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Sample records for diffuse interface model

  1. Multiphase Microfluidics The Diffuse Interface Model

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Multiphase flows are typically described assuming that the different phases are separated by a sharp interface, with appropriate boundary conditions. This approach breaks down whenever the lengthscale of the phenomenon that is being studied is comparable with the real interface thickness, as it happens, for example, in the coalescence and breakup of bubbles and drops, the wetting and dewetting of solid surfaces and, in general, im micro-devices. The diffuse interface model resolves these probems by assuming that all quantities can vary continuously, so that interfaces have a non-zero thickness, i.e. they are "diffuse". The contributions in this book review the theory and describe some relevant applications of the diffuse interface model for one-component, two-phase fluids and for liquid binary mixtures, to model multiphase flows in confined geometries.

  2. Diffuse interface methods for multiphase flow modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows:Nuclear reactor safety programs need to get a better description of some stages of identified incident or accident scenarios. For some of them, such as the reflooding of the core or the dryout of fuel rods, the heat, momentum and mass transfers taking place at the scale of droplets or bubbles are part of the key physical phenomena for which a better description is needed. Experiments are difficult to perform at these very small scales and direct numerical simulations is viewed as a promising way to give new insight into these complex two-phase flows. This type of simulations requires numerical methods that are accurate, efficient and easy to run in three space dimensions and on parallel computers. Despite many years of development, direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows is still very challenging, mostly because it requires solving moving boundary problems. To avoid this major difficulty, a new class of numerical methods is arising, called diffuse interface methods. These methods are based on physical theories dating back to van der Waals and mostly used in materials science. In these methods, interfaces separating two phases are modeled as continuous transitions zones instead of surfaces of discontinuity. Since all the physical variables encounter possibly strong but nevertheless always continuous variations across the interfacial zones, these methods virtually eliminate the difficult moving boundary problem. We show that these methods lead to a single-phase like system of equations, which makes it easier to code in 3D and to make parallel compared to more classical methods. The first method presented is dedicated to liquid-vapor flows with phase-change. It is based on the van der Waals' theory of capillarity. This method has been used to study nucleate boiling of a pure fluid and of dilute binary mixtures. We discuss the importance of the choice and the meaning of the order parameter, i.e. a scalar which discriminates one

  3. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, M.; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Schonbek, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2017), s. 1639-1658 ISSN 0951-7715 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Cahn-Hilliard equation * Darcy law * diffuse interface model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aa6063/meta

  4. Diffusion between evolving interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juntunen, Janne; Merikoski, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion in an evolving environment is studied by continuous-time Monte Carlo simulations. Diffusion is modeled by continuous-time random walkers on a lattice, in a dynamic environment provided by bubbles between two one-dimensional interfaces driven symmetrically towards each other. For one-dimensional random walkers constrained by the interfaces, the bubble size distribution dominates diffusion. For two-dimensional random walkers, it is also controlled by the topography and dynamics of the interfaces. The results of the one-dimensional case are recovered in the limit where the interfaces are strongly driven. Even with simple hard-core repulsion between the interfaces and the particles, diffusion is found to depend strongly on the details of the dynamical rules of particles close to the interfaces.

  5. Free surface modelling with two-fluid model and reduced numerical diffusion of the interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strubelj, Luka; Tiselj, Izrok

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The free surface flows are successfully modelled with one of existing free surface models, such as: level set method, volume of fluid method (with/without surface reconstruction), front tracking, two-fluid model (two momentum equations) with modified interphase force and others. The main disadvantage of two-fluid model used for simulations of free surface flows is numerical diffusion of the interface, which can be significantly reduced using the method presented in this paper. Several techniques for reduction of numerical diffusion of the interface have been implemented in the volume of fluid model and are based on modified numerical schemes for advection of volume fraction near the interface. The same approach could be used also for two-fluid method, but according to our experience more successful reduction of numerical diffusion of the interface can be achieved with conservative level set method. Within the conservative level set method, continuity equation for volume fraction is solved and after that the numerical diffusion of the interface is reduced in such a way that the thickness of the interface is kept constant during the simulation. Reduction of the interface diffusion can be also called interface sharpening. In present paper the two-fluid model with interface sharpening is validated on Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Under assumptions of isothermal and incompressible flow of two immiscible fluids, we simulated a system with the fluid of higher density located above the fluid of smaller density in two dimensions. Due to gravity in the system, fluid with higher density moves below the fluid with smaller density. Initial condition is not a flat interface between the fluids, but a sine wave with small amplitude, which develops into a mushroom-like structure. Mushroom-like structure in simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability later develops to small droplets as result of numerical dispersion of interface (interface sharpening

  6. Diffuse-interface model for rapid phase transformations in nonequilibrium systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galenko, Peter; Jou, David

    2005-04-01

    A thermodynamic approach to rapid phase transformations within a diffuse interface in a binary system is developed. Assuming an extended set of independent thermodynamic variables formed by the union of the classic set of slow variables and the space of fast variables, we introduce finiteness of the heat and solute diffusive propagation at the finite speed of the interface advancing. To describe transformations within the diffuse interface, we use the phase-field model which allows us to follow steep but smooth changes of phase within the width of the diffuse interface. Governing equations of the phase-field model are derived for the hyperbolic model, a model with memory, and a model of nonlinear evolution of transformation within the diffuse interface. The consistency of the model is proved by the verification of the validity of the condition of positive entropy production and by outcomes of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. A comparison with existing sharp-interface and diffuse-interface versions of the model is given.

  7. A thick-interface model for diffusive and massive phase transformation in substitutional alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, J.; Vala, J.; Gamsjaeger, E.; Fischer, F.D.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the application of the thermodynamic extremal principle, a new model for the diffusive and massive phase transformation in multicomponent substitutional alloys is developed. Interfacial reactions such as the rearrangement of the lattice, solute drag and trans-interface diffusion are automatically considered by assigning a finite thickness and a finite mobility to the interface region. As an application of the steady-state solution of the derived evolution equations, the kinetics of the massive γ → α transformation in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni system is simulated. The thermodynamic properties of the interface may influence significantly the contact conditions at the interface as well as the conditions for the occurrence of the massive transformation and its kinetics. The model is also used for the simulation of the diffusion-induced grain boundary migration in the same system. By application of the model a realistic value for the Gibbs energy per unit interface area is obtained

  8. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Smith, James A.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding

  9. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey M., E-mail: Jeffrey.Lacy@inl.gov; Smith, James A., E-mail: Jeffrey.Lacy@inl.gov; Rabin, Barry H., E-mail: Jeffrey.Lacy@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  10. A comparison of molecular dynamics and diffuse interface model predictions of Lennard-Jones fluid evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbante, Paolo [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano - Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32 - 20133 Milano (Italy); Frezzotti, Aldo; Gibelli, Livio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Aerospaziali, Politecnico di Milano - Via La Masa 34 - 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2014-12-09

    The unsteady evaporation of a thin planar liquid film is studied by molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones fluid. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a diffuse interface model in which capillary Korteweg contributions are added to hydrodynamic equations, in order to obtain a unified description of the liquid bulk, liquid-vapor interface and vapor region. Particular care has been taken in constructing a diffuse interface model matching the thermodynamic and transport properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The comparison of diffuse interface model and molecular dynamics results shows that, although good agreement is obtained in equilibrium conditions, remarkable deviations of diffuse interface model predictions from the reference molecular dynamics results are observed in the simulation of liquid film evaporation. It is also observed that molecular dynamics results are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained from a composite model which describes the liquid film by a standard hydrodynamic model and the vapor by the Boltzmann equation. The two mathematical model models are connected by kinetic boundary conditions assuming unit evaporation coefficient.

  11. Modelling of multicomponent diffusion in a two-phase oxide-metal corium pool by a diffuse interface method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardon, Clement

    2016-01-01

    This Ph.D. topic is focused on the modelling of stratification kinetics for an oxide-metal corium pool (U-O-Zr-steel system) in terms of multicomponent and multiphase diffusion. This work is part of a larger research effort for the development of a detailed corium pool modelling based on a CFD approach for thermal hydraulics. The overall goal is to improve the understanding of the involved phenomena and obtain closure laws for integral macroscopic models. The phase-field method coupled with an energy functional using the CALPHAD method appears to be relevant for this purpose. In a first part, we have developed a diffuse interface model in order to describe the diffusion process in the U-O system. This model has been coupled with a CALPHAD thermodynamic database and its parameterization has been developed with, in particular, an up-scaling procedure related to the interface thickness. Then, within the framework of a modelling for the U-O-Zr ternary system, we have proposed a generalization of the diffuse interface model through an assumption of local equilibrium for redox mechanisms. A particular attention was paid to the model analysis by 1D numerical simulations with a special focus on the steady state composition profiles. Finally we have applied this model to the U-O-Zr-Fe system. For that purpose, we have considered a configuration close to small-scale experimental tests of oxide-metal corium pool stratification. (author) [fr

  12. On weak solutions to a diffuse interface model of a binary mixture of compressible fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2016), s. 173-183 ISSN 1937-1632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Euler-Cahn-Hilliard system * weak solution * diffuse interface model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.781, year: 2016 http://aimsciences.org/journals/displayArticlesnew.jsp?paperID=12093

  13. Diffusion-controlled interface kinetics-inclusive system-theoretic propagation models for molecular communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A. K.; Malekian, Reza; Maharaj, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Inspired by biological systems, molecular communication has been proposed as a new communication paradigm that uses biochemical signals to transfer information from one nano device to another over a short distance. The biochemical nature of the information transfer process implies that for molecular communication purposes, the development of molecular channel models should take into consideration diffusion phenomenon as well as the physical/biochemical kinetic possibilities of the process. The physical and biochemical kinetics arise at the interfaces between the diffusion channel and the transmitter/receiver units. These interfaces are herein termed molecular antennas. In this paper, we present the deterministic propagation model of the molecular communication between an immobilized nanotransmitter and nanoreceiver, where the emission and reception kinetics are taken into consideration. Specifically, we derived closed-form system-theoretic models and expressions for configurations that represent different communication systems based on the type of molecular antennas used. The antennas considered are the nanopores at the transmitter and the surface receptor proteins/enzymes at the receiver. The developed models are simulated to show the influence of parameters such as the receiver radius, surface receptor protein/enzyme concentration, and various reaction rate constants. Results show that the effective receiver surface area and the rate constants are important to the system's output performance. Assuming high rate of catalysis, the analysis of the frequency behavior of the developed propagation channels in the form of transfer functions shows significant difference introduce by the inclusion of the molecular antennas into the diffusion-only model. It is also shown that for t > > 0 and with the information molecules' concentration greater than the Michaelis-Menten kinetic constant of the systems, the inclusion of surface receptors proteins and enzymes in the models

  14. Diffuse-Interface Methods in Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. M.; McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review the development of diffuse-interface models of hydrodynamics and their application to a wide variety of interfacial phenomena. The authors discuss the issues involved in formulating diffuse-interface models for single-component and binary fluids. Recent applications and computations using these models are discussed in each case. Further, the authors address issues including sharp-interface analyses that relate these models to the classical free-boundary problem, related computational approaches to describe interfacial phenomena, and related approaches describing fully-miscible fluids.

  15. Multi-solid and multi-fluid diffuse interface model: Applications to dynamic fracture and fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndanou, S., E-mail: serge.ndanou@univ-amu.fr; Favrie, N., E-mail: nicolas.favrie@univ-amu.fr; Gavrilyuk, S., E-mail: sergey.gavrilyuk@univ-amu.fr

    2015-08-15

    We extend the model of diffuse solid–fluid interfaces developed earlier by authors of this paper to the case of arbitrary number of interacting hyperelastic solids. Plastic transformations of solids are taken into account through a Maxwell type model. The specific energy of each solid is given in separable form: it is the sum of a hydrodynamic part of the energy depending only on the density and the entropy, and an elastic part of the energy which is unaffected by the volume change. It allows us to naturally pass to the fluid description in the limit of vanishing shear modulus. In spite of a large number of governing equations, the model has a quite simple mathematical structure: it is a duplication of a single visco-elastic model. The model is well posed both mathematically and thermodynamically: it is hyperbolic and compatible with the second law of thermodynamics. The resulting model can be applied in the situations involving an arbitrary number of fluids and solids. In particular, we show the ability of the model to describe spallation and penetration phenomena occurring during high velocity impacts.

  16. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  17. Introduction to diffuse interfaces and transformation fronts modelling in compressible media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurel Richard

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Computation of interfaces separating compressible materials is related to mixture cells appearance. These mixture cells are consequences of fluid motion and artificial smearing of discontinuities. The correct computation of the entire flow field requires perfect fulfillment of the interface conditions. In the simplest situation of contact interfaces with perfect fluids, these conditions correspond to equal normal velocities and equal pressures. To compute compressible flows with interfaces two main classes of approaches are available. In the first one, the interface is considered as a sharp discontinuity. Lagrangian, Front Tracking and Level Set methods belong to this class. The second option consists in the building of a flow model valid everywhere, in pure materials and mixture cells, solved routinely with a unique Eulerian algorithm [37]. In this frame, the interface is considered as a numerically diffused zone, captured by the algorithm. There are some advantages with this approach, as the corresponding flow model is not only valid in artificial mixture cells, but it also describes accurately true multiphase mixtures of materials. The [37] approach has been simplified by [22] with the help of asymptotic analysis, resulting in a single velocity, single pressure but multi-temperature flow model. This reduced model presents however difficulties for its numerical resolution as one of the equations is non-conservative. In the presence of shocks, jump conditions have been provided by [42], determined in the weak shock limit. When compared against experiments for both weak and strong shocks, excellent agreement was observed. These relations have been accepted as closure shock relations for the [22] model and allowed the study of detonation waves in heterogeneous energetic materials. Generalized Chapman-Jouguet conditions were obtained as well as heterogenous explosives (non-ideal detonation wave structures [36]. Oppositely to the previous example

  18. Optimal distributed control of a diffuse interface model of tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Pierluigi; Gilardi, Gianni; Rocca, Elisabetta; Sprekels, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a distributed optimal control problem is studied for a diffuse interface model of tumor growth which was proposed by Hawkins-Daruud et al in Hawkins-Daruud et al (2011 Int. J. Numer. Math. Biomed. Eng. 28 3-24). The model consists of a Cahn-Hilliard equation for the tumor cell fraction φ coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a function σ representing the nutrient-rich extracellular water volume fraction. The distributed control u monitors as a right-hand side of the equation for σ and can be interpreted as a nutrient supply or a medication, while the cost function, which is of standard tracking type, is meant to keep the tumor cell fraction under control during the evolution. We show that the control-to-state operator is Fréchet differentiable between appropriate Banach spaces and derive the first-order necessary optimality conditions in terms of a variational inequality involving the adjoint state variables. The financial support of the FP7-IDEAS-ERC-StG #256872 (EntroPhase) and of the project Fondazione Cariplo-Regione Lombardia MEGAsTAR ‘Matematica d’Eccellenza in biologia ed ingegneria come accelleratore di una nuona strateGia per l’ATtRattività dell’ateneo pavese’ is gratefully acknowledged. The paper also benefited from the support of the MIUR-PRIN Grant 2015PA5MP7 ‘Calculus of Variations’ for PC and GG, and the GNAMPA (Gruppo Nazionale per l’Analisi Matematica, la Probabilità e le loro Applicazioni) of INdAM (Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica) for PC, GG and ER.

  19. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic

  20. Two-Phase Fluid Simulation Using a Diffuse Interface Model with Peng--Robinson Equation of State

    KAUST Repository

    Qiao, Zhonghua; Sun, Shuyu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, two-phase fluid systems are simulated using a diffusive interface model with the Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS), a widely used realistic EOS for hydrocarbon fluid in the petroleum industry. We first utilize the gradient theory

  1. Ionic diffusion in the double layer at model electrode/molten salt interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankeshwar, K.; Tosi, M.P.

    1991-08-01

    The anisotropic ionic diffusion coefficients in model electrochemical cells in the molten-salt regime for the electrolyte are evaluated from the ionic density profiles reported in simulation work of Grout and coworkers. A local description of the diffusion processes for counterions and coions in the electrical double layer is obtained from the data. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. A Diffuse Interface Model for Incompressible Two-Phase Flow with Large Density Ratios

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Yu; Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore numerical simulations of incompressible and immiscible two-phase flows. The description of the fluid–fluid interface is introduced via a diffuse interface approach. The two-phase fluid system is represented by a coupled Cahn–Hilliard Navier–Stokes set of equations. We discuss challenges and approaches to solving this coupled set of equations using a stabilized finite element formulation, especially in the case of a large density ratio between the two fluids. Specific features that enabled efficient solution of the equations include: (i) a conservative form of the convective term in the Cahn–Hilliard equation which ensures mass conservation of both fluid components; (ii) a continuous formula to compute the interfacial surface tension which results in lower requirement on the spatial resolution of the interface; and (iii) a four-step fractional scheme to decouple pressure from velocity in the Navier–Stokes equation. These are integrated with standard streamline-upwind Petrov–Galerkin stabilization to avoid spurious oscillations. We perform numerical tests to determine the minimal resolution of spatial discretization. Finally, we illustrate the accuracy of the framework using the analytical results of Prosperetti for a damped oscillating interface between two fluids with a density contrast.

  3. A Diffuse Interface Model for Incompressible Two-Phase Flow with Large Density Ratios

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Yu

    2016-10-04

    In this chapter, we explore numerical simulations of incompressible and immiscible two-phase flows. The description of the fluid–fluid interface is introduced via a diffuse interface approach. The two-phase fluid system is represented by a coupled Cahn–Hilliard Navier–Stokes set of equations. We discuss challenges and approaches to solving this coupled set of equations using a stabilized finite element formulation, especially in the case of a large density ratio between the two fluids. Specific features that enabled efficient solution of the equations include: (i) a conservative form of the convective term in the Cahn–Hilliard equation which ensures mass conservation of both fluid components; (ii) a continuous formula to compute the interfacial surface tension which results in lower requirement on the spatial resolution of the interface; and (iii) a four-step fractional scheme to decouple pressure from velocity in the Navier–Stokes equation. These are integrated with standard streamline-upwind Petrov–Galerkin stabilization to avoid spurious oscillations. We perform numerical tests to determine the minimal resolution of spatial discretization. Finally, we illustrate the accuracy of the framework using the analytical results of Prosperetti for a damped oscillating interface between two fluids with a density contrast.

  4. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  5. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  6. Modelling of Diffusive and Massive Phase Transformations in Binary Systems – Thick Interface Parametric Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jiří; Gamsjäger, E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 6 (2011), s. 666-673 ISSN 1862-5282 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10029 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : modelling * phase transformation * ediffusion Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.830, year: 2011

  7. The use of a diffuse interface model to estimate effective transport properties for two-phase flows in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichot, Floriana; Duval, Fabiena; Garcia, Aureliena; Belloni, Julien; Quintard, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the framework of its research programme on severe nuclear reactor accidents, IRSN investigates the water flooding of an overheated porous bed, where complex two-phase flows are likely to exist. The goal is to describe the flow with a general model, covering rods and debris beds regions in the vessel. A better understanding of the flow at the pore level appears to be necessary in order to justify and improve closure laws of macroscopic models. Although the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of two-phase flows is possible with several methods, applications are now limited to small computational domains, typically of the order of a few centimeters. Therefore, numerical solutions at the reactor scale can only be obtained by using averaged models. Volume averaging is the most traditional way of deriving such models. For nuclear safety codes, a control volume must include a few rods or a few debris particles, with a characteristic dimension of a few centimeters. The difficulty usually met with averaged models is the closure of several transport or source terms which appear in the averaged conservation equations (for example the interfacial drag or the heat transfers between phases) [2]. In the past, the closure of these terms was obtained, when possible, from one-dimensional experiments that allowed measurements of heat flux or pressure drops. For more complex flows, the experimental measurement of local parameters is often impossible and the effective properties cannot be determined easily. An alternative way is to perform 'numerical experiments' with numerical simulations of the local flow. As mentioned above, the domain of application of DNS corresponds to the size of control volumes necessary to derive averaged models. Therefore DNS appears as a powerful tool to investigate the local features of a two-phase flow in complex geometries. Diffuse interface methods provide a way to model flows with interfacial phenomena through an

  8. Modeling soft interface dominated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The two main continuum frameworks used for modeling the dynamics of soft multiphase systems are the Gibbs dividing surface model, and the diffuse interface model. In the former the interface is modeled as a two dimensional surface, and excess properties such as a surface density, or surface energy

  9. Model for the interaction between interface migration and carbon diffusion during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite and interface migration during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures is modeled, assuming the same chemical potential of carbon in martensite and austenite at the interface and allowing the motion of the phase interface when a free-energy difference occurs. The simulations show that the motion of the martensite-austenite interface can be significant and can takes place in either direction

  10. Anisotropic diffusion of volatile pollutants at air-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ping Chen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The volatile pollutants that spill into natural waters cause water pollution. Air pollution arises from the water pollution because of volatilization. Mass exchange caused by turbulent fluctuation is stronger in the direction normal to the air-water interface than in other directions due to the large density difference between water and air. In order to explore the characteristics of anisotropic diffusion of the volatile pollutants at the air-water interface, the relationship between velocity gradient and mass transfer rate was established to calculate the turbulent mass diffusivity. A second-order accurate smooth transition differencing scheme (STDS was proposed to guarantee the boundedness for the flow and mass transfer at the air-water interface. Simulations and experiments were performed to study the trichloroethylene (C2HCl3 release. By comparing the anisotropic coupling diffusion model, isotropic coupling diffusion model, and non-coupling diffusion model, the features of the transport of volatile pollutants at the air-water interface were determined. The results show that the anisotropic coupling diffusion model is more accurate than the isotropic coupling diffusion model and non-coupling diffusion model. Mass transfer significantly increases with the increase of the air-water relative velocity at a low relative velocity. However, at a higher relative velocity, an increase in the relative velocity has no effect on mass transfer.

  11. Quantifying the Effects of Noise on Diffuse Interface Models: Cahn-Hilliard-Cook equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Spencer; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation into the dynamics of phase separation through numerical simulations of the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook (CHC) equation. This model is an extension of the well-known Cahn- Hilliard equation, perturbed by an additive white noise. Studies have shown that random fluctuations are critical for proper resolution of physical phenomena. This is especially true for phase critical systems. We explore the transient behavior of the solution space for varying levels of noise. This is enabled by our massively scalable finite element-based numerical framework. We briefly examine the interplay between noise level and discretization (spatial and temporal) in obtaining statistically consistent solutions. We show that the added noise accelerates progress towards phase separation, but retards dynamics throughout subsequent coarsening. We identify a scaling exponent relating morphology metrics with the level of noise. We observe a very clear scaling effect of finite domain size, which is observed to be offset by increasing levels of noise. Domain scaling reveals a clear microstructural asymmetry at various stages of the evolution for lower noise levels. In contrast, higher noise levels tend to produce more uniform morphologies.

  12. A Componentwise Convex Splitting Scheme for Diffuse Interface Models with Van der Waals and Peng--Robinson Equations of State

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Xiaolin

    2017-01-19

    This paper presents a componentwise convex splitting scheme for numerical simulation of multicomponent two-phase fluid mixtures in a closed system at constant temperature, which is modeled by a diffuse interface model equipped with the Van der Waals and the Peng-Robinson equations of state (EoS). The Van der Waals EoS has a rigorous foundation in physics, while the Peng-Robinson EoS is more accurate for hydrocarbon mixtures. First, the phase field theory of thermodynamics and variational calculus are applied to a functional minimization problem of the total Helmholtz free energy. Mass conservation constraints are enforced through Lagrange multipliers. A system of chemical equilibrium equations is obtained which is a set of second-order elliptic equations with extremely strong nonlinear source terms. The steady state equations are transformed into a transient system as a numerical strategy on which the scheme is based. The proposed numerical algorithm avoids the indefiniteness of the Hessian matrix arising from the second-order derivative of homogeneous contribution of total Helmholtz free energy; it is also very efficient. This scheme is unconditionally componentwise energy stable and naturally results in unconditional stability for the Van der Waals model. For the Peng-Robinson EoS, it is unconditionally stable through introducing a physics-preserving correction term, which is analogous to the attractive term in the Van der Waals EoS. An efficient numerical algorithm is provided to compute the coefficient in the correction term. Finally, some numerical examples are illustrated to verify the theoretical results and efficiency of the established algorithms. The numerical results match well with laboratory data.

  13. Two-Phase Fluid Simulation Using a Diffuse Interface Model with Peng--Robinson Equation of State

    KAUST Repository

    Qiao, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, two-phase fluid systems are simulated using a diffusive interface model with the Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS), a widely used realistic EOS for hydrocarbon fluid in the petroleum industry. We first utilize the gradient theory of thermodynamics and variational calculus to derive a generalized chemical equilibrium equation, which is mathematically a second-order elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) in molar density with a strongly nonlinear source term. To solve this PDE, we convert it to a time-dependent parabolic PDE with the main interest in its final steady state solution. A Lagrange multiplier is used to enforce mass conservation. The parabolic PDE is then solved by mixed finite element methods with a semi-implicit time marching scheme. Convex splitting of the energy functional is proposed to construct this time marching scheme, where the volume exclusion effect of an EOS is treated implicitly while the pairwise attraction effect of EOS is calculated explicitly. This scheme is proved to be unconditionally energy stable. Our proposed algorithm is able to solve successfully the spatially heterogeneous two-phase systems with the Peng-Robinson EOS in multiple spatial dimensions, the first time in the literature. Numerical examples are provided with realistic hydrocarbon components to illustrate the theory. Furthermore, our computational results are compared with laboratory experimental data and verified with the Young-Laplace equation with good agreement. This work sets the stage for a broad extension of efficient convex-splitting semi-implicit schemes for numerical simulation of phase field models with a realistic EOS in complex geometries of multiple spatial dimensions.

  14. Stability and Convergence Analysis of Second-Order Schemes for a Diffuse Interface Model with Peng-Robinson Equation of State

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Qiujin; Qiao, Zhonghua; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present two second-order numerical schemes to solve the fourth order parabolic equation derived from a diffuse interface model with Peng-Robinson Equation of state (EOS) for pure substance. The mass conservation, energy decay property, unique solvability and L-infinity convergence of these two schemes are proved. Numerical results demonstrate the good approximation of the fourth order equation and confirm reliability of these two schemes.

  15. Stability and Convergence Analysis of Second-Order Schemes for a Diffuse Interface Model with Peng-Robinson Equation of State

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Qiujin

    2017-09-18

    In this paper, we present two second-order numerical schemes to solve the fourth order parabolic equation derived from a diffuse interface model with Peng-Robinson Equation of state (EOS) for pure substance. The mass conservation, energy decay property, unique solvability and L-infinity convergence of these two schemes are proved. Numerical results demonstrate the good approximation of the fourth order equation and confirm reliability of these two schemes.

  16. Quantitative interface models for simulating microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.Z.; Wang, T.; Zhou, S.H.; Liu, Z.K.; Chen, L.Q.

    2004-01-01

    To quantitatively simulate microstructural evolution in real systems, we investigated three different interface models: a sharp-interface model implemented by the software DICTRA and two diffuse-interface models which use either physical order parameters or artificial order parameters. A particular example is considered, the diffusion-controlled growth of a γ ' precipitate in a supersaturated γ matrix in Ni-Al binary alloys. All three models use the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from the same databases. The temporal evolution profiles of composition from different models are shown to agree with each other. The focus is on examining the advantages and disadvantages of each model as applied to microstructure evolution in alloys

  17. Magnonic band gaps in two-dimension magnonic crystals with diffuse interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu; Ma, Guokun; Tang, Xiaoli; Liao, Yulong; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the plane wave method is extended to include the diffuse interface in the calculation of the dispersion of spin waves in two-dimension magnonic crystals. The diffuse interfaces with linear and sinusoidal profiles of variation in the spontaneous magnetization and exchange constant are considered and the effects of the thicknesses and profiles of diffuse interfaces on the magnonic band gaps are investigated. The results show that the thicknesses and profiles of diffuse interfaces are clearly seen to play a significant role in determining the size and position of the magnonic band gaps in the both square and triangular lattices in the exchange interaction regime. The smooth (linear or sinusoidal) interface does not lead to disappearance of the band gaps, instead it may lead to larger band gaps than those in the model with sharp (infinitely thin) diffuse interface under certain conditions

  18. Modelling of Innovation Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Kijek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the Bass model in 1969, research on the modelling of the diffusion of innovation resulted in a vast body of scientific literature consisting of articles, books, and studies of real-world applications of this model. The main objective of the diffusion model is to describe a pattern of spread of innovation among potential adopters in terms of a mathematical function of time. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art in mathematical models of innovation diffusion and procedures for estimating their parameters. Moreover, theoretical issues related to the models presented are supplemented with empirical research. The purpose of the research is to explore the extent to which the diffusion of broadband Internet users in 29 OECD countries can be adequately described by three diffusion models, i.e. the Bass model, logistic model and dynamic model. The results of this research are ambiguous and do not indicate which model best describes the diffusion pattern of broadband Internet users but in terms of the results presented, in most cases the dynamic model is inappropriate for describing the diffusion pattern. Issues related to the further development of innovation diffusion models are discussed and some recommendations are given. (original abstract

  19. Mechanism of forming interfacial intermetallic compounds at interface for solid state diffusion bonding of dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, P.; Liu, D.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of brittle intermetallic compounds at the interfaces of diffusion bonds is the main cause which leads to poor bond strength. Therefore, it is very important to study and establish the formation and growth model of intermetallic compounds at the interfaces for the control process of diffusion bonding. In this paper, according to the diffusion kinetics and the thermodynamics, the principle of formation of intermetallic compounds at interfaces in the multi-component diffusion couple, the flux-energy principle, is put forward. In the light of diffusion theory, the formation capacity of the phase at the interfaces is determined by specific properties of the composition in the diffusion couple and the composition ratio of the formed phase is in agreement with the diffusion flux. In accordance with the flux-energy principle, the microstructure of the Ni/TC4 interface is Ni/TiNi 3 /TiNi/Ti 2 Ni/TC4, the microstructure of the TC4/00Cr18Ni9Ti interface is 00Cr18Ni9Ti/TiFe 2 /TiFe/Ti 2 Fe/TC4, and the microstructure of the TiAl/40Cr interface is 40Cr/TiC/Ti 3 Al + FeAl + FeAl 2 /TiAl. Multi-intermetallic compounds with the equivalent flux-energy can be formed at the interfaces at the same time

  20. Entropy stable modeling of non-isothermal multi-component diffuse-interface two-phase flows with realistic equations of state

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we consider mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of non-isothermal compressible multi-component diffuse-interface two-phase flows with realistic equations of state. A general model with general reference velocity is derived rigorously through thermodynamical laws and Onsager's reciprocal principle, and it is capable of characterizing compressibility and partial miscibility between multiple fluids. We prove a novel relation among the pressure, temperature and chemical potentials, which results in a new formulation of the momentum conservation equation indicating that the gradients of chemical potentials and temperature become the primary driving force of the fluid motion except for the external forces. A key challenge in numerical simulation is to develop entropy stable numerical schemes preserving the laws of thermodynamics. Based on the convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density with respect to molar densities and temperature, we propose an entropy stable numerical method, which solves the total energy balance equation directly, and thus, naturally satisfies the first law of thermodynamics. Unconditional entropy stability (the second law of thermodynamics) of the proposed method is proved by estimating the variations of Helmholtz free energy and kinetic energy with time steps. Numerical results validate the proposed method.

  1. Entropy stable modeling of non-isothermal multi-component diffuse-interface two-phase flows with realistic equations of state

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2018-02-25

    In this paper, we consider mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of non-isothermal compressible multi-component diffuse-interface two-phase flows with realistic equations of state. A general model with general reference velocity is derived rigorously through thermodynamical laws and Onsager\\'s reciprocal principle, and it is capable of characterizing compressibility and partial miscibility between multiple fluids. We prove a novel relation among the pressure, temperature and chemical potentials, which results in a new formulation of the momentum conservation equation indicating that the gradients of chemical potentials and temperature become the primary driving force of the fluid motion except for the external forces. A key challenge in numerical simulation is to develop entropy stable numerical schemes preserving the laws of thermodynamics. Based on the convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density with respect to molar densities and temperature, we propose an entropy stable numerical method, which solves the total energy balance equation directly, and thus, naturally satisfies the first law of thermodynamics. Unconditional entropy stability (the second law of thermodynamics) of the proposed method is proved by estimating the variations of Helmholtz free energy and kinetic energy with time steps. Numerical results validate the proposed method.

  2. Coulomb Green's function and image potential near a cylindrical diffuse interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Changfeng; Huang, Qiongwei; Deng, Shaozhong

    2015-12-01

    In a preceding paper [Comput. Phys. Commun. 184 (1): 51-59, 2013], we revisited the problem of calculating Coulomb Green's function and image potential near a planar diffuse interface within which the dielectric permittivity of the inhomogeneous medium changes continuously along one Cartesian direction in a transition layer between two dissimilar dielectric materials. In the present paper, we consider a cylindrical diffuse interface within which the dielectric permittivity changes continuously along the radial direction instead. First we propose a specific cylindrical diffuse interface model, termed the quasi-harmonic diffuse interface model, that can admit analytical solution for the Green's function in terms of the modified Bessel functions. Then and more importantly we develop a robust numerical method for building Green's functions for any cylindrical diffuse interface models. The main idea of the numerical method is, after dividing a diffuse interface into multiple sublayers, to approximate the dielectric permittivity profile in each one of the sublayers by one of the quasi-harmonic functional form rather than simply by a constant value as one would normally do. Next we describe how to efficiently compute well-behaved ratios, products, and logarithmic derivatives of the modified Bessel functions so as to avoid direct evaluations of individual modified Bessel functions in our formulations. Finally we conduct numerical experiments to show the effectiveness of the quasi-harmonic diffuse interface model in overcoming the divergence of the image potential, to validate the numerical method in terms of its accuracy and convergence, and to demonstrate its capability for computing Green's functions for any cylindrical diffuse interface models.

  3. Evaporation, diffusion and self-assembly at drying interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, K; Sparr, E; Wennerström, H

    2018-04-18

    Water evaporation from complex aqueous solutions leads to the build-up of structure and composition gradients at their interface with air. We recently introduced an experimental setup for quantitatively studying such gradients and discussed how structure formation can lead to a self-regulation mechanism for controlling water evaporation through self-assembly. Here, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis using an advection/diffusion transport equation that takes into account thermodynamically non-ideal conditions and we directly relate the theoretical description to quantitative experimental data. We derive that the concentration profile develops according to a general square root of time scaling law, which fully agrees with experimental observations. The evaporation rate notably decreases with time as t-1/2, which shows that diffusion in the liquid phase is the rate limiting step for this system, in contrast to pure water evaporation. For the particular binary system that was investigated experimentally, which is composed of water and a sugar-based surfactant (α-dodecylmaltoside), the interfacial layer consists in a sequence of liquid crystalline phases of different mesostructures. We extract values for mutual diffusion coefficients of lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases, which are consistent with previously reported values and simple models. We thus provide a method to estimate the transport properties of oriented mesophases. The macroscopic humidity-independence of the evaporation rate up to 85% relative humidities is shown to result from both an extremely low mutual diffusion coefficient and the large range of water activities corresponding to relative humidities below 85%, at which the lamellar phase exists. Such a humidity self-regulation mechanism is expected for a large variety of complex system.

  4. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Diffusing Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    2001-01-01

    Excitation of two miscible-viscous liquids inside a bounded enclosure in a microgravity environment has shown the evolution of quasi-stationary waves of various modes for a range of parameters. We examine computationally the nonlinear dynamics of the system as the interface breakup and bifurcates to resonance structures typified by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mechanism. Results show that when the mean steady field is much smaller than the amplitude of the sinusoidal excitation, the system behaves linearly, and growth of quasi-stationary waves occurs through the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mechanism. However, as the amplitude of excitation increases, nonlinearity occurs through subharmonic bifurcation prior to broadband chaos.

  5. Perturbation on diffusion problems in domain with interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, F.V.

    1985-01-01

    A perturbative type algorithm for the solution of linear diffusion equation at two dimensions, in domain with interfaces is presented. The perturbative scheme should be assembled in the weak formulation of diffusion equation, even if the strong solution exists, and when it is taken in terms superiors to first order, it should be calculated analytically, in one of the dimensions to avoid problems of slow convergence. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Diffusion in condensed matter methods, materials, models

    CERN Document Server

    Kärger, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion as the process of particle transport due to stochastic movement is a phenomenon of crucial relevance for a large variety of processes and materials. This comprehensive, handbook- style survey of diffusion in condensed matter gives detailed insight into diffusion as the process of particle transport due to stochastic movement. Leading experts in the field describe in 23 chapters the different aspects of diffusion, covering microscopic and macroscopic experimental techniques and exemplary results for various classes of solids, liquids and interfaces as well as several theoretical concepts and models. Students and scientists in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology will benefit from this detailed compilation.

  7. Modeling Europa's Ice-Ocean Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenousy, A.; Vance, S.; Bills, B. G.

    2014-12-01

    This work focuses on modeling the ice-ocean interface on Jupiter's Moon (Europa); mainly from the standpoint of heat and salt transfer relationship with emphasis on the basal ice growth rate and its implications to Europa's tidal response. Modeling the heat and salt flux at Europa's ice/ocean interface is necessary to understand the dynamics of Europa's ocean and its interaction with the upper ice shell as well as the history of active turbulence at this area. To achieve this goal, we used McPhee et al., 2008 parameterizations on Earth's ice/ocean interface that was developed to meet Europa's ocean dynamics. We varied one parameter at a time to test its influence on both; "h" the basal ice growth rate and on "R" the double diffusion tendency strength. The double diffusion tendency "R" was calculated as the ratio between the interface heat exchange coefficient αh to the interface salt exchange coefficient αs. Our preliminary results showed a strong double diffusion tendency R ~200 at Europa's ice-ocean interface for plausible changes in the heat flux due to onset or elimination of a hydrothermal activity, suggesting supercooling and a strong tendency for forming frazil ice.

  8. On Diffusive Climatological Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffel, D. H.; Drazin, P. G.

    1981-11-01

    A simple, zonally and annually averaged, energy-balance climatological model with diffusive heat transport and nonlinear albedo feedback is solved numerically. Some parameters of the model are varied, one by one, to find the resultant effects on the steady solution representing the climate. In particular, the outward radiation flux, the insulation distribution and the albedo parameterization are varied. We have found an accurate yet simple analytic expression for the mean annual insolation as a function of latitude and the obliquity of the Earth's rotation axis; this has enabled us to consider the effects of the oscillation of the obliquity. We have used a continuous albedo function which fits the observed values; it considerably reduces the sensitivity of the model. Climatic cycles, calculated by solving the time-dependent equation when parameters change slowly and periodically, are compared qualitatively with paleoclimatic records.

  9. Transport and diffusion of material quantities on propagating interfaces via level set methods

    CERN Document Server

    Adalsteinsson, D

    2003-01-01

    We develop theory and numerical algorithms to apply level set methods to problems involving the transport and diffusion of material quantities in a level set framework. Level set methods are computational techniques for tracking moving interfaces; they work by embedding the propagating interface as the zero level set of a higher dimensional function, and then approximate the solution of the resulting initial value partial differential equation using upwind finite difference schemes. The traditional level set method works in the trace space of the evolving interface, and hence disregards any parameterization in the interface description. Consequently, material quantities on the interface which themselves are transported under the interface motion are not easily handled in this framework. We develop model equations and algorithmic techniques to extend the level set method to include these problems. We demonstrate the accuracy of our approach through a series of test examples and convergence studies.

  10. Transport and diffusion of material quantities on propagating interfaces via level set methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adalsteinsson, David; Sethian, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We develop theory and numerical algorithms to apply level set methods to problems involving the transport and diffusion of material quantities in a level set framework. Level set methods are computational techniques for tracking moving interfaces; they work by embedding the propagating interface as the zero level set of a higher dimensional function, and then approximate the solution of the resulting initial value partial differential equation using upwind finite difference schemes. The traditional level set method works in the trace space of the evolving interface, and hence disregards any parameterization in the interface description. Consequently, material quantities on the interface which themselves are transported under the interface motion are not easily handled in this framework. We develop model equations and algorithmic techniques to extend the level set method to include these problems. We demonstrate the accuracy of our approach through a series of test examples and convergence studies

  11. Cellular interface morphologies in directional solidification. III - The effects of heat transfer and solid diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Lyle H.; Bennett, Mark J.; Brown, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    The shape and stability of two-dimensional finite-amplitude cellular interfaces arising during directional solidification are compared for several solidification models that account differently for latent heat released at the interface, unequal thermal conductivities of melt and solid, and solute diffusivity in the solid. Finite-element analysis and computer-implemented perturbation methods are used to analyze the families of steadily growing cellular forms that evolve from the planar state. In all models a secondary bifurcation between different families of finite-amplitude cells exists that halves the spatial wavelength of the stable interface. The quantitative location of this transition is very dependent on the details of the model. Large amounts of solute diffusion in the solid retard the growth of large-amplitude cells.

  12. Diffuse-Interface Capturing Methods for Compressible Two-Phase Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurel, Richard; Pantano, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Simulation of compressible flows became a routine activity with the appearance of shock-/contact-capturing methods. These methods can determine all waves, particularly discontinuous ones. However, additional difficulties may appear in two-phase and multimaterial flows due to the abrupt variation of thermodynamic properties across the interfacial region, with discontinuous thermodynamical representations at the interfaces. To overcome this difficulty, researchers have developed augmented systems of governing equations to extend the capturing strategy. These extended systems, reviewed here, are termed diffuse-interface models, because they are designed to compute flow variables correctly in numerically diffused zones surrounding interfaces. In particular, they facilitate coupling the dynamics on both sides of the (diffuse) interfaces and tend to the proper pure fluid-governing equations far from the interfaces. This strategy has become efficient for contact interfaces separating fluids that are governed by different equations of state, in the presence or absence of capillary effects, and with phase change. More sophisticated materials than fluids (e.g., elastic-plastic materials) have been considered as well.

  13. Interface structure of Be/DSCu diffusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, T.; Iwadachi, T. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is used as plasma facing components of the first wall on ITER. Dispersion-Strengthened Copper (DSCu) is used as heat sink material by joining to Be because DSCu has high thermal conductivity and strength. In this study, Be/DSCu diffusion bonding tests using the interlayer of Al, Ni, Nb, Ti, Zr and Be-Cu alloy have been conducted to choose the suitable interlayer materials. As a result of the shear strength tests, Be/DSCu joints by using Be-Cu alloy interlayer showed the strength of about 200 MPa. Diffusion bonding tests using Be-Cu alloy interlayer or no interlayer (direct bonding) at the range of temperature from 600degC to 850degC have been conducted to identify the effect of bonding temperature and time on interface formation and strength. The thickness of diffusion layer was proportional to a square root of bonding time by diffusion controlled process. The shear strength is controlled by the formation of intermetallic layer at Be side. (author)

  14. Computational design of patterned interfaces using reduced order models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vattre, A.J.; Abdolrahim, N.; Kolluri, K.; Demkowicz, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Patterning is a familiar approach for imparting novel functionalities to free surfaces. We extend the patterning paradigm to interfaces between crystalline solids. Many interfaces have non-uniform internal structures comprised of misfit dislocations, which in turn govern interface properties. We develop and validate a computational strategy for designing interfaces with controlled misfit dislocation patterns by tailoring interface crystallography and composition. Our approach relies on a novel method for predicting the internal structure of interfaces: rather than obtaining it from resource-intensive atomistic simulations, we compute it using an efficient reduced order model based on anisotropic elasticity theory. Moreover, our strategy incorporates interface synthesis as a constraint on the design process. As an illustration, we apply our approach to the design of interfaces with rapid, 1-D point defect diffusion. Patterned interfaces may be integrated into the microstructure of composite materials, markedly improving performance. (authors)

  15. Numerical simulation of compressible two-phase flow using a diffuse interface method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, M.R.; Daramizadeh, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Compressible two-phase gas–gas and gas–liquid flows simulation are conducted. ► Interface conditions contain shock wave and cavitations. ► A high-resolution diffuse interface method is investigated. ► The numerical results exhibit very good agreement with experimental results. -- Abstract: In this article, a high-resolution diffuse interface method is investigated for simulation of compressible two-phase gas–gas and gas–liquid flows, both in the presence of shock wave and in flows with strong rarefaction waves similar to cavitations. A Godunov method and HLLC Riemann solver is used for discretization of the Kapila five-equation model and a modified Schmidt equation of state (EOS) is used to simulate the cavitation regions. This method is applied successfully to some one- and two-dimensional compressible two-phase flows with interface conditions that contain shock wave and cavitations. The numerical results obtained in this attempt exhibit very good agreement with experimental results, as well as previous numerical results presented by other researchers based on other numerical methods. In particular, the algorithm can capture the complex flow features of transient shocks, such as the material discontinuities and interfacial instabilities, without any oscillation and additional diffusion. Numerical examples show that the results of the method presented here compare well with other sophisticated modeling methods like adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and local mesh refinement (LMR) for one- and two-dimensional problems

  16. Models of diffuse solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, John; Ridley, Barbara [Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Brown, Bruce [Department of Statistics and Applied Probability, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117546 (Singapore)

    2008-04-15

    For some locations both global and diffuse solar radiation are measured. However, for many locations, only global is measured, or inferred from satellite data. For modelling solar energy applications, the amount of radiation on a tilted surface is needed. Since only the direct component on a tilted surface can be calculated from trigonometry, we need to have diffuse on the horizontal available. There are regression relationships for estimating the diffuse on a tilted surface from diffuse on the horizontal. Models for estimating the diffuse radiation on the horizontal from horizontal global that have been developed in Europe or North America have proved to be inadequate for Australia [Spencer JW. A comparison of methods for estimating hourly diffuse solar radiation from global solar radiation. Sol Energy 1982; 29(1): 19-32]. Boland et al. [Modelling the diffuse fraction of global solar radiation on a horizontal surface. Environmetrics 2001; 12: 103-16] developed a validated model for Australian conditions. We detail our recent advances in developing the theoretical framework for the approach reported therein, particularly the use of the logistic function instead of piecewise linear or simple nonlinear functions. Additionally, we have also constructed a method, using quadratic programming, for identifying values that are likely to be erroneous. This allows us to eliminate outliers in diffuse radiation values, the data most prone to errors in measurement. (author)

  17. Tightness of voter model interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sturm, A.; Swart, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2008), s. 165-174 ISSN 1083-589X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/06/1323; GA ČR GA201/07/0237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : long range voter model * swapping voter model * interface tightness * exclusion process Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 0.392, year: 2008 http://www.emis.de/journals/EJP-ECP/_ejpecp/index.html

  18. Discrete ordinates solution of coupled conductive radiative heat transfer in a two-layer slab with Fresnel interfaces subject to diffuse and obliquely collimated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muresan, Cristian; Vaillon, Rodolphe; Menezo, Christophe; Morlot, Rodolphe

    2004-01-01

    The coupled conductive radiative heat transfer in a two-layer slab with Fresnel interfaces subject to diffuse and obliquely collimated irradiation is solved. The collimated and diffuse components problems are treated separately. The solution for diffuse radiation is obtained by using a composite discrete ordinates method and includes the development of adaptive directional quadratures to overcome the difficulties usually encountered at the interfaces. The complete radiation numerical model is validated against the predictions obtained by using the Monte Carlo method

  19. Characteristic time scales for diffusion processes through layers and across interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Elliot J.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a simple tool for characterizing the time scale for continuum diffusion processes through layered heterogeneous media. This mathematical problem is motivated by several practical applications such as heat transport in composite materials, flow in layered aquifers, and drug diffusion through the layers of the skin. In such processes, the physical properties of the medium vary across layers and internal boundary conditions apply at the interfaces between adjacent layers. To characterize the time scale, we use the concept of mean action time, which provides the mean time scale at each position in the medium by utilizing the fact that the transition of the transient solution of the underlying partial differential equation model, from initial state to steady state, can be represented as a cumulative distribution function of time. Using this concept, we define the characteristic time scale for a multilayer diffusion process as the maximum value of the mean action time across the layered medium. For given initial conditions and internal and external boundary conditions, this approach leads to simple algebraic expressions for characterizing the time scale that depend on the physical and geometrical properties of the medium, such as the diffusivities and lengths of the layers. Numerical examples demonstrate that these expressions provide useful insight into explaining how the parameters in the model affect the time it takes for a multilayer diffusion process to reach steady state.

  20. Interface bonding of SA508-3 steel under deformation and high temperature diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Shao, Chunjuan; Sun, Mingyue

    2018-05-01

    There are mainly two parameters affecting high temperature interface bonding: deformation and diffusion. To study these two parameters, interface bonding of SA508-3 bainitic steel at 1100°C are simulated by gleeble3500 thermal simulator. The results show that interface of SA508-3 steel can be bonded under deformation and high temperature. For a specimen pressed at 1100°C without further high temperature diffusion, a reduction ratio of 30% can make the interface begun to bond, but the interface is still part of the grain boundary and small grains exist near the interface. When reduction ratio reaches 50%, the interface can be completely bonded and the microstructure near the interface is the same as that of the base material. When deformation is small, long time diffusion can also help the interface bonding. The results show that when the diffusion time is long enough, the interface under small deformation can also be bonded. For a specimen holding for 24h at 1100°C, only 13% reduction ratio is enough for interface bonding.

  1. EPES information depth for an overlayer/substrate system with a diffuse interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zommer, L.

    2009-01-01

    The information depth (ID) of elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) was considered for an overlayer/substrate system with a diffuse interface. The interface was assumed to have an exponential concentration profile. The paradox previously found by Zommer and Jablonski for the Rh/Al and Al/Rh systems with sharp interfaces also occurs for these systems with diffuse interfaces. We compared IDs for diffuse and sharp interfaces. Deviations between the IDs depend on the interface width, overlayer thickness, and selected system for a given primary energy (here 2000 eV). The deviations for the Rh/Al and Al/Rh systems differ profoundly. These results are of importance when interpreting EPES measurements of layered system

  2. A one-level FETI method for the drift–diffusion-Poisson system with discontinuities at an interface

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgartner, Stefan; Heitzinger, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    A 3d feti method for the drift-diffusion-Poisson system including discontinuities at a 2d interface is developed. The motivation for this work is to provide a parallel numerical algorithm for a system of PDEs that are the basic model equations

  3. Interface methods for hybrid Monte Carlo-diffusion radiation-transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2006-01-01

    Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations in diffusive media. An important aspect of DDMC is the treatment of interfaces between diffusive regions, where DDMC is used, and transport regions, where standard Monte Carlo is employed. Three previously developed methods exist for treating transport-diffusion interfaces: the Marshak interface method, based on the Marshak boundary condition, the asymptotic interface method, based on the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition, and the Nth-collided source technique, a scheme that allows Monte Carlo particles to undergo several collisions in a diffusive region before DDMC is used. Numerical calculations have shown that each of these interface methods gives reasonable results as part of larger radiation-transport simulations. In this paper, we use both analytic and numerical examples to compare the ability of these three interface techniques to treat simpler, transport-diffusion interface problems outside of a more complex radiation-transport calculation. We find that the asymptotic interface method is accurate regardless of the angular distribution of Monte Carlo particles incident on the interface surface. In contrast, the Marshak boundary condition only produces correct solutions if the incident particles are isotropic. We also show that the Nth-collided source technique has the capacity to yield accurate results if spatial cells are optically small and Monte Carlo particles are allowed to undergo many collisions within a diffusive region before DDMC is employed. These requirements make the Nth-collided source technique impractical for realistic radiation-transport calculations

  4. Quantitative measurement of water diffusion lifetimes at a protein/DNA interface by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruschus, James M.; Ferretti, James A.

    2001-01-01

    Hydration site lifetimes of slowly diffusing water molecules at the protein/DNA interface of the vnd/NK-2 homeodomain DNA complex were determined using novel three-dimensional NMR techniques. The lifetimes were calculated using the ratios of ROE and NOE cross-relaxation rates between the water and the protein backbone and side chain amides. This calculation of the lifetimes is based on a model of the spectral density function of the water-protein interaction consisting of three timescales of motion: fast vibrational/rotational motion, diffusion into/out of the hydration site, and overall macromolecular tumbling. The lifetimes measured ranged from approximately 400 ps to more than 5 ns, and nearly all the slowly diffusing water molecules detected lie at the protein/DNA interface. A quantitative analysis of relayed water cross-relaxation indicated that even at very short mixing times, 5 ms for ROESY and 12 ms for NOESY, relay of magnetization can make a small but detectable contribution to the measured rates. The temperature dependences of the NOE rates were measured to help discriminate direct dipolar cross-relaxation from chemical exchange. Comparison with several X-ray structures of homeodomain/DNA complexes reveals a strong correspondence between water molecules in conserved locations and the slowly diffusing water molecules detected by NMR. A homology model based on the X-ray structures was created to visualize the conserved water molecules detected at the vnd/NK-2 homeodomain DNA interface. Two chains of water molecules are seen at the right and left sides of the major groove, adjacent to the third helix of the homeodomain. Two water-mediated hydrogen bond bridges spanning the protein/DNA interface are present in the model, one between the backbone of Phe8 and a DNA phosphate, and one between the side chain of Asn51 and a DNA phosphate. The hydrogen bond bridge between Asn51 and the DNA might be especially important since the DNA contact made by the invariant

  5. Viscosity and viscoelasticity of two-phase systems having diffuse interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium stability criterion for diffuse interfaces in a two-component solution with a miscibility gap requires that the interdiffusion flux vanish. If the system is continuously deformed, convective fluxes disrupt the equilibrium in the interface regions and induce a counter diffusive flux, which is dissipative and contributes to the apparent viscosity of the mixture. Chemical free energy is recoverably stored, causing viscoelastic phenomena. Both effects are significant.

