WorldWideScience

Sample records for diffraction scanning microscopy

  1. Generation of apodized X-ray illumination and its application to scanning and diffraction microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakurel, Krishna P; Kimura, Takashi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sasaki, Tomoya; Takei, Masashi; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    X-ray science has greatly benefited from the progress in X-ray optics. Advances in the design and the manufacturing techniques of X-ray optics are key to the success of various microscopic and spectroscopic techniques practiced today. Here the generation of apodized X-ray illumination using a two-stage deformable Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system is presented. Such apodized illumination is marked by the suppression of the side-lobe intensities of the focused beam. Thus generated apodized illumination was employed to improve the image quality in scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Imaging of a non-isolated object by coherent X-ray diffractive imaging with apodized illumination in a non-scanning mode is also presented.

  2. Fossilization in Geopark Araripe studied through X-ray diffraction, scanning microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, Ricardo J C; Macedo, Zélia S; Sasaki, José M; Saraiva, Antônio A F

    2008-01-01

    The Geopark Araripe, located in Northeastern Brazil, is the first UNESCO Natural Park in the South hemisphere and a world-famous fossil deposit of the Early Cretaceous period (approximately 120 million years). Fossilized fish fauna in Geopark Araripe is found inside of sedimentary rocks in three-dimensional forms. In the present study sedimentary rocks and fossil fish Rhacolepis bucalis have been carefully analysed by means of X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and termogravimetric analysis. Mineralogical composition of the fossil fish was explained in terms of facts occurred at the initial stages of the opening of the South Atlantic and the oceanic hydrothermal phenomena (``black smoker'', ``white smoker'' and warm-water events). The occurrence of organic substance was, for the first time, evaluated in collapsed internal elements (intestinal and muscles) by termogravimetric analysis.

  3. Simultaneous X-ray fluorescence and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron XFM beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Michael W. M.; Phillips, Nicholas W.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Vine, David J.; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Mudie, Stephen T.; Afshar, Nader; Kirkham, Robin; Chen, Bo; Balaur, Eugeniu; de Jonge, Martin D.

    2016-08-11

    Owing to its extreme sensitivity, quantitative mapping of elemental distributionsviaX-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has become a key microanalytical technique. The recent realisation of scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXDM) meanwhile provides an avenue for quantitative super-resolved ultra-structural visualization. The similarity of their experimental geometries indicates excellent prospects for simultaneous acquisition. Here, in both step- and fly-scanning modes, robust, simultaneous XFM-SXDM is demonstrated.

  4. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  5. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability. PMID:20696933

  6. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microprobe analysis of calcific deposits on intrauterine contraceptive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.R.; Wilkinson, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Deposits found on intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) were studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. All seven devices, including five plastic and two copper IUDs, were coated with a crust containing cellular, acellular, and fibrillar material. The cellular material was composed of erythrocytes, leukocytes, cells of epithelial origin, sperm, and bacteria. Some of the bacteria were filamentous, with acute-angle branching. The fibrillar material appeared to be fibrin. Most of the acellular material was amorphous; calcite was identified by x-ray diffraction, and x-ray microanalysis showed only calcium. Some of the acellular material, particularly that on the IUD side of the crust, was organized in spherulitic crystals and was identified as calcium phosphate by x-ray microanalysis. The crust was joined to the IUD surface by a layer of fibrillar and amorphous material. It is suggested that the initial event in the formation of calcific deposits on IUD surfaces is the deposition of an amorphous and fibrillar layer. Various types of cells present in the endometrial environment adhere to this layer and then calcify. Thus, the deposition of calcific material on the IUDs is a calcification phenomenon, not unlike the formation of plaque on teeth.

  7. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions. PMID:27324109

  8. Puzzling Intergrowth in Cerium Nitridophosphate Unraveled by Joint Venture of Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Synchrotron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloß, Simon D; Neudert, Lukas; Döblinger, Markus; Nentwig, Markus; Oeckler, Oliver; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2017-09-13

    Thorough investigation of nitridophosphates has rapidly accelerated through development of new synthesis strategies. Here we used the recently developed high-pressure metathesis to prepare the first rare-earth metal nitridophosphate, Ce4Li3P18N35, with a high degree of condensation >1/2. Ce4Li3P18N35 consists of an unprecedented hexagonal framework of PN4 tetrahedra and exhibits blue luminescence peaking at 455 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed two intergrown domains with slight structural and compositional variations. One domain type shows extremely weak superstructure phenomena revealed by atomic-resolution scanning TEM (STEM) and single-crystal diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The corresponding superstructure involves a modulated displacement of Ce atoms in channels of tetrahedra 6-rings. The displacement model was refined in a supercell as well as in an equivalent commensurate (3 + 2)-dimensional description in superspace group P63(α, β, 0)0(-α - β, α, 0)0. In the second domain type, STEM revealed disordered vacancies of the same Ce atoms that were modulated in the first domain type, leading to sum formula Ce4-0.5xLi3P18N35-1.5xO1.5x (x ≈ 0.72) of the average structure. The examination of these structural intricacies may indicate the detection limit of synchrotron diffraction and TEM. We discuss the occurrence of either Ce displacements or Ce vacancies that induce the incorporation of O as necessary stabilization of the crystal structure.

  9. Adsorption geometry of glycine on Cu(001) determined with low—energy electron diffraction and scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛四平; 赵学应; 等

    2002-01-01

    Using low-energy electron diffraction(LEED)and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) it has been found that glycine molecules adsorbed on Cu(001) can form but only the (2×4) superstructures.On the basis of the missing LEED spots of the surface,it has been concluded that.each(2×4) unit cell consists of two molecules,one being the mirror image of the other,the C-C axis of both molecules lies in the mirror plane of the Cu substrate without a significant shift and twish from the plane;and the two O atoms of the carboxylate group of both molecules locate at the same height level without significant buckling.According to these conclusions,a structural model has been propsed for the (2×4) superstructure (a model for the c(2×4) supersturcture already exists).We argue that the (2×4) and c(2×4) superstructures must have similar specific surface free energy,that their hydrogen bonds must be of N-H-OII type,and that their local adsorption geometry must be similar or even the same.The advantage of combining STM with LEED to determine surface sturctures is clearly demonstrated.

  10. Adsorption geometry of glycine on Cu(001) determined with low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛四平; 赵学应; 盖峥; 赵汝光; 杨威生

    2002-01-01

    Using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) it has been found thatglycine molecules adsorbed on Cu(001) can form but only the (2×4) and c(2×4) superstructures. On the basis of themissing LEED spots of the surface, it has been concluded that: each (2 ×4) unit cell consists of two molecules, one beingthe mirror image of the other; the C-C axis of both molecules lies in the mirror plane of the Cu substrate without asignificant shift and twist from the plane; and the two O atoms of the carboxylate group of both molecules locate at thesame height level without significant buckling. According to these conclusions, a structural model has been proposed forthe (2×4) superstructure (a model for the c(2×4) superstructure already exists). We argue that the (2×4) and c(2×4)superstructures must have similar specific surface free energy, that their hydrogen bonds must be of N-H-OⅡ type, andthat their local adsorption geometry must be similar or even the same. The advantage of combining STM with LEEDto determine surface structures is clearly demonstrated.

  11. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to understand enamel affected by metabolic disorder mucopolysaccharidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Malik Arshman; Addison, Owen; James, Alison; Hendriksz, Christian J; Al-Jawad, Maisoon

    2016-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is an inherited metabolic disorder that can affect the tooth structure leading to defects. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction being a state of the art technique has been used to determine the enamel crystallite orientation in deciduous enamel affected by Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I and Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IVA and comparing these with that of healthy deciduous enamel. Using this technique it was observed that there is a loss of texture in deciduous enamel affected by Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I and Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IVA when compared to the healthy deciduous enamel. Generally it was observed that the incisal surface of the deciduous teeth possessed a higher texture or preferred orientation of enamel crystallites and on progression towards the cervical region there was a decrease in the texture or preferred orientation of enamel crystallites. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the presence of a poorly calcified layer between the enamel and dentine at the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) in MPS affected samples was likely to be responsible for rendering the tooth structure weak and prone to fracture as is often the case in MPS affected deciduous enamel.

  12. Structural and magnetic properties of inverse opal photonic crystals studied by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoriev, S.V.; Napolskii, K.S.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Petukhov, A.V.; Belov, D.V.; Eliseev, A.A.; Lukashin, A.V.; Tretyakov, Y.D.; Sinitskii, A.S.; Eckerlebe, H.

    2009-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of nickel inverse opal photonic crystal have been studied by complementary experimental techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, wide-angle and small-angle diffraction of synchrotron radiation, and polarized neutrons. The sample was fabricated by ele

  13. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis study of the TiH{sub 2} foaming agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandrino, Djordje, E-mail: djordje.mandrino@imt.si [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Paulin, Irena [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Skapin, Sreco D. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-10-15

    The decomposition of commercially available TiH{sub 2} was investigated while performing different thermal treatments. TiH{sub 2} powder, which is widely used as a foaming agent, was heat treated at 450 Degree-Sign C for various times, from 15 min to 120 min. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the surfaces at different magnifications were obtained and interpreted. A Bragg-Brentano X-ray diffractometer was used to measure the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra on all five samples. A close examination of the diffraction spectra showed that for an as-received sample and samples undergoing the longest thermal treatment (1 and 2 h) these spectra can be explained as deriving from cubic TiH{sub 1.924}, while for the other two samples they can be explained as deriving from tetragonal TiH{sub 1.924}. A constant-unit-cell-volume phase transition between the cubic and tetragonal phases in TiH{sub 2-y}-type compounds had been described in the literature. The unit-cell parameters obtained from measured spectra confirm that within the measurement uncertainty the unit-cell volume is indeed constant in all five samples. Thermo-gravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements were performed on all the samples, showing that the intensity of the dehydrogenation depends on the previous treatment of the TiH{sub 2}. After the thermal analysis XRD of the samples was performed again and the material was found to exhibit a Ti-like unit cell, but slightly enlarged due to the unreleased hydrogen. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiH{sub 2} samples were cubic or tetragonal TiH{sub 1.924} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Onset of the hydrogen release temperature increases with the pre-treatment time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal dehydrogenation for the as-prepared TiH{sub 2} is a three-step process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After thermal analysis 2 residual hydrogen TiH{sub x} phases, close to {alpha}Ti, appeared.

  14. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  15. Functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nanocomposite fibrous networks: Characterization by fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    2015-02-05

    The preparation and characterization of functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nano-composite fibrous material is described. Magnetite-cellulose nano-composite was prepared by a combination of the solution-based formation of magnetic nano-particles and subsequent coating with amino celluloses. Characterization was accomplished using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis. The peaks of Fe3O4 in the XRD pattern of nanocomposite confirm existence of the nanoparticles in the amino cellulose matrix. Magnetite-cellulose particles exhibit an average diameter of roughly 33nm as demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles were irregular spheres dispersed in the cellulose matrix. The vibration corresponding to the NCH3 functional group about 2850cm(-1) is assigned in the FTIR spectra. Functionalized magnetite-cellulose nano-composite polymers have a potential range of application as targeted drug delivery system in biomedical field.

  16. Structure determination of the indium induced Si(001)-(4X3) reconstruction by surface x-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunk, O.; Falkenberg, G.; Seehofer, L.;

    1998-01-01

    The indium-induced Si(001)-(4 X 3) reconstruction has been investigated by surface X-ray diffraction (SXRD) measurements with synchrotron radiation and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The Patterson function analysis enables us to exclude In dimers as a structural element in this reconstruction....... We present a new structural model which includes 6 In atoms threefold coordinated to Si atoms and 5 displaced Si atoms per unit cell. Relaxations down to the sixth layer were determined. 'Trimers' made up of In-Si-In atoms are a key structural element. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V....

  17. 3D -Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis; Schmidt, Søren; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscopy is a fast and non-destructive structural characterization technique aimed at the study of individual crystalline elements (grains or subgrains) within mm-sized polycrystalline specimens. It is based on two principles: the use of highly penetr...

  18. Diffraction by a small aperture in conical geometry: Application to metal coated tips used in near-field scanning optical microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Drezet, A; Huant, S; 10.1103/PhysRevE.65.046611

    2010-01-01

    Light diffraction through a subwavelength aperture located at the apex of a metallic screen with conical geometry is investigated theoretically. A method based on a multipole field expansion is developed to solve Maxwell's equations analytically using boundary conditions adapted both for the conical geometry and for the finite conductivity of a real metal. The topological properties of the diffracted field are discussed in detail and compared to those of the field diffracted through a small aperture in a flat screen, i. e. the Bethe problem. The model is applied to coated, conically tapered optical fiber tips that are used in Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy. It is demonstrated that such tips behave over a large portion of space like a simple combination of two effective dipoles located in the apex plane (an electric dipole and a magnetic dipole parallel to the incident fields at the apex) whose exact expressions are determined. However, the large "backward" emission in the P plane - a salient experimen...

  19. Mineral Compositions and Micro-Structural of Epoxy-Repaired Rock Revealed by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the mechanical properties of rock with lots of cracks, this study adopts electronic methods (X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to determine the mineral compositions and micro structural characteristics of epoxy-repaired rock. Fractured rocks with low strength or high permeability may not be appropriate for dam foundation. The strength and durability of fractured rock are increased after chemical grouting. Test results show that, some of the cracks and voids are repaired by epoxy particles, resulted in the decreasing rock porosity. The proportion of epoxy resins is about 3.5%-5.5%, showing a discrete distribution and can not connect with each other.

  20. Correlating whisker growth and grain structure on Sn-Cu samples by real-time scanning electron microscopy and backscattering diffraction characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei Fei; Jadhav, Nitin; Chason, Eric [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2012-05-28

    Whiskers/hillocks grow out of Pb-free Sn coatings used in electronics manufacturing. To determine which grains form whiskers/hillocks, we use scanning electron microscopy and backscattering diffraction to simultaneously monitor the surface morphology and grain structure. To reduce surface roughness, we developed a ''peel-off'' method to prepare ultra-flat samples that were measured repeatedly while whiskers/hillocks formed. We find grains that form into whiskers/hillocks are present in the as-deposited film (i.e., not re-nucleated) and many have horizontal grain boundaries beneath them. Grain rotation during whisker/hillock formation means that measurements performed after the features grow do not indicate their initial grain orientations.

  1. DESORPTION OF Te CAPPING LAYER FROM ZnTe (100: AUGER SPECTROSCOPY, LOW-ENERGY ELECTRON DIFFRACTION AND SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Sossoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the annealing temperature to desorb a protective Te capping layer of the zinc telluride (ZnTe (100 surface was investigated. The surface reconstruction of the ZnTe (100 upon the removal of a Te capping layer grown by the molecular beam epitaxy was characterized by different methods. Auger spectroscopy brought out the chemical composition of the surface before and after annealing; the Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED gave information about the crystallographic structure. The surface crystallographic configurations of tellurium Te (c (2x2 and Te (c (2x1 are confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM. Such a study reveals a phase transition from a rich-Te to a poor-Te surface as the annealing temperature increases. 

  2. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  3. Diffractive elements performance in chromatic confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, J; Duque, D; Alean, A; Toledo, M [Grupo de Optica y EspectroscopIa, Centro de Ciencia Basica, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. Medellin (Colombia); Meneses, J [Laboratorio de Optica y Tratamiento de Senales, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Gharbi, T, E-mail: jgarzonr10@une.net.co [Laboratoire d' Optique P. M. Duffieux, UMR-6603 CNR/Universite de Franche-Comte. 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    The Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry and biomedicine because of its depth discrimination capability. Subsequent to this technique has been developed in recent years Chromatic Confocal Microscopy. This method retains the same principle of confocal and offers the added advantage of removing the axial movement of the moving system. This advantage is usually accomplished with an optical element that generates a longitudinal chromatic aberration and a coding system that relates the axial position of each point of the sample with the wavelength that is focused on each. The present paper shows the performance of compact chromatic confocal microscope when some different diffractive elements are used for generation of longitudinal chromatic aberration. Diffractive elements, according to the process and manufacturing parameters, may have different diffraction efficiency and focus a specific wavelength in a specific focal position. The performance assessment is carried out with various light sources which exhibit an incoherent behaviour and a broad spectral width.

  4. Examining the ground layer of St. Anthony from Padua 19th century oil painting by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vančo, Ľubomír; Kadlečíková, Magdaléna; Breza, Juraj; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Gregor, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we studied the material composition of the ground layer of a neoclassical painting. We used Raman spectroscopy (RS) as a prime method. Thereafter scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were employed as complementary techniques. The painting inspected was of the side altar in King St. Stephen's Church in Galanta (Slovakia), signed and dated by Jos. Chr. Mayer 1870. Analysis was carried out on both covered and uncovered ground layers. Four principal compounds (barite, lead white, calcite, dolomite) and two minor compounds (sphalerite, quartz) were identified. This ground composition is consistent with the 19th century painting technique used in Central Europe consisting of white pigments and white fillers. Transformation of lead white occurred under laser irradiation. Subdominant Raman peaks of the components were measured. The observed results elucidate useful partnership of RS and SEM-EDS measurements supported by X-ray powder diffraction as well as possibilities and limitations of non-destructive analysis of covered lower layers by RS.

  5. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  6. Innovative analytical methodology combining micro-x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-based mineral maps, and diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy to characterize archeological artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardell, Carolina; Guerra, Isabel; Romero-Pastor, Julia; Cultrone, Giuseppe; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro

    2009-01-15

    Excavations at the 14th century Moorish rampart (Granada, Spain) unearthed a brick oven alongside black ash and bone stratigraphic layers. In situ evidence suggests the oven served to fabricate a wall coating including powdered burnt bones. Original ad hoc analyses improved on conventional methods were used to confirm this hypothesis. These methods enable (i) nondestructive micro-X-ray diffraction (mu-XRD) for fast mineralogical data acquisition (approximately 10 s) and moderately high spatial (approximately 500 microm) resolution and (ii) identification and imaging of crystalline components in sample cross-sections via mineral maps, yielding outstanding visualization of grain distribution and morphology in composite samples based on scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersion X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) elemental maps. Benefits are shown for applying diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) vs transmittance-FT-IR (T-FT-IR) to analyze organic and inorganic components in single samples. Complementary techniques to fully characterize artifacts were gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), optical microscopy (OM), conventional powder XRD, and (14)C dating. Bone-hydroxyapatite was detected in the coating. Mineralogical transformations in the bricks indicate oven temperatures well above 1000 degrees C, supporting the hypothesis.

  7. The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed (√3x√3)R30° at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c(√3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

  8. Lateral ordering of PTCDA on the clean and the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100) surface investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Stefan; Fiedler, Benjamin; Bauer, Oliver; Marele, Antonela; Sokolowski, Moritz M

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on the clean and on the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100) surface [referred to as (√2 × 2√2)R45° - 2O/Cu(100)] by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Our results confirm the (4√2 × 5√2)R45° superstructure of PTCDA/Cu(100) reported by A. Schmidt et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 1995, 99,11770-11779]. However, contrary to Schmidt et al., we have no indication for a dissociation of the PTCDA upon adsorption, and we propose a detailed structure model with two intact PTCDA molecules within the unit cell. Domains of high lateral order are obtained, if the deposition is performed at 400 K. For deposition at room temperature, a significant density of nucleation defects is found pointing to a strong interaction of PTCDA with Cu(100). Quite differently, after preadsorption of oxygen and formation of the (√2 × 2√2)R45° - 2O/Cu(100) superstructure on Cu(100), PTCDA forms an incommensurate monolayer with a structure that corresponds well to that of PTCDA bulk lattice planes.

  9. Structural investigation of 1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy and low-energy electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, D G; Muzik, H; Gölzhäuser, A; Turchanin, A

    2012-10-02

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 1,1'-biphenyl-4-thiol (H-(C(6)H(4))(2)-SH) on Au(111) were prepared from solution or via vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum and characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In contrast to the typically observed for densely packed alkane-thiol SAMs on Au(111) (√3 × √3)R30° structure, the densely packed aromatic biphenylthiol SAMs prepared by both methods exhibit an unusual hexagonal (2 × 2) structure. Upon annealing at 100 °C, this structure evolves into the (2 × 7√3) structure resulting in the formation of highly ordered pinstripes oriented along the [1 -1 0] directions. Lower density SAMs, prepared by vapor deposition in vacuum, show mixed structures comprising the hexagonal (2 × 2) structure and two rectangular arrangements with the unit cells of (3√3 × 9) and (2√3 × 8). An extinction of the (3√3 × 9) structure in the favor of the (2√3 × 8) structure is observed upon annealing at temperatures of ~100 °C.

  10. Lateral ordering of PTCDA on the clean and the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100 surface investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gärtner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the adsorption of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA on the clean and on the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100 surface [referred to as (√2 × 2√2R45° – 2O/Cu(100] by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and low energy electron diffraction (LEED. Our results confirm the (4√2 × 5√2R45° superstructure of PTCDA/Cu(100 reported by A. Schmidt et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 1995, 99,11770–11779]. However, contrary to Schmidt et al., we have no indication for a dissociation of the PTCDA upon adsorption, and we propose a detailed structure model with two intact PTCDA molecules within the unit cell. Domains of high lateral order are obtained, if the deposition is performed at 400 K. For deposition at room temperature, a significant density of nucleation defects is found pointing to a strong interaction of PTCDA with Cu(100. Quite differently, after preadsorption of oxygen and formation of the (√2 × 2√2R45° – 2O/Cu(100 superstructure on Cu(100, PTCDA forms an incommensurate monolayer with a structure that corresponds well to that of PTCDA bulk lattice planes.

  11. Confocal scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    This report is based on a metrological investigation on confocal microscopy technique carried out by Uffe Rolf Arlø Theilade and Paolo Bariani. The purpose of the experimental activity was twofold a metrological instrument characterization and application to assessment of rough PP injection moulded...... replicated topography. Confocal microscopy is seen to be a promising technique in metrology of microstructures. Some limitations with respect to surface metrology were found during the experiments. The experiments were carried out using a Zeiss LSM 5 Pascal microscope owned by the Danish Polymer Centre...

  12. Confocal scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    replicated topography. Confocal microscopy is seen to be a promising technique in metrology of microstructures. Some limitations with respect to surface metrology were found during the experiments. The experiments were carried out using a Zeiss LSM 5 Pascal microscope owned by the Danish Polymer Centre...

  13. Scanning Quantum Decoherence Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The use of qubits as sensitive magnetometers has been studied theoretically and recent demonstrated experimentally. In this paper we propose a generalisation of this concept, where a scanning two-state quantum system is used to probe the subtle effects of decoherence (as well as its surrounding electromagnetic environment). Mapping both the Hamiltonian and decoherence properties of a qubit simultaneously, provides a unique image of the magnetic (or electric) field properties at the nanoscale....

  14. [Confocal laser scanning microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, M

    2015-07-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows the in vivo evaluation of melanocytic and nonmelanocytic skin tumours with high sensitivity and specificity. RCM represents an optical imaging technique, which enables us to examine the skin at high resolution. Today, RCM represents not only an interesting tool for dermatologic research but has also been introduced as a diagnostic tool in every day clinical practice. As such, RCM is applied for improvement of skin cancer diagnosis adjunct to clinical and dermatoscopic examination. In combination with dermatoscopy RCM has shown an increased specificity with similar sensitivity. In this regard RCM helps to decrease the rate of unnecessary biopsies of benign lesions. Despite its use in dermatooncology RCM may also be used for diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory diseases. Future developments include technical improvements, teledermatology solutions and the application of ex vivo RCM in Moh's micrographic surgery.

