode the solution to many important NP-hard problems as its ground state. The basic constituents are stochastic nanomagnets which switch randomly between the ±1 Ising states and can be monitored continuously with standard electronics. Their mutual interactions can be short or long range, and their strengths can be reconfigured as needed to solve specific problems and to anneal the system at room temperature. The natural laws of statistical mechanics guide the network of stochastic nanomagnets at GHz speeds through the collective states with an emphasis on the low energy states that represent optimal solutions. As proof-of-concept, we present simulation results for standard NP-complete examples including a 16-city traveling salesman problem using experimentally benchmarked models for spin-transfer torque driven stochastic nanomagnets. PMID:28295053

  18. Intrinsic plasmarons in warm graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daqing; Chen, Shuyue; Zhang, Shengli; Ma, Ning

    2017-10-01

    Based on a self-consistent method, we predict theoretically that there exist intrinsic plasmarons in graphene at nonzero temperature, with a well defined mode, as shown by the result of Landau damping. We find that there are sharp differences between the discussed system and the QCD/QED system. Firstly, the thermal mass is proportional to α_g3/4T but not αg T . Secondly, at 0c , the fermion channel and plasmaron channel are nearly degenerate, and furthermore the energy difference between fermion and plasmaron becomes larger and larger with increasing q in the region q>qc . Thirdly, the fermion behaves as a ‘relativistic particle’ with nonzero mass, and the plasmaron exhibits an abnormal dispersion at moderate momentum.

  19. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  20. A Generalized Diffusion Tensor for Fully Anisotropic Diffusion of Energetic Particles in the Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Effenberger, Frederic; Scherer, Klaus; Barra, Stephan; Kleimann, Jens; Strauss, Roelf Du Toit

    2012-01-01

    The spatial diffusion of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields can, in the most general case, be fully anisotropic, i.e. one has to distinguish three diffusion axes in a local, field-aligned frame. We reexamine the transformation for the diffusion tensor from this local to a global frame, in which the Parker transport equation for energetic particles is usually formulated and solved. Particularly, we generalize the transformation formulas to allow for an explicit choice of two principal local perpendicular diffusion axes. This generalization includes the 'traditional' diffusion tensor in the special case of isotropic perpendicular diffusion. For the local frame, we motivate the choice of the Frenet-Serret trihedron which is related to the intrinsic magnetic field geometry. We directly compare the old and the new tensor elements for two heliospheric magnetic field configurations, namely the hybrid Fisk and the Parker field. Subsequently, we examine the significance of the different formulations for the diff...

  1. Intrinsic Evaporative Cooling by Hygroscopic Earth Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra R. Rempel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The phase change of water from liquid to vapor is one of the most energy-intensive physical processes in nature, giving it immense potential for cooling. Diverse evaporative cooling strategies have resulted worldwide, including roof ponds and sprinklers, courtyard fountains, wind catchers with qanats, irrigated green roofs, and fan-assisted evaporative coolers. These methods all require water in bulk liquid form. The evaporation of moisture that has been sorbed from the atmosphere by hygroscopic materials is equally energy-intensive, however, yet has not been examined for its cooling potential. In arid and semi-arid climates, hygroscopic earth buildings occur widely and are known to maintain comfortable indoor temperatures, but evaporation of moisture from their walls and roofs has been regarded as unimportant since water scarcity limits irrigation and rainfall; instead, their cool interiors are attributed to well-established mass effects in delaying the transmission of sensible gains. Here, we investigate the cooling accomplished by daily cycles of moisture sorption and evaporation which, requiring only ambient humidity, we designate as “intrinsic” evaporative cooling. Connecting recent soil science to heat and moisture transport studies in building materials, we use soils, adobe, cob, unfired earth bricks, rammed earth, and limestone to reveal the effects of numerous parameters (temperature and relative humidity, material orientation, thickness, moisture retention properties, vapor diffusion resistance, and liquid transport properties on the magnitude of intrinsic evaporative cooling and the stabilization of indoor relative humidity. We further synthesize these effects into concrete design guidance. Together, these results show that earth buildings in diverse climates have significant potential to cool themselves evaporatively through sorption of moisture from humid night air and evaporation during the following day’s heat. This finding

  2. Context-Dependent Encoding in the Human Auditory Brainstem Relates to Hearing Speech in Noise: Implications for Developmental Dyslexia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Hornickel, Jane; Skoe, Erika; Nicol, Trent; Kraus, Nina

    2009-01-01

    We examined context-dependent encoding of speech in children with and without developmental dyslexia by measuring auditory brainstem responses to a speech syllable presented in a repetitive or variable context...

  3. Neurodegenerative changes in the brainstem and olfactory bulb in people older than 50 years old: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Hehn de Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in life expectancy in Brazil, concerns have grown about the most prevalent diseases in elderly people. Among these diseases are neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Protein deposits related to the development of these diseases can pre-date the symptomatic phases by years. The tau protein is particularly interesting: it might be found in the brainstem and olfactory bulb long before it reaches the limbic cortex, at which point symptoms occur. Of the 14 brains collected in this study, the tau protein was found in the brainstems of 10 (71.42% and in olfactory bulbs of 3 out 11. Of the 7 individuals who had a final diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, 6 presented tau deposits in some region of the brainstem. Our data support the idea of the presence of tau protein in the brainstem and olfactory bulb in the earliest stages of AD.

  4. Stress-induced increases in brainstem amino acid levels are prevented by chronic sodium hydrosulfide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warenycia, M W; Kombian, S B; Reiffenstein, R J

    1990-01-01

    Neurotransmitter amino acid levels were measured in select brain regions of rats and mice after chronic treatment with sublethal doses of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). Brainstem aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, taurine and GABA levels increased in chronically but not acutely saline-treated rats. These increases may have been due to stress from frequent handling, and were prevented by chronic NaHS treatment (7.5 mg/kg ip every 8 hr for 3 consecutive days). In contrast, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine increased in female but not in male ICR mouse brainstems after once daily treatment with 7.0 mg/kg NaHS for 5 consecutive days. These effects of NaHS may indicate chronic low level H2S neurotoxicity. Differences between chronic and acute treatments, female and male responses, and treatment paradigms may complicate interpretations of such toxicity studies.

  5. Perioperative posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in 2 pediatric neurosurgery patients with brainstem ependymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Melanie G Hayden; Taft, Bonnie P; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Guzman, Raphael; Edwards, Michael S B

    2011-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) has been described in pediatric neurooncology patients, although it has not been documented perioperatively in pediatric neurosurgery patients not actively receiving chemotherapy. Recently at the authors' facility, 2 cases of PRES were diagnosed perioperatively in children with brainstem ependymoma. Both patients had presented with hypertension, altered mental status, and seizures and demonstrated MR imaging features consistent with PRES. The patients were treated with antiseizure and antihypertension medications, leading to improvement in both clinical symptoms and neuroimaging findings. These cases are the first to document PRES in perioperative pediatric neurosurgery patients not actively receiving chemotherapy. Both patients had ependymoma involving the brainstem, which may have led to intra- and perioperative hemodynamic instability (including hypertension) and predisposed them to this syndrome. An awareness of PRES in similar scenarios will aid in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric neurosurgery patients with this syndrome.

  6. Activation of brainstem serotoninergic pathways decreases homosynaptic depression of monosynaptic responses of frog spinal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A; Rudomin, P

    1983-12-05

    In the isolated neuraxis of the frog, low frequency stimulation (0.5-2 Hz) of the lateral columns produces monosynaptic responses in the ventral roots which are depressed with an exponential time course. Serotonin (10 mumol/liter) added to the bath, or stimulation of the brain-stem midline raphe nuclei, but not of the lateral reticular formation, reduced the magnitude of the low frequency depression of the responses. The above actions were abolished by methysergide (1 mumol/liter), a specific antagonist of serotonin. These observations show that the magnitude of the homosynaptic depression of monosynaptic responses of motoneurons can be controlled by descending serotonergic mechanisms. This action is considered to be an important component of the arousal behavior mediated by the brain-stem raphe nuclei.

  7. Endovascular treatment of brain-stem arteriovenous malformations: safety and efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.M.; Wang, Y.H.; Chen, Y.F.; Huang, K.M. [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, 7 Chung-Shan South Road, 10016, Taipei (Taiwan); Tu, Y.K. [Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, 7 Chung-Shan South Road, 1001, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2003-09-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment of brain-stem arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), reviewing six cases managed in the last 5 years. There were four patients who presented with bleeding, one with a progressive neurological deficit and one with obstructive hydrocephalus. Of the six patients, one showed 100%, one 90%, two 75% and two about 50% angiographic obliteration of the AVM after embolisation; the volume decreased about 75% on average. Five patients had a good outcome and one an acceptable outcome, with a mild postprocedure neurological deficit; none had further bleeding during midterm follow-up. Endovascular management of a brain-stem AVM may be an alternative to treatment such as radiosurgery and microsurgery in selected cases. It may be not as risky as previously thought. Embolisation can reduce the size of the AVM and possibly make it more treatable by radiosurgery and decrease the possibility of radiation injury. (orig.)

  8. Motor-circuit communication matrix from spinal cord to brainstem neurons revealed by developmental origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Chiara; Esposito, Maria Soledad; Sigrist, Markus; Arber, Silvia

    2014-01-30

    Accurate motor-task execution relies on continuous comparison of planned and performed actions. Motor-output pathways establish internal circuit collaterals for this purpose. Here we focus on motor collateral organization between spinal cord and upstream neurons in the brainstem. We used a newly developed mouse genetic tool intersectionally with viruses to uncover the connectivity rules of these ascending pathways by capturing the transient expression of neuronal subpopulation determinants. We reveal a widespread and diverse network of spinal dual-axon neurons, with coincident input to forelimb motor neurons and the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN) in the brainstem. Spinal information to the LRN is not segregated by motor pool or neurotransmitter identity. Instead, it is organized according to the developmental domain origin of the progenitor cells. Thus, excerpts of most spinal information destined for action are relayed to supraspinal centers through exquisitely organized ascending connectivity modules, enabling precise communication between command and execution centers of movement.

  9. Abnormal Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR Findings in a Near-Normal Hearing Child with Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Jalaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noonan syndrome (NS is a heterogeneous genetic disease that affects many parts of the body. It was named after Dr. Jacqueline Anne Noonan, a paediatric cardiologist.Case Report: We report audiological tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR findings in a 5-year old Malay boy with NS. Despite showing the marked signs of NS, the child could only produce a few meaningful words. Audiological tests found him to have bilateral mild conductive hearing loss at low frequencies. In ABR testing, despite having good waveform morphology, the results were atypical. Absolute latency of wave V was normal but interpeak latencies of wave’s I-V, I-II, II-III were prolonged. Interestingly, interpeak latency of waves III-V was abnormally shorter.Conclusion:Abnormal ABR results are possibly due to abnormal anatomical condition of brainstem and might contribute to speech delay.

  10. Effect of Infant Prematurity on Auditory Brainstem Response at Preschool Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hasani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm birth is a risk factor for a number of conditions that requires comprehensive examination. Our study was designed to investigate the impact of preterm birth on the processing of auditory stimuli and brain structures at the brainstem level at a preschool age.   Materials and Methods: An auditory brainstem response (ABR test was performed with low rates of stimuli in 60 children aged 4 to 6 years. Thirty subjects had been born following a very preterm labor or late-preterm labor and 30 control subjects had been born following a full-term labor.   Results: Significant differences in the ABR test result were observed in terms of the inter-peak intervals of the I–III and III–V waves, and the absolute latency of the III wave (P

  11. The relationship between auditory brainstem response, nerve conduction studies, and metabolic risk factors in type II diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported a correlation between auditory brainstem response (ABR) findings and nerve conduction studies (NCSs). The correlation between ABR findings and the metabolic profile of these patients is not well documented in previous studies. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of the disturbed metabolic profile (hyperglyceridemia and hyperlipidemia) in diabetic patients on the peripheral nervous system as well as the auditory brainstem response. ...

  12. Improved outcomes in auditory brainstem implantation with the use of near-field electrical compound action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalà, Marco; Colletti, Liliana; Colletti, Giacomo; Colletti, Vittorio

    2014-12-01

    To compare the outcomes (auditory threshold and open-set speech perception at 48-month follow-up) of a new near-field monitoring procedure, electrical compound action potential, on positioning the auditory brainstem implant electrode array on the surface of the cochlear nuclei versus the traditional far-field electrical auditory brainstem response. Retrospective study. Tertiary referral center. Among the 202 patients with auditory brainstem implants fitted and monitored with electrical auditory brainstem response during implant fitting, 9 also underwent electrical compound action potential recording. These subjects were matched retrospectively with a control group of 9 patients in whom only the electrical auditory brainstem response was recorded. Electrical compound action potentials were obtained using a cotton-wick recording electrode located near the surface of the cochlear nuclei and on several cranial nerves. Significantly lower potential thresholds were observed with the recording electrode located on the cochlear nuclei surface compared with the electrical auditory brainstem response (104.4 ± 32.5 vs 158.9 ± 24.2, P = .0030). Electrical brainstem response and compound action potentials identified effects on the neighboring cranial nerves on 3.2 ± 2.4 and 7.8 ± 3.2 electrodes, respectively (P = .0034). Open-set speech perception outcomes at 48-month follow-up had improved significantly in the near- versus far-field recording groups (78.9% versus 56.7%; P = .0051). Electrical compound action potentials during auditory brainstem implantation significantly improved the definition of the potential threshold and the number of auditory and extra-auditory waves generated. It led to the best coupling between the electrode array and cochlear nuclei, significantly improving the overall open-set speech perception. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  13. Organization of the auditory brainstem in a lizard, Gekko gecko. I. Auditory nerve, cochlear nuclei, and superior olivary nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Y. Z.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Carr, C. E.

    2012-01-01

    We used tract tracing to reveal the connections of the auditory brainstem in the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko). The auditory nerve has two divisions, a rostroventrally directed projection of mid- to high best-frequency fibers to the nucleus angularis (NA) and a more dorsal and caudal projection of lo...... of auditory connections in lizards and archosaurs but also different processing of low- and high-frequency information in the brainstem. J. Comp. Neurol. 520:17841799, 2012. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc...

  14. The maturation state of the auditory nerve and brainstem in rats exposed to lead acetate and supplemented with ferrous sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucki, Fernanda; Morata, Thais C; Duarte, Josilene L; Ferreira, Maria Cecília F; Salgado, Manoel H; Alvarenga, Kátia F

    2017-01-23

    The literature has reported the association between lead and auditory effects, based on clinical and experimental studies. However, there is no consensus regarding the effects of lead in the auditory system, or its correlation with the concentration of the metal in the blood. To investigate the maturation state of the auditory system, specifically the auditory nerve and brainstem, in rats exposed to lead acetate and supplemented with ferrous sulfate. 30 weanling male rats (Rattus norvegicus, Wistar) were distributed into six groups of five animals each and exposed to one of two concentrations of lead acetate (100 or 400mg/L) and supplemented with ferrous sulfate (20mg/kg). The maturation state of the auditory nerve and brainstem was analyzed using Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential before and after lead exposure. The concentration of lead in blood and brainstem was analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. We verified that the concentration of Pb in blood and in brainstem presented a high correlation (r=0.951; pferrous sulfate supplementation reduced significantly the concentration of lead in blood and brainstem for the group exposed to the lowest concentration of lead (100mg/L), but not for the group exposed to the higher concentration (400mg/L). This study indicate that the lead acetate can have deleterious effects on the maturation of the auditory nerve and brainstem (cochlear nucleus region), as detected by the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials, and the ferrous sulphate can partially amend this effect. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  15. Design of intrinsically safe power supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui-jin; JIN Lin

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to make a high power direct current supply safely used in coal mine production,this paper made a deep research on characteristics of intrinsically safe power supply,using the mathematical model established according to coal mine intrinsic safety standards.It provides theory support for the application of high power intrinsically safe power supply.The released energy of output short circuit of switch power supply,and the close related factors that influence the biggest output short-circuit spark discharge energy are the theoretical basis of the power supply.It is shown how to make a high power intrinsically safe power supply using the calculated values in the mathematical model,and take values from intrinsically safe requirements parameters scope,then this theoretical calculation value can be developed as the ultimate basis for research of the power supply.It gets the identification method of intrinsically safe from mathematics model of intrinsically safe power supply characteristics study,which solves the problem of theory and application of designing different power intrinsically safe power supply,and designs a kind of high power intrinsically safe power supply through this method.

  16. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intrinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. (author).

  17. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Berdud

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated.

  18. Relation between derived-band auditory brainstem response latencies and behavioral frequency selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Derived-band click-evoked auditory brainstem responses ABRs were obtained for normal-hearing NH and sensorineurally hearing-impaired HI listeners. The latencies extracted from these responses, as a function of derived-band center frequency and click level, served as objective estimates of cochlear...... selectivity in human listeners and offer a window to better understand how hearing impairment affects the spatiotemporal cochlear response pattern....

  19. Combined monitoring of evoked potentials during microsurgery for lesions adjacent to the brainstem and intracranial aneurysms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG De-zhi; WU Zan-yi; LAN Qing; YU Liang-hong; LIN Zhang-ya; WANG Chen-yang; LIN Yuan-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Background Neurophysiologic monitoring during surgery is to prevent permanent neurological injury resulting from surgical manipulation. To improve the accuracy and sensitivity of intraoperative neuromonitoring, combined monitoring of transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TES-MEPs), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) was attempted in microsurgery for lesions adjacent to the brainstem and intracranial aneurysms.Methods Monitoring of combined TES-MEPs with SSEPs was attempted in 68 consecutive patients with lesions adjacent to the brainstem as well as intracranial aneurysms. Among them, 31 patients (31 operations, 28 of posterior cranial fossa tumors, 3 of posterior circulation aneurysms) were also subjected to monitoring of BAEPs. The correlation of monitoring results and clinical outcome was studied prospectively.Results Combined monitoring of evoked potentials (EPs) was done in 64 (94.1%) of the 68 patients. MEPs monitoring was impossible for 4 patients (5.9%). No complication was observed during the combined monitoring in all the patients. In 45 (66.2%) of the 68 patients, EPs were stable, and they were neurologically intact. Motor dysfunction was detected by MEPs in 8 patients, SSEPs in 5, and BAEPs in 4, respectively.Conclusions A close relationship exists between postoperative motor function and the results of TES-MEPs monitoring.TES-MEPs are superior to SSEPs and BAEPs in detecting motor dysfunction, but combined EPs serve as a safe,effective and invasive method for intraoperative monitoring of the function of the motor nervous system. Monitoring of combined EPs during microsurgery for lesions adjacent to the brainstem and intracranial aneurysms may detect potentially hazardous maneuvers and improve the safety of subsequent procedures.

  20. Compressive brainstem deformation resulting from subdural hygroma after neurosurgery: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shu-qing; WANG Ji-sheng; JI Nan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Acute and chronic subdural hygromas are common postoperative clinical complications of ventricular shunting, arachnoid cyst marsupialization and arachnoid cyst resection.1 This article introduces a case of subdural hygroma after resection of a space-occupying lesion in the left lateral ventricle that resulted in compressive brainstem deformation and reviewed the recent related literature. The conclusion is that in related surgical procedures, prevention of rapid cerebrospinal fluid loss and excessive fluctuations in intracranial pressure are especially important.

  1. Optical analysis of circuitry for respiratory rhythm in isolated brainstem of foetal mice

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Kenneth J.; Tsechpenakis, Gavriil; Homma, Ryota; Nicholls, John G.; Lawrence B Cohen; Eugenin, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory rhythms arise from neurons situated in the ventral medulla. We are investigating their spatial and functional relationships optically by measuring changes in intracellular calcium using the fluorescent, calcium-sensitive dye Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 AM while simultaneously recording the regular firing of motoneurons in the phrenic nerve in isolated brainstem/spinal cord preparations of E17 to E19 mice. Responses of identified cells are associated breath by breath with inspiratory ...

  2. Brainstem encoding of speech and musical stimuli in congenital amusia: evidence from Cantonese speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Maggu, Akshay R; Lau, Joseph C Y; Wong, Patrick C M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of musical processing that also impacts subtle aspects of speech processing. It remains debated at what stage(s) of auditory processing deficits in amusia arise. In this study, we investigated whether amusia originates from impaired subcortical encoding of speech (in quiet and noise) and musical sounds in the brainstem. Fourteen Cantonese-speaking amusics and 14 matched controls passively listened to six Cantonese lexical tones in quiet, two Cantonese tones in noise (signal-to-noise ratios at 0 and 20 dB), and two cello tones in quiet while their frequency-following responses (FFRs) to these tones were recorded. All participants also completed a behavioral lexical tone identification task. The results indicated normal brainstem encoding of pitch in speech (in quiet and noise) and musical stimuli in amusics relative to controls, as measured by FFR pitch strength, pitch error, and stimulus-to-response correlation. There was also no group difference in neural conduction time or FFR amplitudes. Both groups demonstrated better FFRs to speech (in quiet and noise) than to musical stimuli. However, a significant group difference was observed for tone identification, with amusics showing significantly lower accuracy than controls. Analysis of the tone confusion matrices suggested that amusics were more likely than controls to confuse between tones that shared similar acoustic features. Interestingly, this deficit in lexical tone identification was not coupled with brainstem abnormality for either speech or musical stimuli. Together, our results suggest that the amusic brainstem is not functioning abnormally, although higher-order linguistic pitch processing is impaired in amusia. This finding has significant implications for theories of central auditory processing, requiring further investigations into how different stages of auditory processing interact in the human brain.

  3. Evaluation of brainstem auditory evoked potential in type 2 diabetes mellitus individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathnavel Kumaran Murugesan

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: These data reveal that there was a delay in both the latencies and IPLs which signifies the involvement of both the peripheral and central nervous system. The early diagnosis of brainstem defects may lead to improvement in treatment modalities of DM and decrease its morbidity. Thus BAEP might be used as a non- invasive tool to assess diabetic neuropathy. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(9.000: 3939-3944

  4. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-09-04

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of (1)H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Delineating function and connectivity of optokinetic hubs in the cerebellum and the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehl, Ria Maxine; Hinkel, Carolin; Bauermann, Thomas; Eulenburg, Peter Zu

    2017-06-23

    Optokinetic eye movements are crucial for keeping a stable image on the retina during movements of the head. These eye movements can be differentiated into a cortically generated response (optokinetic look nystagmus) and the highly reflexive optokinetic stare nystagmus, which is controlled by circuits in the brainstem and cerebellum. The contributions of these infratentorial networks and their functional connectivity with the cortical eye fields are still poorly understood in humans. To map ocular motor centres in the cerebellum and brainstem, we studied stare nystagmus using small-field optokinetic stimuli in the horizontal and vertical directions in 22 healthy subjects. We were able to differentiate ocular motor areas of the pontine brainstem and midbrain in vivo for the first time. Direction and velocity-dependent activations were found in the pontine brainstem (nucleus reticularis, tegmenti pontis, and paramedian pontine reticular formation), the uvula, flocculus, and cerebellar tonsils. The ocular motor vermis, on the other hand, responded to constant and accelerating velocity stimulation. Moreover, deactivation patterns depict a governing role for the cerebellar tonsils in ocular motor control. Functional connectivity results of these hubs reveal the close integration of cortico-cerebellar ocular motor and vestibular networks in humans. Adding to the cortical concept of a right-hemispheric predominance for visual-spatial processing, we found a complementary left-sided cerebellar dominance for our ocular motor task. A deeper understanding of the role of the cerebellum and especially the cerebellar tonsils for eye movement control in a clinical context seems vitally important and is now feasible with functional neuroimaging.

  6. Thermodynamics, diffusion and the Kirkendall effect in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Aloke; Vuorinen, Vesa; Divinski, Sergiy V

    2014-01-01

    Covering both basic and advanced thermodynamic and phase  principles,  as well as providing stability diagrams relevant for diffusion studies, Thermodynamics, Diffusion and the Kirkendall Effect in Solids maximizes reader insights into Fick’s laws of diffusion, atomic mechanisms, interdiffusion, intrinsic diffusion, tracer diffusion and the Kirkendall effect. Recent advances in the area of interdiffusion will be introduced, while the many practical examples and large number of illustrations given will serve to aid researches working in this area in learning the practical evaluation of various diffusion parameters from experimental results. With a unique approach to the two main focal points in solid state transformations, energetics (thermodynamics) and kinetics (interdiffusion) are extensively studied and their combined use in practise is discussed. Recent developments in the area of Kirkendall effect, grain boundary diffusion and multicomponent diffusion are also covered extensively. This book will appe...

  7. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Alexandre; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  8. Mapping of alpha-neo-endorphin- and neurokinin B-immunoreactivity in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Ewing; Mangas, Arturo; Salinas, Pablo; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Narváez, José Angel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the distribution of alpha-neo-endorphin- or neurokinin B-immunoreactive fibres and cell bodies in the adult human brainstem with no prior history of neurological or psychiatric disease. A low density of alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive cell bodies was only observed in the medullary central gray matter and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (gelatinosa part). Alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive fibres were moderately distributed throughout the human brainstem. A high density of alpha-neo-endorphin-immunoreactive fibres was found only in the solitary nucleus (caudal part), in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (caudal part), and in the gelatinosa part of the latter nucleus. Neurokinin B-immunoreactive cell bodies (low density) were found in the periventricular central gray matter, the reticular formation of the pons and in the superior colliculus. The distribution of the neurokinin-immunoreactive fibres was restricted. In general, for both neuropeptides the density of the immunoreactive fibres was low. In the human brainstem, the proenkephalin system was more widely distributed than the prodynorphin system, and the preprotachykinin A system (neurokinin A) was more widely distributed than the preprotachykinin B system (neurokinin B).