  6. Electrokinetics of diffuse soft interfaces. 1. Limit of low Donnan potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2004-11-09

    The current theoretical approaches to electrokinetics of gels or polyelectrolyte layers are based on the assumption that the position of the very interface between the aqueous medium and the gel phase is well defined. Within this assumption, spatial profiles for the volume fraction of polymer segments (phi), the density of fixed charges in the porous layer (rho fix), and the coefficient modeling the friction to hydrodynamic flow (k) follow a step-function. In reality, the "fuzzy" nature of the charged soft layer is intrinsically incompatible with the concept of a sharp interface and therefore necessarily calls for more detailed spatial representations for phi, rho fix, and k. In this paper, the notion of diffuse interface is introduced. For the sake of illustration, linear spatial distributions for phi and rho fix are considered in the interfacial zone between the bulk of the porous charged layer and the bulk electrolyte solution. The corresponding distribution for k is inferred from the Brinkman equation, which for low phi reduces to Stokes' equation. Linear electrostatics, hydrodynamics, and electroosmosis issues are analytically solved within the context of streaming current and streaming potential of charged surface layers in a thin-layer cell. The hydrodynamic analysis clearly demonstrates the physical incorrectness of the concept of a discrete slip plane for diffuse interfaces. For moderate to low electrolyte concentrations and nanoscale spatial transition of phi from zero (bulk electrolyte) to phi o (bulk gel), the electrokinetic properties of the soft layer as predicted by the theory considerably deviate from those calculated on the basis of the discontinuous approximation by Ohshima.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion bonding of Al–Cu interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chang; Li, Dongxu; Tao, Xiaoma; Chen, Hongmei; Ouyang, Yifang

    2014-01-01

    The effects of temperature on diffusion bonding of Al–Cu interface have been investigated by using molecular dynamics (MD) technique with the embedded atomic method (EAM) potentials. The simulated results indicate that the Cu atoms predominantly diffuse into the Al side in the process of diffusion bonding, and the thickness of the interfacial region depends on temperature, with higher temperatures resulting in larger thickness. In the course of diffusion bonding, the interfacial region became disordered. In addition, the Cu atoms diffuse at low ratios but can deeply diffuse into the interior of Al, and the Al atoms diffuse at high ratios but hardly diffuse into the interior of Cu. The results show that the appropriate temperature range for diffusion bonding of Al–Cu interface is 750–800 K, and the diffusion activation energies of Al and Cu are 0.77 eV and 0.50 eV, respectively. Finally, in this work, three diffusion mechanisms of Cu atoms in Al lattice have been found and the main diffusion mechanism is the nearest neighbor hopping mechanism. (paper)

  8. A singular perturbation limit of diffused interface energy with a fixed contact angle condition

    OpenAIRE

    Kagaya, Takashi; Tonegawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    We study a general asymptotic behavior of critical points of a diffused interface energy with a fixed contact angle condition defined on a domain $\\Omega \\subset \\mathbb{R}^n$. We show that the limit varifold derived from the diffused energy satisfies a generalized contact angle condition on the boundary under a set of assumptions.

  9. Film drainage and interfacial instabilities in polymeric systems with diffuse interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zdravkov, A.N.; Peters, G.W.M.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    We report an experimental investigation on the effect of mutual diffusion in polymeric systems on film drainage between two captive drops. The main objective is to study the influence of diffuse interfaces on film drainage. This is done by using material combinations with different interfacial

  10. Fine structure at the diffusion welded interface of Fe3Al/Q235 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    iron lattice sites (Fair and Wood 1994). 3.2 TEM morphology at the diffusion joint of. Fe3Al/Q235. For the welding of dissimilar materials, the element diffusion and phase formed at the interface of dissimilar. Table 1. Chemical composition and thermophysical properties of Fe3Al intermetallic compound. Chemical composition ...

  11. Modeling of interface roughness in thermoelectric composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gather, F; Heiliger, C; Klar, P J

    2011-01-01

    We use a network model to calculate the influence of the mesoscopic interface structure on the thermoelectric properties of superlattice structures consisting of alternating layers of materials A and B. The thermoelectric figure of merit of such a composite material depends on the layer thickness, if interface resistances are accounted for, and can be increased by proper interface design. In general, interface roughness reduces the figure of merit, again compared to the case of ideal interfaces. However, the strength of this reduction depends strongly on the type of interface roughness. Smooth atomic surface diffusion leading to alloying of materials A and B causes the largest reduction of the figure of merit. Consequently, in real structures, it is important not only to minimize interface roughness, but also to control the type of roughness. Although the microscopic effects of interfaces are only empirically accounted for, using a network model can yield useful information about the dependence of the macroscopic transport coefficients on the mesoscopic disorder in structured thermoelectric materials.

  12. Modeling the diffusion of scientific publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fok (Dennis); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper illustrates that salient features of a panel of time series of annual citations can be captured by a Bass type diffusion model. We put forward an extended version of this diffusion model, where we consider the relation between key characteristics of the diffusion process and

  13. Model of diffusers / permeators for hydrogen processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, W. D.; Hang, T.

    2008-01-01

    Palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) diffusers are mainstays of hydrogen processing. Diffusers separate hydrogen from inert species such as nitrogen, argon or helium. The tubing becomes permeable to hydrogen when heated to more than 250 C and a differential pressure is created across the membrane. The hydrogen diffuses better at higher temperatures. Experimental or experiential results have been the basis for determining or predicting a diffuser's performance. However, the process can be mathematically modeled, and comparison to experimental or other operating data can be utilized to improve the fit of the model. A reliable model-based diffuser system design is the goal which will have impacts on tritium and hydrogen processing. A computer model has been developed to solve the differential equations for diffusion given the operating boundary conditions. The model was compared to operating data for a low pressure diffuser system. The modeling approach and the results are presented in this paper. (authors)

  14. Reflector modelization for neutronic diffusion and parameters identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argaud, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    Physical parameters of neutronic diffusion equations can be adjusted to decrease calculations-measurements errors. The reflector being always difficult to modelize, we choose to elaborate a new reflector model and to use the parameters of this model as adjustment coefficients in the identification procedure. Using theoretical results, and also the physical behaviour of neutronic flux solutions, the reflector model consists then in its replacement by boundary conditions for the diffusion equations on the core only. This theoretical result of non-local operator relations leads then to some discrete approximations by taking into account the multiscaled behaviour, on the core-reflector interface, of neutronic diffusion solutions. The resulting model of this approach is then compared with previous reflector modelizations, and first results indicate that this new model gives the same representation of reflector for the core than previous. (author). 12 refs

  15. Interface discontinuity factors in the modal Eigenspace of the multigroup diffusion matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Herranz, N.; Herrero, J.J.; Cuervo, D.; Ahnert, C.

    2011-01-01

    Interface discontinuity factors based on the Generalized Equivalence Theory are commonly used in nodal homogenized diffusion calculations so that diffusion average values approximate heterogeneous higher order solutions. In this paper, an additional form of interface correction factors is presented in the frame of the Analytic Coarse Mesh Finite Difference Method (ACMFD), based on a correction of the modal fluxes instead of the physical fluxes. In the ACMFD formulation, implemented in COBAYA3 code, the coupled multigroup diffusion equations inside a homogenized region are reduced to a set of uncoupled modal equations through diagonalization of the multigroup diffusion matrix. Then, physical fluxes are transformed into modal fluxes in the Eigenspace of the diffusion matrix. It is possible to introduce interface flux discontinuity jumps as the difference of heterogeneous and homogeneous modal fluxes instead of introducing interface discontinuity factors as the ratio of heterogeneous and homogeneous physical fluxes. The formulation in the modal space has been implemented in COBAYA3 code and assessed by comparison with solutions using classical interface discontinuity factors in the physical space. (author)

  16. Creep and stress relaxation induced by interface diffusion in metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinfeng; Li, Zhonghua

    2013-03-01

    An analytical solution is developed to predict the creep rate induced by interface diffusion in unidirectional fiber-reinforced and particle reinforced composites. The driving force for the interface diffusion is the normal stress acting on the interface, which is obtained from rigorous Eshelby inclusion theory. The closed-form solution is an explicit function of the applied stress, volume fraction and radius of the fiber, as well as the modulus ratio between the fiber and the matrix. It is interesting that the solution is formally similar to that of Coble creep in polycrystalline materials. For the application of the present solution in the realistic composites, the scale effect is taken into account by finite element analysis based on a unit cell. Based on the solution, a closed-form solution is also given as a description of stress relaxation induced by interfacial diffusion under constant strain. In addition, the analytical solution for the interface stress presented in this study gives some insight into the relationship between the interface diffusion and interface slip. This work was supported by the financial support from the Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 10932007), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2010CB631003/5), and the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20100073110006).

  17. Electron confinement at diffuse ZnMgO/ZnO interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddison L. Coke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abrupt interfaces between ZnMgO and ZnO are strained due to lattice mismatch. This strain is relaxed if there is a gradual incorporation of Mg during growth, resulting in a diffuse interface. This strain relaxation is however accompanied by reduced confinement and enhanced Mg-ion scattering of the confined electrons at the interface. Here we experimentally study the electronic transport properties of the diffuse heteroepitaxial interface between single-crystal ZnO and ZnMgO films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The spatial extent of the interface region is controlled during growth by varying the zinc flux. We show that, as the spatial extent of the graded interface is reduced, the enhancement of electron mobility due to electron confinement more than compensates for any suppression of mobility due to increased strain. Furthermore, we determine the extent to which scattering of impurities in the ZnO substrate limits the electron mobility in diffuse ZnMgO–ZnO interfaces.

  18. Electron confinement at diffuse ZnMgO/ZnO interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Maddison L.; Kennedy, Oscar W.; Sagar, James T.; Warburton, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Abrupt interfaces between ZnMgO and ZnO are strained due to lattice mismatch. This strain is relaxed if there is a gradual incorporation of Mg during growth, resulting in a diffuse interface. This strain relaxation is however accompanied by reduced confinement and enhanced Mg-ion scattering of the confined electrons at the interface. Here we experimentally study the electronic transport properties of the diffuse heteroepitaxial interface between single-crystal ZnO and ZnMgO films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The spatial extent of the interface region is controlled during growth by varying the zinc flux. We show that, as the spatial extent of the graded interface is reduced, the enhancement of electron mobility due to electron confinement more than compensates for any suppression of mobility due to increased strain. Furthermore, we determine the extent to which scattering of impurities in the ZnO substrate limits the electron mobility in diffuse ZnMgO-ZnO interfaces.

  19. Lagrangian-similarity diffusion-deposition model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A Lagrangian-similarity diffusion model has been incorporated into the surface-depletion deposition model. This model predicts vertical concentration profiles far downwind of the source that agree with those of a one-dimensional gradient-transfer model

  20. Macroscopic diffusion models for precipitation in crystalline gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmerle, Sven-Joachim Wolfgang

    2009-09-21

    Based on a thermodynamically consistent model for precipitation in gallium arsenide crystals including surface tension and bulk stresses by Dreyer and Duderstadt, we propose two different mathematical models to describe the size evolution of liquid droplets in a crystalline solid. The first model treats the diffusion-controlled regime of interface motion, while the second model is concerned with the interface-controlled regime of interface motion. Our models take care of conservation of mass and substance. These models generalise the well-known Mullins- Sekerka model for Ostwald ripening. We concentrate on arsenic-rich liquid spherical droplets in a gallium arsenide crystal. Droplets can shrink or grow with time but the centres of droplets remain fixed. The liquid is assumed to be homogeneous in space. Due to different scales for typical distances between droplets and typical radii of liquid droplets we can derive formally so-called mean field models. For a model in the diffusion-controlled regime we prove this limit by homogenisation techniques under plausible assumptions. These mean field models generalise the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner model, which can be derived from the Mullins-Sekerka model rigorously, and is well understood. Mean field models capture the main properties of our system and are well adapted for numerics and further analysis. We determine possible equilibria and discuss their stability. Numerical evidence suggests in which case which one of the two regimes might be appropriate to the experimental situation. (orig.)

  1. MHD diffuser model test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzorek, J J

    1976-07-01

    Experimental results of the aerodynamic performance of seven candidate diffusers are presented to assist in determining their suitability for joining an MHD channel to a steam generator at minimum spacing. The three dimensional diffusers varied in area ratio from 2 to 3.8 and wall half angle from 2 to 5 degrees. The program consisted of five phases: (1) tailoring a diffuser inlet nozzle to a 15 percent blockage; (2) comparison of isolated diffusers at enthalpy ratios 0.5 to 1.0 with respect to separation characteristics and pressure recovery coefficients; (3) recording the optimum diffuser exit flow distribution; (4) recording the internal flow distribution within the steam generator when attached to the diffuser; and (5) observing isolated diffuser exhaust dynamic characteristics. The 2 and 2-1/3 degree half angle rectangular diffusers showed recovery coefficients equal to 0.48 with no evidence of flow separation or instability. Diffusion at angles greater than these produced flow instabilities and with angles greater than 3 degrees random flow separation and reattachment.

  2. MHD diffuser model test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idzorek, J.J.

    1976-07-01

    Experimental results of the aerodynamic performance of seven candidate diffusers are presented to assist in determining their suitability for joining an MHD channel to a steam generator at minimum spacing. The three dimensional diffusers varied in area ratio from 2 to 3.8 and wall half angle from 2 to 5 degrees. The program consisted of five phases: (1) tailoring a diffuser inlet nozzle to a 15 percent blockage; (2) comparison of isolated diffusers at enthalpy ratios 0.5 to 1.0 with respect to separation characteristics and pressure recovery coefficients; (3) recording the optimum diffuser exit flow distribution; (4) recording the internal flow distribution within the steam generator when attached to the diffuser; and (5) observing isolated diffuser exhaust dynamic characteristics. The 2 and 2-1/3 degree half angle rectangular diffusers showed recovery coefficients equal to 0.48 with no evidence of flow separation or instability. Diffusion at angles greater than these produced flow instabilities and with angles greater than 3 degrees random flow separation and reattachment

  3. The surface diffusion coefficient for an arbitrarily curved fluid-fluid interface. (I). General expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. C. Sagis, Leonard

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a theory for the calculation of the surface diffusion coefficient for an arbitrarily curved fluid-fluid interface. The theory is valid for systems in hydrodynamic equilibrium, with zero mass-averaged velocities in the bulk and interfacial regions. We restrict our attention to systems with isotropic bulk phases, and an interfacial region that is isotropic in the plane parallel to the dividing surface. The dividing surface is assumed to be a simple interface, without memory effects or yield stresses. We derive an expression for the surface diffusion coefficient in terms of two parameters of the interfacial region: the coefficient for plane-parallel diffusion D (AB)aa(ξ) , and the driving force d(B)I||(ξ) . This driving force is the parallel component of the driving force for diffusion in the interfacial region. We derive an expression for this driving force using the entropy balance.

  4. Homogenization of neutronic diffusion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdebosq, Y.

    1999-09-01

    In order to study and simulate nuclear reactor cores, one needs to access the neutron distribution in the core. In practice, the description of this density of neutrons is given by a system of diffusion equations, coupled by non differential exchange terms. The strong heterogeneity of the medium constitutes a major obstacle to the numerical computation of this models at reasonable cost. Homogenization appears as compulsory. Heuristic methods have been developed since the origin by nuclear physicists, under a periodicity assumption on the coefficients. They consist in doing a fine computation one a single periodicity cell, to solve the system on the whole domain with homogeneous coefficients, and to reconstruct the neutron density by multiplying the solutions of the two computations. The objectives of this work are to provide mathematically rigorous basis to this factorization method, to obtain the exact formulas of the homogenized coefficients, and to start on geometries where two periodical medium are placed side by side. The first result of this thesis concerns eigenvalue problem models which are used to characterize the state of criticality of the reactor, under a symmetry assumption on the coefficients. The convergence of the homogenization process is proved, and formulas of the homogenized coefficients are given. We then show that without symmetry assumptions, a drift phenomenon appears. It is characterized by the mean of a real Bloch wave method, which gives the homogenized limit in the general case. These results for the critical problem are then adapted to the evolution model. Finally, the homogenization of the critical problem in the case of two side by side periodic medium is studied on a one dimensional on equation model. (authors)

  5. Diffuse-interface polycrystal plasticity: expressing grain boundaries as geometrically necessary dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admal, Nikhil Chandra; Po, Giacomo; Marian, Jaime

    2017-12-01

    The standard way of modeling plasticity in polycrystals is by using the crystal plasticity model for single crystals in each grain, and imposing suitable traction and slip boundary conditions across grain boundaries. In this fashion, the system is modeled as a collection of boundary-value problems with matching boundary conditions. In this paper, we develop a diffuse-interface crystal plasticity model for polycrystalline materials that results in a single boundary-value problem with a single crystal as the reference configuration. Using a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into lattice and plastic parts, i.e. F( X,t)= F L( X,t) F P( X,t), an initial stress-free polycrystal is constructed by imposing F L to be a piecewise constant rotation field R 0( X), and F P= R 0( X)T, thereby having F( X,0)= I, and zero elastic strain. This model serves as a precursor to higher order crystal plasticity models with grain boundary energy and evolution.

  6. Modeling the Lithium Ion/Electrode Battery Interface Using Fick’s Second Law of Diffusion, the Laplace Transform, Charge Transfer Functions, and a [4, 4] Padé Approximant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Summerfield

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates a one-dimensional model for the solid-state diffusion in a LiC6/LiMnO2 rechargeable cell. This cell is used in hybrid electric vehicles. In this environment the cell experiences low frequency electrical pulses that degrade the electrodes. The model’s starting point is Fick’s second law of diffusion. The Laplace transform is used to move from time as the independent variable to frequency as the independent variable. To better understand the effect of frequency changes on the cell, a transfer function is constructed. The transfer function is a transcendental function so a Padé approximant is found to better describe the model at the origin. Consider ∂c(r,t/∂t=D∂2c(r/∂2r+(2/r(∂c(r/∂r.

  7. Model-to-model interface for multiscale materials modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Perry Edward [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-12-17

    A low-level model-to-model interface is presented that will enable independent models to be linked into an integrated system of models. The interface is based on a standard set of functions that contain appropriate export and import schemas that enable models to be linked with no changes to the models themselves. These ideas are presented in the context of a specific multiscale material problem that couples atomistic-based molecular dynamics calculations to continuum calculations of fluid ow. These simulations will be used to examine the influence of interactions of the fluid with an adjacent solid on the fluid ow. The interface will also be examined by adding it to an already existing modeling code, Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) and comparing it with our own molecular dynamics code.

  8. Impurity diffusion, point defect engineering, and surface/interface passivation in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2012-01-26

    In recent years germanium has been emerging as a mainstream material that could have important applications in the microelectronics industry. The principle aim of this study is to review investigations of the diffusion of technologically important p- and n-type dopants as well as surface and interface passivation issues in germanium. The diffusion of impurities in germanium is interrelated to the formation of clusters whenever possible, and possibilities for point defect engineering are discussed in view of recent results. The importance of electrically active defects on the Ge surface and interfaces is addressed considering strategies to suppress them and to passivate the surfaces/interfaces, bearing in mind their importance for advanced devices. © 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Diffuse scattering from the liquid-vapor interfaces of dilute Bi:Ga, Tl:Ga, and Pb:Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongxu; Jiang Xu; Rice, Stuart A.; Lin Binhua; Meron, Mati

    2005-01-01

    As part of a study of the in-plane wave-vector (q xy ) dependence of the effective Hamiltonian for the liquid-vapor interface, H(q), the wave-vector dependences of diffuse x-ray scattering from the liquid-vapor interfaces of dilute alloys of Bi in Ga, Tl in Ga, and Pb in Ga have been measured. In these dilute alloys the solute component segregates as a monolayer that forms the outermost stratum of the liquid-vapor interfaces, and the density distribution along the normal to the interface is stratified. Over the temperature ranges that the alloy interfaces were studied, the Tl and Pb monolayers exhibit both crystalline and liquid phases while the Bi monolayer is always liquid. The diffuse scattering from the liquid-vapor interfaces of these alloys displays interesting differences with that from the liquid-vapor interface of pure Ga. The presence of a segregated monolayer of solute in the liquid-vapor interface of the alloy appears to slightly suppress the fluctuations in an intermediate wave-vector range in a fashion that preserves the validity of the macroscopic capillary wave model to smaller wavelengths than in pure liquid Ga, and there is an increase in diffuse scattering when the Tl and Pb monolayers melt. The surface intrinsic roughness from fitting the wave-vector dependence of surface tension is 5.0 pm for the Tl:Ga alloy and 1.4 pm for the Bi:Ga alloy. Also, a mode of excitation that contributes to diffuse scattering from the liquid-vapor interface of Pb in Ga, but does not contribute to diffuse scattering from the liquid-vapor interface of Ga, has been identified. It is proposed that this mode corresponds to the separation of the Pb and Ga layers in the regime 1 nm -1 ≤q xy ≤10 nm -1

  10. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.; Woolley, T.E.; Scott, J.G.; Maini, P.K.; Gaffney, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Chemically mediated diffusion of d-metals and B through Si and agglomeration at Si-on-Mo interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tsarfati,; Zoethout, E.; van de Kruijs, R.; F. Bijkerk,

    2009-01-01

    Chemical diffusion and interlayer formation in thin layers and at interfaces is of increasing influence in nanoscopic devices, such as nanoelectronics and reflective multilayer optics. Chemical diffusion and agglomeration at interfaces of thin Ru, Mo, Si, and B4C layers have been studied with x-ray

  13. Diffusion phenomenon at the interface of Cu-brass under a strong gravitational field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, Yudai; Tokuda, Makoto; Januszko, Kamila; Khandaker, Jahirul Islam; Mashimo, Tsutomu, E-mail: mashimo@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Iguchi, Yusuke [Department of Solid State Physics, Debrecen University, 4032 Debrecen (Hungary); Ono, Masao [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-03-28

    To investigate diffusion phenomenon at the interface between Cu and brass under a strong gravitational field generated by ultracentrifuge apparatus, we performed gravity experiments on samples prepared by electroplating with interfaces normal and parallel to the direction of gravity. For the parallel-mode sample, for which sedimentation cannot occur thorough the interface, the concentration change was significant within the lower gravity region; many pores were observed in this region. Many vacancies arising from crystal strain due to the strong gravitational field moved into the lower gravity region, and enhanced the atoms mobilities. For the two normal-mode samples, which have interface normal to the direction of gravity, the composition gradient of the brass-on-Cu sample was steeper than that for Cu-on-brass. This showed that the atoms of denser Cu diffuse in the direction of gravity, whereas Zn atoms diffuse in the opposite direction by sedimentation. The interdiffusion coefficients became higher in the Cu-on-brass sample, and became lower in the brass-on-Cu sample. This rise may be related to the behavior of the vacancies.

  14. Interface sharpness in the Potts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple proof is given for the existence of a sharp interface between two ordered phases for the three-dimensional 2 double-prime-state Potts model (n integer). The results show that the roughening temperature of the three-dimensional Potts model is greater than the transition temperature of the two-dimensional Potts model. For a large arbitrary spin integer, it is expected that this roughening temperature is equal to the transition temperature (of the 3D model), i.e., that the interface between two ordered phases is harp up to the transition temperature, at which it is wetted by a film of the disordered phase. It is also expected that for a large arbitrary spin integer, the a-f interface (between an ordered and the disordered phase) is sharp at the transition temperature

  15. Symmetries and modelling functions for diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, A G; Spichak, S V; Vedula, Yu S; Naumovets, A G

    2009-01-01

    A constructive approach to the theory of diffusion processes is proposed, which is based on application of both symmetry analysis and the method of modelling functions. An algorithm for construction of the modelling functions is suggested. This algorithm is based on the error function expansion (ERFEX) of experimental concentration profiles. The high-accuracy analytical description of the profiles provided by ERFEX approximation allows a convenient extraction of the concentration dependence of diffusivity from experimental data and prediction of the diffusion process. Our analysis is exemplified by its employment in experimental results obtained for surface diffusion of lithium on the molybdenum (1 1 2) surface precovered with dysprosium. The ERFEX approximation can be directly extended to many other diffusion systems.

  16. Controlled planar interface synthesis by ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding/deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Cox, M. J.; Xu, J.

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) diffusion bonding/deposition instrument was designed and constructed, which can produce homophase and heterophase planar interfaces from a wide array of materials. The interfaces are synthesized in situ by diffusion bonding of two substrates with or without various interfacial layers, at temperatures up to about 1500 degree sign C. Substrate surfaces can be heat treated, ion-beam sputter cleaned, and chemically characterized in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy prior to deposition and/or bonding. Bicrystals can be synthesized by bonding two single-crystal substrates at a specified orientation. Interfacial layers can be deposited by electron beam evaporation and/or sputter deposition in any layered or alloyed combination on the substrates before bonding. The instrument can accommodate cylindrical and/or wafer type specimens whose sizes are sufficient for fracture mechanical testing to measure interface bond strength. A variety of planar interfaces of metals, semiconductors, and ceramics were synthesized. Examples of bonded stainless steel/Ti/stainless steel, Si/Si, and sapphire/sapphire interfaces are presented. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society

  17. Double diffusivity model under stochastic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K.; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2017-05-01

    The "double diffusivity" model was proposed in the late 1970s, and reworked in the early 1980s, as a continuum counterpart to existing discrete models of diffusion corresponding to high diffusivity paths, such as grain boundaries and dislocation lines. It was later rejuvenated in the 1990s to interpret experimental results on diffusion in polycrystalline and nanocrystalline specimens where grain boundaries and triple grain boundary junctions act as high diffusivity paths. Technically, the model pans out as a system of coupled Fick-type diffusion equations to represent "regular" and "high" diffusivity paths with "source terms" accounting for the mass exchange between the two paths. The model remit was extended by analogy to describe flow in porous media with double porosity, as well as to model heat conduction in media with two nonequilibrium local temperature baths, e.g., ion and electron baths. Uncoupling of the two partial differential equations leads to a higher-ordered diffusion equation, solutions of which could be obtained in terms of classical diffusion equation solutions. Similar equations could also be derived within an "internal length" gradient (ILG) mechanics formulation applied to diffusion problems, i.e., by introducing nonlocal effects, together with inertia and viscosity, in a mechanics based formulation of diffusion theory. While being remarkably successful in studies related to various aspects of transport in inhomogeneous media with deterministic microstructures and nanostructures, its implications in the presence of stochasticity have not yet been considered. This issue becomes particularly important in the case of diffusion in nanopolycrystals whose deterministic ILG-based theoretical calculations predict a relaxation time that is only about one-tenth of the actual experimentally verified time scale. This article provides the "missing link" in this estimation by adding a vital element in the ILG structure, that of stochasticity, that takes into

  18. Humor modeling in the interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Cockton, G.; Stock, O.; Korhonen, P.; Dix, A.; Bergman, E.; Bjork, S.; Morkes, J.; Collings, P.; Dey, A.; Draper, S.; Guliksen, J.; Keinonen, T.; Lazar, J.; Lund, A.; Malich, R.; Nakakoji, K.; Nigay, L.; Prates Oliveira, R.; Rieman, J.; Snyder, C.

    2003-01-01

    Humor is a multi-disciplinary field of research. People have been working on humor in many fields of research, such as psychology, philosophy and linguistics, sociology and literature. Especially in the context of computer science (or Artificial Intelligence) humor research aims at modeling humor in

  19. Modeling 2D and 3D diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Modeling obstructed diffusion is essential to the understanding of diffusion-mediated processes in the crowded cellular environment. Simple Monte Carlo techniques for modeling obstructed random walks are explained and related to Brownian dynamics and more complicated Monte Carlo methods. Random number generation is reviewed in the context of random walk simulations. Programming techniques and event-driven algorithms are discussed as ways to speed simulations.

  20. A tracer diffusion model derived from microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehikoinen, Jarmo; Muurinen, Arto; Olin, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Numerous attempts have been made to explain the tracer diffusion of various solutes in compacted clays. These attempts have commonly suffered from an inability to describe the diffusion of uncharged and charged solutes with a single unified model. Here, an internally consistent approach to describing the diffusion of solutes in a heterogeneous porous medium, such as compacted bentonite, in terms of its microstructure is presented. The microstructure is taken to be represented by a succession of unit cells, which consist of two consecutive regions (Do, 1996). In the first region, the diffusion is viewed to occur in two parallel paths: one through microcrystalline units (micropores) and the other through meso-pores between the microcrystalline units. Solutes exiting these two paths are then joined together to continue diffusing through the second, disordered, region, connecting the two adjacent microcrystalline units. Adsorption (incl. co-ion exclusion) is thought to occur in the micropores, whereas meso-pores and the disordered region accommodate free species alone. Co-ions are also assumed to experience transfer resistance into and out of the micropores, which is characterized in the model by a transmission coefficient. Although the model is not new per se, its application to compacted clays has never been attempted before. It is shown that in the limit of strong adsorption, the effective diffusivity is limited from above only by the microstructural parameters of the model porous medium. As intuitive and logical as this result may appear, it has not been proven before. In the limit of vanishing disordered region, the effective diffusivity is no longer explicitly constrained by any of the model parameters. The tortuosity of the diffusion path, i.e. the quotient of the actual diffusion path length in the porous-medium coordinates and the characteristic length of the laboratory frame

  1. Casimir force in O(n) systems with a diffuse interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantchev, Daniel; Grüneberg, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    We study the behavior of the Casimir force in O(n) systems with a diffuse interface and slab geometry infinity;{d-1}xL , where 2system. We consider a system with nearest-neighbor anisotropic interaction constants J_{ parallel} parallel to the film and J_{ perpendicular} across it. We argue that in such an anisotropic system the Casimir force, the free energy, and the helicity modulus will differ from those of the corresponding isotropic system, even at the bulk critical temperature, despite that these systems both belong to the same universality class. We suggest a relation between the scaling functions pertinent to the both systems. Explicit exact analytical results for the scaling functions, as a function of the temperature T , of the free energy density, Casimir force, and the helicity modulus are derived for the n-->infinity limit of O(n) models with antiperiodic boundary conditions applied along the finite dimension L of the film. We observe that the Casimir amplitude Delta_{Casimir}(dmid R:J_{ perpendicular},J_{ parallel}) of the anisotropic d -dimensional system is related to that of the isotropic system Delta_{Casimir}(d) via Delta_{Casimir}(dmid R:J_{ perpendicular},J_{ parallel})=(J_{ perpendicular}J_{ parallel});{(d-1)2}Delta_{Casimir}(d) . For d=3 we derive the exact Casimir amplitude Delta_{Casimir}(3,mid R:J_{ perpendicular},J_{ parallel})=[Cl_{2}(pi3)3-zeta(3)(6pi)](J_{ perpendicular}J_{ parallel}) , as well as the exact scaling functions of the Casimir force and of the helicity modulus Upsilon(T,L) . We obtain that beta_{c}Upsilon(T_{c},L)=(2pi;{2})[Cl_{2}(pi3)3+7zeta(3)(30pi)](J_{ perpendicular}J_{ parallel})L;{-1} , where T_{c} is the critical temperature of the bulk system. We find that the contributions in the excess free energy due to the existence of a diffuse interface result in a repulsive Casimir force in the whole temperature region.

  2. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  3. Behaviour of turbulence models near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrey, P.; Aupoix, B.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of turbulence models near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface is investigated. The analysis holds as well for two-equation as for Reynolds stress turbulence models using Daly and Harlow diffusion model. The behaviour near the interface is shown not to be a power law, as usually considered, but a more complex parametric solution. Why previous works seemed to numerically confirm the power law solution is explained. Constraints for turbulence modelling, i.e., for ensuring that models have a good behaviour near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface so that the solution is not sensitive to small turbulence levels imposed in the irrotational flow, are drawn

  4. Computer simulation of hydrogen diffusion and hydride precipitation at Ta/Zr bond interface. Hydrogen embrittlement in SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of hydrogen and precipitation of zirconium hydrides in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint were analysed by computer simulation. Numerical model of hydride precipitation under hydrogen diffusion was simplified by the alternate model coupled the macroscopic hydrogen diffusion with the microscopic hydride precipitation. Effects of the initial hydrogen content in Ta, working degree of Zr and post-bond heat treatment on the hydrogen diffusion and hydride precipitation were investigated. Hydrogen was rapidly diffused from Ta substrate into Zr after explosive bonding and temporarily concentrated at Ta/Zr bond interface. Zirconium hydrides were precipitated and grew at Ta/Zr bond interface, and the precipitation zone of hydrides was enlarged with the lapse of time. The precipitation of zirconium hydrides was promoted when the initial hydrogen content in Ta and working degree of Zr were increased. The concentration of hydrogen and precipitation of hydrides at the bond interface were reduced and diminished by post-bond heat treatment at 373 K. It was deduced that hydrogen embrittlement in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint was caused by the precipitation of zirconium hydrides and concentration of hydrogen at Ta/Zr bond interface during the diffusion of hydrogen containing in Ta substrate. (author)

  5. Effect of the Wavy permeable Interface on Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Partially Porous Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mehdaoui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional, double diffusion, natural convection in a partially porous cavity satured with a binary fluid is investigated numerically. Multiple motions are driven by the external temperature and concentration differences imposed across vertical walls. The wavy interface between fluid and porous layer is horizontal. The equations which describe the fluid flow and heat and mass transfer are described by the Navier-Stokes equations (fluid region, Darcy-Brinkman equation (porous region and energy and mass equations. The finite element method was applied to solve the governing equations. The fluid flow and heat and mass transfer has been investigated for different values of the amplitude and the wave number of the interface and the buoyancy ratio. The results obtained in the form of isotherms, stream lines, isoconcentrations and the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers; show that the wavy interface has a significant effect on the flow and heat and mass transfer.

  6. Stochastic models for surface diffusion of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.shea@dal.ca; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2014-07-28

    We derive a stochastic model for the surface diffusion of molecules, starting from the classical equations of motion for an N-atom molecule on a surface. The equation of motion becomes a generalized Langevin equation for the center of mass of the molecule, with a non-Markovian friction kernel. In the Markov approximation, a standard Langevin equation is recovered, and the effect of the molecular vibrations on the diffusion is seen to lead to an increase in the friction for center of mass motion. This effective friction has a simple form that depends on the curvature of the lowest energy diffusion path in the 3N-dimensional coordinate space. We also find that so long as the intramolecular forces are sufficiently strong, memory effects are usually not significant and the Markov approximation can be employed, resulting in a simple one-dimensional model that can account for the effect of the dynamics of the molecular vibrations on the diffusive motion.

  7. Modeling the electrified solid-liquid interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Skulason, Egill; Björketun, Mårten

    2008-01-01

    function can be related directly to the potential scale of the normal hydrogen electrode. We also show how finite-size effects in common periodic slab-type calculations can be avoided in calculations of activation energies and reaction energies for charge transfer reactions, where we use the Heyrovsky......A detailed atomistic model based on density functional theory calculations is presented of the charged solid-electrolyte interface. Having protons solvated in a water bilayer outside a Pt(111) slab with excess electrons, we show how the interface capacitance is well described and how the work...

  8. Development of nodal interface conditions for a PN approximation nodal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiz, M.

    1993-01-01

    A relation was developed for approximating higher order odd-moments from lower order odd-moments at the nodal interfaces of a Legendre polynomial nodal model. Two sample problems were tested using different order P N expansions in adjacent nodes. The developed relation proved to be adequate and matched the nodal interface flux accurately. The development allows the use of different order expansions in adjacent nodes, and will be used in a hybrid diffusion-transport nodal model. (author)

  9. Agent-based modelling of cholera diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augustijn-Beckers, Petronella; Doldersum, Tom; Useya, Juliana; Augustijn, Dionysius C.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a spatially explicit agent-based simulation model for micro-scale cholera diffusion. The model simulates both an environmental reservoir of naturally occurring V.cholerae bacteria and hyperinfectious V. cholerae. Objective of the research is to test if runoff from open refuse

  10. Stochastic diffusion models for substitutable technological innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Hu, B.; Yu, X.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the analysis of firms' stochastic adoption behaviour, this paper first points out the necessity to build more practical stochastic models. And then, stochastic evolutionary models are built for substitutable innovation diffusion system. Finally, through the computer simulation of the

  11. Data acquisition interface for calculating heat diffusion in certain electronic circuits; Interface d`acquisition des donnees permettant le calcul de la diffusion de la chaleur dans certains circuits electroniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiesser, Ph.

    1996-05-01

    A user interface has been developed for geometrical and thermal data acquisition, in order to allow calculations of heat diffusion in certain types of electronic circuits such as power hybrids and compact electronic modules, using computerized simulations. Data management, structure and organization, the data acquisition interface program, and variables and sources, are described

  12. Bag model with diffuse surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, S.C.

    1986-01-01

    The constraint of a sharp bag boundary in the bag model is relaxed in the present work. This has been achieved by replacing the square-well potential of the bag model by a smooth scalar potential and introducing a term similar to the bag pressure term. The constraint of the conservation of the energy-momentum tensor is used to obtain an expression for the added bag pressure term. The model is then used to determine the static properties of the nucleon. The calculation shows that the rms charge radius and the nucleon magnetic moment are larger than the corresponding bag model values. Also, the axial vector coupling constant and the πNN coupling constant are in better agreement with the experimental values

  13. Parameter estimation in fractional diffusion models

    CERN Document Server

    Kubilius, Kęstutis; Ralchenko, Kostiantyn

    2017-01-01

    This book is devoted to parameter estimation in diffusion models involving fractional Brownian motion and related processes. For many years now, standard Brownian motion has been (and still remains) a popular model of randomness used to investigate processes in the natural sciences, financial markets, and the economy. The substantial limitation in the use of stochastic diffusion models with Brownian motion is due to the fact that the motion has independent increments, and, therefore, the random noise it generates is “white,” i.e., uncorrelated. However, many processes in the natural sciences, computer networks and financial markets have long-term or short-term dependences, i.e., the correlations of random noise in these processes are non-zero, and slowly or rapidly decrease with time. In particular, models of financial markets demonstrate various kinds of memory and usually this memory is modeled by fractional Brownian diffusion. Therefore, the book constructs diffusion models with memory and provides s...

  14. Electrodeposition of Polymer Nanostructures using Three Diffuse Double Layers: Polymerization beyond the Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Velpula; Sangaranarayanan, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    Nanostructured conducting polymers have received immense attention during the past few decades on account of their phenomenal usefulness in diverse contexts, while the interface between two immiscible liquids is of great interest in chemical and biological applications. Here we propose a novel Electrode(solid)/Electrolyte(aqueous)/Electrolyte(organic) Interfacial assembly for the synthesis of polymeric nanostructures using a novel concept of three diffuse double layers. There exist remarkable differences between the morphologies of the polymers synthesized using the conventional electrode/electrolyte method and that of the new approach. In contrast to the commonly employed electrodeposition at liquid/liquid interfaces, these polymer modified electrodes can be directly employed in diverse applications such as sensors, supercapacitors etc.

  15. Hydrogen diffusion between plasma-deposited silicon nitride-polyimide polymer interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, S.V.; Kerbaugh, M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports a nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for hydrogen technique used to analyze the hydrogen concentration near plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride-polyimide interfaces at various nitride-deposition and polyimide-polymer-curing temperatures. The CF 4 + O 2 (8% O 2 ) plasma-etch-rate variation of PECVD silicon nitride films deposited on polyimide appeared to correlate well with the variation of hydrogen-depth profiles in the nitride films. The NRA data indicate that hydrogen-depth-profile fluctuation in the nitride films is due to hydrogen diffusion between the nitride-polyimide interfaces during deposition. Annealing treatment of polyimide films in a hydrogen atmosphere prior to the nitride film deposition tends to enhance the hydrogen-depth-profile uniformity in the nitride films, and thus substantially reduces or eliminates variation in the nitride plasma-etch rate

  16. Dopant-Modulating Mechanism of Lithium Adsorption and Diffusion at the Graphene /Li2S Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Ma, Liying; He, Chunnian; He, Fang; Liu, Enzuo

    2018-02-01

    Graphene modification is one of the most effective routes to enhance the electrochemical properties of the transition-metal sulfide anode for Li-ion batteries and the Li2S cathode for Li-S batteries. Boron, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur doping greatly affect the electrochemical properties of Li2S /graphene . Here, we investigate the interfacial binding energy, lithium adsorption energy, interface diffusion barrier, and electronic structure by first-principles calculations to unveil the diverse effects of different dopants during interfacial lithiation reactions. The interfacial lithium storage follows the pseudocapacitylike mechanism with intercalation character. Two different mechanisms are revealed to enhance the interfacial lithium adsorption and diffusion, which are the electron-deficiency host doping and the vacancylike structure evolutions with bond breaking. The synergistic effect between different dopants with diverse doping effects is also proposed. The results give a theoretical basis for the materials design with doped graphene as advanced materials modification for energy storage.

  17. Adsorption Of Surfactants At the Water-Oil Interface By Short-Time Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Estrada, Aldo; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Laura; Aguilar-Corona, Alicia; Viramontes-Gamboa, Gonzalo

    2017-11-01

    Surface tension is an important parameter for different industrial processes. The addition of surfactants can modify the interfacial tension between two fluids. As the surfactant molecules reach and are adsorbed at a fluid interface, the surface tension or interfacial tension is reduced until the interface is saturated. Dynamic Interfacial tension measurements were carried out using an optical tensiometer by the Pendant Drop technique at a room temperature of 25 °C for a period of 250 sec. A drop of surfactant solution was deposited and allowed to diffuse into a water-oil interface, and then the adsorption rate at the interface was calculated. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) was used as the surfactant, hexane and dodecane were tested as the oil phase. A linear decay in the interfacial tension was observed for the lower initial concentrations of the order of 0.0001 to 0.01 mM, and an exponential decay was observed for initial concentrations of the order of 0.1 to 1 mM. This study was supported by the Mexican Council of Science and Technology (CONACyT) and by the Scientific Research Coordination of the University of Michoacan in Mexico.

  18. TrackArt: the user friendly interface for single molecule tracking data analysis and simulation applied to complex diffusion in mica supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysik, Artur; Kraut, Rachel S

    2014-05-01

    Single molecule tracking (SMT) analysis of fluorescently tagged lipid and protein probes is an attractive alternative to ensemble averaged methods such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) or fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) for measuring diffusion in artificial and plasma membranes. The meaningful estimation of diffusion coefficients and their errors is however not straightforward, and is heavily dependent on sample type, acquisition method, and equipment used. Many approaches require advanced computing and programming skills for their implementation. Here we present TrackArt software, an accessible graphic interface for simulation and complex analysis of multiple particle paths. Imported trajectories can be filtered to eliminate spurious or corrupted tracks, and are then analyzed using several previously described methodologies, to yield single or multiple diffusion coefficients, their population fractions, and estimated errors. We use TrackArt to analyze the single-molecule diffusion behavior of a sphingolipid analog SM-Atto647N, in mica supported DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayers. Fitting with a two-component diffusion model confirms the existence of two separate populations of diffusing particles in these bilayers on mica. As a demonstration of the TrackArt workflow, we characterize and discuss the effective activation energies required to increase the diffusion rates of these populations, obtained from Arrhenius plots of temperature-dependent diffusion. Finally, TrackArt provides a simulation module, allowing the user to generate models with multiple particle trajectories, diffusing with different characteristics. Maps of domains, acting as impermeable or permeable obstacles for particles diffusing with given rate constants and diffusion coefficients, can be simulated or imported from an image. Importantly, this allows one to use simulated data with a known diffusion behavior as a comparison for results

  19. A one-level FETI method for the drift–diffusion-Poisson system with discontinuities at an interface

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgartner, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    A 3d feti method for the drift-diffusion-Poisson system including discontinuities at a 2d interface is developed. The motivation for this work is to provide a parallel numerical algorithm for a system of PDEs that are the basic model equations for the simulation of semiconductor devices such as transistors and sensors. Moreover, discontinuities or jumps in the potential and its normal derivative at a 2d surface are included for the simulation of nanowire sensors based on a homogenized model. Using the feti method, these jump conditions can be included with the usual numerical properties and the original Farhat-Roux feti method is extended to the drift-diffusion-Poisson equations including discontinuities. We show two numerical examples. The first example verifies the correct implementation including the discontinuities on a 2d grid divided into eight subdomains. The second example is 3d and shows the application of the algorithm to the simulation of nanowire sensors with high aspect ratios. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the drift-diffusion-Poisson system with jump conditions are solved on a 3d grid with real-world boundary conditions. © 2013 Elsevier Inc..

  20. Fractional diffusion models of nonlocal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del

    2006-01-01

    A class of nonlocal models based on the use of fractional derivatives (FDs) is proposed to describe nondiffusive transport in magnetically confined plasmas. FDs are integro-differential operators that incorporate in a unified framework asymmetric non-Fickian transport, non-Markovian ('memory') effects, and nondiffusive scaling. To overcome the limitations of fractional models in unbounded domains, we use regularized FDs that allow the incorporation of finite-size domain effects, boundary conditions, and variable diffusivities. We present an α-weighted explicit/implicit numerical integration scheme based on the Grunwald-Letnikov representation of the regularized fractional diffusion operator in flux conserving form. In sharp contrast with the standard diffusive model, the strong nonlocality of fractional diffusion leads to a linear in time response for a decaying pulse at short times. In addition, an anomalous fractional pinch is observed, accompanied by the development of an uphill transport region where the 'effective' diffusivity becomes negative. The fractional flux is in general asymmetric and, for steady states, it has a negative (toward the core) component that enhances confinement and a positive component that increases toward the edge and leads to poor confinement. The model exhibits the characteristic anomalous scaling of the confinement time, τ, with the system's size, L, τ∼L α , of low-confinement mode plasma where 1<α<2 is the order of the FD operator. Numerical solutions of the model with an off-axis source show that the fractional inward transport gives rise to profile peaking reminiscent of what is observed in tokamak discharges with auxiliary off-axis heating. Also, cold-pulse perturbations to steady sates in the model exhibit fast, nondiffusive propagation phenomena that resemble perturbative experiments

  1. Technological diffusion in the Ramsey model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duczynski, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 3 (2002), s. 243-250 ISSN 1607-0704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7085904 Keywords : neoclassical growth model * technological diffusion Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.ijbe.org/table%20of%20content/pdf/vol1-3/06.pdf

  2. Modelling Safe Interface Interactions in Web Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco; Cabot, Jordi; Grossniklaus, Michael

    Current Web applications embed sophisticated user interfaces and business logic. The original interaction paradigm of the Web based on static content pages that are browsed by hyperlinks is, therefore, not valid anymore. In this paper, we advocate a paradigm shift for browsers and Web applications, that improves the management of user interaction and browsing history. Pages are replaced by States as basic navigation nodes, and Back/Forward navigation along the browsing history is replaced by a full-fledged interactive application paradigm, supporting transactions at the interface level and featuring Undo/Redo capabilities. This new paradigm offers a safer and more precise interaction model, protecting the user from unexpected behaviours of the applications and the browser.

  3. Propagation of plane waves at the interface of an elastic solid half-space and a microstretch thermoelastic diffusion solid half-space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    Full Text Available The problem of reflection and refraction phenomenon due to plane waves incident obliquely at a plane interface between uniform elastic solid half-space and microstretch thermoelastic diffusion solid half-space has been studied. It is found that the amplitude ratios of various reflected and refracted waves are functions of angle of incidence, frequency of incident wave and are influenced by the microstretch thermoelastic diffusion properties of the media. The expressions of amplitude ratios and energy ratios are obtained in closed form. The energy ratios have been computed numerically for a particular model. The variations of energy ratios with angle of incidence are shown for thermoelastic diffusion media in the context of Lord-Shulman (L-S (1967 and Green-Lindsay (G-L (1972 theories. The conservation of energy at the interface is verified. Some particular cases are also deduced from the present investigation.

  4. Diffuse interface immersed boundary method for multi-fluid flows with arbitrarily moving rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra Kumar; Natarajan, Ganesh

    2018-05-01

    We present an interpolation-free diffuse interface immersed boundary method for multiphase flows with moving bodies. A single fluid formalism using the volume-of-fluid approach is adopted to handle multiple immiscible fluids which are distinguished using the volume fractions, while the rigid bodies are tracked using an analogous volume-of-solid approach that solves for the solid fractions. The solution to the fluid flow equations are carried out using a finite volume-immersed boundary method, with the latter based on a diffuse interface philosophy. In the present work, we assume that the solids are filled with a "virtual" fluid with density and viscosity equal to the largest among all fluids in the domain. The solids are assumed to be rigid and their motion is solved using Newton's second law of motion. The immersed boundary methodology constructs a modified momentum equation that reduces to the Navier-Stokes equations in the fully fluid region and recovers the no-slip boundary condition inside the solids. An implicit incremental fractional-step methodology in conjunction with a novel hybrid staggered/non-staggered approach is employed, wherein a single equation for normal momentum at the cell faces is solved everywhere in the domain, independent of the number of spatial dimensions. The scalars are all solved for at the cell centres, with the transport equations for solid and fluid volume fractions solved using a high-resolution scheme. The pressure is determined everywhere in the domain (including inside the solids) using a variable coefficient Poisson equation. The solution to momentum, pressure, solid and fluid volume fraction equations everywhere in the domain circumvents the issue of pressure and velocity interpolation, which is a source of spurious oscillations in sharp interface immersed boundary methods. A well-balanced algorithm with consistent mass/momentum transport ensures robust simulations of high density ratio flows with strong body forces. The

  5. Modeling of Reaction Processes Controlled by Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic modeling is quite powerful in science and technology.The technics derived from this process have been used with great success in laser theory, biological systems and chemical reactions.Besides, they provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of experimental results on the field of particle's diffusion in ordered and disordered materials.In this work we analyze transport processes in one-dimensional fluctuating media, which are media that change their state in time.This fact induces changes in the movements of the particles giving rise to different phenomena and dynamics that will be described and analyzed in this work.We present some random walk models to describe these fluctuating media.These models include state transitions governed by different dynamical processes.We also analyze the trapping problem in a lattice by means of a simple model which predicts a resonance-like phenomenon.Also we study effective diffusion processes over surfaces due to random walks in the bulk.We consider different boundary conditions and transitions movements.We derive expressions that describe diffusion behaviors constrained to bulk restrictions and the dynamic of the particles.Finally it is important to mention that the theoretical results obtained from the models proposed in this work are compared with Monte Carlo simulations.We find, in general, excellent agreements between the theory and the simulations

  6. Diffusion of Acetic Acid Across Oil/Water Interface in Emulsification-Internal Gelation Process for Preparation of Alginate Gel Beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiu-dong; YU Wei-ting; LIN Jun-zhang; MA Xiao-jun; YUAN Quan

    2007-01-01

    Alginate has been widely used in cell microencapsulation and drug delivery systems in the form of gel beads or microcapsules. Although an alternative novel emulsification-internal gelation technology has been established and both the properties and the potential applications of the beads in drug delivery systems have been studied, the mechanism has not been well understood compared with the traditional droplet method( external gelation technology). On the basis of our previous knowledge that the novel technology is composed of complicatedly consecutive processes with multistep diffusion and re action, and the diffusion of acetic acid across oil/water interface being the prerequisite that determines the occurrence and rate for the reactions and the structures and properties of final produced gel beads, a special emphasis was placed on the diffusion process. With the aid of diffusion modeling and simple experimental design, the diffusion rate constant and diffusion coefficient of acetic acid across oil/water interface were determined to be in the orders of magnitude of 10-6 and 10-16, respectively. This knowledge will be of particular importance in understanding and interpreting the formation, structure of the gel beads and the relationship between the structure and properties and guiding the preparation and quality control of the gel beads.

  7. ModelMate - A graphical user interface for model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    ModelMate is a graphical user interface designed to facilitate use of model-analysis programs with models. This initial version of ModelMate supports one model-analysis program, UCODE_2005, and one model software program, MODFLOW-2005. ModelMate can be used to prepare input files for UCODE_2005, run UCODE_2005, and display analysis results. A link to the GW_Chart graphing program facilitates visual interpretation of results. ModelMate includes capabilities for organizing directories used with the parallel-processing capabilities of UCODE_2005 and for maintaining files in those directories to be identical to a set of files in a master directory. ModelMate can be used on its own or in conjunction with ModelMuse, a graphical user interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST.

  8. Institutional Co-Creation Interfaces for Innovation Diffusion during Disaster Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian SOLOMON

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the concept of Resilient and Green Supply Chain Management (RGSCM implementation in South Eastern Europe (SEE from the point of view of understanding the structure of the inter-organizational (institutional interfaces involved in this process as well as how are these interfaces evolving and transforming over time. As social and environmental concerns are growing in importance through normative and coercive directions, all the regional actors (triple/quadruple/quintuple helix that supply chains interact with need to bridge their inter-organizational interfaces to properly ensure co-creation at the entire stakeholder level towards increasing the chances of a homogenous implementation of RGSCM. In this context, this paper adopts a three-stage mixed methodology of interviews, survey, focus groups, modelling and simulation case studies. The results show that the key pillars of inter-organizational interface integration and evolution reside in the proper identification of the key goals (performance indicators of the involved institutions, which will maintain market-optimized competition levels. Then, institutions will steadily adhere to the market trends as explained by the ST and INT and in the process of adopting the RGSCM eco-innovation (DIT, the new entrant institutions will transform their inter-organizational interface to properly bridge with the core market stakeholder group. Finally, the key driver of interface alteration resides in the ability of disruptive (eco innovators to set new standards. This research has core academic implications by extending the INT, DIT and ST under the context of RGSCM, policy implications in terms of proper policy making to support the required co-creation as well as practical implications by helping organizations to manage their inter-organizational interfaces.

  9. Ag diffusion and interface segregation in nanocrystalline γ-FeNi alloy with a two-scale microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divinski, S.V.; Hisker, F.; Kang, Y.-S.; Lee, J.-S.; Herzig, Chr.

    2004-01-01

    Solute diffusion of Ag in nanocrystalline γ-Fe - 40wt%Ni alloy was studied by means of the radiotracer technique in an extended temperature interval (489-1200 K). The powder metallurgical method was applied to produce nanomaterial which consisted of micrometer-large clusters (agglomerates) of nanometer sized grains. Two types of internal interfaces contributed as short-circuit paths for diffusion: the nanocrystalline grain boundaries (GB) and the inter-agglomerate interfaces (subscript a). Combining the recent results on Ag GB diffusion in coarse-grained γ-Fe - 40wt%Ni alloy and the present diffusion data in the nanocrystalline alloy the Ag segregation was determined as function of temperature. Ag segregates strongly at GBs in the γ-Fe - 40wt%Ni alloy with a segregation enthalpy of H s =-47 kJ/mol. Knowing the segregation factor, the experimental data on Ag diffusion along both nanocrystalline and inter-agglomerate interfaces in the nanomaterial were systematically analyzed in dependence on the different kinetic regimes. The sensitive radiotracer experiments and the subsequent diffusion profile analysis resulted in a consistent set of diffusion data in the whole investigated temperature range with Arrhenius behavior for both the Ag nano-GB diffusion (D 0 gb =4.7x10 -4 m 2 /s, H gb =173 kJ/mol) as well as for the much faster inter-agglomerate interface diffusion (D 0 a =8.1x10 -5 m 2 /s, H a =91 kJ/mol)

  10. Radiation budget measurement/model interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Ciesielski, P.; Randel, D.; Stevens, D.