  15. The interfacial and surface properties of thin Fe and Gd films grown on W(110) as studied by scanning tunneling microscopy, site-resolved photoelectron diffraction, and spin polarized photoelectron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tober, E.D. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (US). Office of Graduate Studies

    1997-06-01

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements from Gd films grown on W(110) prepared with and without annealing have been used to provide a detailed picture of the growth of such films, permitting a quantitative structural explanation for previously-measured magnetic properties and the identification of a new two-dimensional structure for the first monolayer. The analysis of the film roughness of room-temperature-grown films as a function of coverage and lateral length scale reveals that the growing Gd surface follows scaling laws for a self-affine surface. Annealing these as-deposited films at elevated temperatures is found to drastically alter the morphology of the films, as seen by both STM and LEED. Nanometer-scale islands of relatively well-defined size and shape are observed under certain conditions. Finally, the first monolayer of Gd is observed to form a (7x14) superstructure with pseudo-(7x7) symmetry that is consistent with a minimally-distorted hexagonal two-dimensional Gd(0001) film. Furthermore, a new beamline and photoelectron spectrometer/diffractometer at the Advanced Light Source have been used to obtain full-solid-angle and site-specific photoelectron diffraction (PD) data from interface W atoms just beneath (1x1) Fe and (7x14) Gd monolayers on W(110) by utilizing the core level shift in the W 4f{sub 7/2} spectrum. A comparison of experiment with multiple scattering calculations permits determining the Fe adsorption site and the relative interlayer spacing to the first and second W layers. These Fe results are also compared to those from the very different Gd overlayer and from the clean W(110) surface. Such interface PD measurements show considerable promise for future studies. Finally, the rare-earth ferromagnetic system of Gd(0001) has been examined through the use of spin polarized photoelectron diffraction from the Gd 4s and 5s photoelectron multiplets.

  16. The interfacial and surface properties of thin Fe and Gd films grown on W(110) as studied by scanning tunneling microscopy, site-resolved photoelectron diffraction, and spin polarized photoelectron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tober, Eric D. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements from Gd films grown on W(110) prepared with and without annealing have been used to provide a detailed picture of the growth of such films, permitting a quantitative structural explanation for previously-measured magnetic properties and the identification of a new two-dimensional structure for the first monolayer. The analysis of the film roughness of room-temperature-grown films as a function of coverage and lateral length scale reveals that the growing Gd surface follows scaling laws for a self-affine surface. Annealing these as-deposited films at elevated temperatures is found to drastically alter the morphology of the films, as seen by both STM and LEED. Nanometer-scale islands of relatively well-defined size and shape are observed under certain conditions. Finally, the first monolayer of Gd is observed to form a (7x14) superstructure with pseudo-(7x7) symmetry that is consistent with a minimally-distorted hexagonal two-dimensional Gd(0001) film. Furthermore, a new beamline and photoelectron spectrometer/diffractometer at the Advanced Light Source have been used to obtain full-solid-angle and site-specific photoelectron diffraction (PD) data from interface W atoms just beneath (1x1) Fe and (7x14) Gd monolayers on W(110) by utilizing the core level shift in the W 4f7/2 spectrum. A comparison of experiment with multiple scattering calculations permits determining the Fe adsorption site and the relative interlayer spacing to the first and second W layers. These Fe results are also compared to those from the very different Gd overlayer and from the clean W(110) surface. Such interface PD measurements show considerable promise for future studies. Finally, the rare-earth ferromagnetic system of Gd(0001) has been examined through the use of spin polarized photoelectron diffraction from the Gd 4s and 5s photoelectron multiplets.

  17. Characterization of wet precipitation by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari Migliavacca, Daniela [Instituto de Biociencias, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ecologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fundacao Estadual de Protecao Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, RS. Rua Carlos Chagas 55/802, 90030-020 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Calesso Teixeira, Elba, E-mail: gerpro.pesquisa@fepam.rs.gov.br [Fundacao Estadual de Protecao Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, RS. Rua Carlos Chagas 55/802, 90030-020 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gervasoni, Fernanda; Vieira Conceicao, Rommulo [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Raya Rodriguez, Maria Teresa [Instituto de Biociencias, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ecologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the composition of wet precipitation in three sites of the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre. Besides the variables usually considered, such as pH, conductivity, major ions (Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, F{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}) and metallic elements (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni), the suspended matter was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with energy dispersive system (EDS), for better identification of possible anthropogenic material in this wet precipitation. Results showed an alkaline pH in the samples analyzed and higher concentrations for Na{sup +}, Cl{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. The acidification and neutralization potential between anions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} + NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and cations (Ca{sup 2+} + Mg{sup 2+} + K{sup +} + NH{sub 4}{sup +}) showed a good correlation (0.922). The metallic elements with highest values were Zn, Fe and Mn. Results of XRD identified the presence of some minerals such as quartz, feldspar, mica, clay, carbonates and sulfates. In samples analyzed with SEM, we detected pyroxene, biotite, amphibole and oxides. Cluster analysis (CA) was applied to the data matrix to identify potential pollution sources of metals (natural or anthropogenic) and the association with minerals found in the analysis of SEM.

  18. Characterization of early-age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders using isothermal calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerman, Miloš; Tydlitát, Vratislav; Keppert, Martin; Čáchová, Monika; Černý, Robert, E-mail: cernyr@fsv.cvut.cz

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Early age hydration processes in lime-ceramic binders are analyzed within a wide range of component ratios. • The applied waste ceramic dust exhibits partial hydraulic properties, ettringite and calcite are formed. • Transition from tobermorite- to jennite-like structures is identified by SEM within the first 48 h. • The highest specific hydration heat after 300 h, 63 J/g, is measured for the binder containing 70% ceramic. • Substantial effect of the heat of wetting is observed, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. - Abstract: Early-age hydration processes in a lime-ceramic-water system are analyzed within the whole range of possible lime/ceramic ratios. The isothermal calorimetry shows a substantial effect of the heat of wetting on the total heat evolved, ranging from 10 J/g for lime to 3.9 J/g for ceramic. The highest specific hydration heat of 63 J/g during the analyzed 300-h hydration period exhibits the blended binder containing 70% ceramic and 30% lime which correlates well with the highest compressive and bending strengths of the paste prepared using this blend. Portlandite, ettringite and calcite are the main phases identified by the X-ray diffraction analysis after the hydration of ceramic-rich blends. According to the results of scanning electron microscopy, the initial course of pozzolanic reaction is for this type of binders characterized by the transition from tobermorite-like calcium-silicate-hydrate structures into jennite-like structures within the first 48 h. Blends with the ceramic content lower than 70% show a high portion of portlandite, calcite is present in low amount, and the jennite-like structures are observed after 48 h, following the initial formation of components with a very high Ca content. The favorable properties of the ceramic-rich blended binders can be explained by the partial hydraulic character of the ceramic. With the specific hydration heat of 29 J/g after 300 h and compressive strength

  19. Twin domain imaging in topological insulator Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 epitaxial thin films by scanning X-ray nanobeam microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcuba, Petr; Veselý, Jozef; Lesnik, Andreas; Bauer, Guenther; Springholz, Gunther; Holý, Václav

    2017-01-01

    The twin distribution in topological insulators Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 was imaged by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXRM). The crystal orientation at the surface, determined by EBSD, is correlated with the surface topography, which shows triangular pyramidal features with edges oriented in two different orientations rotated in the surface plane by 60°. The bulk crystal orientation is mapped out using SXRM by measuring the diffracted X-ray intensity of an asymmetric Bragg peak using a nano-focused X-ray beam scanned over the sample. By comparing bulk- and surface-sensitive measurements of the same area, buried twin domains not visible on the surface are identified. The lateral twin domain size is found to increase with the film thickness.

  20. High Resolution Scanning Ion Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the thesis is the following. The first chapter is an introduction to scanning microscopy, where the path that led to the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is described and the main differences between electrons and ion beams are highlighted. Chapter 2 is what is normally referred to (which I d

  1. Atomic resolution 3D electron diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; O' Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Electron lens aberration is the major barrier limiting the resolution of electron microscopy. Here we describe a novel form of electron microscopy to overcome electron lens aberration. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a 2 x 2 x 2 unit cell nano-crystal (framework of LTA [Al12Si12O48]8) can be ab initio determined at the resolution of 1 Angstrom from a series of simulated noisy diffraction pattern projections with rotation angles ranging from -70 degrees to +70 degrees in 5 degrees increments along a single rotation axis. This form of microscopy (which we call 3D electron diffraction microscopy) does not require any reference waves, and can image the 3D structure of nanocrystals, as well as non-crystalline biological and materials science samples, with the resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction.

  2. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  3. Super-resolution scanning laser microscopy through virtually structured detection

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Rong-Wen; Wang, Ben-Quan; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Yao, Xin-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    High resolution microscopy is essential for advanced study of biological structures and accurate diagnosis of medical diseases. The spatial resolution of conventional microscopes is light diffraction limited. Structured illumination has been extensively explored to break the diffraction limit in wide field light microscopy. However, deployable application of the structured illumination in scanning laser microscopy is challenging due to the complexity of the illumination system and possible ph...

  4. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  5. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  6. [Based on Curing Age of Calcined Coal Gangue Fine Aggregate Mortar of X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zuo-chao; Xia, Jun-wu; Duan, Xiao-mu; Cao, Ji-chang

    2016-03-01

    By using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis method, we stud- ied the activity of coal gangue fine aggregate under different calcination temperature. In view of the activity of the highest-700 degrees C high temperature calcined coal gangue fine aggregate mortar of hydration products, microstructure and strength were discussed in this paper, and the change laws of mortar strength with curing age (3, 7, 14, 28, 60 and 90 d) growth were analyzed. Test results showed that coal gangue fine aggregate with the increase of calcination temperature, the active gradually increases. When the calcination temperature reaches 700 degrees C, the activity of coal gangue fine aggregate is the highest. When calcining temperature continues to rise, activity falls. After 700 degrees C high temperature calcined coal gangue fine aggregate has obvious ash activity, the active components of SiO2 and Al2 O3 can be with cement hydration products in a certain degree of secondary hydration reaction. Through on the top of the activity of different curing age 700 degrees C high temperature calcined coal gangue fine aggregate mortar, XRD and SEM analysis showed that with the increase of curing age, secondary hydration reaction will be more fully, and the amount of hydration products also gradually increases. Compared with the early ages of the cement mortar, the products are more stable hydration products filling in mortar microscopic pore, which can further improve the microstructure of mortar, strengthen the interface performance of the mortar. The mortar internal structure is more uniform, calcined coal gangue fine aggregate and cement mortar are more of a strong continuous whole, which increase the later strength of hardened cement mortar, 700 degrees C high temperature calcined coal gangue fine aggregate pozzolanic effect is obvious.

  7. Image scanning microscopy with radially polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Yunhai; Wei, Tongda; Huang, Wei; Shi, Yaqin

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve the resolution of image scanning microscopy, we present a method based on image scanning microscopy and radially polarized light. According to the theory of image scanning microscopy, we get the effective point spread function of image scanning microscopy with the longitudinal component of radially polarized light and a 1 AU detection area, and obtain imaging results of the analyzed samples using this method. Results show that the resolution can be enhanced by 7% compared with that in image scanning microscopy with circularly polarized light, and is 1.54-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. Additionally, the peak intensity of ISM is 1.54-fold higher than that of a confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. In conclusion, the combination of the image scanning microscopy and the radially polarized light could improve the resolution, and it could realize high-resolution and high SNR imaging at the same time.

  8. Growth and structure of thin platinum films deposited on Co(0001) studied by low-energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, G. F.; Légaré, P.; Sadki, A.; Castellani, N. J.

    2000-06-01

    The growth of platinum deposited on Co(0001) at room temperature in the range of submonolayer coverage is described. The evolution of very thin Pt films has been studied using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The LEED patterns suggested a coherent epitaxial growth mode for Pt on Co(0001). Evidence for an island growth mode has been confirmed by STM together with step decoration. However, the second and third monolayers start growing before the completion of the first Pt layer. The electronic structure of the Pt deposits exhibited original properties with low Fermi level density of states and valence-band broadening. This is in agreement with theoretical calculations presented in this work.

  9. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, G.M.R.; Breedijk, R.M.P.; Brandt, R.A.J.; Zeelenberg, C.H.C.; De Jong, B.E.; Timmermans, W.; Nahidi Azar, L.; Hoebe, R.A.; Stallinga, S.; Manders, E.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity wh

  10. Re-scan confocal microscopy : scanning twice for better resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, G.M.R.; Breedijk, R.M.P.; Brandt, R.A.J.; Zeelenberg, C.H.C.; de Jong, B.E.; Timmermans, W.; Azar, L.N.; Hoebe, R.A.; Stallinga, S.; Manders, E.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity wh

  11. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  14. X-ray induced chemical reaction revealed by in-situ X-ray diffraction and scanning X-ray microscopy in 15 nm resolution (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingyuan; Liu, Wenjun; Bock, David; De Andrade, Vincent; Yan, Hanfei; Huang, Xiaojing; Marschilok, Amy; Takeuchi, Esther; Xin, Huolin; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-09-01

    The detection sensitivity of synchrotron-based X-ray techniques has been largely improved due to the ever increasing source brightness, which have significantly advanced ex-situ and in-situ research for energy materials, such as lithium-ion batteries. However, the strong beam-matter interaction arisen from the high beam flux can significantly modify the material structure. The parasitic beam-induced effect inevitably interferes with the intrinsic material property, which brings difficulties in interpreting experimental results, and therefore requires comprehensive evaluation. Here we present a quantitative in-situ study of the beam-effect on one electrode material Ag2VO2PO4 using four different X-ray probes with different radiation dose rate. The material system we reported exhibits interesting and reversible radiation-induced thermal and chemical reactions, which was further evaluated under electron microscopy to illustrate the underlying mechanism. The work we presented here will provide a guideline in using synchrotron X-rays to distinguish the materials' intrinsic behavior from extrinsic structure changed induced by X-rays, especially in the case of in-situ and operando study where the materials are under external field of either temperature or electric field.

  15. Scanning probe microscopy competency development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, M.E.; Reagor, D.W.; Jia, Quan Xi [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project collaborators developed an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-STM) capability, integrated it with existing scanning probe microscopes, and developed new, advanced air-based scanning force techniques (SPMs). Programmatic, basic, and industrially related laboratory research requires the existence of SPMs, as well as expertise capable of providing local nano-scale information. The UHV-STM capability, equipped with load-lock system and several surface science techniques, will allow introduction, examination, and reaction of surfaces prepared under well-controlled vacuum conditions, including the examination of morphology and local bonding associated with the initial stages of film growth under controlled growth conditions. The resulting capabilities will enable the authors to respond to a variety of problems requiring local characterization of conducting and nonconducting surfaces in liquids, air, and UHV.

  16. Re-scan confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, G.M.R.

    2016-01-01

    One of the instruments that gave insight in the morphology and function of cellular components is the optical microscope. Nowadays, optical microscopy in biomedical applications is commonly combined with fluorescence. One fundamental limit in the possibility to distinguish small structures in the sa

  17. Introduction to scanning tunneling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C Julian

    2008-01-01

    The scanning tunneling and the atomic force microscope, both capable of imaging individual atoms, were crowned with the Physics Nobel Prize in 1986, and are the cornerstones of nanotechnology today. This is a thoroughly updated version of this 'bible' in the field.

  18. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Giulia M R; Breedijk, Ronald M P; Brandt, Rick A J; Zeelenberg, Christiaan H C; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Azar, Leila Nahidi; Hoebe, Ron A; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik M M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity while maintaining the sectioning capability of a standard confocal microscope. This simple technology is typically useful for biological applications where the combination high-resolution and high-sensitivity is required.

  19. Scanning probe microscopy on new dental alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, B.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J.; Ziegler, C.

    Surface analytical methods such as scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the surface properties of amalgam substitutes as tooth filling materials. In particular the corrosion and the passivation behavior of new gallium restorative materials were studied. To give relevant practical data, the measurements were performed with and without the alloys being stored in artificial saliva to simulate physiological oral conditions.

  20. Towards high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabak, Femke Chantal

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, two routes towards high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are described. The first possibility for high-speed scanning that is discussed is the use of MEMS (Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems) devices as high-speed add-ons in STM microscopes. The functionality of these devices

  1. Colloquium: Time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houselt, van Arie; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has revolutionized our ability to image, study, and manipulate solid surfaces on the size scale of atoms. One important limitation of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is, however, its poor time resolution. Recording a standard image with a STM typically takes abo

  2. Proximity Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy/Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Here a new microscopic method is proposed to image and characterize very thin samples like few-layer materials, organic molecules, and nanostructures with nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution using electron beams of energies lower than 20 eV. The microscopic technique achieves high resolution through the proximity (or near-field) effect, as in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), while it also allows detection of transmitted electrons for imaging and spectroscopy, as in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). This proximity transmission electron microscopy (PSTEM) does not require any lens to focus the electron beam. It also allows detailed characterization of the interaction of low-energy electron with materials. PSTEM can operate in a way very similar to scanning tunneling microscopy, which provides high-resolution imaging of geometric and electronic structures of the sample surface. In addition, it allows imaging and characterization of the interior structures of the sample based on the detected...

  3. Rotary-scanning optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Weizhi; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is currently one of the fastest evolving photoacoustic imaging modalities. It has a comparable spatial resolution to pure optical microscopic techniques such as epifluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, and two-photon microscopy, but also owns a deeper penetration depth. In this paper, we report a rotary-scanning (RS)-ORPAM that utilizes a galvanometer scanner integrated with objective to achieve rotary laser scanning. A 15 MHz cylindrically focused ultrasonic transducer is mounted onto a motorized rotation stage to follow optical scanning traces synchronously. To minimize the loss of signal to noise ratio, the acoustic focus is precisely adjusted to reach confocal with optical focus. Black tapes and carbon fibers are firstly imaged to evaluate the performance of the system, and then in vivo imaging of vasculature networks inside the ears and brains of mice is demonstrated using this system.

  4. Production of muscovite-feldspathic glass composite: scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis; Producao de composito moscovita-vidro feldspatico: microscopia eletronica de varredura e analise de difracao de raios X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, F.P.F.; Ogasawara, T.; Santos, S.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEMM/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais; Franca, S.C.A.; Barbato, C.N [Centro de Tecnologia Mineral(CETEM/MCT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this work was to find the sintering conditions for the feldspathic glass + muscovite mixture to produce a dense composite block for manufacturing dental prosthesis by using CAD-CAM. Each 20g of the glass-frit had : 15.55g of Armil-feldspar; 0.53g of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; 1.56g of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}; 0.5g of borax; 1.74g of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}; 0.13g of CeO{sub 2}. Frit's powder finer than 350 Tyler mesh was mixed with 0 wt%, 10 wt%, 20 wt% and 100 wt% of muscovite pressed cylinders (5600 pounds force) 16mm in diameter and sintered under vacuum Vacumat (VITA) furnace at 850 deg C, 900 deg C, 950 deg C, 1000 deg C, 1050 deg C, 1100 deg C and 1150 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. The necessary temperature for high densification depended on the composition of the mixture: 850 deg C (for pure frit); 1050 deg C (for 10 wt% mica) and 1150 deg C (for 20 wt% mica); pure mica degraded during sintering. (author)

  5. Spatial heterodyne scanning laser confocal holographic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Changgeng

    2016-01-01

    Scanning laser confocal holographic microscopy using a spatial heterodyne detection method is presented. Spatial heterodyne detection technique employs a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with the reference beam frequency shifted by two acousto-optic modulators (AOM) relative to the object beam frequency. Different from the traditional temporal heterodyne detection technique in which hundreds temporal samples are taken at each scanning point to achieve the complex signal, the spatial heterodyne detection technique generates spatial interference fringes by use of a linear tempo-spatial relation provided by galvanometer scanning in a typical line-scanning confocal microscope or for the slow-scanning on one dimension in a point-scanning confocal microscope, thereby significantly reducing sampling rate and increasing the signal to noise ratio under the same illumination compared to the traditional temporal heterodyne counterpart. The proposed spatial heterodyne detection scheme applies to both line-scanning and point-s...

  6. Diffraction analysis of beams for barcode scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jay M.; Quinn, Anna M.

    1991-02-01

    Laser based bar code scanners utilize large f/# beams to attain a large depth of focus. The intensity cross-section of the laser beam is generally not uniform but is frequently approximated by a Gaussian intensity profile. In the case of laser diodes the beam cross-section is a two dimensional distribution. It is well known that the focusing properties of large f/# Gaussian beams differ from the predictions of ray tracing techniques. Consequently analytic modeling of laser based bar code scanning systems requires techniques based on diffraction rather than on ray tracing in order to obtain agreement between theory and practice. The line spread function of the focused laser beam is generally the parameter of interest due to the one-dimensional nature of the bar code symbol. Some bar code scanners utilize an anamorphic optical system to produce a beam that that maintains an elliptical cross-section over an extended depth of focus. This elliptical beam shape is used to average over voids and other printing defects that occur in real world symbols. Since the scanner must operate over the maximum possible depth of field the beam emergent from the scanner must be analyzed in both its near field and far field regions in order to properly model the performance of the scanner.

  7. Sample preparation method for scanning force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Jankov, I R; Szente, R N; Carreno, M N P; Swart, J W; Landers, R

    2001-01-01

    We present a method of sample preparation for studies of ion implantation on metal surfaces. The method, employing a mechanical mask, is specially adapted for samples analysed by Scanning Force Microscopy. It was successfully tested on polycrystalline copper substrates implanted with phosphorus ions at an acceleration voltage of 39 keV. The changes of the electrical properties of the surface were measured by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy and the surface composition was analysed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

  8. Scanning probe microscopy at video-rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Schitter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results have demonstrated the feasibility of video-rate scanning tunneling microscopy and video-rate atomic force microscopy. The further development of this technology will enable the direct observation of many dynamic processes that are impossible to observe today with conventional Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs. Examples are atom and molecule diffusion processes, the motion of molecular motors, real-time film growth, and chemical or catalytic reactions. Video-rate scanning probe technology might also lead to the extended application of SPMs in industry, e.g. for process control. In this paper we discuss the critical aspects that have to be taken into account for improving the imaging speed of SPMs. We point out the required instrumentation efforts, give an overview of the state of the art in high-speed scanning technology and discuss the required future developments for imaging at video-rates.