  9. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  10. Impact of monaural frequency compression on binaural fusion at the brainstem level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Isabelle; Kohl, Manuel C; Hannemann, Ronny; Kornagel, Ulrich; Strauss, Daniel J; Corona-Strauss, Farah I

    2015-08-01

    A classical objective measure for binaural fusion at the brainstem level is the so-called β-wave of the binaural interaction component (BIC) in the auditory brainstem response (ABR). However, in some cases it appeared that a reliable detection of this component still remains a challenge. In this study, we investigate the wavelet phase synchronization stability (WPSS) of ABR data for the analysis of binaural fusion and compare it to the BIC. In particular, we examine the impact of monaural nonlinear frequency compression on binaural fusion. As the auditory system is tonotopically organized, an interaural frequency mismatch caused by monaural frequency compression could negatively effect binaural fusion. In this study, only few subjects showed a detectable β-wave and in most cases only for low ITDs. However, we present a novel objective measure for binaural fusion that outperforms the current state-of-the-art technique (BIC): the WPSS analysis showed a significant difference between the phase stability of the sum of the monaurally evoked responses and the phase stability of the binaurally evoked ABR. This difference could be an indicator for binaural fusion in the brainstem. Furthermore, we observed that monaural frequency compression could indeed effect binaural fusion, as the WPSS results for this condition vary strongly from the results obtained without frequency compression.

  11. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasu Kallakuri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s of blast overpressure (OP induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Conclusions: Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury.

  12. Modulation of auditory brainstem responses by serotonin and specific serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papesh, Melissa A; Hurley, Laura M

    2016-02-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin is found throughout the auditory system from the cochlea to the cortex. Although effects of serotonin have been reported at the level of single neurons in many brainstem nuclei, how these effects correspond to more integrated measures of auditory processing has not been well-explored. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the effects of serotonin on far-field auditory brainstem responses (ABR) across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and intensities. Using a mouse model, we investigated the consequences of systemic serotonin depletion, as well as the selective stimulation and suppression of the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, on ABR latency and amplitude. Stimuli included tone pips spanning four octaves presented over a forty dB range. Depletion of serotonin reduced the ABR latencies in Wave II and later waves, suggesting that serotonergic effects occur as early as the cochlear nucleus. Further, agonists and antagonists of specific serotonergic receptors had different profiles of effects on ABR latencies and amplitudes across waves and frequencies, suggestive of distinct effects of these agents on auditory processing. Finally, most serotonergic effects were more pronounced at lower ABR frequencies, suggesting larger or more directional modulation of low-frequency processing. This is the first study to describe the effects of serotonin on ABR responses across a wide range of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes, and it presents an important step in understanding how serotonergic modulation of auditory brainstem processing may contribute to modulation of auditory perception.

  13. The vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) score: a promising tool for evaluation of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelić, T; Krbot Skorić, M; Adamec, I; Barun, B; Zadro, I; Habek, M

    2015-02-01

    Concerning the great importance of brainstem involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS), the aim of this study was to explore the role of the newly developed vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) score as a possible marker of brainstem involvement in MS patients. This was a prospective case-control study which included 100 MS patients divided into two groups (without and with clinical signs of brainstem involvement) and 50 healthy controls. Ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) measurements were performed in all participants and analyzed for latencies, conduction block and amplitude asymmetry ratio. Based on this the VEMP score was calculated and compared with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), disease duration and magnetic resonance imaging data. Multiple sclerosis patients with clinical signs of brainstem involvement (group 2) had a statistically significant higher percentage of VEMP conduction blocks compared with patients without clinical signs of brainstem involvement (group 1) and healthy controls (P = 0.027 and P VEMP score was significantly higher in group 2 compared with group 1 (P = 0.018) and correlated with EDSS and disease duration (P = 0.011 and P = 0.032, respectively). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that the VEMP score has a statistically significant influence on the EDSS score (P VEMP score enables better evaluation of brainstem involvement than either of these evoked potentials alone and correlates well with disability. © 2014 EAN.

  14. Relationship Between the Hypersensitive c-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Level and the Prognosis of Acute Brainstem Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Yu, Zhi-Gang

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the relationship between the hypersensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level and the prognosis of acute brainstem infarction. Serum levels of hs-CRP were measured in 68 patients with acute brainstem infarction 72 h after disease onset. The hs-CRP levels in the U.S. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score group and in the modified RANKIN scale (mRS) score group were compared. The independent risk factors of brainstem infarction were analyzed using Logistic binary regression. The hs-CRP level was significantly higher in the group with NIHSS >5 compared with the one with NIHSS ≤ 5 (P = 0.004). In the group with mRS > 2, the age, smoking history, and blood glucose level were significantly higher than those in the group with mRS ≤ 2 (P hs-CRP level was significantly higher (P = 0.001). Age and hs-CRP level were the independent prognostic factors of the brainstem infarction. The serum hs-CRP level is closely related with the severity and prognosis of brainstem infarction, and is an independent risk factor of acute brainstem infarction.

  15. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary; E.PICKARD; Patricia; J.SOLLARS

    2010-01-01

    A new mammalian photoreceptor was recently discovered to reside in the ganglion cell layer of the inner retina.These intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells(ipRGCs) express a photopigment,melanopsin,that confers upon them the ability to respond to light in the absence of all rod and cone photoreceptor input.Although relatively few in number,ipRGCs extend their dendrites across large expanses of the retina making them ideally suited to function as irradiance detectors to assess changes in ambient light levels.Phototransduction in ipRGCs appears to be mediated by transient receptor potential channels more closely resembling the phototransduction cascade of invertebrate rather than vertebrate photoreceptors.ipRGCs convey irradiance information centrally via the optic nerve to influence several functions.ipRGCs are the primary retinal input to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus(SCN),a circadian oscillator and biological clock,and this input entrains the SCN to the day/night cycle.ipRGCs contribute irradiance signals that regulate pupil size and they also provide signals that interface with the autonomic nervous system to regulate rhythmic gene activity in major organs of the body.ipRGCs also provide excitatory drive to dopaminergic amacrine cells in the retina,providing a novel basis for the restructuring of retinal circuits by light.Here we review the ground-breaking discoveries,current progress and directions for future investigation.

  16. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  17. Robust Machine Learning-Based Correction on Automatic Segmentation of the Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yi Wang

    Full Text Available Automated segmentation is a useful method for studying large brain structures such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, automated segmentation may lead to inaccuracy and/or undesirable boundary. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether SegAdapter, a machine learning-based method, is useful for automatically correcting large segmentation errors and disagreement in anatomical definition. We further assessed the robustness of the method in handling size of training set, differences in head coil usage, and amount of brain atrophy. High resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 30 healthy controls scanned with either an 8-channel or 32-channel head coil. Ten patients, who suffered from brain atrophy because of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, were scanned using the 32-channel head coil. The initial segmentations of the cerebellum and brainstem were generated automatically using Freesurfer. Subsequently, Freesurfer's segmentations were both manually corrected to serve as the gold standard and automatically corrected by SegAdapter. Using only 5 scans in the training set, spatial overlap with manual segmentation in Dice coefficient improved significantly from 0.956 (for Freesurfer segmentation to 0.978 (for SegAdapter-corrected segmentation for the cerebellum and from 0.821 to 0.954 for the brainstem. Reducing the training set size to 2 scans only decreased the Dice coefficient ≤0.002 for the cerebellum and ≤ 0.005 for the brainstem compared to the use of training set size of 5 scans in corrective learning. The method was also robust in handling differences between the training set and the test set in head coil usage and the amount of brain atrophy, which reduced spatial overlap only by <0.01. These results suggest that the combination of automated segmentation and corrective learning provides a valuable method for accurate and efficient segmentation of the cerebellum and brainstem, particularly in large

  18. Somatostatin and leu-enkephalin in the rat auditory brainstem during fetal and postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungel, M; Friauf, E

    1995-05-01

    A transient expression of the neuropeptide somatostatin has been described in several brain areas during early ontogeny and several opioid peptides, such as leu-enkephalin, have also been found in the brain at this stage in development. It is therefore believed that somatostatin and leu-enkephalin may play a role in neural maturation. The aim of the present study was to describe the spatiotemporal pattern of somatostatin and leu-enkephalin immunoreactivity in the auditory brainstem nuclei of the developing rat and to correlate it with other developmental events. In order to achieve this goal, we applied peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemistry to rat brains between embryonic day (E) 17 and adulthood. Somatostatin immunoreactivity (SIR) was found in all nuclei of the auditory brainstem, yet it was temporally restricted in most nuclei. SIR appeared prenatally and reached maximum levels around postnatal day (P) 7, when great numbers of immunoreactive neurons were present in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) and in the lateral lemniscus. At that time relatively low numbers of cells were labeled in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the lateral superior olive (LSO), and the inferior colliculus (IC). During the same period, when somata in the VCN were somatostatin-immunoreactive (SIR), a dense network of labeled fibers was also present in the LSO, the medial superior olive (MSO), and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). As these nuclei receive direct input from VCN neurons, and as the distribution and morphology of the somatostatinergic fibers in the superior olivary complex (SOC) was like that of axons from VCN neurons, these findings suggest a transient somatostatinergic connection within the auditory system. Aside from the LSO, MSO, and MNTB, labeled fibers were found to a smaller extent in all other auditory brainstem nuclei. After P7, the SIR decreased and only a few immunoreactive elements were found in the adult auditory brainstem nuclei, indicating

  19. Processing Complex Sounds Passing through the Rostral Brainstem: The New Early Filter Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John E; Campbell, Tom A

    2016-01-01

    The rostral brainstem receives both "bottom-up" input from the ascending auditory system and "top-down" descending corticofugal connections. Speech information passing through the inferior colliculus of elderly listeners reflects the periodicity envelope of a speech syllable. This information arguably also reflects a composite of temporal-fine-structure (TFS) information from the higher frequency vowel harmonics of that repeated syllable. The amplitude of those higher frequency harmonics, bearing even higher frequency TFS information, correlates positively with the word recognition ability of elderly listeners under reverberatory conditions. Also relevant is that working memory capacity (WMC), which is subject to age-related decline, constrains the processing of sounds at the level of the brainstem. Turning to the effects of a visually presented sensory or memory load on auditory processes, there is a load-dependent reduction of that processing, as manifest in the auditory brainstem responses (ABR) evoked by to-be-ignored clicks. Wave V decreases in amplitude with increases in the visually presented memory load. A visually presented sensory load also produces a load-dependent reduction of a slightly different sort: The sensory load of visually presented information limits the disruptive effects of background sound upon working memory performance. A new early filter model is thus advanced whereby systems within the frontal lobe (affected by sensory or memory load) cholinergically influence top-down corticofugal connections. Those corticofugal connections constrain the processing of complex sounds such as speech at the level of the brainstem. Selective attention thereby limits the distracting effects of background sound entering the higher auditory system via the inferior colliculus. Processing TFS in the brainstem relates to perception of speech under adverse conditions. Attentional selectivity is crucial when the signal heard is degraded or masked: e.g., speech in

  20. Hypoxia attenuates purinergic P2X receptor-induced inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith SMC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie MC Smith,1,2 Gordon S Mitchell,1,2 Scott A Friedle,3 Christine M Sibigtroth,1 Stéphane Vinit,1 Jyoti J Watters1–31Department of Comparative Biosciences, 2Comparative Biomedical Sciences Training Program, 3Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USAAbstract: Hypoxia and increased extracellular nucleotides are frequently coincident in the brainstem. Extracellular nucleotides are potent modulators of microglial inflammatory gene expression via P2X purinergic receptor activation. Although hypoxia is also known to modulate inflammatory gene expression, little is known about how hypoxia or P2X receptor activation alone affects inflammatory molecule production in brainstem microglia, nor how hypoxia and P2X receptor signaling interact when they occur together. In the study reported here, we investigated the ability of a brief episode of hypoxia (2 hours in the presence and absence of the nonselective P2X receptor agonist 2′(3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyladenosine-5′-triphosphate (BzATP to promote inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia in adult rats. We evaluated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, and interleukin (IL-6 messenger RNA levels in immunomagnetically isolated brainstem microglia. While iNOS and IL-6 gene expression increased with hypoxia and BzATP alone, TNFα expression was unaffected. Surprisingly, BzATP-induced inflammatory effects were lost after hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia impairs proinflammatory P2X-receptor signaling. We also evaluated the expression of key P2X receptors activated by BzATP, namely P2X1, P2X4, and P2X7. While hypoxia did not alter their expression, BzATP upregulated P2X4 and P2X7 mRNAs; these effects were ablated in hypoxia. Although both P2X4 and P2X7 receptor expression correlated with increased microglial iNOS and IL-6 levels in microglia from normoxic rats, in hypoxia, P2X7 only correlated with IL-6, and P2X

  1. Diffusion spectrum imaging shows the structural basis of functional cerebellar circuits in the human cerebellum in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Granziera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cerebellum is a complex structure that can be affected by several congenital and acquired diseases leading to alteration of its function and neuronal circuits. Identifying the structural bases of cerebellar neuronal networks in humans in vivo may provide biomarkers for diagnosis and management of cerebellar diseases. OBJECTIVES: To define the anatomy of intrinsic and extrinsic cerebellar circuits using high-angular resolution diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI. METHODS: We acquired high-resolution structural MRI and DSI of the cerebellum in four healthy female subjects at 3T. DSI tractography based on a streamline algorithm was performed to identify the circuits connecting the cerebellar cortex with the deep cerebellar nuclei, selected brainstem nuclei, and the thalamus. RESULTS: Using in-vivo DSI in humans we were able to demonstrate the structure of the following cerebellar neuronal circuits: (1 connections of the inferior olivary nucleus with the cerebellar cortex, and with the deep cerebellar nuclei (2 connections between the cerebellar cortex and the deep cerebellar nuclei, (3 connections of the deep cerebellar nuclei conveyed in the superior (SCP, middle (MCP and inferior (ICP cerebellar peduncles, (4 complex intersections of fibers in the SCP, MCP and ICP, and (5 connections between the deep cerebellar nuclei and the red nucleus and the thalamus. CONCLUSION: For the first time, we show that DSI tractography in humans in vivo is capable of revealing the structural bases of complex cerebellar networks. DSI thus appears to be a promising imaging method for characterizing anatomical disruptions that occur in cerebellar diseases, and for monitoring response to therapeutic interventions.

  2. Rotational Crofton formulae for flagged intrinsic volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auneau, Jeremy Michel

    , and the integration is over all sections containing the fixed point origo. Our main result is a local stereological analogue to the well-known Crofton formula. More precisely, we derive geometric formulae that relate new flagged intrinsic volumes of a set with the flagged intrinsic volumes of its sections...

  3. Intrinsic bioremediation of landfills interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Fliermans, C.B.

    1997-07-14

    Intrinsic bioremediation is a risk management option that relies on natural biological and physical processes to contain the spread of contamination from a source. Evidence is presented in this report that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at the Sanitary Landfill is fundamental to support incorportion into a Corrective Action Plan (CAP).

  4. Diffusion coefficient in photon diffusion theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Ten Bosch, JJ

    2000-01-01

    The choice of the diffusion coefficient to be used in photon diffusion theory has been a subject of discussion in recent publications on tissue optics. We compared several diffusion coefficients with the apparent diffusion coefficient from the more fundamental transport theory, D-app. Application to

  5. Diffusion coefficient in photon diffusion theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Ten Bosch, JJ

    2000-01-01

    The choice of the diffusion coefficient to be used in photon diffusion theory has been a subject of discussion in recent publications on tissue optics. We compared several diffusion coefficients with the apparent diffusion coefficient from the more fundamental transport theory, D-app. Application to

  6. Earthquake-explosion discrimination using diffusion maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, N.; Bregman, Y.; Lindenbaum, O.; Ben-Horin, Y.; Averbuch, A.

    2016-12-01

    Discrimination between earthquakes and explosions is an essential component of nuclear test monitoring and it is also important for maintaining the quality of earthquake catalogues. Currently used discrimination methods provide a partial solution to the problem. In this work, we apply advanced machine learning methods and in particular diffusion maps for modelling and discriminating between seismic signals. Diffusion maps enable us to construct a geometric representation that capture the intrinsic structure of the seismograms. The diffusion maps are applied after a pre-processing step, in which seismograms are converted to normalized sonograms. The constructed low-dimensional model is used for automatic earthquake-explosion discrimination of data that are collected in single seismic stations. We demonstrate our approach on a data set comprising seismic events from the Dead Sea area. The diffusion-based algorithm provides correct discrimination rate that is higher than 90 per cent.

  7. Subnanosecond spectral diffusion measurement using photon correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Sallen, Gregory; Aichele, Thomas; André, Régis; Besombes, Lucien; Bougerol, Catherine; Richard, Maxime; Tatarenko, Serge; Kheng, Kuntheak; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; 10.1038/nphoton.2010.174

    2012-01-01

    Spectral diffusion is a result of random spectral jumps of a narrow line as a result of a fluctuating environment. It is an important issue in spectroscopy, because the observed spectral broadening prevents access to the intrinsic line properties. However, its characteristic parameters provide local information on the environment of a light emitter embedded in a solid matrix, or moving within a fluid, leading to numerous applications in physics and biology. We present a new experimental technique for measuring spectral diffusion based on photon correlations within a spectral line. Autocorrelation on half of the line and cross-correlation between the two halves give a quantitative value of the spectral diffusion time, with a resolution only limited by the correlation set-up. We have measured spectral diffusion of the photoluminescence of a single light emitter with a time resolution of 90 ps, exceeding by four orders of magnitude the best resolution reported to date.

  8. Diffusion-weighted imaging in normal fetal brain maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.F. [University Children' s Hospital UKBB, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Confort-Gouny, S.; Le Fur, Y.; Viout, P.; Cozzone, P. [UMR-CNRS 6612, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale, Marseille (France); Bennathan, M.; Chapon, F.; Fogliarini, C.; Girard, N. [Universite de la Mediterranee, Department of Neuroradiology AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France)

    2007-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides information about tissue maturation not seen on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The aim of this study is to analyze the evolution over time of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of normal fetal brain in utero. DWI was performed on 78 fetuses, ranging from 23 to 37 gestational weeks (GW). All children showed at follow-up a normal neurological evaluation. ADC values were obtained in the deep white matter (DWM) of the centrum semiovale, the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobe, in the cerebellar hemisphere, the brainstem, the basal ganglia (BG) and the thalamus. Mean ADC values in supratentorial DWM areas (1.68 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s) were higher compared with the cerebellar hemisphere (1.25 {+-} 0.06 mm{sup 2}/s) and lowest in the pons (1.11 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s). Thalamus and BG showed intermediate values (1.25 {+-} 0.04 mm{sup 2}/s). Brainstem, cerebellar hemisphere and thalamus showed a linear negative correlation with gestational age. Supratentorial areas revealed an increase in ADC values, followed by a decrease after the 30th GW. This study provides a normative data set that allows insights in the normal fetal brain maturation in utero, which has not yet been observed in previous studies on premature babies. (orig.)

  9. Brainstem projections of neurons located in various subdivisions of the dorsolateral hypothalamic area – an anterograde tract-tracing study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rege Sugárka Papp

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The projections from the dorsolateral hypothalamic area (DLH to the lower brainstem have been investigated by using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA, an anterograde tracer in rats. The DLH can be divided into 3 areas (dorsomedial hypothalamus, perifornical area, lateral hypothalamic area, and further subdivided into 8 subdivisions. After unilateral stereotaxic injections of BDA into individual DLH subdivisions, the correct sites of injections were controlled histologically, and the distribution patterns of BDA-positive fibers were mapped on serial sections between the hypothalamus and spinal cord in 22 rats. BDA-labeled fibers were observable over 100 different brainstem areas, nuclei or subdivisions. Injections into the 8 DLH subdivisions established distinct topographical patterns. In general, the density of labeled fibers was low in the lower brainstem. High density of fibers was seen only 4 of the 116 areas: in the lateral and ventrolateral parts of the periaqueductal gray, the Barrington’s and the pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei. All of the biogenic amine cell groups in the lower brainstem (9 noradrenaline, 3 adrenaline and 9 serotonin cell groups received labeled fibers, some of them from all, or at least 7 DLH subdivisions, mainly from perifornical and ventral lateral hypothalamic neurons. Some of the tegmental nuclei and nuclei of the reticular formation were widely innervated, although the density of the BDA-labeled fibers was generally low. No definitive descending BDA-positive pathway, but long-run solitaire BDA-labeled fibers were seen in the lower brainstem. These descending fibers joined some of the large tracts or fasciculi in the brainstem. The distribution pattern of BDA-positive fibers of DLH origin throughout the lower brainstem was comparable to patterns of previously published orexin- or melanin-concentrating hormone-immunoreactive fibers with somewhat differences.

  10. The Photoelectric Properties of Intrinsic Oxide - p-In4Se3 Heterojunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Katerynchuk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic oxide - p-In4Se3 heterojunction was fabricated by the method of thermal oxidation of semiconductor substrate for the first time. The qualitative energy band diagram was built on the basis of analysis of electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of the heterojunction. The character of dominating current transport mechanisms through the barrier is determined by thermionic emission, rather than carrier diffusion. The AFM-images of oxide layer surface and the photosensitivity spectrum of intrinsic oxide  p-In4Se3 heterojunctions also were presented.

  11. Diffusion of Ti in [alpha]-Zr single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, G.M. (Reactor Materials Division Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)); Zou, H. (Reactor Materials Division Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)); Schultz, R.J. (Reactor Materials Division Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)); Bromley, E.H.; Jackman, J.A. (CANMET, Metals Technology Laboratories, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1994-12-01

    Ti diffusion coefficients (D) have been measured in nominally pure [alpha]-Zr single crystals (773-1124 K) in directions both parallel (D[sub pa]) and perpendicular (D[sub pe], few data) to the c-axis: tracer techniques and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to determine the diffusion profiles. The results show a temperature dependence which may be interpreted in terms of two regions of diffusion behaviour. Above 1035 K, region I, diffusion conforms to the expectations of intrinsic behaviour with normal Arrhenius law constants: Below 1035 K, region II, D's appear to be enhanced with respect to an extrapolation of region I behaviour. ((orig.))

  12. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  13. Multidimensional diffusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    Stroock, Daniel W

    1997-01-01

    From the reviews: "… Both the Markov-process approach and the Itô approach … have been immensely successful in diffusion theory. The Stroock-Varadhan book, developed from the historic 1969 papers by its authors, presents the martingale-problem approach as a more powerful - and, in certain regards, more intrinsic-means of studying the foundations of the subject. […] … the authors make the uncompromising decision not "to proselytise by intimidating the reader with myriad examples demonstrating the full scope of the techniques", but rather to persuade the reader "with a careful treatment of just one problem to which they apply". […] Most of the main tools of stochastic-processes theory are used, ..but it is the formidable combination of probability theory with analysis … which is the core of the work. […] I have emphasized the great importance of the Stroock-Varadhan book. It contains a lot more than I have indicated; in particular, its many exercises conain much interesting material. For immediat...

  14. Algebraic description of intrinsic modes in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a procedure for extracting normal modes in algebraic number-conserving systems of interacting bosons relevant for collective states in even-even nuclei. The Hamiltonian is resolved into intrinsic (bandhead related) and collective (in-band related) parts. Shape parameters are introduced through non-spherical boson bases. Intrinsic modes decoupled from the spurious modes are obtained from the intinsic part of the Hamiltonian in the limit of large number of bosons. Intrinsic states are constructed and serve to evaluate electromagnetic transition rates. The method is illustrated for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  15. The interaction of intrinsic dynamics and network topology in determining network burst synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiteri, Chris; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), within the mammalian respiratory brainstem, represents an ideal system for investigating the synchronization properties of complex neuronal circuits via the interaction of cell-type heterogeneity and network connectivity. In isolation, individual respiratory neurons from the pre-BötC may be tonically active, rhythmically bursting, or quiescent. Despite this intrinsic heterogeneity, coupled networks of pre-BötC neurons en bloc engage in synchronized bursting that can drive inspiratory motor neuron activation. The region's connection topology has been recently characterized and features dense clusters of cells with occasional connections between clusters. We investigate how the dynamics of individual neurons (quiescent/bursting/tonic) and the betweenness centrality of neurons' positions within the network connectivity graph interact to govern network burst synchrony, by simulating heterogeneous networks of computational model pre-BötC neurons. Furthermore, we compare the prevalence and synchrony of bursting across networks constructed with a variety of connection topologies, analyzing the same collection of heterogeneous neurons in small-world, scale-free, random, and regularly structured networks. We find that several measures of network burst synchronization are determined by interactions of network topology with the intrinsic dynamics of neurons at central network positions and by the strengths of synaptic connections between neurons. Surprisingly, despite the functional role of synchronized bursting within the pre-BötC, we find that synchronized network bursting is generally weakest when we use its specific connection topology, which leads to synchrony within clusters but poor coordination across clusters. Overall, our results highlight the relevance of interactions between topology and intrinsic dynamics in shaping the activity of networks and the concerted effects of connectivity patterns and dynamic heterogeneities.