    1983-01-01

    This final report includes research results from the period February, 1981 through November, 1982. Two new results combine to form the final portion of this work. They are the work by Hanna (1982) and Stevens to successfully test and demonstrate a low-order spectral climate model and the work by Ciesielski et al. (1983) to combine and test the new radiation budget results from NIMBUS-7 with earlier satellite measurements. Together, the two related activities set the stage for future research on radiation budget measurement/model interfacing. Such combination of results will lead to new applications of satellite data to climate problems. The objectives of this research under the present contract are therefore satisfied. Additional research reported herein includes the compilation and documentation of the radiation budget data set a Colorado State University and the definition of climate-related experiments suggested after lengthy analysis of the satellite radiation budget experiments.

  11. Numerical computation of the linear stability of the diffusion model for crystal growth simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Sorensen, D.C. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Meiron, D.I.; Wedeman, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We consider a computational scheme for determining the linear stability of a diffusion model arising from the simulation of crystal growth. The process of a needle crystal solidifying into some undercooled liquid can be described by the dual diffusion equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Here U{sub t} and U{sub a} denote the temperature of the liquid and solid respectively, and {alpha} represents the thermal diffusivity. At the solid-liquid interface, the motion of the interface denoted by r and the temperature field are related by the conservation relation where n is the unit outward pointing normal to the interface. A basic stationary solution to this free boundary problem can be obtained by writing the equations of motion in a moving frame and transforming the problem to parabolic coordinates. This is known as the Ivantsov parabola solution. Linear stability theory applied to this stationary solution gives rise to an eigenvalue problem of the form.

  12. Modeling the reemergence of information diffusion in social network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dingda; Liao, Xiangwen; Shen, Huawei; Cheng, Xueqi; Chen, Guolong

    2018-01-01

    Information diffusion in networks is an important research topic in various fields. Existing studies either focus on modeling the process of information diffusion, e.g., independent cascade model and linear threshold model, or investigate information diffusion in networks with certain structural characteristics such as scale-free networks and small world networks. However, there are still several phenomena that have not been captured by existing information diffusion models. One of the prominent phenomena is the reemergence of information diffusion, i.e., a piece of information reemerges after the completion of its initial diffusion process. In this paper, we propose an optimized information diffusion model by introducing a new informed state into traditional susceptible-infected-removed model. We verify the proposed model via simulations in real-world social networks, and the results indicate that the model can reproduce the reemergence of information during the diffusion process.

  13. Dynamics of interface in three-dimensional anisotropic bistable reaction-diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhizhu; Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of dynamics of interface (wave front) in three-dimensional (3D) reaction-diffusion (RD) system for bistable media with anisotropy constructed by means of anisotropic surface tension. An equation of motion for the wave front is derived to carry out stability analysis of transverse perturbations, which discloses mechanism of pattern formation such as labyrinthine in 3D bistable media. Particularly, the effects of anisotropy on wave propagation are studied. It was found that, sufficiently strong anisotropy can induce dynamical instabilities and lead to breakup of the wave front. With the fast-inhibitor limit, the bistable system can further be described by a variational dynamics so that the boundary integral method is adopted to study the dynamics of wave fronts.

  14. Anomalous diffusion in a symbolic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, H V; Lenzi, E K; Mendes, R S; Santoro, P A

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigate some statistical properties of symbolic sequences generated by a numerical procedure in which the symbols are repeated following the power-law probability density. In this analysis, we consider that the sum of n symbols represents the position of a particle in erratic movement. This approach reveals a rich diffusive scenario characterized by non-Gaussian distribution and, depending on the power-law exponent or the procedure used to build the walker, we may have superdiffusion, subdiffusion or usual diffusion. Additionally, we use the continuous-time random walk framework to compare the analytic results with the numerical data, thereby finding good agreement. Because of its simplicity and flexibility, this model can be a candidate for describing real systems governed by power-law probability densities.

  15. Nanomechanical mapping of graphene layers and interfaces in suspended graphene nanostructures grown via carbon diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, B.J. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Rabot, C. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Mazzocco, R. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Delamoreanu, A. [Microelectronics Technology Laboratory (LTM), Joseph Fourier University, French National Research Center (CNRS), 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Zenasni, A. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Kolosov, O.V., E-mail: o.kolosov@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Graphene's remarkable mechanical, electronic and thermal properties are strongly determined by both the mechanism of its growth and its interaction with the underlying substrate. Evidently, in order to explore the fundamentals of these mechanisms, efficient nanoscale methods that enable observation of features hidden underneath the immediate surface are needed. In this paper we use nanomechanical mapping via ultrasonic force microscopy that employs MHz frequency range ultrasonic vibrations and allows the observation of surface composition and subsurface interfaces with nanoscale resolution, to elucidate the morphology of few layer graphene (FLG) films produced via a recently reported method of carbon diffusion growth (CDG) on platinum-metal based substrate. CDG is known to result in FLG suspended over large areas, which could be of high importance for graphene transfer and applications where a standalone graphene film is required. This study directly reveals the detailed mechanism of CDG three-dimensional growth and FLG film detachment, directly linking the level of graphene decoupling with variations of the substrate temperature during the annealing phase of growth. We also show that graphene initially and preferentially decouples at the substrate grain boundaries, likely due to its negative expansion coefficient at cooling, forming characteristic “nano-domes” at the intersections of the grain boundaries. Furthermore, quantitative nanomechanical mapping of flexural stiffness of suspended FLG “nano-domes” using kHz frequency range force modulation microscopy uncovers the progression of “nano-dome” stiffness from single to bi-modal distribution as CDG growth progresses, suggesting growth instability at advanced CDG stages. - Highlights: • Exploring growth and film-substrate decoupling in carbon diffusion grown graphene • Nanomechanical mapping of few layer graphene and graphene–substrate interfaces • Quantitative stiffness mapping of

  16. A self-consistent spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics

    KAUST Repository

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Manchon, Aurelien; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We propose a three-dimensional micromagnetic model that dynamically solves the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation coupled to the full spin-diffusion equation. In contrast to previous methods, we solve for the magnetization dynamics and the electric potential in a self-consistent fashion. This treatment allows for an accurate description of magnetization dependent resistance changes. Moreover, the presented algorithm describes both spin accumulation due to smooth magnetization transitions and due to material interfaces as in multilayer structures. The model and its finite-element implementation are validated by current driven motion of a magnetic vortex structure. In a second experiment, the resistivity of a magnetic multilayer structure in dependence of the tilting angle of the magnetization in the different layers is investigated. Both examples show good agreement with reference simulations and experiments respectively.

  17. A self-consistent spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics

    KAUST Repository

    Abert, Claas

    2016-12-17

    We propose a three-dimensional micromagnetic model that dynamically solves the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation coupled to the full spin-diffusion equation. In contrast to previous methods, we solve for the magnetization dynamics and the electric potential in a self-consistent fashion. This treatment allows for an accurate description of magnetization dependent resistance changes. Moreover, the presented algorithm describes both spin accumulation due to smooth magnetization transitions and due to material interfaces as in multilayer structures. The model and its finite-element implementation are validated by current driven motion of a magnetic vortex structure. In a second experiment, the resistivity of a magnetic multilayer structure in dependence of the tilting angle of the magnetization in the different layers is investigated. Both examples show good agreement with reference simulations and experiments respectively.

  18. Communication: A method to compute the transport coefficient of pure fluids diffusing through planar interfaces from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermorel, Romain; Oulebsir, Fouad; Galliero, Guillaume

    2017-09-14

    The computation of diffusion coefficients in molecular systems ranks among the most useful applications of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. However, when dealing with the problem of fluid diffusion through vanishingly thin interfaces, classical techniques are not applicable. This is because the volume of space in which molecules diffuse is ill-defined. In such conditions, non-equilibrium techniques allow for the computation of transport coefficients per unit interface width, but their weak point lies in their inability to isolate the contribution of the different physical mechanisms prone to impact the flux of permeating molecules. In this work, we propose a simple and accurate method to compute the diffusional transport coefficient of a pure fluid through a planar interface from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, in the form of a diffusion coefficient per unit interface width. In order to demonstrate its validity and accuracy, we apply our method to the case study of a dilute gas diffusing through a smoothly repulsive single-layer porous solid. We believe this complementary technique can benefit to the interpretation of the results obtained on single-layer membranes by means of complex non-equilibrium methods.

  19. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H; Yu, Y; Glimm, J; Li, X-L; Sharp, D H

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method for the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mixing flows. The method yields convergent probability distribution functions (PDFs) for temperature and concentration and a chemical reaction rate when applied to reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable flows. Because such a mesh convergence is an unusual and perhaps original capability for LES of RM flows, we review previous validation studies of the principal components of the algorithm. The components are (i) a front tracking code, FronTier, to control numerical mass diffusion and (ii) dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) models to compensate for unresolved scales in the LES. We also review the relevant code comparison studies. We compare our results to a simple model based on 1D diffusion, taking place in the geometry defined statistically by the interface (the 50% isoconcentration surface between the two fluids). Several conclusions important to physics could be drawn from our study. We model chemical reactions with no closure approximations beyond those in the LES of the fluid variables itself, and as with dynamic SGS models, these closures contain no adjustable parameters. The chemical reaction rate is specified by the joint PDF for temperature and concentration. We observe a bimodal distribution for the PDF and we observe significant dependence on fluid transport parameters.

  20. Radiosity diffusion model in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jason D.; Arridge, Simon R.; Chrysanthou, Yiorgos; Dehghani, Hamid; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Schweiger, Martin

    2001-11-01

    We present the Radiosity-Diffusion model in three dimensions(3D), as an extension to previous work in 2D. It is a method for handling non-scattering spaces in optically participating media. We present the extension of the model to 3D including an extension to the model to cope with increased complexity of the 3D domain. We show that in 3D more careful consideration must be given to the issues of meshing and visibility to model the transport of light within reasonable computational bounds. We demonstrate the model to be comparable to Monte-Carlo simulations for selected geometries, and show preliminary results of comparisons to measured time-resolved data acquired on resin phantoms.

  1. Recent advances in modelling diffuse radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, John; Ridley, Barbara [Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Univ. of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    Boland et al (2001) developed a validated model for Australian conditions, using a logistic function instead of piecewise linear or simple nonlinear functions. Recently, Jacovides et al (2006) have verified that this model performs well for locations in Cyprus. Their analysis includes using moving average techniques to demonstrate the form of the relationship, which corresponds well to a logistic relationship. We have made significant advances in both the intuitive and theoretical justification of the use of the logistic function. In the theoretical development of the model utilising advanced non-parametric statistical methods. We have also constructed a method of identifying values that are likely to be erroneous. Using quadratic programming, we can eliminate outliers in diffuse radiation values, the data most prone to errors in measurement. Additionally, this is a first step in identifying the means for developing a generic model for estimating diffuse from global and other predictors (see Boland and Ridley 2007). Our more recent investigations focus on examining the effects of adding additional explanatory variables to enhance the predictability of the model. Examples for Australian and other locations will be presented. (orig.)

  2. Diffusion and Interface Effects during Preparation of All-Solid Microstructured Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobelke Jens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available All-solid microstructured optical fibers (MOF allow the realization of very flexible optical waveguide designs. They are prepared by stacking of doped silica rods or canes in complex arrangements. Typical dopants in silica matrices are germanium and phosphorus to increase the refractive index (RI, or boron and fluorine to decrease the RI. However, the direct interface contact of stacking elements often causes interrelated chemical reactions or evaporation during thermal processing. The obtained fiber structures after the final drawing step thus tend to deviate from the targeted structure risking degrading their favored optical functionality. Dopant profiles and design parameters (e.g., the RI homogeneity of the cladding are controlled by the combination of diffusion and equilibrium conditions of evaporation reactions. We show simulation results of diffusion and thermal dissociation in germanium and fluorine doped silica rod arrangements according to the monitored geometrical disturbances in stretched canes or drawn fibers. The paper indicates geometrical limits of dopant structures in sub-µm-level depending on the dopant concentration and the thermal conditions during the drawing process. The presented results thus enable an optimized planning of the preform parameters avoiding unwanted alterations in dopant concentration profiles or in design parameters encountered during the drawing process.

  3. Dynamic Stability of the Rate, State, Temperature, and Pore Pressure Friction Model at a Rock Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Nitish; Singh, Arun K.; Singh, Trilok N.

    2018-05-01

    In this article, we study numerically the dynamic stability of the rate, state, temperature, and pore pressure friction (RSTPF) model at a rock interface using standard spring-mass sliding system. This particular friction model is a basically modified form of the previously studied friction model namely the rate, state, and temperature friction (RSTF). The RSTPF takes into account the role of thermal pressurization including dilatancy and permeability of the pore fluid due to shear heating at the slip interface. The linear stability analysis shows that the critical stiffness, at which the sliding becomes stable to unstable or vice versa, increases with the coefficient of thermal pressurization. Critical stiffness, on the other hand, remains constant for small values of either dilatancy factor or hydraulic diffusivity, but the same decreases as their values are increased further from dilatancy factor (˜ 10^{ - 4} ) and hydraulic diffusivity (˜ 10^{ - 9} {m}2 {s}^{ - 1} ) . Moreover, steady-state friction is independent of the coefficient of thermal pressurization, hydraulic diffusivity, and dilatancy factor. The proposed model is also used for predicting time of failure of a creeping interface of a rock slope under the constant gravitational force. It is observed that time of failure decreases with increase in coefficient of thermal pressurization and hydraulic diffusivity, but the dilatancy factor delays the failure of the rock fault under the condition of heat accumulation at the creeping interface. Moreover, stiffness of the rock-mass also stabilizes the failure process of the interface as the strain energy due to the gravitational force accumulates in the rock-mass before it transfers to the sliding interface. Practical implications of the present study are also discussed.

  4. A nonlinear interface model applied to masonry structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Frédéric; Raffa, Maria Letizia; Rizzoni, Raffaella

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a new imperfect interface model is presented. The model includes finite strains, micro-cracks and smooth roughness. The model is consistently derived by coupling a homogenization approach for micro-cracked media and arguments of asymptotic analysis. The model is applied to brick/mortar interfaces. Numerical results are presented.

  5. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Daniel; Llebot, Josep Enric; Fort, Joaquim

    2004-01-01

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations

  6. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Daniel [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Llebot, Josep Enric [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Fort, Joaquim [Dept. de FIsica, Univ. de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2004-07-02

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations.

  7. Size dependent diffusive parameters and tensorial diffusion equations in neutronic models for optically small nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premuda, F.

    1983-01-01

    Two lines in improved neutron diffusion theory extending the efficiency of finite-difference diffusion codes to the field of optically small systems, are here reviewed. The firs involves the nodal solution for tensorial diffusion equation in slab geometry and tensorial formulation in parallelepiped and cylindrical gemometry; the dependence of critical eigenvalue from small slab thicknesses is also analitically investigated and finally a regularized tensorial diffusion equation is derived for slab. The other line refer to diffusion models formally unchanged with respect to the classical one, but where new size-dependent RTGB definitions for diffusion parameters are adopted, requiring that they allow to reproduce, in diffusion approach, the terms of neutron transport global balance; the trascendental equation for the buckling, arising in slab, sphere and parallelepiped geometry from the above requirement, are reported and the sizedependence of the new diffusion coefficient and extrapolated end point is investigated

  8. Thermodynamically consistent simulation of nonisothermal diffuse-interface two-phase flow with Peng-Robinson equation of state

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a diffuse-interface gas-liquid two-phase flow model with inhomogeneous temperatures, in which we employ the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the temperature-dependent influence parameter instead of the van der Waals equation of state and the constant influence parameter used in the existing models. As a result, our model can characterize accurately the physical behaviors of numerous realistic gas-liquid fluids, especially hydrocarbons. Furthermore, we prove a relation associating the pressure gradient with the gradients of temperature and chemical potential, and thereby derive a new formulation of the momentum balance equation, which shows that gradients of the chemical potential and temperature become the primary driving force of the fluid motion. It is rigorously proved that the new formulations of the model obey the first and second laws of thermodynamics. To design efficient numerical methods, we prove that Helmholtz free energy density is a concave function with respect to the temperature under certain physical conditions. Based on the proposed modeling formulations and the convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density, we propose a novel thermodynamically stable numerical scheme. We rigorously prove that the proposed method satisfies the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Finally, numerical tests are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed simulation method.

  9. Thermodynamically consistent simulation of nonisothermal diffuse-interface two-phase flow with Peng-Robinson equation of state

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-12-06

    In this paper, we consider a diffuse-interface gas-liquid two-phase flow model with inhomogeneous temperatures, in which we employ the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the temperature-dependent influence parameter instead of the van der Waals equation of state and the constant influence parameter used in the existing models. As a result, our model can characterize accurately the physical behaviors of numerous realistic gas-liquid fluids, especially hydrocarbons. Furthermore, we prove a relation associating the pressure gradient with the gradients of temperature and chemical potential, and thereby derive a new formulation of the momentum balance equation, which shows that gradients of the chemical potential and temperature become the primary driving force of the fluid motion. It is rigorously proved that the new formulations of the model obey the first and second laws of thermodynamics. To design efficient numerical methods, we prove that Helmholtz free energy density is a concave function with respect to the temperature under certain physical conditions. Based on the proposed modeling formulations and the convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density, we propose a novel thermodynamically stable numerical scheme. We rigorously prove that the proposed method satisfies the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Finally, numerical tests are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed simulation method.

  10. Self-diffusion and heterodiffusion in Zr-2.5%Nb α/β interfaces comparison with grain boundary diffusion in α-Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iribarren, M.J.; Dyment, F.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional radioactive tracer section techniques were used to make an experimental determination of diffusion parameters for Zr, Nb and Ni along the α/β boundary interfaces of Zr-2.5%Nb and comparing them with those for Zr, Nb and Co in α-Zr grain boundaries. Both determinations were made for a wide range of temperatures, including reactor working temperatures. Different materials were used for this purpose, both specially prepared alloys for diffusion experiments and part of the material from the actual pressure tubes. Different stabilizing thermal treatments were performed and results were analyzed based on the different morphologies obtained. (Author) [es

  11. Stochastic Modelling of the Diffusion Coefficient for Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In the paper, a new stochastic modelling of the diffusion coefficient D is presented. The modelling is based on physical understanding of the diffusion process and on some recent experimental results. The diffusion coefficients D is strongly dependent on the w/c ratio and the temperature....

  12. Transitions in a probabilistic interface growth model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S G; Moreira, J G

    2011-01-01

    We study a generalization of the Wolf–Villain (WV) interface growth model based on a probabilistic growth rule. In the WV model, particles are randomly deposited onto a substrate and subsequently move to a position nearby where the binding is strongest. We introduce a growth probability which is proportional to a power of the number n i of bindings of the site i: p i ∝n i ν . Through extensive simulations, in (1 + 1) dimensions, we find three behaviors depending on the ν value: (i) if ν is small, a crossover from the Mullins–Herring to the Edwards–Wilkinson (EW) universality class; (ii) for intermediate values of ν, a crossover from the EW to the Kardar–Parisi–Zhang (KPZ) universality class; and, finally, (iii) for large ν values, the system is always in the KPZ class. In (2 + 1) dimensions, we obtain three different behaviors: (i) a crossover from the Villain–Lai–Das Sarma to the EW universality class for small ν values; (ii) the EW class is always present for intermediate ν values; and (iii) a deviation from the EW class is observed for large ν values

  13. Interface Structure and Elements Diffusion of As-Cast and Annealed Ductile Iron/Stainless Steel Bimetal Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramadan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bimetal casting is considered to a promising technique for the production of high performance function materials. Heat treatment process for bimetal castings became an essential tool for improving interface structure and metallurgical diffusion bond. Molten iron alloy with carbon equivalent of 4.40 is poured into sand mold cavities containing solid 304 stainless steel strips insert. Specimens are heated to 7200C in an electrical heating furnace and holded at 720 0C for 60min and 180min. For as-cast specimens, a good coherent interface structure of ductile cast iron/304 stainless bimetal with four layers interfacial microstructure are obtained. Low temperature annealing at 720oC has a significat effect on the interface layers structure, where, three layers of interface structure are obtained after 180min annealing time because of the complete dissolving of thin layer of ferrite and multi carbides (Layer 2. Low temperature annealing shows a significant effect on the diffusion of C and otherwise shows slightly effect on the diffusion of Cr and Ni. Plearlite phase of Layer 3 is trsformed to spheroidal shape instead of lamallar shape in as-cast bimetals by low tempeature annealing at 720oC. The percent of the performed spheroidal cementit increases by increasing anneaaling time. Hardness of interface layers is changed by low temperauture annealing due to the significant carbon deffussion.

  14. Modelling Ni diffusion in bentonite using different sorption models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingsten, W.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An important component of the multi barrier disposal concept for a radioactive waste repository is the bentonite backfill surrounding the canisters containing vitrified high-level waste and spent fuel located in the tunnels deep within the chosen host rock. The effectiveness of the compacted bentonite barrier is such that calculations have indicated that many radionuclides have decayed to insignificant levels before having diffused through the thickness of bentonite. These calculations are performed using the simple Kd sorption concept in which the values are taken from batch type experiments performed on dispersed systems performed for a single metal at a time, usually at trace concentrations. However, in such complex systems many radionuclides, inactive metal contaminants/ground water components may be simultaneously present in the aqueous phase at a range of concentrations varying with time during the temporal evolution of the repository system. An important aspect influencing the sorption of any radioactive metal under a set of given geochemical conditions is its competition with other metals present, and how this may vary as a function of concentration. Competitive sorption effects are not currently included in safety assessments and are thus an issue which needs to be addressed. Here we provide some first estimates of the potential influence of competitive sorption effects on the migration of radioactive metals through compacted bentonite as a function of their concentration and the concentration of competing metals. Ni(II) and Fe(II) were chosen as possible competing cations since their concentration levels are expected to have values greater than trace levels and effects might be maximal and canister corrosion represents a permanent Fe source at the bentonite interface which could influence bivalent radionuclide diffusion. The modelling of the Ni(II) diffusion/sorption has been carried out using three

  15. Recommendation based on trust diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinfeng; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Recommender system is emerging as a powerful and popular tool for online information relevant to a given user. The traditional recommendation system suffers from the cold start problem and the data sparsity problem. Many methods have been proposed to solve these problems, but few can achieve satisfactory efficiency. In this paper, we present a method which combines the trust diffusion (DiffTrust) algorithm and the probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF). DiffTrust is first used to study the possible diffusions of trust between various users. It is able to make use of the implicit relationship of the trust network, thus alleviating the data sparsity problem. The probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF) is then employed to combine the users' tastes with their trusted friends' interests. We evaluate the algorithm on Flixster, Moviedata, and Epinions datasets, respectively. The experimental results show that the recommendation based on our proposed DiffTrust + PMF model achieves high performance in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE), Recall, and F Measure.

  16. Turbulence structure and CO2 transfer at the air-sea interface and turbulent diffusion in thermally-stratified flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, S.

    1996-01-01

    A supercomputer is a nice tool for simulating environmental flows. The Center for Global Environmental Research (CGER) of the National Institute for Environmental Studies purchased a supercomputer SX-3 of CGER about three years ago, and it has been used for various environmental simulations since. Although one of the main purposes for which the supercomputer was used was to simulate global warming with a general circulation model (GCM), our research organization used the supercomputer for more fundamental work to investigate heat and mass transfer mechanisms in environmental flows. Our motivations for this work was the fact that GCMs involve a number of uncertain submodels related to heat and mass transfer in turbulent atmospheric and oceanic flows. It may be easy to write research reports by running GCMs which were developed in western countries, but it is difficult for numerical scientists to do original work with such second-hand GCMs. In this sense, we thought that it would be more original to study the fundamentals of heat and mass transfer mechanisms in environmental flows rather than to run a GCM. Therefore, we tried to numerically investigate turbulence structure and scalar transfer both at the air-sea interface and in thermally stratified flows, neither of which were well modeled by GCMs. We also employed laboratory experiments to clarify the turbulence structure and scalar transfer mechanism, since numerical simulations are not sufficiently powerful to clarify all aspects of turbulence structure and scalar transfer mechanisms. A numerical technique is a promising tool to complement measurements of processes that cannot be clarified by turbulence measurements in environmental flows. It should also be noted that most of the interesting phenomena in environmental flows can be elucidated by laboratory or field measurements but not by numerical simulations alone. Thus, it is of importance to combine laboratory or field measurements with numerical simulations

  17. CROSS DIFFUSION AND NONLINEAR DIFFUSION PREVENTING BLOW UP IN THE KELLER–SEGEL MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    CARRILLO, JOSÉ ANTONIO; HITTMEIR, SABINE; JÜ NGEL, ANSGAR

    2012-01-01

    A parabolic-parabolic (Patlak-)Keller-Segel model in up to three space dimensions with nonlinear cell diffusion and an additional nonlinear cross-diffusion term is analyzed. The main feature of this model is that there exists a new entropy

  18. A spatial structural derivative model for ultraslow diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the ultraslow diffusion by a spatial structural derivative, in which the exponential function ex is selected as the structural function to construct the local structural derivative diffusion equation model. The analytical solution of the diffusion equation is a form of Biexponential distribution. Its corresponding mean squared displacement is numerically calculated, and increases more slowly than the logarithmic function of time. The local structural derivative diffusion equation with the structural function ex in space is an alternative physical and mathematical modeling model to characterize a kind of ultraslow diffusion.

  19. Observational Constraints for Modeling Diffuse Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federman, S. R.

    2014-02-01

    Ground-based and space-borne observations of diffuse molecular clouds suggest a number of areas where further improvements to modeling efforts is warranted. I will highlight those that have the widest applicability. The range in CO fractionation caused by selective isotope photodissociation, in particular the large 12C16O/13C16O ratios observed toward stars in Ophiuchus, is not reproduced well by current models. Our ongoing laboratory measurements of oscillator strengths and predissociation rates for Rydberg transitions in CO isotopologues may help clarify the situtation. The CH+ abundance continues to draw attention. Small scale structure seen toward ζ Per may provide additional constraints on the possible synthesis routes. The connection between results from optical transitions and those from radio and sub-millimeter wave transitions requires further effort. A study of OH+ and OH toward background stars reveals that these species favor different environments. This brings to focus the need to model each cloud along the line of sight separately, and to allow the physical conditions to vary within an individual cloud, in order to gain further insight into the chemistry. Now that an extensive set of data on molecular excitation is available, the models should seek to reproduce these data to place further constraints on the modeling results.

  20. Numerical analysis of the propagation characteristics of Stoneley waves at an interface between microstretch thermoelastic diffusion solid half spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the study of propagation of Stoneley waves at the interface of two dissimilar isotropic microstretch thermoelastic diffusion medium in the context of generalized theories of thermoelasticity. The dispersion equation of Stoneley waves is derived in the form of a determinant by using the boundary conditions. The dispersion curves giving the phase velocity and attenuation coefficients with wave number are computed numerically. Numerically computed results are shown graphically to depict the diffusion effect alongwith the relaxation times in microstretch thermoelastic diffusion solid half spaces for thermally insulated and impermeable boundaries, respectively. The components of displacement, stress, couple stress, microstress, and temperature change are presented graphically for two dissimilar microstretch thermoelastic diffusion half-spaces. Several cases of interest under different conditions are also deduced and discussed.

  1. Modeling dendrite density from magnetic resonance diffusion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, CD; Østergaard, Leif

    2007-01-01

    in this model: (i) the dendrites and axons, which are modeled as long cylinders with two diffusion coefficients, parallel (DL) and perpendicular (DT) to the cylindrical axis, and (ii) an isotropic monoexponential diffusion component describing water diffusion within and across all other structures, i.......e., in extracellular space and glia cells. The model parameters are estimated from 153 diffusion-weighted images acquired from a formalin-fixed baboon brain. A close correspondence between the data and the signal model is found, with the model parameters consistent with literature values. The model provides......Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides a noninvasive tool to probe tissue microstructure. We propose a simplified model of neural cytoarchitecture intended to capture the essential features important for water diffusion as measured by NMR. Two components contribute to the NMR signal...

  2. Fractal diffusion equations: Microscopic models with anomalous diffusion and its generalizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhincheev, V.E.

    2001-04-01

    To describe the ''anomalous'' diffusion the generalized diffusion equations of fractal order are deduced from microscopic models with anomalous diffusion as Comb model and Levy flights. It is shown that two types of equations are possible: with fractional temporal and fractional spatial derivatives. The solutions of these equations are obtained and the physical sense of these fractional equations is discussed. The relation between diffusion and conductivity is studied and the well-known Einstein relation is generalized for the anomalous diffusion case. It is shown that for Levy flight diffusion the Ohm's law is not applied and the current depends on electric field in a nonlinear way due to the anomalous character of Levy flights. The results of numerical simulations, which confirmed this conclusion, are also presented. (author)

  3. Interface morphology of Mo/Si multilayer systems with varying Mo layer thickness studied by EUV diffuse scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Anton; Soltwisch, Victor; Braun, Stefan; Laubis, Christian; Scholze, Frank

    2017-06-26

    We investigate the influence of the Mo-layer thickness on the EUV reflectance of Mo/Si mirrors with a set of unpolished and interface-polished Mo/Si/C multilayer mirrors. The Mo-layer thickness is varied in the range from 1.7 nm to 3.05 nm. We use a novel combination of specular and diffuse intensity measurements to determine the interface roughness throughout the multilayer stack and do not rely on scanning probe measurements at the surface only. The combination of EUV and X-ray reflectivity measurements and near-normal incidence EUV diffuse scattering allows to reconstruct the Mo layer thicknesses and to determine the interface roughness power spectral density. The data analysis is conducted by applying a matrix method for the specular reflection and the distorted-wave Born approximation for diffuse scattering. We introduce the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method into the field in order to determine the respective confidence intervals for all reconstructed parameters. We unambiguously detect a threshold thickness for Mo in both sample sets where the specular reflectance goes through a local minimum correlated with a distinct increase in diffuse scatter. We attribute that to the known appearance of an amorphous-to-crystallization transition at a certain thickness threshold which is altered in our sample system by the polishing.

  4. A simple modelling of mass diffusion effects on condensation with noncondensable gases for the CATHARE Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coste, P.; Bestion, D. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France)

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a simple modelling of mass diffusion effects on condensation. In presence of noncondensable gases, the mass diffusion near the interface is modelled using the heat and mass transfer analogy and requires normally an iterative procedure to calculate the interface temperature. Simplifications of the model and of the solution procedure are used without important degradation of the predictions. The model is assessed on experimental data for both film condensation in vertical tubes and direct contact condensation in horizontal tubes, including air-steam, Nitrogen-steam and Helium-steam data. It is implemented in the Cathare code, a french system code for nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics developed by CEA, EDF, and FRAMATOME.

  5. A diffusivity model for predicting VOC diffusion in porous building materials based on fractal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanfeng; Zhou, Xiaojun; Wang, Dengjia; Song, Cong; Liu, Jiaping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fractal theory is introduced into the prediction of VOC diffusion coefficient. • MSFC model of the diffusion coefficient is developed for porous building materials. • The MSFC model contains detailed pore structure parameters. • The accuracy of the MSFC model is verified by independent experiments. - Abstract: Most building materials are porous media, and the internal diffusion coefficients of such materials have an important influences on the emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The pore structure of porous building materials has a significant impact on the diffusion coefficient. However, the complex structural characteristics bring great difficulties to the model development. The existing prediction models of the diffusion coefficient are flawed and need to be improved. Using scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) tests of typical porous building materials, this study developed a new diffusivity model: the multistage series-connection fractal capillary-bundle (MSFC) model. The model considers the variable-diameter capillaries formed by macropores connected in series as the main mass transfer paths, and the diameter distribution of the capillary bundles obeys a fractal power law in the cross section. In addition, the tortuosity of the macrocapillary segments with different diameters is obtained by the fractal theory. Mesopores serve as the connections between the macrocapillary segments rather than as the main mass transfer paths. The theoretical results obtained using the MSFC model yielded a highly accurate prediction of the diffusion coefficients and were in a good agreement with the VOC concentration measurements in the environmental test chamber.

  6. A new model of anomalous phosphorus diffusion in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budil, M.; Poetzl, H.; Stingeder, G.; Grasserbauer, M.

    1989-01-01

    A model is presented to describe the 'kink and tail' diffusion of phosphorus. The diffusion behaviour of phosphorus is expplained by the motion of phosphorus-interstitial and phosphorus-vacancy pairs in different charge states. The model yields the enhancement of diffusion in the tail region depending on surface concentration. Furthermore it yields the same selfdiffusion coefficient for interstitials as the gold diffusion experiments. A transformation of the diffusion equation was found to reduce the number of simulation equations. (author) 7 refs., 5 figs

  7. Evolution of the argillite / CEM I interface at 70 C.: in situ tests and modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalan, P.; Dauzeres, A.; Barker, E.; De Windt, L.; Detilleux, V.; Desveaux, P.

    2015-01-01

    French radioactive waste disposal concept involves cementitious materials in a clayey host-rock. The presence of exothermic wastes in the storage cells may induce a temperature of about 70 Celsius degrees at the material interfaces. At present, experiment thermal conditions have been undertaken at about 20 C. degrees and studies at higher temperature are really scarce, especially experiments considering diffusion through the cement / clay interface. The still on-going study presented here is focusing on argillite / CEM-I interface. A one-year experiment under in situ conditions at the Tournemire experimental station (IRSN) was carried out and meanwhile, preliminary reactive transport modelling with HYTEC helped to understand the impact of a high temperature on the physico-chemical behaviour of cement / clay interface. The first results showed decalcification of cement and diffuse carbonation as well as a possible illite precipitation of clay-type phases. A C-S-H ribbon appeared at the interface between the two materials and a layer grew between the C-S-H ribbon and the cementitious material. This layer contained zeolites and behaved as a diffusive barrier. After one year of in situ interactions, the disturbance thickness was about 350 microns in CEM-I cement paste and about 100 microns in argillite. The modelling reproduced relatively well the experimentally observed processes but the extension of the disturbance is too wide and the zeolite layer is misplaced according to the experimental observations. This study highlights the lack of data at highest temperature on the reaction kinetics, diffusion coefficients but also on porosity variations. (authors)

  8. Percolation Model of Adhesion at Polymer Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wool, Richard P.

    1998-03-01

    Adhesion at polymer interfaces is treated as a percolation problem, where an areal density of chains Σ, of length L, contribute a number of entanglements to the interface of thickness X. The fracture energy G, is determined by the fraction of entanglements P, fractured or disentangled in the deformation zone preceding the crack tip, via G ~ P-P_c, where Pc is the percolation threshold, given by Pc = 1- M_e/Mc . For incompatible A/B interfaces reinforced with Σ diblocks or random A-B copolymers of effective length L'(L' ~ 0 for brushes and strongly adsorbed chains), we obtain P ~ ΣL/X, Pc ~ Σ _cL/X, such that G = K(Σ - Σ _c)+ G_o, where K and Go ~ 1 J/m^2 are constants. Note that Log G vs Log Σ will have an apparent slope of about 2, incorrectly suggesting that G ~ Σ ^2. For cohesive fracture, disentanglement dominates at M M*, G = G*[1-M_c/M]. For fatigue crack propagation da/dN, at welding interfaces, we obtain da/dN ~ M-5/2(t/Tr)-5/4, where t is the welding time and Tr is the reptation time. For polymer-solid interfaces, G ~ (X/R)^2. where X is the conformational width of the first layer of chains of random coil size R. The fractal nature of the percolation process is relevant to the fracture mechanism and fractography.

  9. An improved interfacial bonding model for material interface modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liqiang; Wang, Xiaodu; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    An improved interfacial bonding model was proposed from potential function point of view to investigate interfacial interactions in polycrystalline materials. It characterizes both attractive and repulsive interfacial interactions and can be applied to model different material interfaces. The path dependence of work-of-separation study indicates that the transformation of separation work is smooth in normal and tangential direction and the proposed model guarantees the consistency of the cohesive constitutive model. The improved interfacial bonding model was verified through a simple compression test in a standard hexagonal structure. The error between analytical solutions and numerical results from the proposed model is reasonable in linear elastic region. Ultimately, we investigated the mechanical behavior of extrafibrillar matrix in bone and the simulation results agreed well with experimental observations of bone fracture. PMID:28584343

  10. Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaschewski, O.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rate values of titanium, its compounds and alloys are summarized and tabulated. The individual chemical diffusion coefficients and self-diffusion coefficients of certain isotopes are given. Experimental methods are listed which were used for the determination of diffusion coefficients. Some values have been taken over from other studies. Also given are graphs showing the temperature dependences of diffusion and changes in the diffusion coefficient with concentration changes

  11. Structured inverse modeling in parabolic diffusion processess

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Volker; Siebenborn, Martin; Welker, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Often, the unknown diffusivity in diffusive processes is structured by piecewise constant patches. This paper is devoted to efficient methods for the determination of such structured diffusion parameters by exploiting shape calculus. A novel shape gradient is derived in parabolic processes. Furthermore quasi-Newton techniques are used in order to accelerate shape gradient based iterations in shape space. Numerical investigations support the theoretical results.

  12. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasilainen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories. 98 refs. The thesis includes also eight previous publications by author.

  13. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories

  14. Modelling Bourdieu: An extension of the Axelrod cultural diffusion model

    OpenAIRE

    Trigg, Andrew B.; Bertie, Andrew J.; Himmelweit, Susan F.

    2008-01-01

    The contribution to the social theory of consumption of the late Pierre Bourdieu has been widely recognized, but not fully absorbed by the economics discipline. To address this lacuna, an agent-based model of Bourdieu's social theory is developed by extending Axelrod's cultural diffusion model. Bourdieu's theory is decomposed into two components: a capital effect on social interaction and an innovation effect. Whereas simulations of the capital effect are found to have a key role in the repro...

  15. Modeling the liquid-liquid interface and the transfer of a solute by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayoun, Marc

    1990-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics method and Lennard-Jones potential functions have been employed to model Liquid-Liquid Interfaces. The variation of the miscibilities between the two liquids is obtained by changing the interaction between the two atomic species. The resulting interfaces have a thickness of about three atomic diameters and are stable on the time scale of the simulation. They have been characterized by the density and pressure profiles. The interfacial tension has also been computed and is of the order of magnitude of experimental values. The diffusion process is anisotropic in the interfacial region: the transverse diffusion coefficient (parallelly to the interface) is higher than the normal one. A qualitative explanation of this behaviour is suggested by considering the pressure tensor. The second part of this work, performed by Molecular Dynamics in the canonical ensemble, is devoted to the kinetic study of the transfer of a solute through the interface. A model of a symmetric interface with an atomic solute has been used. The interaction potential between the solute and the solvents has been built in order to obtain an activation barrier to the transfer. We have computed the mean force exerted by the solvent on the solute as a function of its distance to the interface. The resulting mean force potential corresponds to a free energy difference. The height of the energy barrier involved is about 4 kT. The potential energy and entropy profiles have also been calculated and discussed. The diffusion coefficient of the solute has been computed by equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods. We deduced the friction coefficient of the solvent, which is essential to determine the Kramers transmission coefficient. This coefficient is compared to the one obtained by simulation. Finally, the solute transfer rate constant has been calculated. (author) [fr

  16. Impurity diffusion, point defect engineering, and surface/interface passivation in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Dimoulas, Athanasios Dimoulas

    2012-01-01

    in view of recent results. The importance of electrically active defects on the Ge surface and interfaces is addressed considering strategies to suppress them and to passivate the surfaces/interfaces, bearing in mind their importance for advanced devices

  17. Study of a diffusion flamelet model, with preferential diffusion effects included

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delhaye, S.; Somers, L.M.T.; Bongers, H.; Oijen, van J.A.; Goey, de L.P.H.; Dias, V.

    2005-01-01

    The non-premixed flamelet model of Peters [1] (model1), which does not include preferential diffusion effects is investigated. Two similar models are presented, but without the assumption of unity Lewis numbers. One of these models was derived by Peters & Pitsch [2] (model2), while the other one was

  18. Diffusion coefficient adaptive correction in Lagrangian puff model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Wenji; Wang Dezhong; Ma Yuanwei; Ji Zhilong

    2014-01-01

    Lagrangian puff model is widely used in the decision support system for nuclear emergency management. The diffusion coefficient is one of the key parameters impacting puff model. An adaptive method was proposed in this paper, which could correct the diffusion coefficient in Lagrangian puff model, and it aimed to improve the accuracy of calculating the nuclide concentration distribution. This method used detected concentration data, meteorological data and source release data to estimate the actual diffusion coefficient with least square method. The diffusion coefficient adaptive correction method was evaluated by Kincaid data in MVK, and was compared with traditional Pasquill-Gifford (P-G) diffusion scheme method. The results indicate that this diffusion coefficient adaptive correction method can improve the accuracy of Lagrangian puff model. (authors)

  19. Towards first principles modeling of electrochemical electrode-electrolyte interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malte; Björketun, Mårten; Hansen, Martin Hangaard

    2015-01-01

    We present a mini-perspective on the development of first principles modeling of electrochemical interfaces. We show that none of the existing methods deal with all the thermodynamic constraints that the electrochemical environment imposes on the structure of the interface. We present two...

  20. A proposed parameterization of interface discontinuity factors depending on neighborhood for pin-by-pin diffusion computations for LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, Jose Javier; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Ahnert, Carol

    2011-01-01

    There exists an interest in performing full core pin-by-pin computations for present nuclear reactors. In such type of problems the use of a transport approximation like the diffusion equation requires the introduction of correction parameters. Interface discontinuity factors can improve the diffusion solution to nearly reproduce a transport solution. Nevertheless, calculating accurate pin-by-pin IDF requires the knowledge of the heterogeneous neutron flux distribution, which depends on the boundary conditions of the pin-cell as well as the local variables along the nuclear reactor operation. As a consequence, it is impractical to compute them for each possible configuration. An alternative to generate accurate pin-by-pin interface discontinuity factors is to calculate reference values using zero-net-current boundary conditions and to synthesize afterwards their dependencies on the main neighborhood variables. In such way the factors can be accurately computed during fine-mesh diffusion calculations by correcting the reference values as a function of the actual environment of the pin-cell in the core. In this paper we propose a parameterization of the pin-by-pin interface discontinuity factors allowing the implementation of a cross sections library able to treat the neighborhood effect. First results are presented for typical PWR configurations. (author)

  1. A proposed parameterization of interface discontinuity factors depending on neighborhood for pin-by-pin diffusion computations for LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, Jose Javier; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Ahnert, Carol, E-mail: herrero@din.upm.es, E-mail: nuria@din.upm.es, E-mail: carol@din.upm.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    There exists an interest in performing full core pin-by-pin computations for present nuclear reactors. In such type of problems the use of a transport approximation like the diffusion equation requires the introduction of correction parameters. Interface discontinuity factors can improve the diffusion solution to nearly reproduce a transport solution. Nevertheless, calculating accurate pin-by-pin IDF requires the knowledge of the heterogeneous neutron flux distribution, which depends on the boundary conditions of the pin-cell as well as the local variables along the nuclear reactor operation. As a consequence, it is impractical to compute them for each possible configuration. An alternative to generate accurate pin-by-pin interface discontinuity factors is to calculate reference values using zero-net-current boundary conditions and to synthesize afterwards their dependencies on the main neighborhood variables. In such way the factors can be accurately computed during fine-mesh diffusion calculations by correcting the reference values as a function of the actual environment of the pin-cell in the core. In this paper we propose a parameterization of the pin-by-pin interface discontinuity factors allowing the implementation of a cross sections library able to treat the neighborhood effect. First results are presented for typical PWR configurations. (author)

  2. Diffusion models in metamorphic thermo chronology: philosophy and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munha, Jose Manuel; Tassinari, Colombo Celso Gaeta

    1999-01-01

    Understanding kinetics of diffusion is of major importance to the interpretation of isotopic ages in metamorphic rocks. This paper provides a review of concepts and methodologies involved on the various diffusion models that can be applied to radiogenic systems in cooling rocks. The central concept of closure temperature is critically discussed and quantitative estimates for the various diffusion models are evaluated, in order to illustrate the controlling factors and the limits of their practical application. (author)

  3. Non-random walk diffusion enhances the sink strength of semicoherent interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattré, A.; Jourdan, T.; Ding, H.; Marinica, M.-C.; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Clean, safe and economical nuclear energy requires new materials capable of withstanding severe radiation damage. One strategy of imparting radiation resistance to solids is to incorporate into them a high density of solid-phase interfaces capable of absorbing and annihilating radiation-induced defects. Here we show that elastic interactions between point defects and semicoherent interfaces lead to a marked enhancement in interface sink strength. Our conclusions stem from simulations that integrate first principles, object kinetic Monte Carlo and anisotropic elasticity calculations. Surprisingly, the enhancement in sink strength is not due primarily to increased thermodynamic driving forces, but rather to reduced defect migration barriers, which induce a preferential drift of defects towards interfaces. The sink strength enhancement is highly sensitive to the detailed character of interfacial stresses, suggesting that `super-sink' interfaces may be designed by optimizing interface stress fields. Such interfaces may be used to create materials with unprecedented resistance to radiation-induced damage.

  4. Modelling Nanoparticle Diffusion into Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podduturi, Vishwa Priya; Derosa, Pedro

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is one of the major, potentially deadly diseases and has been for years. Non-specific delivery of the drug can damage healthy tissue seriously affecting in many cases the patient's living condition. Nanoparticles are being used for a targeted drug delivery thereby reducing the dose. In addition, metallic nanoparticles are being used in thermal treatment of cancer cells where nanoparticles help concentrate heat in the tumor and away from living tissue. We proposed a model that combines random walk with diffusion principles. The particle drift velocity is taken from the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the velocity profile of the particle at the pores in the capillary wall is obtained using the Coventorware software. Pressure gradient and concentration gradient through the capillary wall are considered. Simulations are performed in Matlab using the Monte Carlo technique. Number of particles leaving the blood vessel through a pore is obtained as a function of blood pressure, the osmotic pressure, temperature, particle concentration, blood vessel radius, and pore size, and the relative effect of each of the parameters is discussed.

  5. A variable-order fractal derivative model for anomalous diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaoting

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper pays attention to develop a variable-order fractal derivative model for anomalous diffusion. Previous investigations have indicated that the medium structure, fractal dimension or porosity may change with time or space during solute transport processes, results in time or spatial dependent anomalous diffusion phenomena. Hereby, this study makes an attempt to introduce a variable-order fractal derivative diffusion model, in which the index of fractal derivative depends on temporal moment or spatial position, to characterize the above mentioned anomalous diffusion (or transport processes. Compared with other models, the main advantages in description and the physical explanation of new model are explored by numerical simulation. Further discussions on the dissimilitude such as computational efficiency, diffusion behavior and heavy tail phenomena of the new model and variable-order fractional derivative model are also offered.

  6. A consistent transported PDF model for treating differential molecular diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Pei

    2016-11-01

    Differential molecular diffusion is a fundamentally significant phenomenon in all multi-component turbulent reacting or non-reacting flows caused by the different rates of molecular diffusion of energy and species concentrations. In the transported probability density function (PDF) method, the differential molecular diffusion can be treated by using a mean drift model developed by McDermott and Pope. This model correctly accounts for the differential molecular diffusion in the scalar mean transport and yields a correct DNS limit of the scalar variance production. The model, however, misses the molecular diffusion term in the scalar variance transport equation, which yields an inconsistent prediction of the scalar variance in the transported PDF method. In this work, a new model is introduced to remedy this problem that can yield a consistent scalar variance prediction. The model formulation along with its numerical implementation is discussed, and the model validation is conducted in a turbulent mixing layer problem.

  7. Diffuse radiation models and monthly-average, daily, diffuse data for a wide latitude range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinathan, K.K.; Soler, A.

    1995-01-01

    Several years of measured data on global and diffuse radiation and sunshine duration for 40 widely spread locations in the latitude range 36° S to 60° N are used to develop and test models for estimating monthly-mean, daily, diffuse radiation on horizontal surfaces. Applicability of the clearness-index (K) and sunshine fraction (SSO) models for diffuse estimation and the effect of combining several variables into a single multilinear equation are tested. Correlations connecting the diffuse to global fraction (HdH) with K and SSO predict Hd values more accurately than their separate use. Among clearness-index and sunshine-fraction models, SSO models are found to have better accuracy if correlations are developed for wide latitude ranges. By including a term for declinations in the correlation, the accuracy of the estimated data can be marginally improved. The addition of latitude to the equation does not help to improve the accuracy further. (author)

  8. A model for the origin of solar wind stream interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundhausen, A.J.; Burlaga, L.F.

    1975-01-01

    The basic variations in solar wind properties that have been observed at 'stream interfaces' near 1 AU are explained by a gas dynamic model in which a radially propagating stream, produced by a temperature variation in the solar envelope, steepens nonlinearly while moving through interplanetary space. The region thus identified with the stream interface separates the ambient solar wind from the fresh hot material originally in the stream. However, the interface regions given by the present model are thicker than most stream interfaces observed in the solar wind, a fact suggesting that some additional physical process may be important in determining that thickness. Variations in the density, speed, or Alfven pressure alone appear not to produce streams with such an interface

  9. Two-Phase Diffusion Technique for the Preparation of Ultramacroporous/Mesoporous Silica Microspheres via Interface Hydrolysis, Diffusion, and Gelation of TEOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Minhua; Li, Yupeng; Yu, Liang; Wang, Chongqing; Zhang, Lixiong

    2018-02-06

    Honeycombed hierarchical ultramacroporous/mesoporous silica microspheres were prepared via the hydrolysis of TEOS in the oil-water interface, with subsequent diffusion and gelation in the acidic water-phase microdroplets with the assistance of a simple homemade microdevice. The diffusion of furfuryl alcohol (FA) also happened at a relatively high rate during the hydrolysis and diffusion of TEOS. Therefore, plenty of FA will be inside of the water microdroplets and form a decent number of polyfurfuryl alcohol (PFA) microparticles, thereby obtaining honeycombed hierarchical porosity silica microspheres with abundant ultramacroporous cavities and mesopores after calcination. It was found that the concentration of FA, residence time, and reaction temperature have significant effects on the porosity and pore size due to the influence on the diffusion rate and amount of FA in water-phase microdroplets. The honeycombed silica microspheres have obvious microscopic visible ultramacroporous cavities with the submicrometer cavity diameter as high as 85% porosity based on the rough overall volume of microsphere. N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms show that the honeycombed hierarchical porosity silica microspheres have a high surface area of 602 m 2 g -1 , a mesopore volume of 0.77 cm 3 /g, and a mesopore porosity of 99.6% based on the total pore volume of N 2 adsorption-desorption. On the basis of the experiment results, a rational formation process of the honeycombed hierarchical porosity silica microspheres was deduced.

  10. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Alimadadi, Hossein; Molin, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell and electrolysis cell stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component layer diffuses into the interconnect plate......, causing transformation of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume, and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the interconnect plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic...

  11. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Molin, Sebastian; Zhang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or electrolysis cell (SOEC) stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/YSZ fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component diffuses into the IC plate, causing transformation...... of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the IC plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic stainless steel was conducted, using the CALPHAD...

  12. Numerical and theoretical aspects of the modelling of compressible two-phase flow by interface capture methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokh, S.

    2001-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a numerical direct simulation of compressible two-phase flows by using interface capturing methods. These techniques are based on the use of an Eulerian fixed grid to describe flow variables as well as the interface between fluids. The author first recalls conventional interface capturing methods and makes the distinction between those based on discontinuous colour functions and those based on level set functions. The approach is then extended to a five equation model to allow the largest as possible choice of state equations for the fluids. Three variants are developed. A solver inspired by the Roe scheme is developed for one of them. These interface capturing methods are then refined, more particularly for problems of numerical diffusion at the interface. A last part addresses the study of dynamic phase change. Non-conventional thermodynamics tools are used to study the structures of an interface which performs phase transition [fr

  13. Asymptotic solutions of diffusion models for risk reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a family of diffusion models for risk reserves which account for the investment income earned and for the inflation experienced on claim amounts. After we defined the process of the conditional probability of ruin over finite time and imposed the appropriate boundary conditions, classical results from the theory of diffusion processes turn the stochastic differential equation to a special class of initial and boundary value problems defined by a linear diffusion equation. Armed with asymptotic analysis and perturbation theory, we obtain the asymptotic solutions of the diffusion models (possibly degenerate governing the conditional probability of ruin over a finite time in terms of interest rate.

  14. Lévy flight with absorption: A model for diffusing diffusivity with long tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rohit; Sebastian, K. L.

    2017-03-01

    We consider diffusion of a particle in rearranging environment, so that the diffusivity of the particle is a stochastic function of time. In our previous model of "diffusing diffusivity" [Jain and Sebastian, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 3988 (2016), 10.1021/acs.jpcb.6b01527], it was shown that the mean square displacement of particle remains Fickian, i.e., ∝T at all times, but the probability distribution of particle displacement is not Gaussian at all times. It is exponential at short times and crosses over to become Gaussian only in a large time limit in the case where the distribution of D in that model has a steady state limit which is exponential, i.e., πe(D ) ˜e-D /D0 . In the present study, we model the diffusivity of a particle as a Lévy flight process so that D has a power-law tailed distribution, viz., πe(D ) ˜D-1 -α with 0 <α <1 . We find that in the short time limit, the width of displacement distribution is proportional to √{T }, implying that the diffusion is Fickian. But for long times, the width is proportional to T1 /2 α which is a characteristic of anomalous diffusion. The distribution function for the displacement of the particle is found to be a symmetric stable distribution with a stability index 2 α which preserves its shape at all times.

  15. Atomistic approach for modeling metal-semiconductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stradi, Daniele; Martinez, Umberto; Blom, Anders

    2016-01-01

    realistic metal-semiconductor interfaces and allows for a direct comparison between theory and experiments via the I–V curve. In particular, it will be demonstrated how doping — and bias — modifies the Schottky barrier, and how finite size models (the slab approach) are unable to describe these interfaces......We present a general framework for simulating interfaces using an atomistic approach based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions. The method includes all the relevant ingredients, such as doping and an accurate value of the semiconductor band gap, required to model...