  9. EDITORIAL: Scanning probe microscopy: a visionary development Scanning probe microscopy: a visionary development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-07-01

    The development of scanning probe microscopy repositioned modern physics. When Rohrer and Binnig first used electronic tunnelling effects to image atoms and quantum states they did more than pin down theoretical hypotheses to real-world observables; the scanning tunnelling microscope fed imaginations, prompting researchers to consider new directions and possibilities [1]. As Rohrer once commented, 'We could show that you can easily manipulate or position something small in space with an accuracy of 10 pm.... When you can do that, you simply have ideas of what you can do' [2]. The development heralded a cavalry of scanning probe techniques—such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) [3-5], scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) [6-8] and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) [9, 10]—that still continue to bring nanomaterials and nanoscale phenomena into fresh focus. Not long after the development of scanning tunnelling microscopy, Binnig, Quate and Gerber collaborating in California in the US published work on a new type of microscope also capable of atomic level resolution [3]. The original concept behind scanning tunnelling microscopy uses electrical conductance, which places substantial limitations on the systems that it can image. Binnig, Quate and Gerber developed the AFM to 'feel' the topology of surfaces like the needle of an old fashioned vinyl player. In this way insulators could be imaged as well. The development of a force modulation mode AFM extended the tool's reach to soft materials making images of biological samples accessible with the technique [4]. There have now been a number of demonstrations of image capture at rates that allow dynamics at the nanoscale to be tracked in real time, opening further possibilities in applications of the AFM as described in a recent review by Toshio Ando at Kanazawa University [5]. Researchers also found a way to retrieve optical information at 'super-resolution' [6, 7]. Optical microscopy provides spectral

  10. Conservation of Moroccan manuscript papers aged 150, 200 and 800 years. Analysis by infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajji, Latifa; Boukir, Abdellatif; Assouik, Jamal; Lakhiari, Hamid; Kerbal, Abdelali; Doumenq, Pierre; Mille, Gilbert; De Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2015-02-05

    The preservation of manuscripts and archive materials is a serious problem for librarians and restorers. Paper manuscript is subjected to numerous degradation factors affecting their conservation state. This research represents an attempt to evaluate the conservation restoration process applied in Moroccan libraries, especially the alkaline treatment for strengthening weakened paper. In this study, we focused on six samples of degraded and restored paper taken from three different Moroccan manuscripts aged 150, 200 and 800 years. In addition, the Japanese paper used in restoration has been characterized. A modern paper was also analyzed as reference. A three-step analytical methodology based on infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) analysis was developed before and after restoration in order to determine the effect of the consolidation treatment on the paper structure. The results obtained by XRD and ATR-FTIR disclosed the presence of barium sulfate (BaSO4) in all restored paper manuscripts. The presence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in all considered samples was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. The application of de-acidification treatment causes significant changes connected with the increase of intensity mostly in the region 1426 cm(-1), assigned to the asymmetric and symmetric CO stretching mode of calcite, indicating the effectiveness of de-acidification procedure proved by the rise of the alkaline reserve content allowing the long term preservation of paper. Observations performed by SEM magnify the typical paper morphology and the structure of fibbers, highlighting the effect of the restoration process, manifested by the reduction of impurities.

  11. Semiconductor Surface Characterization by Scanning Probe Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    potentiometry (STP)8 and ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM)9 which allow mapping of lateral surface potential and local subsurface Schottky...A.P.Fein. "Tunneling Spectroscopy of the Si(1 1 1)2xl Surface", Surf.Sci. 181, 295- 306, 1987. 8. P.Muralt, D.W.Pohl, "Scanning tunneling potentiometry

  12. Energetic materials research using scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, J.J.M.H. van den; Duvalois, W.; Benedetto, G.L. Di; Bouma, R.H.B.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    A key-technique for the research of energetic materials is scanning electron microscopy. In this paper several examples are given of characterization studies on energetic materials, including a solid composite propellant formulation. Results of the characterization of energetic materials using scann

  13. Electrochemical gating in scanning electrochemical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahonen, P.; Ruiz, V.; Kontturi, K.; Liljeroth, P.; Quinn, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can be used to determine the conductivity of nanoparticle assemblies as a function of assembly potential. In contrast to conventional electron transport measurements, this method is unique in that electrical connection to the film is not

  14. Phosphogypsum surface characterisation using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to examinations of the samples of natural gypsum and phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has a well developed crystalline structure, and appear in two polymorphous forms, of rombic and hexagonal shape crystals. Natural gypsum has a poorly crystalline structure. The differences in crystalline structure influence the chemical behavior of these row materials.

  15. Energetic materials research using scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, J.J.M.H. van den; Duvalois, W.; Benedetto, G.L. Di; Bouma, R.H.B.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    A key-technique for the research of energetic materials is scanning electron microscopy. In this paper several examples are given of characterization studies on energetic materials, including a solid composite propellant formulation. Results of the characterization of energetic materials using

  16. Environmental scanning electron microscopy in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, J E; Staniewicz, L T L; Guthrie Neé Kirk, S E; Donald, A M

    2013-01-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (1) is an imaging technique which allows hydrated, insulating samples to be imaged under an electron beam. The resolution afforded by this technique is higher than conventional optical microscopy but lower than conventional scanning electron microscopy (CSEM). The major advantage of the technique is the minimal sample preparation needed, making ESEM quick to use and the images less susceptible to the artifacts that the extensive sample preparation usually required for CSEM may introduce. Careful manipulation of both the humidity in the microscope chamber and the beam energy are nevertheless essential to prevent dehydration and beam damage artifacts. In some circumstances it is possible to image live cells in the ESEM (2).In the following sections we introduce the fundamental principles of ESEM imaging before presenting imaging protocols for plant epidermis, mammalian cells, and bacteria. In the first two cases samples are imaged using the secondary electron (topographic) signal, whereas a transmission technique is employed to image bacteria.

  17. Nanoscale thermometry by scanning thermal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Fabian; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Measuring temperature is a central challenge in nanoscience and technology. Addressing this challenge, we report the development of a high-vacuum scanning thermal microscope and a method for non-equilibrium scanning probe thermometry. The microscope is built inside an electromagnetically shielded, temperature-stabilized laboratory and features nanoscopic spatial resolution at sub-nanoWatt heat flux sensitivity. The method is a dual signal-sensing technique inferring temperature by probing a total steady-state heat flux simultaneously to a temporally modulated heat flux signal between a self-heated scanning probe sensor and a sample. Contact-related artifacts, which so far limit the reliability of nanoscopic temperature measurements by scanning thermal microscopy, are minimized. We characterize the microscope's performance and demonstrate the benefits of the new thermometry approach by studying hot spots near lithographically defined constrictions in a self-heated metal interconnect.

  18. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Modeling the Effect of Wave-front Aberrations in Fiber-based Scanning Optical Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraete, H.R.G.W.; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Kalkman, J.

    2013-01-01

    In scanning microscopy and optical coherence tomography, aberrations of the wave-front cause a loss in intensity and resolution. Intensity and resolution are quantified using Fresnel propagation, Fraunhofer diffraction, and the calculation of overlap integrals.

  20. Tip-modulation scanned gate microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Neil R; Cobden, David H

    2008-08-01

    We introduce a technique that improves the sensitivity and resolution and eliminates the nonlocal background of scanned gate microscopy (SGM). In conventional SGM, a voltage bias is applied to the atomic force microscope tip and the sample conductance is measured as the tip is scanned. In the new technique, which we call tip-modulation SGM (tmSGM), the biased tip is oscillated and the induced oscillation of the sample conductance is measured. Applied to single-walled carbon nanotube network devices, tmSGM gives sharp, low-noise and background-free images.

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopy Sample Preparation and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jenny Ngoc Tran; Harbison, Amanda M

    2017-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes allow us to reach magnifications of 20-130,000× and resolve compositional and topographical images with intense detail. These images are created by bombarding a sample with electrons in a focused manner to generate a black and white image from the electrons that bounce off of the sample. The electrons are detected using positively charged detectors. Scanning electron microscopy permits three-dimensional imaging of desiccated specimens or wet cells and tissues by using variable pressure chambers. SEM ultrastructural analysis and intracellular imaging supplement light microscopy for molecular profiling of prokaryotes, plants, and mammals. This chapter demonstrates how to prepare and image samples that are (a) desiccated and conductive, (b) desiccated and nonconductive but coated with an electron conductive film using a gold sputter coater, and (c) wet and maintained in a hydrated state using a Deben Coolstage.

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  3. Manipulating atoms using scanning probe microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Andrew Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Manipulating species using Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is an important discipline in the field of bottom-up fabrication, which facilitates nano-mechanics and electron dynamics investigations. Previous low temperature manipulation highlights include the construction of quantum dots, nano-wires and quantum corrals, all of which began in 1989 with Don Eigler’s iconic writing of I-B-M using 35 xenon atoms. Since then, the field has developed, and we now push, pull, hop, excite, desorb, rotate...

  4. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Manson-Smith, S K

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provi...

  5. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Boppart

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT, utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR. In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR.

  6. Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Presbylarynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Tatiana Maria; Dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho; Pessin, Adriana Bueno Benito; Martins, Regina Helena Garcia

    2016-06-01

    To describe the findings on the presbylarynx under scanning electron microscopy. Cadaver study. Universidade Estadual Paulista (Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil). Sixteen vocal folds were removed during necropsies and distributed into 2 age groups: control (n = 8; aged 30-50 years) and elderly (n = 8; aged 75-92 years). The right vocal fold was dissected, fixed in glutaraldehyde 2.5%, and prepared for scanning electron microscopy. The thickness of the epithelium was measured using a scandium morphometric digital program. In the control group, the epithelium had 5 to 7 overlapped cell layers, rare desquamation cells, and little undulation with protruding intercellular junctions. The lamina propria showed a uniform network of collagen and elastic fibers in the superficial layer. A dense network of collagen was identified in the deeper layer. In the elderly group, the epithelium was atrophic (2-3 cells), with more desquamation cells and intercellular junctions delimited by deep sulci. The epithelial thickness was lower in elderly than in controls (mean [SD], 221.64 [145.90] µm vs 41.79 [21.40] µm, respectively). The lamina propria had a dense and irregular distribution of collagen and elastic fibers in the superficial layer. In the deep layers, the collagen fibers formed a true fibrotic and rigid skeleton. Scanning electron microscopy identified several changes in the elderly larynx, differentiating it from the controls. These alterations are probably related to the aging process of the vocal folds. However, the exact interpretation of these findings requires additional studies, even to the molecular level, having the fibroblasts as targets. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  7. Traceable long range scanning tunneling microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Dimensionally correct and directly traceable measurement is not feasible with conventional scanning tunneling microscopy (STMs) due to severe hysteresis and non-linearity of the commonly applied piezo tube scanners and the very short range.By integrating a custom made probing system based on tunneling current measurement into a commercially available and laser-interferometrically position controlled positioning system, an STM with a principal measuring range of 25 mm×25 mm×5 mm and traceable position measurement has been set-up and tested.

  8. Scanning probe microscopy of protein nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kathleen Ann

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens grows electrically-conductive pili, which act as protein nanowires, in order to transfer electrons from the cell to electron acceptors in its environment when direct charge transfer through the cell membrane is not feasible. Understanding the electronic structure of the pili can provide insight into fundamental processes of electron transfer in biological systems. This study investigated the electronic structure of these protein nanowires using the toolbox of scanning probe microscopy, specifically scanning tunneling microscopy and point tunneling spectroscopy. These measurements were performed at 77 K and at room temperature. The measured data are compared to theoretical calculations. Density of states measurements using tunneling spectroscopy show that these pili act as narrow-gap biological semiconductors at 77 K. The onset of nonzero density of states remains within the metabolically-relevant voltage range. At room temperature, spectroscopy of the pili retains a gap-like structure, but this pseudogap is raised to a nonzero density of states at even the smallest applied voltages. These pilus nanowires also exhibit a distinct spatial dependence of the density of states across the breadth of the pili.

  9. Final Report: Algorithms for Diffractive Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elser, Veit

    2010-10-08

    The phenomenal coherence and brightness of x-ray free-electron laser light sources, such as the LCLS at SLAC, have the potential of revolutionizing the investigation of structure and dynamics in the nano-domain. However, this potential will go unrealized without a similar revolution in the way the data are analyzed. While it is true that the ambitious design parameters of the LCLS have been achieved, the prospects of realizing the most publicized goal of this instrument — the imaging of individual bio-particles — remains daunting. Even with 10{sup 12} photons per x-ray pulse, the feebleness of the scattering process represents a fundamental limit that no amount of engineering ingenuity can overcome. Large bio-molecules will scatter on the order of only 10{sup 3} photons per pulse into a detector with 106 pixels; the diffraction “images” will be virtually indistinguishable from noise. Averaging such noisy signals over many pulses is not possible because the particle orientation cannot be controlled. Each noisy laser snapshot is thus confounded by the unknown viewpoint of the particle. Given the heavy DOE investment in LCLS and the profound technical challenges facing single-particle imaging, the final two years of this project have concentrated on this effort. We are happy to report that we succeeded in developing an extremely efficient algorithm that can reconstruct the shapes of particles at even the extremes of noise expected in future LCLS experiments with single bio-particles. Since this is the most important outcome of this project, the major part of this report documents this accomplishment. The theoretical techniques that were developed for the single-particle imaging project have proved useful in other imaging problems that are described at the end of the report.

  10. Correlative photoactivated localization and scanning electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin G Kopek

    Full Text Available The ability to localize proteins precisely within subcellular space is crucial to understanding the functioning of biological systems. Recently, we described a protocol that correlates a precise map of fluorescent fusion proteins localized using three-dimensional super-resolution optical microscopy with the fine ultrastructural context of three-dimensional electron micrographs. While it achieved the difficult simultaneous objectives of high photoactivated fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation, it required a super-resolution optical and specialized electron microscope that is not available to many researchers. We present here a faster and more practical protocol with the advantage of a simpler two-dimensional optical (Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM and scanning electron microscope (SEM system that retains the often mutually exclusive attributes of fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation. As before, cryosections were prepared using the Tokuyasu protocol, but the staining protocol was modified to be amenable for use in a standard SEM without the need for focused ion beam ablation. We show the versatility of this technique by labeling different cellular compartments and structures including mitochondrial nucleoids, peroxisomes, and the nuclear lamina. We also demonstrate simultaneous two-color PALM imaging with correlated electron micrographs. Lastly, this technique can be used with small-molecule dyes as demonstrated with actin labeling using phalloidin conjugated to a caged dye. By retaining the dense protein labeling expected for super-resolution microscopy combined with ultrastructural preservation, simplifying the tools required for correlative microscopy, and expanding the number of useful labels we expect this method to be accessible and valuable to a wide variety of researchers.

  11. Correlative photoactivated localization and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopek, Benjamin G; Shtengel, Gleb; Grimm, Jonathan B; Clayton, David A; Hess, Harald F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to localize proteins precisely within subcellular space is crucial to understanding the functioning of biological systems. Recently, we described a protocol that correlates a precise map of fluorescent fusion proteins localized using three-dimensional super-resolution optical microscopy with the fine ultrastructural context of three-dimensional electron micrographs. While it achieved the difficult simultaneous objectives of high photoactivated fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation, it required a super-resolution optical and specialized electron microscope that is not available to many researchers. We present here a faster and more practical protocol with the advantage of a simpler two-dimensional optical (Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM)) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system that retains the often mutually exclusive attributes of fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation. As before, cryosections were prepared using the Tokuyasu protocol, but the staining protocol was modified to be amenable for use in a standard SEM without the need for focused ion beam ablation. We show the versatility of this technique by labeling different cellular compartments and structures including mitochondrial nucleoids, peroxisomes, and the nuclear lamina. We also demonstrate simultaneous two-color PALM imaging with correlated electron micrographs. Lastly, this technique can be used with small-molecule dyes as demonstrated with actin labeling using phalloidin conjugated to a caged dye. By retaining the dense protein labeling expected for super-resolution microscopy combined with ultrastructural preservation, simplifying the tools required for correlative microscopy, and expanding the number of useful labels we expect this method to be accessible and valuable to a wide variety of researchers.

  12. Nanoscale resolution immersion scanning thermal microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tovee, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale thermal properties are becoming of extreme importance for modern electronic circuits that dissipate increasing power on the length scale of few tens of nanometers, and for chemical and physical properties sensors and biosensors using nanoscale sized features. While Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) is known for its ability to probe thermal properties and heat generation with nanoscale resolution, until today it was perceived impossible to use it in the liquid environment due to dominating direct heat exchange between microfabricated thermal probe and surrounding liquid that would deteriorate spatial resolution. Nonetheless, our theoretical analysis of SThM in liquids showed that for certain design of SThM probe with resistive heater located near the probe tip, their thermal signal is only moderately affected, by less than half on immersion in a dodecane environment. More significantly, its spatial resolution, surprisingly, would remain practically unaffected, and the thermal contact between the tip...

  13. Scanning electron microscopy of molluscum contagiosum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Abuchaim, Martha Oliveira; Schneider, Maiko Abel; Marques, Leandra; de Castro, Luis Antônio Suíta

    2013-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a disease caused by a poxvirus. It is more prevalent in children up to 5 years of age. There is a second peak of incidence in young adults. In order to examine its ultrastructure, three lesions were curetted without disruption, cut transversely with a scalpel, and routinely processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The oval structure of molluscum contagiosum could be easily identified. In its core, there was a central umbilication and just below this depression, there was a keratinized tunnel. Under higher magnification, a proliferation similar to the epidermis was seen. Moreover, there were areas of cells disposed like a mosaic. Under higher magnification, rounded structures measuring 0.4 micron could be observed at the end of the keratinized tunnel and on the surface of the lesion. PMID:23539009

  14. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemiktarak, U; Ndukum, T; Schwab, K C; Ekinci, K L

    2007-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) relies on localized electron tunnelling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. In the 25-year period since its invention, the STM has helped uncover a wealth of phenomena in diverse physical systems--ranging from semiconductors to superconductors to atomic and molecular nanosystems. A severe limitation in scanning tunnelling microscopy is the low temporal resolution, originating from the diminished high-frequency response of the tunnel current readout circuitry. Here we overcome this limitation by measuring the reflection from a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit in which the tunnel junction is embedded, and demonstrate electronic bandwidths as high as 10 MHz. This approximately 100-fold bandwidth improvement on the state of the art translates into fast surface topography as well as delicate measurements in mesoscopic electronics and mechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM have allowed us to perform thermometry at the nanometre scale. Furthermore, we have detected high-frequency mechanical motion with a sensitivity approaching approximately 15 fm Hz(-1/2). This sensitivity is on par with the highest available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection techniques, and the radio-frequency STM is expected to be capable of quantum-limited position measurements.

  15. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lienert, U.; Li, S. F.; Hefferan, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ...

  16. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kayla X; Holtz, Megan E; Richmond-Decker, Justin; Muller, David A

    2016-08-01

    A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope's objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400 μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens and in situ chemical and electrochemical processes.

  17. Applications of orientation mapping by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The potentials of orientation mapping techniques (in the following referred to as OIM) for studies of thermomechanical processes are analysed. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based OIM techniques are considered. Among the thermomechanical processes...

  18. Scanned probe microscopy for thin film superconductor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Scanned probe microscopy is a general term encompassing the science of imaging based on piezoelectric driven probes for measuring local changes in nanoscale properties of materials and devices. Techniques like scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning potentiometry are becoming common tools in the production and development labs in the semiconductor industry. The author presents several examples of applications specific to the development of high temperature superconducting thin films and thin-film devices.

  19. Bias modulated scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; Perry, David; Byers, Joshua C; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-04-01

    Nanopipets are versatile tools for nanoscience, particularly when used in scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to determine, in a noncontact manner, the topography of a sample. We present a new method, applying an oscillating bias between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in the SICM nanopipet probe and a second QRCE in the bulk solution, to generate a feedback signal to control the distance between the end of a nanopipet and a surface. Both the amplitude and phase of the oscillating ion current, induced by the oscillating bias and extracted using a phase-sensitive detector, are shown to be sensitive to the probe-surface distance and are used to provide stable feedback signals. The phase signal is particularly sensitive at high frequencies of the oscillating bias (up to 30 kHz herein). This development eliminates the need to physically oscillate the probe to generate an oscillating ion current feedback signal, as needed for conventional SICM modes. Moreover, bias modulation allows a feedback signal to be generated without any net ion current flow, ensuring that any polarization of the quasi reference counter electrodes, electro-osmotic effects, and perturbations of the supporting electrolyte composition are minimized. Both feedback signals, magnitude and phase, are analyzed through approach curve measurements to different surfaces at a range of distinct frequencies and via impedance measurements at different distances from a surface. The bias modulated response is readily understood via a simple equivalent circuit model. Bias modulated (BM)-SICM is compared to conventional SICM imaging through measurements of substrates with distinct topographical features and yields equivalent results. Finally, BM-SICM with both amplitude and phase feedback is used for topographical imaging of subtle etch features in a calcite crystal surface. The 2 modes yield similar results, but phase-detection opens up the prospect of faster imaging.

  20. Comparative study of electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy in photosynthetic research

    OpenAIRE

    MATĚNOVÁ, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the ability of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to visualize individual protein complexes. The principle of electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy is explained. For comparision of these methods well characterized photosynthetic complexes LH1, LH2, PSI and PSII were selected.

  1. 3DXRD microscopy - a comparison with neutron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Poulsen, H F

    2002-01-01

    3DXRD microscopy is a novel tool for fast and non-destructive characterisation of the individual grains and sub-grains inside bulk materials (powders or polycrystals). The method is based on diffraction with hard X-rays (E>50 keV), enabling 3D studies of millimeter to centimeter-thick specimens. The position, volume, orientation, and elastic strain can be determined in hundreds of grains simultaneously. Furthermore, the evolution of the plastic strain can be characterised from grain rotations. Likewise, for coarse-grained materials, the topography of the grain boundaries can be mapped. The status of the technique is presented and the potential for in situ processing studies illustrated. The hard-X-ray method is compared to conventional neutron-diffraction techniques: texture and strain measurements, small-angle scattering, and in situ powder diffraction. (orig.)

  2. Photo-imprint Photoacoustic Microscopy for Three-dimensional Label-free Sub-diffraction Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Sub-diffraction optical microscopy allows the imaging of cellular and subcellular structures with resolution finer than the diffraction limit. Here, combining the absorption-based photoacoustic effect and intensity-dependent photobleaching effect, we demonstrate a simple method for sub-diffraction photoacoustic imaging of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent samples. Our method is based on a double-excitation process, where the first excitation pulse partially and inhomogeneously bleaches the molecules in the diffraction-limited excitation volume, thus biasing the signal contributions from a second excitation pulse striking the same region. The differential signal between the two excitations preserves the signal contribution mostly from the center of the excitation volume, and dramatically sharpens the lateral resolution. Moreover, due to the nonlinear nature of the signal, our method offers inherent optical sectioning capability, which is lacking in conventional photoacoustic microscopy. By scanning the excitation beam, we performed three-dimensional sub-diffraction imaging of varied fluorescent and non-fluorescent species. As any molecules have absorption, this technique has the potential to enable label-free sub-diffraction imaging, and can be transferred to other optical imaging modalities or combined with other sub-diffraction methods. PMID:24483902

  3. Collective electronic effects in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, Ali

    The surface plasmon dispersion relations are calculated for a metal coated dielectric probe above a dielectric half space with and without metal coating. Employing prolate spheroidal coordinate system this configuration was modeled as confocal single-sheeted hyperboloids of revolution superimposed on planar domains. The involved media are characterized by frequency dependent, spatially local dielectric functions. Due to subwavelength dimensions of the region of interest, nonretarded electrodynamics is utilized to derive exact analytical expressions describing the resonant surface modes. The dispersion relations are studied as functions of the parameter that defines the hyperboloidal boundaries of the tip and the corresponding coating, and as functions of the involved coating thicknesses. Both parallel and perpendicular polarizations are considered. The results are simulated numerically and limiting cases are discussed with comparison to the Cartesian thin foil case. Using this new type of probe-substrate configuration, the surface plasmon coupling mechanism is investigated experimentally utilizing a scanning probe microscope, and the signal strength acquired by the probe is measured as a function of the distance between the probe and the sample. This is repeated at three different wavelengths of the incident p-polarized photons used to stimulate surface plasmons in the thin metal foil. The results are compared with the theory. Utilizing the prolate spheroidal coordinate system, the related and relevant problem of the Coulomb interaction of a dielectric probe tip with a uniform field existing above a semiinfinite, homogeneous dielectric substrate was studied. This is of interest in atomic force microscopy when the sample surface is electrically charged. The induced polarization surface charge density and the field distribution at the bounding surface of the dielectric medium with the geometry of a single-sheeted hyperboloid of revolution located above the dielectric

  4. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  5. Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Sampled Aerosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bluhme, Anders Brostrøm; Kling, Kirsten; Mølhave, Kristian

    development of an automated software-based analysis of aerosols using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) coupled with Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The automated analysis will be capable of providing both detailed physical and chemical single...