  16. Characteristics of brainstem auditory evoked potentials of students studying folk dance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxiang Li; Yuzhen Zhu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous experiments have demonstrated that brainstem auditory evoked potential is affected by exercise,exercise duration,and frequency. OBJECTIVE:Comparing the brainstem auditory evoked potential of students studying folk dance to students studying other subjects.DESIGN:Observational contrast study. SETTING:Physical Education College,Shandong Normal University PARTICIPANTS:Fifty-five female students were enrolled at Shandong Normal University between September and December in 2005,including 21 students that studied folk dance and 34 students that studied other subjects.The age of the folk dance students averaged(19±1)years and dance training length was(6.0 ±1.5)years.The students that studied other subjects had never taken part in dance training or other physical training,and their age averaged(22±1)years,body height averaged(162±5)cm,body mass averaged(51 ±6)kg.All subjects had no prior ear disease or history of other neurological disorders.All students provided informed consent for the experimental project. METHODS:The neural electricity tester,NDI-200(Shanghai Poseidon Medical Electronic Instrument Factory)was used to examine and record Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values of the subjects during silence,as well as to transversally analyze the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values.The electrode positions were cleaned and degreased with soapy water,followed by ethanol.The selected bipolar electrodes were situated on the head:recording electrodes were placed at the Baihui acupoint,and the reference electrode was placed at the mastoid of the measured ear,with grounding electrodes in the center of the forehead.Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential values were elicited by monaural stimulation of a "click" though an earphone; the other ear was sheltered by the white noise.The click intensity was 102 db,the stimulation frequency was 30 Hz,the bandpass filters were 1 000-3 000 Hz,the sensitivity was 5 μV,and a total of 2 000 sweeps were

  17. A novel computerized algorithm to detect microstructural brainstem pathology in Parkinson's disease using standard 3 Tesla MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelmans, Kai; Spies, Lothar; Sedlacik, Jan; Fiehler, Jens; Jahn, Holger; Gerloff, Christian; Münchau, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Increased deposition of α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease (PD) is known to be prominent in the brainstem and discussed to be clinically relevant for motor and non-motor features. Whether structural magnetic resonance imaging is capable to detect degraded tissue microstructure caused by increased deposition of α-synuclein at this predilection site in PD remains unclear. We hypothesize that microstructural degradation in the brainstem leads to a reduced T1 contrast provoking standard tissue segmentation engines to misclassify tissue as additional grey matter in regions predominantly composed of white matter. High-resolution T1-weighted three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE) imaging at 3 Tesla in fifty-two PD patients with mild-to-moderate disease severity and in forty age- and gender-matched healthy controls was performed. A dedicated computerized algorithm that comprises standard tissue segmentation in combination with a statistical test was set up that evaluates grey matter composition on voxel level. The algorithm detected a single significant cluster of voxels with enhanced grey matter (cluster volume is 1,368 mm(3), p < 0.05 corrected for false discovery rate) in the pontomedullary junction of the brainstem in PD patients as compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, absolute grey matter volume was significantly higher in the brainstem of the PD group compared to healthy controls. We conclude that this cluster may reflect α-synuclein induced microstructural brainstem pathology in PD.

  18. Relationships between behavior, brainstem and cortical encoding of seen and heard speech in musicians and non-musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, Gabriella; Strait, Dana; Kraus, Nina

    2008-07-01

    Musicians have a variety of perceptual and cortical specializations compared to non-musicians. Recent studies have shown that potentials evoked from primarily brainstem structures are enhanced in musicians, compared to non-musicians. Specifically, musicians have more robust representations of pitch periodicity and faster neural timing to sound onset when listening to sounds or both listening to and viewing a speaker. However, it is not known whether musician-related enhancements at the subcortical level are correlated with specializations in the cortex. Does musical training shape the auditory system in a coordinated manner or in disparate ways at cortical and subcortical levels? To answer this question, we recorded simultaneous brainstem and cortical evoked responses in musician and non-musician subjects. Brainstem response periodicity was related to early cortical response timing across all subjects, and this relationship was stronger in musicians. Peaks of the brainstem response evoked by sound onset and timbre cues were also related to cortical timing. Neurophysiological measures at both levels correlated with musical skill scores across all subjects. In addition, brainstem and cortical measures correlated with the age musicians began their training and the years of musical practice. Taken together, these data imply that neural representations of pitch, timing and timbre cues and cortical response timing are shaped in a coordinated manner, and indicate corticofugal modulation of subcortical afferent circuitry.

  19. Brainstem lesion in benign paroxysmal vertigo children: Evaluated by a combined ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuei-You; Hsu, Ying-Shuo; Young, Yi-Ho

    2010-05-01

    This study utilized a combined ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) test in children with benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV) to investigate whether the upper or lower brainstem is more frequently affected in BPV children. Fifteen BPV children aged 4-14 years, and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy children were enrolled. All subjects underwent pure tone audiometry, stabilometry, and a combined oVEMP and cVEMP test using acoustic stimulation. All BPV patients displayed normal hearing and clear oVEMPs. However, 11 (73%) of 15 BPV patients had delayed cVEMPs, showing significant difference when compared with 100% normal cVEMPs in healthy children. The sway path and sway area in stabilometry were significantly different between BPV and healthy children, regardless of whether their eyes were open or closed. However, neither the sway path nor sway area correlated significantly with cVEMP results. Normal oVEMPs in BPV children indicate an intact vestibulo-ocular reflex pathway, which travels through the upper brainstem. In contrast, delayed cVEMPs in BPV children reflect a retrolabyrinthine lesion along the sacculo-collic reflex pathway, which descends via the lower brainstem. Hence, the lower brainstem is more frequently affected than the upper brainstem in children with BPV. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Individual differences in brainstem and basal ganglia structure predict postural control and balance loss in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisgontier, Matthieu P; Cheval, Boris; Chalavi, Sima; van Ruitenbeek, Peter; Leunissen, Inge; Levin, Oron; Nieuwboer, Alice; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2017-02-01

    It remains unclear which specific brain regions are the most critical for human postural control and balance, and whether they mediate the effect of age. Here, associations between postural performance and corticosubcortical brain regions were examined in young and older adults using multiple structural imaging and linear mixed models. Results showed that of the regions involved in posture, the brainstem was the strongest predictor of postural control and balance: lower brainstem volume predicted larger center of pressure deviation and higher odds of balance loss. Analyses of white and gray matter in the brainstem showed that the pedunculopontine nucleus area appeared to be critical for postural control in both young and older adults. In addition, the brainstem mediated the effect of age on postural control, underscoring the brainstem's fundamental role in aging. Conversely, lower basal ganglia volume predicted better postural performance, suggesting an association between greater neural resources in the basal ganglia and greater movement vigor, resulting in exaggerated postural adjustments. Finally, results showed that practice, shorter height and heavier weight (i.e., higher body mass index), higher total physical activity, and larger ankle active (but not passive) range of motion were predictive of more stable posture, irrespective of age.

  1. Vagal afferents from the uterus and cervix provide direct connections to the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J J; Lin, C E; Berthoud, H R; Papka, R E

    1999-01-01

    Previous anatomical studies demonstrated vagal innervation to the ovary and distal colon and suggested the vagus nerve has uterine inputs. Recent behavioral and physiological evidence indicated that the vagus nerves conduct sensory information from the uterus to the brainstem. The present study was undertaken to identify vagal sensory connections to the uterus. Retrograde tracers, Fluorogold and pseudorabies virus were injected into the uterus and cervix. DiI, an anterograde tracer, was injected into the nodose ganglia. Neurectomies involving the pelvic, hypogastric, ovarian and abdominal vagus nerves were performed, and then uterine whole-mounts examined for sensory nerves containing calcitonin gene-related peptide. Nodose ganglia and caudal brainstem sections were examined for the presence of estrogen receptor-containing neurons in "vagal locales." Labeling of uterine-related neurons in the nodose ganglia (Fluorogold and pseudorabies virus) and in the brainstem nuclei (pseudorabies virus) was obtained. DiI-labeled nerve fibers occurred near uterine horn and uterine cervical blood vessels, in the myometrium, and in paracervical ganglia. Rats with vagal, pelvic, hypogastric and ovarian neurectomies exhibited a marked decrease in calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive nerves in the uterus relative to rats with pelvic, hypogastric, and ovarian neurectomies with intact vagus nerves. Neurons in the nodose ganglia and nucleus tractus solitarius were immunoreactive for estrogen receptors. These results demonstrated: (1) the vagus nerves serve as connections between the uterus and CNS, (2) the nodose ganglia contain uterine-related vagal afferent neuron cell bodies, and (3) neurons in vagal locales contain estrogen receptors.

  2. Musical training heightens auditory brainstem function during sensitive periods in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eSkoe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Experience has a profound influence on how sound is processed in the brain. Yet little is known about how enriched experiences interact with developmental processes to shape neural processing of sound. We examine this question as part of a large cross-sectional study of auditory brainstem development involving more than 700 participants, 213 of whom were classified as musicians. We hypothesized that experience-dependent processes piggyback on developmental processes, resulting in a waxing-and-waning effect of experience that tracks with the undulating developmental baseline. This hypothesis led to the prediction that experience-dependent plasticity would be amplified during periods when developmental changes are underway (i.e., early and later in life and that the peak in experience-dependent plasticity would coincide with the developmental apex for each subcomponent of the auditory brainstem response. Consistent with our predictions, we reveal that musicians have heightened response features at distinctive times in the life span that coincide with periods of developmental change and climax. The effect of musicianship is also quite specific: we find that only select components of auditory brainstem activity are affected, with musicians having heightened function for onset latency, high frequency phase-locking, and response consistency, and with little effect observed for other measures, including lower frequency phase-locking and non-stimulus-related activity. By showing that musicianship imparts a neural signature that is especially evident during childhood and old age, our findings reinforce the idea that the nervous system’s response to sound is chiseled by how a person interacts with his specific auditory environment, with the effect of the environment wielding its greatest influence during certain privileged windows of development.

  3. Sensitization of trigeminal brainstem pathways in a model for tear deficient dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mostafeezur; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Katagiri, Ayano; Bereiter, David A

    2015-05-01

    Chronic dry eye disease (DE) is associated with an unstable tear film and symptoms of ocular discomfort. The characteristics of symptoms suggest a key role for central neural processing; however, little is known about central neuroplasticity and DE. We used a model for tear deficient DE and assessed effects on eye blink behavior, orbicularis oculi muscle activity (OOemg), and trigeminal brainstem neural activity in male rats. Ocular-responsive neurons were recorded at the interpolaris/caudalis transition (Vi/Vc) and Vc/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) regions under isoflurane, whereas OOemg activity was recorded under urethane. Spontaneous tear volume was reduced by ∼50% at 14 days after exorbital gland removal. Hypertonic saline-evoked eye blink behavior in awake rats was enhanced throughout the 14 days after surgery. Saline-evoked neural activity at the Vi/Vc transition and in superficial and deep laminae at the Vc/C1 region was greatly enhanced in DE rats. Neurons from DE rats classified as wide dynamic range displayed enlarged convergent periorbital receptive fields consistent with central sensitization. Saline-evoked OOemg activity was markedly enhanced in DE rats compared with controls. Synaptic blockade at the Vi/Vc transition or the Vc/C1 region greatly reduced hypertonic saline-evoked OOemg activity in DE and sham rats. These results indicated that persistent tear deficiency caused sensitization of ocular-responsive neurons at multiple regions of the caudal trigeminal brainstem and enhanced OOemg activity. Central sensitization of ocular-related brainstem circuits is a significant factor in DE and likely contributes to the apparent weak correlation between peripheral signs of tear dysfunction and symptoms of irritation.

  4. Phase locked neural activity in the human brainstem predicts preference for musical consonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, Oliver; Hopkins, Kathryn; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Plack, Christopher J

    2014-05-01

    When musical notes are combined to make a chord, the closeness of fit of the combined spectrum to a single harmonic series (the 'harmonicity' of the chord) predicts the perceived consonance (how pleasant and stable the chord sounds; McDermott, Lehr, & Oxenham, 2010). The distinction between consonance and dissonance is central to Western musical form. Harmonicity is represented in the temporal firing patterns of populations of brainstem neurons. The current study investigates the role of brainstem temporal coding of harmonicity in the perception of consonance. Individual preference for consonant over dissonant chords was measured using a rating scale for pairs of simultaneous notes. In order to investigate the effects of cochlear interactions, notes were presented in two ways: both notes to both ears or each note to different ears. The electrophysiological frequency following response (FFR), reflecting sustained neural activity in the brainstem synchronised to the stimulus, was also measured. When both notes were presented to both ears the perceptual distinction between consonant and dissonant chords was stronger than when the notes were presented to different ears. In the condition in which both notes were presented to the both ears additional low-frequency components, corresponding to difference tones resulting from nonlinear cochlear processing, were observable in the FFR effectively enhancing the neural harmonicity of consonant chords but not dissonant chords. Suppressing the cochlear envelope component of the FFR also suppressed the additional frequency components. This suggests that, in the case of consonant chords, difference tones generated by interactions between notes in the cochlea enhance the perception of consonance. Furthermore, individuals with a greater distinction between consonant and dissonant chords in the FFR to individual harmonics had a stronger preference for consonant over dissonant chords. Overall, the results provide compelling evidence

  5. Brainstem raphe and substantia nigra echogenicity in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder with comorbid depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Dolores; Iranzo, Alex; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Serradell, Mónica; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2015-07-01

    In Parkinson disease (PD), REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and depression may occur before the onset of parkinsonism. Transcranial sonography (TCS) shows that hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (SN+) and hypoechogenicity of the brainstem raphe (BR+) are frequent in PD, particularly when depression is associated. Combined SN+ and BR+ identify PD subjects in whom depression antedates parkinsonism onset. It can be speculated that SN+ and BR+ may also identify idiopathic RBD (IRBD) subjects with comorbid depression, supporting the clinical diagnosis of this mood disorder. We aimed to study the brainstem raphe and substantia nigra echogenicity and their ability to predict comorbid depression in IRBD. Seventy-two IRBD patients and 71 age and sex-matched controls underwent TCS. Depression was diagnosed by means of DSM-IV criteria. Depression was more frequent in IRBD patients than in controls (44.4 vs. 18.3 %; p = 0.001). BR+ was more frequent in depressed than in nondepressed IRBD patients (32.0 vs. 11.4 %; p = 0.050). Sensitivity of BR+ to predict depression in IRBD was 32.0 %, specificity was 88.6 %, and relative risk was 1.88. Sensitivity of SN+ to predict depression in IRBD was 72.0 %, specificity was 44.1 %, and relative risk was 1.53. Sensitivity of combined BR+ and SN+ to predict depression in IRBD was 23.1 %, specificity 97.1 %, and relative risk was 2.31. Hypoechogenicity of the brainstem raphe, particularly when combined with hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, detects comorbid depression in IRBD. This finding suggests that dysfunction of the serotonergic dorsal raphe may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression in IRBD.

  6. Tactile modulation of whisking via the brainstem loop: statechart modeling and experimental validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Sherman

    Full Text Available Rats repeatedly sweep their facial whiskers back and forth in order to explore their environment. Such explorative whisking appears to be driven by central pattern generators (CPGs that operate independently of direct sensory feedback. Nevertheless, whisking can be modulated by sensory feedback, and it has been hypothesized that some of this modulation already occurs within the brainstem. However, the interaction between sensory feedback and CPG activity is poorly understood. Using the visual language of statecharts, a dynamic, bottom-up computerized model of the brainstem loop of the whisking system was built in order to investigate the interaction between sensory feedback and CPG activity during whisking behavior. As a benchmark, we used a previously quantified closed-loop phenomenon of the whisking system, touched-induced pump (TIP, which is thought to be mediated by the brainstem loop. First, we showed that TIPs depend on sensory feedback, by comparing TIP occurrence in intact rats with that in rats whose sensory nerve was experimentally cut. We then inspected several possible feedback mechanisms of TIPs using our model. The model ruled out all hypothesized mechanisms but one, which adequately simulated the corresponding motion observed in the rat. Results of the simulations suggest that TIPs are generated via sensory feedback that activates extrinsic retractor muscles in the mystacial pad. The model further predicted that in addition to the touching whisker, all whiskers found on the same side of the snout should exhibit a TIP. We present experimental results that confirm the predicted movements in behaving rats, establishing the validity of the hypothesized interaction between sensory feedback and CPG activity we suggest here for the generation of TIPs in the whisking system.

  7. Cortical influences on brainstem circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Andrew M; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2016-07-01

    Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is a powerful endogenous analgesic mechanism which can completely inhibit incoming nociceptor signals at the primary synapse. The circuitry responsible for CPM lies within the brainstem and involves the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis (SRD). While the brainstem is critical for CPM, the cortex can significantly modulate its expression, likely via the brainstem circuitry critical for CPM. Since higher cortical regions such as the anterior, mid-cingulate, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices are activated by noxious stimuli and show reduced activations during other analgesic responses, we hypothesized that these regions would display reduced responses during CPM analgesia. Furthermore, we hypothesized that functional connectivity strength between these cortical regions and the SRD would be stronger in those that express CPM analgesia compared with those that do not. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine sites recruited during CPM expression and their influence on the SRD. A lack of CPM analgesia was associated with greater signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus compared to test stimuli alone in the mid-cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and increased functional connectivity with the SRD. In contrast, those subjects exhibiting CPM analgesia showed no change in the magnitude of signal intensity increases in these cortical regions or strength of functional connectivity with the SRD. These data suggest that during multiple or widespread painful stimuli, engagement of the prefrontal and cingulate cortices prevents the generation of CPM analgesia, raising the possibility altered responsiveness in these cortical regions underlie the reduced CPM observed in individuals with chronic pain. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2630-2644, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cortical and brainstem plasticity in Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppa, Antonio; Marsili, Luca; Di Stasio, Flavio; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Pasquini, Massimo; Cardona, Francesco; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2014-10-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is characterized by motor/vocal tics commonly associated with psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. We investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in Tourette patients, exposed and unexposed to chronic drug treatment, with and without psychiatric disturbances. We also investigated primary motor cortex and brainstem plasticity in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We studied 20 Tourette patients with and without psychiatric disturbances, 15 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 20 healthy subjects. All groups included drug-naïve patients. We conditioned the left primary motor cortex with intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation and recorded motor evoked potentials. We conditioned the supraorbital nerve with facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation and recorded the blink reflex late response area. In healthy subjects, intermittent theta-burst increased and continuous theta-burst stimulation decreased motor evoked potentials. Differently, intermittent theta-burst failed to increase and continuous theta-burst stimulation failed to decrease motor evoked potentials in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances. In obsessive-compulsive disorder, intermittent/continuous theta-burst stimulation elicited normal responses. In healthy subjects and in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder, the blink reflex late response area increased after facilitatory high-frequency and decreased after inhibitory high-frequency stimulation. Conversely, in Tourette patients, with and without psychiatric disturbances, facilitatory/inhibitory high-frequency stimulation left the blink reflex late response area unchanged. Theta-burst and high-frequency stimulation elicited similar responses in drug-naïve and chronically treated patients. Tourette patients have reduced plasticity regardless of psychiatric disturbances. These findings suggest that abnormal plasticity contributes to the

  9. Amplitude and phase equalization of stimuli for click evoked auditory brainstem responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutelmann, Rainer; Laumen, Geneviève; Tollin, Daniel; Klump, Georg M

    2015-01-01

    Although auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), the sound-evoked brain activity in response to transient sounds, are routinely measured in humans and animals there are often differences in ABR waveform morphology across studies. One possible reason may be the method of stimulus calibration. To explore this hypothesis, click-evoked ABRs were measured from seven ears in four Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) using three common spectrum calibration strategies: Minimum phase filter, linear phase filter, and no filter. The results show significantly higher ABR amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio, and better waveform resolution with the minimum phase filtered click than with the other strategies.

  10. Neuroimaging of Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases of the Pediatric Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar involvement by infectious-inflammatory conditions is rare in children. Most patients present with acute ataxia, and are typically previously healthy, young (often preschool) children. Viral involvement is the most common cause and ranges from acute postinfectious ataxia to acute cerebellitis MR imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harboring inflammatory-infectious involvement of the cerebellum and brainstem. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disorders and technical competence on pediatric MR imaging are necessary for a correct interpretation of findings, which in turn prompts further management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased astrocytic expression of metallothioneins I + II in brainstem of adult rats treated with 6-aminonicotinamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Hidalgo, Juan; Moos, Torben

    1997-01-01

    The cerebral distribution of metallothioneins I and II (MT-I + II) was studied in adult rats subjected to i.p. injection with the gliotoxin 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN). Grey matter regions of the brainstem heralded numerous OX-42-positive macrophages and microglia, indicating that 6-AN primarily...... caused damage to this part of the brain. In the grey matter regions infiltrated with OX-42-positive cells, astrocytes identified by anti-GFAP and MT-I + II antibodies were almost absent. By contrast, in the peripheral zone of the lesioned regions numerous reactive GFAP- and MT-I + II-positive astrocytes...

  12. Effects of hypomagnetic field on noradrenergic activities in the brainstem of golden hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Jun-Feng; Wu, Qi-Jiu; Li, Bing; Jiang, Jin-Chang

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies found that elimination of the geomagnetic field (GMF) interferes with the normal brain functions, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. The present study examined the effects of long-term exposures to a near-zero magnetic environment on the noradrenergic activities in the brainstem of golden hamsters. Both the content of norepinephrine (NE) and the density of NE-immunopositive neurons in the tissue decreased significantly after the treatment, and the effects could be progressive with time. These variations may substantially contribute to behavioral and mood disorders reported in other studies when animals are shielded from the GMF.

  13. A rare case of acute posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome involving brainstem in a child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olfa Chakroun-Walha; Ichrak Bacha; Mehdi Frikha; Kheireddine Ben Mahfoudh; Noureddine Rekik

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare entity involving brainstem in very rare reported cases. We describe here the case of a boy who presented to the emergency department for headaches and strabismus. Diagnosis of PRES was retained by magnetic resonance imaging. The causes were blood pressure urgency and renal failure. Location of lesions was very rarely reported in literature and neurological troubles were persistent. Emergency physicians should evocate PRES each time there is a clinical context associated with neurological troubles by a normal brain CT scan. Early diagnosis is very important to treat its causes and improve prognosis.

  14. A rare case of acute poster ior reversible encephalopathy syndrome involving brainstem in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Chakroun-Walha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a rare entity involving brainstem in very rare reported cases. We describe here the case of a boy who presented to the emergency department for headaches and strabismus. Diagnosis of PRES was retained by magnetic resonance imaging. The causes were blood pressure urgency and renal failure. Location of lesions was very rarely reported in literature and neurological troubles were persistent. Emergency physicians should evocate PRES each time there is a clinical context associated with neurological troubles by a normal brain CT scan. Early diagnosis is very important to treat its causes and improve prognosis.

  15. Successful removal of an impacted metallic arrowhead penetrating up to the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramhans Dharmdas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of impacted metallic arrowhead in the brain through an unusual route of the neck and behind the external carotid artery to the base of the skull up to the brainstem is reported. Review of the literature reveals no previous reports of this type of injury. A 35-year-old man was admitted to the hospital after 36 h of injury, being fully conscious and with partial facial palsy. The arrowhead was successfully removed by exploration of the entry wound, without any neurovascular complications. The patient not only survived the operation but was also discharged in an improved neurological condition.

  16. Increased brainstem perfusion, but no blood-brain barrier disruption, during attacks of migraine with aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal M; Christensen, Casper E; Younis, Samaira; Wolfram, Frauke; Cramer, Stig P; Larsson, Henrik B W; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-06-01

    See Moskowitz (doi:10.1093/brain/awx099) for a scientific commentary on this article.The migraine aura is characterized by transient focal cortical disturbances causing dramatic neurological symptoms that are usually followed by migraine headache. It is currently not understood how the aura symptoms are related to the headache phase of migraine. Animal studies suggest that cortical spreading depression, the likely mechanism of migraine aura, causes disruption of the blood-brain barrier and noxious stimulation of trigeminal afferents leading to activation of brainstem nuclei and triggering of migraine headache. We used the sensitive and validated technique of dynamic contrast-enhanced high-field magnetic resonance imaging to simultaneously investigate blood-brain barrier permeability and tissue perfusion in the brainstem (at the level of the lower pons), visual cortex, and brain areas of the anterior, middle and posterior circulation during spontaneous attacks of migraine with aura. Patients reported to our institution to undergo magnetic resonance imaging during the headache phase after presenting with typical visual aura. Nineteen patients were scanned during attacks and on an attack-free day. The mean time from attack onset to scanning was 7.6 h. We found increased brainstem perfusion bilaterally during migraine with aura attacks. Perfusion also increased in the visual cortex and posterior white matter following migraine aura. We found no increase in blood-brain barrier permeability in any of the investigated regions. There was no correlation between blood-brain barrier permeability, brain perfusion, and time from symptom onset to examination or pain intensity. Our findings demonstrate hyperperfusion in brainstem during the headache phase of migraine with aura, while the blood-brain barrier remains intact during attacks of migraine with aura. These data thus contradict the preclinical hypothesis of cortical spreading depression-induced blood-brain barrier

  17. Painful tonic spasms and brainstem involvement in a patient with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Filip, Corina; Ungureanu, Aurelian; Cernuşcă-Miţaru, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system classically characterized by optic neuritis and severe myelitis. New diagnostic criteria defined neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder as limited forms of NMO or diverse neurologic presentations in the presence of specific antiaquaporin-4 antibodies. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman admitted in our department for recurrent attacks of optic neuritis, tetraparesis with severe painful tonic spasms of the left limbs and brainstem involvement. Painful tonic spasms have been described as movement disorders associated with multiple sclerosis, but a growing number of reports describe them in cases of NMO.