  16. Fractional diffusion models of transport in magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Carreras, B. A.; Lynch, V. E.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical evidence suggests that transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas deviates from the standard diffusion paradigm. Some examples include the confinement time scaling in L-mode plasmas, rapid pulse propagation phenomena, and inward transport in off-axis fueling experiments. The limitations of the diffusion paradigm can be traced back to the restrictive assumptions in which it is based. In particular, Fick's law, one of the cornerstones of diffusive transport, assumes that the fluxes only depend on local quantities, i. e. the spatial gradient of the field (s). another key issue is the Markovian assumption that neglects memory effects. Also, at a microscopic level, standard diffusion assumes and underlying Gaussian, uncorrelated stochastic process (i. e. a Brownian random walk) with well defined characteristic spatio-temporal scales. Motivated by the need to develop models of non-diffusive transport, we discuss here a class of transport models base on the use of fractional derivative operators. The models incorporates in a unified way non-Fickian transport, non-Markovian processes or memory effects, and non-diffusive scaling. At a microscopic level, the models describe an underlying stochastic process without characteristic spatio-temporal scales that generalizes the Brownian random walk. As a concrete case study to motivate and test the model, we consider transport of tracers in three-dimensional, pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. We show that in this system transport is non-diffusive and cannot be described in the context of the standard diffusion parading. In particular, the probability density function (pdf) of the radial displacements of tracers is strongly non-Gaussian with algebraic decaying tails, and the moments of the tracer displacements exhibit super-diffusive scaling. there is quantitative agreement between the turbulence transport calculations and the proposed fractional diffusion model. In particular, the model

  17. Diffusion of hydrous species in model basaltic melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Guo, Xuan; Wang, Qinxia; Ding, Jiale; Ni, Huaiwei

    2017-10-01

    Water diffusion in Fe-free model basaltic melt with up to 2 wt% H2O was investigated at 1658-1846 K and 1 GPa in piston-cylinder apparatus using both hydration and diffusion couple techniques. Diffusion profiles measured by FTIR are consistent with a model in which both molecular H2O (H2Om) and hydroxyl (OH) contribute to water diffusion. OH diffusivity is roughly 13% of H2Om diffusivity, showing little dependence on temperature or water concentration. Water diffusion is dominated by the motion of OH until total H2O (H2Ot) concentration reaches 1 wt%. The dependence of apparent H2Ot diffusivity on H2Ot concentration appears to be overestimated by a previous study on MORB melt, but H2Ot diffusivity at 1 wt% H2Ot in basaltic melt is still greater than those in rhyolitic to andesitic melts. The appreciable contribution of OH to water diffusion in basaltic melt can be explained by enhanced mobility of OH, probably associated with the development of free hydroxyl bonded with network-modifying cations, as well as higher OH concentration. Calculation based on the Nernst-Einstein equation demonstrates that OH may serve as an effective charge carrier in hydrous basaltic melt, which could partly account for the previously observed strong influence of water on electrical conductivity of basaltic melt.

  18. Physical modelling of interactions between interfaces and turbulence; Modelisation physique des interactions entre interfaces et turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutant, A

    2006-12-15

    The complex interactions between interfaces and turbulence strongly impact the flow properties. Unfortunately, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have to entail a number of degrees of freedom proportional to the third power of the Reynolds number to correctly describe the flow behaviour. This extremely hard constraint makes it impossible to use DNS for industrial applications. Our strategy consists in using and improving DNS method in order to develop the Interfaces and Sub-grid Scales concept. ISS is a two-phase equivalent to the single-phase Large Eddy Simulation (LES) concept. The challenge of ISS is to integrate the two-way coupling phenomenon into sub-grid models. Applying a space filter, we have exhibited correlations or sub-grid terms that require closures. We have shown that, in two-phase flows, the presence of a discontinuity leads to specific sub-grid terms. Comparing the maximum of the norm of the sub-grid terms with the maximum of the norm of the advection tensor, we have found that sub-grid terms related to interfacial forces and viscous effect are negligible. Consequently, in the momentum balance, only the sub-grid terms related to inertia have to be closed. Thanks to a priori tests performed on several DNS data, we demonstrate that the scale similarity hypothesis, reinterpreted near discontinuity, provides sub-grid models that take into account the two-way coupling phenomenon. These models correspond to the first step of our work. Indeed, in this step, interfaces are smooth and, interactions between interfaces and turbulence occur in a transition zone where each physical variable varies sharply but continuously. The next challenge has been to determine the jump conditions across the sharp equivalent interface corresponding to the sub-grid models of the transition zone. We have used the matched asymptotic expansion method to obtain the jump conditions. The first tests on the velocity of the sharp equivalent interface are very promising (author)

  19. STEPS: efficient simulation of stochastic reaction–diffusion models in realistic morphologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepburn Iain

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Models of cellular molecular systems are built from components such as biochemical reactions (including interactions between ligands and membrane-bound proteins, conformational changes and active and passive transport. A discrete, stochastic description of the kinetics is often essential to capture the behavior of the system accurately. Where spatial effects play a prominent role the complex morphology of cells may have to be represented, along with aspects such as chemical localization and diffusion. This high level of detail makes efficiency a particularly important consideration for software that is designed to simulate such systems. Results We describe STEPS, a stochastic reaction–diffusion simulator developed with an emphasis on simulating biochemical signaling pathways accurately and efficiently. STEPS supports all the above-mentioned features, and well-validated support for SBML allows many existing biochemical models to be imported reliably. Complex boundaries can be represented accurately in externally generated 3D tetrahedral meshes imported by STEPS. The powerful Python interface facilitates model construction and simulation control. STEPS implements the composition and rejection method, a variation of the Gillespie SSA, supporting diffusion between tetrahedral elements within an efficient search and update engine. Additional support for well-mixed conditions and for deterministic model solution is implemented. Solver accuracy is confirmed with an original and extensive validation set consisting of isolated reaction, diffusion and reaction–diffusion systems. Accuracy imposes upper and lower limits on tetrahedron sizes, which are described in detail. By comparing to Smoldyn, we show how the voxel-based approach in STEPS is often faster than particle-based methods, with increasing advantage in larger systems, and by comparing to MesoRD we show the efficiency of the STEPS implementation. Conclusion STEPS simulates

  20. A priori analysis of differential diffusion for model development for scale-resolving simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Franziska; Dietzsch, Felix; Gauding, Michael; Hasse, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The present study analyzes differential diffusion and the mechanisms responsible for it with regard to the turbulent/nonturbulent interface (TNTI) with special focus on model development for scale-resolving simulations. In order to analyze differences between resolved and subfilter phenomena, direct numerical simulation (DNS) data are compared with explicitly filtered data. The DNS database stems from a temporally evolving turbulent plane jet transporting two passive scalars with Schmidt numbers of unity and 0.25 presented by Hunger et al. [F. Hunger et al., J. Fluid Mech. 802, R5 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.471]. The objective of this research is twofold: (i) to compare the position of the turbulent-nonturbulent interface between the original DNS data and the filtered data and (ii) to analyze differential diffusion and the impact of the TNTI with regard to scale resolution in the filtered DNS data. For the latter, differential diffusion quantities are studied, clearly showing the decrease of differential diffusion at the resolved scales with increasing filter width. A transport equation for the scalar differences is evaluated. Finally, the existence of large scalar gradients, gradient alignment, and the diffusive fluxes being the physical mechanisms responsible for the separation of the two scalars are compared between the resolved and subfilter scales.

  1. A diffusivity model for predicting VOC diffusion in porous building materials based on fractal theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanfeng; Zhou, Xiaojun; Wang, Dengjia; Song, Cong; Liu, Jiaping

    2015-12-15

    Most building materials are porous media, and the internal diffusion coefficients of such materials have an important influences on the emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The pore structure of porous building materials has a significant impact on the diffusion coefficient. However, the complex structural characteristics bring great difficulties to the model development. The existing prediction models of the diffusion coefficient are flawed and need to be improved. Using scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) tests of typical porous building materials, this study developed a new diffusivity model: the multistage series-connection fractal capillary-bundle (MSFC) model. The model considers the variable-diameter capillaries formed by macropores connected in series as the main mass transfer paths, and the diameter distribution of the capillary bundles obeys a fractal power law in the cross section. In addition, the tortuosity of the macrocapillary segments with different diameters is obtained by the fractal theory. Mesopores serve as the connections between the macrocapillary segments rather than as the main mass transfer paths. The theoretical results obtained using the MSFC model yielded a highly accurate prediction of the diffusion coefficients and were in a good agreement with the VOC concentration measurements in the environmental test chamber. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Simple Brownian diffusion an introduction to the standard theoretical models

    CERN Document Server

    Gillespie, Daniel T

    2013-01-01

    Brownian diffusion, the motion of large molecules in a sea of very many much smaller molecules, is topical because it is one of the ways in which biologically important molecules move about inside living cells. This book presents the mathematical physics that underlies the four simplest models of Brownian diffusion.

  3. Wind Power in Europe. A Simultaneous Innovation-Diffusion Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederholm, P.; Klaassen, G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a quantitative analysis of innovation and diffusion in the European wind power sector. We derive a simultaneous model of wind power innovation and diffusion, which combines a rational choice model of technological diffusion and a learning curve model of dynamic cost reductions. These models are estimated using pooled annual time series data for four European countries (Denmark, Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom) over the time period 1986-2000. The empirical results indicate that reductions in investment costs have been important determinants of increased diffusion of wind power, and these cost reductions can in turn be explained by learning activities and public R and D support. Feed-in tariffs also play an important role in the innovation and diffusion processes. The higher the feed-in price the higher, ceteris paribus, the rate of diffusion, and we present some preliminary empirical support for the notion that the impact on diffusion of a marginal increase in the feed-in tariff will differ depending on the support system used. High feed-in tariffs, though, also have a negative effect on cost reductions as they induce wind generators to choose high-cost sites and provide fewer incentives for cost cuts. This illustrates the importance of designing an efficient wind energy support system, which not only promotes diffusion but also provides continuous incentives for cost-reducing innovations

  4. Advanced diffusion model in compacted bentonite based on modified Poisson-Boltzmann equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yotsuji, K.; Tachi, Y.; Nishimaki, Y.

    2012-01-01

    dry density Kunipia-F (-0.129 C m -2 surface charge density). We used Booth equation and Malsh-Grahame equation as the dielectric permittivity dependent on electric field. In this condition field strength come to ∼ 10 9 V m -1 in the vicinity of the interface, then saturation effect by Booth equation is larger than Malsh-Grahame equation. Therefore Na + is strongly eliminated from the interface by Booth equation than Malsh-Grahame equation. While Figure 1(b) shows salinity dependence of the effective diffusivity (D e ) of Sr 2+ /Cs + /I - , calculated by the modified ISD model incorporated the dielectric saturation effects with Booth equation and original one (present ISD model). For Cs + as an example electrostatic potential term in Boltzmann factor of the modified model is larger than the original one, however hydration free energy term in Boltzmann factor cancel out this increment. Consequently D e by the modified model was not mostly changed from the original model. For other ionic species we can be considered as well. The ISD model was modified considering the excluded volume effect which is caused by quantum mechanical short range repulsive force of inter-particle. We used the restricted primitive model for the sake of simplicity. Figure 2 shows the concentration distributions of Na + as numerical solutions of the modified models incorporated the excluded volume effect and the original model, and salinity dependence of D e (b). We used here the Stokes radius (=1.84 x 10 -10 m) as ionic radius in a solution and crystal radius (= 1.16 x 10 -10 m) on the interface. It can be said that the excluded volume effect influence hardly D e as well as the dielectric saturation effects. As results of numerical analysis of the models the considered factors influence hardly D e of Sr 2+ /Cs + /I - . Therefore it was concluded that the disagreements with experimental data observed in present ISD model cannot be improved by considered factors in this study, because ionic

  5. Modelling of diffuse solar fraction with multiple predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridley, Barbara; Boland, John [Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Lauret, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physique du Batiment et des Systemes, University of La Reunion, Reunion (France)

    2010-02-15

    For some locations both global and diffuse solar radiation are measured. However, for many locations, only global radiation is measured, or inferred from satellite data. For modelling solar energy applications, the amount of radiation on a tilted surface is needed. Since only the direct component on a tilted surface can be calculated from direct on some other plane using trigonometry, we need to have diffuse radiation on the horizontal plane available. There are regression relationships for estimating the diffuse on a tilted surface from diffuse on the horizontal. Models for estimating the diffuse on the horizontal from horizontal global that have been developed in Europe or North America have proved to be inadequate for Australia. Boland et al. developed a validated model for Australian conditions. Boland et al. detailed our recent advances in developing the theoretical framework for the use of the logistic function instead of piecewise linear or simple nonlinear functions and was the first step in identifying the means for developing a generic model for estimating diffuse from global and other predictors. We have developed a multiple predictor model, which is much simpler than previous models, and uses hourly clearness index, daily clearness index, solar altitude, apparent solar time and a measure of persistence of global radiation level as predictors. This model performs marginally better than currently used models for locations in the Northern Hemisphere and substantially better for Southern Hemisphere locations. We suggest it can be used as a universal model. (author)

  6. What Can the Diffusion Model Tell Us About Prospective Memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Sebastian S.; Bayen, Ute J.; Smith, Rebekah E.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive process models, such as Ratcliff’s (1978) diffusion model, are useful tools for examining cost- or interference effects in event-based prospective memory (PM). The diffusion model includes several parameters that provide insight into how and why ongoing-task performance may be affected by a PM task and is ideally suited to analyze performance because both reaction time and accuracy are taken into account. Separate analyses of these measures can easily yield misleading interpretations in cases of speed-accuracy tradeoffs. The diffusion model allows us to measure possible criterion shifts and is thus an important methodological improvement over standard analyses. Performance in an ongoing lexical decision task (Smith, 2003) was analyzed with the diffusion model. The results suggest that criterion shifts play an important role when a PM task is added, but do not fully explain the cost effect on RT. PMID:21443332

  7. CROSS DIFFUSION AND NONLINEAR DIFFUSION PREVENTING BLOW UP IN THE KELLER–SEGEL MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    CARRILLO, JOSÉ ANTONIO

    2012-12-01

    A parabolic-parabolic (Patlak-)Keller-Segel model in up to three space dimensions with nonlinear cell diffusion and an additional nonlinear cross-diffusion term is analyzed. The main feature of this model is that there exists a new entropy functional, yielding gradient estimates for the cell density and chemical concentration. For arbitrarily small cross-diffusion coefficients and for suitable exponents of the nonlinear diffusion terms, the global-in-time existence of weak solutions is proved, thus preventing finite-time blow up of the cell density. The global existence result also holds for linear and fast diffusion of the cell density in a certain parameter range in three dimensions. Furthermore, we show L∞ bounds for the solutions to the parabolic-elliptic system. Sufficient conditions leading to the asymptotic stability of the constant steady state are given for a particular choice of the nonlinear diffusion exponents. Numerical experiments in two and three space dimensions illustrate the theoretical results. © 2012 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  8. New sensitive micro-measurements of dynamic surface tension and diffusion coefficients: Validated and tested for the adsorption of 1-Octanol at a microscopic air-water interface and its dissolution into water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Koji; Parra, Elisa; Needham, David

    2017-02-15

    Currently available dynamic surface tension (DST) measurement methods, such as Wilhelmy plate, droplet- or bubble-based methods, still have various experimental limitations such as the large size of the interface, convection in the solution, or a certain "dead time" at initial measurement. These limitations create inconsistencies for the kinetic analysis of surfactant adsorption/desorption, especially significant for ionic surfactants. Here, the "micropipette interfacial area-expansion method" was introduced and validated as a new DST measurement having a high enough sensitivity to detect diffusion controlled molecular adsorption at the air-water interfaces. To validate the new technique, the diffusion coefficient of 1-Octanol in water was investigated with existing models: the Ward Tordai model for the long time adsorption regime (1-100s), and the Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption isotherm models for surface excess concentration. We found that the measured diffusion coefficient of 1-Octanol, 7.2±0.8×10 -6 cm 2 /s, showed excellent agreement with the result from an alternative method, "single microdroplet catching method", to measure the diffusion coefficient from diffusion-controlled microdroplet dissolution, 7.3±0.1×10 -6 cm 2 /s. These new techniques for determining adsorption and diffusion coefficients can apply for a range of surface active molecules, especially the less-characterized ionic surfactants, and biological compounds such as lipids, peptides, and proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pricing Participating Products under a Generalized Jump-Diffusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Kuen Siu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model for valuing participating life insurance products under a generalized jump-diffusion model with a Markov-switching compensator. It also nests a number of important and popular models in finance, including the classes of jump-diffusion models and Markovian regime-switching models. The Esscher transform is employed to determine an equivalent martingale measure. Simulation experiments are conducted to illustrate the practical implementation of the model and to highlight some features that can be obtained from our model.

  10. WWER radial reflector modeling by diffusion codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, P. T.; Mittag, S.

    2005-01-01

    The two commonly used approaches to describe the WWER radial reflectors in diffusion codes, by albedo on the core-reflector boundary and by a ring of diffusive assembly size nodes, are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the first approach are presented first, then the Koebke's equivalence theory is outlined and its implementation for the WWER radial reflectors is discussed. Results for the WWER-1000 reactor are presented. Then the boundary conditions on the outer reflector boundary are discussed. The possibility to divide the library into fuel assembly and reflector parts and to generate each library by a separate code package is discussed. Finally, the homogenization errors for rodded assemblies are presented and discussed (Author)

  11. A multiphase electrokinetic flow model for electrolytes with liquid/liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J.D., E-mail: joe.d.berry@gmail.com; Davidson, M.R., E-mail: m.davidson@unimelb.edu.au; Harvie, D.J.E., E-mail: daltonh@unimelb.edu.au

    2013-10-15

    A numerical model for electrokinetic flow of multiphase systems with deformable interfaces is presented, based on a combined level set-volume of fluid technique. A new feature is a multiphase formulation of the Nernst–Planck transport equation for advection, diffusion and conduction of individual charge carrier species that ensures their conservation in each fluid phase. The numerical model is validated against the analytical results of Zholkovskij et al. (2002) [1], and results for the problem of two drops coalescing in the presence of mobile charge carriers are presented. The time taken for two drops containing ions to coalesce decreases with increasing ion concentration.

  12. Radiation budget measurement/model interface research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    The NIMBUS 6 data were analyzed to form an up to date climatology of the Earth radiation budget as a basis for numerical model definition studies. Global maps depicting infrared emitted flux, net flux and albedo from processed NIMBUS 6 data for July, 1977, are presented. Zonal averages of net radiation flux for April, May, and June and zonal mean emitted flux and net flux for the December to January period are also presented. The development of two models is reported. The first is a statistical dynamical model with vertical and horizontal resolution. The second model is a two level global linear balance model. The results of time integration of the model up to 120 days, to simulate the January circulation, are discussed. Average zonal wind, meridonal wind component, vertical velocity, and moisture budget are among the parameters addressed.

  13. Dynamic Diffusion Estimation in Exponential Family Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dedecius, Kamil; Sečkárová, Vladimíra

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 11 (2013), s. 1114-1117 ISSN 1070-9908 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7D12004; GA ČR GA13-13502S Keywords : diffusion estimation * distributed estimation * paremeter estimation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.639, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/AS/dedecius-0396518.pdf

  14. Weak diffusion limits of dynamic conditional correlation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hafner, Christian M.; Laurent, Sebastien; Violante, Francesco

    The properties of dynamic conditional correlation (DCC) models are still not entirely understood. This paper fills one of the gaps by deriving weak diffusion limits of a modified version of the classical DCC model. The limiting system of stochastic differential equations is characterized...... by a diffusion matrix of reduced rank. The degeneracy is due to perfect collinearity between the innovations of the volatility and correlation dynamics. For the special case of constant conditional correlations, a non-degenerate diffusion limit can be obtained. Alternative sets of conditions are considered...

  15. Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Diffusion, Lattice Defect Formation, and Kink Incorporation Processes of Particles on Growth Interfaces of Colloidal Crystals with Attractive Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Suzuki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Good model systems are required in order to understand crystal growth processes because, in many cases, precise incorporation processes of atoms or molecules cannot be visualized easily at the atomic or molecular level. Using a transmission-type optical microscope, we have successfully observed in situ adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, lattice defect formation, and kink incorporation of particles on growth interfaces of colloidal crystals of polystyrene particles in aqueous sodium polyacrylate solutions. Precise surface transportation and kink incorporation processes of the particles into the colloidal crystals with attractive interactions were observed in situ at the particle level. In particular, contrary to the conventional expectations, the diffusion of particles along steps around a two-dimensional island of the growth interface was not the main route for kink incorporation. This is probably due to the number of bonds between adsorbed particles and particles in a crystal; the number exceeds the limit at which a particle easily exchanges its position to the adjacent one along the step. We also found novel desorption processes of particles from steps to terraces, attributing them to the assistance of attractive forces from additionally adsorbing particles to the particles on the steps.

  16. A simplified model exploration research of new anisotropic diffuse radiation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Wanxiang; Li, Zhengrong; Wang, Xiao; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Zhigang; Lin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The specific process of measured diffuse radiation data. - Highlights: • Simplified diffuse radiation model is extremely important for solar radiation simulation and energy simulation. • A new simplified anisotropic diffuse radiation model (NSADR model) is proposed. • The accuracy of existing models and NSADR model is compared based on the measured values. • The accuracy of the NSADR model is higher than that of the existing models, and suitable for calculating diffuse radiation. - Abstract: More accurate new anisotropic diffuse radiation model (NADR model) has been proposed, but the parameters and calculation process of NADR model used in the process are complex. So it is difficult to widely used in the simulation software and engineering calculation. Based on analysis of the diffuse radiation model and measured diffuse radiation data, this paper put forward three hypotheses: (1) diffuse radiation from sky horizontal region is concentrated in a very thin layer which is close to the line source; (2) diffuse radiation from circumsolar region is concentrated in the point of the sun; (3) diffuse radiation from orthogonal region is concentrated in the point located at 90 degree angles with the Sun. Based on these hypotheses, NADR model is simplified to a new simplified anisotropic diffuse radiation model (NSADR model). Then the accuracy of NADR model and its simplified model (NSADR model) are compared with existing models based on the measured values, and the result shows that Perez model and its simplified model are relatively accurate among existing models. However, the accuracy of these two models is lower than the NADR model and NSADR model due to neglect the influence of the orthogonal diffuse radiation. The accuracy of the NSADR model is higher than that of the existing models, meanwhile, another advantage is that the NSADR model simplifies the process of solution parameters and calculation. Therefore it is more suitable for

  17. Accelerated diffusion controlled creep of polycrystalline materials. Communication 1. Model of diffusion controlled creep acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, E.S.; Chuvil'deev, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The model is suggested which describes the influence of large-angle grain boundary migration on a diffusion controlled creep rate in polycrystalline materials (Coble creep). The model is based on the concept about changing the value of migrating boundary free volume when introducing dislocations distributed over the grain bulk into this boundary. Expressions are obtained to calculate the grain boundary diffusion coefficient under conditions of boundary migration and the parameter, which characterized the value of Coble creep acceleration. A comparison is made between calculated and experimental data for Cd, Co and Fe

  18. Verification of atmospheric diffusion models with data of atmospheric diffusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hato, Shinji; Homma, Toshimitsu

    2009-02-01

    The atmospheric diffusion experiments were implemented by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) around Mount Tsukuba in 1989 and 1990, and the tracer gas concentration were monitored. In this study, the Gauss Plume Model and RAMS/HYPACT that are meteorological forecast code and atmospheric diffusion code with detailed physical law are made a comparison between monitored concentration. In conclusion, the Gauss Plume Model is better than RAM/HYPACT even complex topography if the estimation is around tens of kilometer form release point and the change in weather is constant for short time. This reason is difference of wind between RAMS and observation. (author)

  19. Enabling Accessibility Through Model-Based User Interface Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Daniel; Peissner, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive user interfaces (AUIs) can increase the accessibility of interactive systems. They provide personalized display and interaction modes to fit individual user needs. Most AUI approaches rely on model-based development, which is considered relatively demanding. This paper explores strategies to make model-based development more attractive for mainstream developers.

  20. Integrating Models of Diffusion and Behavior to Predict Innovation Adoption, Maintenance, and Social Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel A; Kim, Youllee; Zhu, Xun; Doudou, Dimi Théodore; Sternberg, Eleanore D; Thomas, Matthew B

    2018-01-01

    This study documents an investigation into the adoption and diffusion of eave tubes, a novel mosquito vector control, during a large-scale scientific field trial in West Africa. The diffusion of innovations (DOI) and the integrated model of behavior (IMB) were integrated (i.e., innovation attributes with attitudes and social pressures with norms) to predict participants' (N = 329) diffusion intentions. The findings showed that positive attitudes about the innovation's attributes were a consistent positive predictor of diffusion intentions: adopting it, maintaining it, and talking with others about it. As expected by the DOI and the IMB, the social pressure created by a descriptive norm positively predicted intentions to adopt and maintain the innovation. Drawing upon sharing research, we argued that the descriptive norm may dampen future talk about the innovation, because it may no longer be seen as a novel, useful topic to discuss. As predicted, the results showed that as the descriptive norm increased, the intention to talk about the innovation decreased. These results provide broad support for integrating the DOI and the IMB to predict diffusion and for efforts to draw on other research to understand motivations for social diffusion.

  1. Diffuse Scattering Model of Indoor Wideband Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Andersen, Jørgen Bach; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    segments in total and approximately 2 min running time on average computer. Frequency independent power levels at the walls around the circumference of the room and at four receiver locations in the middle of the room are observed. It is demonstrated that after finite period of initial excitation the field...... radio coverage predictions.......This paper presents a discrete-time numerical algorithm for computing field distribution in indoor environment by diffuse scattering from walls. Calculations are performed for a rectangular room with semi-reflective walls. The walls are divided into 0.5 x 0.5 m segments, resulting in 2272 wall...

  2. MODEL OF THE TOKAMAK EDGE DENSITY PEDESTAL INCLUDING DIFFUSIVE NEUTRALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BURRELL, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Several previous analytic models of the tokamak edge density pedestal have been based on diffusive transport of plasma plus free-streaming of neutrals. This latter neutral model includes only the effect of ionization and neglects charge exchange. The present work models the edge density pedestal using diffusive transport for both the plasma and the neutrals. In contrast to the free-streaming model, a diffusion model for the neutrals includes the effect of both charge exchange and ionization and is valid when charge exchange is the dominant interaction. Surprisingly, the functional forms for the electron and neutral density profiles from the present calculation are identical to the results of the previous analytic models. There are some differences in the detailed definition of various parameters in the solution. For experimentally relevant cases where ionization and charge exchange rate are comparable, both models predict approximately the same width for the edge density pedestal

  3. Contribution to the modeling and the identification of haptic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janot, A.

    2007-12-01

    This thesis focuses on the modeling and the identification of haptic interfaces using cable drive. An haptic interface is a force feedback device, which enables its user to interact with a virtual world or a remote environment explored by a slave system. It aims at the matching between the forces and displacements given by the user and those applied to virtual world. Usually, haptic interfaces make use of a mechanical actuated structure whose distal link is equipped with a handle. When manipulating this handle to interact with explored world, the user feels the apparent mass, compliance and friction of the interface. This distortion introduced between the operator and the virtual world must be modeled and identified to enhance the design of the interface and develop appropriate control laws. The first approach has been to adapt the modeling and identification methods of rigid and localized flexibilities robots to haptic interfaces. The identification technique makes use of the inverse dynamic model and the linear least squares with the measurements of joint torques and positions. This approach is validated on a single degree of freedom and a three degree of freedom haptic devices. A new identification method needing only torque data is proposed. It is based on a closed loop simulation using the direct dynamic model. The optimal parameters minimize the 2 norms of the error between the actual torque and the simulated torque assuming the same control law and the same tracking trajectory. This non linear least squares problem dramatically is simplified using the inverse model to calculate the simulated torque. This method is validated on the single degree of freedom haptic device and the SCARA robot. (author)

  4. Clarifying roughness and atomic diffusion contributions to the interface broadening in exchange-biased NiFe/FeMn/NiFe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, V.P., E-mail: valberpn@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, 29075-910 Vitória (Brazil); Merino, I.L.C.; Passamani, E.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, 29075-910 Vitória (Brazil); Alayo, W. [Departamento de Física, Universidade de Pelotas, 96010-610 Pelotas (Brazil); Tafur, M. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, 37500-903 Itajubá (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74001-970 Goiânia (Brazil); Magalhães-Paniago, R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Alvarenga, A.D. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, 25250-020 Xerém (Brazil); Saitovitch, E.B. [Coordenação de Física Experimental e Baixas Energias, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-09-02

    NiFe(30 nm)/FeMn(13 nm)/NiFe(10 nm) heterostructures prepared by magnetron sputtering at different argon working pressures (0.27, 0.67 and 1.33 Pa) were systematically investigated by using specular and off-specular diffuse X-ray scattering experiments, combined with ferromagnetic resonance technique, in order to distinguish the contribution from roughness and atomic diffusion to the total structural disorder at NiFe/FeMn interfaces. It was shown that an increase in the working gas pressure from 0.27 to 1.33 Pa causes an enhancement of the atomic diffusion at the NiFe/FeMn interfaces, an effect more pronounced at the top FeMn/NiFe interface. In particular, this atomic diffusion provokes a formation of non-uniform magnetic dead-layers at the NiFe/FeMn interfaces (NiFeMn regions with paramagnetic or weak antiferromagnetic properties); that are responsible for the substantial reduction of the exchange bias field in the NiFe/FeMn system. Thus, this work generically helps to understand the discrepancies found in the literature regarding the influence of the interface broadening on the exchange bias properties (e.g., exchange bias field) of the NiFe/FeMn system. - Highlights: • Roughness and atomic diffusion contributions to the interface broadening • Clarification of the exchange bias field dependence on the interface disorder • Ferromagnetic, paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases at the magnetic interface • Magnetic dead layers formed by increasing the argon work pressure • Atomic diffusion in heterostructures prepared at higher argon pressure.

  5. Towards a sharp-interface volume-of-fluid methodology for modeling evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    In modeling evaporation, the diffuse-interface (one-domain) formulation yields inaccurate results. Recent efforts approaching the problem via a sharp-interface (two-domain) formulation have shown significant improvements. The reasons behind their better performance are discussed in the present work. All available sharp-interface methods, however, exclusively employ the level-set. In the present work, we develop a sharp-interface evaporation model in a volume-of-fluid (VOF) framework in order to leverage its mass-conserving property as well as its ability to handle large topographical changes. We start with a critical review of the assumptions underlying the mathematical equations governing evaporation. For example, it is shown that the assumption of incompressibility can only be applied in special circumstances. The famous D2 law used for benchmarking is valid exclusively to steady-state test problems. Transient is present over significant lifetime of a micron-size droplet. Therefore, a 1D spherical fully transient model is developed to provide a benchmark transient solution. Finally, a 3D Cartesian Navier-Stokes evaporation solver is developed. Some preliminary validation test-cases are presented for static and moving drop evaporation. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the Department of Defense, Tank and Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center, under Award Number DEEE0007292.

  6. Microscopic modeling of the Raman diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benisti, D.; Morice, O.; Gremillet, L.; Strozzi, D.

    2010-01-01

    In the typical conditions of density and electronic temperature of the Laser Megajoule (LMJ), a quantitative assessment of the Raman reflectivity requires an accurate calculation of the non-linear movement of each electron submitted to the waves propagating in the plasma. The interaction of a laser beam with a plasma generates an electronic wave shifted in frequency (that can be back-scattered) and an electron plasma wave (OPE). The OPE can give to the electrons a strongly non-linear movement by trapping them in a potential well. This non-linearity of microscopic origin has an impact on the plasma electronic density. We have succeeded in computing this plasma electronic density in a very accurate way by combining the principles of a perturbative approach with those of an adiabatic theory. Results show that the Raman diffusion can grow on temperature and density ranges more important than expected. We have predicted the threshold and the behavior of the Raman diffusion above this threshold as accurately as we had done it with a Vlasov code but by being 10000 times more rapid. (A.C.)

  7. A strongly nonlinear reaction-diffusion model for a deterministic diffusive epidemic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirane, M.; Kouachi, S.

    1992-10-01

    In the present paper the mathematical validity of a model on the spread of an infectious disease is proved. This model was proposed by Bailey. The mathematical validity is proved by means of a positivity, uniqueness and existence theorem. In spite of the apparent simplicity of the problem, the solution requires a delicate set of techniques. It seems very difficult to extend these techniques to a model in more than one dimension without imposing conditions on the diffusivities. (author). 7 refs

  8. ITER plasma safety interface models and assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Bartels, H-W.; Honda, T.; Amano, T.; Boucher, D.; Post, D.; Wesley, J.

    1996-01-01

    Physics models and requirements to be used as a basis for safety analysis studies are developed and physics results motivated by safety considerations are presented for the ITER design. Physics specifications are provided for enveloping plasma dynamic events for Category I (operational event), Category II (likely event), and Category III (unlikely event). A safety analysis code SAFALY has been developed to investigate plasma anomaly events. The plasma response to ex-vessel component failure and machine response to plasma transients are considered

  9. Verification of atmospheric diffusion models using data of long term atmospheric diffusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Junji; Kido, Hiroko; Hato, Shinji; Homma, Toshimitsu

    2009-03-01

    Straight-line or segmented plume models as atmospheric diffusion models are commonly used in probabilistic accident consequence assessment (PCA) codes due to cost and time savings. The PCA code, OSCAAR developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Present; Japan Atomic Energy Agency) uses the variable puff trajectory model to calculate atmospheric transport and dispersion of released radionuclides. In order to investigate uncertainties involved with the structure of the atmospheric dispersion/deposition model in OSCAAR, we have introduced the more sophisticated computer codes that included regional meteorological models RAMS and atmospheric transport model HYPACT, which were developed by Colorado State University, and comparative analyses between OSCAAR and RAMS/HYPACT have been performed. In this study, model verification of OSCAAR and RAMS/HYPACT was conducted using data of long term atmospheric diffusion experiments, which were carried out in Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken. The predictions by models and the results of the atmospheric diffusion experiments indicated relatively good agreements. And it was shown that model performance of OSCAAR was the same degree as it of RAMS/HYPACT. (author)

  10. Mean field diffusion models for precipitation in crystalline GaAs including surface tension and bulk stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Wolfgang [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany); Kimmerle, Sven-Joachim [Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Mathematics

    2009-07-01

    Based on a thermodynamically consistent model for precipitation in gallium arsenide crystals including surface tension and bulk stresses by Dreyer and Duderstadt, we propose different mathematical models to describe the size evolution of liquid droplets in a crystalline solid. The first class of models treats the diffusion-controlled regime of interface motion, while the second class is concerned with the interface-controlled regime of interface motion. Our models take care of conservation of mass and substance. We consider homogenised models, where different length scales of the experimental situation have been exploited in order to simplify the equations. These homogenised models generalise the well-known Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner model for Ostwald ripening. Mean field models capture the main properties of our system and are well adapted for numerics and further analysis. Numerical evidence suggests in which case which one of the two regimes might be appropriate to the experimental situation. (orig.)

  11. Transient interfacial tension and dilatational rheology of diffuse polymer-polymer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, G.W.M.; Zdravkov, A.N.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate the influence of molecular weight and molecular weightasymmetry across an interface on the transient behavior of the interfacial tension. The interfacial tension was measured as a function of time for a range of polymer combinations with a broadrange of interfacial properties using a

  12. Electrokinetics of diffuse soft interfaces. I. Limit of low Donnan potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duval, J.F.L.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The current theoretical approaches to electrokinetics of gels or polyelectrolyte layers are based on the assumption that the position of the very interface between the aqueous medium and the gel phase is well defined. Within this assumption, spatial profiles for the volume fraction of polymer

  13. Electrokinetics of diffuse soft interfaces. 2. Analysis based on the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duval, J.F.L.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous study (Langmuir 2004, 20, 10324), the electrokinetic properties of diffuse soft layers were theoretically investigated within the framework of the Debye-H¿ckel approximation valid in the limit of sufficiently low values for the Donnan potential. In the current paper, the

  14. Catchment Models and Management Tools for diffuse Contaminants (Sediment, Phosphorus and Pesticides): DIFFUSE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, Eva; Reaney, Simeon; Mellander, Per-Erik; Wade, Andrew; Collins, Adrian; Arheimer, Berit; Bruen, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The agricultural sector is the most common suspected source of nutrient pollution in Irish rivers. However, it is also often the most difficult source to characterise due to its predominantly diffuse nature. Particulate phosphorus in surface water and dissolved phosphorus in groundwater are of particular concern in Irish water bodies. Hence the further development of models and indices to assess diffuse sources of contaminants are required for use by the Irish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide support for river basin planning. Understanding connectivity in the landscape is a vital component of characterising the source-pathway-receptor relationships for water-borne contaminants, and hence is a priority in this research. The DIFFUSE Project will focus on connectivity modelling and incorporation of connectivity into sediment, nutrient and pesticide risk mapping. The Irish approach to understanding and managing natural water bodies has developed substantially in recent years assisted by outputs from multiple research projects, including modelling and analysis tools developed during the Pathways and CatchmentTools projects. These include the Pollution Impact Potential (PIP) maps, which are an example of research output that is used by the EPA to support catchment management. The PIP maps integrate an understanding of the pollution pressures and mobilisation pathways and, using the source-pathways-receptor model, provide a scientific basis for evaluation of mitigation measures. These maps indicate the potential risk posed by nitrate and phosphate from diffuse agricultural sources to surface and groundwater receptors and delineate critical source areas (CSAs) as a means of facilitating the targeting of mitigation measures. Building on this previous research, the DIFFUSE Project will develop revised and new catchment managements tools focused on connectivity, sediment, phosphorus and pesticides. The DIFFUSE project will strive to identify the state

  15. Discrete random walk models for space-time fractional diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorenflo, Rudolf; Mainardi, Francesco; Moretti, Daniele; Pagnini, Gianni; Paradisi, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    A physical-mathematical approach to anomalous diffusion may be based on generalized diffusion equations (containing derivatives of fractional order in space or/and time) and related random walk models. By space-time fractional diffusion equation we mean an evolution equation obtained from the standard linear diffusion equation by replacing the second-order space derivative with a Riesz-Feller derivative of order α is part of (0,2] and skewness θ (moduleθ≤{α,2-α}), and the first-order time derivative with a Caputo derivative of order β is part of (0,1]. Such evolution equation implies for the flux a fractional Fick's law which accounts for spatial and temporal non-locality. The fundamental solution (for the Cauchy problem) of the fractional diffusion equation can be interpreted as a probability density evolving in time of a peculiar self-similar stochastic process that we view as a generalized diffusion process. By adopting appropriate finite-difference schemes of solution, we generate models of random walk discrete in space and time suitable for simulating random variables whose spatial probability density evolves in time according to this fractional diffusion equation

  16. Adsorption of phospholipids at oil/water interfaces during emulsification is controlled by stress relaxation and diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Ellen; Nirschl, Hermann; Kok, Robbert Jan; Leneweit, Gero

    2018-05-16

    Adsorption of phosphatidylcholines at oil/water interfaces strongly deviates from spread monolayers at air/water surfaces. Understanding its nature and consequences could vastly improve applications in medical nanoemulsions and biotechnologies. Adsorption kinetics at interfaces of water with different oil phases were measured by profile analysis tensiometry. Adsorption kinetics for 2 different phospholipids, DPPC and POPC, as well as 2 organic phases, squalene and squalane, show that formation of interfacial monolayers is initially dominated by stress-relaxation in the first minutes. Diffusion only gradually contributes to a decrease in interfacial tension at later stages of time and higher film pressures. The results can be applied for the optimization of emulsification protocols using mechanical treatments. Emulsions using phospholipids with unsaturated fatty acids are dominated much more strongly by stress-relaxation and cover interfaces very fast compared to those with saturated fatty acids. In contrast, phospholipid layers consisting of saturated fatty acids converge faster towards the equilibrium than those with unsaturated fatty acids.

  17. Flux-limited diffusion models in radiation hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomraning, G.C.; Szilard, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors discuss certain flux-limited diffusion theories which approximately describe radiative transfer in the presence of steep spatial gradients. A new formulation is presented which generalizes a flux-limited description currently in widespread use for large radiation hydrodynamic calculations. This new formation allows more than one Case discrete mode to be described by a flux-limited diffusion equation. Such behavior is not extant in existing formulations. Numerical results predicted by these flux-limited diffusion models are presented for radiation penetration into an initially cold halfspace. 37 refs., 5 figs

  18. Convergence of surface diffusion parameters with model crystal size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer M.; Voter, Arthur F.

    1994-07-01

    A study of the variation in the calculated quantities for adatom diffusion with respect to the size of the model crystal is presented. The reported quantities include surface diffusion barrier heights, pre-exponential factors, and dynamical correction factors. Embedded atom method (EAM) potentials were used throughout this effort. Both the layer size and the depth of the crystal were found to influence the values of the Arrhenius factors significantly. In particular, exchange type mechanisms required a significantly larger model than standard hopping mechanisms to determine adatom diffusion barriers of equivalent accuracy. The dynamical events that govern the corrections to transition state theory (TST) did not appear to be as sensitive to crystal depth. Suitable criteria for the convergence of the diffusion parameters with regard to the rate properties are illustrated.

  19. A diffusive ink transport model for lipid dip-pen nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urtizberea, A.; Hirtz, M.

    2015-09-01

    Despite diverse applications, phospholipid membrane stacks generated by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) still lack a thorough and systematic characterization that elucidates the whole ink transport process from writing to surface spreading, with the aim of better controlling the resulting feature size and resolution. We report a quantitative analysis and modeling of the dependence of lipid DPN features (area, height and volume) on dwell time and relative humidity. The ink flow rate increases with humidity in agreement with meniscus size growth, determining the overall feature size. The observed time dependence indicates the existence of a balance between surface spreading and the ink flow rate that promotes differences in concentration at the meniscus/substrate interface. Feature shape is controlled by the substrate surface energy. The results are analyzed within a modified model for the ink transport of diffusive inks. At any humidity the dependence of the area spread on the dwell time shows two diffusion regimes: at short dwell times growth is controlled by meniscus diffusion while at long dwell times surface diffusion governs the process. The critical point for the switch of regime depends on the humidity.Despite diverse applications, phospholipid membrane stacks generated by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) still lack a thorough and systematic characterization that elucidates the whole ink transport process from writing to surface spreading, with the aim of better controlling the resulting feature size and resolution. We report a quantitative analysis and modeling of the dependence of lipid DPN features (area, height and volume) on dwell time and relative humidity. The ink flow rate increases with humidity in agreement with meniscus size growth, determining the overall feature size. The observed time dependence indicates the existence of a balance between surface spreading and the ink flow rate that promotes differences in concentration at the meniscus

  20. When mechanism matters: Bayesian forecasting using models of ecological diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefley, Trevor J.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Russell, Robin E.; Walsh, Daniel P.; Powell, James A.

    2017-01-01

    Ecological diffusion is a theory that can be used to understand and forecast spatio-temporal processes such as dispersal, invasion, and the spread of disease. Hierarchical Bayesian modelling provides a framework to make statistical inference and probabilistic forecasts, using mechanistic ecological models. To illustrate, we show how hierarchical Bayesian models of ecological diffusion can be implemented for large data sets that are distributed densely across space and time. The hierarchical Bayesian approach is used to understand and forecast the growth and geographic spread in the prevalence of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We compare statistical inference and forecasts from our hierarchical Bayesian model to phenomenological regression-based methods that are commonly used to analyse spatial occurrence data. The mechanistic statistical model based on ecological diffusion led to important ecological insights, obviated a commonly ignored type of collinearity, and was the most accurate method for forecasting.

  1. Homogenization of neutronic diffusion models; Homogeneisation des modeles de diffusion en neutronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdebosq, Y

    1999-09-01

    In order to study and simulate nuclear reactor cores, one needs to access the neutron distribution in the core. In practice, the description of this density of neutrons is given by a system of diffusion equations, coupled by non differential exchange terms. The strong heterogeneity of the medium constitutes a major obstacle to the numerical computation of this models at reasonable cost. Homogenization appears as compulsory. Heuristic methods have been developed since the origin by nuclear physicists, under a periodicity assumption on the coefficients. They consist in doing a fine computation one a single periodicity cell, to solve the system on the whole domain with homogeneous coefficients, and to reconstruct the neutron density by multiplying the solutions of the two computations. The objectives of this work are to provide mathematically rigorous basis to this factorization method, to obtain the exact formulas of the homogenized coefficients, and to start on geometries where two periodical medium are placed side by side. The first result of this thesis concerns eigenvalue problem models which are used to characterize the state of criticality of the reactor, under a symmetry assumption on the coefficients. The convergence of the homogenization process is proved, and formulas of the homogenized coefficients are given. We then show that without symmetry assumptions, a drift phenomenon appears. It is characterized by the mean of a real Bloch wave method, which gives the homogenized limit in the general case. These results for the critical problem are then adapted to the evolution model. Finally, the homogenization of the critical problem in the case of two side by side periodic medium is studied on a one dimensional on equation model. (authors)

  2. Density functional theory study of lithium diffusion at the interface between olivine-type LiFePO4 and LiMnPO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianjian; Wang, Zhiguo; Qing Fu, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Coating LiMnPO4 with a thin layer of LiFePO4 shows a better electrochemical performance than the pure LiFePO4 and LiMnPO4, thus it is critical to understand Li diffusion at their interfaces to improve the performance of electrode materials. Li diffusion at the (1 0 0)\\text{LiFeP{{\\text{O}}4}} //(1 0 0)\\text{LiMnP{{\\text{O}}4}} , (0 1 0)\\text{LiFeP{{\\text{O}}4}} //(0 1 0)\\text{LiMnP{{\\text{O}}4}} , and (0 0 1)\\text{LiFeP{{\\text{O}}4}} //(0 0 1)\\text{LiMnP{{\\text{O}}4}} interfaces between LiFePO4 and LiMnPO4 was investigated using density functional theory. The calculated diffusion energy barriers are 0.55 eV for Li to diffuse along the (0 0 1) interface, 0.44 and 0.49 eV for the Li diffusion inside the LiMnPO4 and along the (1 0 0) interface, respectively. When Li diffuses from the LiFePO4 to LiMnPO4 by passing through the (0 1 0) interfaces, the diffusion barriers are 0.45 and 0.60 eV for the Li diffusions in both sides. The diffusion barriers for Li to diffuse in LiMnPO4 near the interfaces decrease compared with those in the pure LiMnPO4. The calculated diffusion coefficient of Li along the (1 0 0) interface is in the range of 3.65  ×  10-11-5.28  ×  10-12 cm2 s-1, which is larger than that in the pure LiMnPO4 with a value of 7.5  ×  10-14 cm2 s-1. Therefore, the charging/discharging rate performance of the LiMnPO4 can be improved by surface coating with the LiFePO4.

  3. Statistical model of a gas diffusion electrode. III. Photomicrograph study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winsel, A W

    1965-12-01

    A linear section through a gas diffusion electrode produces a certain distribution function of sinews with the pores. From this distribution function some qualities of the pore structure are derived, and an automatic device to determine the distribution function is described. With a statistical model of a gas diffusion electrode the behavior of a DSK electrode is discussed and compared with earlier measurements of the flow resistance of this material.

  4. Particles at fluid-fluid interfaces: A new Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard surface- phase-field-crystal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2012-10-01

    Colloid particles that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. The fluids together with the interfacial colloids form an emulsion with interesting material properties and offer an important route to new soft materials. A promising approach to simulate these emulsions was presented in Aland et al. [Phys. Fluids 23, 062103 (2011)], where a Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase fluid system was combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal particles along the interface. Unfortunately this model leads to spurious velocities which require very fine spatial and temporal resolutions to accurately and stably simulate. In this paper we develop an improved Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard-surface phase-field-crystal model based on the principles of mass conservation and thermodynamic consistency. To validate our approach, we derive a sharp interface model and show agreement with the improved diffuse interface model. Using simple flow configurations, we show that the new model has much better properties and does not lead to spurious velocities. Finally, we demonstrate the solid-like behavior of the crystallized interface by simulating the fall of a solid ball through a colloid-laden multiphase fluid.

  5. TiO2 as diffusion barrier at Co/Alq3 interface studied by x-ray standing wave technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatak Londhe, Vaishali; Gupta, A.; Ponpandian, N.; Kumar, D.; Reddy, V. R.

    2018-06-01

    Nano-scale diffusion at the interfaces in organic spin valve thin films plays a vital role in controlling the performance of magneto-electronic devices. In the present work, it is shown that a thin layer of titanium dioxide at the interface of Co/Alq3 can act as a good diffusion barrier. The buried interfaces of Co/Alq3/Co organic spin valve thin film has been studied using x-ray standing waves technique. A planar waveguide is formed with Alq3 layer forming the cavity and Co layers as the walls of the waveguide. Precise information about diffusion of Co into Alq3 is obtained through excitation of the waveguide modes. It is found that the top Co layer diffuses deep into the Alq3 resulting in incorporation of 3.1% Co in the Alq3 layer. Insertion of a 1.7 nm thick barrier layer of TiO2 at Co/Alq3 interface results in a drastic reduction in the diffusion of Co into Alq3 to a value of only 0.4%. This suggests a better performance of organic spin valve with diffusion barrier of TiO2.

  6. Observation of two-dimensional p-type dopant diffusion across a p+-InP/n–-InGaAs interface using scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurumi, Daisuke; Hamada, Kotaro; Kawasaki, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with potential calculations has been shown to be effective for the detection of p-type dopant diffusion, even across a Zn doped p + -InP/non-doped n – -InGaAs/n + -InP heterojunction. Heterojunction samples were observed using SEM and the electrostatic potential was calculated from Zn concentration profiles obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The sensitivity of SEM for the potential was derived from the SEM observations and potential calculation results. The results were then used to investigate the dependence of the SEM contrast on the Zn diffusion length across the p + -InP/non-doped n – -InGaAs interface. Accurate dopant mapping was difficult when the Zn diffusion length was shorter than 30 nm, because the heterojunction affects the potential at the interface. However, accurate dopant mapping was possible when the Zn diffusion length was longer than 30 nm, because the factor dominating the potential variation was not the heterojunction, but rather Zn diffusion 30 nm distant from the interface. Thus, Zn diffusion further than 30 nm from a Zn-doped p + -InP/non-doped n – -InGaAs interface can be effectively detected by secondary electron (SE) imaging. SE imaging with potential calculations can be widely used for accurate dopant mapping, even at heterojunctions, and is, therefore, expected to be of significant assistance to the compound semiconductor industry.

  7. Modelling of Transport Phenomena at Cement Matrix—Aggregate Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Breugel, Klaas; Koenders, Eddie; Ye, Guang

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a heterogeneous material like concrete is largely determined by the many interfaces in this material. This contribution focuses on the potential of numerical simulation models to investigate the character of the matrix-aggregate interfacial zone and to simulate hydration-induce...

  8. An enriched cohesive zone model for delamination in brittle interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samimi, M.; Dommelen, van J.A.W.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2009-01-01

    Application of standard cohesive zone models in a finite element framework to simulate delamination in brittle interfaces may trigger non-smooth load-displacement responses that lead to the failure of iterative solution procedures. This non-smoothness is an artifact of the discretization; and hence

  9. Modeling charge transfer at organic donor-acceptor semiconductor interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cakir, Deniz; Bokdam, Menno; de Jong, Machiel Pieter; Fahlman, M.; Brocks, G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop an integer charge transfer model for the potential steps observed at interfaces between donor and acceptor molecular semiconductors. The potential step can be expressed as the difference between the Fermi energy pinning levels of electrons on the acceptor material and holes on the donor

  10. Effects of irradiation on the interface between U-Mo and zirconium diffusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Jan-Fong; Keiser, Dennis D.; Miller, Brandon D.; Madden, James W.; Robinson, Adam B.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2018-02-01

    Irradiated fuel plates were characterized by microscopy that focused on the interface between U-Mo and Zr. Before irradiation, there were three major sub-layers identified in the U-Mo/Zr interface, namely, UZr2, Mo2Zr, and U with low Mo. The typical total thickness of this U-Mo/Zr interaction is 2-3 μm. The UZr2 sub-layer formed during fuel plate fabrication remains stable after irradiation, without large bubbles/porosity accumulation. However, this sub-layer becomes increasingly discontinuous as burnup increases. The low-Mo sub-layer exhibits numerous sub-micron bubbles/porosity at low burnup. Larger, interconnected porosity in this sub-layer was observed in a medium-burnup fuel specimen. However, at higher burnup, regions with the extra-large bubbles/porosity (i.e., larger than 5 μm) were observed in the U-Mo fuel foil at least 5 μm away from the original location of this sub-layer. The mechanism for the formation of the extra-large bubbles/porosity is still unclear at this time. In general, the U-Mo/Zr interface in monolithic U-Mo fuels is relatively stable after irradiation. No large detrimental defects, such as large interfacial bubbles or cracks/delamination, were observed in the fuel plates characterized.

  11. An axisymmetric non-hydrostatic model for double-diffusive water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgersom, Koen; Zijlema, Marcel; van de Giesen, Nick

    2018-02-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) modelling of water systems involving double-diffusive processes is challenging due to the large computation times required to solve the flow and transport of constituents. In 3-D systems that approach axisymmetry around a central location, computation times can be reduced by applying a 2-D axisymmetric model set-up. This article applies the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations described in cylindrical coordinates and integrates them to guarantee mass and momentum conservation. The discretized equations are presented in a way that a Cartesian finite-volume model can be easily extended to the developed framework, which is demonstrated by the implementation into a non-hydrostatic free-surface flow model. This model employs temperature- and salinity-dependent densities, molecular diffusivities, and kinematic viscosity. One quantitative case study, based on an analytical solution derived for the radial expansion of a dense water layer, and two qualitative case studies demonstrate a good behaviour of the model for seepage inflows with contrasting salinities and temperatures. Four case studies with respect to double-diffusive processes in a stratified water body demonstrate that turbulent flows are not yet correctly modelled near the interfaces and that an advanced turbulence model is required.

  12. Turbulent eddy diffusion models in exposure assessment - Determination of the eddy diffusion coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuan; Ramachandran, Sandhya; Arnold, Susan; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2017-03-01

    The use of the turbulent eddy diffusion model and its variants in exposure assessment is limited due to the lack of knowledge regarding the isotropic eddy diffusion coefficient, D T . But some studies have suggested a possible relationship between D T and the air changes per hour (ACH) through a room. The main goal of this study was to accurately estimate D T for a range of ACH values by minimizing the difference between the concentrations measured and predicted by eddy diffusion model. We constructed an experimental chamber with a spatial concentration gradient away from the contaminant source, and conducted 27 3-hr long experiments using toluene and acetone under different air flow conditions (0.43-2.89 ACHs). An eddy diffusion model accounting for chamber boundary, general ventilation, and advection was developed. A mathematical expression for the slope based on the geometrical parameters of the ventilation system was also derived. There is a strong linear relationship between D T and ACH, providing a surrogate parameter for estimating D T in real-life settings. For the first time, a mathematical expression for the relationship between D T and ACH has been derived that also corrects for non-ideal conditions, and the calculated value of the slope between these two parameters is very close to the experimentally determined value. The values of D T obtained from the experiments are generally consistent with values reported in the literature. They are also independent of averaging time of measurements, allowing for comparison of values obtained from different measurement settings. These findings make the use of turbulent eddy diffusion models for exposure assessment in workplace/indoor environments more practical.