  6. Scanning-tunneling-microscopy studies of the S-induced reconstruction of Cu(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Chorkendorff, Ib

    1994-01-01

    This study utilizes Auger-electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to examine sulfur coverages above theta(S)=0.25 on the Cu(100) surface. These large sulfur coverages are observed to induce a restructuring of the copper surface through the r...

  7. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  8. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  9. Characterization of Biopolymer Surfaces Using Scanning Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-15

    microscopic images of M’, Frommer JE, Foster JS (1989) adsorbed serum albumin on highly oriented Contrast mechanism for resolving organic pyrolyti: graphite J...Colloid Xncerface molecules with tunneling microscopy .re. 1Z:, 650-653. rature ._1, 137-139. Foster JS, Frommer JE (1938) Stemmer A, Rechelt R

  10. SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY STUDIES ON OPTICAL DISC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐磊; 顾冬红; 等

    1994-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope(STM) is used to investigate the optical dise.The areas with and without data stampers are all observedcarefully.Three-dimensional images of the disc surface clearly demonstrate the period.depth of the grooves and the shape of data stampers.Some phenomena of STM imaging are also discussed.

  11. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    to extend a model sample prepared for the microscopies towards a microscale sample while keeping the intrinsic properties found by the microscopies.In this study we present our trial of developing microscopic combined instruments among FIM, field emission microscopy (FEM), STM, AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in which we prepared and characterized the tips for the SPM, and in addition, the sample preparation to take a correlation between nanoscale and microscale properties of functional materials. Recently, we developed a simple sample preparation method of a rutile single crystal TiO2 covered with an epitaxially-grown monolayer of SiO2 by annealing the crystals in a furnace at high temperatures in air; the crystal samples were placed into a quartz container in the furnace [1]. The vapor of SiO evaporated from the quartz container were adsorbed on the crystal while the crystal surfaces being fully oxidized in air. The SiO2-TiO2 composite systems are promising to protect catalytic TiO2 performance; the photo-catalytic activity is kept by coating with hard and stable SiO2 layers and to extend the lifetime of water super-hydrophilicity even in dark, though understanding of their properties is insufficient due to the lack of techniques to fabricate a well-characterized system on a nanoscale to conduct control experiments. The SiO2 overlayers were observed by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) in vacuum and frequency-modulation (FM) AFM in water [1,2], and water contact angles (WCA) were measured [2]. Although the WCA measurement seems a classic characterization, this method possesses a high potential to make a bridge by controlling the environmental conditions. We will discuss the details. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Automated spherical aberration correction in scanning confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.; Royen, M.E.; van Cappellen, W.A.; Houtsmuller, A.B.; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Schitter, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mismatch between the refractive indexes of immersion media and glass coverslips introduces spherical aberrations in microscopes especially for high numerical aperture objectives. This contribution demonstrates an automated adjustment of the coverslip correction collar in scanning confocal microscopy

  13. Full information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, Stephen; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Somnath, Suhas

    2017-04-04

    Apparatus and methods are described for scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy based on acquisition of full probe response. The full probe response contains valuable information about the probe-sample interaction that is lost in traditional scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy methods. The full probe response is analyzed post data acquisition using fast Fourier transform and adaptive filtering, as well as multivariate analysis. The full response data is further compressed to retain only statistically significant components before being permanently stored.

  14. Reducing Photobleaching in STED Microscopy with Higher Scanning Speed

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of super-resolution STED microscopy. We show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy is slowed down by scanning with a higher linear speed, enabled by the large field of view in our custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance. With a depletion irradiance of 0.4 GW/cm$^2$ (time average), we were able to slow down the photobleaching of the Atto 647N dye by 80% with 8-fold faster scanning. Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data qualitatively agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

  15. Scanning coherent diffractive imaging methods for actinic extreme ultraviolet mask metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Patrick; Mohacsi, Istvan; Rajeev, Rajendran; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-07-01

    For the successful implementation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography in the upcoming technology nodes, a major challenge to overcome is the stable and reliable detection and characterization of mask defects. We have recently presented a reflective mode EUV mask scanning lensless imaging tool (RESCAN) which was installed at the XIL-II beamline of the swiss light source and showed reconstructed aerial images of test patterns on EUV masks. RESCAN uses scanning coherent diffractive imaging (SCDI) methods to obtain actinic aerial images of EUV photomasks and was designed for 80 nm onmask resolution. Our SCDI algorithm reconstructs the measured sample by iteratively solving the phase problem using overdetermined diffraction data gathered by scanning across the specimen with a finite illumination. It provides the phase and amplitude aerial images of EUV photomasks with high resolution without the need to use high numerical aperture (NA) lenses. Contrary to scanning microscopy and full-field microscopy, where the resolution is limited by the spot size or NA of the lens, the achievable resolution with our method depends on the detector noise and NA of the detector. To increase the resolution of our tool, we upgraded RESCAN with a detector and algorithms. Here, we present the results obtained with the tool that is capable of up to 40-nm onmask resolution. We believe that the realization of our prototype marks a significant step toward overcoming the limitations imposed by methods relying on imaging optics and shows a viable solution for actinic mask metrology.

  16. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological proc

  17. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological

  18. Scanning SQUID microscopy of local superconductivity in inhomogeneous combinatorial ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Mitra; Stir, Manuela; Kirtley, John R; Hulliger, Jürg

    2014-11-24

    Although combinatorial solid-state chemistry promises to be an efficient way to search for new superconducting compounds, the problem of determining which compositions are strongly diamagnetic in a mixed-phase sample is challenging. By means of reactions in a system of randomly mixed starting components (Ca, Sr, Ba, La, Y, Pb, Bi, Tl, and Cu oxides), samples were produced that showed an onset of diamagnetic response above 115 K in bulk measurements. Imaging of this diamagnetic response in ceramic samples by scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM) revealed local superconducting areas with sizes down to as small as the spatial resolution of a few micrometers. In addition, locally formed superconducting matter was extracted from mixed-phase samples by magnetic separation. The analysis of single grains (d<80 μm) by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and bulk SQUID measurements allowed Tl2Ca3Ba2Cu4O12, TlCaBaSrCu2O(7-δ), BaPb(0.5)Bi(0.25)Tl(0.25)O(3-δ), TlBa2Ca2Cu3O9, Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8, and YBa2Cu3O7 phases to be identified. SSM, in combination with other diagnostic techniques, is therefore shown to be a useful instrument to analyze inhomogeneous reaction products in the solid-state chemistry of materials showing magnetic properties.

  19. Information Acquisition & Processing in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA

    2008-01-01

    Much of the imaging and spectroscopy capabilities of the existing 20,000+ scanning probe microscopes worldwide relies on specialized data processing that links the microsecond (and sometimes faster) time scale of cantilever motion to the millisecond (and sometimes slower) time scale of image acquisition and feedback. In most SPMs, the cantilever is excited to oscillate sinusoidally and the time-averaged amplitude and/or phase are used as imaging or control signals. Traditionally, the step of converting the rapid motion of the cantilever into an amplitude or phase is performed by phase sensitive homodyne or phase-locked loop detection. The emergence of fast configurable data processing electronics in last several years has allowed the development of non-sinusoidal data acquisition and processing methods. Here, we briefly review the principles and limitations of phase sensitive detectors and discuss some of the emergent technologies based on rapid spectroscopic measurements in frequency- and time domains.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of bacteria Tetrasphaera duodecadis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, E; Enríquez, L; Sánchez, A; Ovalle, M; Olivas, A

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the characterization of the Tetrasphaera duodecadis bacteria and the techniques used therein. In order to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the T. duodecadis bacteria scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used throughout its different growth stages. These microorganisms were grown in vitamin B12 broths with 1% tryptone, 0.2% yeast extract, and 0.1% glucose. The turbidimetric method was employed for the determination of bacterial concentration and growth curve. The SEM results show small agglomerates of 0.8 ± 0.05 µm during the lag phase, and rod-like shapes during the exponential phase with similar shapes in the stationary phase.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of Dalkon Shield tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, H L; Williamson, H O

    1983-09-01

    Scanning electron micrographs of Dalkon Shield tails removed from asymptomatic patients show a variety of microbes and debris throughout their entire length. Apparently, even in undamaged tails, bacterial flora thrive in the protein-rich environment within the multifilament tail. The presence of microbes in the portion of the tail beyond the double knot indicates that an alternative mechanism of microbial transport can occur. Since transient endometritis often occurs immediately after insertion of intrauterine devices, microbes may come in contact with both exposed ends of the multifilament tail and be drawn into the tail by capillary action from the uterine environment down the tail toward the double knot as well as upward from the vagina. Such microorganisms could serve as an inoculum for infection.

  2. Scanning SQUID microscopy for magnetic flux systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, J I; Hata, Y

    2003-01-01

    Recently, vortices confined into micro-scale superconductors with shapes like a disk, triangle, square, etc., have attracted much attention because of the quantum phase transition of the self-organized vortex arrangement occurring within such geometrical constraints. Such a transition can be observed using a scanning SQUID microscope with high spatial resolution. We have successfully improved spatial resolution by incorporating a microfabrication technique that reduces both the size of the pick-up coil of the micro DC-SQUID and the standoff distance between the pick-up coil and the sample surface. Using this microscope, we have studied vortex arrangements in micro-scale superconductors made of Nb and YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta films with various sizes and geometrical shapes. A peculiar oscillating behavior of diamagnetic magnetization corresponding to the particular vortex state was observed.

  3. Preparation of platinum/iridium scanning probe microscopy tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Hvid, U.; Mortensen, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    for the production of sharp tips. After being etched the tips are ready for use in scanning tunneling microscopes, or they may be bent to form integrated tip/cantilever systems in ordinary commercial atomic force microscopes, being applicable as tapping mode tips and as electrostatic force microscopy tips. ©1999......We report on the development of an etching setup for use in the preparation of platinum/iridium tips for atomic force microscopy and scanning electrostatic force microscopy as well as scanning tunneling microscopy. The etching process is based on a two step electrochemical procedure. The first step....... This mechanism is based on the formation of oxygen and hydrogen at the platinum/iridium electrode when the potential is above the dissociation potential of water (~ 1.23 V) and storage of these products interstitially in the outer layers of the platinum wire. This leads to "microexplosions" that detach fragments...

  4. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software Package Gxsm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahl P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2009-08-10

    Gxsm is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected toan instrument, it is operating many different avors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy(STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) or in general two-dimensional multi channel data acquisition instruments. The Gxsm core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and oating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor (DSP) subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable Gxsm vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) or tip formation. The Gxsm software is released under the GNU general public license (GPL) and can be obtained via the Internet.

  5. Vector sensor for scanning SQUID microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Vu The; Toji, Masaki; Thanh Huy, Ho; Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Shishido, Hiroaki; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Hayashi, Masahiko; Ishida, Takekazu

    2017-07-01

    We plan to build a novel 3-dimensional (3D) scanning SQUID microscope with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. In the system, a vector sensor consists of three SQUID sensors and three pick-up coils realized on a single chip. Three pick-up coils are configured in orthogonal with each other to measure the magnetic field vector of X, Y, Z components. We fabricated some SQUID chips with one uniaxial pick-up coil or three vector pick-up coils and carried out fundamental measurements to reveal the basic characteristics. Josephson junctions (JJs) of sensors are designed to have the critical current density J c of 320 A/cm2, and the critical current I c becomes 12.5 μA for the 2.2μm × 2.2μm JJ. We carefully positioned the three pickup coils so as to keep them at the same height at the centers of all three X, Y and Z coils. This can be done by arranging them along single line parallel to a sample surface. With the aid of multilayer technology of Nb-based fabrication, we attempted to reduce an inner diameter of the pickup coils to enhance both sensitivity and spatial resolution. The method for improving a spatial resolution of a local magnetic field image is to employ an XYZ piezo-driven scanner for controlling the positions of the pick-up coils. The fundamental characteristics of our SQUID sensors confirmed the proper operation of our SQUID sensors and found a good agreement with our design parameters.

  6. A new Ti/H phase transformation in the H sub 2 sup + titanium alloy studied by x-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction analysis, elastic recoil detection analysis and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T; Grambole, D; Grötzschel, R; Herrmann, F; Kreissig, U; Möller, Wolfhard

    2002-01-01

    The titanium hydrogenation process in the H sub 2 sup + implanted Ti225 titanium alloy has been studied in this work. The Ti/H phase transformation from hydrogen solid solution (hcp) to gamma phase titanium hydride (TiH(gamma)) with a primitive tetragonal structure and then to a titanium dihydride (TiH sub 2 (x)) with a body centred tetragonal structure has been characterized by x-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction analysis and elastic recoil detection analysis. This process is very different from the usual hydrogenation mechanism, in which the delta phase titanium dihydride (TiH sub 2 (delta)) with a face centred cubic structure is always involved. Both of the TiH(gamma) and TiH sub 2 (x) are rare phases, which are formed under extreme conditions. The TiH(gamma) was considered to be a metastable phase in low hydrogen concentration titanium, and the TiH sub 2 (x) phase has not yet been notated in the present Ti/H phase list. The characteristics of the TiH sub 2 (x) are unclear, but it is very stable at room te...

  7. On radiation damage in FIB-prepared softwood samples measured by scanning X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Selina; Ogurreck, Malte; Laipple, Daniel; Krywka, Christina; Burghammer, Manfred; Di Cola, Emanuela; Müller, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The high flux density encountered in scanning X-ray nanodiffraction experiments can lead to severe radiation damage to biological samples. However, this technique is a suitable tool for investigating samples to high spatial resolution. The layered cell wall structure of softwood tracheids is an interesting system which has been extensively studied using this method. The tracheid cell has a complex geometry, which requires the sample to be prepared by cutting it perpendicularly to the cell wall axis. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling in combination with scanning electron microscopy allows precise alignment and cutting without splintering. Here, results of a scanning X-ray diffraction experiment performed on a biological sample prepared with a focused ion beam of gallium atoms are reported for the first time. It is shown that samples prepared and measured in this way suffer from the incorporation of gallium atoms up to a surprisingly large depth of 1 µm.

  8. Super-Resolution Scanning Laser Microscopy Based on Virtually Structured Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yanan; Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy plays a key role in biological studies and medical diagnosis. The spatial resolution of conventional optical microscopes is limited to approximately half the wavelength of the illumination light as a result of the diffraction limit. Several approaches-including confocal microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy, and structured illumination microscopy-have been established to achieve super-resolution imaging. However, none of these methods is suitable for the super-resolution ophthalmoscopy of retinal structures because of laser safety issues and inevitable eye movements. We recently experimentally validated virtually structured detection (VSD) as an alternative strategy to extend the diffraction limit. Without the complexity of structured illumination, VSD provides an easy, low-cost, and phase artifact-free strategy to achieve super-resolution in scanning laser microscopy. In this article we summarize the basic principles of the VSD method, review our demonstrated single-point and line-scan super-resolution systems, and discuss both technical challenges and the potential of VSD-based instrumentation for super-resolution ophthalmoscopy of the retina.

  9. Scanning near-field infrared microscopy on semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Rainer

    2011-01-15

    Near-field optical microscopy has attracted remarkable attention, as it is the only technique that allows the investigation of local optical properties with a resolution far below the diffraction limit. Especially, the scattering-type near-field optical microscopy allows the nondestructive examination of surfaces without restrictions to the applicable wavelengths. However, its usability is limited by the availability of appropriate light sources. In the context of this work, this limit was overcome by the development of a scattering-type near-field microscope that uses a widely tunable free-electron laser as primary light source. In the theoretical part, it is shown that an optical near-field contrast can be expected when materials with different dielectric functions are combined. It is derived that these differences yield different scattering cross-sections for the coupled system of the probe and the sample. Those cross-sections define the strength of the near-field signal that can be measured for different materials. Hence, an optical contrast can be expected, when different scattering cross-sections are probed. This principle also applies to vertically stacked or even buried materials, as shown in this thesis experimentally for two sample systems. In the first example, the different dielectric functions were obtained by locally changing the carrier concentration in silicon by the implantation of boron. It is shown that the concentration of free charge-carriers can be deduced from the near-field contrast between implanted and pure silicon. For this purpose, two different experimental approaches were used, a non-interferometric one by using variable wavelengths and an interferometric one with a fixed wavelength. As those techniques yield complementary information, they can be used to quantitatively determine the effective carrier concentration. Both approaches yield consistent results for the carrier concentration, which excellently agrees with predictions from

  10. 基于上海光源扫描透射X射线显微术的相干衍射成像模拟%Simulation of Coherent Diffraction Imaging Based on Scanning Transimission X-Ray Microscopy of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭兴兴; 刘海岗; 郭智; 吴衍青; 许子健; 王勇; 邰仁忠

    2011-01-01

    扫描透射X射线显微术(STXM)是近年发展起来的基于第三代同步辐射光源的新型谱学显微技术.上海光源已在覆盖大多数重要元素吸收边的250~2000 eV光子能量段实现了STXM技术.基于上海光源STXM实验站装置模拟了一种新的成像方法:在充分利用原有装置基础上发展扫描相干衍射成像技术,不但可以有效提升实验站的空间分辨能力,而且实现起来也相对简单.针对上海光源软X射线实验站特点,讨论了实现扫描相干衍射成像的相干性条件,实验站各因素对成像分辨率的影响等,并针对具体的实验条件进行了模拟分析.模拟显示,通过发展该项技术可有效提高特定样品的空间分辨能力.%Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is a recently developed spectroscopic microscopy based on the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) has achieved STXM method, and the energy spans from 250 to 2000eV which covers most of the important elements' absorption edge. A new experimental method: by fully using the STXM equipment to develop scanning X-ray diffractive technology, not only can improve the spatial resolution, but also can be easy to implement. Considering the specialty of SSRF, the condition of coherence of SSRF for scanning X-ray diffractive technology and experimental condition for the image resolution of reconstruction are discussed. Finally, the method using specific parameters is simulated.Simulation shows that using this technology can efficiently improve the spatial resolution based on specific experimental conditions of specific specimen.

  11. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  12. Scanning superlens microscopy for non-invasive large field-of-view visible light nanoscale imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Wen, Yangdong; Yu, Peng; Liu, Zhu; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-12-01

    Nanoscale correlation of structural information acquisition with specific-molecule identification provides new insight for studying rare subcellular events. To achieve this correlation, scanning electron microscopy has been combined with super-resolution fluorescent microscopy, despite its destructivity when acquiring biological structure information. Here we propose time-efficient non-invasive microsphere-based scanning superlens microscopy that enables the large-area observation of live-cell morphology or sub-membrane structures with sub-diffraction-limited resolution and is demonstrated by observing biological and non-biological objects. This microscopy operates in both non-invasive and contact modes with ~200 times the acquisition efficiency of atomic force microscopy, which is achieved by replacing the point of an atomic force microscope tip with an imaging area of microspheres and stitching the areas recorded during scanning, enabling sub-diffraction-limited resolution. Our method marks a possible path to non-invasive cell imaging and simultaneous tracking of specific molecules with nanoscale resolution, facilitating the study of subcellular events over a total cell period.

  13. Electron-beam-assisted Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Of Insulating Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bullock, E T

    2000-01-01

    Insulating materials are widely used in electronic devices. Bulk insulators and insulating films pose unique challenges for high resolution study since most commonly used charged particle surface analysis techniques are incompatible with insulating surfaces and materials. A, method of performing scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on insulating surfaces has been investigated. The method is referred to as electron-beam assisted scanning tunneling microscopy (e-BASTM). It is proposed that by coupling the STM and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as one integrated device, that insulating materials may be studied, obtaining both high spatial resolution, and topographic and electronic resolution. The premise of the technique is based on two physical consequences of the interaction of an energetic electron beam (PE) with a material. First, when an electron beam is incident upon a material, low level material electrons are excited into conduction band states. For insulators, with very high secondary electron yi...

  14. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, H W

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological processes and aberration-corrected imaging to localize the targeted biomolecule precisely through optical disturbances by specimen. In this thesis, optomechatronics design and control are discussed for...

  15. Resolution and contrast enhancement in laser scanning microscopy using dark beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehez, Harold; Piché, Michel; De Koninck, Yves

    2013-07-01

    Laser scanning microscopy allows for three-dimensional imaging of cells with molecular specific labeling. However the spatial resolution of optical microscopy is fundamentally limited by the diffraction of light. In the last two decades many techniques have been introduced to enhance the resolution of laser scanning microscopes. However most of these techniques impose strong constraints on the specimen or rely on complex optical systems. These constraints limit the applicability of resolution improvement to various imaging modalities and sample types. To overcome these limitations, we introduce here a novel approach, which we called Switching LAser Mode (SLAM) microscopy, to enhance resolution and contrast in laser scanning microscopy. SLAM microscopy relies on subtracting images obtained with dark and bright modes, and exploits the smaller dimensions of the dark spot of the azimuthally polarized TE 01 mode. With this approach, resolution is improved by a factor of two in confocal microscopy. The technique is not based on complex nonlinear processes and thus requires laser power similar to that used in conventional imaging, minimizing photo-damage. The flexibility of the approach enables retrofitting in commercial confocal and two-photon microscopes and opens avenues for resolution enhancement in fluorescence-independent microscopy.

  16. Diffraction phase microscopy: monitoring nanoscale dynamics in materials science [invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Chris; Zhou, Renjie; Hwang, Suk-Won; McKeown, Steven J; Wang, Kaiyuan; Bhaduri, Basanta; Ganti, Raman; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G; Rogers, John A; Goddard, Lynford L; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-09-20

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) utilizes the fact that the phase of an imaging field is much more sensitive than its amplitude. As fields from the source interact with the specimen, local variations in the phase front are produced, which provide structural information about the sample and can be used to reconstruct its topography with nanometer accuracy. QPI techniques do not require staining or coating of the specimen and are therefore nondestructive. Diffraction phase microscopy (DPM) combines many of the best attributes of current QPI methods; its compact configuration uses a common-path off-axis geometry which realizes the benefits of both low noise and single-shot imaging. This unique collection of features enables the DPM system to monitor, at the nanoscale, a wide variety of phenomena in their natural environments. Over the past decade, QPI techniques have become ubiquitous in biological studies and a recent effort has been made to extend QPI to materials science applications. We briefly review several recent studies which include real-time monitoring of wet etching, photochemical etching, surface wetting and evaporation, dissolution of biodegradable electronic materials, and the expansion and deformation of thin-films. We also discuss recent advances in semiconductor wafer defect detection using QPI.

  17. Two-photon microscopy with diffractive optical elements and spatial light modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendon O Watson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates, due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel, resulting in a corresponding increase in speed, or in signal-to-noise ratio, in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM, to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image, such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions, including light path corrections or as adaptive optical devices.

  18. A dynamic scanning method based on signal-statistics for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timischl, F

    2014-01-01

    A novel dynamic scanning method for noise reduction in scanning electron microscopy and related applications is presented. The scanning method dynamically adjusts the scanning speed of the electron beam depending on the statistical behavior of the detector signal and gives SEM images with uniform and predefined standard deviation, independent of the signal value itself. In the case of partially saturated images, the proposed method decreases image acquisition time without sacrificing image quality. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown and compared to the conventional scanning method and median filtering using numerical simulations.

  19. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum's magnetosome chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutner, Christoph; von Bohlen, Alex; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Schneider, Claus M; Westphal, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  20. Microstress contrast in scanning electron acoustic microscopy of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of image contrast in scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) due to the effect of residual stresses in materials is presented. It is found that in regions near the ends of the radial cracks induced by Vickers indentation the SEAM micrographs reveal a rather large variation of the acoustic output signal.

  1. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies.

  2. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-01-03

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  3. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF RAT FOLLICLE DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to study follicular development in millimeter pieces of rat ovary. To use this technology, it is essential to stain the tissue before laser excitation with the confocal microscope. Various fluorescent stains (Yo-Pro, Bo-Pr...