  18. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses with and without sedation in autism and Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, E A; Heaney, G; Clausen, J; Belser, R; Rainbow, S

    1990-04-15

    Brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAER) were obtained from 46 control, 16 Down's syndrome, and 48 autistic male subjects. Six Down's syndrome and 37 autistic subjects were tested with sedation. Sedated and unsedated Down's syndrome subjects displayed shorter absolute and interpeak latencies for early components of the BAER whereas the sedated autistic group showed longer latencies for the middle and late components. The prolongation of latencies in the sedated autistic group was unrelated to age or intellectual level. Although individuals requiring sedation may have a higher probability of neurological impairment, an effect of sedation on the BAER cannot be ruled out.

  19. Intrinsic stress analysis of sputtered carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqin Liu; Zhanshan Wang; Jingtao Zhu; Zhong Zhang; Moyan Tan; Qiushi Huang; Rui Chen; Jing Xu; Lingyan Chen

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic stresses of carbon films deposited by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering were investigated.The bombardments of energetic particles during the growth of films were considered to be the main reason for compressive intrinsic stresses.The values of intrinsic stresses were determined by measuring the radius of curvature of substrates before and after film deposition.By varying argon pressure and target-substrate distance,energies of neutral carbon atoms impinging on the growing films were optimized to control the intrinsic stresses level.The stress evolution in carbon films as a function of film thickness was investigated and a void-related stress relief mechanism was proposed to interpret this evolution.

  20. Parameter likelihood of intrinsic ellipticity correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Capranico, Federica; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte

    2012-01-01

    Subject of this paper are the statistical properties of ellipticity alignments between galaxies evoked by their coupled angular momenta. Starting from physical angular momentum models, we bridge the gap towards ellipticity correlations, ellipticity spectra and derived quantities such as aperture moments, comparing the intrinsic signals with those generated by gravitational lensing, with the projected galaxy sample of EUCLID in mind. We investigate the dependence of intrinsic ellipticity correlations on cosmological parameters and show that intrinsic ellipticity correlations give rise to non-Gaussian likelihoods as a result of nonlinear functional dependencies. Comparing intrinsic ellipticity spectra to weak lensing spectra we quantify the magnitude of their contaminating effect on the estimation of cosmological parameters and find that biases on dark energy parameters are very small in an angular-momentum based model in contrast to the linear alignment model commonly used. Finally, we quantify whether intrins...

  1. Original Paper Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-20

    Apr 20, 2011 ... Micro-organisms from intrinsic and extrinsic sources have .... All isolates with similar antibiotic profile were analysed for ... microcentrifuge at 12,000rpm for 10 minutes. The ..... emphasising the need to remove urinary catheters.

  2. RUSSIAN STUDENTS’ INTRINSIC MOTIVATION: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    SHAROVATOVA S.A.

    2015-01-01

    The article is aimed at analysing Russian teachers’ experience in developing students’ intrinsic motivation. The author’s own reflections and findings based on motivation theory and practice are also given.

  3. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  4. The Nonlinear Evolution of Galaxy Intrinsic Alignments

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jounghun; Pen, Ue-Li

    2007-01-01

    The non-Gaussian contribution to the intrinsic halo spin alignments is analytically modeled and numerically detected. Assuming that the growth of non-Gaussianity in the density fluctuations caused the tidal field to have nonlinear-order effect on the orientations of the halo angular momentum, we model the intrinsic halo spin alignments as a linear scaling of the density correlations on large scales, which is different from the previous quadratic-scaling model based on the linear tidal torque ...

  5. Reconciling economics and psychology on intrinsic motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno, Bruna

    2012-01-01

    The paper analyzes how the debate on intrinsic motivation was imported from psychology into economics. The most important differences between the two disciplines are in the definition of intrinsic motivation and in the timing of the undermining effect of rewards. The economic framework of inter-temporal choices is proposed to reconcile the different empirical and theoretical results arising in the literature, and it is shown how rewards induce substitution and income effects depending on whet...

  6. Intrinsic Mean Square Displacements in Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    VURAL, Derya; Glyde, Henry R.

    2012-01-01

    The thermal mean square displacement (MSD) of hydrogen in proteins and its associated hydration water is measured by neutron scattering experiments and used an indicator of protein function. The observed MSD as currently determined depends on the energy resolution width of the neutron scattering instrument employed. We propose a method for obtaining the intrinsic MSD of H in the proteins, one that is independent of the instrument resolution width. The intrinsic MSD is defined as the infinite ...

  7. Incentives and intrinsic motivation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdud, Mikel; Cabasés, Juan M; Nieto, Jorge

    It has been established in the literature that workers within public organisations are intrinsically motivated. This paper is an empirical study of the healthcare sector using methods of qualitative analysis research, which aims to answer the following hypotheses: 1) doctors are intrinsically motivated; 2) economic incentives and control policies may undermine doctors' intrinsic motivation; and 3) well-designed incentives may encourage doctors' intrinsic motivation. We conducted semi-structured interviews à-la-Bewley with 16 doctors from Navarre's Healthcare Service (Servicio Navarro de Salud-Osasunbidea), Spain. The questions were based on current theories of intrinsic motivation and incentives to test the hypotheses. Interviewees were allowed to respond openly without time constraints. Relevant information was selected, quantified and analysed by using the qualitative concepts of saturation and codification. The results seem to confirm the hypotheses. Evidence supporting hypotheses 1 and 2 was gathered from all interviewees, as well as indications of the validity of hypothesis 3 based on interviewees' proposals of incentives. The conclusions could act as a guide to support the optimal design of incentive policies and schemes within health organisations when healthcare professionals are intrinsically motivated. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Branching in current-voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukrinov, Yu M [BLTP, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation); Mahfouzi, F [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, PO Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    We study branching in the current-voltage characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions of high-temperature superconductors in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A system of dynamical equations for the gauge-invariant phase differences between superconducting layers for a stack of ten intrinsic junctions has been numerically solved. We have obtained a total branch structure in the current-voltage characteristics. We demonstrate the existence of a 'breakpoint region' on the current-voltage characteristics and explain it as a result of resonance between Josephson and plasma oscillations. The effect of the boundary conditions is investigated. The existence of two outermost branches and correspondingly two breakpoint regions for the periodic boundary conditions is shown. One branch, which is observed only at periodic boundary conditions, corresponds to the propagating of the plasma mode. The second one corresponds to the situation when the charge oscillations on the superconducting layers are absent, excluding the breakpoint. A time dependence of the charge oscillations at breakpoints is presented.

  9. Branching in current voltage characteristics of intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Mahfouzi, F.

    2007-02-01

    We study branching in the current-voltage characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions of high-temperature superconductors in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A system of dynamical equations for the gauge-invariant phase differences between superconducting layers for a stack of ten intrinsic junctions has been numerically solved. We have obtained a total branch structure in the current-voltage characteristics. We demonstrate the existence of a 'breakpoint region' on the current-voltage characteristics and explain it as a result of resonance between Josephson and plasma oscillations. The effect of the boundary conditions is investigated. The existence of two outermost branches and correspondingly two breakpoint regions for the periodic boundary conditions is shown. One branch, which is observed only at periodic boundary conditions, corresponds to the propagating of the plasma mode. The second one corresponds to the situation when the charge oscillations on the superconducting layers are absent, excluding the breakpoint. A time dependence of the charge oscillations at breakpoints is presented.

  10. Separation of scattering and intrinsic attenuation at Asama volcano (Japan): Evidence of high volcanic structural contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudencio, Janire; Aoki, Yosuke; Takeo, Minoru; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Song, WenZhan

    2017-03-01

    In this study we show 2D intrinsic- and scattering-Q images of Asama volcano obtained by analyzing 2320 waveforms from active data. Observed energy envelopes were fitted to the diffusion model and separate intrinsic- and scattering-Q images were produced using a back-projection method based on a Gaussian-type weighting function. Synthetic tests indicate robustness and reliability of the results. Areas of high scattering attenuation coincide with the volcanic edifice and the summit at which recent eruptions took place. The intrinsic dissipation pattern shows a strong contrast between the east and west side of the volcanic structure with the low values observed in the west interpreted as solidified magma bodies. Our results demonstrate a strong relationship between structural heterogeneities and attenuation processes in volcanic areas and confirm the effectiveness of the present technique, which can be used as an imaging tool complementary to conventional techniques.

  11. Determination of intrinsic viscosity of poly(ethylene terephthalate) using infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Spinacé, M A; Lucato, M U; Ferrão, M F; Davanzo, C U; De Paoli, M-A

    2006-05-15

    A methodology was developed to determine the intrinsic viscosity of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and multivariate calibration (MVC) methods. Multivariate partial least squares calibration was applied to the spectra using mean centering and cross validation. The results were correlated to the intrinsic viscosities determined by the standard chemical method (ASTM D 4603-01) and a very good correlation for values in the range from 0.346 to 0.780dLg(-1) (relative viscosity values ca. 1.185-1.449) was observed. The spectrophotometer detector sensitivity and the humidity of the samples did not influence the results. The methodology developed is interesting because it does not produce hazardous wastes, avoids the use of time-consuming chemical methods and can rapidly predict the intrinsic viscosity of PET samples over a large range of values, which includes those of recycled materials.

  12. Brainstem neurons survive the identical ischemic stress that kills higher neurons: insight to the persistent vegetative state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Global ischemia caused by heart attack, pulmonary failure, near-drowning or traumatic brain injury often damages the higher brain but not the brainstem, leading to a 'persistent vegetative state' where the patient is awake but not aware. Approximately 30,000 U.S. patients are held captive in this condition but not a single research study has addressed how the lower brain is preferentially protected in these people. In the higher brain, ischemia elicits a profound anoxic depolarization (AD causing neuronal dysfunction and vasoconstriction within minutes. Might brainstem nuclei generate less damaging AD and so be more resilient? Here we compared resistance to acute injury induced from simulated ischemia by 'higher' hippocampal and striatal neurons versus brainstem neurons in live slices from rat and mouse. Light transmittance (LT imaging in response to 10 minutes of oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed immediate and acutely damaging AD propagating through gray matter of neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. In adjacent brainstem nuclei, OGD-evoked AD caused little tissue injury. Whole-cell patch recordings from hippocampal and striatal neurons under OGD revealed sudden membrane potential loss that did not recover. In contrast brainstem neurons from locus ceruleus and mesencephalic nucleus as well as from sensory and motor nuclei only slowly depolarized and then repolarized post-OGD. Two-photon microscopy confirmed non-recoverable swelling and dendritic beading of hippocampal neurons during OGD, while mesencephalic neurons in midbrain appeared uninjured. All of the above responses were mimicked by bath exposure to 100 µM ouabain which inhibits the Na+/K+ pump or to 1-10 nM palytoxin which converts the pump into an open cationic channel. Therefore during ischemia the Na+/K+ pump of higher neurons fails quickly and extensively compared to naturally resilient hypothalamic and brainstem neurons. The selective survival

  13. Implantation and diffusion of $^{73}$As in GaAs and GaP

    CERN Document Server

    Bösker, G; Stolwijk, N A; Mehrer, H; Burchard, A

    2000-01-01

    Self-diffusion on the As sublattice in intrinsic GaAs and foreign- atom diffusion on the P sublattice in intrinsic GaP were investigated in a direct way by As tracer diffusion measurements using the radioisotope /sup 73/As. For this purpose /sup 73/As was implanted in both materials at the ISOLDE facility of CERN. Then diffusion annealings were performed followed by serial sectioning and counting of the radioactivity in each section. The resulting profiles were simulated within a computer model which accounts for the observed loss of tracer to the diffusion ambient. The so-obtained diffusion coefficients for As in GaAs and GaP are compared with existing diffusivities in these compounds. (25 refs).

  14. Speech-evoked auditory brainstem responses in children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koravand, Amineh; Al Osman, Rida; Rivest, Véronique; Poulin, Catherine

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate subcortical auditory processing in children with sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABRs) were recorded using click and speech/da/stimuli. Twenty-five children, aged 6-14 years old, participated in the study: 13 with normal hearing acuity and 12 with sensorineural hearing loss. No significant differences were observed for the click-evoked ABRs between normal hearing and hearing-impaired groups. For the speech-evoked ABRs, no significant differences were found for the latencies of the following responses between the two groups: onset (V and A), transition (C), one of the steady-state wave (F), and offset (O). However, the latency of the steady-state waves (D and E) was significantly longer for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal hearing group. Furthermore, the amplitude of the offset wave O and of the envelope frequency response (EFR) of the speech-evoked ABRs was significantly larger for the hearing-impaired compared to the normal hearing group. Results obtained from the speech-evoked ABRs suggest that children with a mild to moderately-severe sensorineural hearing loss have a specific pattern of subcortical auditory processing. Our results show differences for the speech-evoked ABRs in normal hearing children compared to hearing-impaired children. These results add to the body of the literature on how children with hearing loss process speech at the brainstem level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lateral asymmetry and reduced forward masking effect in early brainstem auditory evoked responses in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källstrand, Johan; Nehlstedt, Sara Fristedt; Sköld, Mia Ling; Nielzén, Sören

    2012-04-30

    Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia show deficiencies of basic neurophysiological sorting mechanisms. This study further investigated this issue, focusing on the two phenomena, laterality of coding and auditory forward masking. A specific audiometric method for use in psychiatry was the measuring set up to register brain stem audiograms (ABRs). A sample of 49 schizophrenic patients was compared with three control groups consisting of healthy reference subjects (n=49), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients (n=29), Asperger syndrome (AS) patients (n=13) and drug-induced psychotic patients (n=14). Schizophrenic patients showed significant abnormal laterality of brainstem activity in wave II of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in comparison with all other study groups. Forward masking effects in the superior olive complex were coded significantly differently by schizophrenic patients compared to control groups except for the AS group. The results suggest deficits in the coding of auditory stimuli in the lower parts of the auditory pathway in schizophrenia and indicate that increased peripheral lateral asymmetry and forward masking aberrances could be neurophysiological markers for the disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of edaravone on acute brainstem-cerebellar infarction with vertigo and sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuta; Yabe, Takao; Okada, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuka

    2014-06-01

    We report 2 cases with acute brainstem and brainstem-cerebellar infarction showed improvement of their signs and symptoms after administration of edaravone. Case 1, a 74-year-old woman who experienced sudden vertigo, also had dysarthria and left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal region in the right ventrolateral medulla oblongata. The patient's vertigo and hemiplegia improved completely after treatment. Case 2, a 50-year-old man who experienced sudden vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), developed dysarthria after admission. MRI revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed dissection of the basilar artery and occlusion of the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient's vertigo and hearing remarkably improved. We have described 2 patients whose early symptoms were vertigo and sudden SNHL, but who were later shown to have ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. Edaravone is neuroprotective drug with free radical-scavenging actions. Free radicals in the ear are responsible for ischemic damage. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, may be useful in the treatment of vertigo and SNHL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sedation of children for auditory brainstem response using ketamine-midazolam-atropine combination - a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocskai, Tímea; Németh, Adrienne; Bogár, Lajos; Pytel, József

    2013-12-01

    Authors investigated sedation quality in children for auditory brainstem response testing. Two-hundred and seventy-six sedation procedures were retrospectively analyzed using recorded data focusing on efficacy of sedation and complications. Intramuscular ketamine-midazolam-atropine combination was administered on sedation preceded by narcotic suppository as pre-medication. On using the combination vital parameters remained within normal range, the complication rate was minimal. Pulse rate, arterial blood pressure and pulse oxymetry readings were stable, hypoventilation developed in 4, apnoea in none of the cases, post-sedation agitation occurred in 3 and nausea and/or vomiting in 2 cases. Repeated administration of narcotic agent was necessary in a single case only. Our practice is suitable for the sedation assisting hearing examinations in children. It has no influence on the auditory brainstem testing, the conditions necessary for the test can be met entirely with minimal side-effects. Our practice provides a more lasting sedation time in children during the examination hence there is no need for the repetition of the narcotics.

  18. Hearing outcomes after loss of brainstem auditory evoked potentials during microvascular decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Krishnaiah, Balaji; Habeych, Miguel E; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Crammond, Donald J

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to study the pre-operative characteristics, intra-operative changes and post-operative hearing outcomes in patients after complete loss of wave V of the brainstem auditory evoked potential. We retrospectively analyzed the brainstem auditory evoked potential data of 94 patients who underwent microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm at our institute. Patients were divided into two groups - those with and those without loss of wave V. The differences between the two groups and outcomes were assessed using t-test and chi-squared tests. In our study 23 (24%) patients out of 94 had a complete loss of wave V, with 11 (48%) patients experiencing transient loss and 12 (52%) patients experiencing permanent loss. The incidence of hearing loss in patients with no loss of wave V was 5.7% and 26% in patients who did experience wave V loss. The incidence of hearing change in patients with no loss of wave V was 12.6% and 30.43% in patients who did experience wave V loss. Loss of wave V during the procedure or at the end of procedure significantly increases the odds of hearing loss. Hearing change is a significant under-reported clinical condition after microvascular decompression in patients who have loss of wave V.

  19. Comparison of Auditory Brainstem Response in Noise Induced Tinnitus and Non-Tinnitus Control Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassem Mohammadkhani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Tinnitus is an unpleasant sound which can cause some behavioral disorders. According to evidence the origin of tinnitus is not only in peripheral but also in central auditory system. So evaluation of central auditory system function is necessary. In this study Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were compared in noise induced tinnitus and non-tinnitus control subjects.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study is conducted in 60 cases in two groups including of 30 noise induced tinnitus and 30 non-tinnitus control subjects. ABRs were recorded ipsilateraly and contralateraly and their latencies and amplitudes were analyzed.Results: Mean interpeak latencies of III-V (p= 0.022, I-V (p=0.033 in ipsilatral electrode array and mean absolute latencies of IV (p=0.015 and V (p=0.048 in contralatral electrode array were significantly increased in noise induced tinnitus group relative to control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded from that there are some decrease in neural transmission time in brainstem and there are some sign of involvement of medial nuclei in olivery complex in addition to lateral lemniscus.

  20. Correlation of augmented startle reflex with brainstem electrophysiological responses in Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sadao; Saito, Yoshiaki; Ishiyama, Akihiko; Sugai, Kenji; Iso, Takashi; Inagaki, Masumi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the evolution of an augmented startle reflex in Tay-Sachs disease and compare the temporal relationship between this reflex and brainstem evoked potentials. Clinical and electrophysiological data from 3 patients with Tay-Sachs disease were retrospectively collected. The augmented startle reflex appeared between the age of 3 and 17 months and disappeared between the age of 4 and 6 years. Analysis of brainstem auditory evoked potentials revealed that poor segregation of peak I, but not peak III, coincided with the disappearance of the augmented startle reflex. A blink reflex with markedly high amplitude was observed in a patient with an augmented startle reflex. The correlation between the augmented startle reflex and the preservation of peak I but not peak III supports the theory that the superior olivary nucleus is dispensable for this reflex. The blink reflex with high amplitudes may represent augmented excitability of reticular formation at the pontine tegmentum in Tay-Sachs disease, where the pattern generators for the augmented startle and blink reflexes may functionally overlap. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal auditory forward masking pattern in the brainstem response of individuals with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Källstrand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Johan Källstrand1, Olle Olsson2, Sara Fristedt Nehlstedt1, Mia Ling Sköld1, Sören Nielzén21SensoDetect AB, Lund, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, SwedenAbstract: Abnormal auditory information processing has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. In the present study auditory processing was investigated by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs elicited by forward masking in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (AS. Sixteen AS subjects were included in the forward masking experiment and compared to three control groups consisting of healthy individuals (n = 16, schizophrenic patients (n = 16 and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients (n = 16, respectively, of matching age and gender. The results showed that the AS subjects exhibited abnormally low activity in the early part of their ABRs that distinctly separated them from the three control groups. Specifically, wave III amplitudes were significantly lower in the AS group than for all the control groups in the forward masking condition (P < 0.005, which was not the case in the baseline condition. Thus, electrophysiological measurements of ABRs to complex sound stimuli (eg, forward masking may lead to a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiology of AS. Future studies may further point to specific ABR characteristics in AS individuals that separate them from individuals diagnosed with other neurodevelopmental diseases.Keywords: asperger syndrome, auditory brainstem response, forward masking, psychoacoustics

  2. Perinatal sulfur dioxide exposure alters brainstem parasympathetic control of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerman, Amanda L; Mendelowitz, David

    2013-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO₂) is an air pollutant that impedes neonatal development and induces adverse cardiorespiratory health effects, including tachycardia. Here, an animal model was developed that enabled characterization of (i) in vivo alterations in heart rate and (ii) altered activity in brainstem neurons that control heart rate after perinatal SO₂ exposure. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams and their pups were exposed to 5 parts per million SO₂ for 1 h daily throughout gestation and 6 days postnatal. Electrocardiograms were recorded from pups at 5 days postnatal to examine changes in basal and diving reflex-evoked changes in heart rate following perinatal SO₂ exposure. In vitro studies employed whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to examine changes in neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons within the nucleus ambiguus upon SO₂ exposure using a preparation that maintains fictive inspiratory activity recorded from the hypoglossal rootlet. Perinatal SO₂ exposure increased heart rate and blunted the parasympathetic-mediated diving reflex-evoked changes in heart rate. Neither spontaneous nor inspiratory-related inhibitory GABAergic or glycinergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons was altered by SO₂ exposure. However, excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission was decreased by 51.2% upon SO₂ exposure. This diminished excitatory neurotransmission was tetrodotoxin-sensitive, indicating SO₂ exposure impaired the activity of preceding glutamatergic neurons that synapse upon cardiac vagal neurons. Diminished glutamatergic, but unaltered inhibitory neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons provides a mechanism for the observed SO₂-induced elevated heart rate via an impairment of brainstem cardioinhibitory parasympathetic activity to the heart.

  3. Rate and adaptation effects on the auditory evoked brainstem response in human newborns and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, R E

    1997-09-01

    Auditory evoked brainstem response (ABR) latencies increased and amplitudes decreased with increasing stimulus repetition rate for human newborns and adults. The wave V latency increases were larger for newborns than adults. The wave V amplitude decreases were smaller for newborns than adults. These differences could not be explained by developmental differences in frequency responsivity. The transition from the unadapted to the fully adapted response was less rapid in newborns than adults at short (= 10 ms) inter stimulus intervals (ISIs). At longer ISIs (= 20 ms) there were no developmental differences in the transition to the fully adapted response. The newborn transition occurred in a two stage process. The rapid initial stage observed in adults and newborns was complete by about 40 ms. A second slower stage was observed only in newborns although it has been observed in adults in other studies (Weatherby and Hecox, 1982; Lightfoot, 1991; Lasky et al., 1996). These effects were replicated at different stimulus intensities. After the termination of stimulation the return to the wave V unadapted response took nearly 500 ms in newborns. Neither the newborn nor the adult data can be explained by forward masking of one click on the next click. These results indicate human developmental differences in adaptation to repetitive auditory stimulation at the level of the brainstem.

  4. Regional brainstem expression of Fos associated with sexual behavior in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamson, Dwayne K; Watson, Neil V

    2004-05-01

    This study utilized Fos expression to map the distribution of activated cells in brainstem areas following masculine sexual behavior. Males displaying both appetitive and consumatory sexual behaviors (Cop) were compared to animals prevented from copulation (NC) and to socially isolated (SI) animals. Following copulation, Fos was preferentially augmented in the caudal ventral medulla (CVM), a region mediating descending inhibition of penile reflexes, and which may be regulated by a forebrain circuit that includes the medial preoptic area (MPOA). Copulation-induced Fos was observed in the medial divisions of both the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DC) and trapezoid bodies (Tz), areas which are part of a circuit processing auditory information. In addition, the medullary linear nucleus (Li) displayed comparable amounts of Fos in Cop and NC as compared to the SI animals. Other regions of the pontomedullary reticular system, which may mediate sleep and arousal, did not exhibit Fos expression associated with consumatory sexual behavior. We suggest that Fos is associated with the inhibition of sexual behavior following ejaculation in the CVM, and that auditory information arising from the DC and Tz is combined with copulation-related sensory information in the subparafasicular nucleus and projected to the hypothalamus. In addition, equal amounts of Fos expression observed in the Li in both the Cop and NC animals suggests that this region is involved in sexual arousal. Overall, the data suggest that processing by brainstem nuclei directly contributes to the regulation of mating behavior in male rats.