  13. Measurement and modeling of diffusion kinetics of a lipophilic molecule across rabbit cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chhavi; Chauhan, Anuj; Mutharasan, Raj; Srinivas, Sangly P

    2010-04-01

    To develop a kinetic model for representing the diffusion and partitioning of Rhodamine B (RhB), a fluorescent lipophilic molecule, across the cornea for gaining insights into pharmacokinetics of topical drugs to the eye. Rabbit corneas mounted underneath a custom-built scanning microfluorometer were perfused with Ringers on both sides of the tissue. After a step change in RhB on the tear side, transients of trans-corneal fluorescence of RhB were measured at a depth resolution approximately 8 microm. RhB distribution exhibited discontinuities at the interface between epithelium and stroma, and between stroma and endothelium. In each of the layers, fluorescence was non-uniform. Fluorescence was elevated in the epithelium and endothelium relative to the stroma. Modeling of RhB transport by diffusion in each layer and stipulation of partitioning of RhB at the cellular interfaces were required to account for trans-corneal penetration kinetics of RhB. The model parameters, estimated using the unsteady state trans-corneal RhB profiles, were found to be sensitive, and the model predicted the experimental profiles accurately. Conventional pharmacokinetic models that depict cornea as a single compartment do not predict the depth-dependent kinetics of RhB penetration. The proposed model incorporates realistic transport mechanisms and thereby highlights the influence of physicochemical properties of drugs on trans-corneal kinetics.

  14. First-principles modeling of magnetic misfit interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsyuk, Sergiy; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the structural and magnetic properties of interfaces with large lattice mismatch, choosing Pt/Co and Au/Co as prototypes. For our first-principles calculations, we reduce the lattice mismatch to 0.2% by constructing Moiré supercells. Our results show that the roughness and atomic density, and thus the magnetic properties, depend strongly on the substrate and thickness of the Co slab. An increasing thickness leads to the formation of a Co transition layer at the interface, especially for Pt/Co due to strong Pt-Co interaction. A Moiré supercell with a transition layer is found to reproduce the main experimental findings and thus turns out to be the appropriate model for simulating magnetic misfit interfaces.

  15. First-principles modeling of magnetic misfit interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Grytsiuk, Sergii

    2013-08-16

    We investigate the structural and magnetic properties of interfaces with large lattice mismatch, choosing Pt/Co and Au/Co as prototypes. For our first-principles calculations, we reduce the lattice mismatch to 0.2% by constructing Moiré supercells. Our results show that the roughness and atomic density, and thus the magnetic properties, depend strongly on the substrate and thickness of the Co slab. An increasing thickness leads to the formation of a Co transition layer at the interface, especially for Pt/Co due to strong Pt-Co interaction. A Moiré supercell with a transition layer is found to reproduce the main experimental findings and thus turns out to be the appropriate model for simulating magnetic misfit interfaces.

  16. Modelling and simulation of diffusive processes methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, SK

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses the key issues in the modeling and simulation of diffusive processes from a wide spectrum of different applications across a broad range of disciplines. Features: discusses diffusion and molecular transport in living cells and suspended sediment in open channels; examines the modeling of peristaltic transport of nanofluids, and isotachophoretic separation of ionic samples in microfluidics; reviews thermal characterization of non-homogeneous media and scale-dependent porous dispersion resulting from velocity fluctuations; describes the modeling of nitrogen fate and transport

  17. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A model of non-Gaussian diffusion in heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoiselée, Yann; Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2018-04-01

    Recent progress in single-particle tracking has shown evidence of the non-Gaussian distribution of displacements in living cells, both near the cellular membrane and inside the cytoskeleton. Similar behavior has also been observed in granular materials, turbulent flows, gels and colloidal suspensions, suggesting that this is a general feature of diffusion in complex media. A possible interpretation of this phenomenon is that a tracer explores a medium with spatio-temporal fluctuations which result in local changes of diffusivity. We propose and investigate an ergodic, easily interpretable model, which implements the concept of diffusing diffusivity. Depending on the parameters, the distribution of displacements can be either flat or peaked at small displacements with an exponential tail at large displacements. We show that the distribution converges slowly to a Gaussian one. We calculate statistical properties, derive the asymptotic behavior and discuss some implications and extensions.

  19. Modelling of monovacancy diffusion in W over wide temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukonte, L.; Ahlgren, T.; Heinola, K.

    2014-01-01

    The diffusion of monovacancies in tungsten is studied computationally over a wide temperature range from 1300 K until the melting point of the material. Our modelling is based on Molecular Dynamics technique and Density Functional Theory. The monovacancy migration barriers are calculated using nudged elastic band method for nearest and next-nearest neighbour monovacancy jumps. The diffusion pre-exponential factor for monovacancy diffusion is found to be two to three orders of magnitude higher than commonly used in computational studies, resulting in attempt frequency of the order 10 15 Hz. Multiple nearest neighbour jumps of monovacancy are found to play an important role in the contribution to the total diffusion coefficient, especially at temperatures above 2/3 of T m , resulting in an upward curvature of the Arrhenius diagram. The probabilities for different nearest neighbour jumps for monovacancy in W are calculated at different temperatures

  20. The parton model for the diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducati, M.B. Gay; Machado, M.V.T.

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the Buchmueller-Hebecker model for diffraction processes, point out its predictions to the diffractive structure function F D(3) 2 (x IP , β,Q 2 ). The break of factorization for the F D93) 2 present in recent H1 data is well described introducing an extra soft (reggeon) contribution as an extension to the model. (author)

  1. A general graphical user interface for automatic reliability modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liceaga, Carlos A.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1991-01-01

    Reported here is a general Graphical User Interface (GUI) for automatic reliability modeling of Processor Memory Switch (PMS) structures using a Markov model. This GUI is based on a hierarchy of windows. One window has graphical editing capabilities for specifying the system's communication structure, hierarchy, reconfiguration capabilities, and requirements. Other windows have field texts, popup menus, and buttons for specifying parameters and selecting actions. An example application of the GUI is given.

  2. A combinatorial model of malware diffusion via bluetooth connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merler, Stefano; Jurman, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We outline here the mathematical expression of a diffusion model for cellphones malware transmitted through Bluetooth channels. In particular, we provide the deterministic formula underlying the proposed infection model, in its equivalent recursive (simple but computationally heavy) and closed form (more complex but efficiently computable) expression.

  3. A combinatorial model of malware diffusion via bluetooth connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Merler

    Full Text Available We outline here the mathematical expression of a diffusion model for cellphones malware transmitted through Bluetooth channels. In particular, we provide the deterministic formula underlying the proposed infection model, in its equivalent recursive (simple but computationally heavy and closed form (more complex but efficiently computable expression.

  4. Diffusion approximation for modeling of 3-D radiation distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zardecki, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; De Kinder, R.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional transport code DIF3D, based on the diffusion approximation, is used to model the spatial distribution of radiation energy arising from volumetric isotropic sources. Future work will be concerned with the determination of irradiances and modeling of realistic scenarios, relevant to the battlefield conditions. 8 refs., 4 figs

  5. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; AbdulHalim, Lina G.; Besong, Tabot M.D.; Soldan, Giada; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-10-29

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Diffuse scattering from hemispherical nanoparticles at the air–silicon interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centeno, Anthony; Ahmed, Badar; Reehal, Haricharan; Xie, Fang

    2013-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in the application of plasmonics to improve the efficiency of silicon solar cells. In this paper we use finite difference time domain calculations to investigate the placement of hemispherical gold nanoparticles on the rear surface of a silicon solar cell. The results indicate that nanoparticles protruding into the silicon, rather than into air, have a larger scattering efficiency and diffuse scattering into the semiconductor. This finding could lead to improved light trapping within a thin silicon solar cell device. (paper)

  8. Anomalous Transport of Cosmic Rays in a Nonlinear Diffusion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E. [Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P. B. 3105, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand); Fichtner, Horst; Walter, Dominik [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2017-05-20

    We investigate analytically and numerically the transport of cosmic rays following their escape from a shock or another localized acceleration site. Observed cosmic-ray distributions in the vicinity of heliospheric and astrophysical shocks imply that anomalous, superdiffusive transport plays a role in the evolution of the energetic particles. Several authors have quantitatively described the anomalous diffusion scalings, implied by the data, by solutions of a formal transport equation with fractional derivatives. Yet the physical basis of the fractional diffusion model remains uncertain. We explore an alternative model of the cosmic-ray transport: a nonlinear diffusion equation that follows from a self-consistent treatment of the resonantly interacting cosmic-ray particles and their self-generated turbulence. The nonlinear model naturally leads to superdiffusive scalings. In the presence of convection, the model yields a power-law dependence of the particle density on the distance upstream of the shock. Although the results do not refute the use of a fractional advection–diffusion equation, they indicate a viable alternative to explain the anomalous diffusion scalings of cosmic-ray particles.

  9. Numerical modelling of swirling diffusive flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra-Santos Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics has been used to study the mixing and combustion of two confined jets whose setup and operating conditions are those of the benchmark of Roback and Johnson. Numerical model solves 3D transient Navier Stokes for turbulent and reactive flows. Averaged velocity profiles using RNG swirl dominated k-epsilon model have been validated with experimental measurements from other sources for the non reactive case. The combustion model is Probability Density Function. Bearing in mind the annular jet has swirl number over 0.5, a vortex breakdown appears in the axis of the burner. Besides, the sudden expansion with a ratio of 2 in diameter between nozzle exits and the test chamber produces the boundary layer separation with the corresponding torus shape recirculation. Contrasting the mixing and combustion models, the last one produces the reduction of the vortex breakdown.

  10. Diffuse solar radiation estimation models for Turkey's big cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulgen, Koray; Hepbasli, Arif

    2009-01-01

    A reasonably accurate knowledge of the availability of the solar resource at any place is required by solar engineers, architects, agriculturists, and hydrologists in many applications of solar energy such as solar furnaces, concentrating collectors, and interior illumination of buildings. For this purpose, in the past, various empirical models (or correlations) have been developed in order to estimate the solar radiation around the world. This study deals with diffuse solar radiation estimation models along with statistical test methods used to statistically evaluate their performance. Models used to predict monthly average daily values of diffuse solar radiation are classified in four groups as follows: (i) From the diffuse fraction or cloudness index, function of the clearness index, (ii) From the diffuse fraction or cloudness index, function of the relative sunshine duration or sunshine fraction, (iii) From the diffuse coefficient, function of the clearness index, and (iv) From the diffuse coefficient, function of the relative sunshine duration or sunshine fraction. Empirical correlations are also developed to establish a relationship between the monthly average daily diffuse fraction or cloudness index (K d ) and monthly average daily diffuse coefficient (K dd ) with the monthly average daily clearness index (K T ) and monthly average daily sunshine fraction (S/S o ) for the three big cities by population in Turkey (Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir). Although the global solar radiation on a horizontal surface and sunshine duration has been measured by the Turkish State Meteorological Service (STMS) over all country since 1964, the diffuse solar radiation has not been measured. The eight new models for estimating the monthly average daily diffuse solar radiation on a horizontal surface in three big cites are validated, and thus, the most accurate model is selected for guiding future projects. The new models are then compared with the 32 models available in the

  11. Diffusion theory model for optimization calculations of cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Cold neutron sources are becoming increasingly important and common experimental facilities made available at many research reactors around the world due to the high utility of cold neutrons in scattering experiments. The authors describe a simple two-group diffusion model of an infinite slab LD 2 cold source. The simplicity of the model permits to obtain an analytical solution from which one can deduce the reason for the optimum thickness based solely on diffusion-type phenomena. Also, a second more sophisticated model is described and the results compared to a deterministic transport calculation. The good (particularly qualitative) agreement between the results suggests that diffusion theory methods can be used in parametric and optimization studies to avoid the generally more expensive transport calculations

  12. Optimizing the Diffusion Welding Process for Alloy 800H: Thermodynamic, Diffusion Modeling, and Experimental Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizia, R.E.; Clark, D.E.; Glazoff, M.V.; Lister, Tedd E.; Trowbridge, T.L.

    2011-01-01

    A research effort was made to evaluate the usefulness of modern thermodynamic and diffusion computational tools, Thermo-Calc(copyright) and Dictra(copyright), in optimizing the parameters for diffusion welding of Alloy 800H. This would achieve a substantial reduction in the overall number of experiments required to achieve optimal welding and post-weld heat treatment conditions. This problem is important because diffusion welded components of Alloy 800H are being evaluated for use in assembling compact, micro-channel heat exchangers that are being proposed in the design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor by the US Department of Energy. The modeling was done in close contact with experimental work. The latter included using the Gleeble 3500 System(reg sign) for welding simulation, mechanical property measurement, and light optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The modeling efforts suggested a temperature of 1150 C for 1 hour with an applied pressure of 5 MPa using a 15 μm Ni foil as a joint filler to reduce chromium oxidation on the welded surfaces. Good agreement between modeled and experimentally determined concentration gradients was achieved, and model refinements to account for the complexity of actual alloy materials are suggested.

  13. Diffusive transfer to membranes as an effective interface between gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Mitchell, Charles; Stevenson, Tracy I.; Loo, Joseph A.; Andrews, Philip C.

    1997-12-01

    Diffusive transfer was examined as a blotting method to transfer proteins from polyacrylamide gels to membranes for ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The method is well-suited for transfers from isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Spectra have been obtained for 11 pmol of 66 kDa albumin loaded onto an IEF gel and subsequently blotted to polyethylene. Similarly, masses of intact carbonic anhydrase and hemoglobin were obtained from 14 and 20 pmol loadings. This methodology is also compatible with blotting high molecular weight proteins, as seen for 6 pmol of the 150 kDa monoclonal antibody anti-[beta]-galactosidase transferred to Goretex. Polypropylene, Teflon, Nafion and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) also produced good spectra following diffusive transfer. Only analysis from PVDF required that the membrane be kept wet prior to application of matrix. Considerations in mass accuracy for analysis from large-area membranes with continuous extraction and delayed extraction were explored, as were remedies for surface charging. Vapor phase CNBr cleavage was applied to membrane-bound samples for peptide mapping.

  14. Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained. The study has been conducted using a four-phase approach. The first phase develops the solution to the steady-state radon-diffusion equation in one-dimensieered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent f water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Uranium concentrations in the sediments which were above detection limits ranged from 0.10 t 51.2 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.53. A group of high uranium concentrations occurs near the junctions of quadrangles AB, AC, BB, a 200 mK. In case 2), x-ray studies of isotopic phase separation in 3 He-- 4 He bcc solids were carried out by B. A. Fraass

  15. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction–diffusion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spill, Fabian; Guerrero, Pilar; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K.; Byrne, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction–diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model. - Highlights: • A novel hybrid stochastic/deterministic reaction–diffusion simulation method is given. • Can massively speed up stochastic simulations while preserving stochastic effects. • Can handle multiple reacting species. • Can handle moving boundaries

  16. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction–diffusion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spill, Fabian, E-mail: fspill@bu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Guerrero, Pilar [Department of Mathematics, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Alarcon, Tomas [Centre de Recerca Matematica, Campus de Bellaterra, Edifici C, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Departament de Matemàtiques, Universitat Atonòma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Maini, Philip K. [Wolfson Centre for Mathematical Biology, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Byrne, Helen [Wolfson Centre for Mathematical Biology, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Computational Biology Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Reaction–diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction–diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model. - Highlights: • A novel hybrid stochastic/deterministic reaction–diffusion simulation method is given. • Can massively speed up stochastic simulations while preserving stochastic effects. • Can handle multiple reacting species. • Can handle moving boundaries.

  17. Mathematical and Simulation Modelling of Moisture Diffusion Mechanism during Plastic IC Packages Disassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Mou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reuse of plastic IC packages disassembled from printed circuit boards (PCBs has significant environmental benefits and economic value. The interface delamination caused by moisture diffusion is the main failure mode of IC packages during the disassembling process, which greatly reduces the reusability and reliability of disassembled IC packages. Exploring moisture diffusion mechanism is a prerequisite to optimize prebaking processes before disassembling that is an effective way to avoid the interface delamination. To this end, a computational model with variable boundary conditions is developed based on the different combination state of water in IC packages. The distribution characteristics and mechanism of moisture diffusion behavior are analyzed including the humidity distribution field and the relation among baking temperature, water loss rate, and baking time during baking process, and then the results are validated by FEA simulation based on the improved definition of relative moisture concentration. Baking under variable temperature is proposed and compared with the baking process and baking efficiency under constant temperature to find out the optimized baking parameters. Finally, a set of curves which indicate the relation between baking energy consumption and temperature are determined under actual industrial baking experiments, which could be used as references to develop industrial standards for PCB disassembling process.

  18. Green emission from ZnO–MgO nanocomposite due to Mg diffusion at the interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowri Babu, K.; Ramachandra Reddy, A.; Venugopal Reddy, K.

    2015-01-01

    The origin and electronic transitions responsible for green emission observed from ZnO–MgO nanocomposite are investigated. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of ZnO–MgO nanocomposite annealed at 600 °C showed only a sharp and intense UV emission peak centered at 396 nm. As the annealing temperature increased from 600 °C to 1000 °C, the green emission positioned at 503 nm is emerged and its intensity enhanced gradually and reached maximum value at 900 °C and then decreased at 1000 °C. It is observed that both UV and green emission intensities are enhanced with variation of atomic ratio (Zn/Mg=1.52, 0.50, 0.30, 0.21, 0.15). Our experiments confirmed that the enhancement of green emission intensity is due to the formation of oxygen vacancies (V o ) due to Mg doping at the interface of ZnO and MgO. This experimental observation is in good agreement with the recent theoretical predictions which states that Mg doping in ZnO lowers the formation energies of oxygen vacancies (V o ) and zinc interstitials (Zn i ) significantly. PL excitation and emission spectra analysis reveals that excited state for both UV and green emissions is same and lies 0.24 eV below the conduction band of ZnO. Hence, the green emission is attributed to the transition of an electron form the shallow donor (defect level of Zn i ) to the deep acceptor (defect level of V o ). - Highlights: • It is found that the UV emission intensity from ZnO–MgO nanocomposite enhanced with increase of Mg concentration. • The intensity of the green emission is enhanced gradually as the temperature increased from 600 °C to 900 °C and then decreased at 1000 °C. • The effect of Mg concentration, MgO, strain at the interface on green emission is investigated. • These experiments confirmed that green emission is due to the oxygen vacancies created in ZnO due to the Mg doping at the interface and it is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. • The decrease of green emission intensity is

  19. A diffuse radar scattering model from Martian surface rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Jakosky, B. M.; Christensen, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Remote sensing of Mars has been done with a variety of instrumentation at various wavelengths. Many of these data sets can be reconciled with a surface model of bonded fines (or duricrust) which varies widely across the surface and a surface rock distribution which varies less so. A surface rock distribution map from -60 to +60 deg latitude has been generated by Christensen. Our objective is to model the diffuse component of radar reflection based on this surface distribution of rocks. The diffuse, rather than specular, scattering is modeled because the diffuse component arises due to scattering from rocks with sizes on the order of the wavelength of the radar beam. Scattering for radio waves of 12.5 cm is then indicative of the meter scale and smaller structure of the surface. The specular term is indicative of large scale surface undulations and should not be causally related to other surface physical properties. A simplified model of diffuse scattering is described along with two rock distribution models. The results of applying the models to a planet of uniform fractional rock coverage with values ranging from 5 to 20% are discussed.

  20. Growth of fingers at an unstable diffusing interface in a porous medium or hele-shaw cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooding, R A

    1969-11-27

    Waves at an unstable horizontal interface, between 2 fluids moving vertically through a saturated porous medium, are observed to grow rapidly to become fingers (i.e., the amplitude greatly exceeds the wavelength). For a diffusing interface, in experiments using a Hele-Shaw cell, the mean amplitude taken over many fingers grows approx. as (time)U2D, followed by a transition to a growth proportional to time. Correspondingly, the mean wave number decreases approx. as (time)U-1/2D. Because of the rapid increase in amplitude, longitudinal dispersion ultimately becomes negligible relative to wave growth. To represent the observed quantities at large time, the transport equation is suitably weighted and averaged over the horizontal plane. Hyperbolic equations result, and the ascending and descending zones containing the fronts of the fingers are replaced by discontinuities. These averaged equations form an open set, but closure is achieved by assuming a law for the mean wave number based on similarity. (22 refs.)

  1. Hyper alginate gel microbead formation by molecular diffusion at the hydrogel/droplet interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirama, Hirotada; Kambe, Taisuke; Aketagawa, Kyouhei; Ota, Taku; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Torii, Toru

    2013-01-15

    We report a simple method for forming monodispersed, uniformly shaped gel microbeads with precisely controlled sizes. The basis of our method is the placement of monodispersed sodium alginate droplets, formed by a microfluidic device, on an agarose slab gel containing a high-osmotic-pressure gelation agent (CaCl(2) aq.): (1) the droplets are cross-linked (gelated) due to the diffusion of the gelation agent from the agarose slab gel to the sodium alginate droplets and (2) the droplets simultaneously shrink to a fraction of their original size (slab gel. We verified the mass transfer mechanism between the droplet and the agarose slab gel. This method circumvents the limitations of gel microbead formation, such as the need to prepare microchannels of various sizes, microchannel clogging, and the deformation of the produced gel microbeads.

  2. A diffusive ink transport model for lipid dip-pen nanolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urtizberea, A; Hirtz, M

    2015-10-14

    Despite diverse applications, phospholipid membrane stacks generated by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) still lack a thorough and systematic characterization that elucidates the whole ink transport process from writing to surface spreading, with the aim of better controlling the resulting feature size and resolution. We report a quantitative analysis and modeling of the dependence of lipid DPN features (area, height and volume) on dwell time and relative humidity. The ink flow rate increases with humidity in agreement with meniscus size growth, determining the overall feature size. The observed time dependence indicates the existence of a balance between surface spreading and the ink flow rate that promotes differences in concentration at the meniscus/substrate interface. Feature shape is controlled by the substrate surface energy. The results are analyzed within a modified model for the ink transport of diffusive inks. At any humidity the dependence of the area spread on the dwell time shows two diffusion regimes: at short dwell times growth is controlled by meniscus diffusion while at long dwell times surface diffusion governs the process. The critical point for the switch of regime depends on the humidity.

  3. Diffusion approximation of neuronal models revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čupera, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2014), s. 11-25 ISSN 1547-1063. [International Workshop on Neural Coding (NC) /10./. Praha, 02.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP103/11/0282 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : stochastic model * neuronal activity * first-passage time Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 0.840, year: 2014

  4. Diffusion in energy materials: Governing dynamics from atomistic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, D.; Kordatos, A.; Filippatos, P. P.; Chroneos, A.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding diffusion in energy materials is critical to optimising the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and batteries both of which are of great technological interest as they offer high efficiency for cleaner energy conversion and storage. In the present review, we highlight the insights offered by atomistic modelling of the ionic diffusion mechanisms in SOFCs and batteries and how the growing predictive capability of high-throughput modelling, together with our new ability to control compositions and microstructures, will produce advanced materials that are designed rather than chosen for a given application. The first part of the review focuses on the oxygen diffusion mechanisms in cathode and electrolyte materials for SOFCs and in particular, doped ceria and perovskite-related phases with anisotropic structures. The second part focuses on disordered oxides and two-dimensional materials as these are very promising systems for battery applications.

  5. Estimation and prediction under local volatility jump-diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namhyoung; Lee, Younhee

    2018-02-01

    Volatility is an important factor in operating a company and managing risk. In the portfolio optimization and risk hedging using the option, the value of the option is evaluated using the volatility model. Various attempts have been made to predict option value. Recent studies have shown that stochastic volatility models and jump-diffusion models reflect stock price movements accurately. However, these models have practical limitations. Combining them with the local volatility model, which is widely used among practitioners, may lead to better performance. In this study, we propose a more effective and efficient method of estimating option prices by combining the local volatility model with the jump-diffusion model and apply it using both artificial and actual market data to evaluate its performance. The calibration process for estimating the jump parameters and local volatility surfaces is divided into three stages. We apply the local volatility model, stochastic volatility model, and local volatility jump-diffusion model estimated by the proposed method to KOSPI 200 index option pricing. The proposed method displays good estimation and prediction performance.

  6. Asymmetric diffusion model for oblique-incidence reflectometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaqin Chen; Liji Cao; Liqun Sun

    2011-01-01

    A diffusion theory model induced by a line source distribution is presented for oblique-incidence reflectom-etry. By fitting to this asymmetric diffusion model, the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients μa and μ's of the turbid medium can both be determined with accuracy of 10% from the absolute profile of the diffuse reflectance in the incident plane at the negative position -1.5 transport mean free path (mfp') away from the incident point; particularly, μ's can be estimated from the data at positive positions within 0-1.0 mfp' with 10% accuracy. The method is verified by Monte Carlo simulations and experimentally tested on a phantom.%A diffusion theory model induced by a line source distribution is presented for oblique-incidence reflectometry.By fitting to this asymmetric diffusion model,the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients μa and μ's of the turbid medium can both be determined with accuracy of 10% from the absolute profile of the diffuse reflectance in the incident plane at the negative position -1.5 transport mean free path (mfp')away from the incident point;particularly,μ's can be estimated from the data at positive positions within 0-1.0 mfp' with 10% accuracy.The method is verified by Monte Carlo simulations and experimentally tested on a phantom.Knowledge about the optical properties,including the absorption coefficient (μa) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μ's =μs(1-g)),where μs is the scattering coefficient and g is the anisotropy factor of scattering,of biological tissues plays an important role for optical therapeutic and diagnostic techniques in medicine.

  7. A fractional motion diffusion model for grading pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, M Muge; Wang, He; Sui, Yi; Engelhard, Herbert H; Li, Yuhua; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel fractional motion (FM) diffusion model for distinguishing low- versus high-grade pediatric brain tumors; and to investigate its possible advantage over apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and/or a previously reported continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) diffusion model. With approval from the institutional review board and written informed consents from the legal guardians of all participating patients, this study involved 70 children with histopathologically-proven brain tumors (30 low-grade and 40 high-grade). Multi- b -value diffusion images were acquired and analyzed using the FM, CTRW, and mono-exponential diffusion models. The FM parameters, D fm , φ , ψ (non-Gaussian diffusion statistical measures), and the CTRW parameters, D m , α , β (non-Gaussian temporal and spatial diffusion heterogeneity measures) were compared between the low- and high-grade tumor groups by using a Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon U test. The performance of the FM model for differentiating between low- and high-grade tumors was evaluated and compared with that of the CTRW and the mono-exponential models using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The FM parameters were significantly lower ( p  < 0.0001) in the high-grade ( D fm : 0.81 ± 0.26, φ : 1.40 ± 0.10, ψ : 0.42 ± 0.11) than in the low-grade ( D fm : 1.52 ± 0.52, φ : 1.64 ± 0.13, ψ : 0.67 ± 0.13) tumor groups. The ROC analysis showed that the FM parameters offered better specificity (88% versus 73%), sensitivity (90% versus 82%), accuracy (88% versus 78%), and area under the curve (AUC, 93% versus 80%) in discriminating tumor malignancy compared to the conventional ADC. The performance of the FM model was similar to that of the CTRW model. Similar to the CTRW model, the FM model can improve differentiation between low- and high-grade pediatric brain tumors over ADC.

  8. A Graphical User Interface to Generalized Linear Models in MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dunn

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Generalized linear models unite a wide variety of statistical models in a common theoretical framework. This paper discusses GLMLAB-software that enables such models to be fitted in the popular mathematical package MATLAB. It provides a graphical user interface to the powerful MATLAB computational engine to produce a program that is easy to use but with many features, including offsets, prior weights and user-defined distributions and link functions. MATLAB's graphical capacities are also utilized in providing a number of simple residual diagnostic plots.

  9. Diffusive spatio-temporal noise in a first-passage time model for intracellular calcium release

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by ion channels. The resulting calcium signals exhibit a rich spatio-temporal signature, which originates at least partly from microscopic fluctuations. While stochasticity in the gating transition of ion channels has been incorporated into many models, the distribution of calcium is usually described by deterministic reaction-diffusion equations. Here we test the validity of the latter modeling approach by using two different models to calculate the frequency of localized calcium signals (calcium puffs) from clustered IP3 receptor channels. The complexity of the full calcium system is here limited to the basic opening mechanism of the ion channels and, in the mathematical reduction simplifies to the calculation of a first passage time. Two models are then studied: (i) a hybrid model, where channel gating is treated stochastically, while calcium concentration is deterministic and (ii) a fully stochastic model with noisy channel gating and Brownian calcium ion motion. The second model utilises the recently developed two-regime method [M. B. Flegg, S. J. Chapman, and R. Erban, "The two-regime method for optimizing stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations," J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859-868 (2012)] in order to simulate a large domain with precision required only near the Ca2+ absorbing channels. The expected time for a first channel opening that results in a calcium puff event is calculated. It is found that for a large diffusion constant, predictions of the interpuff time are significantly overestimated using the model (i) with a deterministic non-spatial calcium variable. It is thus demonstrated that the presence of diffusive noise in local concentrations of intracellular Ca2+ ions can substantially influence the occurrence of calcium signals. The presented approach and results may also be relevant for other cell-physiological first-passage time problems with small ligand concentration

  10. Evaluation of the Thermodynamic Models for the Thermal Diffusion Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Bagnoli, Mariana G.; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2003-01-01

    Over the years, several thermodynamic models for the thermal diffusion factors for binary mixtures have been proposed. The goal of this paper is to test some of these models in combination with different equations of state. We tested the following models: those proposed by Rutherford and Drickamer...... we applied different thermodynamic models, such as the Soave-Redlich-Kwong and the Peng-Robinson equations of state. The necessity to try different thermo-dynamic models is caused by the high sensitivity of the thermal diffusion factors to the values of the partial molar properties. Two different...... corrections for the determination of the partial molar volumes have been implemented; the Peneloux correction and the correction based on the principle of corresponding states....

  11. Diffusion of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Across the Sediment-Water Interface and In Seawater at Aquaculture Areas of Daya Bay, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangju Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the yearly increasing marine culture activities in floating cages in Daya Bay, China, the effects of pollution may overlap and lead to more severe water environmental problems. In order to track the impacts of the marine culture in floating cages on water environment, sediments and overlying water were sampled by cylindrical samplers at three representative aquaculture areas of Daya Bay. The water content, porosity, density of sediments as well as the vertical distributions of ammonia nitrogen and active phosphate in pore water along sediments depth were measured. The release rate and annual released quantity of the nutrients across sediment-water interface were calculated using Fick’s Law. A horizontal two-dimensional mathematical model was developed to compute the spatial and temporal distributions of the nutrients in seawater after being released across the sediment-water interface. The results showed that the sediments, with a high content and a large annual released quantity of nitrogen and phosphorus, constitute a potential inner source of seawater pollution. Influenced by tide and water depth, the scope of diffusion and migration of the nutrients appears as a long belt which is about 1 km long and 50 m wide. Seawater in this area is vulnerable to eutrophication.

  12. Diffusion model of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shmakov, AA; Kalin, BA; Matvienko, YG; Singh, RN; De, PK

    2004-01-01

    We develop a method for the evaluation of the rate of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys. The model is based on the stationary solution of the phenomenological diffusion equation and the detailed analysis of the distribution of hydrostatic stresses in the plane of a sharp tensile crack.

  13. Three dimensional simulated modelling of diffusion capacitance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A three dimensional (3-D) simulated modelling was developed to analyse the excess minority carrier density in the base of a polycrystalline bifacial silicon solar cell. The concept of junction recombination velocity was ado-pted to quantify carrier flow through the junction, and to examine the solar cell diffusion capacitance for ...

  14. Analytically solvable models of reaction-diffusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E P; Kassner, K [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Universitaetsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    We consider a class of analytically solvable models of reaction-diffusion systems. An analytical treatment is possible because the nonlinear reaction term is approximated by a piecewise linear function. As particular examples we choose front and pulse solutions to illustrate the matching procedure in the one-dimensional case.

  15. An improved analytical model of diffusion through the RIST target

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, J R J

    2003-01-01

    The diffusion and effusion through the RIST target is calculated using a more realistic model than previously. Extremely good fits to the data are obtained and new values of the time constants of effusion through the target and the ioniser are found.

  16. Modeling intragranular diffusion in low-connectivity granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robert P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Qinhong

    2012-03-01

    Characterizing the diffusive exchange of solutes between bulk water in an aquifer and water in the intragranular pores of the solid phase is still challenging despite decades of study. Many disparities between observation and theory could be attributed to low connectivity of the intragranular pores. The presence of low connectivity indicates that a useful conceptual framework is percolation theory. The present study was initiated to develop a percolation-based finite difference (FD) model, and to test it rigorously against both random walk (RW) simulations of diffusion starting from nonequilibrium, and data on Borden sand published by Ball and Roberts (1991a,b) and subsequently reanalyzed by Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) using a multirate mass transfer (MRMT) approach. The percolation-theoretical model is simple and readily incorporated into existing FD models. The FD model closely matches the RW results using only a single fitting parameter, across a wide range of pore connectivities. Simulation of the Borden sand experiment without pore connectivity effects reproduced the MRMT analysis, but including low pore connectivity effects improved the fit. Overall, the theory and simulation results show that low intragranular pore connectivity can produce diffusive behavior that appears as if the solute had undergone slow sorption, despite the absence of any sorption process, thereby explaining some hitherto confusing aspects of intragranular diffusion.

  17. Laminated materials with plastic interfaces: modeling and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandino Aquino de los Ríos, Gilberto; Castañeda Balderas, Rubén; Diaz Diaz, Alberto; Duong, Van Anh; Chataigner, Sylvain; Caron, Jean-François; Ehrlacher, Alain; Foret, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a model of laminated plates called M4-5N and validated in a previous paper is modified in order to take into account interlaminar plasticity by means of displacement discontinuities at the interfaces. These discontinuities are calculated by adapting a 3D plasticity model. In order to compute the model, a Newton–Raphson-like method is employed. In this method, two sub-problems are considered: one is linear and the other is non-linear. In the linear problem the non-linear equations of the model are linearized and the calculations are performed by making use of a finite element software. By iterating the resolution of each sub-problem, one obtains after convergence the solution of the global problem. The model is then applied to the problem of a double lap, adhesively bonded joint subjected to a tensile load. The adhesive layer is modeled by an elastic–plastic interface. The results of the M4-5N model are compared with those of a commercial finite element software. A good agreement between the two computation techniques is obtained and validates the non-linear calculations proposed in this paper. Finally, the numerical tool and a delamination criterion are applied to predict delamination onset in composite laminates

  18. An alternative atmospheric diffusion model for control room habitability assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) staff uses procedures to evaluate control room designs for compliance with General Design Criterion 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Appendix A, 10 CRF Part 50. These procedures deal primarily with radiation protection. However, other hazardous materials, for example, chlorine, pose a potential threat to control room habitability. The NRC is considering changes in their current procedures to update methods and extend their applicability. Two changes to the current procedures are suggested: using a puff diffusion model to estimate concentrations at air intakes and using a new method to estimate diffusion coefficients

  19. Turing and Non-Turing patterns in diffusive plankton model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Thakur

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate a Rosenzweig-McAurthur model and its variant for phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish population dynamics with Holling type II and III functional responses. We present the theoretical analysis of processes of pattern formation that involves organism distribution and their interaction of spatially distributed population with local diffusion. The choice of parameter values is important to study the effect of diffusion, also it depends more on the nonlinearity of the system. With the help of numerical simulations, we observe the formation of spatiotemporal patterns both inside and outside the Turing space.

  20. Demonstrating the feasibility of monitoring the molecular-level structures of moving polymer/silane interfaces during silane diffusion using SFG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunyan; Wang, Jie; Loch, Cheryl L; Ahn, Dongchan; Chen, Zhan

    2004-02-04

    In this paper, the feasibility of monitoring molecular structures at a moving polymer/liquid interface by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been demonstrated. N-(2-Aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AATM, NH2(CH2)2NH(CH2)3Si(OCH3)3) has been brought into contact with a deuterated poly(methyl methacrylate) (d-PMMA) film, and the interfacial silane structure has been monitored using SFG. Upon initial contact, the SFG spectra can be detected, but as time progresses, the spectral intensity changes and finally disappears. Additional experiments indicate that these silane molecules can diffuse into the polymer film and the detected SFG signals are actually from the moving polymer/silane interface. Our results show that the molecular order of the polymer/silane interface exists during the entire diffusion process and is lost when the silane molecules traverse through the thickness of the d-PMMA film. The loss of the SFG signal is due to the formation of a new disordered substrate/silane interface, which contributes no detectable SFG signal. The kinetics of the diffusion of the silane into the polymer have been deduced from the time-dependent SFG signals detected from the AATM molecules as they diffuse through polymer films of different thickness.

  1. Behavior of asphaltene model compounds at w/o interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgård, Erland L; Sørland, Geir; Sjöblom, Johan

    2010-02-16

    Asphaltenes, present in significant amounts in heavy crude oil, contains subfractions capable of stabilizing water-in-oil emulsions. Still, the composition of these subfractions is not known in detail, and the actual mechanism behind emulsion stability is dependent on perceived interfacial concentrations and compositions. This study aims at utilizing polyaromatic surfactants which contains an acidic moiety as model compounds for the surface-active subfraction of asphaltenes. A modified pulse-field gradient (PFG) NMR method has been used to study droplet sizes and stability of emulsions prepared with asphaltene model compounds. The method has been compared to the standard microscopy droplet counting method. Arithmetic and volumetric mean droplet sizes as a function of surfactant concentration and water content clearly showed that the interfacial area was dependent on the available surfactant at the emulsion interface. Adsorption of the model compounds onto hydrophilic silica has been investigated by UV depletion, and minor differences in the chemical structure of the model compounds caused significant differences in the affinity toward this highly polar surface. The cross-sectional areas obtained have been compared to areas from the surface-to-volume ratio found by NMR and gave similar results for one of the two model compounds. The mean molecular area for this compound suggested a tilted geometry of the aromatic core with respect to the interface, which has also been proposed for real asphaltenic samples. The film behavior was further investigated using a liquid-liquid Langmuir trough supporting the ability to form stable interfacial films. This study supports that acidic, or strong hydrogen-bonding fractions, can promote stable water-in-oil emulsion. The use of model compounds opens up for studying emulsion behavior and demulsifier efficiency based on true interfacial concentrations rather than perceived interfaces.

  2. On a Generalized Squared Gaussian Diffusion Model for Option Valuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edeki S.O.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In financial mathematics, option pricing models are vital tools whose usefulness cannot be overemphasized. Modern approaches and modelling of financial derivatives are therefore required in option pricing and valuation settings. In this paper, we derive via the application of Ito lemma, a pricing model referred to as Generalized Squared Gaussian Diffusion Model (GSGDM for option pricing and valuation. Same approach can be considered via Stratonovich stochastic dynamics. We also show that the classical Black-Scholes, and the square root constant elasticity of variance models are special cases of the GSGDM. In addition, general solution of the GSGDM is obtained using modified variational iterative method (MVIM.

  3. Just Another Gibbs Additive Modeler: Interfacing JAGS and mgcv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N. Wood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The BUGS language offers a very flexible way of specifying complex statistical models for the purposes of Gibbs sampling, while its JAGS variant offers very convenient R integration via the rjags package. However, including smoothers in JAGS models can involve some quite tedious coding, especially for multivariate or adaptive smoothers. Further, if an additive smooth structure is required then some care is needed, in order to centre smooths appropriately, and to find appropriate starting values. R package mgcv implements a wide range of smoothers, all in a manner appropriate for inclusion in JAGS code, and automates centring and other smooth setup tasks. The purpose of this note is to describe an interface between mgcv and JAGS, based around an R function, jagam, which takes a generalized additive model (GAM as specified in mgcv and automatically generates the JAGS model code and data required for inference about the model via Gibbs sampling. Although the auto-generated JAGS code can be run as is, the expectation is that the user would wish to modify it in order to add complex stochastic model components readily specified in JAGS. A simple interface is also provided for visualisation and further inference about the estimated smooth components using standard mgcv functionality. The methods described here will be un-necessarily inefficient if all that is required is fully Bayesian inference about a standard GAM, rather than the full flexibility of JAGS. In that case the BayesX package would be more efficient.

  4. Transforming Collaborative Process Models into Interface Process Models by Applying an MDA Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarte, Ivanna M.; Chiotti, Omar; Villarreal, Pablo D.

    Collaborative business models among enterprises require defining collaborative business processes. Enterprises implement B2B collaborations to execute these processes. In B2B collaborations the integration and interoperability of processes and systems of the enterprises are required to support the execution of collaborative processes. From a collaborative process model, which describes the global view of the enterprise interactions, each enterprise must define the interface process that represents the role it performs in the collaborative process in order to implement the process in a Business Process Management System. Hence, in this work we propose a method for the automatic generation of the interface process model of each enterprise from a collaborative process model. This method is based on a Model-Driven Architecture to transform collaborative process models into interface process models. By applying this method, interface processes are guaranteed to be interoperable and defined according to a collaborative process.

  5. Modeling of the atomic and electronic structures of interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent tight binding and Car-Parrinello simulations of grain boundaries in semiconductors are reviewed. A critique is given of some models of embrittlement that are based on electronic structure considerations. The structural unit model of grain boundary structure is critically assessed using some results for mixed tilt and twist grain boundaries. A new method of characterizing interfacial structure in terms of bond angle distribution functions is described. A new formulation of thermodynamic properties of interfaces is presented which focusses on the local atomic environment. Effective, temperature dependent N-body atomic interactions are derived for studying grain boundary structure at elevated temperature

  6. Leaky-box approximation to the fractional diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchaikin, V V; Sibatov, R T; Saenko, V V

    2013-01-01

    Two models based on fractional differential equations for galactic cosmic ray diffusion are applied to the leaky-box approximation. One of them (Lagutin-Uchaikin, 2000) assumes a finite mean free path of cosmic ray particles, another one (Lagutin-Tyumentsev, 2004) uses distribution with infinite mean distance between collision with magnetic clouds, when the trajectories have form close to ballistic. Calculations demonstrate that involving boundary conditions is incompatible with spatial distributions given by the second model.

  7. Intravoxel water diffusion heterogeneity MR imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using stretched exponential diffusion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Vincent; Khong, Pek Lan [University of Hong Kong, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Pok Fu Lam (China); Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lam, Ka On; Sze, Henry Chun Kin [University of Hong Kong, Department of Clinical Oncology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Pok Fu Lam (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (China)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the utility of stretched exponential diffusion model in characterisation of the water diffusion heterogeneity in different tumour stages of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty patients with newly diagnosed NPC were prospectively recruited. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging was performed using five b values (0-2,500 s/mm{sup 2}). Respective stretched exponential parameters (DDC, distributed diffusion coefficient; and alpha (α), water heterogeneity) were calculated. Patients were stratified into low and high tumour stage groups based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging for determination of the predictive powers of DDC and α using t test and ROC curve analyses. The mean ± standard deviation values were DDC = 0.692 ± 0.199 (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) for low stage group vs 0.794 ± 0.253 (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) for high stage group; α = 0.792 ± 0.145 for low stage group vs 0.698 ± 0.155 for high stage group. α was significantly lower in the high stage group while DDC was negatively correlated. DDC and α were both reliable independent predictors (p < 0.001), with α being more powerful. Optimal cut-off values were (sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio) DDC = 0.692 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (94.4 %, 64.3 %, 2.64, 0.09), α = 0.720 (72.2 %, 100 %, -, 0.28). The heterogeneity index α is robust and can potentially help in staging and grading prediction in NPC. (orig.)

  8. Intravoxel water diffusion heterogeneity MR imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using stretched exponential diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Vincent; Khong, Pek Lan; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lam, Ka On; Sze, Henry Chun Kin; Chan, Queenie

    2015-01-01

    To determine the utility of stretched exponential diffusion model in characterisation of the water diffusion heterogeneity in different tumour stages of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty patients with newly diagnosed NPC were prospectively recruited. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging was performed using five b values (0-2,500 s/mm 2 ). Respective stretched exponential parameters (DDC, distributed diffusion coefficient; and alpha (α), water heterogeneity) were calculated. Patients were stratified into low and high tumour stage groups based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging for determination of the predictive powers of DDC and α using t test and ROC curve analyses. The mean ± standard deviation values were DDC = 0.692 ± 0.199 (x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) for low stage group vs 0.794 ± 0.253 (x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) for high stage group; α = 0.792 ± 0.145 for low stage group vs 0.698 ± 0.155 for high stage group. α was significantly lower in the high stage group while DDC was negatively correlated. DDC and α were both reliable independent predictors (p < 0.001), with α being more powerful. Optimal cut-off values were (sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio) DDC = 0.692 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s (94.4 %, 64.3 %, 2.64, 0.09), α = 0.720 (72.2 %, 100 %, -, 0.28). The heterogeneity index α is robust and can potentially help in staging and grading prediction in NPC. (orig.)

  9. Robust and fast nonlinear optimization of diffusion MRI microstructure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, R L; Fritz, F J; Tobisch, A; Goebel, R; Roebroeck, A

    2017-07-15

    Advances in biophysical multi-compartment modeling for diffusion MRI (dMRI) have gained popularity because of greater specificity than DTI in relating the dMRI signal to underlying cellular microstructure. A large range of these diffusion microstructure models have been developed and each of the popular models comes with its own, often different, optimization algorithm, noise model and initialization strategy to estimate its parameter maps. Since data fit, accuracy and precision is hard to verify, this creates additional challenges to comparability and generalization of results from diffusion microstructure models. In addition, non-linear optimization is computationally expensive leading to very long run times, which can be prohibitive in large group or population studies. In this technical note we investigate the performance of several optimization algorithms and initialization strategies over a few of the most popular diffusion microstructure models, including NODDI and CHARMED. We evaluate whether a single well performing optimization approach exists that could be applied to many models and would equate both run time and fit aspects. All models, algorithms and strategies were implemented on the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to remove run time constraints, with which we achieve whole brain dataset fits in seconds to minutes. We then evaluated fit, accuracy, precision and run time for different models of differing complexity against three common optimization algorithms and three parameter initialization strategies. Variability of the achieved quality of fit in actual data was evaluated on ten subjects of each of two population studies with a different acquisition protocol. We find that optimization algorithms and multi-step optimization approaches have a considerable influence on performance and stability over subjects and over acquisition protocols. The gradient-free Powell conjugate-direction algorithm was found to outperform other common algorithms in terms of

  10. Sensitivity, Error and Uncertainty Quantification: Interfacing Models at Different Scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, Predrag S.

    2014-01-01

    Discussion on accuracy of AMO data to be used in the plasma modeling codes for astrophysics and nuclear fusion applications, including plasma-material interfaces (PMI), involves many orders of magnitude of energy, spatial and temporal scales. Thus, energies run from tens of K to hundreds of millions of K, temporal and spatial scales go from fs to years and from nm’s to m’s and more, respectively. The key challenge for the theory and simulation in this field is the consistent integration of all processes and scales, i.e. an “integrated AMO science” (IAMO). The principal goal of the IAMO science is to enable accurate studies of interactions of electrons, atoms, molecules, photons, in many-body environment, including complex collision physics of plasma-material interfaces, leading to the best decisions and predictions. However, the accuracy requirement for a particular data strongly depends on the sensitivity of the respective plasma modeling applications to these data, which stresses a need for immediate sensitivity analysis feedback of the plasma modeling and material design communities. Thus, the data provision to the plasma modeling community is a “two-way road” as long as the accuracy of the data is considered, requiring close interactions of the AMO and plasma modeling communities.

  11. Diffusion of MMPs on the Surface of Collagen Fibrils: The Mobile Cell Surface – Collagen Substratum Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Ivan E.; Legant, Wesley; Marmer, Barry; Lubman, Olga; Saffarian, Saveez; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro; Elson, Elliot; Goldberg, Gregory I.

    2011-01-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix catalyzed by MMPs is central to morphogenetic phenomena during development and wound healing as well as in numerous pathologic conditions such as fibrosis and cancer. We have previously demonstrated that secreted MMP-2 is tethered to the cell surface and activated by MT1-MMP/TIMP-2-dependent mechanism. The resulting cell-surface collagenolytic complex (MT1-MMP)2/TIMP-2/MMP-2 can initiate (MT1-MMP) and complete (MMP-2) degradation of an underlying collagen fibril. The following question remained: What is the mechanism of substrate recognition involving the two structures of relatively restricted mobility, the cell surface enzymatic complex and a collagen fibril embedded in the ECM? Here we demonstrate that all the components of the complex are capable of processive movement on a surface of the collagen fibril. The mechanism of MT1-MMP movement is a biased diffusion with the bias component dependent on the proteolysis of its substrate, not adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. It is similar to that of the MMP-1 Brownian ratchet we described earlier. In addition, both MMP-2 and MMP-9 as well as their respective complexes with TIMP-1 and -2 are capable of Brownian diffusion on the surface of native collagen fibrils without noticeable dissociation while the dimerization of MMP-9 renders the enzyme immobile. Most instructive is the finding that the inactivation of the enzymatic activity of MT1-MMP has a detectable negative effect on the cell force developed in miniaturized 3D tissue constructs. We propose that the collagenolytic complex (MT1-MMP)2/TIMP-2/MMP-2 represents a Mobile Cell Surface – Collagen Substratum Interface. The biological implications of MT1-MMP acting as a molecular ratchet tethered to the cell surface in complex with MMP-2 suggest a new mechanism for the role of spatially regulated peri-cellular proteolysis in cell-matrix interactions. PMID:21912660

  12. Diffusion of MMPs on the surface of collagen fibrils: the mobile cell surface-collagen substratum interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan E Collier

    Full Text Available Remodeling of the extracellular matrix catalyzed by MMPs is central to morphogenetic phenomena during development and wound healing as well as in numerous pathologic conditions such as fibrosis and cancer. We have previously demonstrated that secreted MMP-2 is tethered to the cell surface and activated by MT1-MMP/TIMP-2-dependent mechanism. The resulting cell-surface collagenolytic complex (MT1-MMP(2/TIMP-2/MMP-2 can initiate (MT1-MMP and complete (MMP-2 degradation of an underlying collagen fibril. The following question remained: What is the mechanism of substrate recognition involving the two structures of relatively restricted mobility, the cell surface enzymatic complex and a collagen fibril embedded in the ECM? Here we demonstrate that all the components of the complex are capable of processive movement on a surface of the collagen fibril. The mechanism of MT1-MMP movement is a biased diffusion with the bias component dependent on the proteolysis of its substrate, not adenosine triphosphate (ATP hydrolysis. It is similar to that of the MMP-1 Brownian ratchet we described earlier. In addition, both MMP-2 and MMP-9 as well as their respective complexes with TIMP-1 and -2 are capable of Brownian diffusion on the surface of native collagen fibrils without noticeable dissociation while the dimerization of MMP-9 renders the enzyme immobile. Most instructive is the finding that the inactivation of the enzymatic activity of MT1-MMP has a detectable negative effect on the cell force developed in miniaturized 3D tissue constructs. We propose that the collagenolytic complex (MT1-MMP(2/TIMP-2/MMP-2 represents a Mobile Cell Surface-Collagen Substratum Interface. The biological implications of MT1-MMP acting as a molecular ratchet tethered to the cell surface in complex with MMP-2 suggest a new mechanism for the role of spatially regulated peri-cellular proteolysis in cell-matrix interactions.

  13. Diffusion in higher dimensional SYK model with complex fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenhe; Ge, Xian-Hui; Yang, Guo-Hong

    2018-01-01

    We construct a new higher dimensional SYK model with complex fermions on bipartite lattices. As an extension of the original zero-dimensional SYK model, we focus on the one-dimension case, and similar Hamiltonian can be obtained in higher dimensions. This model has a conserved U(1) fermion number Q and a conjugate chemical potential μ. We evaluate the thermal and charge diffusion constants via large q expansion at low temperature limit. The results show that the diffusivity depends on the ratio of free Majorana fermions to Majorana fermions with SYK interactions. The transport properties and the butterfly velocity are accordingly calculated at low temperature. The specific heat and the thermal conductivity are proportional to the temperature. The electrical resistivity also has a linear temperature dependence term.

  14. Fractional Heat Conduction Models and Thermal Diffusivity Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Žecová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the fractional heat conduction models and their use for determining thermal diffusivity. A brief historical overview of the authors who have dealt with the heat conduction equation is described in the introduction of the paper. The one-dimensional heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are listed. Analytical and numerical methods of solution of the heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are described. Individual methods have been implemented in MATLAB and the examples of simulations are listed. The proposal and experimental verification of the methods for determining thermal diffusivity using half-order derivative of temperature by time are listed at the conclusion of the paper.

  15. A Diffusion Model for Two-sided Service Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Koichi; Yano, Koujin; Funabashi, Motohisa

    A diffusion model is proposed for two-sided service systems. ‘Two-sided’ refers to the existence of an economic network effect between two different and interrelated groups, e.g., card holders and merchants in an electronic money service. The service benefit for a member of one side depends on the number and quality of the members on the other side. A mathematical model by J. H. Rohlfs explains the network (or bandwagon) effect of communications services. In Rohlfs' model, only the users' group exists and the model is one-sided. This paper extends Rohlfs' model to a two-sided model. We propose, first, a micro model that explains individual behavior in regard to service subscription of both sides and a computational method that drives the proposed model. Second, we develop macro models with two diffusion-rate variables by simplifying the micro model. As a case study, we apply the models to an electronic money service and discuss the simulation results and actual statistics.

  16. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA)

    2010-05-01

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  17. Interface Management for a NASA Flight Project Using Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Shull, Thomas A.; Infeld, Samatha; Price, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The goal of interface management is to identify, define, control, and verify interfaces; ensure compatibility; provide an efficient system development; be on time and within budget; while meeting stakeholder requirements. This paper will present a successful seven-step approach to interface management used in several NASA flight projects. The seven-step approach using Model Based Systems Engineering will be illustrated by interface examples from the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The MISSE-X was being developed as an International Space Station (ISS) external platform for space environmental studies, designed to advance the technology readiness of materials and devices critical for future space exploration. Emphasis will be given to best practices covering key areas such as interface definition, writing good interface requirements, utilizing interface working groups, developing and controlling interface documents, handling interface agreements, the use of shadow documents, the importance of interface requirement ownership, interface verification, and product transition.