  4. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  5. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1998-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy provides a description of the physics of electron-probe formation and of electron-specimen interations The different imaging and analytical modes using secondary and backscattered electrons, electron-beam-induced currents, X-ray and Auger electrons, electron channelling effects, and cathodoluminescence are discussed to evaluate specific contrasts and to obtain quantitative information

  6. A custom CMOS imager for multi-beam laser scanning microscopy and an improvement of scanning speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2013-02-01

    Multi-beam laser scanning confocal microscopy with a 256 × 256-pixel custom CMOS imager performing focal-plane pinhole effect, in which any rotating disk is not required, is demonstrated. A specimen is illuminated by 32 × 32 diffraction limited light spots whose wavelength and pitch are 532nm and 8.4 μm, respectively. The spot array is generated by a microlens array, which is scanned by two-dimensional piezo actuator according to the scanning of the image sensor. The frame rate of the prototype is 0.17 Hz, which is limited by the actuator. The confocal effect has been confirmed by comparing the axial resolution in the confocal imaging mode with that of the normal imaging mode. The axial resolution in the confocal mode measured by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) for a planar mirror was 8.9 μm, which is showed that the confocality has been achieved with the proposed CMOS image sensor. The focal-plane pinhole effect in the confocal microscopy with the proposed CMOS imager has been demonstrated at low frame rate. An improvement of the scanning speed and a CMOS imager with photo-sensitivity modulation pixels suitable for high-speed scanning are also discussed.

  7. Rapid super-resolution line-scanning microscopy through virtually structured detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yanan; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-15

    Virtually structured detection (VSD) has been demonstrated to break the diffraction limit in scanning laser microscopy (SLM). VSD provides an easy, low-cost, and phase-artifact-free strategy to achieve super-resolution imaging. However, practical application of this method is challenging due to a limited image acquisition speed. We report here the combination of VSD and line-scanning microscopy (LSM) to improve the image acquisition speed. A motorized dove prism was used to achieve automatic control of four-angle (i.e., 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°) scanning, thus ensuring isotropic resolution improvement. Both an optical resolution target and a living frog eyecup were used to verify resolution enhancement.

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1996-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy III provides a unique introduction to the theoretical foundations of scanning tunneling microscopy and related scanning probe methods. The different theoretical concepts developed in the past are outlined, and the implications of the theoretical results for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed in detail. Therefore, this book serves as a most useful guide for experimentalists as well as for theoreticians working in the filed of local probe methods. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  9. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-04

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position.

  10. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions on the erythrocyte surface, called knobs. Current methods for studying these knobs include atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Standard electron microscopy methods rely on chemical fixation and dehydration modifying cell size. Here, a novel method is presented using rapid freezing and scanning electron microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Non-linear image scanning microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Ingo; Ros, Robert; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, multiphoton microscopy can be considered as a routine method for the observation of living cells, organs, up to whole organisms. Second-harmonics generation (SHG) imaging has evolved to a powerful qualitative and label-free method for studying fibrillar structures, like collagen networks. However, examples of super-resolution non-linear microscopy are rare. So far, such approaches require complex setups and advanced synchronization of scanning elements limiting the image acquisition rates. We describe theory and realization of a super-resolution image scanning microscope [1, 2] using two-photon excited fluorescence as well as second-harmonic generation. It requires only minor modifications compared to a classical two-photon laser-scanning microscope and allows image acquisition at the high frame rates of a resonant galvo-scanner. We achieve excellent sensitivity and high frame-rate in combination with two-times improved lateral resolution. We applied this method to fixed cells, collagen hydrogels, as well as living fly embryos. Further, we proofed the excellent image quality of our setup for deep tissue imaging. 1. Müller C.B. and Enderlein J. (2010) Image scanning microscopy. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104(19), 198101. 2. Sheppard C.J.R. (1988) Super-resolution in confocal imaging. Optik (Stuttg) 80 53-54.

  12. Scanning near field microwave microscopy based on an active resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Naser; Kolokoltsev, Oleg; Ordonez-Romero, Cesar Leonardo

    2014-03-01

    A large number of recent implementations of near field scanning microwave microscopy (NFSMM) have been based on the perturbation of a resonant cavity connected to a sharp scanning probe. In this work we present results from an alternative approach: the perturbation of a microwave source connected to a scanning tip. Based on a yittrium iron garnet (YIG) cavity ring resonator this scanning probe system has a quality factor greater than 106, which allows us to detect very small frequency shifts, which translates to a very high sensitivity in sample impedance measurements. Using a selection of representative semiconductor, metal and biological samples we show how this approach leads to unusually high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Work supported by a grant from PAPIIT, UNAM 104513.

  13. Scanning conductance microscopy investigations on fixed human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Jensen, Linda Boye;

    2008-01-01

    Scanning conductance microscopy investigations were carried out in air on human chromosomes fixed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. The point of the investigation was to estimate the dielectric constant of fixed human chromosomes in order to use it for microfluidic device...... optimization. The phase shift caused by the electrostatic forces, together with geometrical measurements of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and the chromosomes were used to estimate a value,for the dielectric constant of different human chromosomes....

  14. Insights into the regulation of transcription by scanning force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, R T; Wyman, C; Goosen, N

    2003-12-01

    The scanning force microscope (SFM) is a valuable tool for the structural analysis of complexes between protein(s) and DNA. In recent years the application of scanning force microscopy to the field of transcription regulation has been reported in numerous studies. Using this technique, novel insights could be obtained into the architecture and dynamics of complexes, which are relevant to the transcription process and the mechanisms by which this process is regulated. In this article an overview is given of SFM studies addressing, in particular, topics in the field of transcription in prokaryotic organisms.

  15. Nanochannel alignment analysis by scanning transmission ion microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajta, I.; Gál, G.A.B.; Szilasi, S.Z.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a study on the ion transmission ratio of a nanoporous alumina sample is presented. The sample was investigated by scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) with different beam sizes. The hexagonally close-packed AlO nanocapillary array, realized as a suspended membrane of 15 νm...... domain. However, for larger beam scanning areas (sampling multiple domains) the transmission ratio was reduced to 5%. The STIM analysis over an area larger than the typical domain size revealed an overall capillary angular spread of ∼ 2°....

  16. Scanning microscopies of superconductors at very low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, V.; Maldonado, A.; Galvis, J.A.; Kulkarni, P. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Guillamon, I. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Rodrigo, J.G. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Suderow, H., E-mail: hermann.suderow@uam.es [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Vieira, S. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Banerjee, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, UP (India); Rodiere, P. [Institut Neel, CNRS/UJF, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-09-15

    We discuss basics of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy (STM/S) of the superconducting state with normal and superconducting tips. We present a new method to measure the local variations in the Andreev reflection amplitude between a superconducting tip and the sample. This method is termed Scanning Andreev Reflection Spectroscopy (SAS). We also briefly discuss vortex imaging with STM/S under an applied current through the sample, and show the vortex lattice as a function of the angle between the magnetic field and sample's surface.

  17. Phase modulation mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Changlin [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn, E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Guangyong, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn, E-mail: gli@engr.pitt.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    This Letter reports a phase modulation (PM) mode of scanning ion conductance microscopy. In this mode, an AC current is directly generated by an AC voltage between the electrodes. The portion of the AC current in phase with the AC voltage, which is the current through the resistance path, is modulated by the tip-sample distance. It can be used as the input of feedback control to drive the scanner in Z direction. The PM mode, taking the advantages of both DC mode and traditional AC mode, is less prone to electronic noise and DC drift but maintains high scanning speed. The effectiveness of the PM mode has been proven by experiments.

  18. Development of first ever scanning probe microscopy capabilities for plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaux, Miles F.; Cordoba, Miguel Santiago; Zocco, Adam T.; Vodnik, Douglas R.; Ramos, Michael; Richmond, Scott; Moore, David P.; Venhaus, Thomas J.; Joyce, Stephen A.; Usov, Igor O.

    2017-04-01

    Scanning probe microscopy capabilities have been developed for plutonium and its derivative compounds. Specifically, a scanning tunneling microscope and an atomic force microscope housed in an ultra-high vacuum system and an inert atmosphere glove box, respectively, were prepared for the introduction of small non-dispersible δ-Pu coupons. Experimental details, procedures, and preliminary imaging of δ-Pu coupons are presented to demonstrate the functionality of these new capabilities. These first of a kind capabilities for plutonium represent a significant step forward in the ability to characterize and understand plutonium surfaces with high spatial resolution.

  19. Axial scanning in confocal microscopy employing adaptive lenses (CAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukourakis, Nektarios; Finkeldey, Markus; Stürmer, Moritz; Leithold, Christoph; Gerhardt, Nils C; Hofmann, Martin R; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Czarske, Jürgen W; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-03-10

    In this paper we analyze the capability of adaptive lenses to replace mechanical axial scanning in confocal microscopy. The adaptive approach promises to achieve high scan rates in a rather simple implementation. This may open up new applications in biomedical imaging or surface analysis in micro- and nanoelectronics, where currently the axial scan rates and the flexibility at the scan process are the limiting factors. The results show that fast and adaptive axial scanning is possible using electrically tunable lenses but the performance degrades during the scan. This is due to defocus and spherical aberrations introduced to the system by tuning of the adaptive lens. These detune the observation plane away from the best focus which strongly deteriorates the axial resolution by a factor of ~2.4. Introducing balancing aberrations allows addressing these influences. The presented approach is based on the employment of a second adaptive lens, located in the detection path. It enables shifting the observation plane back to the best focus position and thus creating axial scans with homogeneous axial resolution. We present simulated and experimental proof-of-principle results.

  20. Compact diffraction phase microscopy for quantitative visualization of cells in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaikova, N. A.; Ryabukho, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a simplified and compact scheme of interference phase microscopy using a diffraction grating and spatial filtering of the diffracted field, i.e., diffraction phase microscopy. The scheme and the parameters of the device with the possibility of using the optical system of a smartphone and its software are analysed. The results of experimental determination of the spatial structure parameters of erythrocytes are presented.

  1. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilyaprak, C; Daraspe, J; Humbel, B M

    2014-06-01

    Since the end of the last millennium, the focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) has progressively found use in biological research. This instrument is a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an attached gallium ion column and the 2 beams, electrons and ions (FIB) are focused on one coincident point. The main application is the acquisition of three-dimensional data, FIB-SEM tomography. With the ion beam, some nanometres of the surface are removed and the remaining block-face is imaged with the electron beam in a repetitive manner. The instrument can also be used to cut open biological structures to get access to internal structures or to prepare thin lamella for imaging by (cryo-) transmission electron microscopy. Here, we will present an overview of the development of FIB-SEM and discuss a few points about sample preparation and imaging.

  3. Applications of scanning probe microscopy in intrinsically conducting polymer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tao; NIU Li; LI Zhuang; DONG Shaojun

    2007-01-01

    The applications of scanning probe microscopy(SPM)in intrinsically conducting polymer research is briefly reviewed,including morphology observation,nanofabrication,microcosmic electrical property measurements,electrochemistry researches,in-situ measurements of film thickness change,and so on.At the same time,some important variations of SPM and the related techniques are briefly introduced.Finally,the future development of SPM in the study of intrinsically conducting polymers is prospected.

  4. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF FILLED SILICONE RUBBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yufu; YANG Qiyun; LI Guangliang

    1988-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of a number of silicone vulcanizates were investigated by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the difference in the presence and absence of filler, the variation of its surface modification as well as the history of thermal aging of the vulcanizates, all of these factors made difference in surface morphology of the fractured surface. This was correlated with the strength of the vulcanizates. The reinforcing effect of filler and the process of fracture were discussed.

  5. Single-nanoparticle-terminated tips for scanning probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Higashitani, Ko

    2006-03-28

    We have developed a wet-chemistry procedure to attach a 10-40 nm colloidal gold nanoparticle to the top of a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) probe tip, making experiments of single nanoparticle interaction possible. This procedure of particle attachment is flexible and can be modified to attach nanoparticles of different kinds and sizes. The single-nanoparticle-terminated tips also have potential in various other applications, such as probes of enhanced sensitivity for optical and magnetic modes SPM.

  6. Scanning gate microscopy of ultra clean carbon nanotube quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Jiamin; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; LeRoy, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We perform scanning gate microscopy on individual suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. The size and position of the quantum dots can be visually identified from the concentric high conductance rings. For the ultra clean devices used in this study, two new effects are clearly identified. Electrostatic screening creates non-overlapping multiple sets of Coulomb rings from a single quantum dot. In double quantum dots, by changing the tip voltage, the interactions between the quantum dots can b...

  7. Active nanocharacterization of nanofunctional materials by scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    FUJITA, Daisuke; Sagisaka, Keisuke

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in the application of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to nanofabrication and nanocharacterization are reviewed. The main focus of this paper is to outline techniques for depositing and manipulating nanometer-scale structures using STM tips. Firstly, the transfer of STM tip material through the application of voltage pulses is introduced. The highly reproducible fabrication of metallic silver nanodots and nanowires is discussed. The mechanism is thought to be spontaneou...

  8. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    PASCARETTI-GRIZON, Florence; MABILLEAU, Guillaume; CHAPPARD, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Material and Methods Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Results Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Conclusion Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials. PMID:24212995

  9. Confocal laser scanning microscopy image correlation for nanoparticle flow velocimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Brian; Yang, Haisheng; Main, Russell; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-01-01

    We present a new particle image correlation technique for resolving nanoparticle flow velocity using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The two primary issues that complicate nanoparticle scanning laser image correlation (SLIC) based velocimetry are (1) the use of diffusion dominated nanoparticles as flow tracers, which introduce a random decorrelating error into the velocity estimate, and (2) the effects of the scanning laser image acquisition, which introduces a bias error. To date, no study has quantified these errors or demonstrated a means to deal with them in SLIC velocimetry. In this work, we build upon the robust phase correlation (RPC) and existing methods of SLIC to quantify and mitigate these errors. First, we implement an ensemble RPC instead of using an ensemble standard cross correlation, and develop an SLIC optimal filter that maximizes the correlation strength in order to reliably and accurately detect the correlation peak representing the most probable average displacement of the nano...

  10. Surface sensitivity effects with local probe scanning Auger-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Agterveld, DTL; Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM; Bentley, J; Allen, C; Dahmen, U; Petrov,

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-high-vacuum segregation studies on in-situ fractured Cu-Sb alloys were performed in terms of nanometer scale scanning Auger/Electron microscopy. S contamination leads to the formation Of Cu2S precipitates which, upon removal due to fracture, expose pits with morphology that depends on the prec

  11. Surface sensitivity effects with local probe scanning Auger-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Agterveld, DTL; Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM; Bentley, J; Allen, C; Dahmen, U; Petrov,

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-high-vacuum segregation studies on in-situ fractured Cu-Sb alloys were performed in terms of nanometer scale scanning Auger/Electron microscopy. S contamination leads to the formation Of Cu2S precipitates which, upon removal due to fracture, expose pits with morphology that depends on the

  12. The Use of Scanning Probe Microscopy to Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Christine A.; Giocondi, Jennifer L.

    2007-06-01

    Over the past decade there has been a natural drive to extend the investigation of dynamic surfaces in fluid environments to higher resolution characterization tools. Various aspects of solution crystal growth have been directly visualized for the first time. These include island nucleation and growth using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy; elemental step motion using scanning probe microscopy; and the time evolution of interfacial atomic structure using various diffraction techniques. In this lecture we will discuss the use of one such in situ method, scanning probe microscopy, as a means of measuring surface dynamics during crystal growth and dissolution. We will cover both practical aspects of imaging such as environmental control, fluid flow, and electrochemical manipulation, as well as the types of physical measurements that can be made. Measurements such as step motion, critical lengths, nucleation density, and step fluctuations, will be put in context of the information they provide about mechanistic processes at surfaces using examples from metal and mineral crystal growth.

  13. Near-field scanning optical microscopy in cell biology and cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Michael; Perner, Birgit; Rapp, Alexander; Wollweber, Leo; Scherthan, Harry; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    2006-01-01

    Light microscopy has proven to be one of the most versatile analytical tools in cell biology and cytogenetics. The growing spectrum of scientific knowledge demands a continuous improvement of the optical resolution of the instruments. In far-field light microscopy, the attainable resolution is dictated by the limit of diffraction, which, in practice, is about 250 nm for high-numerical-aperture objective lenses. Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) was the first technique that has overcome this limit up to about one order of magnitude. Typically, the resolution range below 100 nm is accessed for biological applications. Using appropriately designed scanning probes allows for obtaining an extremely small near-field light excitation volume (some tens of nanometers in diameter). Because of the reduction of background illumination, high contrast imaging becomes feasible for light transmission and fluorescence microscopy. The height of the scanning probe is controlled by atomic force interactions between the specimen surface and the probe tip. The control signal can be used for the production of a topographic (nonoptical) image that can be acquired simultaneously. In this chapter, the principle of NSOM is described with respect to biological applications. A brief overview of some requirements in biology and applications described in the literature are given. Practical advice is focused on instruments with aperture-type illumination probes. Preparation protocols focussing on NSOM of cell surfaces and chromosomes are presented.

  14. The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C A; Giocondi, J L

    2007-04-16

    Over the past decade there has been a natural drive to extend the investigation of dynamic surfaces in fluid environments to higher resolution characterization tools. Various aspects of solution crystal growth have been directly visualized for the first time. These include island nucleation and growth using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy; elemental step motion using scanning probe microscopy; and the time evolution of interfacial atomic structure using various diffraction techniques. In this lecture we will discuss the use of one such in situ method, scanning probe microscopy, as a means of measuring surface dynamics during crystal growth and dissolution. We will cover both practical aspects of imaging such as environmental control, fluid flow, and electrochemical manipulation, as well as the types of physical measurements that can be made. Measurements such as step motion, critical lengths, nucleation density, and step fluctuations, will be put in context of the information they provide about mechanistic processes at surfaces using examples from metal and mineral crystal growth.

  15. Scanning probe microscopy: instrumentation and applications on thin films and magnetic multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoutsos, Vagelis

    2009-12-01

    In this article we present a review on instrumentation and the modes of operation of a scanning probe microscope. In detail, we review the main techniques of Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), which are Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), focusing our attention on the latter one. The AFM instrument provides information on the roughness and grain size of thin films. As an example we review recent results on two metallic thin film systems: thin Ag films deposited on glass, and Ni/Pt compositionally modulated multilayers deposited on glass, Si, and polyimide substrates. To show the validity of the grain size measurements, we compare the data with the ones resulting from X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. We show that the AFM results are reliable for grain diameters as small as 14 nm, which is approximately comparable to the tip radius. Finally, we deal with Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) results on Co/Pt and Co/Au multilayers. We observe perpendicularly magnetized domains. The domain configurations are correlated to the magnetization hysteresis curves.

  16. Correlative Analysis of Immunoreactivity in Confocal Laser-Scanning Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Focused Ion Beam Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eSonomura

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of rat brain with minimal effort has recently been realized by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam milling (FIB-SEM. Because application of immunohistochemical staining to electron microscopy has a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures, we here tried to apply immunocytochemistry to FIB-SEM and correlate immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM with that in FIB-SEM. The dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in rat neostriatum were visualized with a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion, and thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2. After detecting the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites in CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for electron microscopy by the immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB methods, respectively. In the contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitation and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were easily recognizable as in the images of transmission electron microscopy. In the sites of interest, some appositions were revealed to display synaptic specialization of asymmetric type. The present method is thus useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connection in the central neural circuit.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy of monoatomic gold chains on vicinal Si(335) surface: experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, M.; Kwapinski, T.; Jalochowski, M. [Institute of Physics and Nanotechnology Center, M. Curie-Sklodowska University, pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2005-02-01

    We study electronic and topographic properties of the Si(335) surface, containing Au wires parallel to the steps. We use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) supplemented by reflection of high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) technique. The STM data show the space and voltage dependent oscillations of the distance between STM tip and the surface which can be explained within one band tight binding Hubbard model. We calculate the STM current using nonequilibrium Keldysh Green function formalism. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Scanning electron microscopy: preparation and imaging for SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chris G

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been almost universally applied for the surface examination and characterization of both natural and man-made objects. Although an invasive technique, developments in electron microscopy over the years has given the microscopist a much clearer choice in how invasive the technique will be. With the advent of low vacuum SEM in the 1970s (The environmental cold stage, 1970) and environmental SEM in the late 1980s (J Microsc 160(pt. 1):9-19, 1989), it is now possible in some circumstances to examine samples without preparation. However, for the examination of biological tissue and cells it is still advisable to chemically fix, dehydrate, and coat samples for SEM imaging and analysis. This chapter aims to provide an overview of SEM as an imaging tool, and a general introduction to some of the methods applied for the preparation of samples.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of primate chorionic villi following ultrasonic microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B F

    1991-01-01

    Villi from human, macaque and baboon placentae were subjected to ultrasonication after prolonged osmication, and examined by scanning electron microscopy. The technique was often successful in removing the overlying trophoblast and revealing expanses of the trophoblastic basal lamina, a conclusion corroborated by transmission electron microscopy. These preparations bore a remarkable similarity in appearance to microvascular cast preparations of the fetal vasculature. Relatively straight parallel tubules appeared to correspond in position to the location of fetal vessels in intermediate villi, whereas portions of the basal laminae of terminal villi were in the form of convoluted, branched cylinders similar to SEM images of fetal capillaries of terminal villi. The basal lamina did not have evidence of pores as has been described in some basal laminae.

  20. Integrated Confocal and Scanning Probe Microscopy for Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Haupt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM continues to be developed, not only in design, but also in application. The new focus of using AFM is changing from pure material to biomedical studies. More frequently, it is being used in combination with other optical imaging methods, such as confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and fluorescent imaging, to provide a more comprehensive understanding of biological systems. To date, AFM has been used increasingly as a precise micromanipulator, probing and altering the mechanobiological characteristics of living cells and tissues, in order to examine specific, receptor-ligand interactions, material properties, and cell behavior. In this review, we discuss the development of this new hybrid AFM, current research, and potential applications in diagnosis and the detection of disease.