  5. Assembly of the auditory circuitry by a Hox genetic network in the mouse brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Di Bonito

    Full Text Available Rhombomeres (r contribute to brainstem auditory nuclei during development. Hox genes are determinants of rhombomere-derived fate and neuronal connectivity. Little is known about the contribution of individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes to auditory sensorimotor circuitry. Here, we show that r4 contributes to functionally linked sensory and motor components, including the ventral nucleus of lateral lemniscus, posterior ventral cochlear nuclei (VCN, and motor olivocochlear neurons. Assembly of the r4-derived auditory components is involved in sound perception and depends on regulatory interactions between Hoxb1 and Hoxb2. Indeed, in Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutant mice the transmission of low-level auditory stimuli is lost, resulting in hearing impairments. On the other hand, Hoxa2 regulates the Rig1 axon guidance receptor and controls contralateral projections from the anterior VCN to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, a circuit involved in sound localization. Thus, individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes control the assembly of distinct functionally segregated sub-circuits in the developing auditory brainstem.

  6. Assembly of the auditory circuitry by a Hox genetic network in the mouse brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonito, Maria; Narita, Yuichi; Avallone, Bice; Sequino, Luigi; Mancuso, Marta; Andolfi, Gennaro; Franzè, Anna Maria; Puelles, Luis; Rijli, Filippo M; Studer, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    Rhombomeres (r) contribute to brainstem auditory nuclei during development. Hox genes are determinants of rhombomere-derived fate and neuronal connectivity. Little is known about the contribution of individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes to auditory sensorimotor circuitry. Here, we show that r4 contributes to functionally linked sensory and motor components, including the ventral nucleus of lateral lemniscus, posterior ventral cochlear nuclei (VCN), and motor olivocochlear neurons. Assembly of the r4-derived auditory components is involved in sound perception and depends on regulatory interactions between Hoxb1 and Hoxb2. Indeed, in Hoxb1 and Hoxb2 mutant mice the transmission of low-level auditory stimuli is lost, resulting in hearing impairments. On the other hand, Hoxa2 regulates the Rig1 axon guidance receptor and controls contralateral projections from the anterior VCN to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, a circuit involved in sound localization. Thus, individual rhombomeres and their associated Hox codes control the assembly of distinct functionally segregated sub-circuits in the developing auditory brainstem.

  7. The auditory brainstem response to complex sounds: a potential biomarker for guiding treatment of psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Tarasenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits limit psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. For many patients, cognitive remediation approaches have yielded encouraging results. Nevertheless, therapeutic response is variable, and outcome studies consistently identify individuals who respond minimally to these interventions. Biomarkers that can assist in identifying patients likely to benefit from particular forms of cognitive remediation are needed. Here we describe an event-related potential (ERP biomarker – the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR – that appears to be particularly well-suited for predicting response to at least one form of cognitive remediation that targets auditory information processing. Uniquely, the cABR quantifies the fidelity of sound encoded at the level of the brainstem and midbrain. This ERP biomarker has revealed auditory processing abnormalities in various neurodevelopmental disorders, correlates with functioning across several cognitive domains, and appears to be responsive to targeted auditory training. We present preliminary cABR data from 18 schizophrenia patients and propose further investigation of this biomarker for predicting and tracking response to cognitive interventions.

  8. Migraine with brainstem aura presenting as recurrent hypersomnia (Kleine-Levin syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Alexander D; Leschziner, Guy D

    2016-10-01

    Recurrent hypersomnia, or Kleine-Levin syndrome, is rare and frequently causes substantial diagnostic anxiety and delay. Patients often undergo multiple investigations to rule out other causes of encephalopathy. The treatment options are unsatisfactory. Migraine with brainstem aura has not previously been widely considered in the medical literature as a differential diagnosis. We describe two patients referred to a tertiary sleep neurology service with a putative diagnosis of Kleine-Levin syndrome. Each described attacks of hypersomnia with elements of migraine with brainstem aura, in addition to having a history of migraine with aura. Simple acute migraine treatment clearly attenuated further attacks. These cases generate discussion as to the common features and potential mechanisms underlying both disorders. Furthermore, they highlight a hitherto underexplored alternative diagnosis of Kleine-Levin syndrome. This provides scope for offering established and effective migraine treatment options to patients who with a potential misdiagnosis of Kleine-Levin syndrome, providing scope for offering established and effective migraine treatment to some patients originally diagnosed with a rare condition for which there is no current consistently effective therapeutic options.

  9. Short GSM mobile phone exposure does not alter human auditory brainstem response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuróczy György

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are about 1.6 billion GSM cellular phones in use throughout the world today. Numerous papers have reported various biological effects in humans exposed to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones. The aim of the present study was to advance our understanding of potential adverse effects of the GSM mobile phones on the human hearing system. Methods Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR was recorded with three non-polarizing Ag-AgCl scalp electrodes in thirty young and healthy volunteers (age 18–26 years with normal hearing. ABR data were collected before, and immediately after a 10 minute exposure to 900 MHz pulsed electromagnetic field (EMF emitted by a commercial Nokia 6310 mobile phone. Fifteen subjects were exposed to genuine EMF and fifteen to sham EMF in a double blind and counterbalanced order. Possible effects of irradiation was analyzed by comparing the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after genuine/sham EMF exposure. Results Paired sample t-test was conducted for statistical analysis. Results revealed no significant differences in the latency of ABR waves I, III and V before and after 10 minutes of genuine/sham EMF exposure. Conclusion The present results suggest that, in our experimental conditions, a single 10 minute exposure of 900 MHz EMF emitted by a commercial mobile phone does not produce measurable immediate effects in the latency of auditory brainstem waves I, III and V.

  10. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in a case of 'Manto syndrome', or spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disertori, B; Ducati, A; Piazza, M; Pavani, M

    1982-12-01

    A case of spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome observed for over 18 months is presented and discussed. Maximal head rotation (determining backward gaze) was associated with compression of the brachial plexus between the scaleni muscles and motor, sensory and trophic troubles in the hand. This new syndrome is called after the diviner Manto, quoted by Dante Alighieri in his 'Divina Commedia' (Inferno, XX, 52-56). The etiology was ascribed to subacute toxic effects of methylparathion. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEPs) demonstrated severe brainstem involvement, maximal in the mesencephalic structures. Clinical and neurophysiological data improved on treatment with L-5-hydroxytryptophan. Finally, BAEPs returned to normal.

  11. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  12. A Neurophysiological Approach for Evaluating Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance: Calculating the Time Constant of the Dynamic Characteristics in the Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagusari, Junta; Matsui, Toshihito

    2016-03-25

    Chronic sleep disturbance induced by traffic noise is considered to cause environmental sleep disorder, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and other stress-related diseases. However, noise indices for the evaluation of sleep disturbance are not based on the neurophysiological process of awakening regulated by the brainstem. In this study, through the neurophysiological approach, we attempted (1) to investigate the thresholds of awakening due to external stimuli in the brainstem; (2) to evaluate the dynamic characteristics in the brainstem and (3) to verify the validity of existing noise indices. Using the mathematical Phillips-Robinson model, we obtained thresholds of awakening in the brainstem for different durations of external stimuli. The analysis revealed that the brainstem seemed insensitive to short stimuli and that the response to external stimuli in the brainstem could be approximated by a first-order lag system with a time constant of 10-100 s. These results suggest that the brainstem did not integrate sound energy as external stimuli, but neuroelectrical signals from auditory nerve. To understand the awakening risk accumulated in the brainstem, we introduced a new concept of "awakening potential" instead of sound energy.

  13. A Generalized Diffusion Tensor for Fully Anisotropic Diffusion of Energetic Particles in the Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, F.; Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.; Barra, S.; Kleimann, J.; Strauss, R. D.

    2012-05-01

    The spatial diffusion of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields can, in the most general case, be fully anisotropic, i.e., one has to distinguish three diffusion axes in a local, field-aligned frame. We reexamine the transformation for the diffusion tensor from this local to a global frame, in which the Parker transport equation for energetic particles is usually formulated and solved. Particularly, we generalize the transformation formulae to allow for an explicit choice of two principal local perpendicular diffusion axes. This generalization includes the "traditional" diffusion tensor in the special case of isotropic perpendicular diffusion. For the local frame, we describe the motivation for the choice of the Frenet-Serret trihedron, which is related to the intrinsic magnetic field geometry. We directly compare the old and the new tensor elements for two heliospheric magnetic field configurations, namely the hybrid Fisk and Parker fields. Subsequently, we examine the significance of the different formulations for the diffusion tensor in a standard three-dimensional model for the modulation of galactic protons. For this, we utilize a numerical code to evaluate a system of stochastic differential equations equivalent to the Parker transport equation and present the resulting modulated spectra. The computed differential fluxes based on the new tensor formulation deviate from those obtained with the "traditional" one (only valid for isotropic perpendicular diffusion) by up to 60% for energies below a few hundred MeV depending on heliocentric distance.

  14. Diffusion of $^{52}$Mn in GaAs

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Following our previous diffusion studies performed with the modified radiotracer technique, we propose to determine the diffusion of Mn in GaAs under intrinsic conditions in a previously un-investigated temperature region. The aim of the presently proposed experiments is twofold. \\begin{itemize} \\item A quantitative study of Mn diffusion in GaAs at low Mn concentrations would be decisive in providing new information on the diffusion mechanism involved. \\item As Ga vacancies are expected to be involved in the Mn diffusion process it can be predicted that also the GaAs material growth technique most likely plays a role. To clarify this assumption diffusion experiments will be conducted for GaAs material grown by two different techniques. \\end{itemize} For such experiments we ask for two runs of 3 shifts (total of 6 shifts) with $^{52}$Mn$^{+}$ ion beam.

  15. Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alexander.chroneos@imperial.ac.uk [Engineering and Innovation, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bracht, H., E-mail: bracht@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Germanium is being actively considered by the semiconductor community as a mainstream material for nanoelectronic applications. Germanium has advantageous materials properties; however, its dopant-defect interactions are less understood as compared to the mainstream material, silicon. The understanding of self- and dopant diffusion is essential to form well defined doped regions. Although p-type dopants such as boron exhibit limited diffusion, n-type dopants such as phosphorous, arsenic, and antimony diffuse quickly via vacancy-mediated diffusion mechanisms. In the present review, we mainly focus on the impact of intrinsic defects on the diffusion mechanisms of donor atoms and point defect engineering strategies to restrain donor atom diffusion and to enhance their electrical activation.

  16. Intrinsic-extrinsic factors in sport motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Darhl M

    2002-10-01

    Participants were 83 students (36 men and 47 women). 10 intrinsic-extrinsic factors involved in sport motivation were obtained. The factors were generated from items obtained from the participants rather than items from the experimenter. This was done to avoid the possible influence of preconceptions on the part of the experimenter regarding what the final dimensions may be. Obtained motivational factors were Social Reinforcement, Fringe Benefits, Fame and Fortune, External Forces, Proving Oneself, Social Benefits, Mental Enrichment, Expression of Self, Sense of Accomplishment, and Self-enhancement. Each factor was referred to an intrinsic-extrinsic dimension to describe its relative position on that dimension. The order of the factors as listed indicates increasing intrinsic motivation. i.e., the first four factors were rated in the extrinsic range, whereas the remaining six were rated to be in the intrinsic range. Next, the participants rated the extent to which each of the various factors was involved in their decision to participate in sport activities. The pattern of use of the motivational factors was the same for both sexes except that men indicated greater use of the Fringe Benefits factor. Overall, the more intrinsic a sport motivation factor was rated, the more likely it was to be rated as a factor in actual sport participation.

  17. Genome-Wide Prediction of Intrinsic Disorder; Sequence Alignment of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midic, Uros

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is defined as a lack of stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are highly abundant in nature. IDPs possess a number of crucial biological functions, being involved in regulation, recognition, signaling and control, e.g. their functional…

  18. Genome-Wide Prediction of Intrinsic Disorder; Sequence Alignment of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midic, Uros

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) is defined as a lack of stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are highly abundant in nature. IDPs possess a number of crucial biological functions, being involved in regulation, recognition, signaling and control, e.g. their functional…

  19. Structure and intrinsic disorder in protein autoinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Travis; Nassar, Roy; Cumberworth, Alexander; Wong, Eric T C; Woollard, Geoffrey; Gsponer, Jörg

    2013-03-05

    Autoinhibition plays a significant role in the regulation of many proteins. By analyzing autoinhibited proteins, we demonstrate that these proteins are enriched in intrinsic disorder because of the properties of their inhibitory modules (IMs). A comparison of autoinhibited proteins with structured and intrinsically disordered IMs revealed that in the latter group (1) multiple phosphorylation sites are highly abundant; (2) splice variants occur in greater number than in their structured cousins; and (3) activation is often associated with changes in secondary structure in the IM. Analyses of families of autoinhibited proteins revealed that the levels of disorder in IMs can vary significantly throughout homologous proteins, whereas residues located at the interfaces between the IMs and inhibited domains are conserved. Our findings suggest that intrinsically disordered IMs provide advantages over structured ones that are likely to be exploited in the fine-tuning of the equilibrium between active and inactive states of autoinhibited proteins.

  20. Functions of intrinsic disorder in transmembrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms. (3) Trafficking of membrane proteins. (4) Transient membrane associations. (5) Post-translational modifications most notably phosphorylation and (6) disorder-linked isoform dependent function. We finish the review by discussing the future challenges facing the membrane protein community regarding......Intrinsic disorder is common in integral membrane proteins, particularly in the intracellular domains. Despite this observation, these domains are not always recognized as being disordered. In this review, we will discuss the biological functions of intrinsically disordered regions of membrane...... proteins, and address why the flexibility afforded by disorder is mechanistically important. Intrinsically disordered regions are present in many common classes of membrane proteins including ion channels and transporters; G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine...

  1. Spin drift and spin diffusion currents in semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Idrish Miah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a spin drift-diffusion model, we show how the spin current is composed and find that spin drift and spin diffusion contribute additively to the spin current, where the spin diffusion current decreases with electric field while the spin drift current increases, demonstrating that the extension of the spin diffusion length by a strong field does not result in a significant increase in spin current in semiconductors owing to the competing effect of the electric field on diffusion. We also find that there is a spin drift-diffusion crossover field for a process in which the drift and diffusion contribute equally to the spin current, which suggests a possible method of identifying whether the process for a given electric field is in the spin drift or spin diffusion regime. Spin drift-diffusion crossover fields for GaAs are calculated and are found to be quite small. We derive the relations between intrinsic spin diffusion length and the spin drift-diffusion crossover field of a semiconductor for different electron statistical regimes. The findings resulting from this investigation might be important for semiconductor spintronics.

  2. Prescription dose and fractionation predict improved survival after stereotactic radiotherapy for brainstem metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeman Jonathan E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brainstem metastases represent an uncommon clinical presentation that is associated with a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited given the unacceptable risks associated with surgical resection in this location. However, without local control, symptoms including progressive cranial nerve dysfunction are frequently observed. The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery (SRT/SRS of brainstem metastases. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 38 tumors in 36 patients treated with SRT/SRS between February 2003 and December 2011. Treatment was delivered with the Cyberknife™ or Trilogy™ radiosurgical systems. The median age of patients was 62 (range: 28–89. Primary pathologies included 14 lung, 7 breast, 4 colon and 11 others. Sixteen patients (44% had received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT prior to SRT/SRS; ten had received prior SRT/SRS at a different site (28%. The median tumor volume was 0.94 cm3 (range: 0.01-4.2 with a median prescription dose of 17 Gy (range: 12–24 delivered in 1–5 fractions. Results Median follow-up for the cohort was 3.2 months (range: 0.4-20.6. Nineteen patients (52% had an MRI follow-up available for review. Of these, one patient experienced local failure corresponding to an actuarial 6-month local control of 93%. Fifteen of the patients with available follow-up imaging (79% experienced intracranial failure outside of the treatment volume. The median time to distant intracranial failure was 2.1 months. Six of the 15 patients with distant intracranial failure (40% had received previous WBRT. The actuarial overall survival rates at 6- and 12-months were 27% and 8%, respectively. Predictors of survival included Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA score, greater number of treatment fractions, and higher prescription dose. Three patients experienced acute treatment-related toxicity consisting of

  3. Scalar Curvature and Intrinsic Flat Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Sormani, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present open problems and survey examples and theorems concerning sequences of Riemannian manifolds with uniform lower bounds on scalar curvature and their limit spaces. Examples of Gromov and of Ilmanen which naturally ought to have certain limit spaces do not converge with respect to smooth or Gromov-Hausdorff convergence. Thus we focus here on the notion of Intrinsic Flat convergence, developed jointly with Wenger. This notion has been applied successfully to study sequences that arise in General Relativity. Gromov has suggested it should be applied in other settings as well. We first review intrinsic flat convergence, its properties, and its compactness theorems, before presenting the applications and the open problems.

  4. Intrinsic Universality of Causal Graph Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Martiel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Causal graph dynamics are transformations over graphs that capture two important symmetries of physics, namely causality and homogeneity. They can be equivalently defined as continuous and translation invariant transformations or functions induced by a local rule applied simultaneously on every vertex of the graph. Intrinsic universality is the ability of an instance of a model to simulate every other instance of the model while preserving the structure of the computation at every step of the simulation. In this work we present the construction of a family of intrinsically universal instances of causal graphs dynamics, each instance being able to simulate a subset of instances.

  5. Intrinsic viscosity of a suspension of cubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-06

    We report on the viscosity of a dilute suspension of cube-shaped particles. Irrespective of the particle size, size distribution, and surface chemistry, we find empirically that cubes manifest an intrinsic viscosity [η]=3.1±0.2, which is substantially higher than the well-known value for spheres, [η]=2.5. The orientation-dependent intrinsic viscosity of cubic particles is determined theoretically using a finite-element solution of the Stokes equations. For isotropically oriented cubes, these calculations show [η]=3.1, in excellent agreement with our experimental observations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  6. A model of intrinsic symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Li [Research Center for Quantum Manipulation, Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Li, Sheng [Department of Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Zhejiang 310004 (China); George, Thomas F., E-mail: tfgeorge@umsl.edu [Office of the Chancellor and Center for Nanoscience, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States); Sun, Xin, E-mail: xin_sun@fudan.edu.cn [Research Center for Quantum Manipulation, Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Different from the symmetry breaking associated with a phase transition, which occurs when the controlling parameter is manipulated across a critical point, the symmetry breaking presented in this Letter does not need parameter manipulation. Instead, the system itself suddenly undergoes symmetry breaking at a certain time during its evolution, which is intrinsic symmetry breaking. Through a polymer model, it is revealed that the origin of the intrinsic symmetry breaking is nonlinearity, which produces instability at the instance when the evolution crosses an inflexion point, where this instability breaks the original symmetry.

  7. Characteristics of multiple sclerosis patient stance control disorders, measured by means of posturography and related to brainstem lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Alpini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Balance disorders are commonly observed during the course of multiple sclerosis (MS. The aim of this study is to report characteristics of MS patient stance control disorders, measured by means of posturography and related to the brainstem lesions. Thirty-eight patients affected by MS, mildly to moderately disable according to Kurtzke’s Expanded Disability Status Scale, underwent a complete clinical neurological and vestibular evaluation and brain MRI scanning. All patients were then tested on a static posturography platform (Tetrax, Israel in four conditions: eyes open and eyes closed standing on a firm surface and on a foam pad. Clinical and/or magnetic resonance imaging evidence of brainstem involvement was observed in 55.3% of patients. When brainstem lesion was detected, Fourier analysis showed a typical pattern characterized by inversion of the 0- 0.1 Hz and 0.1-0.25 Hz frequency bands. In conclusion, MS leads to pervasive postural disturbances in the majority of subjects, including the visuo-vestibular loops and proprioception involving vestibulospinal pathways in at least 55.3% of patients. Our results may also suggest the presence of Fourier inversion in patients with brainstem lesions.

  8. Implementation of a nation-wide automated auditory brainstem response hearing screening programme in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straaten, H.L.M. van; Hille, E.T.M.; Kok, J.H.; Verkerk, P.H.; Baerts, W.; Bunkers, C.M.; Smink, E.W.A.; Elburg, R.M. van; Kleine, M.J.K. de; Ilsen, A.; Maingay-Visser, A.P.G.F.; Vries, L.S. de; Weisglas-Kuperus, N.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: As part of a future national neonatal hearing screening programme in the Netherlands, automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) hearing screening was implemented in seven neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The objective was to evaluate key outcomes of this programme: participation rate,

  9. Interactions between Brainstem Noradrenergic Neurons and the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Modulating Memory for Emotionally Arousing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Williams, Cedric L.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens shell (NAC) receives axons containing dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase that originate from brainstem neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Recent findings show that memory enhancement produced by stimulating NTS neurons after learning may involve interactions with the NAC. However, it is unclear whether these…

  10. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobe, Lisete Pessoa de Oliveira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: lispessoa@yahoo.com

    1999-12-01

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  11. Endorphins and the hypotensive response to stimulation of alpha-receptors in the brainstem by alpha-methylnoradrenaline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Wybren de; Petty, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Opioid peptide involvement in the fall in blood pressure resulting from stimulation of alpha-receptors in the brainstem has been investigated in the urethane-anaesthetised rat. Unilateral microinjection of alpha-methylnoradrenaline into the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) induced a doserelated fall

  12. Axonal sprouting of a brainstem-spinal pathway after estrogen administration in the adult female rhesus monkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderhorst, VGJM; Terasawa, E; Ralston, HJ

    2002-01-01

    The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) is located in the caudal medulla oblongata and contains premotor neurons that project to motoneuronal cell groups in the brainstem and spinal cord. NRA projections to the lumbosacral cord are species specific and might be involved in mating behavior. In the female cat

  13. Musicians and Tone-Language Speakers Share Enhanced Brainstem Encoding but Not Perceptual Benefits for Musical Pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M.; Gandour, Jackson T.; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral and neurophysiological transfer effects from music experience to language processing are well-established but it is currently unclear whether or not linguistic expertise (e.g., speaking a tone language) benefits music-related processing and its perception. Here, we compare brainstem responses of English-speaking musicians/non-musicians…

  14. The relationship between auditory brainstem response, nerve conduction studies, and metabolic risk factors in type II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha M Abo-Elfetoh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem dysfunction and ABR changes are common in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. These changes are significantly correlated to NCS parameters on one hand and serum HbA1c% and lipid profile (total cholesterol and triglycerides on the other hand.

  15. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  16. Effect of High-Pass Filtering on the Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Response to Air- and Bone-Conducted Clicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Andrew; Yang, Edward Y.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous 3- channel recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were obtained from 20 neonates with various high-pass filter settings and low intensity levels. Results support the advocacy of less restrictive high-pass filtering for neonatal and infant ABR screening to air-conducted and bone-conducted clicks. (Author/JDD)

  17. Interactions between Brainstem Noradrenergic Neurons and the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Modulating Memory for Emotionally Arousing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Williams, Cedric L.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens shell (NAC) receives axons containing dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase that originate from brainstem neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Recent findings show that memory enhancement produced by stimulating NTS neurons after learning may involve interactions with the NAC. However, it is unclear whether these…

  18. Survey of the Knowledge of Brainstem Death and Attitude Toward Organ Donation Among Relations of Neurosurgical Patients in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, T B; Oshola, H A; Adebayo, B O

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a developing field in Nigeria, and availability of organs for donation would be a determining factor of the success of the transplant programs. Patients with brainstem death (BSD) are a major source of organs for transplantation. The level of knowledge of BSD as well as attitudes toward organ donation are very important determinants of people's willingness or otherwise to donate organs. We conducted a survey of relations of our in-service neurosurgical patients to assess their knowledge of brainstem death and attitude toward organ donation. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind among the growing Nigerian neurosurgery patient and patient-relations population. Convenience sampling of randomly selected relations of neurosurgical patients on admission using interviewer-administered questionnaires was performed. Demographic information and information about brainstem death, attitude toward brainstem death, knowledge of organ donation, and attitude toward organ donation were obtained. The study comprised 127 respondents with a mean age of 36 years (range, 19-72). The majority of the respondents (87, 62.4%) were Christians, 122 (96.1%) were Yorubas, and 66 (52.0%) were women. Eighty-five (66.9%) of the respondents had at least a secondary level of education, and 77 (60.6%) were of low socioeconomic status. Twenty-eight (22.2%) of the respondents had heard of brainstem death. Twenty-six (92.9%) of those who had heard of brainstem death believed that the brain could die long before life finally ceases. One hundred twenty-five (98.4%) of the respondents believed that death only occurs when both breathing and heartbeat stop, and 107 (83.6%) would agree with the physician on a diagnosis of brainstem death in the relation. Sixty-five (51.2%) would want such patients put on a ventilator, and, of these, 43 (66.2%) would want such patients on the ventilator in hope that he or she may recover. One hundred twelve (88.2%) of the relations were

  19. Brainstem Monitoring in the Neurocritical Care Unit: A Rationale for Real-Time, Automated Neurophysiological Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James L; Bailes, Julian E; Hassan, Ahmed N; Sindelar, Brian; Patel, Vimal; Fino, John

    2017-02-01

    Patients with severe traumatic brain injury or large intracranial space-occupying lesions (spontaneous cerebral hemorrhage, infarction, or tumor) commonly present to the neurocritical care unit with an altered mental status. Many experience progressive stupor and coma from mass effects and transtentorial brain herniation compromising the ascending arousal (reticular activating) system. Yet, little progress has been made in the practicality of bedside, noninvasive, real-time, automated, neurophysiological brainstem, or cerebral hemispheric monitoring. In this critical review, we discuss the ascending arousal system, brain herniation, and shortcomings of our current management including the neurological exam, intracranial pressure monitoring, and neuroimaging. We present a rationale for the development of nurse-friendly-continuous, automated, and alarmed-evoked potential monitoring, based upon the clinical and experimental literature, advances in the prognostication of cerebral anoxia, and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

  20. Guillain-Barré Syndrome with Absent Brainstem Reflexes: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Gordon Chaves

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old man was admitted to an intensive care unit following respiratory arrest. One day prior to admission, he had complaints of nausea and pain involving lower limbs. On the night of admission he developed diplopia, dysphagia, and rapidly progressive quadriparesis. He developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical lung ventilation 24 hours later. On the fifth day of hospital stay the patient became comatose with absent brainstem reflexes and appeared to be brain dead. The cerebrospinal fluid showed albuminocytological dissociation. The electroencephalogram revealed an alpha rhythmical activity. The electrophysiological evaluation revealed an inexcitability of all nerves. Guillain-Barré syndrome was suspected. With supportive treatment the patient had a remarkable recovery and now is able to independently conduct his daily activities.