  18. Mechanism of anisotropic surface self-diffusivity at the prismatic ice-vapor interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gladich, I.; Oswald, A.; Bowens, N.; Naatz, S.; Rowe, P.; Roeselová, Martina; Neshyba, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 35 (2015), s. 22947-22958 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06181S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics simulations * water models * melting point Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015

  19. Failure Propagation Modeling and Analysis via System Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety-critical systems must be shown to be acceptably safe to deploy and use in their operational environment. One of the key concerns of developing safety-critical systems is to understand how the system behaves in the presence of failures, regardless of whether that failure is triggered by the external environment or caused by internal errors. Safety assessment at the early stages of system development involves analysis of potential failures and their consequences. Increasingly, for complex systems, model-based safety assessment is becoming more widely used. In this paper we propose an approach for safety analysis based on system interface models. By extending interaction models on the system interface level with failure modes as well as relevant portions of the physical system to be controlled, automated support could be provided for much of the failure analysis. We focus on fault modeling and on how to compute minimal cut sets. Particularly, we explore state space reconstruction strategy and bounded searching technique to reduce the number of states that need to be analyzed, which remarkably improves the efficiency of cut sets searching algorithm.

  20. User interface using a 3D model for video surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Toshihiko; Boh, Satoru; Tsukada, Akihiro; Ozaki, Minoru

    1998-02-01

    These days fewer people, who must carry out their tasks quickly and precisely, are required in industrial surveillance and monitoring applications such as plant control or building security. Utilizing multimedia technology is a good approach to meet this need, and we previously developed Media Controller, which is designed for the applications and provides realtime recording and retrieval of digital video data in a distributed environment. In this paper, we propose a user interface for such a distributed video surveillance system in which 3D models of buildings and facilities are connected to the surveillance video. A novel method of synchronizing camera field data with each frame of a video stream is considered. This method records and reads the camera field data similarity to the video data and transmits it synchronously with the video stream. This enables the user interface to have such useful functions as comprehending the camera field immediately and providing clues when visibility is poor, for not only live video but also playback video. We have also implemented and evaluated the display function which makes surveillance video and 3D model work together using Media Controller with Java and Virtual Reality Modeling Language employed for multi-purpose and intranet use of 3D model.

  1. Modelling Cr depletion under a growing Cr2O3 layer on austenitic stainless steel: the influence of grain boundary diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Anette Nørgaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2009-01-01

    according to a parabolic rate law as a consequence of rate limiting diffusion of Cr cations through the oxide layer; the retraction of the oxide/alloy interface associated with the removal of Cr atoms from the substrate is included in the calculations. Numerically, the movement of the oxide/alloy interface......The oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in the temperature range 723–1173K is strongly influenced by the grain size of the oxidizing alloy. In this work the evolution of the concentration profiles of Cr, Ni and Fe in the substrate below a growing Cr2O3 layer is simulated...... with a Fisher-type numerical model, which takes both volume and grain boundary diffusion into consideration. The model is based on a two-dimensional control volume-based solution of Fick’s 2nd law for multicomponent diffusion and includes crossterm diffusion coefficients. The oxide layer is assumed to grow...

  2. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spill, Fabian; Guerrero, Pilar; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K.; Byrne, Helen

    2015-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  3. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models.

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  4. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models.

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, Fabian; Guerrero, Pilar; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K; Byrne, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  5. Modeling information diffusion in time-varying community networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuelian; Zhao, Narisa

    2017-12-01

    Social networks are rarely static, and they typically have time-varying network topologies. A great number of studies have modeled temporal networks and explored social contagion processes within these models; however, few of these studies have considered community structure variations. In this paper, we present a study of how the time-varying property of a modular structure influences the information dissemination. First, we propose a continuous-time Markov model of information diffusion where two parameters, mobility rate and community attractiveness, are introduced to address the time-varying nature of the community structure. The basic reproduction number is derived, and the accuracy of this model is evaluated by comparing the simulation and theoretical results. Furthermore, numerical results illustrate that generally both the mobility rate and community attractiveness significantly promote the information diffusion process, especially in the initial outbreak stage. Moreover, the strength of this promotion effect is much stronger when the modularity is higher. Counterintuitively, it is found that when all communities have the same attractiveness, social mobility no longer accelerates the diffusion process. In addition, we show that the local spreading in the advantage group has been greatly enhanced due to the agglomeration effect caused by the social mobility and community attractiveness difference, which thus increases the global spreading.

  6. An innovation diffusion model for new mobile technologies acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkoczia Nadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to approach the diffusion model developed in 1960 by Frank Bass has been utilized to study the distribution of different types of new products and services. The Bass Model helps by describing the process in which new products are adopted in a market. This model is a useful tool for predicting the first purchase of an innovative product for which there are competing alternatives on the market. It also provides the innovator with information regarding the size of customers and the adoption time for the product. The second part of the paper is dedicated to a monographic study of specific conceptual correlations between the diffusion of technology and marketing management that emphasizes technological uncertainty and market uncertainty as major risks to innovative projects. In the final section, the results of empirical research conducted in Baia-Mare, Romania will be presented in a way that uses diffusion Bass model to estimate the adoption period for new mobile technologies.

  7. Unsteady effects at the interface between impeller-vaned diffuser in a low pressure centrifugal compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Leonida NICULESCU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD is applied to the analysis of the unsteady rotor-stator interaction in a low-pressure centrifugal compressor. Numerical simulations are carried out through finite volumes method using the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations (URANS model. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition allows an accurate reconstruction of flow field using only a small number of modes; therefore, this method is one of the best tools for data storage. The POD results and the data obtained by the Adamczyk decomposition are compared. Both decompositions show the behavior of unsteady rotor-stator interaction, but the POD modes allow quantifying better the numerical errors.

  8. Analysis of model interfaces for Li ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemayer, Andreas; Pareek, Aparna; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Renner, Frank [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Lithium ion batteries are the most promising power source for future electromobility applications. Therefore a better understanding of the basic processes in Lithium ion batteries is needed. Especially nowadays research projects aim to improve real systems in terms of higher rate capability, cycle life, safety and operating temperature. Following the surface science approach we focus on the investigation of single crystal model systems of possible anode and cathode materials and electrode/solid electrolyte interfaces prepared by electrochemical deposition, molecular beam epitaxy or pulsed laser deposition.

  9. Diffusive flux of PAHs across sediment-water and water-air interfaces at urban superfund sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minick, D James; Anderson, Kim A

    2017-09-01

    Superfund sites may be a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the surrounding environment. These sites can also act as PAH sinks from present-day anthropogenic activities, especially in urban locations. Understanding PAH transport across environmental compartments helps to define the relative contributions of these sources and is therefore important for informing remedial and management decisions. In the present study, paired passive samplers were co-deployed at sediment-water and water-air interfaces within the Portland Harbor Superfund Site and the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site. These sites, located along the Willamette River (Portland, OR, USA), have PAH contamination from both legacy and modern sources. Diffusive flux calculations indicate that the Willamette River acts predominantly as a sink for low molecular weight PAHs from both the sediment and the air. The sediment was also predominantly a source of 4- and 5-ring PAHs to the river, and the river was a source of these same PAHs to the air, indicating that legacy pollution may be contributing to PAH exposure for residents of the Portland urban center. At the remediated McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site, flux measurements highlight locations within the sand and rock sediment cap where contaminant breakthrough is occurring. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2281-2289. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  10. Exciton delocalization incorporated drift-diffusion model for bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi Shuai; Sha, Wei E. I.; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling the charge-generation process is highly important to understand device physics and optimize power conversion efficiency of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells (OSCs). Free carriers are generated by both ultrafast exciton delocalization and slow exciton diffusion and dissociation at the heterojunction interface. In this work, we developed a systematic numerical simulation to describe the charge-generation process by a modified drift-diffusion model. The transport, recombination, and collection of free carriers are incorporated to fully capture the device response. The theoretical results match well with the state-of-the-art high-performance organic solar cells. It is demonstrated that the increase of exciton delocalization ratio reduces the energy loss in the exciton diffusion-dissociation process, and thus, significantly improves the device efficiency, especially for the short-circuit current. By changing the exciton delocalization ratio, OSC performances are comprehensively investigated under the conditions of short-circuit and open-circuit. Particularly, bulk recombination dependent fill factor saturation is unveiled and understood. As a fundamental electrical analysis of the delocalization mechanism, our work is important to understand and optimize the high-performance OSCs.

  11. Social influence and perceptual decision making: a diffusion model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germar, Markus; Schlemmer, Alexander; Krug, Kristine; Voss, Andreas; Mojzisch, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Classic studies on social influence used simple perceptual decision-making tasks to examine how the opinions of others change individuals' judgments. Since then, one of the most fundamental questions in social psychology has been whether social influence can alter basic perceptual processes. To address this issue, we used a diffusion model analysis. Diffusion models provide a stochastic approach for separating the cognitive processes underlying speeded binary decisions. Following this approach, our study is the first to disentangle whether social influence on decision making is due to altering the uptake of available sensory information or due to shifting the decision criteria. In two experiments, we found consistent evidence for the idea that social influence alters the uptake of available sensory evidence. By contrast, participants did not adjust their decision criteria.

  12. Modeling and Analysis of New Products Diffusion on Heterogeneous Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a heterogeneous networks model with the awareness stage and the decision-making stage to explain the process of new products diffusion. If mass media is neglected in the decision-making stage, there is a threshold whether the innovation diffusion is successful or not, or else it is proved that the network model has at least one positive equilibrium. For networks with the power-law degree distribution, numerical simulations confirm analytical results, and also at the same time, by numerical analysis of the influence of the network structure and persuasive advertisements on the density of adopters, we give two different products propagation strategies for two classes of nodes in scale-free networks.

  13. Modelling and control of a diffusion/LPCVD furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaard, H.; Dekoning, W. L.

    1988-12-01

    Heat transfer inside a cylindrical resistance diffusion/Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) furnace is studied with the aim of developing an improved temperature controller. A model of the thermal behavior is derived, which covers the important class of furnaces equipped with semitransparent quartz process tubes. The model takes into account the thermal behavior of the thermocouples. Currently used temperature controllers are shown to be highly inefficient for very large scale integration applications. Based on the model an alternative temperature controller of the LQG (linear quadratic Gaussian) type is proposed which features direct wafer temperature control. Some simulation results are given.

  14. Statistical models of a gas diffusion electrode: II. Current resistent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proksch, D B; Winsel, O W

    1965-07-01

    The authors describe an apparatus for measuring the flow resistance of gas diffusion electrodes which is a mechanical analog of the Wheatstone bridge for measuring electric resistance. The flow resistance of a circular DSK electrode sheet, consisting of two covering layers and a working layer between them, was measured as a function of the gas pressure. While the pressure first was increased and then decreased, a hysteresis occurred, which is discussed and explained by a statistical model of a porous electrode.

  15. Dynamic Model of Contact Interface between Stator and Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZengHui Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the equivalent principle, a linear spring contact model was established for the friction layer between stator and rotor. Different contact conditions were described by a distance index δ. Detailed analysis of the nonlinear contact behavior especially the static and dynamic slipping was carried on using a space-time equation. A contact deflection angle was proposed to quantitatively express the influence of friction force on the output performance. A more precision simulation model was established based on the theoretical analysis, and influences of different preload pressures and elastic modulus Em of friction layer on output performance were analyzed. The results showed the simulation results had very good consistency with experimental results, and the model could well reflect the output characteristics of contact interface.

  16. Electrode-tissues interface: modeling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, M; Laaziri, Y; Mounaim, F; Elzayat, E; Corcos, J; Elhilali, M M

    2007-01-01

    The electrode-tissues interface (ETI) is one of the key issues in implantable devices such as stimulators and sensors. Once the stimulator is implanted, safety and reliability become more and more critical. In this case, modeling and monitoring of the ETI are required. We propose an empirical model for the ETI and a dedicated integrated circuit to measure its corresponding complex impedance. These measurements in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 100 kHz were achieved in acute dog experiments. The model demonstrates a closer fitting with experimental measurements. In addition, a custom monitoring device based on a stimuli current generator has been completed to evaluate the phase shift and voltage across the electrodes and to transmit wirelessly the values to an external controller. This integrated circuit has been fabricated in a CMOS 0.18 μm process, which consumes 4 mW only during measurements and occupies an area of 1 mm 2 . (review article)

  17. The Kinematic Learning Model using Video and Interfaces Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, T.; Setiawan, W.; Hamidah, I.

    2017-09-01

    An educator currently in demand to apply the learning to not be separated from the development of technology. Educators often experience difficulties when explaining kinematics material, this is because kinematics is one of the lessons that often relate the concept to real life. Kinematics is one of the courses of physics that explains the cause of motion of an object, Therefore it takes the thinking skills and analytical skills in understanding these symptoms. Technology is one that can bridge between conceptual relationship with real life. A framework of technology-based learning models has been developed using video and interfaces analysis on kinematics concept. By using this learning model, learners will be better able to understand the concept that is taught by the teacher. This learning model is able to improve the ability of creative thinking, analytical skills, and problem-solving skills on the concept of kinematics.

  18. An epidemic model of rumor diffusion in online social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun-Jun; Liu, Yun; Shen, Bo; Yuan, Wei-Guo

    2013-01-01

    So far, in some standard rumor spreading models, the transition probability from ignorants to spreaders is always treated as a constant. However, from a practical perspective, the case that individual whether or not be infected by the neighbor spreader greatly depends on the trustiness of ties between them. In order to solve this problem, we introduce a stochastic epidemic model of the rumor diffusion, in which the infectious probability is defined as a function of the strength of ties. Moreover, we investigate numerically the behavior of the model on a real scale-free social site with the exponent γ = 2.2. We verify that the strength of ties plays a critical role in the rumor diffusion process. Specially, selecting weak ties preferentially cannot make rumor spread faster and wider, but the efficiency of diffusion will be greatly affected after removing them. Another significant finding is that the maximum number of spreaders max( S) is very sensitive to the immune probability μ and the decay probability v. We show that a smaller μ or v leads to a larger spreading of the rumor, and their relationships can be described as the function ln(max( S)) = Av + B, in which the intercept B and the slope A can be fitted perfectly as power-law functions of μ. Our findings may offer some useful insights, helping guide the application in practice and reduce the damage brought by the rumor.

  19. Modeling of semiconductor nanostructures and semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birner, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of Part I is to give an overview of some of the methods that have been implemented into the nextnano 3 software. Examples are discussed that give insight into doping, strain and mobility. Applications of the single-band Schroedinger equation include three-dimensional superlattices, and a qubit that is manipulated by a magnetic field. Results of the multi-band k.p method are presented for HgTe-CdTe and InAs-GaSb superlattices, and for a SiGe-Si quantum cascade structure. Particular focus is put on a detailed description of the contact block reduction (CBR) method that has been developed within our research group. By means of this approach, quantum transport in the ballistic limit in one, two and three dimensions can be calculated. I provide a very detailed description of the algorithm and present several well documented examples that highlight the key points of this method. Calculating quantum transport in three dimensions is a very challenging task where computationally efficient algorithms - apart from the CBR method - are not available yet. Part II describes the methods that I have implemented into the nextnano 3 software for calculating systems that consist of a combination of semiconductor materials and liquids. These biosensors have a solid-electrolyte interface, and the charges in the solid and in the electrolyte are coupled to each other through the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. I apply this model to a silicon based protein sensor, where I solve the Schroedinger equation together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation self-consistently, and compare theoretical results with experiment. Furthermore, I have developed a novel approach to model the charge density profiles at semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces that allows us to distinguish hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces. Our approach extends previous work where ion specific potentials of mean force describe the distribution of ion species at the interface. I apply this new model to recently

  20. Modeling of semiconductor nanostructures and semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birner, Stefan

    2011-11-15

    The main objective of Part I is to give an overview of some of the methods that have been implemented into the nextnano{sup 3} software. Examples are discussed that give insight into doping, strain and mobility. Applications of the single-band Schroedinger equation include three-dimensional superlattices, and a qubit that is manipulated by a magnetic field. Results of the multi-band k.p method are presented for HgTe-CdTe and InAs-GaSb superlattices, and for a SiGe-Si quantum cascade structure. Particular focus is put on a detailed description of the contact block reduction (CBR) method that has been developed within our research group. By means of this approach, quantum transport in the ballistic limit in one, two and three dimensions can be calculated. I provide a very detailed description of the algorithm and present several well documented examples that highlight the key points of this method. Calculating quantum transport in three dimensions is a very challenging task where computationally efficient algorithms - apart from the CBR method - are not available yet. Part II describes the methods that I have implemented into the nextnano{sup 3} software for calculating systems that consist of a combination of semiconductor materials and liquids. These biosensors have a solid-electrolyte interface, and the charges in the solid and in the electrolyte are coupled to each other through the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. I apply this model to a silicon based protein sensor, where I solve the Schroedinger equation together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation self-consistently, and compare theoretical results with experiment. Furthermore, I have developed a novel approach to model the charge density profiles at semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces that allows us to distinguish hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces. Our approach extends previous work where ion specific potentials of mean force describe the distribution of ion species at the interface. I apply this new model

  1. Finite element modelling of the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 with a controlled metal-oxide interface and the influence of growth stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumpicchiat, Guillaume; Pascal, Serge; Tupin, Marc; Berdin-Méric, Clotilde

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: We developed two finite element models of zirconium-based alloy oxidation using the CEA Cast3M code to simulate the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. We also studied the effect of stresses on the oxidation kinetics. The main results are: • Both models lead to parabolic oxidation kinetics in agreement with the Wagner’s theory. • The modellings enable to calculate the stress distribution in the oxide as well as in the metal. • A strong effect of the hydrostatic stress on the oxidation kinetics has been evidenced. • The stress gradient effect changes the parabolic kinetics into a sub-parabolic law closer to the experimental kinetics because of the stress gradient itself, but also because of the growth stress increase with the oxide thickness. - Abstract: Experimentally, zirconium-based alloys oxidation kinetics is sub-parabolic, by contrast with the Wagner theory which predicts a parabolic kinetics. Two finite element models have been developed to simulate this phenomenon: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. Both simulate parabolic oxidation kinetics. The growth stress effects on oxygen diffusion are studied to try to explain the gap between theory and experience. Taking into account the influence of the hydrostatic stress and its gradient into the oxygen flux expression, sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics have been simulated. The sub-parabolic behaviour of the oxidation kinetics can be explained by a non-uniform compressive stress level into the oxide layer.

  2. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. WILLIAMS [and others

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  3. Yearly, seasonal and monthly daily average diffuse sky radiation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, A.S.; Mujahid, A.M.; Turner, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    A daily average diffuse sky radiation regression model based on daily global radiation was developed utilizing two year data taken near Blytheville, Arkansas (Lat. =35.9 0 N, Long. = 89.9 0 W), U.S.A. The model has a determination coefficient of 0.91 and 0.092 standard error of estimate. The data were also analyzed for a seasonal dependence and four seasonal average daily models were developed for the spring, summer, fall and winter seasons. The coefficient of determination is 0.93, 0.81, 0.94 and 0.93, whereas the standard error of estimate is 0.08, 0.102, 0.042 and 0.075 for spring, summer, fall and winter, respectively. A monthly average daily diffuse sky radiation model was also developed. The coefficient of determination is 0.92 and the standard error of estimate is 0.083. A seasonal monthly average model was also developed which has 0.91 coefficient of determination and 0.085 standard error of estimate. The developed monthly daily average and daily models compare well with a selected number of previously developed models. (author). 11 ref., figs., tabs

  4. Nonlinear Displacement Discontinuity Model for Generalized Rayleigh Wave in Contact Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, No Hyu; Yang, Seung Yong [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Imperfectly jointed interface serves as mechanical waveguide for elastic waves and gives rise to two distinct kinds of guided wave propagating along the interface. Contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) is known to plays major role in the generation of these interface waves called generalized Rayleigh waves in non-welded interface. Closed crack is modeled as non-welded interface that has nonlinear discontinuity condition in displacement across its boundary. Mathematical analysis of boundary conditions and wave equation is conducted to investigate the dispersive characteristics of the interface waves. Existence of the generalized Rayleigh wave(interface wave) in nonlinear contact interface is verified in theory where the dispersion equation for the interface wave is formulated and analyzed. It reveals that the interface waves have two distinct modes and that the phase velocity of anti-symmetric wave mode is highly dependent on contact conditions represented by linear and nonlinear dimensionless specific stiffness

  5. Nonlinear Displacement Discontinuity Model for Generalized Rayleigh Wave in Contact Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, No Hyu; Yang, Seung Yong

    2007-01-01

    Imperfectly jointed interface serves as mechanical waveguide for elastic waves and gives rise to two distinct kinds of guided wave propagating along the interface. Contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) is known to plays major role in the generation of these interface waves called generalized Rayleigh waves in non-welded interface. Closed crack is modeled as non-welded interface that has nonlinear discontinuity condition in displacement across its boundary. Mathematical analysis of boundary conditions and wave equation is conducted to investigate the dispersive characteristics of the interface waves. Existence of the generalized Rayleigh wave(interface wave) in nonlinear contact interface is verified in theory where the dispersion equation for the interface wave is formulated and analyzed. It reveals that the interface waves have two distinct modes and that the phase velocity of anti-symmetric wave mode is highly dependent on contact conditions represented by linear and nonlinear dimensionless specific stiffness

  6. SXPS study of model GaAs(100)/electrolyte interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Mikhail V. [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mankel, Eric; Mayer, Thomas; Jaegermann, Wolfram [Institute of Material Sciences, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Model GaAs(100)/electrolyte interfaces are prepared in vacuum by co-adsorption of Cl{sub 2} and 2-propanol molecules at LN{sub 2} temperature. On adsorption of Cl{sub 2} molecules gallium chlorides, elemental arsenic and arsenic chlorides are formed. Co-adsorption of 2-propanol causes formation of additional GaCl{sub 3} and AsCl, as well as soluble/volatile As-based complexes, which are released from the surface depleting the sur- face by arsenic. Comparison of the As 3d and Ga 3d spectra obtained after heating the model interface to room temperature with the corresponding spectra obtained after emersion of the GaAs(100) surface from HCl/2-propanol solution allows to conclude that in HCl solution Cl{sup -} ions attack gallium sites and H{sup +} ions mostly attack arsenic sites. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Diffusion Modeling: A Study of the Diffusion of “Jatropha Curcas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consequently, the study recommended the use of diffusion networks which integrate interpersonal networks, and multimedia strategies for the effective diffusion of innovation such as Jacodiesel in Adamawa State and other parts of the country. Keywords: Sustainability, Diffusion, Innovation, Communicative Influence, ...

  8. Modeling organohalide perovskites for photovoltaic applications: From materials to interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Filippo

    2015-03-01

    The field of hybrid/organic photovoltaics has been revolutionized in 2012 by the first reports of solid-state solar cells based on organohalide perovskites, now topping at 20% efficiency. First-principles modeling has been widely applied to the dye-sensitized solar cells field, and more recently to perovskite-based solar cells. The computational design and screening of new materials has played a major role in advancing the DSCs field. Suitable modeling strategies may also offer a view of the crucial heterointerfaces ruling the device operational mechanism. I will illustrate how simulation tools can be employed in the emerging field of perovskite solar cells. The performance of the proposed simulation toolbox along with the fundamental modeling strategies are presented using selected examples of relevant materials and interfaces. The main issue with hybrid perovskite modeling is to be able to accurately describe their structural, electronic and optical features. These materials show a degree of short range disorder, due to the presence of mobile organic cations embedded within the inorganic matrix, requiring to average their properties over a molecular dynamics trajectory. Due to the presence of heavy atoms (e.g. Sn and Pb) their electronic structure must take into account spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in an effective way, possibly including GW corrections. The proposed SOC-GW method constitutes the basis for tuning the materials electronic and optical properties, rationalizing experimental trends. Modeling charge generation in perovskite-sensitized TiO2 interfaces is then approached based on a SOC-DFT scheme, describing alignment of energy levels in a qualitatively correct fashion. The role of interfacial chemistry on the device performance is finally discussed. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme [FP7/2007 2013] under Grant Agreement No. 604032 of the MESO project.

  9. Analytical Model for Diffusive Evaporation of Sessile Droplets Coupled with Interfacial Cooling Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan A H; Biggs, Simon R; Nguyen, Anh V

    2018-05-30

    Current analytical models for sessile droplet evaporation do not consider the nonuniform temperature field within the droplet and can overpredict the evaporation by 20%. This deviation can be attributed to a significant temperature drop due to the release of the latent heat of evaporation along the air-liquid interface. We report, for the first time, an analytical solution of the sessile droplet evaporation coupled with this interfacial cooling effect. The two-way coupling model of the quasi-steady thermal diffusion within the droplet and the quasi-steady diffusion-controlled droplet evaporation is conveniently solved in the toroidal coordinate system by applying the method of separation of variables. Our new analytical model for the coupled vapor concentration and temperature fields is in the closed form and is applicable for a full range of spherical-cap shape droplets of different contact angles and types of fluids. Our analytical results are uniquely quantified by a dimensionless evaporative cooling number E o whose magnitude is determined only by the thermophysical properties of the liquid and the atmosphere. Accordingly, the larger the magnitude of E o , the more significant the effect of the evaporative cooling, which results in stronger suppression on the evaporation rate. The classical isothermal model is recovered if the temperature gradient along the air-liquid interface is negligible ( E o = 0). For substrates with very high thermal conductivities (isothermal substrates), our analytical model predicts a reversal of temperature gradient along the droplet-free surface at a contact angle of 119°. Our findings pose interesting challenges but also guidance for experimental investigations.

  10. Performance modeling of parallel algorithms for solving neutron diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmy, Y.Y.; Kirk, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron diffusion calculations are the most common computational methods used in the design, analysis, and operation of nuclear reactors and related activities. Here, mathematical performance models are developed for the parallel algorithm used to solve the neutron diffusion equation on message passing and shared memory multiprocessors represented by the Intel iPSC/860 and the Sequent Balance 8000, respectively. The performance models are validated through several test problems, and these models are used to estimate the performance of each of the two considered architectures in situations typical of practical applications, such as fine meshes and a large number of participating processors. While message passing computers are capable of producing speedup, the parallel efficiency deteriorates rapidly as the number of processors increases. Furthermore, the speedup fails to improve appreciably for massively parallel computers so that only small- to medium-sized message passing multiprocessors offer a reasonable platform for this algorithm. In contrast, the performance model for the shared memory architecture predicts very high efficiency over a wide range of number of processors reasonable for this architecture. Furthermore, the model efficiency of the Sequent remains superior to that of the hypercube if its model parameters are adjusted to make its processors as fast as those of the iPSC/860. It is concluded that shared memory computers are better suited for this parallel algorithm than message passing computers

  11. Thermodynamic modelling of fast dopant diffusion in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltas, V.; Chroneos, A.; Vallianatos, F.

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, nickel and copper fast diffusion in silicon is investigated in the framework of the cBΩ thermodynamic model, which connects point defect parameters with the bulk elastic and expansion properties. All the calculated point defect thermodynamic properties (activation Gibbs free energy, activation enthalpy, activation entropy, and activation volume) exhibit temperature dependence due to the non-linear anharmonic behavior of the isothermal bulk modulus of Si. Calculated activation enthalpies (0.15-0.16 eV for Ni and 0.17-0.19 eV for Cu) are in agreement with the reported experimental results. Small values of calculated activation volumes for both dopants (˜4% of the mean atomic volume) are consistent with the interstitial diffusion of Ni and Cu in Si.

  12. Computing diffusivities from particle models out of equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embacher, Peter; Dirr, Nicolas; Zimmer, Johannes; Reina, Celia

    2018-04-01

    A new method is proposed to numerically extract the diffusivity of a (typically nonlinear) diffusion equation from underlying stochastic particle systems. The proposed strategy requires the system to be in local equilibrium and have Gaussian fluctuations but it is otherwise allowed to undergo arbitrary out-of-equilibrium evolutions. This could be potentially relevant for particle data obtained from experimental applications. The key idea underlying the method is that finite, yet large, particle systems formally obey stochastic partial differential equations of gradient flow type satisfying a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The strategy is here applied to three classic particle models, namely independent random walkers, a zero-range process and a symmetric simple exclusion process in one space dimension, to allow the comparison with analytic solutions.

  13. Measurement and modeling of interface heat transfer coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollett, A.D.; Lewis, H.D.; Dunn, P.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of preliminary work on the modeling and measurement of the heat transfer coefficients of metal/mold interfaces is reported. The system investigated is the casting of uranium in graphite molds. The motivation for the work is primarily to improve the accuracy of process modeling of prototype mold designs at the Los Alamos Foundry. The evolution in design of a suitable mold for unidirectional solidification is described, illustrating the value of simulating mold designs prior to use. Experiment indicated a heat transfer coefficient of 2 kW/m 2 /K both with and without superheat. It was possible to distinguish between solidification due to the mold and that due to radiative heat loss. This permitted an experimental estimate of the emissivity, epsilon = 0.2, of the solidified metal

  14. ORIGAMI -- The Oak Ridge Geometry Analysis and Modeling Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    A revised ''ray-tracing'' package which is a superset of the geometry specifications of the radiation transport codes MORSE, MASH (GIFT Versions 4 and 5), HETC, and TORT has been developed by ORNL. Two additional CAD-based formats are also included as part of the superset: the native format of the BRL-CAD system--MGED, and the solid constructive geometry subset of the IGES specification. As part of this upgrade effort, ORNL has designed an Xwindows-based utility (ORIGAMI) to facilitate the construction, manipulation, and display of the geometric models required by the MASH code. Since the primary design criterion for this effort was that the utility ''see'' the geometric model exactly as the radiation transport code does, ORIGAMI is designed to utilize the same ''ray-tracing'' package as the revised version of MASH. ORIGAMI incorporates the functionality of two previously developed graphical utilities, CGVIEW and ORGBUG, into a single consistent interface

  15. Continuum modelling of silicon diffusion in indium gallium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Henry Lee, Jr.

    A possible method to overcome the physical limitations experienced by continued transistor scaling and continue improvements in performance and power consumption is integration of III-V semiconductors as alternative channel materials for logic devices. Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) is such a material from the III-V semiconductor family, which exhibit superior electron mobilities and injection velocities than that of silicon. In order for InGaAs integration to be realized, contact resistances must be minimized through maximizing activation of dopants in this material. Additionally, redistribution of dopants during processing must be clearly understood and ultimately controlled at the nanometer-scale. In this work, the activation and diffusion behavior of silicon, a prominent n-type dopant in InGaAs, has been characterized and subsequently modelled using the Florida Object Oriented Process and Device Simulator (FLOOPS). In contrast to previous reports, silicon exhibits non-negligible diffusion in InGaAs, even for smaller thermal budget rapid thermal anneals (RTAs). Its diffusion is heavily concentration-dependent, with broadening "shoulder-like" profiles when doping levels exceed 1-3x1019cm -3, for both ion-implanted and Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE)-grown cases. Likewise a max net-activation value of ˜1.7x1019cm -3 is consistently reached with enough thermal processing, regardless of doping method. In line with experimental results and several ab-initio calculation results, rapid concentration-dependent diffusion of Si in InGaAs and the upper limits of its activation is believed to be governed by cation vacancies that serve as compensating defects in heavily n-type regions of InGaAs. These results are ultimately in line with an amphoteric defect model, where the activation limits of dopants are an intrinsic limitation of the material, rather than governed by individual dopant species or their methods of incorporation. As a result a Fermi level dependent point

  16. Diffusion of innovations in Axelrod’s model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilles, Paulo F. C.; Fontanari, José F.

    2015-11-01

    Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture contains two key factors required to model the process of diffusion of innovations, namely, social influence (i.e., individuals become more similar when they interact) and homophily (i.e., individuals interact preferentially with similar others). The strength of these social influences are controlled by two parameters: $F$, the number of features that characterizes the cultures and $q$, the common number of states each feature can assume. Here we assume that the innovation is a new state of a cultural feature of a single individual -- the innovator -- and study how the innovation spreads through the networks among the individuals. For infinite regular lattices in one (1D) and two dimensions (2D), we find that initially the successful innovation spreads linearly with the time $t$, but in the long-time limit it spreads diffusively ($\\sim t^{1/2}$) in 1D and sub-diffusively ($\\sim t/\\ln t$) in 2D. For finite lattices, the growth curves for the number of adopters are typically concave functions of $t$. For random graphs with a finite number of nodes $N$, we argue that the classical S-shaped growth curves result from a trade-off between the average connectivity $K$ of the graph and the per feature diversity $q$. A large $q$ is needed to reduce the pace of the initial spreading of the innovation and thus delimit the early-adopters stage, whereas a large $K$ is necessary to ensure the onset of the take-off stage at which the number of adopters grows superlinearly with $t$. In an infinite random graph we find that the number of adopters of a successful innovation scales with $t^\\gamma$ with $\\gamma =1$ for $K> 2$ and $1/2 < \\gamma < 1$ for $K=2$. We suggest that the exponent $\\gamma$ may be a useful index to characterize the process of diffusion of successful innovations in diverse scenarios.

  17. A current induced diffusion model of gas sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotston, E.S.

    1980-01-01

    A model is proposed to explain the experimental results on deuteron trapping in stainless steel targets at low temperatures carried out at Garching and Culham. The model proposes that the ions are trapped in two kinds of sites: Deep sites with high activation energy and shallow sites of low activation energy. Trapped deuterons reach the surface of the target by being expelled from shallow sites by the action of the ion beam and migrate to nearby sites in a random way, thus moving by a bombardment induced diffusion. Ions diffusing to the target surface and being released are said to be sputtered from the target. It has been necessary to assume numerical values for sizes of some of the processes which occur. With a suitable choice of values the model successfully predicts the numbers of deuterons trapped per unit area of the target, the obserbed density profile of the trapped ions and the threshold at which sputtering starts. The model also successfully describes the replacement of the trapped deuterons by protons, when the deuteron beam is replaced by a proton beam. The collision cross-section for beam ions and ions trapped in shallow sites is too large, 4 x 10 -13 cm 2 , for a binary collision and it is tentatively suggested that the ions in the shallow sites may be in small voids in the target which may be connected with blister formation. Comparison of the present model with one being developed to describe the trapping of deuterons in carbon suggests that it may be possible to describe all gas sputtering experiments in terms of diffusion processes. (orig.)

  18. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  19. Turbulent diffusion modelling for windflow and dispersion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartzis, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The need for simple but reliable models for turbulent diffusion for windflow and atmospheric dispersion analysis is a necessity today if one takes into consideration the relatively high demand in computer time and costs for such an analysis, arising mainly from the often large solution domains needed, the terrain complexity and the transient nature of the phenomena. In the accident consequence assessment often there is a need for a relatively large number of cases to be analysed increasing further the computer time and costs. Within the framework of searching for relatively simple and universal eddy viscosity/diffusivity models, a new three dimensional non isotropic model is proposed applicable to any domain complexity and any atmospheric stability conditions. The model utilizes the transport equation for turbulent kinetic energy but introduces a new approach in effective length scale estimation based on the flow global characteristics and local atmospheric stability. The model is discussed in detail and predictions are given for flow field and boundary layer thickness. The results are compared with experimental data with satisfactory results

  20. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material. Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  1. An extended diffusive model for calculating thermal diffusivity from single monopole tokamak heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinak, M.

    1990-02-01

    The problem of deducing χ e from measurements of the propagation of a monopole heatpulse is considered. An extended diffusive model, which takes into account perturbed sources and sinks is extended to the case of a monopole heat input. χ e is expressed as a function of two observables, the heat pulse velocity and the radial damping rate. Two simple expressions valid for two different ranges of the radius of the poloidal waist of the beam power profile are given. The expressions are valid in the heat pulse measurement region, extending radially 0.05a beyond the beam power waist to near 0.6a. The inferred χ e is a local value, not an average value of the radial χ e profile. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. OMWS: A Web Service Interface for Ecological Niche Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato De Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecological niche modelling (ENM experiments often involve a high number of tasks to be performed. Such tasks may consume a significant amount of computing resources and take a long time to complete, especially when using personal computers. OMWS is a Web service interface that allows more powerful computing back-ends to be remotely exploited by other applications to carry out ENM tasks. Its latest version includes a new operation that can be used to specify complex workflows in a single request, adding the possibility of using workflow management systems on parallel computing back-end. In this paper we describe the OMWS protocol and compare its most recent version with the previous one by running the same ENM experiment using two functionally equivalent clients, each designed for one of the OMWS interface versions. Different back-end configurations were used to investigate how the performance scales for each protocol version when more processing power is made available. Results show that the new version outperforms (in a factor of 2 the previous one when more computing resources are used.

  3. Sooting Characteristics and Modeling in Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2013-11-01

    Soot formation is one of the most complex phenomena in combustion science and an understanding of the underlying physico-chemical mechanisms is important. This work adopted both experimental and numerical approaches to study soot formation in laminar counterfl ow diffusion flames. As polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the precursors of soot particles, a detailed gas-phase chemical mechanism describing PAH growth upto coronene for fuels with 1 to 4 carbon atoms was validated against laminar premixed and counter- flow diffusion fl ames. Built upon this gas-phase mechanism, a soot model was then developed to describe soot inception and surface growth. This soot model was sub- sequently used to study fuel mixing effect on soot formation in counterfl ow diffusion flames. Simulation results showed that compared to the baseline case of the ethylene flame, the doping of 5% (by volume) propane or ethane in ethylene tends to increase the soot volume fraction and number density while keeping the average soot size almost unchanged. These results are in agreement with experimental observations. Laser light extinction/scattering as well as laser induced fluorescence techniques were used to study the effect of strain rate on soot and PAH formation in counterfl ow diffusion ames. The results showed that as strain rate increased both soot volume fraction and PAH concentrations decreased. The concentrations of larger PAH were more sensitive to strain rate compared to smaller ones. The effect of CO2 addition on soot formation was also studied using similar experimental techniques. Soot loading was reduced with CO2 dilution. Subsequent numerical modeling studies were able to reproduce the experimental trend. In addition, the chemical effect of CO2 addition was analyzed using numerical data. Critical conditions for the onset of soot were systematically studied in counterfl ow diffusion ames for various gaseous hydrocarbon fuels and at different strain rates. A sooting

  4. Application of the evolution theory in modelling of innovation diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Milan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of evolution has found numerous analogies and applications in other scientific disciplines apart from biology. In that sense, today the so-called 'memetic-evolution' has been widely accepted. Memes represent a complex adaptable system, where one 'meme' represents an evolutional cultural element, i.e. the smallest unit of information which can be identified and used in order to explain the evolution process. Among others, the field of innovations has proved itself to be a suitable area where the theory of evolution can also be successfully applied. In this work the authors have started from the assumption that it is also possible to apply the theory of evolution in the modelling of the process of innovation diffusion. Based on the conducted theoretical research, the authors conclude that the process of innovation diffusion in the interpretation of a 'meme' is actually the process of imitation of the 'meme' of innovation. Since during the process of their replication certain 'memes' show a bigger success compared to others, that eventually leads to their natural selection. For the survival of innovation 'memes', their manifestations are of key importance in the sense of their longevity, fruitfulness and faithful replicating. The results of the conducted research have categorically confirmed the assumption of the possibility of application of the evolution theory with the innovation diffusion with the help of innovation 'memes', which opens up the perspectives for some new researches on the subject.

  5. Different approach to the modeling of nonfree particle diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Niels

    2018-03-01

    A new approach to the modeling of nonfree particle diffusion is presented. The approach uses a general setup based on geometric graphs (networks of curves), which means that particle diffusion in anything from arrays of barriers and pore networks to general geometric domains can be considered and that the (free random walk) central limit theorem can be generalized to cover also the nonfree case. The latter gives rise to a continuum-limit description of the diffusive motion where the effect of partially absorbing barriers is accounted for in a natural and non-Markovian way that, in contrast to the traditional approach, quantifies the absorptivity of a barrier in terms of a dimensionless parameter in the range 0 to 1. The generalized theorem gives two general analytic expressions for the continuum-limit propagator: an infinite sum of Gaussians and an infinite sum of plane waves. These expressions entail the known method-of-images and Laplace eigenfunction expansions as special cases and show how the presence of partially absorbing barriers can lead to phenomena such as line splitting and band gap formation in the plane wave wave-number spectrum.

  6. pyhector: A Python interface for the simple climate model Hector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N Willner, Sven; Hartin, Corinne; Gieseke, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Pyhector is a Python interface for the simple climate model Hector (Hartin et al. 2015) developed in C++. Simple climate models like Hector can, for instance, be used in the analysis of scenarios within integrated assessment models like GCAM1, in the emulation of complex climate models, and in uncertainty analyses. Hector is an open-source, object oriented, simple global climate carbon cycle model. Its carbon cycle consists of a one pool atmosphere, three terrestrial pools which can be broken down into finer biomes or regions, and four carbon pools in the ocean component. The terrestrial carbon cycle includes primary production and respiration fluxes. The ocean carbon cycle circulates carbon via a simplified thermohaline circulation, calculating air-sea fluxes as well as the marine carbonate system (Hartin et al. 2016). The model input is time series of greenhouse gas emissions; as example scenarios for these the Pyhector package contains the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)2. These were developed to cover the range of baseline and mitigation emissions scenarios and are widely used in climate change research and model intercomparison projects. Using DataFrames from the Python library Pandas (McKinney 2010) as a data structure for the scenarios simplifies generating and adapting scenarios. Other parameters of the Hector model can easily be modified when running the model. Pyhector can be installed using pip from the Python Package Index.3 Source code and issue tracker are available in Pyhector's GitHub repository4. Documentation is provided through Readthedocs5. Usage examples are also contained in the repository as a Jupyter Notebook (Pérez and Granger 2007; Kluyver et al. 2016). Courtesy of the Mybinder project6, the example Notebook can also be executed and modified without installing Pyhector locally.

  7. Dense-gas dispersion advection-diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermak, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    A dense-gas version of the ADPIC particle-in-cell, advection- diffusion model was developed to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of denser-than-air releases. In developing the model, it was assumed that the dense-gas effects could be described in terms of the vertically-averaged thermodynamic properties and the local height of the cloud. The dense-gas effects were treated as a perturbation to the ambient thermodynamic properties (density and temperature), ground level heat flux, turbulence level (diffusivity), and windfield (gravity flow) within the local region of the dense-gas cloud. These perturbations were calculated from conservation of energy and conservation of momentum principles along with the ideal gas law equation of state for a mixture of gases. ADPIC, which is generally run in conjunction with a mass-conserving wind flow model to provide the advection field, contains all the dense-gas modifications within it. This feature provides the versatility of coupling the new dense-gas ADPIC with alternative wind flow models. The new dense-gas ADPIC has been used to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of ground-level, colder-than-ambient, denser-than-air releases and has compared favorably with the results of field-scale experiments

  8. Diffusion and reaction within porous packing media: a phenomenological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W L; Dockery, J D; Vogel, C R; Sturman, P J

    1993-04-25

    A phenomenological model has been developed to describe biomass distribution and substrate depletion in porous diatomaceous earth (DE) pellets colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The essential features of the model are diffusion, attachment and detachment to/from pore walls of the biomass, diffusion of substrate within the pellet, and external mass transfer of both substrate and biomass in the bulk fluid of a packed bed containing the pellets. A bench-scale reactor filled with DE pellets was inoculated with P. aeruginosa and operated in plug flow without recycle using a feed containing glucose as the limiting nutrient. Steady-state effluent glucose concentrations were measured at various residence times, and biomass distribution within the pellet was measured at the lowest residence time. In the model, microorganism/substrate kinetics and mass transfer characteristics were predicted from the literature. Only the attachment and detachment parameters were treated as unknowns, and were determined by fitting biomass distribution data within the pellets to the mathematical model. The rate-limiting step in substrate conversion was determined to be internal mass transfer resistance; external mass transfer resistance and microbial kinetic limitations were found to be nearly negligible. Only the outer 5% of the pellets contributed to substrate conversion.

  9. Modeling of 1D Anomalous Diffusion in Fractured Nanoporous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albinali Ali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fractured nanoporous reservoirs include multi-scale and discontinuous fractures coupled with a complex nanoporous matrix. Such systems cannot be described by the conventional dual-porosity (or multi-porosity idealizations due to the presence of different flow mechanisms at multiple scales. More detailed modeling approaches, such as Discrete Fracture Network (DFN models, similarly suffer from the extensive data requirements dictated by the intricacy of the flow scales, which eventually deter the utility of these models. This paper discusses the utility and construction of 1D analytical and numerical anomalous diffusion models for heterogeneous, nanoporous media, which is commonly encountered in oil and gas production from tight, unconventional reservoirs with fractured horizontal wells. A fractional form of Darcy’s law, which incorporates the non-local and hereditary nature of flow, is coupled with the classical mass conservation equation to derive a fractional diffusion equation in space and time. Results show excellent agreement with established solutions under asymptotic conditions and are consistent with the physical intuitions.

  10. Compact Models for Defect Diffusivity in Semiconductor Alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Alan F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics Department; Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics Department; Lee, Stephen R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Sciences Department; Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Materials and Data Science Department

    2017-09-01

    Predicting transient effects caused by short - pulse neutron irradiation of electronic devices is an important part of Sandia's mission. For example , predicting the diffusion of radiation - induced point defects is needed with in Sandia's Qualification Alternative to the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (QASPR) pro gram since defect diffusion mediates transient gain recovery in QASPR electronic devices. Recently, the semiconductors used to fabricate radiation - hard electronic devices have begun to shift from silicon to III - V compounds such as GaAs, InAs , GaP and InP . An advantage of this shift is that it allows engineers to optimize the radiation hardness of electronic devices by using alloy s such as InGaAs and InGaP . However, the computer codes currently being used to simulate transient radiation effects in QASP R devices will need to be modified since they presume that defect properties (charge states, energy levels, and diffusivities) in these alloys do not change with time. This is not realistic since the energy and properties of a defect depend on the types of atoms near it and , therefore, on its location in the alloy. In particular, radiation - induced defects are created at nearly random locations in an alloy and the distribution of their local environments - and thus their energies and properties - evolves with time as the defects diffuse through the alloy . To incorporate these consequential effects into computer codes used to simulate transient radiation effects, we have developed procedures to accurately compute the time dependence of defect energies and properties and then formulate them within compact models that can be employed in these computer codes. In this document, we demonstrate these procedures for the case of the highly mobile P interstitial (I P ) in an InGaP alloy. Further dissemination only as authorized to U.S. Government agencies and their contractors; other requests shall be approved by the originating facility or higher DOE

  11. Anomalous diffusion in neutral evolution of model proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-06-01

    Protein evolution is frequently explored using minimalist polymer models, however, little attention has been given to the problem of structural drift, or diffusion. Here, we study neutral evolution of small protein motifs using an off-lattice heteropolymer model in which individual monomers interact as low-resolution amino acids. In contrast to most earlier models, both the length and folded structure of the polymers are permitted to change. To describe structural change, we compute the mean-square distance (MSD) between monomers in homologous folds separated by n neutral mutations. We find that structural change is episodic, and, averaged over lineages (for example, those extending from a single sequence), exhibits a power-law dependence on n . We show that this exponent depends on the alignment method used, and we analyze the distribution of waiting times between neutral mutations. The latter are more disperse than for models required to maintain a specific fold, but exhibit a similar power-law tail.

  12. The effects of size, shape, and surface composition on the diffusive behaviors of nanoparticles at/across water–oil interfaces via molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wei; Jiao, Yang; Dai, Lenore L., E-mail: Lenore.Dai@asu.edu [Arizona State University, School of Engineering of Matter, Transport, and Energy (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We have employed molecular dynamics simulations to systematically investigate the effects of nanoparticles’ structural and chemical properties on their diffusive behaviors at/across the water–benzene interface. Four different nanoparticles were studied: modified hydrocarbon nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 1.2 nm (1.2HCPs), modified hydrocarbon nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 0.6 nm (0.6HCPs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and buckyballs. We found that the diffusion coefficients of 0.6 and 1.2HCP were larger than the corresponding values predicted using the Stokes–Einstein (SE) equation and attributed this deviation to the small particle size and the anisotropy of the interface system. In addition, the observed directional diffusive behaviors for various particles were well-correlated with the derivative of the potential of mean force (PMF), which might indicate an effective driving force for the particles along the direction perpendicular to the interface. We also found that nanoparticles with isotropic shape and uniform surface, e.g., buckyballs, tend to have smaller diffusion coefficients than those of nanoparticles with comparable dimensions but anisotropic shapes and non-uniform surface composition, e.g., SWCNT and 0.6HCP. One possible hypothesis for this behavior is that the “perfect” isotropic shape and uniform surface of buckyballs result in a better-defined “solvation shell” (i.e., a shell of solution molecules), which leads to a larger “effective radius” of the particle, and thus, a reduced diffusion coefficient.

  13. Measurements of ultrafast spin-profiles and spin-diffusion properties in the domain wall area at a metal/ferromagnetic film interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, T; Ksenzov, D; Capotondi, F; Pedersoli, E; Manfredda, M; Kiskinova, M; Zabel, H; Kläui, M; Lüning, J; Pietsch, U; Gutt, C

    2017-11-08

    Exciting a ferromagnetic material with an ultrashort IR laser pulse is known to induce spin dynamics by heating the spin system and by ultrafast spin diffusion processes. Here, we report on measurements of spin-profiles and spin diffusion properties in the vicinity of domain walls in the interface region between a metallic Al layer and a ferromagnetic Co/Pd thin film upon IR excitation. We followed the ultrafast temporal evolution by means of an ultrafast resonant magnetic scattering experiment in surface scattering geometry, which enables us to exploit the evolution of the domain network within a 1/e distance of 3 nm to 5 nm from the Al/FM film interface. We observe a magnetization-reversal close to the domain wall boundaries that becomes more pronounced closer to the Al/FM film interface. This magnetization-reversal is driven by the different transport properties of majority and minority carriers through a magnetically disordered domain network. Its finite lateral extension has allowed us to measure the ultrafast spin-diffusion coefficients and ultrafast spin velocities for majority and minority carriers upon IR excitation.

  14. Thermal analysis of charring materials based on pyrolysis interface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charring thermal protection systems have been used to protect hypersonic vehicles from high heat loads. The pyrolysis of charring materials is a complicated physical and chemical phenomenon. Based on the pyrolysis interface model, a simulating approach for charring ablation has been designed in order to obtain one dimensional transient thermal behavior of homogeneous charring materials in reentry capsules. As the numerical results indicate, the pyrolysis rate and the surface temperature under a given heat flux rise abruptly in the beginning, then reach a plateau, but the temperature at the bottom rises very slowly to prevent the structural materials from being heated seriously. Pyrolysis mechanism can play an important role in thermal protection systems subjected to serious aerodynamic heat.

  15. Parallelization of a hydrological model using the message passing interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Li, Tiejian; Sun, Liqun; Chen, Ji

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the natural processes, hydrological models such as the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) are becoming larger and more complex with increasing computation time. Additionally, other procedures such as model calibration, which may require thousands of model iterations, can increase running time and thus further reduce rapid modeling and analysis. Using the widely-applied SWAT as an example, this study demonstrates how to parallelize a serial hydrological model in a Windows® environment using a parallel programing technology—Message Passing Interface (MPI). With a case study, we derived the optimal values for the two parameters (the number of processes and the corresponding percentage of work to be distributed to the master process) of the parallel SWAT (P-SWAT) on an ordinary personal computer and a work station. Our study indicates that model execution time can be reduced by 42%–70% (or a speedup of 1.74–3.36) using multiple processes (two to five) with a proper task-distribution scheme (between the master and slave processes). Although the computation time cost becomes lower with an increasing number of processes (from two to five), this enhancement becomes less due to the accompanied increase in demand for message passing procedures between the master and all slave processes. Our case study demonstrates that the P-SWAT with a five-process run may reach the maximum speedup, and the performance can be quite stable (fairly independent of a project size). Overall, the P-SWAT can help reduce the computation time substantially for an individual model run, manual and automatic calibration procedures, and optimization of best management practices. In particular, the parallelization method we used and the scheme for deriving the optimal parameters in this study can be valuable and easily applied to other hydrological or environmental models.

  16. Residual sweeping errors in turbulent particle pair diffusion in a Lagrangian diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nadeem A

    2017-01-01

    Thomson, D. J. & Devenish, B. J. [J. Fluid Mech. 526, 277 (2005)] and others have suggested that sweeping effects make Lagrangian properties in Kinematic Simulations (KS), Fung et al [Fung J. C. H., Hunt J. C. R., Malik N. A. & Perkins R. J. J. Fluid Mech. 236, 281 (1992)], unreliable. However, such a conclusion can only be drawn under the assumption of locality. The major aim here is to quantify the sweeping errors in KS without assuming locality. Through a novel analysis based upon analysing pairs of particle trajectories in a frame of reference moving with the large energy containing scales of motion it is shown that the normalized integrated error [Formula: see text] in the turbulent pair diffusivity (K) due to the sweeping effect decreases with increasing pair separation (σl), such that [Formula: see text] as σl/η → ∞; and [Formula: see text] as σl/η → 0. η is the Kolmogorov turbulence microscale. There is an intermediate range of separations 1 < σl/η < ∞ in which the error [Formula: see text] remains negligible. Simulations using KS shows that in the swept frame of reference, this intermediate range is large covering almost the entire inertial subrange simulated, 1 < σl/η < 105, implying that the deviation from locality observed in KS cannot be atributed to sweeping errors. This is important for pair diffusion theory and modeling. PACS numbers: 47.27.E?, 47.27.Gs, 47.27.jv, 47.27.Ak, 47.27.tb, 47.27.eb, 47.11.-j.

  17. Model for Educational Game Using Natural User Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrulhizam Shapi’i

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural User Interface (NUI is a new approach that has become increasingly popular in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI. The use of this technology is widely used in almost all sectors, including the field of education. In recent years, there are a lot of educational games using NUI technology in the market such as Kinect game. Kinect is a sensor that can recognize body movements, postures, and voices in three dimensions. It enables users to control and interact with game without the need of using game controller. However, the contents of most existing Kinect games do not follow the standard curriculum in classroom, thus making it do not fully achieve the learning objectives. Hence, this research proposes a design model as a guideline in designing educational game using NUI. A prototype has been developed as one of the objectives in this study. The prototype is based on proposed model to ensure and assess the effectiveness of the model. The outcomes of this study conclude that the proposed model contributed to the design method for the development of the educational game using NUI. Furthermore, evaluation results of the prototype show a good response from participant and in line with the standard curriculum.