  1. Local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline AlN ceramics measured by scanning thermal microscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yue-Fei; Wang Li; R. Heiderhoff; A. K. Geinzer; Wei Bin; Ji Yuan; Han Xiao-Dong; L. J. Balk; Zhang Ze

    2012-01-01

    The local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics is measured and imaged by using a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) and complementary scanning electron microscope (SEM) based techniques at room temperature.The quantitative thermal conductivity for the AlN sample is gained by using a SThM with a spatial resolution of sub-micrometer scale through using the 3w method.A thermal conductivity of 308 W/m·K withingrains corresponding to that of high-purity single crystal AlN is obtained.The slight differences in thermal conduction between the adjacent grains are found to result from crystallographic misorientations,as demonstrated in the electron backscattered diffraction.A much lower thermal conductivity at the grain boundary is due to impurities and defects enriched in these sites,as indicated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  2. High resolution helium ion scanning microscopy of the rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, William L; Van Hoek, Alfred N; Păunescu, Teodor G; Huynh, Chuong; Goetze, Bernhard; Singh, Bipin; Scipioni, Larry; Stern, Lewis A; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Helium ion scanning microscopy is a novel imaging technology with the potential to provide sub-nanometer resolution images of uncoated biological tissues. So far, however, it has been used mainly in materials science applications. Here, we took advantage of helium ion microscopy to explore the epithelium of the rat kidney with unsurpassed image quality and detail. In addition, we evaluated different tissue preparation methods for their ability to preserve tissue architecture. We found that high contrast, high resolution imaging of the renal tubule surface is possible with a relatively simple processing procedure that consists of transcardial perfusion with aldehyde fixatives, vibratome tissue sectioning, tissue dehydration with graded methanol solutions and careful critical point drying. Coupled with the helium ion system, fine details such as membrane texture and membranous nanoprojections on the glomerular podocytes were visualized, and pores within the filtration slit diaphragm could be seen in much greater detail than in previous scanning EM studies. In the collecting duct, the extensive and striking apical microplicae of the intercalated cells were imaged without the shrunken or distorted appearance that is typical with conventional sample processing and scanning electron microscopy. Membrane depressions visible on principal cells suggest possible endo- or exocytotic events, and central cilia on these cells were imaged with remarkable preservation and clarity. We also demonstrate the use of colloidal gold probes for highlighting specific cell-surface proteins and find that 15 nm gold labels are practical and easily distinguishable, indicating that external labels of various sizes can be used to detect multiple targets in the same tissue. We conclude that this technology represents a technical breakthrough in imaging the topographical ultrastructure of animal tissues. Its use in future studies should allow the study of fine cellular details and provide

  3. High-speed Lissajous-scan atomic force microscopy: scan pattern planning and control design issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaei, A; Yong, Yuen K; Moheimani, S O Reza

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of triangular or sawtooth waveforms is a major difficulty for achieving high-speed operation in many scanning applications such as scanning probe microscopy. Such non-smooth waveforms contain high order harmonics of the scan frequency that can excite mechanical resonant modes of the positioning system, limiting the scan range and bandwidth. Hence, fast raster scanning often leads to image distortion. This paper proposes analysis and design methodologies for a nonlinear and smooth closed curve, known as Lissajous pattern, which allows much faster operations compared to the ordinary scan patterns. A simple closed-form measure is formulated for the image resolution of the Lissajous pattern. This enables us to systematically determine the scan parameters. Using internal model controllers (IMC), this non-raster scan method is implemented on a commercial atomic force microscope driven by a low resonance frequency positioning stage. To reduce the tracking errors due to actuator nonlinearities, higher order harmonic oscillators are included in the IMC controllers. This results in significant improvement compared to the traditional IMC method. It is shown that the proposed IMC controller achieves much better tracking performances compared to integral controllers when the noise rejection performances is a concern.

  4. Integrated micro ring resonator displacement sensor for scanning probe microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyat, Isa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2004-03-01

    We describe a novel displacement sensor for scanning probe microscopies using an integrated optical micro ring resonator. This device operates by means of monitoring the changes in the transmission spectrum of a high finesse micro ring resonator. Finite element method simulations were carried out to obtain the optimum sensor design and finite difference time domain simulation was used to obtain the transfer characteristics of micro ring resonators. Operation principles and sensitivity calculations are discussed in detail. To achieve high sensitivity, we have studied different types of ring resonator. The highest sensitivity is obtained in a race-track resonator. This new design should provide sensitivities as high as ~10-4 Å-1.

  5. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhang, Hao F.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experimen...

  6. Contrast distortion induced by modulation voltage in scanning capacitance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M. N.; Hu, C. W.; Chou, T. H.; Lee, Y. J.

    2012-08-01

    With a dark-mode scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM), we directly observed the influence of SCM modulation voltage (MV) on image contrasts. For electrical junctions, an extensive modulated area induced by MV may lead to noticeable changes in the SCM signal phase and intensity, resulting in a narrowed junction image and a broadened carrier concentration profile. This contrast distortion in SCM images may occur even if the peak-to-peak MV is down to 0.3 V. In addition, MV may shift the measured electrical junction depth. The balance of SCM signals components explain these MV-induced contrast distortions.

  7. Oxygen-free in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy under full electrochemical potential control (in situ STM) has been used extensively as an efficient method to characterize microstructures at solid/liquid interfaces at the atomic and molecular levels. However, under ambient conditions oxygen may interfere in open......, the STM image quality of the monolayer structures has improved significantly in the absence of oxygen. Reasons for the drastic effects of dioxygen based on both chemical surface reactivity and electron scattering effects are discussed. These observations are important in general for STM of oxygen...

  8. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  9. Measurement of dihedral angles by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achutaramayya, G.; Scott, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The extension of Hoover's (1971) technique to the case of dihedral-angle measurement is described. Dihedral angles are often determined by interferometry on thermally grooved grain boundaries to obtain information on relative interfacial energies. In the technique considered the measured angles approach the true angles as the tilt angle approaches 90 deg. It is pointed out that the scanning electron microscopy method provides a means of seeing the real root of a groove at a lateral magnification which is higher than that obtainable with interferometry.

  10. Measurement of dihedral angles by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achutaramayya, G.; Scott, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The extension of Hoover's (1971) technique to the case of dihedral-angle measurement is described. Dihedral angles are often determined by interferometry on thermally grooved grain boundaries to obtain information on relative interfacial energies. In the technique considered the measured angles approach the true angles as the tilt angle approaches 90 deg. It is pointed out that the scanning electron microscopy method provides a means of seeing the real root of a groove at a lateral magnification which is higher than that obtainable with interferometry.

  11. Transfer functions in collection scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnaya, Elena A.

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that, if in collection near-field optical microscopy the probe-sample coupling can be disregarded, a fiber probe can be considered as a detector of the near-field intensity whose size can be accounted for via an intensity transfer function. We show that, in general...... are considered with respect to the relation between near-field optical images and the corresponding intensity distributions. Our conclusions are supported with numerical simulations and experimental results obtained by using a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  12. Multifrequency scanning probe microscopy study of nanodiamond agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Vasudeva; Lippold, Stephen; Li, Qian; Strelcov, Evgheny; Okatan, Baris; Legum, Benjamin; Kalinin, Sergei; Clarion University Team; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Team

    Due to their rich surface chemistry and excellent mechanical properties and non-toxic nature, nanodiamond particles have found applications such as biomedicine, tribology and lubrication, targeted drug delivery systems, tissue scaffolds and surgical implants. Although single nanodiamond particles have diameters about 4-5nm, they tend to form agglomerates. While these agglomerates can be useful for some purposes, many applications of nanodiamonds require single particle, disaggregated nanodiamonds. This work is oriented towards studying forces and interactions that contribute to agglomeration in nanodiamonds. In this work, using multifrequency scanning probe microscopy techniques, we show that agglomerate sizes can vary between 50-100nm in raw nanodiamonds. Extremeties of particles and Interfaces between agglomerates show dissipative forces with scanning probe microscope tip, indicating agglomerates could act as points of increased adhesion, thus reducing lubricating efficiency when nanodiamonds are used as lubricant additives. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  13. Imaging Photon Lattice States by Scanning Defect Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, D. L.; Shanks, W. E.; Li, Andy C. Y.; Ateshian, Lamia; Koch, Jens; Houck, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave photons inside lattices of coupled resonators and superconducting qubits can exhibit surprising matterlike behavior. Realizing such open-system quantum simulators presents an experimental challenge and requires new tools and measurement techniques. Here, we introduce scanning defect microscopy as one such tool and illustrate its use in mapping the normal-mode structure of microwave photons inside a 49-site kagome lattice of coplanar waveguide resonators. Scanning is accomplished by moving a probe equipped with a sapphire tip across the lattice. This locally perturbs resonator frequencies and induces shifts of the lattice resonance frequencies, which we determine by measuring the transmission spectrum. From the magnitude of mode shifts, we can reconstruct photon field amplitudes at each lattice site and thus create spatial images of the photon-lattice normal modes.

  14. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of graphite edges

    CERN Document Server

    Niimi, Y; Kambara, H; Tagami, K; Tsukada, M; Fukuyama, H; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the electronic local density of states (LDOS) near single step edges at the surface of exfoliated graphite. In scanning tunneling microscopy measurements, we observed the $(\\sqrt{3} \\times \\sqrt{3}) R 30^{\\circ}$ and honeycomb superstructures both extending over 3$-$4 nm either from the zigzag or armchair edge. Calculations based on a density-functional derived non-orthogonal tight-binding model show that these superstructures can coexist if the two types of edge admix each other in real graphite step edges. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements near the zigzag edge reveal a clear peak in the LDOS at an energy below the Fermi energy by 20 meV. No such a peak was observed near the armchair edge. We concluded that this peak corresponds to the "edge state" theoretically predicted for graphene ribbons, since a similar prominent LDOS peak due to the edge state is obtained by the first principles calculations.

  15. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Yoshitaka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example, while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  16. Correlative analysis of immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Nakatani, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Yo; Unzai, Tomo; Matsuda, Wakoto; Iwai, Haruki; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Uemura, Masanori; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of the brain has been realized with minimal effort by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with focused ion beam (FIB) milling (FIB-SEM). Application of immunohistochemical staining in electron microscopy (EM) provides a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures. Thus, we applied immunocytochemistry for FIB-SEM and correlated this immunoreactivity with that in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM). Dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in the rat neostriatum were visualized using a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion. Moreover, the thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). After detection of the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites by using CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for EM by using immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB) methods, respectively. In contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitations and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were as easily recognizable as those in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Furthermore, in the sites of interest, some appositions displayed synaptic specializations of an asymmetric type. Thus, the present method was useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connections in the central neural circuit.

  17. Super-Resolution Scanning Laser Microscopy Based on Virtually Structured Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi, Yanan; Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy plays a key role in biological studies and medical diagnosis. The spatial resolution of conventional optical microscopes is limited to approximately half the wavelength of the illumination light as a result of the diffraction limit. Several approaches—including confocal microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy, and structured illumination microscopy—have been established to achie...

  18. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  19. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM.

  20. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored.

  1. Rank-1 accelerated illumination recovery in scanning diffractive imaging by transparency estimation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hau-Tieng

    2014-08-07

    Illumination retrieval in scanning diffractive imaging a.k.a. ptychography is challenging when the specimen is weakly scattering or surrounded by empty space. We describe a rank-1 acceleration method for weakly scattering or piecewise smooth specimens.

  2. Wavelength scanning achieves pixel super-resolution in holographic on-chip microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Göröcs, Zoltan; Zhang, Yibo; Feizi, Alborz; Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Lensfree holographic on-chip imaging is a potent solution for high-resolution and field-portable bright-field imaging over a wide field-of-view. Previous lensfree imaging approaches utilize a pixel super-resolution technique, which relies on sub-pixel lateral displacements between the lensfree diffraction patterns and the image sensor's pixel-array, to achieve sub-micron resolution under unit magnification using state-of-the-art CMOS imager chips, commonly used in e.g., mobile-phones. Here we report, for the first time, a wavelength scanning based pixel super-resolution technique in lensfree holographic imaging. We developed an iterative super-resolution algorithm, which generates high-resolution reconstructions of the specimen from low-resolution (i.e., under-sampled) diffraction patterns recorded at multiple wavelengths within a narrow spectral range (e.g., 10-30 nm). Compared with lateral shift-based pixel super-resolution, this wavelength scanning approach does not require any physical shifts in the imaging setup, and the resolution improvement is uniform in all directions across the sensor-array. Our wavelength scanning super-resolution approach can also be integrated with multi-height and/or multi-angle on-chip imaging techniques to obtain even higher resolution reconstructions. For example, using wavelength scanning together with multi-angle illumination, we achieved a halfpitch resolution of 250 nm, corresponding to a numerical aperture of 1. In addition to pixel super-resolution, the small scanning steps in wavelength also enable us to robustly unwrap phase, revealing the specimen's optical path length in our reconstructed images. We believe that this new wavelength scanning based pixel super-resolution approach can provide competitive microscopy solutions for high-resolution and field-portable imaging needs, potentially impacting tele-pathology applications in resource-limited-settings.

  3. Sample heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2013-08-01

    A sample-heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) has been developed and used for microscopic magnetization analysis at temperatures up to 500°C. In this system, a compact ceramic heater and a preheating operation keep the ultra-high vacuum conditions while the sample is heated during spin SEM measurement. Moreover, the secondary-electron collector, which is arranged close to the sample, was modified so that it is not damaged at high temperatures. The system was used to heat a Co(1000) single-crystal sample from room temperature up to 500°C, and the magnetic-domain structures were observed. Changes of the domain structures were observed around 220 and 400°C, and these changes are considered to be due to phase transitions of this sample.

  4. Ultramicrosensors based on transition metal hexacyanoferrates for scanning electrochemical microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Komkova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report here a way for improving the stability of ultramicroelectrodes (UME based on hexacyanoferrate-modified metals for the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The most stable sensors were obtained by electrochemical deposition of six layers of hexacyanoferrates (HCF, more specifically, an alternating pattern of three layers of Prussian Blue and three layers of Ni–HCF. The microelectrodes modified with mixed layers were continuously monitored in 1 mM hydrogen peroxide and proved to be stable for more than 5 h under these conditions. The mixed layer microelectrodes exhibited a stability which is five times as high as the stability of conventional Prussian Blue-modified UMEs. The sensitivity of the mixed layer sensor was 0.32 A·M−1·cm−2, and the detection limit was 10 µM. The mixed layer-based UMEs were used as sensors in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM experiments for imaging of hydrogen peroxide evolution.

  5. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L; Shung, K Kirk; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging.

  6. Conditioning of mealybug (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Palma-Jiménez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the methodology for an adequate conditioning for the cleaning of mealybugs specimens and its correct observation. This work was done in the laboratory of the Research Center in Microscopic Structures (CIEMIC of the University of Costa Rica, in 2012. Four types of methodologies were implemented, which evidenced a gradual improvement of the observation of the ultrastructures through the Scanning Electron Microscopy. Every process was described in detail. The best results were showed with 10% xylene (in some cases it was feasible using 95-100% ethanol. It allowed to remove the wax from the body of the insect, avoiding its collapse, and observing the specific ultrastructures of the individual. This approach will reduce the time and cost of future taxonomic research of mealybugs.

  7. Extracting Impurity Locations using Scanning Capacitance Microscopy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGHAEI, S.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the possibility to use scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM for the 2-D and 3-D "atomistic" dopant profiling of semiconductor materials. For this purpose, we first analyze the effects of random dopant fluctuations (RDF on SCM measurements with nanoscale probes and show that the discrete and random locations of dopant impurities significantly affect the differential capacitance measured in SCM experiments if the dimension of the probe is below 50 nm. Then, we present an algorithm to compute the x, y, and z coordinates of the ionized impurities in the semiconductor material using a set of SCM measurements. The algorithm is based on evaluating the doping sensitivity functions of the differential capacitance and uses a gradient-based iterative method to compute the locations of dopants. Finally, we discuss a standard simulation case and show that we are able to successfully retrieve the locations of the ionized impurities using the proposed algorithm.

  8. Theory and application of scanning electron acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Chen, Ruiyi; Yost, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional theoretical model based on the application of the thermal conduction and Navier equations to a chopped electron beam incident on a disk specimen is used to obtain the particle displacement field in the specimen. The results lead to a consideration of the signal generation, spatial resolution, and contrast mechanisms in scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM). The model suggests that the time-variant heat source produced by the beam chopping generates driving source, thermal wave, and acoustic wave displacements simultaneously in the specimen. Evidence of the correctness of the prediction is obtained from the mathematically similar problem of pulsed laser light injection into a tank of water. High speed Schlieren photographs taken following laser injection show the simultaneous evolution of thermal and acoustic waveforms. Examples of contrast reversal, stress-induced contrast, and acoustic zone contrast and resolution with SEAM are presented and explained in terms of the model features.

  9. Semiconductor characterization by scanning ion beam induced charge (IBIC) microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vittone, E; Olivero, P; Manfredotti, C; Jaksic, M; Giudice, A Lo; Fizzotti, F; Colombo, E

    2016-01-01

    The acronym IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) was coined in early 1990's to indicate a scanning microscopy technique which uses MeV ion beams as probes to image the basic electronic properties of semiconductor materials and devices. Since then, IBIC has become a widespread analytical technique to characterize materials for electronics or for radiation detection, as testified by more than 200 papers published so far in peer-reviewed journals. Its success stems from the valuable information IBIC can provide on charge transport phenomena occurring in finished devices, not easily obtainable by other analytical techniques. However, IBIC analysis requires a robust theoretical background to correctly interpret experimental data. In order to illustrate the importance of using a rigorous mathematical formalism, we present in this paper a benchmark IBIC experiment aimed to test the validity of the interpretative model based on the Gunn's theorem and to provide an example of the analytical capability of IBIC to characteriz...

  10. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging dynamics at low accelerating voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugg, N.R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Mizoguchi, T. [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); D' Alfonso, A.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Motivated by the desire to minimize specimen damage in beam sensitive specimens, there has been a recent push toward using relatively low accelerating voltages (<100kV) in scanning transmission electron microscopy. To complement experimental efforts on this front, this paper seeks to explore the variations with accelerating voltage of the imaging dynamics, both of the channelling of the fast electron and of the inelastic interactions. High-angle annular-dark field, electron energy loss spectroscopic imaging and annular bright field imaging are all considered. -- Highlights: {yields} Both elastic and inelastic scattering in STEM are acceleration voltage dependent. {yields} HAADF, EELS and ABF imaging are assessed with a view to optimum imaging. {yields} Lower accelerating voltages improve STEM EELS contrast in very thin crystals. {yields} Higher accelerating voltages give better STEM EELS contrast in thicker crystals. {yields} At fixed resolution, higher accelerating voltage aids ABF imaging of light elements.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of congenital corneal leukomas (Peters' anomaly).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, F M; Graue, E L

    1979-08-01

    Specimens of three corneas in two patients with Peter's anomaly were obtained at the time of penetrating keratoplasty and studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In one patient, the anomaly was monocular, and the endothelial surface showed a central defect in Descemet's layer with isolated rounded defects in the midperiphery. Fine collagenous material covered the posterior surface. The other two specimens were obtained from a patient with rubella syndrome without cataracts. The cornea showed malformation of Descemet's membrane with fibroblastic overgrowth on the endothelial layer. Epithelial-like cells and leukocytes were also found. The congenital central leukoma we believe was caused by adhesion of the pupillary membrane in our first patient, and possibly was inflammatory in our second patient.

  12. 2-photon laser scanning microscopy on native human cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Joerg; Toensing, Katja; Dickob, Michael; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Native hyaline cartilage from a human knee joint was directly investigated with laser scanning microscopy via 2-photon autofluorescence excitation with no additional staining or labelling protocols in a nondestructive and sterile manner. Using a femtosecond, near-infrared (NIR) Ti:Sa laser for 2-photon excitation and a dedicated NIR long distance objective, autofluorescence imaging and measurements of the extracellular matrix (ECM) tissue with incorporated chondrocytes were possible with a penetration depth of up to 460 μm inside the sample. Via spectral autofluorescence separation these experiments allowed the discrimination of chondrocytes from the ECM and therefore an estimate of chondrocytic cell density within the cartilage tissue to approximately 0.2-2•107cm3. Furthermore, a comparison of the relative autofluorescence signals between nonarthritic and arthritic cartilage tissue exhibited distinct differences in tissue morphology. As these morphological findings are in keeping with the macroscopic diagnosis, our measurement has the potential of being used in future diagnostic applications.

  13. Local deposition of anisotropic nanoparticles using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Roman G; Mandler, Daniel

    2013-02-28

    We demonstrate localized electrodeposition of anisotropic metal nanoobjects, namely Au nanorods (GNR), on indium tin oxide (ITO) using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). A gold microelectrode was the source of the gold ions whereby double pulse chronoamperometry was employed to generate initially Au seeds which were further grown under controlled conditions. The distance between the microelectrode and the ITO surface as well as the different experimental parameters (electrodeposition regime, solution composition and temperature) were optimized to produce faceted gold seeds with the required characteristics (size and distribution). Colloidal chemical synthesis was successfully exploited for better understanding the role of the surfactant and different additives in breaking the crystallographic symmetry and anisotropic growth of GNR. Experiments performed in a conventional three-electrode cell revealed the most appropriate electrochemical conditions allowing high yield synthesis of nanorods with well-defined shape as well as nanocubes and bipyramids.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of ascospores of Debaryomyces and Saccharomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, C P; Smiley, M J; Baker, F L

    1975-02-28

    Ascospores from species of Debaryomyces and the Torulaspora-group of Saccharomyces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Ornamentation on ascospores of D. hansenii varied from short to long interconnected ridges or broad based, elongated conical protuberances. A spiral rigde system was detected on the ascospores of D. marama, but wart-like protuberances occurred on those of D. cantarelli, D. castellii, D. coudertii, D. formicarius, D. phaffii, D. vanriji and D. yarrowii. Ascospores of D. halotolerans did not have protuberances and the species appears to be identical with Pichia farinosa. Wart-like protuberances also were found on ascospores of S. delbrueckii, S. microellipsodes, S. rosei, S. inconspicuus, S. fermentati, S. montanus and S. vafer, but the ascospore surface of S. pretoriensis was covered by fine ridges. Short tapered ridges covered the ascospores of S. kloeckerianus.

  15. Scanning photoelectron microscopy using a pointed capillary probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, B. N.; Cherkun, A. P.; Aseyev, S. A.; Chekalin, S. V.

    2017-08-01

    The possibilities of a new type of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) for two different samples are experimentally demonstrated. The method is based on the use of a pointed capillary, which can simultaneously act as a 'classical' SPM probe and also as a controlled thin channel for transporting charged particles emitted by the surface to the detector. In the experiment, photoelectrons pass through a dielectric hollow cone probe with an aperture radius of 1 μm and detected by microchannel plates at different points of the investigated conducting surface irradiated by the second harmonic of a femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser. As a result, the sample's surface profile is visualised with a subwavelength spatial resolution. This method makes it possible to control spatially localised beams of electrons, ions, neutral atoms (molecules) and soft X-ray radiation, as well as opens a possibility for research in the field of nanoscale photodesorption of molecular ions.

  16. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  18. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  19. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  20. Volume scanning electron microscopy for imaging biological ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titze, Benjamin; Genoud, Christel

    2016-11-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) has been a key imaging method to investigate biological ultrastructure for over six decades. In recent years, novel volume EM techniques have significantly advanced nanometre-scale imaging of cells and tissues in three dimensions. Previously, this had depended on the slow and error-prone manual tasks of cutting and handling large numbers of sections, and imaging them one-by-one with transmission EM. Now, automated volume imaging methods mostly based on scanning EM (SEM) allow faster and more reliable acquisition of serial images through tissue volumes and achieve higher z-resolution. Various software tools have been developed to manipulate the acquired image stacks and facilitate quantitative analysis. Here, we introduce three volume SEM methods: serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM), focused ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) and automated tape-collecting ultramicrotome SEM (ATUM-SEM). We discuss and compare their capabilities, provide an overview of the full volume SEM workflow for obtaining 3D datasets and showcase different applications for biological research.