  1. Outcomes following Pediatric Auditory Brainstem Implant Surgery: Early Experiences in a North American Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V; Barber, Samuel R; Kozin, Elliott D; Shah, Parth; Remenschneider, Aaron; Herrmann, Barbara S; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Barker, Fred G; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    There are no approved Food and Drug Administration indications for pediatric auditory brainstem implant (ABI) surgery in the United States. Our prospective case series aims to determine the safety and feasibility of ABI surgery in pediatric patients age, 2.52 ± 0.39 years). Four patients underwent ABI surgery (age, 19.2 ± 3.43 months), including 4 primary procedures and 1 revision for device failure. Spontaneous device failure occurred in another subject postoperatively. No major/minor complications occurred, including cerebrospinal fluid leak, facial nerve injury, hematoma, and nonauditory stimulation. All subjects detected sound with environmental awareness, and several demonstrated babbling and mimicry. Poor durability of older implants underscores need for updated technology. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  2. Severe Metabolic Acidosis and Hepatopathy due to Leukoencephalopathy with Thalamus and Brainstem Involvement and High Lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellars, Elizabeth A; Balmakund, Tonya; Bosanko, Katherine; Nichols, Brandi L; Kahler, Stephen G; Zarate, Yuri A

    2017-04-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with thalamus and brainstem involvement and high lactate (LTBL) is a recently described autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease characterized by early onset of neurological symptoms, a biphasic clinical course, and distinctive neuroimaging. Pathogenic variants in the EARS2 gene that encode for mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase are responsible for LTBL. Here, we describe the clinical course of an infant diagnosed with an acute crisis of LTBL and severe liver disease. This article illustrates the utility of blood lactate quantification in addition to basic metabolic testing and brain imaging in a child with low tone and poor growth. In addition, this case demonstrates the utility of current genetic diagnostic testing, in lieu of more invasive procedures, in obtaining rapid answers in this very complicated group of disorders. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Three-dimensional atlas of iron, copper, and zinc in the mouse cerebrum and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Dominic J; Lee, Jason K; Beavis, Alison D; van Gramberg, Amanda; George, Jessica; Adlard, Paul A; Finkelstein, David I; Doble, Philip A

    2012-05-01

    Atlases depicting molecular and functional features of the brain are becoming an integral part of modern neuroscience. In this study we used laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) to quantitatively measure iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) levels in a serially sectioned C57BL/6 mouse brain (cerebrum and brainstem). Forty-six sections were analyzed in a single experiment of approximately 158 h in duration. We constructed a 46-plate reference atlas by aligning quantified images of metal distribution with corresponding coronal sections from the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Atlas. The 46 plates were also used to construct three-dimensional models of Fe, Cu, and Zn distribution. This atlas represents the first reconstruction of quantitative trace metal distribution through the brain by LA-ICPMS and will facilitate the study of trace metals in the brain and help to elucidate their role in neurobiology.

  4. Effect of click-polarity on abnormality of intraoperatively monitored brainstem acoustic evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrusch, T; Schramm, J; Hochstetter, A

    1988-01-01

    The configuration of brainstem acoustic evoked potentials (BAEP) is influenced by the type of click stimuli used and may thus affect detectability of abnormalities. In a group of 19 patients with lesions in the posterior fossa BAEP were recorded pre- and intraoperatively. Repeat recordings were performed in each patient in two alternating series with rarefaction and condensation click stimuli. The findings demonstrated that intraoperative potential changes in latency and amplitude were different between the two stimulation modes, but did not vary significantly in their incidence. It was also not possible to predict from the preoperative BAEP which click polarity would demonstrate intraoperative changes more markedly, taking latency and amplitude as parameters. Two conclusions are drawn from this study: None of the two stimulation modes is superior in detecting intraoperative changes and therefore no recommendation can be made which click polarity to use. When working with only one click polarity it is recommended to use occasional control recordings with the other click polarity.

  5. A case of overlapping Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis and Guillain-Barré syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-sheng; TANG Ying; WANG Ye

    2006-01-01

    Objective: There is no report on Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE) patients in China. We here report the first case of BBE in China. Methods: Clinical features, results of electromyography, electroencephalography (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination were studied to clarify the characteristics of this syndrome.Results: A 44-year-old man presented himself at our inpatient department with somnolence and dizziness as his initial symptoms.He developed multiple cranial nerves paralysis especially internal and external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and tetraparesis within 1 week. His condition rapidly deteriorated, and he experienced coma. Electromyography showed indications of peripheral nerve dysfunction, electroencephalography revealed loss of basic rhythm, MRI demonstrated high-intensity abnormalities on T2-weighted images of medulla oblongata, and CSF albuminocytological dissociation was defined abnormally as high protein. Ten similar clinically; BBE and FS were proposed to be the variant of GBS.

  6. State-dependent variations in brainstem auditory evoked responses in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sersen, E A; Majkowski, J; Clausen, J; Heaney, G M

    1984-12-01

    BAERs from 16 subjects during 3 sessions varied in the latency or amplitude of some components depending upon level of arousal as indicated by EEG patterns. There was a general tendency for activation to produce the fastest responses with the largest amplitudes and for drowsiness to produce the slowest responses with the smallest amplitudes. The latency of P2 was significantly prolonged during drowsiness, relative to those during relaxation or activation. For right-ear stimulation, P5 latency was longest during drowsiness, and shortest during activation while for left-ear stimulation the shortest latency occurred during relaxation. The amplitudes of Wave II and Wave VII were significantly smaller during drowsiness than during activation. Although the differences were below the level of clinical significance, the data indicate a modification in the characteristics of brainstem transmission as a function of concurrent activity in other brain areas.

  7. Aberrant lateralization of brainstem auditory evoked responses by individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miezejeski, C M; Heaney, G; Belser, R; Sersen, E A

    1994-01-01

    Brainstem auditory evoked response latencies were studied in 80 males (13 with Down syndrome, 23 with developmental disability due to other causes, and 44 with no disability). Latencies for waves P3 and P5 were shorter for the Down syndrome than for the other groups, though at P5, as compared to latencies for the nondisabled group, the difference was not significant. The pattern of left versus right ear responses in the Down syndrome group differed from those of the other groups. This finding was related to research noting decreased lateralization of and decreased ability at receptive and expressive language among people with Down syndrome. Some individuals required sedation. A lateralized effect of sedation was noted.

  8. Longer brainstem auditory evoked response latencies of individuals with fragile X syndrome related to sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miezejeski, C M; Heaney, G; Belser, R; Brown, W T; Jenkins, E C; Sersen, E A

    1997-04-18

    Brainstem auditory evoked response latencies were studies in 75 males (13 with fragile X syndrome, 18 with mental retardation due to other causes, and 44 with no disability). Latency values were obtained for each ear for the positive deflections of waves I (P1), III (P3), and V (P5). Some individuals with mental retardation required sedation. Contrary to previous report, latencies obtained for individuals with fragile X did not differ from those obtained for persons without mental retardation. Persons receiving sedation, whether or not their retardation was due to fragile X, had longer latencies for wave P5 than persons who did not receive sedation. This effect of sedation may also explain the previously reported increased latencies for persons with fragile X.

  9. Probing Intrinsic Resting-State Networks in the Infant Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajic, Dusica; Craig, Michael M.; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) measures spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the absence of external stimuli. It has become a powerful tool for mapping large-scale brain networks in humans and animal models. Several rs-fMRI studies have been conducted in anesthetized and awake adult rats, reporting consistent patterns of brain activity at the systems level. However, the evolution to adult patterns of resting-state activity has not yet been evaluated and quantified in the developing rat brain. In this study, we hypothesized that large-scale intrinsic networks would be easily detectable but not fully established as specific patterns of activity in lightly anesthetized 2-week-old rats (N = 11). Independent component analysis (ICA) identified 8 networks in 2-week-old-rats. These included Default mode, Sensory (Exteroceptive), Salience (Interoceptive), Basal Ganglia-Thalamic-Hippocampal, Basal Ganglia, Autonomic, Cerebellar, as well as Thalamic-Brainstem networks. Many of these networks consisted of more than one component, possibly indicative of immature, underdeveloped networks at this early time point. Except for the Autonomic network, infant rat networks showed reduced connectivity with subcortical structures in comparison to previously published adult networks. Reported slow fluctuations in the BOLD signal that correspond to functionally relevant resting-state networks in 2-week-old rats can serve as an important tool for future studies of brain development in the settings of different pharmacological applications or disease. PMID:27803653

  10. Identification of Intrinsic Axon Growth Modulators for Intact CNS Neurons after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Kathren L; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Kim, In-Jung; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Cafferty, William B J

    2017-03-14

    Functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI) because axons in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) fail to regenerate. However, modest levels of spontaneous functional recovery are typically observed after trauma and are thought to be mediated by the plasticity of intact circuitry. The mechanisms underlying intact circuit plasticity are not delineated. Here, we characterize the in vivo transcriptome of sprouting intact neurons from Ngr1 null mice after partial SCI. We identify the lysophosphatidic acid signaling modulators LPPR1 and LPAR1 as intrinsic axon growth modulators for intact corticospinal motor neurons after adjacent injury. Furthermore, in vivo LPAR1 inhibition or LPPR1 overexpression enhances sprouting of intact corticospinal tract axons and yields greater functional recovery after unilateral brainstem lesion in wild-type mice. Thus, the transcriptional profile of injury-induced sprouting of intact neurons reveals targets for therapeutic enhancement of axon growth initiation and new synapse formation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Visualization of oxytocin release that mediates paired pulse facilitation in hypothalamic pathways to brainstem autonomic neurons.

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    Ramón A Piñol

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that oxytocin is involved in more than lactation and uterine contraction. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN contains neuroendocrine neurons that control the release of hormones, including vasopressin and oxytocin. Other populations of PVN neurons do not release hormones, but rather project to and release neurotransmitters onto other neurons in the CNS involved in fluid retention, thermoregulation, sexual behavior and responses to stress. Activation of oxytocin receptors can be cardioprotective and reduces the adverse cardiovascular consequences of anxiety and stress, yet how oxytocin can affect heart rate and cardiac function is unknown. While anatomical work has shown the presence of peptides, including oxytocin, in the projections from the PVN to parasympathetic nuclei, electrophysiological studies to date have only demonstrated release of glutamate and activation of fast ligand gated receptors in these pathways. In this study, using rats, we directly show, using sniffer CHO cells that express oxytocin receptors and the Ca2+ indicator R-GECO, that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 expressing PVN fibers in the brainstem activates oxytocin receptors in the dorsomotor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV. We also demonstrate that while a single photoactivation of PVN terminals only activates glutamatergic receptors in brainstem cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs, neurons that dominate the neural control of heart rate, both the paired pulse facilitation, and sustained enhancement of glutamate release in this pathway is mediated by activation of oxytocin receptors. Our results provide direct evidence that a pathway from the PVN likely releases oxytocin and enhances short-term plasticity of this critical autonomic connection.

  12. Visualization of Oxytocin Release that Mediates Paired Pulse Facilitation in Hypothalamic Pathways to Brainstem Autonomic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol, Ramón A.; Jameson, Heather; Popratiloff, Anastas; Lee, Norman H.; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has shown that oxytocin is involved in more than lactation and uterine contraction. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains neuroendocrine neurons that control the release of hormones, including vasopressin and oxytocin. Other populations of PVN neurons do not release hormones, but rather project to and release neurotransmitters onto other neurons in the CNS involved in fluid retention, thermoregulation, sexual behavior and responses to stress. Activation of oxytocin receptors can be cardioprotective and reduces the adverse cardiovascular consequences of anxiety and stress, yet how oxytocin can affect heart rate and cardiac function is unknown. While anatomical work has shown the presence of peptides, including oxytocin, in the projections from the PVN to parasympathetic nuclei, electrophysiological studies to date have only demonstrated release of glutamate and activation of fast ligand gated receptors in these pathways. In this study, using rats, we directly show, using sniffer CHO cells that express oxytocin receptors and the Ca2+ indicator R-GECO, that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressing PVN fibers in the brainstem activates oxytocin receptors in the dorsomotor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV). We also demonstrate that while a single photoactivation of PVN terminals only activates glutamatergic receptors in brainstem cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs), neurons that dominate the neural control of heart rate, both the paired pulse facilitation, and sustained enhancement of glutamate release in this pathway is mediated by activation of oxytocin receptors. Our results provide direct evidence that a pathway from the PVN likely releases oxytocin and enhances short-term plasticity of this critical autonomic connection. PMID:25379676

  13. The role of the auditory brainstem in processing musically-relevant pitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin M. Bidelman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging work has shed light on the cerebral architecture involved in processing the melodic and harmonic aspects of music. Here, recent evidence is reviewed illustrating that subcortical auditory structures contribute to the early formation and processing of musically-relevant pitch. Electrophysiological recordings from the human brainstem and population responses from the auditory nerve reveal that nascent features of tonal music (e.g., consonance/dissonance, pitch salience, harmonic sonority are evident at early, subcortical levels of the auditory pathway. The salience and harmonicity of brainstem activity is strongly correlated with listeners’ perceptual preferences and perceived consonance for the tonal relationships of music. Moreover, the hierarchical ordering of pitch intervals/chords described by the Western music practice and their perceptual consonance is well-predicted by the salience with which pitch combinations are encoded in subcortical auditory structures. While the neural correlates of consonance can be tuned and exaggerated with musical training, they persist even in the absence of musicianship or long-term enculturation. As such, it is posited that the structural foundations of musical pitch might result from innate processing performed by the central auditory system. A neurobiological predisposition for consonant, pleasant sounding pitch relationships may be one reason why these pitch combinations have been favored by composers and listeners for centuries. It is suggested that important perceptual dimensions of music emerge well before the auditory signal reaches cerebral cortex and prior to attentional engagement. While cortical mechanisms are no doubt critical to the perception, production, and enjoyment of music, the contribution of subcortical structures implicates a more integrated, hierarchically organized network underlying music processing within the brain.

  14. THE EFFECTS OF SALICYLATE ON AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIAL AMPLITWDE FROM THE AUDITORY CORTEX AND AUDITORY BRAINSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian Sawka; SUN Wei

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus has often been studied using salicylate in animal models as they are capable of inducing tempo-rary hearing loss and tinnitus. Studies have recently observed enhancement of auditory evoked responses of the auditory cortex (AC) post salicylate treatment which is also shown to be related to tinnitus like behavior in rats. The aim of this study was to observe if enhancements of the AC post salicylate treatment are also present at structures in the brainstem. Four male Sprague Dawley rats with AC implanted electrodes were tested for both AC and auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings pre and post 250 mg/kg intraperitone-al injections of salicylate. The responses were recorded as the peak to trough amplitudes of P1-N1 (AC), ABR wave V, and ABR waveⅡ. AC responses resulted in statistically significant enhancement of ampli-tude at 2 hours post salicylate with 90 dB stimuli tone bursts of 4, 8, 12, and 20 kHz. Wave V of ABR re-sponses at 90 dB resulted in a statistically significant reduction of amplitude 2 hours post salicylate and a mean decrease of amplitude of 31%for 16 kHz. WaveⅡamplitudes at 2 hours post treatment were signifi-cantly reduced for 4, 12, and 20 kHz stimuli at 90 dB SPL. Our results suggest that the enhancement chang-es of the AC related to salicylate induced tinnitus are generated superior to the level of the inferior colliculus and may originate in the AC.

  15. Unilateral and bilateral brainstem auditory-evoked response abnormalities in 900 Dalmatian dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, T A; Nelson, H J; Williams, D C; Willits, N

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 900 Dalmatian dogs, brainstem auditory-evoked responses (BAER) and clinical observations were used to determine the incidence and sex distribution of bilateral and unilateral BAER abnormalities and their association with heterochromia iridis (HI). To assess the efficacy of BAER testing in guiding breeding programs, data from 749 dogs (subgroup A), considered to be a sample of the population at large, were compared with data from a subgroup (subgroup B; n = 151) in which selection of breeding stock had been based on BAER testing from the beginning of the 4-year survey. Brainstem auditory-evoked responses were elicited by applying click stimuli unilaterally, while applying a white noise masking sound to the contralateral ear. Under these conditions, BAER were either normal, unilaterally absent, or bilaterally absent. Dogs with bilaterally absent BAER were clinically deaf; dogs with unilaterally absent BAER were not clinically deaf but appeared dependent on their BAER-normal ears for their auditory-cued behavior. Dogs with unilaterally absent BAER often were misidentified as normal by uninformed observers. Among the 900 dogs, 648 (72.0%) were normal, 189 (21.0%) had unilateral absence of BAER, and 63 (7.0%) had bilateral absence of BAER or were clinically deaf and assumed to have bilaterally absent BAER (n = 4). Total incidence in the population sampled was assumed to be higher, because some bilaterally affected dogs that would have been members of subgroup A undoubtedly did not come to our attention. Among females, 24.0% were unilaterally abnormal and 8.2% were bilaterally abnormal whereas, among males, 17.8% were unilaterally abnormal and 5.7% were bilaterally abnormal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Auditory Rehabilitation in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Auditory Brainstem Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Min Wang; Zhi-Jun Yang; Fu Zhao; Bo Wang; Xing-Chao Wang; Pei-Ran Qu; Pi-Nan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background:The auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) have been used to treat deafness for patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 and nontumor patients.The lack of an appropriate animal model has limited the study of improving hearing rehabilitation by the device.This study aimed to establish an animal model of ABI in adult rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta).Methods:Six adult rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) were included.Under general anesthesia,a multichannel ABI was implanted into the lateral recess of the fourth ventricle through the modified suboccipital-retrosigmoid (RS) approach.The electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) waves were tested to ensure the optimal implant site.After the operation,the EABR and computed tomography (CT) were used to test and verify the effectiveness via electrophysiology and anatomy,respectively.The subjects underwent behavioral observation for 6 months,and the postoperative EABR was tested every two weeks from the 1st month after implant surgery.Result:The implant surgery lasted an average of 5.2 h,and no monkey died or sacrificed.The averaged latencies of peaks Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅳ were 1.27,2.34 and 3.98 ms,respectively in the ABR.One-peak EABR wave was elicited in the operation,and one-or two-peak waves were elicited during the postoperative period.The EABR wave latencies appeared to be constant under different stimulus intensities;however,the amplitudes increased as the stimulus increased within a certain scope.Conclusions:It is feasible and safe to implant ABIs in rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) through a modified suboccipital RS approach,and EABR and CT are valid tools for animal model establishment.In addition,this model should be an appropriate animal model for the electrophysiological and behavioral study of rhesus macaque monkey with ABI.

  17. Gap prepulse inhibition and auditory brainstem evoked potentials as objective measures for tinnitus in guinea pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eDehmel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus or ringing of the ears is a subjective phantom sensation necessitating behavioral models that objectively demonstrate the existence and quality of the tinnitus sensation. The gap detection test uses the acoustic startle response elicited by loud noise pulses and its gating or suppression by preceding sub-startling prepulses. Gaps in noise bands serve as prepulses, assuming that ongoing tinnitus masks the gap and results in impaired gap detection. This test has shown its reliability in rats, mice, and gerbils. No data exists for the guinea pig so far, although gap detection is similar across mammals and the acoustic startle response is a well-established tool in guinea pig studies of psychiatric disorders and in pharmacological studies. Here we investigated the startle behavior and prepulse inhibition (PPI of the guinea pig and showed that guinea pigs have a reliable startle response that can be suppressed by 15 ms gaps embedded in narrow noise bands preceding the startle noise pulse. After recovery of auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds from a unilateral noise over-exposure centered at 7 kHz, guinea pigs showed diminished gap-induced reduction of the startle response in frequency bands between 8 and 18 kHz. This suggests the development of tinnitus in frequency regions that showed a temporary threshold shift (TTS after noise over-exposure. Changes in discharge rate and synchrony, two neuronal correlates of tinnitus, should be reflected in altered ABR waveforms, which would be useful to objectively detect tinnitus and its localization to auditory brainstem structures. Therefore we analyzed latencies and amplitudes of the first five ABR waves at suprathreshold sound intensities and correlated ABR abnormalities with the results of the behavioral tinnitus testing. Early ABR wave amplitudes up to N3 were increased for animals with tinnitus possibly stemming from hyperactivity and hypersynchrony underlying the tinnitus percept.

  18. The role of the auditory brainstem in processing musically relevant pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging work has shed light on the cerebral architecture involved in processing the melodic and harmonic aspects of music. Here, recent evidence is reviewed illustrating that subcortical auditory structures contribute to the early formation and processing of musically relevant pitch. Electrophysiological recordings from the human brainstem and population responses from the auditory nerve reveal that nascent features of tonal music (e.g., consonance/dissonance, pitch salience, harmonic sonority) are evident at early, subcortical levels of the auditory pathway. The salience and harmonicity of brainstem activity is strongly correlated with listeners' perceptual preferences and perceived consonance for the tonal relationships of music. Moreover, the hierarchical ordering of pitch intervals/chords described by the Western music practice and their perceptual consonance is well-predicted by the salience with which pitch combinations are encoded in subcortical auditory structures. While the neural correlates of consonance can be tuned and exaggerated with musical training, they persist even in the absence of musicianship or long-term enculturation. As such, it is posited that the structural foundations of musical pitch might result from innate processing performed by the central auditory system. A neurobiological predisposition for consonant, pleasant sounding pitch relationships may be one reason why these pitch combinations have been favored by composers and listeners for centuries. It is suggested that important perceptual dimensions of music emerge well before the auditory signal reaches cerebral cortex and prior to attentional engagement. While cortical mechanisms are no doubt critical to the perception, production, and enjoyment of music, the contribution of subcortical structures implicates a more integrated, hierarchically organized network underlying music processing within the brain.

  19. Photoperiodic regulation of satiety mediating neuropeptides in the brainstem of the seasonal Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, Michael; Archer, Zoë A; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Tups, Alexander; Mercer, Julian G; Klingenspor, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Central regulation of energy balance in seasonal mammals such as the Siberian hamster is dependent on the precise integration of short-term satiety information arising from the gastrointestinal tract with long-term signals on the status of available energy reserves (e.g. leptin) and prevailing photoperiod. Within the central nervous system, the brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) are major relay nuclei that transmit information from the gastrointestinal tract to higher forebrain centres. We extended studies on the seasonal programming of the hypothalamus to examine the effect of the photoperiod on neuropeptidergic circuitries of this gut-brain axis. In the NTS and PBN we performed gene expression and immunoreactivity (-ir) studies on selected satiety-related neuropeptides and receptors: alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, melanocortin-3 receptor, melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R), growth hormone secretagogue-receptor, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, preproglucagon (PPG), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY, galanin, neurotensin, and corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH). Gene expression of PPG and MC4-R, and -ir of CCK and GLP-1, in the NTS were up-regulated after 14 weeks in long-day photoperiod (16 h light:8 h dark) compared to short-days (8 h light:16 h dark), whereas CRH-ir and NT-ir were increased in short-days within the PBN. We suggest that brainstem neuroendocrine mechanisms contribute to the long-term regulation of body mass in the Siberian hamster by a photoperiod-related modulation of satiety signalling.