  18. The brush model - a new approach to numerical modeling of matrix diffusion in fractured clay stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lege, T.; Shao, H.

    1998-01-01

    A special approach for numerical modeling of contaminant transport in fractured clay stone is presented. The rock matrix and the fractures are simulated with individual formulations for FE grids and transport, coupled into a single model. The capacity of the rock matrix to take up contaminants is taken into consideration with a discrete simulation of matrix diffusion. Thus, the natural process of retardation due to matrix diffusion can be better simulated than by a standard introduction of an empirical parameter into the transport equation. Transport in groundwater in fractured clay stone can be simulated using a model called a 'brush model'. The 'brush handle' is discretized by 2-D finite elements. Advective-dispersive transport in groundwater in the fractures is assumed. The contaminant diffuses into 1D finite elements perpendicular to the fractures, i.e., the 'bristles of the brush'. The conclusion is drawn that matrix diffusion is an important property of fractured clay stone for contaminant retardation. (author)

  19. Magnetic properties of the three-dimensional Ising model with an interface amorphization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.; Saber, M.

    1993-09-01

    A three-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model with an interface amorphization is investigated with the use of the effective field theory. Phase diagrams and reduced magnetization curves of interface and bulks are studied. We obtain a number of characteristic behaviour such as the possibility of the reentrant phenomena and a large depression of interface magnetization. (author). 21 refs, 5 figs

  20. Bayesian uncertainty quantification in linear models for diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund, Jens; Eklund, Anders; Özarslan, Evren; Herberthson, Magnus; Bånkestad, Maria; Knutsson, Hans

    2018-03-29

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) is a valuable tool in the assessment of tissue microstructure. By fitting a model to the dMRI signal it is possible to derive various quantitative features. Several of the most popular dMRI signal models are expansions in an appropriately chosen basis, where the coefficients are determined using some variation of least-squares. However, such approaches lack any notion of uncertainty, which could be valuable in e.g. group analyses. In this work, we use a probabilistic interpretation of linear least-squares methods to recast popular dMRI models as Bayesian ones. This makes it possible to quantify the uncertainty of any derived quantity. In particular, for quantities that are affine functions of the coefficients, the posterior distribution can be expressed in closed-form. We simulated measurements from single- and double-tensor models where the correct values of several quantities are known, to validate that the theoretically derived quantiles agree with those observed empirically. We included results from residual bootstrap for comparison and found good agreement. The validation employed several different models: Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), Mean Apparent Propagator MRI (MAP-MRI) and Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD). We also used in vivo data to visualize maps of quantitative features and corresponding uncertainties, and to show how our approach can be used in a group analysis to downweight subjects with high uncertainty. In summary, we convert successful linear models for dMRI signal estimation to probabilistic models, capable of accurate uncertainty quantification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A chaotic model for advertising diffusion problem with competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, W. H.; Yung, K. L.; Wang, Dingwei

    2012-08-01

    In this article, the author extends Dawid and Feichtinger's chaotic advertising diffusion model into the duopoly case. A computer simulation system is used to test this enhanced model. Based on the analysis of simulation results, it is found that the best advertising strategy in duopoly is to increase the advertising investment to reach the best Win-Win situation where the oscillation of market portion will not occur. In order to effectively arrive at the best situation, we define a synthetic index and two thresholds. An estimation method for the parameters of the index and thresholds is proposed in this research. We can reach the Win-Win situation by simply selecting the control parameters to make the synthetic index close to the threshold of min-oscillation state. The numerical example and computational results indicated that the proposed chaotic model is useful to describe and analyse advertising diffusion process in duopoly, it is an efficient tool for the selection and optimisation of advertising strategy.

  2. Modeling the Determinants Influencing the Diffusion of Mobile Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwahaishi, Saleh; Snášel, Václav

    2013-04-01

    Understanding individual acceptance and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is one of the most mature streams of information systems research. In Information Technology and Information System research, numerous theories are used to understand users' adoption of new technologies. Various models were developed including the Innovation Diffusion Theory, Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned Behavior, Technology Acceptance Model, and recently, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. This research composes a new hybrid theoretical framework to identify the factors affecting the acceptance and use of Mobile Internet -as an ICT application- in a consumer context. The proposed model incorporates eight constructs: Performance Expectancy (PE), Effort Expectancy (EE), Facilitating Conditions (FC), Social Influences (SI), Perceived Value (PV), Perceived Playfulness (PP), Attention Focus (AF), and Behavioral intention (BI). Individual differences-namely, age, gender, education, income, and experience are moderating the effects of these constructs on behavioral intention and technology use.

  3. TaskMaster: a prototype graphical user interface to a schedule optimization model

    OpenAIRE

    Banham, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited This thesis investigates the use of current graphical interface techniques to build more effective computer-user interfaces to Operations Research (OR) schedule optimization models. The design is directed at the scheduling decision maker who possesses limited OR experience. The feasibility and validity of building an interface for this kind of user is demonstrated in the development of a prototype graphical user interface called TaskMa...

  4. Computation of diffusion coefficients for waters of Gauthami Godavari estuary using one-dimensional advection-diffusion model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothi, D.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sarma, V.V.; Rao, D.P.

    conditions. As the pollutant load on the estuary increases, the. water quality may deteriorate rapidly and therefore the scientific interests are centered on the analysis of water quality. The pollutants will be subjected to a number of physical, chemical... study we have applied one-dimensional advection-diffusion model for the waters of Gauthami Godavari estuary to determine the axial diffusion coefficients and thereby to predict the impact assessment. The study area (Fig. 1) is the lower most 32 km...

  5. Description of waste pretreatment and interfacing systems dynamic simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbrick, D.J.; Zimmerman, B.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation Model was created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates for both high level and low level waste so that the vitrification of tank waste can be completed according to the milestones defined in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). In order to achieve this objective, the processes upstream and downstream of the pretreatment facilities must also be included. The simulation model starts with retrieval of tank waste and ends with vitrification for both low level and high level wastes. This report describes the results of three simulation cases: one based on suggested average facility processing rates, one with facility rates determined so that approximately 6 new DSTs are required, and one with facility rates determined so that approximately no new DSTs are required. It appears, based on the simulation results, that reasonable facility processing rates can be selected so that no new DSTs are required by the TWRS program. However, this conclusion must be viewed with respect to the modeling assumptions, described in detail in the report. Also included in the report, in an appendix, are results of two sensitivity cases: one with glass plant water recycle steams recycled versus not recycled, and one employing the TPA SST retrieval schedule versus a more uniform SST retrieval schedule. Both recycling and retrieval schedule appear to have a significant impact on overall tank usage

  6. Resistive switching near electrode interfaces: Estimations by a current model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Herbert; Zurhelle, Alexander; Stemmer, Stefanie; Marchewka, Astrid; Waser, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    The growing resistive switching database is accompanied by many detailed mechanisms which often are pure hypotheses. Some of these suggested models can be verified by checking their predictions with the benchmarks of future memory cells. The valence change memory model assumes that the different resistances in ON and OFF states are made by changing the defect density profiles in a sheet near one working electrode during switching. The resulting different READ current densities in ON and OFF states were calculated by using an appropriate simulation model with variation of several important defect and material parameters of the metal/insulator (oxide)/metal thin film stack such as defect density and its profile change in density and thickness, height of the interface barrier, dielectric permittivity, applied voltage. The results were compared to the benchmarks and some memory windows of the varied parameters can be defined: The required ON state READ current density of 105 A/cm2 can only be achieved for barriers smaller than 0.7 eV and defect densities larger than 3 × 1020 cm-3. The required current ratio between ON and OFF states of at least 10 requests defect density reduction of approximately an order of magnitude in a sheet of several nanometers near the working electrode.

  7. Investigation into diffusion induced plastic deformation behavior in hollow lithium ion battery electrode revealed by analytical model and atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Wu, Hong; Liu, Youwen; Wen, Pihua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Diffusion induced stress is established. • Yield stress is dependent upon concentration. • Plastic deformation induced stress lowers tensile stress. • Plastic deformation suppresses crack nucleation. • Plastic deformation occurs not only at lithiated phase but also at electrode interior. - Abstract: This paper is theoretically suggested to describe diffusion induced stress in the elastoplastic hollow spherical silicon electrode for plastic deformation using both analytical model and molecular simulation. Based on the plastic deformation and the yield criterion, we develop this model accounting for the lithium-ion diffusion effect in hollow electrode, focusing on the concentration and stress distributions undergoing lithium-ion insertion. The results show that the two ways, applied compressive stress to inner surface or limited inner surface with higher concentration using biological membranes maintaining concentration difference, lead to the compressive stress induced by the lithium-ion diffusion effect. Hollow spherical electrode reduces effectively diffusion induced stress through controlling and tuning electrode parameters to obtain the reasonably low yield strength. According to MD simulations, plastic deformation phenomenon not only occurs at interface layer of lithiated phase, but also penetrates at electrode interior owning to confinement imposed by lithiated phase. These criteria that radial and hoop stresses reduce dramatically when plastic deformation occurs near the end faces of hollow electrode, may help guide development of new materials for lithium-ion batteries with enhanced mechanical durability, by means of reasonable designing yield strength to maintain mechanical stress below fracture strength, thereby increasing battery life.

  8. Introducing serendipity in a social network model of knowledge diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremonini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Serendipity as a control mechanism for knowledge diffusion in social network. • Local communication enhanced in the periphery of a network. • Prevalence of hub nodes in the network core mitigated. • Potential disruptive effect on network formation of uncontrolled serendipity. - Abstract: In this paper, we study serendipity as a possible strategy to control the behavior of an agent-based network model of knowledge diffusion. The idea of considering serendipity in a strategic way has been first explored in Network Learning and Information Seeking studies. After presenting the major contributions of serendipity studies to digital environments, we discuss the extension to our model: Agents are enriched with random topics for establishing new communication according to different strategies. The results show how important network properties could be influenced, like reducing the prevalence of hubs in the network’s core and increasing local communication in the periphery, similar to the effects of more traditional self-organization methods. Therefore, from this initial study, when serendipity is opportunistically directed, it appears to behave as an effective and applicable approach to social network control.

  9. Zirconium - ab initio modelling of point defects diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasca, Petrica

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium is the main element of the cladding found in pressurized water reactors, under an alloy form. Under irradiation, the cladding elongate significantly, phenomena attributed to the vacancy dislocation loops growth in the basal planes of the hexagonal compact structure. The understanding of the atomic scale mechanisms originating this process motivated this work. Using the ab initio atomic modeling technique we studied the structure and mobility of point defects in Zirconium. This led us to find four interstitial point defects with formation energies in an interval of 0.11 eV. The migration paths study allowed the discovery of activation energies, used as entry parameters for a kinetic Monte Carlo code. This code was developed for calculating the diffusion coefficient of the interstitial point defect. Our results suggest a migration parallel to the basal plane twice as fast as one parallel to the c direction, with an activation energy of 0.08 eV, independent of the direction. The vacancy diffusion coefficient, estimated with a two-jump model, is also anisotropic, with a faster process in the basal planes than perpendicular to them. Hydrogen influence on the vacancy dislocation loops nucleation was also studied, due to recent experimental observations of cladding growth acceleration in the presence of this element [fr

  10. Turing instability for a competitor-competitor-mutualist model with nonlinear cross-diffusion effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Zijuan; Fu, Shengmao

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a strongly coupled reaction-diffusion system modeling a competitor-competitor-mutualist three-species model with diffusion, self-diffusion and nonlinear cross-diffusion and subject to Neumann boundary conditions. First, we establish the persistence of a corresponding reaction-diffusion system without self- and cross-diffusion. Second, the global asymptotic stability of the unique positive equilibrium for weakly coupled PDE system is established by using a comparison method. Moreover, under certain conditions about the intra- and inter-species effects, we prove that the uniform positive steady state is linearly unstable for the cross-diffusion system when one of the cross-diffusions is large enough. The results indicate that Turing instability can be driven solely from strong diffusion effect of the first species (or the second species or the third species) due to the pressure of the second species (or the first species).

  11. Implementation and verification of interface constitutive model in FLAC3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-min Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity of soil-structure interaction, simple constitutive models typically used for interface elements in general computer programs cannot satisfy the requirements of discontinuous deformation analysis of structures that contain different interfaces. In order to simulate the strain-softening characteristics of interfaces, a nonlinear strain-softening interface constitutive model was incorporated into fast Lagrange analysis of continua in three dimensions (FLAC3D through a user-defined program in the FISH environment. A numerical simulation of a direct shear test for geosynthetic interfaces was conducted to verify that the interface model was implemented correctly. Results of the numerical tests show good agreement with the results obtained from theoretical calculations, indicating that the model incorporated into FLAC3D can simulate the nonlinear strain-softening behavior of interfaces involving geosynthetic materials. The results confirmed the validity and reliability of the improved interface model. The procedure and method of implementing an interface constitutive model into a commercial computer program also provide a reference for implementation of a new interface constitutive model in FLAC3D.

  12. Modelling thermal radiation and soot formation in buoyant diffusion flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarco Bull, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    The radiative heat transfer plays an important role in fire problems since it is the dominant mode of heat transfer between flames and surroundings. It controls the pyrolysis, and therefore the heat release rate, and the growth rate of the fire. In the present work a numerical study of buoyant diffusion flames is carried out, with the main objective of modelling the thermal radiative transfer and the soot formation/destruction processes. In a first step, different radiative property models were tested in benchmark configurations. It was found that the FSCK coupled with the Modest and Riazzi mixing scheme was the best compromise in terms of accuracy and computational requirements, and was a good candidate to be implemented in CFD codes dealing with fire problems. In a second step, a semi-empirical soot model, considering acetylene and benzene as precursor species for soot nucleation, was validated in laminar co flow diffusion flames over a wide range of hydrocarbons (C1-C3) and conditions. In addition, the optically-thin approximation was found to produce large discrepancies in the upper part of these small laminar flames. Reliable predictions of soot volume fractions require the use of an advanced radiation model. Then the FSCK and the semi-empirical soot model were applied to simulate laboratory-scale and intermediate-scale pool fires of methane and propane. Predicted flame structures as well as the radiant heat flux transferred to the surroundings were found to be in good agreement with the available experimental data. Finally, the interaction between radiation and turbulence was quantified. (author)

  13. Graphical User Interface for Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, R. Caitlyn

    2009-01-01

    The J-2X Engine (built by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne,) in the Upper Stage of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, will only start within a certain range of temperature and pressure for Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen propellants. The purpose of the Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model is to verify that in all reasonable conditions the temperature and pressure of the propellants are within the required J-2X engine start boxes. In order to run the simulation, test variables must be entered at all reasonable values of parameters such as heat leak and mass flow rate. To make this testing process as efficient as possible in order to save the maximum amount of time and money, and to show that the J-2X engine will start when it is required to do so, a graphical user interface (GUI) was created to allow the input of values to be used as parameters in the Simulink Model, without opening or altering the contents of the model. The GUI must allow for test data to come from Microsoft Excel files, allow those values to be edited before testing, place those values into the Simulink Model, and get the output from the Simulink Model. The GUI was built using MATLAB, and will run the Simulink simulation when the Simulate option is activated. After running the simulation, the GUI will construct a new Microsoft Excel file, as well as a MATLAB matrix file, using the output values for each test of the simulation so that they may graphed and compared to other values.

  14. Electrode-electrolyte interface model of tripolar concentric ring electrode and electrode paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrollaholhosseini, Seyed Hadi; Steele, Preston; Besio, Walter G

    2016-08-01

    Electrodes are used to transform ionic currents to electrical currents in biological systems. Modeling the electrode-electrolyte interface could help to optimize the performance of the electrode interface to achieve higher signal to noise ratios. There are previous reports of accurate models for single-element biomedical electrodes. In this paper we develop a model for the electrode-electrolyte interface for tripolar concentric ring electrodes (TCRE) that are used to record brain signals.

  15. The development of radioactivity diffusion model in global ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M.; Watanabe, H.; Katagiri, H.

    2000-01-01

    The radioactivity diffusion model in global ocean has been developing in order to assess the long-term behavior of radioactive materials for discharge from nuclear facility. The model system consists of two parts. One is to calculate current velocity; and the other is for particle chasing. Both systems are executed by Macintosh personal computer. A lot of techniques to estimate ocean current velocity were investigated in geophysical field. The robust diagnosis model advocated by Sarmiento and Bryan was applied to build the numerical calculation system for getting the current velocity field in global scale. The latitudinal and longitudinal lattices were 2 degrees each and the number of vertical layer was 15. The movement of radioactive materials by current and diffusion were calculated using the particle chasing system. The above-mentioned current velocity field and the initial particle positions at will were read by the system. The movement of a particle was calculated using the interpolated current data step by step. The diffusion of a particle was calculated by random walk method. The model was verified by using the fallout data from atmospheric nuclear test. Yearly and latitudinal fallout data was adopted from UNSCEAR1977. The calculation result was compared with the observation data that includes total amount and vertical profile of Cs-137 and Pu-239,240 in the North Pacific Ocean. The result of the verification was agreed with the following general knowledge. Though the fallout amount between 40N and 50N was the biggest in the world, the amount in the seawater between 40N and 50N was smaller than that in south of 40N because of horizontal transportation, which carried water from north to south. As for vertical profile, Cs-137 could be accurately calculated except the surface layer. However the observation peak of Pu-239,240 existed deeper than the calculation peak. This model could calculate the vertical profile of Cs-137 because most of Cs exists as dissolved

  16. Pre-Clinical Models of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren J Becher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG is a rare and incurable brain tumor that arises in the brainstem of children predominantly between the ages of six and eight. Its intricate morphology and involvement of normal pons tissue precludes surgical resection, and the standard of care today remains fractionated radiation alone. In the past 30 years, there have been no significant advances made in the treatment of DIPG. This is largely because we lack good models of DIPG and therefore have little biological basis for treatment. In recent years however, due to increased biopsy and acquisition of autopsy specimens, research is beginning to unravel the genetic and epigenetic drivers of DIPG. Insight gleaned from these studies has led to improvements in approaches to both model these tumors in the lab, as well as to potentially treat them in the clinic. This review will detail the initial strides towards modeling DIPG in animals, which included allograft and xenograft rodent models using non-DIPG glioma cells. Important advances in the field came with the development of in vitro cell and in vivo xenograft models derived directly from autopsy material of DIPG patients or from human embryonic stem cells. Lastly, we will summarize the progress made in the development of genetically engineered mouse models of DIPG. Cooperation of studies incorporating all of these modeling systems to both investigate the unique mechanisms of gliomagenesis in the brainstem and to test potential novel therapeutic agents in a preclinical setting will result in improvement in treatments for DIPG patients.

  17. Mathematical and Simulation Modelling of Moisture Diffusion Mechanism during Plastic IC Packages Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Mou; Dong Xiang; Guanghong Duan

    2013-01-01

    Reuse of plastic IC packages disassembled from printed circuit boards (PCBs) has significant environmental benefits and economic value. The interface delamination caused by moisture diffusion is the main failure mode of IC packages during the disassembling process, which greatly reduces the reusability and reliability of disassembled IC packages. Exploring moisture diffusion mechanism is a prerequisite to optimize prebaking processes before disassembling that is an effective way to avoid the ...

  18. Rigorous Multicomponent Reactive Separations Modelling: Complete Consideration of Reaction-Diffusion Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, A.; Meyer, M.; Rouzineau, D.; Prevost, M.; Alix, P.; Laloue, N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives the first step of the development of a rigorous multicomponent reactive separation model. Such a model is highly essential to further the optimization of acid gases removal plants (CO 2 capture, gas treating, etc.) in terms of size and energy consumption, since chemical solvents are conventionally used. Firstly, two main modelling approaches are presented: the equilibrium-based and the rate-based approaches. Secondly, an extended rate-based model with rigorous modelling methodology for diffusion-reaction phenomena is proposed. The film theory and the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations are used in order to characterize multicomponent interactions. The complete chain of chemical reactions is taken into account. The reactions can be kinetically controlled or at chemical equilibrium, and they are considered for both liquid film and liquid bulk. Thirdly, the method of numerical resolution is described. Coupling the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations with chemical equilibrium equations leads to a highly non-linear Differential-Algebraic Equations system known as DAE index 3. The set of equations is discretized with finite-differences as its integration by Gear method is complex. The resulting algebraic system is resolved by the Newton- Raphson method. Finally, the present model and the associated methods of numerical resolution are validated for the example of esterification of methanol. This archetype non-electrolytic system permits an interesting analysis of reaction impact on mass transfer, especially near the phase interface. The numerical resolution of the model by Newton-Raphson method gives good results in terms of calculation time and convergence. The simulations show that the impact of reactions at chemical equilibrium and that of kinetically controlled reactions with high kinetics on mass transfer is relatively similar. Moreover, the Fick's law is less adapted for multicomponent mixtures where some abnormalities such as counter-diffusion

  19. A Jump Diffusion Model for Volatility and Duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Pelletier, Denis

    by the market microstructure theory. Traditional measures of volatility do not utilize durations. I adopt a jump diffusion process to model the persistence of intraday volatility and conditional duration, and their interdependence. The jump component is disentangled from the continuous part of the price......, volatility and conditional duration process. I develop a MCMC algorithm for the inference of irregularly spaced multivariate process with jumps. The algorithm provides smoothed estimates of the latent variables such as spot volatility, jump times and jump sizes. I apply this model to IBM data and I find...... meaningful relationship between volatility and conditional duration. Also, jumps play an important role in the total variation, but the jump variation is smaller than traditional measures that use returns sampled at lower frequency....

  20. Decomposition in aluminium alloys: diffuse scattering and crystal modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam-Malik, A.

    1995-01-01

    In the present study the microstructure of metastable precipitates in Al-Ag and Al-Cu, so called pre-precipitates or Guinier-Preston (GP) zones, was investigated. In both systems important aspects of the microstructure are still controversially discussed. In Al-Ag two forms of GP zones are suggested; depending on the aging temperatures above or below about 443 K, ε- or η-zones should evolve. Differences between these two types of zones may be due to differences in internal order and/or composition. In Al-Cu the characterization of GP I zones is difficult because of the strong atomic displacements around the zones. The proper separation of short-range order and displacement scattering within a diffuse scattering experiment is still under discussion. The technique used to determine the short-range order in both alloys was diffuse scattering with neutrons and X-rays. To separate short-range order and displacement scattering, the methods of Georgopoulos-Cohen (X-ray scattering) and Borie-Sparks (neutron scattering) were used. Of main importance is the optimization of the scattering contrast and thus the scattering contribution due to short-range order. Short-range order scattering is rationalized in terms of pair correlations. Crystals may subsequently be modelled to visualize the microstructure. The Al-Ag system was investigated by diffuse X-ray wide-angle scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. The small-angle neutron scattering measurement was necessary since the GP zones in Al-Ag are almost spherical and the main scattering contribution is found close to the origin of reciprocal space. The small-angle scattering is not that important in the case of Al-Cu because the main scattering extends along (100) owing to the planar character of the GP I zones on (100) lattice planes. (author) 24 figs., 10 tabs., refs

  1. Modeling Periodic Impulsive Effects on Online TV Series Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peihua; Zhu, Anding; Fang, Qiwen; Wang, Xi

    Online broadcasting substantially affects the production, distribution, and profit of TV series. In addition, online word-of-mouth significantly affects the diffusion of TV series. Because on-demand streaming rates are the most important factor that influences the earnings of online video suppliers, streaming statistics and forecasting trends are valuable. In this paper, we investigate the effects of periodic impulsive stimulation and pre-launch promotion on on-demand streaming dynamics. We consider imbalanced audience feverish distribution using an impulsive susceptible-infected-removed(SIR)-like model. In addition, we perform a correlation analysis of online buzz volume based on Baidu Index data. We propose a PI-SIR model to evolve audience dynamics and translate them into on-demand streaming fluctuations, which can be observed and comprehended by online video suppliers. Six South Korean TV series datasets are used to test the model. We develop a coarse-to-fine two-step fitting scheme to estimate the model parameters, first by fitting inter-period accumulation and then by fitting inner-period feverish distribution. We find that audience members display similar viewing habits. That is, they seek new episodes every update day but fade away. This outcome means that impulsive intensity plays a crucial role in on-demand streaming diffusion. In addition, the initial audience size and online buzz are significant factors. On-demand streaming fluctuation is highly correlated with online buzz fluctuation. To stimulate audience attention and interpersonal diffusion, it is worthwhile to invest in promotion near update days. Strong pre-launch promotion is also a good marketing tool to improve overall performance. It is not advisable for online video providers to promote several popular TV series on the same update day. Inter-period accumulation is a feasible forecasting tool to predict the future trend of the on-demand streaming amount. The buzz in public social communities

  2. Modeling Periodic Impulsive Effects on Online TV Series Diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihua Fu

    Full Text Available Online broadcasting substantially affects the production, distribution, and profit of TV series. In addition, online word-of-mouth significantly affects the diffusion of TV series. Because on-demand streaming rates are the most important factor that influences the earnings of online video suppliers, streaming statistics and forecasting trends are valuable. In this paper, we investigate the effects of periodic impulsive stimulation and pre-launch promotion on on-demand streaming dynamics. We consider imbalanced audience feverish distribution using an impulsive susceptible-infected-removed(SIR-like model. In addition, we perform a correlation analysis of online buzz volume based on Baidu Index data.We propose a PI-SIR model to evolve audience dynamics and translate them into on-demand streaming fluctuations, which can be observed and comprehended by online video suppliers. Six South Korean TV series datasets are used to test the model. We develop a coarse-to-fine two-step fitting scheme to estimate the model parameters, first by fitting inter-period accumulation and then by fitting inner-period feverish distribution.We find that audience members display similar viewing habits. That is, they seek new episodes every update day but fade away. This outcome means that impulsive intensity plays a crucial role in on-demand streaming diffusion. In addition, the initial audience size and online buzz are significant factors. On-demand streaming fluctuation is highly correlated with online buzz fluctuation.To stimulate audience attention and interpersonal diffusion, it is worthwhile to invest in promotion near update days. Strong pre-launch promotion is also a good marketing tool to improve overall performance. It is not advisable for online video providers to promote several popular TV series on the same update day. Inter-period accumulation is a feasible forecasting tool to predict the future trend of the on-demand streaming amount. The buzz in public

  3. Modeling Periodic Impulsive Effects on Online TV Series Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qiwen; Wang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Background Online broadcasting substantially affects the production, distribution, and profit of TV series. In addition, online word-of-mouth significantly affects the diffusion of TV series. Because on-demand streaming rates are the most important factor that influences the earnings of online video suppliers, streaming statistics and forecasting trends are valuable. In this paper, we investigate the effects of periodic impulsive stimulation and pre-launch promotion on on-demand streaming dynamics. We consider imbalanced audience feverish distribution using an impulsive susceptible-infected-removed(SIR)-like model. In addition, we perform a correlation analysis of online buzz volume based on Baidu Index data. Methods We propose a PI-SIR model to evolve audience dynamics and translate them into on-demand streaming fluctuations, which can be observed and comprehended by online video suppliers. Six South Korean TV series datasets are used to test the model. We develop a coarse-to-fine two-step fitting scheme to estimate the model parameters, first by fitting inter-period accumulation and then by fitting inner-period feverish distribution. Results We find that audience members display similar viewing habits. That is, they seek new episodes every update day but fade away. This outcome means that impulsive intensity plays a crucial role in on-demand streaming diffusion. In addition, the initial audience size and online buzz are significant factors. On-demand streaming fluctuation is highly correlated with online buzz fluctuation. Conclusion To stimulate audience attention and interpersonal diffusion, it is worthwhile to invest in promotion near update days. Strong pre-launch promotion is also a good marketing tool to improve overall performance. It is not advisable for online video providers to promote several popular TV series on the same update day. Inter-period accumulation is a feasible forecasting tool to predict the future trend of the on-demand streaming amount

  4. Des interfaces intelligentes pour les modèles de gisements Intelligent Interfaces for Reservoir Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucchini P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les codes de simulation numérique nécessitent souvent l'entrée de données nombreuses et variées. Nous présentons un programme interactif d'aide à la constitution d'un jeu de données pour un modèle de simulation de l'évolution des fluides dans un gisement d'hydrocarbures pendant son exploitation. Nous avons utilisé un moteur d'inférences et un générateur d'écrans de saisie pour écrire cette interface. Cette approche comporte de nombreux avantages concernant la qualité du logiciel produit : fiabilité, extensibilité, facilité d'utilisation, etc. L'utilisation combinée de règles d'expertise et d'un langage orienté objet offre de nouvelles perspectives qui sont étudiées. En conclusion, nous proposons l'extension de cette démarche pour développer une interface commune aux logiciels en Exploration - Production. Numerical simulation software often needs many input data having different natures. This article describes an interactive software that is of help in building the input data fill needed by oil reservoir simulators. A professional inference engine has been used to build this interface. This approach offers many advantages concerning the quality of the software produced, i. e. reliability, extensibility, user friendliness, etc. New prospects opened up by the mixed use of expertise rules and object-oriented languages are pointed out. The conclusion emphasizes the extension of this approach to the development of a common interface for exploration-production software.

  5. Designing, Modeling, Constructing, and Testing a Flat Panel Speaker and Sound Diffuser for a Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, model, build, and test a flat panel speaker and frame for a spherical dome structure being made into a simulator. The simulator will be a test bed for evaluating an immersive environment for human interfaces. This project focused on the loud speakers and a sound diffuser for the dome. The rest of the team worked on an Ambisonics 3D sound system, video projection system, and multi-direction treadmill to create the most realistic scene possible. The main programs utilized in this project, were Pro-E and COMSOL. Pro-E was used for creating detailed figures for the fabrication of a frame that held a flat panel loud speaker. The loud speaker was made from a thin sheet of Plexiglas and 4 acoustic exciters. COMSOL, a multiphysics finite analysis simulator, was used to model and evaluate all stages of the loud speaker, frame, and sound diffuser. Acoustical testing measurements were utilized to create polar plots from the working prototype which were then compared to the COMSOL simulations to select the optimal design for the dome. The final goal of the project was to install the flat panel loud speaker design in addition to a sound diffuser on to the wall of the dome. After running tests in COMSOL on various speaker configurations, including a warped Plexiglas version, the optimal speaker design included a flat piece of Plexiglas with a rounded frame to match the curvature of the dome. Eight of these loud speakers will be mounted into an inch and a half of high performance acoustic insulation, or Thinsulate, that will cover the inside of the dome. The following technical paper discusses these projects and explains the engineering processes used, knowledge gained, and the projected future goals of this project

  6. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called "giant fluctuations" of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power -4 of the wavenumber-except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  7. Modelling of diffusion from equilibrium diffraction fluctuations in ordered phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arapaki, E.; Argyrakis, P.; Tringides, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of the collective diffusion coefficient D c at equilibrium are difficult because they are based on monitoring low amplitude concentration fluctuations generated spontaneously, that are difficult to measure experimentally. A new experimental method has been recently used to measure time-dependent correlation functions from the diffraction intensity fluctuations and was applied to measure thermal step fluctuations. The method has not been applied yet to measure superstructure intensity fluctuations in surface overlayers and to extract D c . With Monte Carlo simulations we study equilibrium fluctuations in Ising lattice gas models with nearest neighbor attractive and repulsive interactions. The extracted diffusion coefficients are compared to the ones obtained from equilibrium methods. The new results are in good agreement with the results from the other methods, i.e., D c decreases monotonically with coverage Θ for attractive interactions and increases monotonically with Θ for repulsive interactions. Even the absolute value of D c agrees well with the results obtained with the probe area method. These results confirm that this diffraction based method is a novel, reliable way to measure D c especially within the ordered region of the phase diagram when the superstructure spot has large intensity

  8. Modeling of interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, O.I.; Knyazheva, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    A model of the interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron during rapid thermal annealing of silicon layers previously amorphized by implantation of germanium has been proposed. It is supposed that the boron interstitials are created continuously during annealing due to generation, dissolution, or rearrangement of the clusters of impurity atoms which are formed in the ion-implanted layers with impurity concentration above the solubility limit. The local elastic stresses arising due to the difference of boron atomic radius and atomic radius of silicon also contribute to the generation of boron interstitials. A simulation of boron redistribution during thermal annealing for 60 s at a temperature of 850 C has been carried out. The calculated profile agrees well with the experimental data. A number of the parameters of interstitial diffusion have been derived. In particular, the average migration length of nonequilibrium boron interstitials is equal to 12 nm. It was also obtained that approximately 1.94% of boron atoms were converted to the interstitial sites, participated in the fast interstitial migration, and then became immobile again transferring into a substitutional position or forming the electrically inactive complexes with crystal lattice defects. (authors)

  9. Analytical model of diffuse reflectance spectrum of skin tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M; Firago, V A [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus); Sobchuk, A N [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2014-01-31

    We have derived simple analytical expressions that enable highly accurate calculation of diffusely reflected light signals of skin in the spectral range from 450 to 800 nm at a distance from the region of delivery of exciting radiation. The expressions, taking into account the dependence of the detected signals on the refractive index, transport scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy factor of the medium, have been obtained in the approximation of a two-layer medium model (epidermis and dermis) for the same parameters of light scattering but different absorption coefficients of layers. Numerical experiments on the retrieval of the skin biophysical parameters from the diffuse reflectance spectra simulated by the Monte Carlo method show that commercially available fibre-optic spectrophotometers with a fixed distance between the radiation source and detector can reliably determine the concentration of bilirubin, oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin in the dermis tissues and the tissue structure parameter characterising the size of its effective scatterers. We present the examples of quantitative analysis of the experimental data, confirming the correctness of estimates of biophysical parameters of skin using the obtained analytical expressions. (biophotonics)

  10. Nonequilibrium two-dimensional Ising model with stationary uphill diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, Matteo; Giardinà, Cristian; Giberti, Claudio; Vernia, Cecilia

    2018-03-01

    Usually, in a nonequilibrium setting, a current brings mass from the highest density regions to the lowest density ones. Although rare, the opposite phenomenon (known as "uphill diffusion") has also been observed in multicomponent systems, where it appears as an artificial effect of the interaction among components. We show here that uphill diffusion can be a substantial effect, i.e., it may occur even in single component systems as a consequence of some external work. To this aim we consider the two-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model in contact with two reservoirs that fix, at the left and the right boundaries, magnetizations of the same magnitude but of opposite signs.We provide numerical evidence that a class of nonequilibrium steady states exists in which, by tuning the reservoir magnetizations, the current in the system changes from "downhill" to "uphill". Moreover, we also show that, in such nonequilibrium setup, the current vanishes when the reservoir magnetization attains a value approaching, in the large volume limit, the magnetization of the equilibrium dynamics, thus establishing a relation between equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties.

  11. Study of superionic conductors dynamics by continued diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennai, M.

    1993-12-01

    The superionic conductors form a special category of solids characterized by their remarkable transport properties and are in general, Simplified as being constituted by the superposition of two inter penetrable crystal lattices. The ions of the first one form a rigid structure through which the other ions of opposite charge diffuse in quasi-liquid way. Basing on experimental and theoretical arguments, it was proved necessary to adopt a model of N-body continued diffusion which the basic theory is that of brownian movement. This thesis deals with the study of the dynamic structure factor S (q,w) and its line half width by the method of development in continued fractions issued from the Mori theory. With regard to the analytical difficulty met at the time of the static correlations functions calculation, the homogeneous approximation was applied and the notion of effective strength was introduced. So, it was obtained general relationships which give the static correlation functions, only in term of the static structure factor of liquids and effective potential. 98 refs.; 22 figs. (F.M.)

  12. Postural control model interpretation of stabilogram diffusion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Collins and De Luca [Collins JJ. De Luca CJ (1993) Exp Brain Res 95: 308-318] introduced a new method known as stabilogram diffusion analysis that provides a quantitative statistical measure of the apparently random variations of center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories recorded during quiet upright stance in humans. This analysis generates a stabilogram diffusion function (SDF) that summarizes the mean square COP displacement as a function of the time interval between COP comparisons. SDFs have a characteristic two-part form that suggests the presence of two different control regimes: a short-term open-loop control behavior and a longer-term closed-loop behavior. This paper demonstrates that a very simple closed-loop control model of upright stance can generate realistic SDFs. The model consists of an inverted pendulum body with torque applied at the ankle joint. This torque includes a random disturbance torque and a control torque. The control torque is a function of the deviation (error signal) between the desired upright body position and the actual body position, and is generated in proportion to the error signal, the derivative of the error signal, and the integral of the error signal [i.e. a proportional, integral and derivative (PID) neural controller]. The control torque is applied with a time delay representing conduction, processing, and muscle activation delays. Variations in the PID parameters and the time delay generate variations in SDFs that mimic real experimental SDFs. This model analysis allows one to interpret experimentally observed changes in SDFs in terms of variations in neural controller and time delay parameters rather than in terms of open-loop versus closed-loop behavior.

  13. Differences in Gaussian diffusion tensor imaging and non-Gaussian diffusion kurtosis imaging model-based estimates of diffusion tensor invariants in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzafame, S; Giannelli, M; Garaci, F; Floris, R; Duggento, A; Guerrisi, M; Toschi, N

    2016-05-01

    An increasing number of studies have aimed to compare diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-related parameters [e.g., mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD)] to complementary new indexes [e.g., mean kurtosis (MK)/radial kurtosis (RK)/axial kurtosis (AK)] derived through diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in terms of their discriminative potential about tissue disease-related microstructural alterations. Given that the DTI and DKI models provide conceptually and quantitatively different estimates of the diffusion tensor, which can also depend on fitting routine, the aim of this study was to investigate model- and algorithm-dependent differences in MD/FA/RD/AD and anisotropy mode (MO) estimates in diffusion-weighted imaging of human brain white matter. The authors employed (a) data collected from 33 healthy subjects (20-59 yr, F: 15, M: 18) within the Human Connectome Project (HCP) on a customized 3 T scanner, and (b) data from 34 healthy subjects (26-61 yr, F: 5, M: 29) acquired on a clinical 3 T scanner. The DTI model was fitted to b-value =0 and b-value =1000 s/mm(2) data while the DKI model was fitted to data comprising b-value =0, 1000 and 3000/2500 s/mm(2) [for dataset (a)/(b), respectively] through nonlinear and weighted linear least squares algorithms. In addition to MK/RK/AK maps, MD/FA/MO/RD/AD maps were estimated from both models and both algorithms. Using tract-based spatial statistics, the authors tested the null hypothesis of zero difference between the two MD/FA/MO/RD/AD estimates in brain white matter for both datasets and both algorithms. DKI-derived MD/FA/RD/AD and MO estimates were significantly higher and lower, respectively, than corresponding DTI-derived estimates. All voxelwise differences extended over most of the white matter skeleton. Fractional differences between the two estimates [(DKI - DTI)/DTI] of most invariants were seen to vary with the invariant value itself as well as with MK

  14. Using cognitive modeling to improve the man-machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, R.A.; Zyduck, R.C.; Johnson, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    A group of utilities from the Westinghouse Owners Group was formed in early 1980 to examine the interface requirements and to determine how they could be implemented. The products available from the major vendors were examined early in 1980 and judged not to be completely applicable. The utility group then decided to develop its own specifications for a Safety Assessment System (SAS) and, later in 1980, contracted with a company to develop the system, prepare the software and demonstrate the system on a simulator. The resulting SAS is a state-of-the-art system targeted for implementation on pressurized water reactor nuclear units. It has been designed to provide control room operators with centralized and easily understandable information from a computer-based data and display system. This paper gives an overview of the SAS plus a detailed description of one of its functional areas - called AIDS. The AIDS portion of SAS is an advanced concept which uses cognitive modeling of the operator as the basis for its design

  15. Computational modelling for diffusion of neutrons problems inside nuclear multiplying medium on bidimensional cartesian rectangular geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Nozimar do

    2003-01-01

    Diffusion theory is traditionally applied to nuclear reactor global calculations. Based on the good results generated by the one-dimensional spectral nodal diffusion (SND) method for benchmark problems, we offer the SND method for nuclear reactor global calculations in X,Y geometry. In this method, the continuity equation and Flick law are transverse integrated in each spatial direction leading to a system of two 'one-dimensional' equations coupled by the transverse leakage terms. We then apply the SND method to numerically solve this system with constant approximations for the transverse leakage terms. We perform a spectral analysis to determine the local general solution of each 'one-dimensional' nodal equation with flat approximation for the transverse leakages. We used special auxiliary equations with parameters that are to be determined in order to preserve the analytical general solutions in the numerical algorithm. By considering continuity conditions at the node interfaces and appropriate boundary conditions, we obtain a solvable system of discretized equations involving the node-edge average scalar fluxes at each estimate of the dominant eigenvalue (k eff ) in the outer power iterations. As we considered approximations to the transverse leakages, the SND method is not free of spatial truncation errors. Nevertheless, it generated good results for the typical model problems that we considered. (author)

  16. Individual differences in emotion word processing: A diffusion model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christina J; Kuchinke, Lars

    2016-06-01

    The exploratory study investigated individual differences in implicit processing of emotional words in a lexical decision task. A processing advantage for positive words was observed, and differences between happy and fear-related words in response times were predicted by individual differences in specific variables of emotion processing: Whereas more pronounced goal-directed behavior was related to a specific slowdown in processing of fear-related words, the rate of spontaneous eye blinks (indexing brain dopamine levels) was associated with a processing advantage of happy words. Estimating diffusion model parameters revealed that the drift rate (rate of information accumulation) captures unique variance of processing differences between happy and fear-related words, with highest drift rates observed for happy words. Overall emotion recognition ability predicted individual differences in drift rates between happy and fear-related words. The findings emphasize that a significant amount of variance in emotion processing is explained by individual differences in behavioral data.

  17. Reaction-diffusion modeling of hydrogen in beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensing, Mirko; Matveev, Dmitry; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium will be used as first-wall material for the future fusion reactor ITER as well as in the breeding blanket of DEMO. In both cases it is important to understand the mechanisms of hydrogen retention in beryllium. In earlier experiments with beryllium low-energy binding states of hydrogen were observed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) which are not yet well understood. Two candidates for these states are considered: beryllium-hydride phases within the bulk and surface effects. The retention of deuterium in beryllium is studied by a reaction rate approach using a coupled reaction diffusion system (CRDS)-model relying on ab initio data from density functional theory calculations (DFT). In this contribution we try to assess the influence of surface recombination.

  18. Analytical model for the effects of wetting on thermal boundary conductance across solid/classical liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, Matthew E.; Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    We develop an analytical model for the thermal boundary conductance between a solid and a liquid. By infusing recent developments in the phonon theory of liquid thermodynamics with diffuse mismatch theory, we derive a closed form model that can predict the effects of wetting on the thermal boundary conductance across an interface between a solid and a classical liquid. We account for the complete wetting (hydrophilicity), or lack thereof (hydrophobicity), of the liquid to the solid by considering varying contributions of transverse mode interactions between the solid and liquid interfacial layers; this transverse coupling relationship is determined with local density of states calculations from molecular dynamics simulations between Lennard-Jones solids and a liquids with different interfacial interaction energies. We present example calculations for the thermal boundary conductance between both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces of Al/water and Au/water, which show excellent agreement with measured values reported by Ge et al. [Z. Ge, D. G. Cahill, and P. V. Braun, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 186101 (2006)]. Our model does not require any fitting parameters and is appropriate to model heat flow across any planar interface between a solid and a classical liquid.

  19. Modeling of immision from power plants using stream-diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanevce, Lj.; Kanevce, G.; Markoski, A.

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of simple empirical and integral immision models, comparing with complex three dimensional differential models is given. Complex differential models needs huge computer power, so they can't be useful for practical engineering calculations. In this paper immision modeling, using stream-diffusion approach is presented. Process of dispersion is divided into two parts. First part is called stream part, it's near the source of the pollutants, and it's presented with defected turbulent jet in wind field. This part finished when the velocity of stream (jet) becomes equal with wind speed. Boundary conditions in the end of the first part, are initial for the second, called diffusion part, which is modeling with tri dimensional diffusion equation. Gradient of temperature, wind speed profile and coefficient of diffusion in this model must not be constants, they can change with the height. Presented model is much simpler than the complete meteorological differential models which calculates whole fields of meteorological parameters. Also, it is more complex and gives more valuable results for dispersion of pollutants from widely used integral and empirical models

  20. Modelling thermal radiation in buoyant turbulent diffusion flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvi, J. L.; Demarco, R.; Fuentes, A.

    2012-10-01

    This work focuses on the numerical modelling of radiative heat transfer in laboratory-scale buoyant turbulent diffusion flames. Spectral gas and soot radiation is modelled by using the Full-Spectrum Correlated-k (FSCK) method. Turbulence-Radiation Interactions (TRI) are taken into account by considering the Optically-Thin Fluctuation Approximation (OTFA), the resulting time-averaged Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) being solved by the Finite Volume Method (FVM). Emission TRIs and the mean absorption coefficient are then closed by using a presumed probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction. The mean gas flow field is modelled by the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes (FANS) equation set closed by a buoyancy-modified k-ɛ model with algebraic stress/flux models (ASM/AFM), the Steady Laminar Flamelet (SLF) model coupled with a presumed pdf approach to account for Turbulence-Chemistry Interactions, and an acetylene-based semi-empirical two-equation soot model. Two sets of experimental pool fire data are used for validation: propane pool fires 0.3 m in diameter with Heat Release Rates (HRR) of 15, 22 and 37 kW and methane pool fires 0.38 m in diameter with HRRs of 34 and 176 kW. Predicted flame structures, radiant fractions, and radiative heat fluxes on surrounding surfaces are found in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data across all the flames. In addition further computations indicate that, for the present flames, the gray approximation can be applied for soot with a minor influence on the results, resulting in a substantial gain in Computer Processing Unit (CPU) time when the FSCK is used to treat gas radiation.

  1. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedke, Bartosz

    2011-01-01

    Self-organization of regular surface pattern under ion beam erosion was described in detail by Navez in 1962. Several years later in 1986 Bradley and Harper (BH) published the first self-consistent theory on this phenomenon based on the competition of surface roughening described by Sigmund's sputter theory and surface smoothing by Mullins-Herring diffusion. Many papers that followed BH theory introduced other processes responsible for the surface patterning e.g. viscous flow, redeposition, phase separation, preferential sputtering, etc. The present understanding is still not sufficient to specify the dominant driving forces responsible for self-organization. 3D atomistic simulations can improve the understanding by reproducing the pattern formation with the detailed microscopic description of the driving forces. 2D simulations published so far can contribute to this understanding only partially. A novel program package for 3D atomistic simulations called TRIDER (TRansport of Ions in matter with DEfect Relaxation), which unifies full collision cascade simulation with atomistic relaxation processes, has been developed. The collision cascades are provided by simulations based on the Binary Collision Approximation, and the relaxation processes are simulated with the 3D lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method. This allows, without any phenomenological model, a full 3D atomistic description on experimental spatiotemporal scales. Recently discussed new mechanisms of surface patterning like ballistic mass drift or the dependence of the local morphology on sputtering yield are inherently included in our atomistic approach. The atomistic 3D simulations do not depend so much on experimental assumptions like reported 2D simulations or continuum theories. The 3D computer experiments can even be considered as 'cleanest' possible experiments for checking continuum theories. This work aims mainly at the methodology of a novel atomistic approach, showing that: (i) In general

  2. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedke, Bartosz

    2011-03-24

    Self-organization of regular surface pattern under ion beam erosion was described in detail by Navez in 1962. Several years later in 1986 Bradley and Harper (BH) published the first self-consistent theory on this phenomenon based on the competition of surface roughening described by Sigmund's sputter theory and surface smoothing by Mullins-Herring diffusion. Many papers that followed BH theory introduced other processes responsible for the surface patterning e.g. viscous flow, redeposition, phase separation, preferential sputtering, etc. The present understanding is still not sufficient to specify the dominant driving forces responsible for self-organization. 3D atomistic simulations can improve the understanding by reproducing the pattern formation with the detailed microscopic description of the driving forces. 2D simulations published so far can contribute to this understanding only partially. A novel program package for 3D atomistic simulations called TRIDER (TRansport of Ions in matter with DEfect Relaxation), which unifies full collision cascade simulation with atomistic relaxation processes, has been developed. The collision cascades are provided by simulations based on the Binary Collision Approximation, and the relaxation processes are simulated with the 3D lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method. This allows, without any phenomenological model, a full 3D atomistic description on experimental spatiotemporal scales. Recently discussed new mechanisms of surface patterning like ballistic mass drift or the dependence of the local morphology on sputtering yield are inherently included in our atomistic approach. The atomistic 3D simulations do not depend so much on experimental assumptions like reported 2D simulations or continuum theories. The 3D computer experiments can even be considered as 'cleanest' possible experiments for checking continuum theories. This work aims mainly at the methodology of a novel atomistic approach, showing that: (i) In

  3. Agent-based Modeling Automated: Data-driven Generation of Innovation Diffusion Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, T.; Chappin, E.J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation modeling is useful to gain insights into driving mechanisms of diffusion of innovations. This study aims to introduce automation to make identification of such mechanisms with agent-based simulation modeling less costly in time and labor. We present a novel automation procedure in which

  4. Technology diffusion in energy-economy models: The case of Danish vintage models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation. This paper examines the effect on aggregate energy efficiency of using technological vintage models to describe technology diffusion. The focus is on short- to medium-term issues. Three different models of Danish energy supply and demand are used to illustrate...

  5. Charge loss experiments in surface channel CCD's explained by the McWhorter interface states model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning De Vries, R.G.M.; Wallinga, Hans

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the McWhorter interface states model the CCD charge loss is derived as a function of bias charge, signal charge and channel width. As opposed to existing models, the charge loss is now attributed to interface states in the entire gate area, even for high bias charge levels.

  6. Nanoreinforced polymer composites: 3D FEM modeling with effective interface concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.W.; Zhou, H.W.; Peng, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    modeling. The generalized effective interface model, with two layers of different stiffnesses and the option of overlapping layers is developed here. The effects of the effective interface properties, particle sizes, particle shapes (spherical, cylindrical, ellipsoidal and disc-shaped) and volume fraction...

  7. Introducing a new open source GIS user interface for the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is a robust watershed modelling tool. It typically uses the ArcSWAT interface to create its inputs. ArcSWAT is public domain software which works in the licensed ArcGIS environment. The aim of this paper was to develop an open source user interface ...

  8. Mechanism to synthesize a ‘moving optical mark’ at solid-ambient interface for the estimation of thermal diffusivity of solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settu Balachandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel mechanism is proposed, involving a novel interaction between solid-sample supporting unsteady heat flow with its ambient-humidity; invokes phase transformation of water-vapour molecule and synthesize a ‘moving optical-mark’ at sample-ambient-interface. Under tailored condition, optical-mark exhibits a characteristic macro-scale translatory motion governed by thermal diffusivity of solid. For various step-temperature inputs via cooling, position-dependent velocities of moving optical-mark are measured at a fixed distance. A new approach is proposed. ‘Product of velocity of optical-mark and distance’ versus ‘non-dimensional velocity’ is plotted. The slope reveals thermal diffusivity of solid at ambient-temperature; preliminary results obtained for Quartz-glass is closely matching with literature.

  9. Thermally induced atomic diffusion at the interface between release agent coating and mould substrate in a glass moulding press

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Jun; Fukase, Yasushi [Toshiba Machine Co., Ltd, Ooka 2068-3, Numazu-Shi, Shizuoka-Ken, 410-8510 (Japan); Yan Jiwang; Zhou Tianfeng; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto, E-mail: yanjw@pm.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-01, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    In a glass moulding press (GMP) for refractive/diffractive hybrid lenses, to improve the service life of nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) plated moulds, it is necessary to control the diffusion of constituent elements from the mould into the release agent coating. In this study, diffusion phenomena of constituents of Ni-P plating are investigated for two types of release agent coatings, iridium-platinum (Ir-Pt) and iridium-rhenium (Ir-Re), by cross-sectional observation, compositional analysis and stress measurements. The results show that Ni atoms in the plating layer flow from regions of compressive stress to regions of tensile stress. In the case of the Ir-Pt coated mould, the diffusion of Ni is promoted from the grain boundaries between the Ni and Ni{sub 3}P phases in the plating towards the surface of the Ir-Pt coating. However, in the Ir-Re coated mould, the diffusion of Ni is suppressed because the diffusion coefficient of Ni in the Ir-Re alloy is smaller than that in the Ir-Pt alloy, although the stress state is similar in both cases. By controlling the diffusion of Ni atoms, the use of Ir-Re alloy as a release agent coating for Ni-P plated moulds is expected to lead to a high degree of durability.

  10. Modelling of a diffusion-sorption experiment on sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.A.

    1989-11-01

    The results of a diffusion-sorption experiment on a sample of Darley Dale sandstone, using simulated groundwater spiked with a mixture of 125 I, 85 Sr and 137 Cs, are modelled by a one-dimensional porous medium approach in which sorption is described by Freundlich isotherms. The governing equations are solved analytically for the special case of a linear isotherm, and numerically using the computer code RANCHDIFF for non-linear isotherms. A set of time-dependent, ordinary differential equations is obtained using the Lagrange interpolation technique and integrated by Gear's variable order predictor-corrector method. It is shown that the sorption behaviour of 85 Sr can be modelled successfully by a linear isotherm, using a sorption parameter consistent with batch-sorption tests. The behaviour of 137 Cs may be modelled by a non-linear isotherm, but the amount of 137 Cs sorbed is less than that anticipated from batch-sorption tests. 125 I is assumed to be non-sorbing and is used to determine the porosity of the sandstone. (author) 10 figs., 4 tabs., 6 refs

  11. The dynamics of multimodal integration: The averaging diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brandon M; Gao, Juan; Koenig, Scott; Palfy, Dylan; L McClelland, James

    2017-12-01

    We combine extant theories of evidence accumulation and multi-modal integration to develop an integrated framework for modeling multimodal integration as a process that unfolds in real time. Many studies have formulated sensory processing as a dynamic process where noisy samples of evidence are accumulated until a decision is made. However, these studies are often limited to a single sensory modality. Studies of multimodal stimulus integration have focused on how best to combine different sources of information to elicit a judgment. These studies are often limited to a single time point, typically after the integration process has occurred. We address these limitations by combining the two approaches. Experimentally, we present data that allow us to study the time course of evidence accumulation within each of the visual and auditory domains as well as in a bimodal condition. Theoretically, we develop a new Averaging Diffusion Model in which the decision variable is the mean rather than the sum of evidence samples and use it as a base for comparing three alternative models of multimodal integration, allowing us to assess the optimality of this integration. The outcome reveals rich individual differences in multimodal integration: while some subjects' data are consistent with adaptive optimal integration, reweighting sources of evidence as their relative reliability changes during evidence integration, others exhibit patterns inconsistent with optimality.