  1. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  2. Char porosity characterisation by scanning electron microscopy and image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, H.S.; Rosenberg, P.; Petersen, H.I.; Soerensen, L.H. [Danfoss A/S, Nordborg (Denmark)

    2000-09-01

    No significant change in either the morphotype composition or the macroporosity (pores {gt}5 {mu}m) in the 0-30 wt.% char burnout interval were revealed by reflected light microscopy or image analysis. Two high temperature char series from a Tertiary South American coal (C1) and a Permian Gondwana coal (C2) were therefore examined by scanning electron microscopy to provide information on the combustion process up to {approximately} 60 wt% char burnout. This study documents a significant mesopore ({approximately} 0.1-5 {mu}m) development on the fused chars in the burnout interval studied. A method to quantify the size and amount of the mesopores is described and both the parameters increased with increasing char burnout. Above a char burnout of {approximately} 30 wt% an increase in macroporosity was detected and ascribed to coalescence of mesopores to form large pores. Although the measurement of mesoporosity is restricted to fused chars, i.e. pores in fragments and the char morphotypes inertoid, fusinoid and solid could not be measured, the consideration of mesoporosity seems to be fundamental in understanding, evaluating and modelling combustion processes in the char burnout interval studied. 7 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

  4. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  5. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamer Vestlund, A. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); FIRA International Ltd., Maxwell Road, Stevenage, Herts SG1 2EW (United Kingdom); Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Drew, G.H., E-mail: g.h.drew@cranfield.ac.uk [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  6. Scanning X-ray microscopy of superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Claudia; Ruoss, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Schuetz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart (Germany); Zahn, Patrick; Bayer, Jonas [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart (Germany); Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic flux distribution arising from a high-T{sub c} superconductor is detected and visualized with high spatial resolution using scanning x-ray microscopy (SXM). Therefore, we introduce a sensor layer, namely, an amorphous, soft-magnetic CoFeB cover layer. The magnetic stray fields of the supercurrents lead to a local reorientation of the magnetic moments in the ferromagnet, which is visualized using the large x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effect of the Co and Fe L3-edge. We show that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer corresponds to the in-plane magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and can hence be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors with high spatial resolution. Using the total electron yield (TEY) mode the surface structure and the magnetic domains can be imaged simultaneously and can be correlated. The measurements are carried out at our scanning x-ray microscope MAXYMUS at Bessy II, Berlin with the new low temperature setup.

  7. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy using a MEMS scanning mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Ling, Tao; Wei, Xunbin; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    It has been studied that a potential marker to obtain prognostic information about bladder cancer is tumor neoangiogenesis, which can be quantified by morphometric characteristics such as microvascular density. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can render sensitive three-dimensional (3D) mapping of microvasculature, providing promise to evaluate the neoangiogenesis that is closely related to the diagnosis of bladder cancer. To ensure good image quality, it is desired to acquire bladder PAM images from its inside via the urethra, like conventional cystoscope. Previously, we demonstrated all-optical PAM systems using polymer microring resonators to detect photoacoustic signals and galvanometer mirrors for laser scanning. In this work, we build a miniature PAM system using a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, demonstrating a prototype of an endoscopic PAM head capable of high imaging quality of the bladder. The system has high resolutions of 17.5 μm in lateral direction and 19 μm in the axial direction at a distance of 5.4 mm. Images of printed grids and the 3D structure of microvasculature in animal bladders ex vivo by the system are demonstrated.

  8. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of SILICON(100) 2 X 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubacek, Jerome S.

    1992-01-01

    The Si(100) 2 x 1 surface, a technologically important surface in microelectronics and silicon molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has been studied with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to attempt to clear up the controversy that surrounds previous studies of this surface. To this end, an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) STM/surface science system has been designed and constructed to study semiconductor surfaces. Clean Si(100) 2 x 1 surfaces have been prepared and imaged with the STM. Atomic resolution images probing both the filled states and empty states indicate that the surface consists of statically buckled dimer rows. With electronic device dimensions shrinking to smaller and smaller sizes, the Si-SiO_2 interface is becoming increasingly important and, although it is the most popular interface used in the microelectronics industry, little is known about the initial stages of oxidation of the Si(100) surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy has been employed to examine Si(100) 2 x 1 surfaces exposed to molecular oxygen in UHV. Ordered rows of bright and dark spots, rotated 45^circ from the silicon dimer rows, appear in the STM images, suggesting that the Si(100)-SiO_2 interface may be explained with a beta -cristobalite(100) structure rotated by 45^ circ on the Si(100) surface.

  9. Reciprocity theory of apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy with point-dipole probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esslinger, Moritz; Vogelgesang, Ralf

    2012-09-25

    Near-field microscopy offers the opportunity to reveal optical contrast at deep subwavelength scales. In scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), the diffraction limit is overcome by a nanoscopic probe in close proximity to the sample. The interaction of the probe with the sample fields necessarily perturbs the bare sample response, and a critical issue is the interpretation of recorded signals. For a few specific SNOM configurations, individual descriptions have been modeled, but a general and intuitive framework is still lacking. Here, we give an exact formulation of the measurable signals in SNOM which is easily applicable to experimental configurations. Our results are in close analogy with the description Tersoff and Hamann have derived for the tunneling currents in scanning tunneling microscopy. For point-like scattering probe tips, such as used in apertureless SNOM, the theory simplifies dramatically to a single scalar relation. We find that the measured signal is directly proportional to the field of the coupled tip-sample system at the position of the tip. For weakly interacting probes, the model thus verifies the empirical findings that the recorded signal is proportional to the unperturbed field of the bare sample. In the more general case, it provides guidance to an intuitive and faithful interpretation of recorded images, facilitating the characterization of tip-related distortions and the evaluation of novel SNOM configurations, both for aperture-based and apertureless SNOM.

  10. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  12. Scanning probe microscopy investigation of complex-oxide heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Feng

    Advances in the growth of precisely tailored complex-oxide heterostructures have led to new emergent behavior and associated discoveries. One of the most successful examples consists of an ultrathin layer of LaAlO 3 (LAO) deposited on TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 (STO), where a high mobility quasi-two dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) is formed at the interface. Such 2DEL demonstrates a variety of novel properties, including field tunable metal-insulator transition, superconductivity, strong spin-orbit coupling, magnetic and ferroelectric like behavior. Particularly, for 3-unit-cell (3 u.c.) LAO/STO heterostructures, it was demonstrated that a conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) tip can be used to "write" or "erase" nanoscale conducting channels at the interface, making LAO/STO a highly flexible platform to fabricate novel nanoelectronics. This thesis is focused on scanning probe microscopy studies of LAO/STO properties. We investigate the mechanism of c-AFM lithography over 3 u.c. LAO/STO in controlled ambient conditions by using a vacuum AFM, and find that the water molecules dissociated on the LAO surface play a critical role during the c-AFM lithography process. We also perform electro-mechanical response measurements over top-gated LAO/STO devices. Simultaneous piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and capacitance measurements reveal a correlation between LAO lattice distortion and interfacial carrier density, which suggests that PFM could not only serve as a powerful tool to map the carrier density at the interface but also provide insight into previously reported frequency dependence of capacitance enhancement of top-gated LAO/STO structures. To study magnetism at the LAO/STO interface, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetoelectric force microscopy (MeFM) are carried out to search for magnetic signatures that depend on the carrier density at the interface. Results demonstrate an electronicallycontrolled ferromagnetic phase on top-gated LAO

  13. Scanning Transmission X-Ray, Laser Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscopy Mapping of the Exopolymeric Matrix of Microbial Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, J. R.; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Leppard, G. G.; T. Araki; Zhang, X.; West, M. M.; A. P. Hitchcock

    2003-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provid...

  14. Scanning Probe Microscopy at mK Temperatures *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Jae

    2010-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has made significant advances with a wealth of new physics emerging as cryogenic instruments have been developed in the last decade allowing high resolution spectroscopic studies with spatial atomic resolution [1]. Most low temperature SPM instruments today operate at 4 K using liquid ^4He, with a few exceptions [2]. In this talk, we describe the next generation of ultra low temperature scanning probe microscope (SPM) with high magnetic field (15 T) capability operating at 10 mK using the circulation of a ^3He-^4He mixture in a dilution refrigerator (DR). With this system operating at 10 mK, we can extend the capability of scanning tunneling spectroscopy to higher energy resolution ( 3 μeV) for a range of applications in nanoscale systems. To achieve the design goal of mK operation for SPM applications we designed and constructed an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) SPM-compatible DR, an ultra-low temperature compatible SPM module, and extensive vibration isolation and RF shielding components. The DR was designed and constructed with features specific for UHV SPM applications, such as a Joule-Thomson (JT) condenser for lower noise operation. Noise measurements of the tunneling current show virtually no circulation-induced noise using the JT condenser, in contrast to noisy operation with a 1K pot. The custom-designed SPM module, with a three-axis position stage, is made from coin silver and ceramics for rigidity and thermal conduction in the mK regime. We also developed and constructed a low temperature current pre-amplifier, operating on the still at 650 mK, to circumvent problems due to long cable capacitances. Extensive noise measurements and first scanning measurements on graphene samples will be described. *In collaboration with Alexander F. Otte, Young Kuk, Phillip N. First, Walt A. de Heer, and Joseph A. Stroscio [1] D. L. Miller, et al., Science 324, 924 (2009) [2] A. J. Heinrich, et al., Science 306, 466 (2004)

  15. Investigation of the Remineralization Effect Tnrough Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damyanova Dobrinka M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Local fluoride varnishes have been widely used as a method of non-operative treatment and for caries preventive interventions for more than three decades. Purpose: Evaluation of the remineralization effect by means of electron microscopy of mineralization varnish - Clinpro ™ White Varnish with TCP (Tri-Calcium phosphate (3M. Materials and Methods: The material used is from 20 temporary intact teeth, extracted due to physiological change with permanent teeth, with a completely preserved structure and anatomy of crowns and fully physiologically resorbed roots. For the purposes of the study a scanning electron microscope JEOL JSM 6390 is used with an attachment for element analysis (EDS INCA of Oxford. Prepared samples are pre-coated with gold (cathode sputtering with apparatus JEOL JFC – 1200 to obtain a better contrast of the SEM image of early carious lesions on the smooth surfaces of the temporary teeth, with predilection for development of caries with a d1 threshold. For this purpose the two processes were monitored occurring continuously on the enamel surfacede- and remineralization. Performed was computer processing of the digital images. Results: There is presence of certain minerals deposited in the embossed enamel prisms after of remineralization. The chemical analysis established the presence of calcium (Ca2 + , around the organic matrix. Demineralised surface has pores present of around 1%, which is visible through the enamel on the surface of the deciduous teeth looking like filled and pores looking like partially covered, filled with newly formed and growing crystals. The crystals, which are hydroxylapatite, fluorapatite or fluorhydroxiapatite gradually connect, growing and forming mineral structure filling the microscopi defects and the pores from the demineralisation in the surface enamel prismless layer

  16. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  17. Simultaneous Nanomechanical and Electrochemical Mapping: Combining Peak Force Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy with Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Peter; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2016-06-21

    Soft electronic devices play a crucial role in, e.g., neural implants as stimulating electrodes, transducers for biosensors, or selective drug-delivery. Because of their elasticity, they can easily adapt to their environment and prevent immunoreactions leading to an overall improved long-term performance. In addition, flexible electronic devices such as stretchable displays will be increasingly used in everyday life, e.g., for so-called electronic wearables. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile tool to characterize these micro- and nanostructured devices in terms of their topography. Using advanced imaging techniques such as peak force tapping (PFT), nanomechanical properties including adhesion, deformation, and Young's modulus can be simultaneously mapped along with surface features. However, conventional AFM provides limited laterally resolved information on electrical or electrochemical properties such as the activity of an electrode array. In this study, we present the first combination of AFM with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in PFT mode, thereby offering spatially correlated electrochemical and nanomechanical information paired with high-resolution topographical data under force control (QNM-AFM-SECM). The versatility of this combined scanning probe approach is demonstrated by mapping topographical, electrochemical, and nanomechanical properties of gold microelectrodes and of gold electrodes patterned onto polydimethylsiloxane.

  18. Scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction measurements at beamline 7.0.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomes, R.; Booth, N.A.; Woodruff, D.P. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the results of the authors first experimental run, in May 1996, conducted to explore the advantages offered by the high spectral resolution available at the SpectroMicroscopy Facility on beam line 7.0 to conduct scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction (PhD). This technique is now a well-established method for the determination of local structure of atomic and molecular adsorbates on well-characterised surfaces. The directly-emitted component of an adsorbate core-level photoelectron wavefield interferes coherently with components of the same wavefield elastically scattered by surrounding atoms, leading to a modulation in the photoemission intensity as a function of kinetic energy in any specific emission direction. A series of such PhD modulation spectra, each typically covering energies from 50-500 eV, for a series of different emission directions, provides the basis for a quantitative structure determination of the emitter-scatterer geometry. Within the last years the authors have developed an integrated approach to extract the structural information from these photoelectron diffraction (PhD) spectra in a quantitative way. A direct data inversion technique (the so-called Projection method) provides a first-order estimate of the local adsorbate geometry in the form of an `image` of the scatterer atoms which are nearest neighbours to the emitter. This information is then used as a starting model for optimisation of the structural parameters by comparing the experimental PhD spectra with the results of multiple scattering simulations using a code developed by Fritzsche. The optimisation uses an automated trial-and-error procedure by minimising a reliability factor which provides an objective measure of the quality of agreement between experiment and theory. The authors have successfully applied this approach to the structure determination of about 30 adsorption systems.

  19. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D correlative light and electron microscopy of cultured cells using serial blockface scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Burden, Jemima J.; Nkwe, David O.; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Durgan, Joanne; Weston, Anne; Jones, Martin L.; Peddie, Christopher J.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Florey, Oliver; Marsh, Mark; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processes of life take place in multiple dimensions, but imaging these processes in even three dimensions is challenging. Here, we describe a workflow for 3D correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy to identify and follow biological events, combined with serial blockface scanning electron microscopy to analyse the underlying ultrastructure. The workflow encompasses all steps from cell culture to sample processing, imaging strategy, and 3D image processing and analysis. We demonstrate successful application of the workflow to three studies, each aiming to better understand complex and dynamic biological processes, including bacterial and viral infections of cultured cells and formation of entotic cell-in-cell structures commonly observed in tumours. Our workflow revealed new insight into the replicative niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and the composition of the entotic vacuole. The broad application of this 3D CLEM technique will make it a useful addition to the correlative imaging toolbox for biomedical research. PMID:27445312

  1. 3D correlative light and electron microscopy of cultured cells using serial blockface scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Matthew R G; Lerner, Thomas R; Burden, Jemima J; Nkwe, David O; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Durgan, Joanne; Weston, Anne; Jones, Martin L; Peddie, Christopher J; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Florey, Oliver; Marsh, Mark; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G; Collinson, Lucy M

    2017-01-01

    The processes of life take place in multiple dimensions, but imaging these processes in even three dimensions is challenging. Here, we describe a workflow for 3D correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) of cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy to identify and follow biological events, combined with serial blockface scanning electron microscopy to analyse the underlying ultrastructure. The workflow encompasses all steps from cell culture to sample processing, imaging strategy, and 3D image processing and analysis. We demonstrate successful application of the workflow to three studies, each aiming to better understand complex and dynamic biological processes, including bacterial and viral infections of cultured cells and formation of entotic cell-in-cell structures commonly observed in tumours. Our workflow revealed new insight into the replicative niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, HIV-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and the composition of the entotic vacuole. The broad application of this 3D CLEM technique will make it a useful addition to the correlative imaging toolbox for biomedical research. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Continuous-scan capability at SSRL and applications to X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlei; Kiss, Andrew M; Van Campen, Douglas G; Garachtchenko, Alex; Kolotovsky, Yuriy; Stone, Kevin; Xu, Yahong; Zhang, Wenjun; Corbett, Jeff

    2016-07-01

    Typical X-ray diffraction measurements are made by moving a detector to discrete positions in space and then measuring the signal at each stationary position. This step-scanning method can be time-consuming, and may induce vibrations in the measurement system when the motors are accelerated and decelerated at each position. Furthermore, diffraction information between the data points may be missed unless a fine step-scanning is used, which further increases the total measurement time. To utilize beam time efficiently, the motor acceleration and deceleration time should be minimized, and the signal-to-noise ratio should be maximized. To accomplish this, an integrated continuous-scan system was developed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). The continuous-scan system uses an in-house integrated motor controller system and counter/timer electronics. SPEC software is used to control both the hardware and data acquisition systems. The time efficiency and repeatability of the continuous-scan system were tested using X-ray diffraction from a ZnO powder and compared with the step-scan technique. Advantages and limitations of the continuous-scan system and a demonstration of variable-velocity continuous scan are discussed.

  3. Comparison between diffraction contrast tomography and high-energy diffraction microscopy on a slightly deformed aluminium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renversade, Loïc; Quey, Romain; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Menasche, David; Maddali, Siddharth; Suter, Robert M; Borbély, András

    2016-01-01

    The grain structure of an Al-0.3 wt%Mn alloy deformed to 1% strain was reconstructed using diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) and high-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM). 14 equally spaced HEDM layers were acquired and their exact location within the DCT volume was determined using a generic algorithm minimizing a function of the local disorientations between the two data sets. The microstructures were then compared in terms of the mean crystal orientations and shapes of the grains. The comparison shows that DCT can detect subgrain boundaries with disorientations as low as 1° and that HEDM and DCT grain boundaries are on average 4 µm apart from each other. The results are important for studies targeting the determination of grain volume. For the case of a polycrystal with an average grain size of about 100 µm, a relative deviation of about ≤10% was found between the two techniques.

  4. Comparison between diffraction contrast tomography and high-energy diffraction microscopy on a slightly deformed aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Renversade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The grain structure of an Al–0.3 wt%Mn alloy deformed to 1% strain was reconstructed using diffraction contrast tomography (DCT and high-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM. 14 equally spaced HEDM layers were acquired and their exact location within the DCT volume was determined using a generic algorithm minimizing a function of the local disorientations between the two data sets. The microstructures were then compared in terms of the mean crystal orientations and shapes of the grains. The comparison shows that DCT can detect subgrain boundaries with disorientations as low as 1° and that HEDM and DCT grain boundaries are on average 4 µm apart from each other. The results are important for studies targeting the determination of grain volume. For the case of a polycrystal with an average grain size of about 100 µm, a relative deviation of about ≤10% was found between the two techniques.

  5. Tomographic diffractive microscopy with agile illuminations for imaging targets in a noisy background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Godavarthi, C; Chaumet, P C; Maire, G; Giovannini, H; Talneau, A; Prada, C; Sentenac, A; Belkebir, K

    2015-02-15

    Tomographic diffractive microscopy is a marker-free optical digital imaging technique in which three-dimensional samples are reconstructed from a set of holograms recorded under different angles of incidence. We show experimentally that, by processing the holograms with singular value decomposition, it is possible to image objects in a noisy background that are invisible with classical wide-field microscopy and conventional tomographic reconstruction procedure. The targets can be further characterized with a selective quantitative inversion.

  6. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K. [St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Syková, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Kubinová, Š. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  7. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  8. Characterization of fragile nanostructures using scanning force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Michael Richard

    1998-12-01

    The possibility of using scanning force microscopy (SFM) to image monolayer arrays of nanometer diameter gold clusters on flat substrates has been investigated. A major difficulty in SFM studies of supported cluster arrays is the interaction force between the SFM probe and the clusters which results in the clusters moving on the substrate during imaging. The addition of a carbon nanotube to the tip of the SFM probe reduces this interaction force, resulting in stable, tapping mode height images of the supported cluster arrays. However, resolution of individual nanometer-size cluster in an array requires reduction of the endform radius of the nanotubes. In an attempt to reduce the effects of image dilation, the endform shape of the nanotube has been modified by spark etching. Also, metal atoms have been deposited onto the tip endform by sparking the tip of the nanotube by sparking the tip against a metal substrate and by electro-depositing metal onto the tip. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using embedded-atom-method (EAM) potentials have been used to model the compression behavior of nanometer-size gold clusters. The simulations examined the behavior of free and supported gold particles compressed with normal and shear forces. These results have been used to explain previously observed descrepencies between the calculated and measured elastic modulus of nanometer-size gold clusters.

  9. Energy dissipation measurements in frequency-modulated scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Kalinin, Sergei V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-11-12

    Local dissipation measurements by scanning probe microscopy have attracted increasing interest as a method for probing energy losses and hysteretic phenomena due to magnetic, electrical, and structural transformations at the tip-surface junction. One challenge of this technique is the lack of a standard for ensuring quantification of the dissipation signal. In the following, we explored magnetic dissipation imaging of an yttrium-iron garnet (YIG) sample, using a number of similar but not identical cantilever probes. Typical frequency-dependent dispersion of the actuator-probe assembly commonly approached {+-} 1 part in 10{sup 3} Hz{sup -1}, much larger than the minimum detectable level of {+-} 1 part in 10{sup 5} Hz{sup -1}. This cantilever-dependent behavior results in a strong crosstalk between the conservative (frequency) and dissipative channels. This crosstalk was very apparent in the YIG dissipation images and in fact should be an inherent feature of single-frequency heterodyne detection schemes. It may also be a common effect in other dissipation imaging, even down to the atomic level, and in particular may be a significant issue when there are correlations between the conservative and dissipative components. On the other hand, we present a simple method for correcting for this effect. This correction technique resulted in self-consistent results for the YIG dissipation measurements and would presumably be effective for other systems as well.

  10. Scanning microwave microscopy technique for nanoscale characterization of magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, C. H.; Sardi, G. M.; Tuca, S. S.; Gramse, G.; Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E.; Kienberger, F.; Marcelli, R.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, microwave characterization of magnetic materials using the scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) technique is presented. The capabilities of the SMM are employed for analyzing and imaging local magnetic properties of the materials under test at the nanoscale. The analyses are performed by acquiring both amplitude and phase of the reflected microwave signal. The changes in the reflection coefficient S11 are related to the local properties of the material under investigation, and the changes in its magnetic properties have been studied as a function of an external DC magnetic bias. Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films deposited by RF sputtering and grown by liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates and permalloy samples have been characterized. An equivalent electromagnetic transmission line model is discussed for the quantitative analysis of the local magnetic properties. We also observed the hysteretic behavior of the reflection coefficient S11 with an external bias field. The imaging and spectroscopy analysis on the experimental results are evidently indicating the possibilities of measuring local changes in the intrinsic magnetic properties on the surface of the material.

  11. X-ray absorption measurement by scanning capacitance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masashi; Uchihashi, Takayuki

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes a demonstration of scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) as a technique for measuring X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) in what is called the SCM-XAFS method. This method achieves the simultaneous analysis of the electrical and chemical characteristics of surface-trapping centers. In obtaining the XAFS spectrum of trapping centers, the method takes advantage of the fact that the X-ray-induced photoemission of a localized electron leads to a change in capacitance. When the Fermi level corresponds to the trapping level, the photoemission process is sensitively detected. Therefore, a specific trapping center may be selectively observed by controlling the bias. From SCM-XAFS measurements of a GaAs surface, we found that gallium oxide trapping centers capture electrons in the positive bias voltage region. Moreover, experimental findings that resonant intra-transition and resonant scattering of emitted photoelectrons enhance the SCM-XAFS signal at particular X-ray photon energy reveal the local density of states of the gallium oxide and the complex structure of the trapping centers.

  12. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F.; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaNxAs1‑x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with GexSi1‑x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16–255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering.

  13. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy and roughness study of dental composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cortez, Louise Ribeiro; Zarur, Raquel de Oliveira; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the use of mouthwashes, consumption of soft drinks, as well as the type of light curing unit (LCU), would change the surface roughness (Ra) and morphology of a nanofilled composite resin (Z350® 3M ESPE). Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: Halogen LCU, group 1, saliva (control); group 2, Pepsi Twist®; group 3, Listerine®; group 4, Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, group 5, saliva; group 6, Pepsi Twist®; group 7, Listerine®; group 8, Colgate Plax®. Ra values were measured at baseline, and after 7 and 14 days. One specimen of each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis after 14 days. The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post-hoc test. All the treatments resulted in morphological changes in composite resin surface, and the most significant change was in Pepsi Twist® groups. The samples of G6 had the greatest increase in Ra. The immersion of nanofilled resin in mouthwashes with alcohol and soft drink increases the surface roughness. Polymerization by halogen LCU (reduced light intensity) associated with alcohol contained mouthwash resulted in significant roughness on the composite.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of xiphinema, longidorus, and californidorus stylet morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M R; Robbins, R T

    1990-04-01

    Stylet ultrastructure of five Xiphinema, four Longidorus, and three Californidorus species was compared by scanning electron microscopy. Morphological differences were seen in the odontophores and odontostyle bases between the genera and some of the species. All Xiphinema studied had well-developed odontophore flanges; the Longidorus species lacked flanges, except for weakly developed ones in L. diadecturus; and none of the Californidorus had flanges. Three sinuses were present in the odontophores of all species. The sinuses varied in length depending upon species. In Xiphinema and Californidorus the odontostyle bases had distinct overlapping collars, but in Longidorus the collars were absent except for L. diadecturus. The odontostyle-odontophore junction from a lateral view appeared as a slanted transverse line in all the species, but in a dorsal view of Xiphinema and Californidorus it was V-shaped. Dorsal longitudinal seams of the odontostyle and odontophore were observed in all the species. The dorsally located odontostyle aperture was ca. 1 mum from the anterior end in all species, except in one Longidorus sp. it was ca. 4 mum from the end.