  20. Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnden, Leighton R.; Kwiatek, Richard; Crouch, Benjamin; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Autonomic changes are often associated with the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but their pathogenetic role is unclear and brain imaging investigations are lacking. The vasomotor centre and, through it, nuclei in the midbrain and hypothalamus play a key role in autonomic nervous system regulation of steady state blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). In this exploratory cross-sectional study, BP and HR, as indicators of autonomic function, were correlated with volumetric and T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (T1w and T2w) brain MRI in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Steady state BP (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) and HR in two postures were extracted from 24 h blood pressure monitoring. We performed (1) MRI versus autonomic score interaction-with-group regressions to detect locations where regression slopes differed in the CFS and NC groups (collectively indicating abnormality in CFS), and (2) MRI regressions in the CFS and NC groups alone to detect additional locations with abnormal correlations in CFS. Significant CFS regressions were repeated controlling for anxiety and depression (A&D). Abnormal regressions were detected in nuclei of the brainstem vasomotor centre, midbrain reticular formation and hypothalamus, but also in limbic nuclei involved in stress responses and in prefrontal white matter. Group comparisons of CFS and NC did not find MRI differences in these locations. We propose therefore that these regulatory nuclei are functioning correctly, but that two-way communication between them is impaired in CFS and this affects signalling to/from peripheral effectors/sensors, culminating in inverted or magnified correlations. This single explanation for the diverse abnormal correlations detected here consolidates the conclusion for a brainstem/midbrain nerve conduction deficit inferred earlier (Barnden et al., 2015). Strong correlations were also detected in isolated NC regressions. PMID:27114901

  1. Alterations in peripheral and central components of the auditory brainstem response: a neural assay of tinnitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Lowe

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus, or "ringing of the ears", affects upwards of 15% of the adult population. Identifying a cost-effective and objective measure of tinnitus is needed due to legal concerns and disability issues, as well as for facilitating the effort to assess neural biomarkers. We developed a modified gap-in-noise (GIN paradigm to assess tinnitus in mice using the auditory brainstem response (ABR. We then compared the commonly used acoustic startle reflex gap-prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI and the ABR GIN paradigm in young adult CBA/CaJ mice before and after administrating sodium salicylate (SS, which is known to reliably induce a 16 kHz tinnitus percept in rodents. Post-SS, gap-PPI was significantly reduced at 12 and 16 kHz, consistent with previous studies demonstrating a tinnitus-induced gap-PPI reduction in this frequency range. ABR audiograms indicated thresholds were significantly elevated post-SS, also consistent with previous studies. There was a significant increase in the peak 2 (P2 to peak 1 (P1 and peak 4 (P4 to P1 amplitude ratios in the mid-frequency range, along with decreased latency of P4 at higher intensities. For the ABR GIN, peak amplitudes of the response to the second noise burst were calculated as a percentage of the first noise burst response amplitudes to quantify neural gap processing. A significant decrease in this ratio (i.e. recovery was seen only at 16 kHz for P1, indicating the presence of tinnitus near this frequency. Thus, this study demonstrates that GIN ABRs can be used as an efficient, non-invasive, and objective method of identifying the approximate pitch and presence of tinnitus in a mouse model. This technique has the potential for application in human subjects and also indicates significant, albeit different, deficits in temporal processing in peripheral and brainstem circuits following drug induced tinnitus.

  2. Phase transitions in the common brainstem and related systems investigated by nonstationary time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertz, M; Vandenhouten, R; Grebe, R; Langhorst, P

    2000-01-14

    Neuronal activities of the reticular formation (RF) of the lower brainstem and the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS, first relay station of baroreceptor afferents) were recorded together in the anesthized dog with related parameters of EEG, respiration and cardiovascular system. The RF neurons are part of the common brainstem system (CBS) which participates in regulation and coordination of cardiovascular, respiratory, somatomotor systems, and vigilance. Multiple time series of these physiological subsystems yield useful information about internal dynamic coordination of the organism. Essential problems are nonlinearity and instationarity of the signals, due to the dynamic complexity of the systems. Several time-resolving methods are presented to describe nonlinear dynamic couplings in the time course, particularly during phase transitions. The methods are applied to the recorded signals representing the complex couplings of the physiological subsystems. Phase transitions in these systems are detected by recurrence plots of the instationary signals. The pointwise transinformation and the pointwise conditional coupling divergence are measures of the mutual interaction of the subsystems in the state space. If the signals show marked rhythms, instantaneous frequencies and their shiftings are demonstrated by time frequency distributions, and instantaneous phase differences show couplings of oscillating subsystems. Transient signal components are reconstructed by wavelet packet time selective transient reconstruction. These methods are useful means for analyzing coupling characteristics of the complex physiological system, and detailed analyses of internal dynamic coordination of subsystems become possible. During phase transitions of the functional organization (a) the rhythms of the central neuronal activities and the peripheral systems are altered, (b) changes in the coupling between CBS neurons and cardiovascular signals, respiration and the EEG, and (c) between NTS

  3. Evaluation of otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses for hearing screening of high risk infants

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    Tania Nazir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the present study is the assessment of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs for hearing screening of high risk infants. Study Design: Prospective, hospital-based. Materials and Methods: Distortion product OAEs (DPOAEs and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA recordings were obtained for 30 controls and 100 infants with one or more high risk factors, in a sound treated room and the results were interpreted. ABR peak latencies, amplitudes, and waveform morphology in high risk infants were compared with those in control group. DPOAE as screening test was evaluated in terms of various parameters with BERA/ABR taken as gold standard. Results: Absolute latencies of Wave I and Wave V and interpeak latency of I-V were significantly prolonged in high risk group as compared to control group. The most common causes to contribute significantly for hearing impairment were found to be hyperbilirubinemia, birth asphyxia, meningitis/septicemia. DPOAE when compared with ABR taken as gold standard showed that sensitivity of the test was 87.7% (74.5%-94.9% and specificity was 74.5% (60.0%-85.2%. Positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.2%-86.6% and negative predictive value of the test was 86% (71.9%-94.3%. Positive likelihood ratio was 0.29 (0.18-0.46 and negative likelihood ratio was 6.08 (2.82-13.09. Conclusion : ABR/BERA, though highly reliable, is a tedious and time consuming test. DPOAE is a simple and rapid test with relatively higher acceptability but low sensitivity and specificity; therefore, limits its role as independent screening test. DPOAE-ABR test series is an effective way to screen all the high risk infants at the earliest.

  4. Impact of head immobilization position on dose distribution in patients of brainstem glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of patient position (supine and prone on conventional bilateral field, three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment plans in patients of brainstem glioma with a view to exploring the possibility of avoiding beam entry through immobilization accessories. Methods: Five patients of brainstem glioma were immobilized and scanned in supine and prone positions with a combination of head rest and thermoplastic cast. Each patient was planned with three techniques: (i 2-fields bilateral (ii 3-fields 3DCRT, and (iii 5-fields IMRT. Plan quality was analyzed in terms of planning target volume (PTV coverage and dose to various critical organs at risk (OAR for both the supine and prone treatment positions. Results: In case of bilateral fields (parallel opposed planning, the PTV coverage and dose to the OAR were almost similar for both the supine and prone positions. In 3DCRT plan, although the PTV coverage and dose to critical structures were comparable for both the supine and prone position, dose to cochlea was lower for the prone position plan. A modest decrease in maximum dose to optic nerves and mean dose to temporal lobes were also observed for the prone position plan. In IMRT plans, the PTV coverage and homogeneity were comparable in both the supine and prone positions. Reduction in average maximum and mean doses to all OARs with functional subunit (FSU in series and parallel respectively was observed in the IMRT plan for prone position when compared to the supine position.Conclusion: Supine and prone positions resulted in almost similar dose distribution in all the three techniques applied. At some instances, the prone position showed better normal tissues sparing when compared to supine. Moreover, prone position is more likely to avoid attenuation due to immobilization devices and uncertainty in dose calculation under large

  5. Magnetic field changes activate the trigeminal brainstem complex in a migratory bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyers, Dominik; Zapka, Manuela; Hoffmeister, Mara; Wild, John Martin; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2010-05-18

    The upper beak of birds, which contains putative magnetosensory ferro-magnetic structures, is innervated by the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (V1). However, because of the absence of replicable neurobiological evidence, a general acceptance of the involvement of the trigeminal nerve in magnetoreception is lacking in birds. Using an antibody to ZENK protein to indicate neuronal activation, we here document reliable magnetic activation of neurons in and near the principal (PrV) and spinal tract (SpV) nuclei of the trigeminal brainstem complex, which represent the two brain regions known to receive primary input from the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more neurons were activated in PrV and in medial SpV when European robins (Erithacus rubecula) experienced a magnetic field changing every 30 seconds for a period of 3 h (CMF) than when robins experienced a compensated, zero magnetic field condition (ZMF). No such differences in numbers of activated neurons were found in comparison structures. Under CMF conditions, sectioning of V1 significantly reduced the number of activated neurons in and near PrV and medial SpV, but not in lateral SpV or in the optic tectum. Tract tracing of V1 showed spatial proximity and regional overlap of V1 nerve endings and ZENK-positive (activated) neurons in SpV, and partly in PrV, under CMF conditions. Together, these results suggest that magnetic field changes activate neurons in and near the trigeminal brainstem complex and that V1 is necessary for this activation. We therefore suggest that V1 transmits magnetic information to the brain in this migratory passerine bird.

  6. Quality of Life After Surgery for Cerebral Cavernoma: Brainstem Versus Nonbrainstem Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Jan Frederick; Kürten, Katharina; Fischer, Igor; Hänggi, Daniel; Steiger, Hans Jakob

    2016-11-01

    We sought to analyze long-term outcome and quality of life after surgery of cerebral cavernomas (CCs) with special regard to localization (brainstem vs. nonbrainstem). We conducted a retrospective study in a tertiary care center (2000-2010). Clinical charts were analyzed. Health-related quality of life (QoL) was evaluated with the Short Form-36 questionnaire. The study included 60 patients (21 male, 39 female, mean age 39.8 years). The distribution was 67% supratentorial, 7% cerebellar, and 26% brainstem (BS). In the BS group, 87.5% had a preoperative deficit versus 18.2% in the nonbrainstem group (NBS). Operative neurologic morbidity was 31.3% for BS versus 11.4% for NBS. After mean follow-up of 43 months, neurologic status was better or the same as compared with the preoperative status in 75% of BS and all of NBS. SF-36 showed no significant differences between all cavernoma patients compared with a normative healthy population except for a better "pain" score. Subgroup analysis found the same results when comparing NBS with the normative population. Comparison of BS versus norm and NBS, respectively, showed worse scores for BS in physical but not mental health (P ≤ 0.01). Clinical outcome was different depending on location: NBS recovered the same neurologic status as preoperatively and showed better QoL in physical health and lower working inability than BS. Surprisingly, there was no difference in mental health. Moreover, QoL of the operated cavernoma population after long-term follow-up did not differ from the norm. We conclude that surgery of cavernomas even in eloquent areas may result in favorable outcome and high patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Eating in mice with gastric bypass surgery causes exaggerated activation of brainstem anorexia circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumphrey, Michael B.; Hao, Zheng; Townsend, R. Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M.; Münzberg, Heike; Morrison, Christopher C.; Ye, Jianping; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective Obesity and metabolic diseases are at an alarming level globally and increasingly affect children and adolescents. Gastric bypass and other bariatric surgeries have proven remarkably successful and are increasingly performed worldwide. Reduced desire to eat and changes in eating behavior and food choice account for most of the initial weight loss and diabetes remission after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms of altered gut-brain communication are unknown. Subjects/Methods To explore the potential involvement of a powerful brainstem anorexia pathway centered around the lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) we measured meal-induced neuronal activation by means of c-Fos immunohistochemistry in a new high-fat diet-induced obese mouse model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) at 10 and 40 days after RYGB or sham surgery. Results Voluntary ingestion of a meal 10 days after RYGB, but not after sham surgery, strongly and selectively activates calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons in the external lPBN as well as neurons in the nucleus tractus solitaries, area postrema, and medial amygdala. At 40 days after surgery, meal-induced activation in all these areas was greatly diminished and did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The neural activation pattern and dynamics suggest a role of the brainstem anorexia pathway in the early effects of RYGB on meal size and food intake that may lead to adaptive neural and behavioral changes involved in the control of food intake and body weight at a lower level. However, selective inhibition of this pathway will be required for a more causal implication. PMID:26984418

  8. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brainstem Volumes, Plaques, and Surface Area in the Occipital Regions of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alper, F.; Kantarci, M.; Altunkaynak, E.; Varoglu, A. O.; Karaman, A.; Oral, E.; Okur, A. [Ataturk Univ., Erzurum (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Histology, Neurology and Embryology, Psychiatry

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To determine brainstem volumes, number of plaques, and surface areas in the occipital lobes of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS), and to investigate whether there is any correlation between brainstem volume and the number/surface areas of plaque in the occipital lobes. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained on 14 relapsing-remitting (RR) and 13 secondary progressive (SP) MS patients and 26 female control subjects. The Cavalieri method was used by modern design stereology to measure brainstem volume. The point-counting grid was used to evaluate sclerotic plaque surface areas in the occipital lobe. The number of plaques in the imaging section was calculated. Results: Brainstem volumes for RR and SP with multiple sclerosis and control subjects were 3647 mm{sup 3} , 3515 mm{sup 3} , and 4517 mm{sup 3} , respectively. Mean number of plaques in the right-left occipital lobe was found to be 2.7-3.4 in RR-MS and 5.2-2.8 in SP-MS. Mean plaque surface area in the right-left occipital lobe was determined to be 58.52-88.24 mm{sup 2} in RR MS and 124.3-64.82 mm{sup 2} in SP MS. Brainstem volumes were significantly reduced in both groups of patients with MS compared to controls ( P <0.01). Conclusion: Magnetic-resonance-estimated volume and surface area values in multiple sclerosis may facilitate our understanding of the clinical situation of patients and provide a simple index for evaluating therapeutic efficiency.

  9. MRI and associated clinical characteristics of EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis in children with hand-foot-mouth disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hongwu; Gan, Yungen [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shenzhen (China); Wen, Feiqiu [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurology, Shenzhen (China); Huang, Wenxian [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Respiratory, Shenzhen (China)

    2012-06-15

    This study was conducted to investigate MRI and associated clinical characteristics of brainstem encephalitis induced by enterovirus 71 (EV71) in children with hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD). We analyzed clinical and imaging data from 42 HFMD cases with EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis. All patients underwent plain and enhanced MRI cranial scans and were placed into one of two groups according to MRI enhancement results, an enhanced group or a nonenhanced group. Thirty-two cases were positive on MRI exam. The primary location of the lesion for brainstem encephalitis was the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata (32 cases), followed by the cerebellar dentate nucleus (8 cases), midbrain (5 cases), and thalamus (2 cases). Plain T1-weighted images showed isointense or hypointense signals, and T2-weighted images showed isointense and hyperintense signals. Enhanced MRI scans showed that 12 cases had slight to moderate enhancement; 4 of these were normal on plain scan. The time from MRI examination to disease onset was statistically different between the enhanced (n = 12) and nonenhanced (n = 21) groups with a mean of 7.67 days (SD = 1.07) vs 11.95 days (SD = 5.33), respectively. The most common neurological symptoms for brainstem encephalitis were myoclonus and tremor. The greater the area of affected brain, the more severe the clinical symptoms were. The locations of EV71-induced HFMD-associated brainstem encephalitis lesions are relatively specific. Enhanced MRI scans could also identify the lesions missed by early plain scans. MRI scans can provide important information for clinical evaluation and treatment. (orig.)

  10. Mapping the distribution of serotonin transporter in the human brainstem with high-resolution PET: Validation using postmortem autoradiography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, P; Schain, M; Varnäs, K; Halldin, C; Farde, L; Varrone, A

    2016-06-01

    The human brainstem is a complex structure with several small nuclei and neural pathways of interest in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In common with other monoaminergic systems, serotoninergic neurons originate from a group of nuclei located in the brainstem. The present study was designed to validate a user-independent approach for a detailed in vivo quantification of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) availability in the human brainstem using a template-based approach that consisted of three steps. First, 3T-MR images and parametric binding potential (BPND) [(11)C]MADAM images of ten healthy subjects were used to generate a PET template of 5-HTT availability. In the second step, volumes of interest (VOIs) for different brainstem nuclei were obtained using a method in which VOIs are initially delineated on MRI images using anatomical landmarks and then are finally tailored on the distribution of 5-HTT binding using a thresholding approach applied to the 5-HTT template. In the final step, the VOIs were transformed and applied individually to BPND images of 16 healthy subjects (14M/2F, 20-64years). The in vivo distribution of BPND values obtained with the template-based method were in good agreement with an individual-based approach taken as gold standard. Results were also in agreement with 5-HTT quantification using in vitro binding data obtained with autoradiography (ARG) studies using [(3)H]MADAM. The proposed template-based method can be applied to PET data acquired in several CNS disorders in which serotonin neurons in the brainstem might be affected.

  11. The driving system for hippocampal theta in the brainstem: an examination by single neuron recording in urethane-anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yuji; Hanada, Yasuhiro

    2009-05-08

    The brainstem has been shown to be involved in generating hippocampal theta; however, which brainstem region plays the most important role in generating the rhythm has remained unclear. To reveal which brainstem region triggers the theta, the hippocampal local field potential was recorded simultaneously with single unit activity in the brainstem of urethane-anesthetized rat. The firing latencies before theta onset and offset were compared among recording sites (deep mesencephalic nucleus, DpMe; pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, PPT; nucleus pontis oralis, PnO). We examined the activities of 59 cells; PPT showed the highest proportion of neurons changing their firing rates at theta onset (14/16, 87.5%). The proportion in the PnO was 14/22 (63.6%), but the neurons in the PnO showed the earliest changes in latencies (0.57s before theta onset). The change in the PPT was 0.96s after theta onset. Regarding the theta offset, the PPT showed the highest proportion of neurons changing their firing rates at theta offset (9/16, 56.3%; the proportion in the PnO was 5/22, 22.7%), but the difference in latent time was not significant among recorded regions. The neurons in the DpMe did not show any remarkable firing tendency at theta onset and offset. From these results, we propose a driving system of hippocampal theta, in which neurons in the PnO first trigger the theta onset and then those in the PPT maintain the theta by activating broadly the brainstem areas for the wave.

  12. Diffusion Weighted and Trace Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Nayeri

    2009-01-01

    purulent abscess there is restriction of free water move- ment (hyperintensity on the DWI, iso- to hypointensity on the ADC maps. Whereas in cystic and necrotic areas of tumors there is reduced restriction due to the disruption of the intrinsic physical and chemical barriers to water diffusion. "nDifferences in the restriction of free water movement also can result from differences in tumor cellularity. Extraaxial lesions such as arachnoid cysts therefore can be easily distinguished from epidermoid tumors using DWI as the former have an elevated ADC characteristic of solid tissue. Diffusion weighted images show different patterns in acute and chronic demyelinating lesions due to anisotropic and isotropic characteristics of the lesions. DWI as well as other quantitative MR techniques including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer MRI, and MR spectroscopy can be used as different MR techniques to help characterize the evolution and extent of tissue damage and repair in MS patients. 

  13. Intrinsic Josephson effects on superconducting films

    CERN Document Server

    Chana, O S

    2002-01-01

    Films of the high-T sub c superconductor Tl sub 2 Ba sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8 with the crystal c-axis misaligned from the substrate normal have been used to make intrinsic Josephson junctions. The copper-oxide layers in the cuprate superconductor are weakly coupled in the c-direction. This weak interplanar coupling is analogous to superconductor- insulator-superconductor stacks parallel to the c-direction in the film and this maps out to a series array of intrinsic Josephson junctions. A novel device geometry has been used to exploit this and series arrays of intrinsic Josephson junctions have been fabricated. The junctions are optimised in quality and have a high and critical-current- independent value for the product of the critical current and normal state resistance. The temperature dependence of the critical current fits the Ambegaokar-Baratoff theory for SIS tunnelling. X-band emission at around 12 GHz has been detected from the intrinsic Josephson bridge at 103 K. This confirms that the junctions are s...

  14. Intrinsic Motivation, Organizational Justice, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Kalli; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    For employees to generate creative ideas that are not only original, but also useful to their company, they must interact with their workplace environment to determine organizational needs. Therefore, it is important to consider aspects of the individual as well as their environment when studying creativity. Intrinsic motivation, a predictor of…

  15. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Collegiate Instrumentalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather and compare information on measures of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among instrumentalists enrolled in collegiate ensembles. A survey instrument was developed to gather information concerning demographic data and responses to questions on motivational preference. Participants were undergraduate and…

  16. Intrinsic Novobiocin Resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Anna A.; Chopra, Ian; O'Neill, Alex J.

    2007-01-01

    Intrinsic novobiocin resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus was associated with expression of a novobiocin-resistant form of the drug target protein (GyrB). Site-directed mutagenesis established that resistance depends upon the presence of two specific amino acid residues in GyrB: a glycine at position 85 and a lysine at position 140. PMID:17876001

  17. Intrinsically conductive polymer thin film piezoresistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemose, Michael; Spieser, Martin; Christiansen, N.O.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the piezoresistive effect in the intrinsically conductive polymer, polyaniline. A process recipe for indirect patterning of thin film polyaniline has been developed. Using a specially designed chip, the polyaniline thin films have been characterised with respect to resistivity...

  18. Intrinsic Risk Factors of Falls in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Amatullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are common geriatric problems. The risk factors of falls are the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Studies on falls are scarcely conducted in Indonesia, especially in Bandung. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the intrinsic risk factors of falls among elderly. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out from August to October 2013 at the Geriatric Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Fifty three participants were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria using consecutive sampling. The determined variables in this study were classification of the risk of falls, demographic profile, history of falls, disease, and medications. After the selection, the participants were tested by Timed up-and-go test (TUGT. Moreover, an interview and analysis of medical records were carried out to discover the risk factors of falls. The collected data were analyzed and presented in the form of percentages shown in tables. Results: From 53 patients, women (35.66% were considered to have higher risk of fall than men (18.34%. The majority of patients (66% with the risk of fall were from the age group 60–74 years. The major diseases suffered by patients were hypertension, osteoarthritis and diabetes mellitus. Drugs that were widely used were antihypertensive drugs; analgesic and antipyretic drugs and antidiabetic drugs. Conclusions: There are various intrinsic risk factors of falls in elderly and each of the elderly has more than one intrinsic risk factor of falls.

  19. Organisational Learning and Employees' Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Richard; Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational learning initiatives on employee motivation. Four initiatives consistent with theories of organisational learning were a priori ranked in terms of concepts that underpin intrinsic-motivation theory. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of…

  20. Simple intrinsic defects in InAs :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in indium arsenide, InAs, as computed by density functional theory using semi-local density functionals, intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models.

  1. Intrinsic Motivation, Organizational Justice, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Kalli; Narayan, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    For employees to generate creative ideas that are not only original, but also useful to their company, they must interact with their workplace environment to determine organizational needs. Therefore, it is important to consider aspects of the individual as well as their environment when studying creativity. Intrinsic motivation, a predictor of…

  2. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Collegiate Instrumentalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather and compare information on measures of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among instrumentalists enrolled in collegiate ensembles. A survey instrument was developed to gather information concerning demographic data and responses to questions on motivational preference. Participants were undergraduate and…

  3. Intrinsic Diophantine approximation on general polynomial surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiljeset, Morten Hein

    2017-01-01

    We study the Hausdorff measure and dimension of the set of intrinsically simultaneously -approximable points on a curve, surface, etc, given as a graph of integer polynomials. We obtain complete answers to these questions for algebraically “nice” manifolds. This generalizes earlier work done...

  4. Discovery of Intrinsic Primitives on Triangle Meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Solomon, Justin

    2011-04-01

    The discovery of meaningful parts of a shape is required for many geometry processing applications, such as parameterization, shape correspondence, and animation. It is natural to consider primitives such as spheres, cylinders and cones as the building blocks of shapes, and thus to discover parts by fitting such primitives to a given surface. This approach, however, will break down if primitive parts have undergone almost-isometric deformations, as is the case, for example, for articulated human models. We suggest that parts can be discovered instead by finding intrinsic primitives, which we define as parts that posses an approximate intrinsic symmetry. We employ the recently-developed method of computing discrete approximate Killing vector fields (AKVFs) to discover intrinsic primitives by investigating the relationship between the AKVFs of a composite object and the AKVFs of its parts. We show how to leverage this relationship with a standard clustering method to extract k intrinsic primitives and remaining asymmetric parts of a shape for a given k. We demonstrate the value of this approach for identifying the prominent symmetry generators of the parts of a given shape. Additionally, we show how our method can be modified slightly to segment an entire surface without marking asymmetric connecting regions and compare this approach to state-of-the-art methods using the Princeton Segmentation Benchmark. © 2011 The Author(s).

  5. Intrinsic novobiocin resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Anna A; Chopra, Ian; O'Neill, Alex J

    2007-12-01

    Intrinsic novobiocin resistance in Staphylococcus saprophyticus was associated with expression of a novobiocin-resistant form of the drug target protein (GyrB). Site-directed mutagenesis established that resistance depends upon the presence of two specific amino acid residues in GyrB: a glycine at position 85 and a lysine at position 140.

  6. An Intrinsic Approach to Lichnerowicz Conjecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil Ranjan

    2000-02-01

    In this paper we give a proof of Lichnerowicz conjecture for compact simply connected manifolds which is intrinsic in the sense that it avoids the nice embeddings into eigenspaces of the Laplacian. Even if one wants to use these embeddings, this paper gives a more streamlined proof. As a byproduct, we get a simple criterion for a polynomial to be a Jacobi polynomial.