  12. An efficient method for model refinement in diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, A. R.; Khademi, M.

    2007-11-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a non-linear, ill-posed, boundary value and optimization problem which necessitates regularization. Also, Bayesian methods are suitable owing to measurements data are sparse and correlated. In such problems which are solved with iterative methods, for stabilization and better convergence, the solution space must be small. These constraints subject to extensive and overdetermined system of equations which model retrieving criteria specially total least squares (TLS) must to refine model error. Using TLS is limited to linear systems which is not achievable when applying traditional Bayesian methods. This paper presents an efficient method for model refinement using regularized total least squares (RTLS) for treating on linearized DOT problem, having maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator and Tikhonov regulator. This is done with combination Bayesian and regularization tools as preconditioner matrices, applying them to equations and then using RTLS to the resulting linear equations. The preconditioning matrixes are guided by patient specific information as well as a priori knowledge gained from the training set. Simulation results illustrate that proposed method improves the image reconstruction performance and localize the abnormally well.

  13. The EZ diffusion model provides a powerful test of simple empirical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravenzwaaij, Don; Donkin, Chris; Vandekerckhove, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Over the last four decades, sequential accumulation models for choice response times have spread through cognitive psychology like wildfire. The most popular style of accumulator model is the diffusion model (Ratcliff Psychological Review, 85, 59-108, 1978), which has been shown to account for data from a wide range of paradigms, including perceptual discrimination, letter identification, lexical decision, recognition memory, and signal detection. Since its original inception, the model has become increasingly complex in order to account for subtle, but reliable, data patterns. The additional complexity of the diffusion model renders it a tool that is only for experts. In response, Wagenmakers et al. (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14, 3-22, 2007) proposed that researchers could use a more basic version of the diffusion model, the EZ diffusion. Here, we simulate experimental effects on data generated from the full diffusion model and compare the power of the full diffusion model and EZ diffusion to detect those effects. We show that the EZ diffusion model, by virtue of its relative simplicity, will be sometimes better able to detect experimental effects than the data-generating full diffusion model.

  14. A solid-on-solid invasion percolation model for self-affine interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arizmendi, C.M.; Martin, H.O.; Sanchez, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    The scaling properties of the interface of a new growth model are studied. The model is based on the standard invasion percolation without trapping in which the solid-on-solid condition is imposed. The local correlation between points of the interface can be controlled through a parameter. The self-affine properties of the interface show strong dependence on the existence of the local correlation. The dependence of the relevant exponents of the interface with the correlation is analysed. (author). 8 refs, 4 figs

  15. Modeling adsorption of cationic surfactants at air/water interface without using the Gibbs equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Chi M; Le, Thu N; Nguyen, Cuong V; Yusa, Shin-ichi

    2013-04-16

    The Gibbs adsorption equation has been indispensable in predicting the surfactant adsorption at the interfaces, with many applications in industrial and natural processes. This study uses a new theoretical framework to model surfactant adsorption at the air/water interface without the Gibbs equation. The model was applied to two surfactants, C14TAB and C16TAB, to determine the maximum surface excesses. The obtained values demonstrated a fundamental change, which was verified by simulations, in the molecular arrangement at the interface. The new insights, in combination with recent discoveries in the field, expose the limitations of applying the Gibbs adsorption equation to cationic surfactants at the air/water interface.

  16. Preisach hysteresis model for non-linear 2D heat diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancskar, Ildiko; Ivanyi, Amalia

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes a non-linear heat diffusion process when the thermal diffusivity behaviour is a hysteretic function of the temperature. Modelling this temperature dependence, the discrete Preisach algorithm as general hysteresis model has been integrated into a non-linear multigrid solver. The hysteretic diffusion shows a heating-cooling asymmetry in character. The presented type of hysteresis speeds up the thermal processes in the modelled systems by a very interesting non-linear way

  17. Validation of a mixture-averaged thermal diffusion model for premixed lean hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlup, Jason; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2018-03-01

    The mixture-averaged thermal diffusion model originally proposed by Chapman and Cowling is validated using multiple flame configurations. Simulations using detailed hydrogen chemistry are done on one-, two-, and three-dimensional flames. The analysis spans flat and stretched, steady and unsteady, and laminar and turbulent flames. Quantitative and qualitative results using the thermal diffusion model compare very well with the more complex multicomponent diffusion model. Comparisons are made using flame speeds, surface areas, species profiles, and chemical source terms. Once validated, this model is applied to three-dimensional laminar and turbulent flames. For these cases, thermal diffusion causes an increase in the propagation speed of the flames as well as increased product chemical source terms in regions of high positive curvature. The results illustrate the necessity for including thermal diffusion, and the accuracy and computational efficiency of the mixture-averaged thermal diffusion model.

  18. User's Manual for the Object User Interface (OUI): An Environmental Resource Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    The Object User Interface is a computer application that provides a framework for coupling environmental-resource models and for managing associated temporal and spatial data. The Object User Interface is designed to be easily extensible to incorporate models and data interfaces defined by the user. Additionally, the Object User Interface is highly configurable through the use of a user-modifiable, text-based control file that is written in the eXtensible Markup Language. The Object User Interface user's manual provides (1) installation instructions, (2) an overview of the graphical user interface, (3) a description of the software tools, (4) a project example, and (5) specifications for user configuration and extension.

  19. Copper diffusion in In2S3 and charge separation at In2S3/CuSCN and TiO2/In2S3 interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juma, Albert Owino

    2013-01-01

    The concept of inorganic nanostructured solar cells consists of a very thin absorber layer sandwiched between highly structured electron and hole conductors. When a TiO 2 /In 2 S 3 /CuSCN nanocomposite heterostructure is illuminated with light, photo-generated electrons in In 2 S 3 can be injected into the conduction band of TiO 2 and holes into the valence band of CuSCN. Charge transfer at the interfaces is limited by the deposition parameters, band alignment and diffusion of Cu from CuSCN into In 2 S 3 , which was the focus of this work. TiO 2 nanoparticles were screen printed onto SnO 2 :F (FTO)-coated glass substrates to give a layer of nanoporous (np) TiO 2 . In 2 S 3 layers were deposited by thermal evaporation or ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) methods producing Cl-free (In(acac) 3 precursor) and Cl-containing (InCl 3 precursor) layers. A spray-spin method was developed for deposition of CuSCN onto In 2 S 3 . Diffusion of Cu into In 2 S 3 layers was investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) while charge transport mechanisms were studied with surface photovoltage (SPV) technique in the fixed capacitor configuration. The activation energy (Ea) for Cu diffusion in thermally evaporated and Cl-free ILGAR In 2 S 3 layers was 0.30 and 0.24 eV, respectively but increased to between 0.72 and 0.78 eV for Cl-containing In 2 S 3 with residual Cl concentrations of 7.8 - 13.8 at.%. The diffusion prefactor (D 0 ) was six orders of magnitude higher for Cl-containing compared to Cl-free layers. The relationship between E a and D 0 was described by the Meyer-Neldel rule with a Meyer-Neldel energy of 40 meV. The presence of Cl has no significant influence on the structural properties of In 2 S 3 but resulted in a modified diffusion mechanism for Cu diffusion. The photovoltage of In 2 S 3 /CuSCN samples decreased after annealing for longer than 2 min at 200 C. A defect band was formed near the interface where holes accumulated and electrons tunneled through

  20. SC lipid model membranes designed for studying impact of ceramide species on drug diffusion and permeation--part II: diffusion and permeation of model drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochalek, M; Podhaisky, H; Ruettinger, H-H; Wohlrab, J; Neubert, R H H

    2012-10-01

    The barrier function of two quaternary stratum corneum (SC) lipid model membranes, which were previously characterized with regard to the lipid organization, was investigated based on diffusion studies of model drugs with varying lipophilicities. Diffusion experiments of a hydrophilic drug, urea, and more lipophilic drugs than urea (i.e. caffeine, diclofenac sodium) were conducted using Franz-type diffusion cells. The amount of permeated drug was analyzed using either HPLC or CE technique. The subjects of interest in the present study were the investigation of the influence of physicochemical properties of model drugs on their diffusion and permeation through SC lipid model membranes, as well as the study of the impact of the constituents of these artificial systems (particularly ceramide species) on their barrier properties. The diffusion through both SC lipid model membranes and the human SC of the most hydrophilic model drug, urea, was faster than the permeation of the more lipophilic drugs. The slowest rate of permeation through SC lipid systems occurred in the case of caffeine. The composition of SC lipid model membranes has a significant impact on their barrier function. Model drugs diffused and permeated faster through Membrane II (presence of Cer [EOS]). In terms of the barrier properties, Membrane II is much more similar to the human SC than Membrane I. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Two dimensional finite element modelling for dynamic water diffusion through stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Perry; Imhof, Robert E

    2012-10-01

    Solvents penetration through in vivo human stratum corneum (SC) has always been an interesting research area for trans-dermal drug delivery studies, and the importance of intercellular routes (diffuse in between corneocytes) and transcellular routes (diffuse through corneocytes) during diffusion is often debatable. In this paper, we have developed a two dimensional finite element model to simulate the dynamic water diffusion through the SC. It is based on the brick-and-mortar model, with brick represents corneocytes and mortar represents lipids, respectively. It simulates the dynamic water diffusion process through the SC from pre-defined initial conditions and boundary conditions. Although the simulation is based on water diffusions, the principles can also be applied to the diffusions of other topical applied substances. The simulation results show that both intercellular routes and transcellular routes are important for water diffusion. Although intercellular routes have higher flux rates, most of the water still diffuse through transcellular routes because of the high cross area ratio of corneocytes and lipids. The diffusion water flux, or trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), is reversely proportional to corneocyte size, i.e. the larger the corneocyte size, the lower the TEWL, and vice versa. There is also an effect of the SC thickness, external air conditions and diffusion coefficients on the water diffusion through SC on the resulting TEWL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Flashover of a vacuum-insulator interface: A statistical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Stygar

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a statistical model for the flashover of a 45° vacuum-insulator interface (such as would be found in an accelerator subject to a pulsed electric field. The model assumes that the initiation of a flashover plasma is a stochastic process, that the characteristic statistical component of the flashover delay time is much greater than the plasma formative time, and that the average rate at which flashovers occur is a power-law function of the instantaneous value of the electric field. Under these conditions, we find that the flashover probability is given by 1-exp(-E_{p}^{β}t_{eff}C/k^{β}, where E_{p} is the peak value in time of the spatially averaged electric field E(t, t_{eff}≡∫[E(t/E_{p}]^{β}dt is the effective pulse width, C is the insulator circumference, k∝exp(λ/d, and β and λ are constants. We define E(t as V(t/d, where V(t is the voltage across the insulator and d is the insulator thickness. Since the model assumes that flashovers occur at random azimuthal locations along the insulator, it does not apply to systems that have a significant defect, i.e., a location contaminated with debris or compromised by an imperfection at which flashovers repeatedly take place, and which prevents a random spatial distribution. The model is consistent with flashover measurements to within 7% for pulse widths between 0.5 ns and 10   μs, and to within a factor of 2 between 0.5 ns and 90 s (a span of over 11 orders of magnitude. For these measurements, E_{p} ranges from 64 to 651  kV/cm, d from 0.50 to 4.32 cm, and C from 4.96 to 95.74 cm. The model is significantly more accurate, and is valid over a wider range of parameters, than the J. C. Martin flashover relation that has been in use since 1971 [J. C. Martin on Pulsed Power, edited by T. H. Martin, A. H. Guenther, and M. Kristiansen (Plenum, New York, 1996]. We have generalized the statistical model to estimate the total-flashover probability of an

  3. Determination of oxygen effective diffusivity in porous gas diffusion layer using a three-dimensional pore network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Rui; Zhu Xun; Liao Qiang; Wang Hong; Ding Yudong; Li Jun; Ye Dingding

    2010-01-01

    In proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) models, oxygen effective diffusivity is the most important parameter to characterize the oxygen transport in the gas diffusion layer (GDL). However, its determination is a challenge due to its complex dependency on GDL structure. In the present study, a three-dimensional network consisting of spherical pores and cylindrical throats is developed and used to investigate the effects of GDL structural parameters on oxygen effective diffusivity under the condition with/without water invasion process. Oxygen transport in the throat is described by Fick's law and water invasion process in the network is simulated using the invasion percolation with trapping algorithm. The simulation results reveal that oxygen effective diffusivity is slightly affected by network size but increases with decreasing the network heterogeneity and with increasing the pore connectivity. Impacts of network anisotropy on oxygen transport are also investigated in this paper. The anisotropic network is constructed by constricting the throats in the through-plane direction with a constriction factor. It is found that water invasion has a more severe negative influence on oxygen transport in an anisotropic network. Finally, two new correlations are introduced to determine the oxygen effective diffusivity for the Toray carbon paper GDLs.

  4. Microstructural changes in ischemic cortical gray matter predicted by a model of diffusion-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Hansen, Brian; Ostergaard, Leif; Jakobsen, Rikke

    2007-09-01

    To understand the diffusion attenuated MR signal from normal and ischemic brain tissue in order to extract structural and physiological information using mathematical modeling, taking into account the transverse relaxation rates in gray matter. We fit our diffusion model to the diffusion-weighted MR signal obtained from cortical gray matter in healthy subjects. Our model includes variable volume fractions, intracellular restriction effects, and exchange between compartments in addition to individual diffusion coefficients and transverse relaxation rates for each compartment. A global optimum was found from a wide range of parameter permutations using cluster computing. We also present simulations of cell swelling and changes of exchange rate and intracellular diffusion as possible cellular mechanisms in ischemia. Our model estimates an extracellular volume fraction of 0.19 in accordance with the accepted value from histology. The absolute apparent diffusion coefficient obtained from the model was similar to that of experiments. The model and the experimental results indicate significant differences in diffusion and transverse relaxation between the tissue compartments and slow water exchange. Our model reproduces the signal changes observed in ischemia via physiologically credible mechanisms. Our modeling suggests that transverse relaxation has a profound influence on the diffusion attenuated MR signal. Our simulations indicate cell swelling as the primary cause of the diffusion changes seen in the acute phase of brain ischemia. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Nonlinear variational models for reaction and diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanyi, G.E.

    1983-08-01

    There exists a natural metric w.r.t. which the density dependent diffusion operator is harmonic in the sense of Eells and Sampson. A physical corollary of this statement is the property that any two regular points on the orbit of a reaction or diffusion operator can be connected by a path along which the reaction rate is constant. (author)

  6. Diffusion in Liquids : Equilibrium Molecular Simulations and Predictive Engineering Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study multicomponent diffusion in liquids using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Diffusion plays an important role in mass transport processes. In binary systems, mass transfer processes have been studied extensively using both experiments and molecular simulations.

  7. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Li, Xiao - Lin [STONY BROOK UNIV; Gilmm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without

  8. Synchronized stability in a reaction–diffusion neural network model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ling; Zhao, Hongyong, E-mail: hongyongz@126.com

    2014-11-14

    The reaction–diffusion neural network consisting of a pair of identical tri-neuron loops is considered. We present detailed discussions about the synchronized stability and Hopf bifurcation, deducing the non-trivial role that delay plays in different locations. The corresponding numerical simulations are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. In addition, the numerical results about the effects of diffusion reveal that diffusion may speed up the tendency to synchronization and induce the synchronized equilibrium point to be stable. Furthermore, if the parameters are located in appropriate regions, multiple unstability and bistability or unstability and bistability may coexist. - Highlights: • Point to non-trivial role that τ plays in different positions. • Diffusion speeds up the tendency to synchronization. • Diffusion induces the synchronized equilibrium point to be stable. • The coexistence of multiple unstability and bistability or unstability and bistability.

  9. Synchronized stability in a reaction–diffusion neural network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ling; Zhao, Hongyong

    2014-01-01

    The reaction–diffusion neural network consisting of a pair of identical tri-neuron loops is considered. We present detailed discussions about the synchronized stability and Hopf bifurcation, deducing the non-trivial role that delay plays in different locations. The corresponding numerical simulations are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. In addition, the numerical results about the effects of diffusion reveal that diffusion may speed up the tendency to synchronization and induce the synchronized equilibrium point to be stable. Furthermore, if the parameters are located in appropriate regions, multiple unstability and bistability or unstability and bistability may coexist. - Highlights: • Point to non-trivial role that τ plays in different positions. • Diffusion speeds up the tendency to synchronization. • Diffusion induces the synchronized equilibrium point to be stable. • The coexistence of multiple unstability and bistability or unstability and bistability

  10. Bounds for perpetual American option prices in a jump diffusion model

    OpenAIRE

    Ekström, Erik

    2006-01-01

    We provide bounds for perpetual American option prices in a jump diffusion model in terms of American option prices in the standard Black-Scholes model. We also investigate the dependence of the bounds on different parameters of the model.

  11. Towards emotion modeling based on gaze dynamics in generic interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Martin; Leimberg, Denis; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2005-01-01

    Gaze detection can be a useful ingredient in generic human computer interfaces if current technical barriers are overcome. We discuss the feasibility of concurrent posture and eye-tracking in the context of single (low cost) camera imagery. The ingredients in the approach are posture and eye region...

  12. Supporting special-purpose health care models via Web interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, James R.; Frankel, Heath K.; Noone, Joseph T.; van der Zwaag, B.J.

    The potential of the Web, via both the Internet and intranets, to facilitate development of clinical information systems has been evident for some time. Most Web-based clinical workstations interfaces, however, provide merely a loose collection of access channels. There are numerous examples of

  13. On the Modeling of Contact Interfaces with Frictional Slips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Munteanu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the contact interfaces between the scatterers and the matrix into the sonic composites, in the presence of the frictional slips. The sonic composite is a sonic liner designed in order to provide suppression of unwanted noise for jet engines, with emphases on the nacelle of turbofan engines for commercial aircraft.

  14. A Contextual Model for Identity Management (IdM) Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The usability of Identity Management (IdM) systems is highly dependent upon design that simplifies the processes of identification, authentication, and authorization. Recent findings reveal two critical problems that degrade IdM usability: (1) unfeasible techniques for managing various digital identifiers, and (2) ambiguous security interfaces.…

  15. Numerical modelling of random walk one-dimensional diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vamos, C.; Suciu, N.; Peculea, M.

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of a particle which moves on a discrete one-dimensional lattice, according to a random walk low, approximates better the diffusion process smaller the steps of the spatial lattice and time are. For a sufficiently large assembly of particles one can assume that their relative frequency at lattice knots approximates the distribution function of the diffusion process. This assumption has been tested by simulating on computer two analytical solutions of the diffusion equation: the Brownian motion and the steady state linear distribution. To evaluate quantitatively the similarity between the numerical and analytical solutions we have used a norm given by the absolute value of the difference of the two solutions. Also, a diffusion coefficient at any lattice knots and moment of time has been calculated, by using the numerical solution both from the diffusion equation and the particle flux given by Fick's low. The difference between diffusion coefficient of analytical solution and the spatial lattice mean coefficient of numerical solution constitutes another quantitative indication of the similarity of the two solutions. The results obtained show that the approximation depends first on the number of particles at each knot of the spatial lattice. In conclusion, the random walk is a microscopic process of the molecular dynamics type which permits simulations precision of the diffusion processes with given precision. The numerical method presented in this work may be useful both in the analysis of real experiments and for theoretical studies

  16. Comparison of non-Gaussian and Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion weighted imaging of rectal cancer at 3.0 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangwen; Wang, Shuangshuang; Wen, Didi; Zhang, Jing; Wei, Xiaocheng; Ma, Wanling; Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Mian; Wu, Guosheng; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-12-09

    Water molecular diffusion in vivo tissue is much more complicated. We aimed to compare non-Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) including intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM), stretched-exponential model (SEM) and Gaussian diffusion model at 3.0 T MRI in patients with rectal cancer, and to determine the optimal model for investigating the water diffusion properties and characterization of rectal carcinoma. Fifty-nine consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma underwent DWI with 16 b-values at a 3.0 T MRI system. DWI signals were fitted to the mono-exponential and non-Gaussian diffusion models (IVIM-mono, IVIM-bi and SEM) on primary tumor and adjacent normal rectal tissue. Parameters of standard apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), slow- and fast-ADC, fraction of fast ADC (f), α value and distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) were generated and compared between the tumor and normal tissues. The SEM exhibited the best fitting results of actual DWI signal in rectal cancer and the normal rectal wall (R 2  = 0.998, 0.999 respectively). The DDC achieved relatively high area under the curve (AUC = 0.980) in differentiating tumor from normal rectal wall. Non-Gaussian diffusion models could assess tissue properties more accurately than the ADC derived Gaussian diffusion model. SEM may be used as a potential optimal model for characterization of rectal cancer.

  17. Modeling of Instabilities and Self-organization at the Frictional Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Vahid

    frictional surface to exhibit "self-protection" and "self-healing" properties. Hence, this research is dealing with the fundamental concepts that allow the possibility of the development of a new generation of tribosystem and materials that reinforce such properties. In chapter 2, we investigate instabilities due to the temperature-dependency of the coefficient of friction. The temperature-dependency of the coefficient of friction can have a significant effect on the frictional sliding stability, by leading to the formation of "hot" and "cold" spots on the contacting surfaces. We formulate a stability criterion and perform a case study of a brake disk. In chapter 3, we study frictional running-in. Running-in is a transient period on the onset of the frictional sliding, in which friction and wear decrease to their stationary values. In this research, running-in is interpreted as friction-induced self-organization process. We introduce a theoretical model of running-in and investigate rough profile evolution assuming that its kinetics is driven by two opposite processes or events, i.e., smoothening which is typical for the deformation-driven friction and wear, and roughening which is typical for the adhesion-driven friction and wear. In chapter 4, we investigate the possibility of the so-called Turing-type pattern formation during friction. Turing or reaction-diffusion systems describe variations of spatial concentrations of chemical components with time due to local chemical reactions coupled with diffusion. During friction, the patterns can form at the sliding interface due to the mass transfer (diffusion), heat transfer, various tribochemical reactions, and wear. In chapter 5, we investigate how interfacial patterns including propagating trains of stick and slip zones form due to dynamic sliding instabilities. These can be categorized as self-organized patterns. We treat stick and slip as two phases at the interface, and study the effects related to phase transitions. Our

  18. Modeling Auditory-Haptic Interface Cues from an Analog Multi-line Telephone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Bittner, Rachael M.

    2012-01-01

    The Western Electric Company produced a multi-line telephone during the 1940s-1970s using a six-button interface design that provided robust tactile, haptic and auditory cues regarding the "state" of the communication system. This multi-line telephone was used as a model for a trade study comparison of two interfaces: a touchscreen interface (iPad)) versus a pressure-sensitive strain gauge button interface (Phidget USB interface controllers). The experiment and its results are detailed in the authors' AES 133rd convention paper " Multimodal Information Management: Evaluation of Auditory and Haptic Cues for NextGen Communication Dispays". This Engineering Brief describes how the interface logic, visual indications, and auditory cues of the original telephone were synthesized using MAX/MSP, including the logic for line selection, line hold, and priority line activation.

  19. Information Technology and Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion: Exploring the Intermediary-End User Interface in a Policy Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses U.S. technology policy and the transfer of scientific and technical information (STI). Results of a study of knowledge diffusion in the aerospace industry are reported, including data on aerospace information intermediaries, use of computer and information technologies, and the use of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration)…

  20. A non-local structural derivative model for characterization of ultraslow diffusion in dense colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingjie; Chen, Wen

    2018-03-01

    Ultraslow diffusion has been observed in numerous complicated systems. Its mean squared displacement (MSD) is not a power law function of time, but instead a logarithmic function, and in some cases grows even more slowly than the logarithmic rate. The distributed-order fractional diffusion equation model simply does not work for the general ultraslow diffusion. Recent study has used the local structural derivative to describe ultraslow diffusion dynamics by using the inverse Mittag-Leffler function as the structural function, in which the MSD is a function of inverse Mittag-Leffler function. In this study, a new stretched logarithmic diffusion law and its underlying non-local structural derivative diffusion model are proposed to characterize the ultraslow diffusion in aging dense colloidal glass at both the short and long waiting times. It is observed that the aging dynamics of dense colloids is a class of the stretched logarithmic ultraslow diffusion processes. Compared with the power, the logarithmic, and the inverse Mittag-Leffler diffusion laws, the stretched logarithmic diffusion law has better precision in fitting the MSD of the colloidal particles at high densities. The corresponding non-local structural derivative diffusion equation manifests clear physical mechanism, and its structural function is equivalent to the first-order derivative of the MSD.

  1. Modelling energy level alignment at organic interfaces and density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores, F.; Ortega, J.; Vazquez, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    A review of our theoretical understanding of the band alignment at organic interfaces is presented with particular emphasis on the metal/organic (MO) case. The unified IDIS (induced density of interface states) and the ICT (integer charge transfer) models are reviewed and shown to describe qualit...

  2. Analytical Solution of Interface Effect on the Strength of Combined Model Composed of Different Geologic Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the special combined structure of surrounding rock in western mining area of China, a micromechanical model with variable parameters containing contact interface was proposed firstly. Then, the derived stresses in coal and rock near the interface were analyzed on the basis of the harmonized strain relation, and the analytical solutions with respect to stress states near the interface were drawn up. The triaxial compressive strength of coal and rock was further determined in case the contact interface was in the horizontal position. Moreover, effects of stiffness ratio, interface angle, and stress level on the strength of two bodies near the contact area were expounded in detail. Results indicate that additional stresses which have significant effect on the strength of combined model are derived due to the adhesive effect of contact interface and lithological differences between geologic bodies located on both sides. The interface effect on the strength of combined body is most associated with the stiffness, interface angle, and the stress level. These conclusions are also basically valid for three-body model and even for the multibody model and lay important theory foundation to guide the stability study of soft strata composed of different geologic bodies.

  3. Numerical vs. turbulent diffusion in geophysical flow modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Isidoro, M.; Maurizi, A.; Tampieri, F.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical advection schemes induce the spreading of passive tracers from localized sources. The effects of changing resolution and Courant number are investigated using the WAF advection scheme, which leads to a sub-diffusive process. The spreading rate from an instantaneous source is compared with the physical diffusion necessary to simulate unresolved turbulent motions. The time at which the physical diffusion process overpowers the numerical spreading is estimated, and is shown to reduce as the resolution increases, and to increase as the wind velocity increases.

  4. Spin-diffusion lengths in metals and alloys, and spin-flipping at metal/metal interfaces: an experimentalist's critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, Jack; Pratt, William P Jr

    2007-01-01

    In magnetoresistance (MR) studies of magnetic multilayers composed of combinations of ferromagnetic (F) and non-magnetic (N) metals, the magnetic moment (or related 'spin') of each conduction electron plays a crucial role, supplementary to that of its charge. While initial analyses of MR in such multilayers assumed that the direction of the spin of each electron stayed fixed as the electron transited the multilayer, we now know that this is true only in a certain limit. Generally, the spins 'flip' in a distance characteristic of the metal, its purity, and the temperature. They can also flip at F/N or N1/N2 interfaces. In this review we describe how to measure the lengths over which electron moments flip in pure metals and alloys, and the probability of spin-flipping at metallic interfaces. Spin-flipping within metals is described by a spin-diffusion length, l sf M , where the metal M F or N. Spin-diffusion lengths are the characteristic lengths in the current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) and lateral non-local (LNL) geometries that we focus upon in this review. In certain simple cases, l sf N sets the distance over which the CPP-MR and LNL-MR decrease as the N-layer thickness (CPP-MR) or N-film length (LNL) increases, and l sf F does the same for increase of the CPP-MR with increasing F-layer thickness. Spin-flipping at M1/M2 interfaces can be described by a parameter, δ M1/M2 , which determines the spin-flipping probability, P = 1-exp(-δ). Increasing δ M1/M2 usually decreases the MR. We list measured values of these parameters and discuss the limitations on their determinations. (topical review)

  5. Accessing Data Bases Through Interface Views Using a Unified Graph-Oriented Entity-Relationship Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Peter; Sørensen, Jens Otto

    Interface Abstract: The paper describes an Entity Relationship (ER) model with a diagrammed schema and extensions modeled into a graph. The semantics of schema symbols are fundamentally simple implying a unified model where given conceptualizations of environments are diagrammed uniquely. By the ......Interface Abstract: The paper describes an Entity Relationship (ER) model with a diagrammed schema and extensions modeled into a graph. The semantics of schema symbols are fundamentally simple implying a unified model where given conceptualizations of environments are diagrammed uniquely...... with a unified graphic model is more efficient and less error-prone than working with more complex ER models and models based on lexical description. Key terms: Entity-relationship model, path expressions, entity-relationship language, derived interface view, view updates, graphical models....

  6. Asymmetric diffusion of Zr, Sc and Ce, Gd at the interface between zirconia electrolyte and ceria interlayer for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bo, E-mail: Liangbo@gdut.edu.cn; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Silong; Huang, Yongan; Cai, Zhihong; Lu, Shenguo, E-mail: sglu@gdut.edu.cn

    2016-09-15

    The microstructures of cathode interlayer and elemental diffusion behaviors across the interfacial region (electrolyte/interlayer) have been characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning TEM combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS). A densified film about 100 nm is locally formed at the interface of electrolyte/interlayer as the interlayer using dip-coating method and being sintered at 1200 °C. It is observed that the compositional distribution curves across the interface are asymmetric. More amount of the Zr, Sc component is detected in gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) than that of the Ce, Gd component is detected in scandia-stabilized-zirconia (SSZ). XRD and EDS results show that the densified layer might consist of (Zr, Ce)O{sub 2}-based solid solution. The high open circuit voltage of the cell is related to the dense structure of electrolyte, while the increased activation energy in overpotential resistance is attributed to the porous structure of interlayer as well as the high resistance phases locally formed at its interface. - Highlights: • The (Ce−Zr)O{sub 2} based solid solution was locally formed at 1200 °C. • More Zr, Sc elements were detected in GDC than Ce, Gd elements in SSZ. • Zirconia nanodomain was embedded in GDC beside grain boundary. • High OCVs were achieved due to the highly dense electrolyte layer.

  7. Induced- and alternating-current electro-osmotic control of the diffusion layer growth in a microchannel-membrane interface device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-11-01

    The passage of an electric current through an ionic permselective medium under an applied electric field is characterized by the formation of ionic concentration gradients, which result in regions of depleted and enriched ionic concentration at opposite ends of the medium. Induced-current electro-osmosis (ICEO) and alternating-current-electro-osmosis (ACEO) are shown to control the growth of the diffusion layer (DL) which, in turn, controls the diffusion limited ion transport through the microchannel-membrane system. We fabricated and tested devices made of a Nafion membrane connecting two opposite PDMS microchannels. An interdigitated electrode array was embedded within the microchannel with various distances from the microchannel-membrane interface. The induced ICEO (floating electrodes) / ACEO (active electrodes) vortices formed at the electrode array stir the fluid and thereby suppress the growth of the DL. The intensity of the ACEO vortices is controlled by either varying the voltage amplitude or the frequency, each having its own unique effect. Enhancement of the limiting current by on-demand control of the diffusion length is of importance in on-chip electro-dialysis, desalination and preconcentration of analytes.

  8. Small-polaron model of light atom diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1977-01-01

    A number of researchers have treated the diffusion of light interstitials in metals in strict analogy with the theory for the hopping diffusion of electrons in low-mobility insulators. In other words, these authors view the diffusion of light atoms as simply being an example of small-polaron hopping motion. In this paper the motion of a small polaron is introduced, and the mechanism of its motion is described. The experimental results are then succinctly presented. Next the physical assumptions implicit in the theory are compared with the situation which is believed to characterize the existence and motion of light interstitial atoms in metals. Concomitantly, the modifications of the small-polaron theory required in applying it to light atom diffusion are ennumerated

  9. A mathematical model in charactering chloride diffusivity in unsaturated cementitious material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Ye, G.; Pecur, I.B.; Baricevic, A.; Stirmer, N; Bjegovic, D.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new analytic model for predicting chloride diffusivity in unsaturated cementitious materials is developed based on conductivity theory and Nernst-Einstein equation. The model specifies that chloride diffusivity in unsaturated cementitious materials can be mathematically described as

  10. A critical discussion of the vacancy diffusion model of ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heera, V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple vacancy diffusion model of ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization of silicon including divacancy formation is developed. The model reproduces some of the experimental findings, as e.g. the dose rate dependence of the crystallization rate. However, the measured activation energy of the ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization cannot be accounted for by vacancy diffusion alone. (author)

  11. Nuclear interaction potential in a folded-Yukawa model with diffuse densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1975-09-01

    The folded-Yukawa model for the nuclear interaction potential is generalized to diffuse density distributions which are generated by folding a Yukawa function into sharp generating distributions. The effect of a finite density diffuseness or of a finite interaction range is studied. The Proximity Formula corresponding to the generalized model is derived and numerical comparison is made with the exact results. (8 figures)

  12. Business models for maximising the diffusion of technological innovations for climate-smart agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, T.B.; Blok, V.; Poldner, Kim

    2017-01-01

    r, CSA technological innovation diffusion is subject to socio-economic barriers. The success of innovations is partly dependent on the business models that are used to diffuse them. Within the context of innovations for CSA, the role that innovation providers’ business models play in the successful

  13. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling of the space - time diffusion patterns of cholera epidemic in Kumasi, Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osei, Frank B.; Osei, F.B.; Duker, Alfred A.; Stein, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyses the joint effects of the two transmission routes of cholera on the space-time diffusion dynamics. Statistical models are developed and presented to investigate the transmission network routes of cholera diffusion. A hierarchical Bayesian modelling approach is employed for a joint

  14. Model-driven Instrumentation of graphical user interfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Funk, M.; Hoyer, P.; Link, S.

    2009-01-01

    In today's continuously changing markets newly developed products often do not meet the demands and expectations of customers. Research on this problem identified a large gap between developer and user expectations. Approaches to bridge this gap are to provide the developers with better information on product usage and to create a fast feedback cycle that helps tackling usage problems. Therefore, the user interface of the product, the central point of human-computer interaction, has to be ins...

  15. Modeling Simple Driving Tasks with a One-Boundary Diffusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Roger; Strayer, David

    2014-01-01

    A one-boundary diffusion model was applied to the data from two experiments in which subjects were performing a simple simulated driving task. In the first experiment, the same subjects were tested on two driving tasks using a PC-based driving simulator and the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). The diffusion model fit the response time (RT) distributions for each task and individual subject well. Model parameters were found to correlate across tasks which suggests common component processes were being tapped in the three tasks. The model was also fit to a distracted driving experiment of Cooper and Strayer (2008). Results showed that distraction altered performance by affecting the rate of evidence accumulation (drift rate) and/or increasing the boundary settings. This provides an interpretation of cognitive distraction whereby conversing on a cell phone diverts attention from the normal accumulation of information in the driving environment. PMID:24297620

  16. Modeling bioluminescent photon transport in tissue based on Radiosity-diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Pu; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Han, Dong; Yang, Xin

    2010-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is one of the most important non-invasive optical molecular imaging modalities. The model for the bioluminescent photon propagation plays a significant role in the bioluminescence tomography study. Due to the high computational efficiency, diffusion approximation (DA) is generally applied in the bioluminescence tomography. But the diffusion equation is valid only in highly scattering and weakly absorbing regions and fails in non-scattering or low-scattering tissues, such as a cyst in the breast, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer of the brain and synovial fluid layer in the joints. A hybrid Radiosity-diffusion model is proposed for dealing with the non-scattering regions within diffusing domains in this paper. This hybrid method incorporates a priori information of the geometry of non-scattering regions, which can be acquired by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or x-ray computed tomography (CT). Then the model is implemented using a finite element method (FEM) to ensure the high computational efficiency. Finally, we demonstrate that the method is comparable with Mont Carlo (MC) method which is regarded as a 'gold standard' for photon transportation simulation.

  17. Lateral strength force of URM structures based on a constitutive model for interface element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Akhaveissy

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical implementation of a new proposed interface model for modeling the behavior of mortar joints in masonry walls. Its theoretical framework is fully based on the plasticity theory. The Von Mises criterion is used to simulate the behavior of brick and stone units. The interface laws for contact elements are formulated to simulate the softening behavior of mortar joints under tensile stress; a normal linear cap model is also used to limit compressive stress. The numerical predictions based on the proposed model for the behavior of interface elements correlate very highly with test data. A new explicit formula based on results of proposed interface model is also presented to estimate the strength of unreinforced masonry structures. The closed form solution predicts the ultimate lateral load of unreinforced masonry walls less error percentage than ATC and FEMA-307. Consequently, the proposed closed form solution can be used satisfactorily to analyze unreinforced masonry structures.

  18. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamitros, M., E-mail: matkara@gmail.com [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Luan, S. [University of New Mexico, Department of Computer Science, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Allison, J. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Baldacchino, G. [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, LIDYL, Radiation Physical Chemistry Group, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR3299, SIS2M, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Davidkova, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Mkalles, Beirut (Lebanon); Friedland, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ivantchenko, V. [Ecoanalytica, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Ivantchenko, A. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Mantero, A. [SwHaRD s.r.l., via Buccari 9, 16153 Genova (Italy); Nieminem, P.; Santin, G. [ESA-ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics and Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Stepan, V. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Incerti, S., E-mail: incerti@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  19. Diffusion of PAH in potato and carrot slices and application for a potato model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Cammarano, A.; Capri, E.

    2007-01-01

    of water, potato tissue, and carrot tissue. Naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene served as model substances. Their transfer from source to sink disk was measured by HPLC to determine a velocity rate constant proportional to the diffusive conductivity. The diffusive flux through the plant...... of the chemical. The findings of this study provide a convenient method to estimate the diffusion of nonvolatile organic chemicals through various plant materials. The application to a radial diffusion model suggests that "growth dilution" renders the concentration of highly hydrophobic chemicals in potatoes...... below their equilibrium partitioning level. This is in agreement with field results for the bioconcentration of PAHs in potatoes....

  20. Models for the estimation of diffuse solar radiation for typical cities in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakirci, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    In solar energy applications, diffuse solar radiation component is required. Solar radiation data particularly in terms of diffuse component are not readily affordable, because of high price of measurements as well as difficulties in their maintenance and calibration. In this study, new empirical models for predicting the monthly mean diffuse solar radiation on a horizontal surface for typical cities in Turkey are established. Therefore, fifteen empirical models from studies in the literature are used. Also, eighteen diffuse solar radiation models are developed using long term sunshine duration and global solar radiation data. The accuracy of the developed models is evaluated in terms of different statistical indicators. It is found that the best performance is achieved for the third-order polynomial model based on sunshine duration and clearness index. - Highlights: • Diffuse radiation is given as a function of clearness index and sunshine fraction. • The diffuse radiation is an important parameter in solar energy applications. • The diffuse radiation measurement is for limited periods and it is very rare. • The new models can be used to estimate monthly average diffuse solar radiation. • The accuracy of the models is evaluated on the basis of statistical indicators

  1. Extracting surface diffusion coefficients from batch adsorption measurement data: application of the classic Langmuir kinetics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Khim Hoong

    2017-11-09

    Surface diffusion coefficients may be estimated by fitting solutions of a diffusion model to batch kinetic data. For non-linear systems, a numerical solution of the diffusion model's governing equations is generally required. We report here the application of the classic Langmuir kinetics model to extract surface diffusion coefficients from batch kinetic data. The use of the Langmuir kinetics model in lieu of the conventional surface diffusion model allows derivation of an analytical expression. The parameter estimation procedure requires determining the Langmuir rate coefficient from which the pertinent surface diffusion coefficient is calculated. Surface diffusion coefficients within the 10 -9 to 10 -6  cm 2 /s range obtained by fitting the Langmuir kinetics model to experimental kinetic data taken from the literature are found to be consistent with the corresponding values obtained from the traditional surface diffusion model. The virtue of this simplified parameter estimation method is that it reduces the computational complexity as the analytical expression involves only an algebraic equation in closed form which is easily evaluated by spreadsheet computation.

  2. Numerical algorithms based on Galerkin methods for the modeling of reactive interfaces in photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Michael; Gamba, Irene M.; Ren, Kui

    2016-12-01

    This work concerns the numerical solution of a coupled system of self-consistent reaction-drift-diffusion-Poisson equations that describes the macroscopic dynamics of charge transport in photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells with reactive semiconductor and electrolyte interfaces. We present three numerical algorithms, mainly based on a mixed finite element and a local discontinuous Galerkin method for spatial discretization, with carefully chosen numerical fluxes, and implicit-explicit time stepping techniques, for solving the time-dependent nonlinear systems of partial differential equations. We perform computational simulations under various model parameters to demonstrate the performance of the proposed numerical algorithms as well as the impact of these parameters on the solution to the model.

  3. Stalled-Flow and Head-Loss Model for Diffuser Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Modeling procedure approximates inlet transition zone (blade leading edge to blade throat) of diffuser pump as two-dimensional cascade, properties of which are well known. Model applied to stators as well as rotors. Procedure much faster than previous methods.

  4. Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion models for transport in semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Falco, Carlo; Gatti, Emilio; Lacaita, Andrea L.; Sacco, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a unified framework for Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion (QCDD) models in nanoscale semiconductor device simulation. QCDD models are presented as a suitable generalization of the classical drift-diffusion (DD) system, each particular model being identified by the constitutive relation for the quantum-correction to the electric potential. We examine two special, and relevant, examples of QCDD models; the first one is the modified DD model named Schroedinger-Poisson-drift-diffusion, and the second one is the quantum-drift-diffusion (QDD) model. For the decoupled solution of the two models, we introduce a functional iteration technique that extends the classical Gummel algorithm widely used in the iterative solution of the DD system. We discuss the finite element discretization of the various differential subsystems, with special emphasis on their stability properties, and illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithms and models on the numerical simulation of nanoscale devices in two spatial dimensions

  5. A model for self-diffusion of guanidinium-based ionic liquids: a molecular simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Seduraman, Abirami; Wu, Ping

    2008-11-06

    We propose a novel self-diffusion model for ionic liquids on an atomic level of detail. The model is derived from molecular dynamics simulations of guanidinium-based ionic liquids (GILs) as a model case. The simulations are based on an empirical molecular mechanical force field, which has been developed in our preceding work, and it relies on the charge distribution in the actual liquid. The simulated GILs consist of acyclic and cyclic cations that were paired with nitrate and perchlorate anions. Self-diffusion coefficients are calculated at different temperatures from which diffusive activation energies between 32-40 kJ/mol are derived. Vaporization enthalpies between 174-212 kJ/mol are calculated, and their strong connection with diffusive activation energies is demonstrated. An observed formation of cavities in GILs of up to 6.5% of the total volume does not facilitate self-diffusion. Instead, the diffusion of ions is found to be determined primarily by interactions with their immediate environment via electrostatic attraction between cation hydrogen and anion oxygen atoms. The calculated average time between single diffusive transitions varies between 58-107 ps and determines the speed of diffusion, in contrast to diffusive displacement distances, which were found to be similar in all simulated GILs. All simulations indicate that ions diffuse by using a brachiation type of movement: a diffusive transition is initiated by cleaving close contacts to a coordinated counterion, after which the ion diffuses only about 2 A until new close contacts are formed with another counterion in its vicinity. The proposed diffusion model links all calculated energetic and dynamic properties of GILs consistently and explains their molecular origin. The validity of the model is confirmed by providing an explanation for the variation of measured ratios of self-diffusion coefficients of cations and paired anions over a wide range of values, encompassing various ionic liquid classes

  6. Global stability and pattern formation in a nonlocal diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wenjie; Shi, Junping; Wang, Mingxin

    2018-06-01

    A diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition model with nonlocal intraspecific and interspecific competition between species is formulated and analyzed. The nonlocal competition strength is assumed to be determined by a diffusion kernel function to model the movement pattern of the biological species. It is shown that when there is no nonlocal intraspecific competition, the dynamics properties of nonlocal diffusive competition problem are similar to those of classical diffusive Lotka-Volterra competition model regardless of the strength of nonlocal interspecific competition. Global stability of nonnegative constant equilibria are proved using Lyapunov or upper-lower solution methods. On the other hand, strong nonlocal intraspecific competition increases the system spatiotemporal dynamic complexity. For the weak competition case, the nonlocal diffusive competition model may possess nonconstant positive equilibria for some suitably large nonlocal intraspecific competition coefficients.

  7. Comparative studies on constitutive models for cohesive interface cracks of quasi-brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xinpu; Shen Guoxiao; Zhou Lin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, Concerning on the modelling of quasi-brittle fracture process zone at interface crack of quasi-brittle materials and structures, typical constitutive models of interface cracks were compared. Numerical calculations of the constitutive behaviours of selected models were carried out at local level. Aiming at the simulation of quasi-brittle fracture of concrete-like materials and structures, the emphases of the qualitative comparisons of selected cohesive models are focused on: (1) the fundamental mode I and mode II behaviours of selected models; (2) dilatancy properties of the selected models under mixed mode fracture loading conditions. (authors)

  8. Comparison of Experimental Methods for Estimating Matrix Diffusion Coefficients for Contaminant Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telfeyan, Katherine Christina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ware, Stuart Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Birdsell, Kay Hanson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-06

    Diffusion cell and diffusion wafer experiments were conducted to compare methods for estimating matrix diffusion coefficients in rock core samples from Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). A diffusion wafer method, in which a solute diffuses out of a rock matrix that is pre-saturated with water containing the solute, is presented as a simpler alternative to the traditional through-diffusion (diffusion cell) method. Both methods yielded estimates of matrix diffusion coefficients that were within the range of values previously reported for NNSS volcanic rocks. The difference between the estimates of the two methods ranged from 14 to 30%, and there was no systematic high or low bias of one method relative to the other. From a transport modeling perspective, these differences are relatively minor when one considers that other variables (e.g., fracture apertures, fracture spacings) influence matrix diffusion to a greater degree and tend to have greater uncertainty than diffusion coefficients. For the same relative random errors in concentration measurements, the diffusion cell method yields diffusion coefficient estimates that have less uncertainty than the wafer method. However, the wafer method is easier and less costly to implement and yields estimates more quickly, thus allowing a greater number of samples to be analyzed for the same cost and time. Given the relatively good agreement between the methods, and the lack of any apparent bias between the methods, the diffusion wafer method appears to offer advantages over the diffusion cell method if better statistical representation of a given set of rock samples is desired.

  9. Comparison of experimental methods for estimating matrix diffusion coefficients for contaminant transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfeyan, Katherine; Ware, S. Doug; Reimus, Paul W.; Birdsell, Kay H.

    2018-02-01

    Diffusion cell and diffusion wafer experiments were conducted to compare methods for estimating effective matrix diffusion coefficients in rock core samples from Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). A diffusion wafer method, in which a solute diffuses out of a rock matrix that is pre-saturated with water containing the solute, is presented as a simpler alternative to the traditional through-diffusion (diffusion cell) method. Both methods yielded estimates of effective matrix diffusion coefficients that were within the range of values previously reported for NNSS volcanic rocks. The difference between the estimates of the two methods ranged from 14 to 30%, and there was no systematic high or low bias of one method relative to the other. From a transport modeling perspective, these differences are relatively minor when one considers that other variables (e.g., fracture apertures, fracture spacings) influence matrix diffusion to a greater degree and tend to have greater uncertainty than effective matrix diffusion coefficients. For the same relative random errors in concentration measurements, the diffusion cell method yields effective matrix diffusion coefficient estimates that have less uncertainty than the wafer method. However, the wafer method is easier and less costly to implement and yields estimates more quickly, thus allowing a greater number of samples to be analyzed for the same cost and time. Given the relatively good agreement between the methods, and the lack of any apparent bias between the methods, the diffusion wafer method appears to offer advantages over the diffusion cell method if better statistical representation of a given set of rock samples is desired.

  10. A microscopic model of ballistic-diffusive crossover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagchi, Debarshee; Mohanty, P K

    2014-01-01

    Several low-dimensional systems show a crossover from diffusive to ballistic heat transport when system size is decreased. Although there is some phenomenological understanding of this crossover phenomenon at the coarse-grained level, a microscopic picture that consistently describes both the ballistic and the diffusive transport regimes has been lacking. In this work we derive a scaling form for the thermal current in a class of one dimensional systems attached to heat baths at boundaries and rigorously show that the crossover occurs when the characteristic length scale of the system competes with the system size. (paper)

  11. A fractional Fokker-Planck model for anomalous diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Johan, E-mail: anderson.johan@gmail.com [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Kim, Eun-jin [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Moradi, Sara [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR7648, LPP, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we present a study of anomalous diffusion using a Fokker-Planck description with fractional velocity derivatives. The distribution functions are found using numerical means for varying degree of fractionality of the stable Lévy distribution. The statistical properties of the distribution functions are assessed by a generalized normalized expectation measure and entropy in terms of Tsallis statistical mechanics. We find that the ratio of the generalized entropy and expectation is increasing with decreasing fractionality towards the well known so-called sub-diffusive domain, indicating a self-organising behavior.

  12. Model potential for the description of metal/organic interface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbrust, Nico; Schiller, Frederik; Güdde, Jens; Höfer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    We present an analytical one-dimensional model potential for the description of electronic interface states that form at the interface between a metal surface and flat-lying adlayers of π-conjugated organic molecules. The model utilizes graphene as a universal representation of these organic adlayers. It predicts the energy position of the interface state as well as the overlap of its wave function with the bulk metal without free fitting parameters. We show that the energy of the interface state depends systematically on the bond distance between the carbon backbone of the adayers and the metal. The general applicability and robustness of the model is demonstrated by a comparison of the calculated energies with numerous experimental results for a number of flat-lying organic molecules on different closed-packed metal surfaces that cover a large range of bond distances. PMID:28425444

  13. Information diffusion, Facebook clusters, and the simplicial model of social aggregation: a computational simulation of simplicial diffusers for community health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Kerk F; Sparks, Lisa; Struppa, Daniele C; Mannucci, Mirco A; Damiano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    By integrating the simplicial model of social aggregation with existing research on opinion leadership and diffusion networks, this article introduces the constructs of simplicial diffusers (mathematically defined as nodes embedded in simplexes; a simplex is a socially bonded cluster) and simplicial diffusing sets (mathematically defined as minimal covers of a simplicial complex; a simplicial complex is a social aggregation in which socially bonded clusters are embedded) to propose a strategic approach for information diffusion of cancer screenings as a health intervention on Facebook for community cancer prevention and control. This approach is novel in its incorporation of interpersonally bonded clusters, culturally distinct subgroups, and different united social entities that coexist within a larger community into a computational simulation to select sets of simplicial diffusers with the highest degree of information diffusion for health intervention dissemination. The unique contributions of the article also include seven propositions and five algorithmic steps for computationally modeling the simplicial model with Facebook data.

  14. Quantitative study of elemental inter-diffusion across ZnSe/GaAs interface by using SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gard, F.S.; Riley, J.; Usher, B.F.; Prince, K.; Burke, P.

    1999-01-01

    ZnSe and related II-VI materials are wide bandgap semiconductors, which are expected to be used for blue/green lasers. However, the maximum lifetime of the devices has not been increased beyond 400 hours for the last 3 years. In this time commercial GaN-based devices have been successfully introduced to market. However GaN-based devices do not cover the whole range of green region, due to their bandgaps. Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) of ZnSe-based materials has overcome some of the problems traditionally encountered in producing high-quality crystalline ZnSe. Controlled doping of ZnSe to produce n- and p- type material has made it possible to develop high efficiency pin diodes for use in the visible region. ZnSe-based materials still have a technological future, however remaining problems are yet to be solved. This paper present data obtained from ZnSe epilayers grown on GaAs substrates by MBE. At temperatures over 500 deg C diffusion og Ga atoms was clearly observed. The diffusion of As atoms was relatively small compared to the Ga atoms

  15. Continuous Dependence in Front Propagation for Convective Reaction-Diffusion Models with Aggregative Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Malaguti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation, including aggregative movements and convective terms. The model also incorporates a real parameter causing the change from a purely diffusive to a diffusive-aggregative and to a purely aggregative regime. Existence and qualitative properties of traveling wave solutions are investigated, and estimates of their threshold speeds are furnished. Further, the continuous dependence of the threshold wave speed and of the wave profiles on a real parameter is studied, both when the process maintains its diffusion-aggregation nature and when it switches from it to another regime.

  16. Characteristics and Diffusion Model of the Individual Knowledge in the WeChat Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lingzhi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Purpose/significance] According to the model of the individual knowledge diffusion, we conduct a behavior research and analyze the characteristics of that based on WeChat which is the most popular communication platform in China.[Method/process] By analyzing the methods of the diffusion on WeChat, we analyzed the characteristics of the individual knowledge diffusion. [Result/conclusion]The characteristics of the individual knowledge diffusion include real-time, short-term, speciality, friendship and transmission.

  17. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M. A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davídková, Marie; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Mantero, A.; Nieminen, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H. N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 274, OCT (2014), s. 841-882 ISSN 0021-9991 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : chemical kinetics simulation * radiation chemistry * Fokker-Planck equation * Smoluchowski diffusion equation * Brownian bridge * dynamical time steps * k-d tree * radiolysis * radiobiology * Geant4-DNA * Brownian dynamics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.434, year: 2014

  18. A model of modulated diffusion. I. Analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzani, A.; Turcchetti, G.; Vaienti, S.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce an integrable isochronous system and perturb its frequency by an external-deterministic or purely random-noise. Under the perturbation the action variable evolves in time: the corresponding diffusion coefficient is exactly computed and its dependence on the magnitude of the perturbation is carefully investigated. Different behaviors are found and justified: the quasilinear approximation, the superlinear regime, and the ballistic motion

  19. Comparison Of Diffuse Solar Radiation Models Using Data For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurements of global solar radiation and sunshine duration data during the period from 1984 to 1999 were supplied by IITA (International Institute of Tropical Agriculture) at Onne. The data were used to establish empirical relationships that would connect the daily monthly average diffuse irradiation with both relative ...

  20. Explicit modeling the progressive interface damage in fibrous composite: Analytical vs. numerical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kushch, V.I.; Shmegera, S.V.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2011-01-01

    of the multiple inclusion problem by means of complex potentials. The second, finite element model of FRC is based on the cohesive zone model of interface. Simulation of progressive debonding in FRC using the many-fiber models of composite has been performed. The advantageous features and applicability areas...... of both models are discussed. It has been shown that the developed models provide detailed analysis of the progressive debonding phenomena including the interface crack cluster formation, overall stiffness reduction and induced anisotropy of the effective elastic moduli of composite....