  7. The quantitative analysis of S100 in the brain tissue and serum following diffuse brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qi; Huang Ping; Xing Bo; Tuo Ya; Zhang Yongpan; Tian Weiping; Wang Zhenyuan

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dynamics of the level of S100 in cerebrum, brainstem, and serum following the diffuse brain injury in rats and provide the experimental evidences for estimating injury time. Methods ELISA was used to determine whether S100 protein is changed after diffuse brain injury in rats. Forty rats were sacrificed at 0.5 hour, 2 hours, 4 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 3 d and 7 d after diffuse brain injury and normal rats as control. Results The level of S100 in cerebrum, brainstem, and serum increased, followed by a decrease, and then further increased. The level of S100 could be detected to increase at 30 minutes and reached the peak at 4 hours after DBI. The level decreased gradually to the normal at 1d and till 3 d formed the second peak. The level returned to the normal at 7d following injury again. In the postmortem injury groups, there were no significant changes compared to the control group. Conclusion The present study showed that the time-dependent expression of S100 is obvious following diffuse brain injury in rats and suggested that S100 will be a suitable marker for diffuse brain injury age determination.

  8. Neonate Auditory Brainstem Responses to CE-Chirp and CE-Chirp Octave Band Stimuli II: Versus Adult Auditory Brainstem Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Kensi M; Stuart, Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to examine the differences in auditory brainstem response (ABR) latency and amplitude indices to the CE-Chirp stimuli in neonates versus young adults as a function of stimulus level, rate, polarity, frequency and gender. Participants were 168 healthy neonates and 20 normal-hearing young adults. ABRs were obtained to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps and air-conducted CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. The effects of stimulus level, rate, and polarity were examined with air-conducted CE-Chirps. The effect of stimulus level was also examined with bone-conducted CE-Chirps and CE-Chirp octave band stimuli. The effect of gender was examined across all stimulus manipulations. In general, ABR wave V amplitudes were significantly larger (p CE-Chirp stimuli with all stimulus manipulations. For bone-conducted CE-Chirps, infants had significantly shorter wave V latencies than adults at 15 dB nHL and 45 dB nHL (p = 0.02). Adult wave V amplitude was significantly larger for bone-conducted CE-Chirps only at 30 dB nHL (p = 0.02). The effect of gender was not statistically significant across all measures (p > 0.05). Significant differences in ABR latencies and amplitudes exist between newborns and young adults using CE-Chirp stimuli. These differences are consistent with differences to traditional click and tone burst stimuli and reflect maturational differences as a function of age. These findings continue to emphasize the importance of interpreting ABR results using age-based normative data.

  9. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-Yue Tang; Xiao-Ming Zhang; Tian-Wu Chen; Xiao-Hua Huang

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignanttumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging(DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed.

  10. Pre-requisites for the formation of unusual diffusion profiles in II-VI semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, H; Kronenberg, J; Wagner, F; ISOLDE Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion of the impurities Cu, Ag, Au, and Na in CdTe and CdZnTe exhibits the unusual phenomenon of uphill diffusion if the diffusion of the impurity is performed under external Cd pressure at temperatures typically in the range 700-900 K. A model is proposed that describes these concentration profiles quantitatively and yields pre-requisites for the observation of uphill diffusion. If a metal layer is evaporated onto the implanted surface, the diffusion of the impurity is strongly affected by the generation of intrinsic defects at the metal-semiconductor interface. (C) 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH \\& Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  11. Pre-requisites for the formation of unusual diffusion profiles in II-VI semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, H.; Kronenberg, J.; Wagner, F.; Wichert, T. [Technische Physik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The diffusion of the impurities Cu, Ag, Au, and Na in CdTe and CdZnTe exhibits the unusual phenomenon of uphill diffusion if the diffusion of the impurity is performed under external Cd pressure at temperatures typically in the range 700-900 K. A model is proposed that describes these concentration profiles quantitatively and yields pre-requisites for the observation of uphill diffusion. If a metal layer is evaporated onto the implanted surface, the diffusion of the impurity is strongly affected by the generation of intrinsic defects at the metal-semiconductor interface. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Predicting permeability from the characteristic relaxation time and intrinsic formation factor of complex conductivity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.; Binley, A.; Mejus, L.; Kessouri, P.

    2015-08-01

    Low-frequency quadrature conductivity spectra of siliclastic materials exhibit typically a characteristic relaxation time, which either corresponds to the peak frequency of the phase or the quadrature conductivity or a typical corner frequency, at which the quadrature conductivity starts to decrease rapidly toward lower frequencies. This characteristic relaxation time can be combined with the (intrinsic) formation factor and a diffusion coefficient to predict the permeability to flow of porous materials at saturation. The intrinsic formation factor can either be determined at several salinities using an electrical conductivity model or at a single salinity using a relationship between the surface and quadrature conductivities. The diffusion coefficient entering into the relationship between the permeability, the characteristic relaxation time, and the formation factor takes only two distinct values for isothermal conditions. For pure silica, the diffusion coefficient of cations, like sodium or potassium, in the Stern layer is equal to the diffusion coefficient of these ions in the bulk pore water, indicating weak sorption of these couterions. For clayey materials and clean sands and sandstones whose surface have been exposed to alumina (possibly iron), the diffusion coefficient of the cations in the Stern layer appears to be 350 times smaller than the diffusion coefficient of the same cations in the pore water. These values are consistent with the values of the ionic mobilities used to determine the amplitude of the low and high-frequency quadrature conductivities and surface conductivity. The database used to test the model comprises a total of 202 samples. Our analysis reveals that permeability prediction with the proposed model is usually within an order of magnitude from the measured value above 0.1 mD. We also discuss the relationship between the different time constants that have been considered in previous works as characteristic relaxation time, including

  13. Diffusion on spatial network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zi; Tang, Xiaoyue; Li, Wei; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study the problem of diffusing a product (idea, opinion, disease etc.) among agents on spatial network. The network is constructed by random addition of nodes on the planar. The probability for a previous node to be connected to the new one is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of α. The diffusion rate between two connected nodes is inversely proportional to their spatial distance to the power of β as well. Inspired from the Fick's first law, we introduce the diffusion coefficient to measure the diffusion ability of the spatial network. Using both theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, we get the fact that the diffusion coefficient always decreases with the increasing of parameter α and β, and the diffusion sub-coefficient follows the power-law of the spatial distance with exponent equals to -α-β+2. Since both short-range diffusion and long-range diffusion exist, we use anomalous diffusion method in diffusion process. We get the fact that the slope index δ in anomalous diffusion is always smaller that 1. The diffusion process in our model is sub-diffusion.

  14. Identifying the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation during task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woogul; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2017-06-21

    Intrinsic motivation is the inherent tendency to seek out novelty and challenge, to explore and investigate, and to stretch and extend one's capacities. When people imagine performing intrinsically motivating tasks, they show heightened anterior insular cortex (AIC) activity. To fully explain the neural system of intrinsic motivation, however, requires assessing neural activity while people actually perform intrinsically motivating tasks (i.e., while answering curiosity-inducing questions or solving competence-enabling anagrams). Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the neural system of intrinsic motivation involves not only AIC activity, but also striatum activity and, further, AIC-striatum functional interactions. These findings suggest that subjective feelings of intrinsic satisfaction (associated with AIC activations), reward processing (associated with striatum activations), and their interactions underlie the actual experience of intrinsic motivation. These neural findings are consistent with the conceptualization of intrinsic motivation as the pursuit and satisfaction of subjective feelings (interest and enjoyment) as intrinsic rewards.

  15. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis mimicking meningeal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Collantes-Bellido, Elena; Rodriguez de Rivera, Francisco; Medina-Báez, Josmarlin; Palomo-Ferrer, Farnando; Morales-Bastos, Carmen; Arpa, Javier

    2011-05-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition, with only 45 cases recorded to date, characterized by infiltration of the meninges by glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. Here, we describe a patient with PDLG who was managed with tuberculostatic drugs owing to multiple findings that were suggestive of tuberculous meningitis. A 19-year-old woman presented with headaches and behavioral changes. A sudden decrease in visual acuity with papilledema, bilateral sixth nerve palsies, and neck stiffness developed. Lumbar puncture showed elevated opening pressure (50 cm H2O). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed glucose 30 mg/dL, protein 26.5 mg/dL, white blood cell count 150 (60% lymphocytes, 40% neutrophils). The second sample of CSF provided adenosine deaminase activity 21.9 U/L. Polymerase chain reaction for Koch's bacillus was positive in the third CSF sample. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed meningeal thickening of the quadrigeminal cistern, tentorium cerebelli, cerebral convexity, and spinal cord, with gadolinium enhancement in nodular lesions. The patient died 22 weeks after symptom onset owing to brainstem infarction. Postmortem pathologic studies revealed PDLG. This entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis that does not respond to treatment with antituberculous drugs. Surgical biopsy should be considered in contrast-enhanced areas in magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Intrinsic microwave dielectric loss of lanthanum aluminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Koji; Minemura, Tetsuro; Yamauchi, Hiroki; Utsumi, Wataru; Ishii, Yoshinobu; Breeze, Jonathan; Alford, Neil McN

    2010-10-01

    The intrinsic dielectric properties of LaAlO₃ were investigated to understand the microwave properties of several materials containing LaAlO₃. In this study, LaAlO₃ single crystals were prepared by the Czochralski method. The temperature dependence of the dielectric properties and neutron inelastic scattering of the single crystals were measured. From these data, the intrinsic dielectric properties were evaluated and it was found that the dielectric loss of the LaAlO₃ includes two types of dielectric loss. One is a phonon absorption-related loss and the other is a component of the loss arising from Debye- type orientation polarization. The latter affects the room temperature dielectric loss in materials containing LaAlO₃. The present study suggests that avoiding this polarization loss is an important goal in decreasing the total dielectric loss.

  17. Extrinsic and intrinsic curvatures in thermodynamic geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini Mansoori, Seyed Ali, E-mail: shossein@bu.edu [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirza, Behrouz, E-mail: b.mirza@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sharifian, Elham, E-mail: e.sharifian@ph.iut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-10

    We investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures of a certain hypersurface in thermodynamic geometry of a physical system and show that they contain useful thermodynamic information. For an anti-Reissner–Nordström-(A)de Sitter black hole (Phantom), the extrinsic curvature of a constant Q hypersurface has the same sign as the heat capacity around the phase transition points. The intrinsic curvature of the hypersurface can also be divergent at the critical points but has no information about the sign of the heat capacity. Our study explains the consistent relationship holding between the thermodynamic geometry of the KN-AdS black holes and those of the RN (J-zero hypersurface) and Kerr black holes (Q-zero hypersurface) ones [1]. This approach can easily be generalized to an arbitrary thermodynamic system.

  18. Documentation Requirements, Intrinsic Motivation, and Worker Absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Kristensen, Nicolai; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Command systems are widely used to monitor public service provision, but little is known about unintended effects on individual workers’ motivation and work effort. Using insights from motivation crowding theory, we estimate a SEM model that captures how Danish childcare assistants and social...... and higher sickness absence. The association is statistically significant, but very small in substantive terms. The result is nevertheless consistent with the expectation in motivation crowding theory and contributes to the literature by including a new, reliable behavioral variable—sickness absence....../healthcare assistants perceive documentation requirements. We analyze how this perception relates to intrinsic motivation measured in a survey and sickness absence as reported in administrative registers, and find that individuals who perceive documentation requirements as controlling have lower intrinsic motivation...

  19. Direct measurement of intrinsic atomic scale magnetostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoni, M P; Pascarelli, S; Grössinger, R; Turtelli, R Sato; Bormio-Nunes, C; Pettifer, R F

    2008-10-03

    Using differential x-ray absorption spectroscopy (DiffXAS) we have measured and quantified the intrinsic, atomic-scale magnetostriction of Fe81Ga19. By exploiting the chemical selectivity of DiffXAS, the Fe and Ga local environments have been assessed individually. The enhanced magnetostriction induced by the addition of Ga to Fe was found to originate from the Ga environment, where lambda;{gamma,2}( approximately (3/2)lambda_{100}) is 390+/-40 ppm. In this environment, 001 Ga-Ga pair defects were found to exist, which mediate the magnetostriction by inducing large strains in the surrounding Ga-Fe bonds. For the first time, intrinsic, chemically selective magnetostrictive strain has been measured and quantified at the atomic level, allowing true comparison with theory.

  20. Partitioned quantum cellular automata are intrinsically universal

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    There have been several non-axiomatic approaches taken to define Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA). Partitioned QCA (PQCA) are the most canonical of these non-axiomatic definitions. In this work we show that any QCA can be put into the form of a PQCA. Our construction reconciles all the non-axiomatic definitions of QCA, showing that they can all simulate one another, and hence that they are all equivalent to the axiomatic definition. This is achieved by defining generalised n-dimensional intrinsic simulation, which brings the computer science based concepts of simulation and universality closer to theoretical physics. The result is not only an important simplification of the QCA model, it also plays a key role in the identification of a minimal n-dimensional intrinsically universal QCA.

  1. Intrinsic Simulations between Stochastic Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Arrighi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a simple formalism for dealing with deterministic, non-deterministic and stochastic cellular automata in a unifying and composable manner. Armed with this formalism, we extend the notion of intrinsic simulation between deterministic cellular automata, to the non-deterministic and stochastic settings. We then provide explicit tools to prove or disprove the existence of such a simulation between two stochastic cellular automata, even though the intrinsic simulation relation is shown to be undecidable in dimension two and higher. The key result behind this is the caracterization of equality of stochastic global maps by the existence of a coupling between the random sources. We then prove that there is a universal non-deterministic cellular automaton, but no universal stochastic cellular automaton. Yet we provide stochastic cellular automata achieving optimal partial universality.

  2. Effect of intrinsic curvature on semiflexible polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Surya K.; Singh, Kulveer; Sain, Anirban

    2009-11-01

    Recently many important biopolymers have been found to possess intrinsic curvature. Tubulin protofilaments in animal cells, FtsZ filaments in bacteria and double stranded DNA are examples. We examine how intrinsic curvature influences the conformational statistics of such polymers. We give exact results for the tangent-tangent spatial correlation function C(r)=⟨t̂(s).t̂(s+r)⟩ , both in two and three dimensions. Contrary to expectation, C(r) does not show any oscillatory behavior, rather decays exponentially and the effective persistence length has strong length dependence for short polymers. We also compute the distribution function P(R) of the end to end distance R and show how curved chains can be distinguished from wormlike chains using loop formation probability.

  3. Extrinsic and intrinsic determinants of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby A. Ferguson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After central nervous system (CNS injury axons fail to regenerate often leading to persistent neurologic deficit although injured peripheral nervous system (PNS axons mount a robust regenerative response that may lead to functional recovery. Some of the failures of CNS regeneration arise from the many glial-based inhibitory molecules found in the injured CNS, whereas the intrinsic regenerative potential of some CNS neurons is actively curtailed during CNS maturation and limited after injury. In this review, the molecular basis for extrinsic and intrinsic modulation of axon regeneration within the nervous system is evaluated. A more complete understanding of the factors limiting axonal regeneration will provide a rational basis, which is used to develop improved treatments for nervous system injury.

  4. Intrinsic Motivation in Open Source Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitzer, J.; W., Schrettl,; Schröder, Philipp

    2004-01-01

    of a public good, these features emerge quite naturally. We adapt a dynamic private-provision-of-public-goods model to reflects key aspects of the OSS phenomenon. In particular, instead of relying on extrinsic motives for programmers (e.g. signaling) the present model is driven by intrinsic motives of OSS...... programmers, such as user-programmers, play value or \\emph{homo ludens} payoff, and gift culture benefits. Such intrinsic motives feature extensively in the wider OSS literature and turn out to add new insights to the economic analysis.......This papers sheds light on the puzzling evidence that even though open source software (OSS) is a public good, it is developed for free by highly qualified, young and motivated individuals, and evolves at a rapid pace. We show that once OSS development is understood as the private provision...

  5. Intrinsic luminescence of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, V.I.; Grabovskis, V.Y.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Vitol, I.K.

    1986-09-01

    This study obtains additional information on L centers and their role in electron excitation and intrinsic luminescence of a whole series. (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) of alkali silicate glasses. The authors compare the features of the interaction with radiation of specimens of glass and crystal of a similar chemical composition, since silicates of alkali metals can be obtained in both the glassy and crystalline states.

  6. A Model for Intrinsic Redshifts of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  7. Quantum geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development

    CERN Document Server

    Soo, Chopin

    2016-01-01

    Quantum geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development is presented. Paradigm shift from full space-time covariance to spatial diffeomorphism invariance yields a non-vanishing Hamiltonian, a resolution of the `problem of time', and gauge-invariant temporal ordering in an ever expanding universe. Einstein's general relativity is a particular realization of a wider class of theories; and the framework prompts natural extensions and improvements, with the consequent dominance of Cotton-York potential at early times when the universe was small.

  8. Macroscopic Objects, Intrinsic Spin, and Lorentz Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, David W; Tasson, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    The framework of the Standard-Model Extension (SME) provides a relativistic quantum field theory for the study of Lorentz violation. The classical, nonrelativistic equations of motion can be extracted as a limit that is useful in various scenarios. In this work, we consider the effects of certain SME coefficients for Lorentz violation on the motion of macroscopic objects having net intrinsic spin in the classical, nonrelativistic limit.

  9. A Student Diffusion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration…

  10. Acoustic diffusers III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidondo, Alejandro

    2002-11-01

    This acoustic diffusion research presents a pragmatic view, based more on effects than causes and 15 very useful in the project advance control process, where the sound field's diffusion coefficient, sound field diffusivity (SFD), for its evaluation. Further research suggestions are presented to obtain an octave frequency resolution of the SFD for precise design or acoustical corrections.

  11. A Student Diffusion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.

  12. Effect of the wire width on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusche, R., E-mail: robert.lusche@dlr.de; Semenov, A. [Institute of Planetary Research, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Ilin, K.; Siegel, M. [Institute of Micro- und Nano-electronic Systems (IMS), KIT, Hertzstrasse 16, 76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); Korneeva, Y.; Trifonov, A. [Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1 Malaya Pirogovskaya, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Korneev, A. [Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1 Malaya Pirogovskaya, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya Ulitsa, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), 9 Institutskiy pereulok, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region 141700 (Russian Federation); Goltsman, G. [Department of Physics, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 1 Malaya Pirogovskaya, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya Ulitsa, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation); Vodolazov, D. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin Avenue, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Hübers, H.-W. [Institute of Planetary Research, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-28

    A thorough spectral study of the intrinsic single-photon detection efficiency in superconducting TaN and NbN nanowires with different widths has been performed. The experiment shows that the cut-off of the intrinsic detection efficiency at near-infrared wavelengths is most likely controlled by the local suppression of the barrier for vortex nucleation around the absorption site. Beyond the cut-off quasi-particle diffusion in combination with spontaneous, thermally activated vortex crossing explains the detection process. For both materials, the reciprocal cut-off wavelength scales linearly with the wire width where the scaling factor agrees with the hot-spot detection model.

  13. Moral Distress, Workplace Health, and Intrinsic Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Elijah

    2016-05-01

    Moral distress is now being recognized as a frequent experience for many health care providers, and there's good evidence that it has a negative impact on the health care work environment. However, contemporary discussions of moral distress have several problems. First, they tend to rely on inadequate characterizations of moral distress. As a result, subsequent investigations regarding the frequency and consequences of moral distress often proceed without a clear understanding of the phenomenon being discussed, and thereby risk substantially misrepresenting the nature, frequency, and possible consequences of moral distress. These discussions also minimize the intrinsically harmful aspects of moral distress. This is a serious omission. Moral distress doesn't just have a negative impact on the health care work environment; it also directly harms the one who experiences it. In this paper, I claim that these problems can be addressed by first clarifying our understanding of moral distress, and then identifying what makes moral distress intrinsically harmful. I begin by identifying three common mistakes that characterizations of moral distress tend to make, and explaining why these mistakes are problematic. Next, I offer an account of moral distress that avoids these mistakes. Then, I defend the claim that moral distress is intrinsically harmful to the subject who experiences it. I conclude by explaining how acknowledging this aspect of moral distress should reshape our discussions about how best to deal with this phenomenon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Management Control, Intrinsic Motivation and Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godt Gregersen, Mikkel

    This thesis consists of a cape and three papers. The overall research question is: How can intrinsic motivation and management control coexist in a creative environment and how can coordination be possible in such a context? The cape ties together the research done in the three papers. It is divi......This thesis consists of a cape and three papers. The overall research question is: How can intrinsic motivation and management control coexist in a creative environment and how can coordination be possible in such a context? The cape ties together the research done in the three papers....... It is divided into six sections. The first section introduces the concepts of intrinsic motivation, creativity and management control. This is followed by a section on management control in a creative context. These two sections frame the thesis and introduce the setting in which the research has been done....... The third section presents the research approach, which is the application of basic needs as social mechanisms. Social mechanisms are used to explain one event by a previous event by identifying the causal links between the two events. Basic needs are the needs for feelings of autonomy, competence...

  15. Brainstem circuitry regulating phasic activation of trigeminal motoneurons during REM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Anaclet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS is characterized by activation of the cortical and hippocampal electroencephalogram (EEG and atonia of non-respiratory muscles with superimposed phasic activity or twitching, particularly of cranial muscles such as those of the eye, tongue, face and jaw. While phasic activity is a characteristic feature of REMS, the neural substrates driving this activity remain unresolved. Here we investigated the neural circuits underlying masseter (jaw phasic activity during REMS. The trigeminal motor nucleus (Mo5, which controls masseter motor function, receives glutamatergic inputs mainly from the parvocellular reticular formation (PCRt, but also from the adjacent paramedian reticular area (PMnR. On the other hand, the Mo5 and PCRt do not receive direct input from the sublaterodorsal (SLD nucleus, a brainstem region critical for REMS atonia of postural muscles. We hypothesized that the PCRt-PMnR, but not the SLD, regulates masseter phasic activity during REMS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test our hypothesis, we measured masseter electromyogram (EMG, neck muscle EMG, electrooculogram (EOG and EEG in rats with cell-body specific lesions of the SLD, PMnR, and PCRt. Bilateral lesions of the PMnR and rostral PCRt (rPCRt, but not the caudal PCRt or SLD, reduced and eliminated REMS phasic activity of the masseter, respectively. Lesions of the PMnR and rPCRt did not, however, alter the neck EMG or EOG. To determine if rPCRt neurons use glutamate to control masseter phasic movements, we selectively blocked glutamate release by rPCRt neurons using a Cre-lox mouse system. Genetic disruption of glutamate neurotransmission by rPCRt neurons blocked masseter phasic activity during REMS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that (1 premotor glutamatergic neurons in the medullary rPCRt and PMnR are involved in generating phasic activity in the masseter muscles, but not phasic eye movements, during REMS; and (2

  16. Radiofrequency trigeminal rhizolysis for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to brainstem infarction. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroohar, M; Herman, M; Heller, S; Levy, R M

    1997-01-15

    Although percutaneous radiofrequency trigeminal rhizolysis (RFL) has been used to treat idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia thought secondary to multiple sclerosis, the use of RFL for trigeminal neuralgia caused by brainstem infarction has not been advocated. The authors report two patients with trigeminal neuralgia following pontine infarction in whom aggressive medical management failed, but who were successfully treated with RFL. Pain relief has persisted for the 3- and 6-year duration of follow-up examinations. Descending trigeminal reticular fibers may be affected by brainstem infarction and result in trigeminal neuralgia; thus, treatment by rhizotomy may be effective in decreasing the peripheral afferent input into the spinal trigeminal nucleus thus decreasing the pain. These two cases demonstrate the utility of RFL in the relief of ischemia-induced trigeminal neuralgia and lead the authors to suggest that its use be broadened to include this indication.

  17. Effects of Extrinsic Rewards on Intrinsic Motivation in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Edward A.; Williams, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews classroom behavior management studies to see if extrinsic rewards affect intrinsic reinforcement value of appropriate classroom behaviors. Conclusion indicates extrinsic rewards are useful. Teachers need not avoid the use of rewards in fear of undermining intrinsic interest. (LAB)

  18. Effects of Extrinsic Rewards on Intrinsic Motivation in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Edward A.; Williams, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews classroom behavior management studies to see if extrinsic rewards affect intrinsic reinforcement value of appropriate classroom behaviors. Conclusion indicates extrinsic rewards are useful. Teachers need not avoid the use of rewards in fear of undermining intrinsic interest. (LAB)

  19. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    OpenAIRE

    ter Haar, G.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to deliver tone bursts ranging in frequency from 1 - 32 kHz for frequency-specific assessment of the cochlea in dogs. Brainstem auditory evoked responses to a click (CS) and to 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, a...

  20. DEVELOPING ‘STANDARD NOVEL ‘VAD’ TECHNIQUE’ AND ‘NOISE FREE SIGNALS’ FOR SPEECH AUDITORY BRAINSTEM RESPONSES FOR HUMAN SUBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ranganadh Narayanam*

    2016-01-01

    In this research as a first step we have concentrated on collecting non-intra cortical EEG data of Brainstem Speech Evoked Potentials from human subjects in an Audiology Lab in University of Ottawa. The problems we have considered are the most advanced and most essential problems of interest in Auditory Neural Signal Processing area in the world: The first problem is the Voice Activity Detection (VAD) in Speech Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR); The second problem is to identify the best De-...