  16. Bifurcation, chaos, and scan instability in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, John H., E-mail: john.h.cantrell@nasa.gov [Research Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Cantrell, Sean A., E-mail: scantrell@nlsanalytics.com [NLS Analytics, LLC, 375 Dundee Road, Glencoe, Illinois 60022 (United States)

    2016-03-28

    The dynamical motion at any point on the cantilever of an atomic force microscope can be expressed quite generally as a superposition of simple harmonic oscillators corresponding to the vibrational modes allowed by the cantilever shape. Central to the dynamical equations is the representation of the cantilever-sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients that account for the interaction force “stiffness,” the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Renormalization of the cantilever beam model shows that for a given cantilever drive frequency cantilever dynamics can be accurately represented by a single nonlinear mass-spring model with frequency-dependent stiffness and damping coefficients [S. A. Cantrell and J. H. Cantrell, J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094314 (2011)]. Application of the Melnikov method to the renormalized dynamical equation is shown to predict a cascade of period doubling bifurcations with increasing cantilever drive force that terminates in chaos. The threshold value of the drive force necessary to initiate bifurcation is shown to depend strongly on the cantilever setpoint and drive frequency, effective damping coefficient, nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. The model predicts the experimentally observed interruptions of the bifurcation cascade for cantilevers of sufficiently large stiffness. Operational factors leading to the loss of image quality in dynamic atomic force microscopy are addressed, and guidelines for optimizing scan stability are proposed using a quantitative analysis based on system dynamical parameters and choice of feedback loop parameter.

  17. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmaack, K. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wittmaack@gsf.de; Wehnes, H. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Heinzmann, U. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Agerer, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Department Biology, Biodiversity Research: Mycology, Menzinger Stasse 67, 80638 Munich (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 {mu}m. The collected particles, sampled for short periods ({approx}15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C{sub 60} or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces.

  18. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy applied to seed-borne fungi examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marcelo de Carvalho; Pozza, Edson Ampélio

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the standard scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as a potential alternative to study seed-borne fungi in seeds, by two different conditions of blotter test and water restriction treatment. In the blotter test, seeds were subjected to conditions that enabled pathogen growth and expression, whereas the water restriction method consisted in preventing seed germination during the incubation period, resulting in the artificial inoculation of fungi. In the first condition, seeds of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), maize (Zea mays L.), and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were submitted to the standard blotter test and then prepared and observed with SEM. In the second condition, seeds of cotton (G. hirsutum), soybean (Glycine max L.), and common bean (P. vulgaris L.) were, respectively, inoculated with Colletotrichum gossypii var. cephalosporioides, Colletotrichum truncatum, and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum by the water restriction technique, followed by preparation and observation with SEM. The standard SEM methodology was adopted to prepare the specimens. Considering the seeds submitted to the blotter test, it was possible to identify Fusarium sp. on maize, C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides, and Fusarium oxysporum on cotton, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium sp., Rhizopus sp., and Mucor sp. on common bean. Structures of C. gossypii var. cephalosporioides, C. truncatum, and C. lindemuthianum were observed in the surface of inoculated seeds. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Thermal mapping of a scanning thermal microscopy tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwiak, Grzegorz; Wielgoszewski, Grzegorz; Gotszalk, Teodor; Kępiński, Leszek

    2013-10-01

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is a very promising technique for local investigation of temperature and thermal properties of nanostructures with great application potential in contemporary nanoelectronics and nanotechnology. In order to increase the localization of SThM measurements, the size of probes has recently substantially decreased, which results in novel types of SThM probes manufactured with the use of modern silicon microfabrication technology. Quantitative SThM measurements with these probes need methods, which enable to assess the quality of thermal contact between the probe and the investigated surface. In this paper we propose a tip thermal mapping (TThM) procedure, which is used to estimate experimentally the distribution of power dissipated by the tip of an SThM probe. We also show that the proposed power dissipation model explains the results of active-mode SThM measurements and that the TThM procedure is reversible for a given probe and sample. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Scanning Auger microscopy for high lateral and depth elemental sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, E., E-mail: eugenie.martinez@cea.fr [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Yadav, P. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bouttemy, M. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, 45 av. des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Renault, O.; Borowik, Ł.; Bertin, F. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, 45 av. des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Chabli, A. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •SAM performances and limitations are illustrated on real practical cases such as the analysis of nanowires and nanodots. •High spatial elemental resolution is shown with the analysis of reference semiconducting Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs multilayers. •High in-depth elemental resolution is also illustrated. Auger depth profiling with low energy ion beams allows revealing ultra-thin layers (∼1 nm). •Analysis of cross-sectional samples is another effective approach to obtain in-depth elemental information. -- Abstract: Scanning Auger microscopy is currently gaining interest for investigating nanostructures or thin multilayers stacks developed for nanotechnologies. New generation Auger nanoprobes combine high lateral (∼10 nm), energy (0.1%) and depth (∼2 nm) resolutions thus offering the possibility to analyze the elemental composition as well as the chemical state, at the nanometre scale. We report here on the performances and limitations on practical examples from nanotechnology research. The spatial elemental sensitivity is illustrated with the analysis of Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs heterostructures, Si nanowires and SiC nanodots. Regarding the elemental in-depth composition, two effective approaches are presented: low energy depth profiling to reveal ultra-thin layers (∼1 nm) and analysis of cross-sectional samples.

  2. Scanning force microscope for in situ nanofocused X-ray diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhe, E-mail: zhe.ren@im2np.fr; Mastropietro, Francesca; Davydok, Anton [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Faculté des Sciences, Campus de Saint-Jérôme, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen – Case 142, F-13397 Marseille (France); Langlais, Simon [Grenoble Institute of Technology and CNRS, BP 75, F-38402 Saint-Martin d’Hères Cedex (France); Richard, Marie-Ingrid [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Faculté des Sciences, Campus de Saint-Jérôme, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen – Case 142, F-13397 Marseille (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Furter, Jean-Jacques; Thomas, Olivier [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Faculté des Sciences, Campus de Saint-Jérôme, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen – Case 142, F-13397 Marseille (France); Dupraz, Maxime; Verdier, Marc; Beutier, Guillaume [Grenoble Institute of Technology and CNRS, BP 75, F-38402 Saint-Martin d’Hères Cedex (France); Boesecke, Peter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Cornelius, Thomas W. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Faculté des Sciences, Campus de Saint-Jérôme, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen – Case 142, F-13397 Marseille (France)

    2014-08-06

    An atomic force microscope has been developed for combination with sub-micrometer focused X-ray diffraction at synchrotron beamlines and in situ mechanical tests on single nanostructures. A compact scanning force microscope has been developed for in situ combination with nanofocused X-ray diffraction techniques at third-generation synchrotron beamlines. Its capabilities are demonstrated on Au nano-islands grown on a sapphire substrate. The new in situ device allows for in situ imaging the sample topography and the crystallinity by recording simultaneously an atomic force microscope (AFM) image and a scanning X-ray diffraction map of the same area. Moreover, a selected Au island can be mechanically deformed using the AFM tip while monitoring the deformation of the atomic lattice by nanofocused X-ray diffraction. This in situ approach gives access to the mechanical behavior of nanomaterials.

  3. Alternating current scanning electrochemical microscopy with simultaneous fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jason A; Baur, Melinda B; Woodall, Erica L; Baur, John E

    2012-11-06

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is combined with alternating current scanning electrochemical microscopy (AC-SECM) for simultaneous measurements of impedance and faradaic current. Scan rates of 10-1000 V s(-1) were used for voltammetry, while a high-frequency (100 kHz), low-amplitude (10 mV rms) sine wave was added to the voltammetric waveform for the ac measurement. Both a lock-in amplifier and an analog circuit were used to measure the amplitude of the resultant ac signal. The effect of the added sine wave on the voltammetry at a carbon fiber electrode was investigated and found to have negligible effect. The combined FSCV and ac measurements were used to provide simultaneous chemical and topographical information about a substrate using a single carbon fiber probe. The technique is demonstrated in living cell culture, where cellular respiration and topography were simultaneously imaged without the addition of a redox mediator. This approach promises to be useful for the topographical and multidimensional chemical imaging of substrates.

  4. Quantitative 3D imaging of whole, unstained cells by using X-ray diffraction microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huaidong; Song, Changyong; Chen, Chien-Chun; Xu, Rui; Raines, Kevin S; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Lu, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ting-Kuo; Nakashima, Akio; Urano, Jun; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Miao, Jianwei

    2010-06-22

    Microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of biology. Although significant progress has recently been made in optical microscopy to break the diffraction-limit barrier, reliance of such techniques on fluorescent labeling technologies prohibits quantitative 3D imaging of the entire contents of cells. Cryoelectron microscopy can image pleomorphic structures at a resolution of 3-5 nm, but is only applicable to thin or sectioned specimens. Here, we report quantitative 3D imaging of a whole, unstained cell at a resolution of 50-60 nm by X-ray diffraction microscopy. We identified the 3D morphology and structure of cellular organelles including cell wall, vacuole, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, granules, nucleus, and nucleolus inside a yeast spore cell. Furthermore, we observed a 3D structure protruding from the reconstructed yeast spore, suggesting the spore germination process. Using cryogenic technologies, a 3D resolution of 5-10 nm should be achievable by X-ray diffraction microscopy. This work hence paves a way for quantitative 3D imaging of a wide range of biological specimens at nanometer-scale resolutions that are too thick for electron microscopy.

  5. Imaging of apoptotic HeLa cells by using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM), HeLa cells in apoptosis process are imaged with a higher optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. Since SNOM provides both topographic and transmitted light intensity information of a cell, it can correlate the structural characteristics and optical properties with the spatial position of the apoptotic cells. Wavelength imaging by using near-field spectroscopy shows that there is a great difference in light propagation and absorption in the cell. This unique technique can be applied to the super high resolution imaging of different components in the cell. The observations by near-field optical imaging and near-field spectroscopy indicate an inhomogeneous aggregation of the inner structure in the apoptotic HeLa cells and the change of transmission intensity of light with the apoptosis status.

  6. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  7. An introduction to three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy is a fast and nondestructive structural characterization technique aimed at studies of the individual crystalline elements (grains or subgrains) within millimetre-sized polycrystalline specimens. It is based on two principles: the use of highly penet....... © 2012 International Union of Crystallography Printed in Singapore-all rights reserved....

  8. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional data cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. We demonstrate this ‘big data’ approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.

  9. Analyses and computations of asymmetric Z-scan for large phase shift from diffraction theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liyong Ren(任立勇); Baoli Yao(姚保利); Xun Hou(侯洵); Liren Liu(刘立人); Changhe Zhou(周常河)

    2003-01-01

    Based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory, we set up a diffraction model of nonlinear optical media toGaussian beam, which can interpret the Z-scan phenomenon from a new way. This theory is not onlywell consistent with the conventional Z-scan theory in the case of small nonlinear phase shift, but alsocan fit for the lager nonlinear phase shift. Numeric computations indicate the shape of the Z-scan curveis greatly affected by the value of the nonlinear phase shift. The symmetric dispersion-like Z-scan curveis only valid for small nonlinear phase shift (|△φo| <π), but with increasing the nonlinear phase shift, thevalley of the transmittance is severely suppressed and the peak is greatly enhanced. Further calculationsshow some new interesting results.

  10. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  11. Engineering and Characterization of Collagen Networks Using Wet Atomic Force Microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Jenna; Coffey, Tonya; Conrad, Brad; Burris, Jennifer; Hester, Brooke

    2014-03-01

    Collagen is an abundant protein and its monomers covalently crosslink to form fibrils which form fibers which contribute to forming macrostructures like tendon or bone. While the contribution is well understood at the macroscopic level, it is not well known at the fibril level. We wish to study the mechanical properties of collagen for networks of collagen fibers that vary in size and density. We present here a method to synthesize collagen networks from monomers and that allows us to vary the density of the networks. By using biotynilated collagen and a surface that is functionalized with avidin, we generate two-dimensional collagen networks across the surface of a silicon wafer. During network synthesis, the incubation time is varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours or temperature is varied from 25°C to 45°C. The two-dimensional collagen network created in the process is characterized using environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The network density is measured by the number of strands in one frame using SPIP software. We expect that at body temperature (37°C) and with longer incubation times, the network density should increase.

  12. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  13. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tate, Mark W; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert M; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2015-01-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (EMPAD - electron microscope pixel array detector) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128 x 128 pixel detector consists of a 500 um thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as loc...

  14. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    While the first two volumes on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and its related scanning probe (SXM) methods have mainly concentrated on intro­ ducing the experimental techniques, as well as their various applications in different research fields, this third volume is exclusively devoted to the theory of STM and related SXM methods. As the experimental techniques including the reproducibility of the experimental results have advanced, more and more theorists have become attracted to focus on issues related to STM and SXM. The increasing effort in the development of theoretical concepts for STM/SXM has led to considerable improvements in understanding the contrast mechanism as well as the experimental conditions necessary to obtain reliable data. Therefore, this third volume on STM/SXM is not written by theorists for theorists, but rather for every scientist who is not satisfied by just obtaining real­ space images of surface structures by STM/SXM. After a brief introduction (Chap. 1), N. D. Lang first co...

  15. Bayesian deconvolution of scanning electron microscopy images using point-spread function estimation and non-local regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, Joris; Aelterman, Jan; De Vylder, Jonas; Hiep Luong; Saeys, Yvan; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-08-01

    Microscopy is one of the most essential imaging techniques in life sciences. High-quality images are required in order to solve (potentially life-saving) biomedical research problems. Many microscopy techniques do not achieve sufficient resolution for these purposes, being limited by physical diffraction and hardware deficiencies. Electron microscopy addresses optical diffraction by measuring emitted or transmitted electrons instead of photons, yielding nanometer resolution. Despite pushing back the diffraction limit, blur should still be taken into account because of practical hardware imperfections and remaining electron diffraction. Deconvolution algorithms can remove some of the blur in post-processing but they depend on knowledge of the point-spread function (PSF) and should accurately regularize noise. Any errors in the estimated PSF or noise model will reduce their effectiveness. This paper proposes a new procedure to estimate the lateral component of the point spread function of a 3D scanning electron microscope more accurately. We also propose a Bayesian maximum a posteriori deconvolution algorithm with a non-local image prior which employs this PSF estimate and previously developed noise statistics. We demonstrate visual quality improvements and show that applying our method improves the quality of subsequent segmentation steps.

  16. Observation of the sweating in lipstick by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S Y; Lee, I S; Shin, H Y; Choi, K Y; Kang, S H; Ahn, H J

    1999-06-01

    The relationship between the wax matrix in lipstick and sweating has been investigated by observing the change of size and shape of the wax matrix due to sweating by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). For observation by SEM, a lipstick sample was frozen in liquid nitrogen. The oil in the lipstick was then extracted in cold isopropanol (-70 degrees C) for 1-3 days. After the isopropanol was evaporated, the sample was sputtered with gold and examined by SEM. The change of wax matrix underneath the surface from fine, uniform structure to coarse, nonuniform structure resulted from the caking of surrounding wax matrix. The oil underneath the surface migrated to the surface of lipstick with sweating; consequently the wax matrix in that region was rearranged into the coarse matrix. In case of flamed lipstick, sweating was delayed and the wax matrix was much coarser than that of the unflamed one. The larger wax matrix at the surface region was good for including oil. The effect of molding temperature on sweating was also studied. As the molding temperature rose, sweating was greatly reduced and the size of the wax matrix increased. It was found that sweating was influenced by the compatibility of wax and oil. A formula consisting of wax and oil that have good compatibility has a tendency to reduce sweating and increase the size of the wax matrix. When pigments were added to wax and oil, the size of the wax matrix was changed, but in all cases sweating was increased due to the weakening of the binding force between wax and oil. On observing the thick membrane of wax at the surface of lipstick a month after molding it was also found that sweating was influenced by ageing. In conclusion, the structure of the wax matrix at the surface region of lipstick was changed with the process of flaming, molding temperature, compatibility of wax and oil, addition of pigment, and ageing. In most cases, as the size of the wax matrix was increased, sweating was reduced and delayed.

  17. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum’s magnetosome chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keutner, Christoph [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); von Bohlen, Alex [Leibniz-Institut fur Analytische Wissenschaften, Dortmund (Germany); Berges, Ulf [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); Espeter, Philipp [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany); Schneider, Claus M. [Peter Grunberg Institut, Julich (Germany); Westphal, Carsten [Technische Univ. Dortmund, Dortmung (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  18. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...

  19. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.;

    2001-01-01

    Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...

  20. Interferometric backward third harmonic generation microscopy for axial imaging with accuracy beyond the diffraction limit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daaf Sandkuijl

    Full Text Available A new nonlinear microscopy technique based on interference of backward-reflected third harmonic generation (I-THG from multiple interfaces is presented. The technique is used to measure height variations or changes of a layer thickness with an accuracy of up to 5 nm. Height variations of a patterned glass surface and thickness variations of fibroblasts are visualized with the interferometric epi-THG microscope with an accuracy at least two orders of magnitude better than diffraction limit. The microscopy technique can be broadly applied for measuring distance variations between membranes or multilayer structures inside biological tissue and for surface height variation imaging.

  1. Further resolution enhancement of high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy applied to mouse endogenous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Kazuaki; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-12-01

    Photothermal microscopy has intrinsically super resolution capability due to the bilinear dependence of signal intensity of pump and probe. In the present paper, we have made further resolution improvement of high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy by applying non-linear detection. By this, the new method has the following advantages: (1) super resolution with 61% and 42% enhancement from the diffraction limit values of the probe and pump wavelengths, respectively, by a second-order non-linear scheme, (2) compact light source using inexpensive conventional diode lasers, (3) wide applicability to nonfluorescent materials such as gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and hematoxylin-eosin stained biological samples, (4) relative robustness to optical damage, and (5) a high-frame rate using a Galvano mirror. The maximum resolution is determined to be 160 nm in the second-order non-linear detection mode and 270 nm in the linear detection mode by the PT signal of GNPs. The pixel rate and frame rate for 300 × 300 pixel image are 50 μs and 4.5 s, respectively. The pixel and frame rate are shorter than the rates, which are 1 ms and 100 s, respectively, using the piezo-driven stage system.

  2. Stacking disorder in silicon carbide supported cobalt crystallites: an X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, H E; de Villiers, J P R; Tuling, A; Olivier, E J

    2016-11-21

    Supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts are characteristically nanoparticulate and the reduced SiC supported catalyst was found to contain both HCP and FCC polymorphs. This is reflected in the powder XRD patterns and generally there is a poor fit between the experimental and calculated diffractograms. This was ascribed to small crystallite sizes and the occurrence of disorder, manifested as peak broadening and peak shifts. Selected area electron diffraction data of suitably oriented cobalt catalyst grains on silicon carbide supports show non-periodic disorder in the zone axis orientations that contain the common (001) (HCP) and (111) (FCC) reciprocal lattice planes. Both FCC and HCP polymorphs are present in the same grains and these show disorder mainly in the HCP component. The disorder is further examined using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution and the stacking sequences elucidated. Random sequences of mainly FCC are interrupted by HCP sequences and twin surfaces with reverse stacking sequences are also present. This study highlights the presence of significant disorder in cobalt catalyst grains confirmed by HAADF microscopy.

  3. Validation of a crystal plasticity model using high energy diffraction microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, A. J.; Obstalecki, M.; Storer, R.; Tayon, W.; Mach, J.; Kenesei, P.; Lienert, U.

    2012-03-01

    High energy diffraction microscopy is used to measure the crystallographic orientation and evolution of lattice strain in an Al-Li alloy. The relative spatial arrangement of the several pancake-shaped grains in a tensile sample is determined through in situ and ex situ techniques. A model for crystal plasticity with continuity of lattice spin is posed, where grains are represented by layers in a finite element mesh following the arrangement indicated by experiment. Comparison is drawn between experiment and simulation.

  4. Validation of a Crystal Plasticity Model Using High Energy Diffraction Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, A. J.; Obstalecki, M.; Storer, R.; Tayon, W.; Mach, J.; Kenesei, P.; Lienert, U.

    2012-01-01

    High energy diffraction microscopy is used to measure the crystallographic orientation and evolution of lattice strain in an Al Li alloy. The relative spatial arrangement of the several pancake-shaped grains in a tensile sample is determined through in situ and ex situ techniques. A model for crystal plasticity with continuity of lattice spin is posed, where grains are represented by layers in a finite element mesh following the arrangement indicated by experiment. Comparison is drawn between experiment and simulation.

  5. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    . Fortunately, many antimicrobial defense systems of higher organisms require sensitive detection to combat microbial pathogens. We employ here the primitive immune system of the evolutionarily ancient horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. This species relies on multi-enzyme signal amplification detection of cell wall molecules and they can be applied to the development of useful detectors of life. An extension of this work includes the visualization of microbial signatures by labeling LAL components with chromogenic or electron dense markers. The protein Limulus Anti-LPS Factor (LALF) has an extremely high affinity for LPS. By coupling LALF binding with colloidal gold labels we demonstrate a correlation of the structures visible by electron microscopy with biochemical evidence of microbial cell wall materials. Pure silica particles were mixed with cultures of E. coli (10(exp 6) cfu/mL). Samples were washed sequentially with buffered saline, LALF, antibody to LALF and finally colloidal gold-labeled Protein A. Negative controls were not exposed to E. coli but received identical treatment otherwise. Samples were coated with carbon and imaged on a JEOL JSM-840 scanning electron microscope with LaB6 source in the back scatter mode with the JEOL annular back scatter detector. 20 nm-scale black spots in this contrast-reversed image originate from electrons back-scattered by gold atoms. Negative controls did not give any signal. Future work will expand application of this technique to soil simulants and mineralized rock samples.

  6. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    . Fortunately, many antimicrobial defense systems of higher organisms require sensitive detection to combat microbial pathogens. We employ here the primitive immune system of the evolutionarily ancient horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. This species relies on multi-enzyme signal amplification detection of cell wall molecules and they can be applied to the development of useful detectors of life. An extension of this work includes the visualization of microbial signatures by labeling LAL components with chromogenic or electron dense markers. The protein Limulus Anti-LPS Factor (LALF) has an extremely high affinity for LPS. By coupling LALF binding with colloidal gold labels we demonstrate a correlation of the structures visible by electron microscopy with biochemical evidence of microbial cell wall materials. Pure silica particles were mixed with cultures of E. coli (10(exp 6) cfu/mL). Samples were washed sequentially with buffered saline, LALF, antibody to LALF and finally colloidal gold-labeled Protein A. Negative controls were not exposed to E. coli but received identical treatment otherwise. Samples were coated with carbon and imaged on a JEOL JSM-840 scanning electron microscope with LaB6 source in the back scatter mode with the JEOL annular back scatter detector. 20 nm-scale black spots in this contrast-reversed image originate from electrons back-scattered by gold atoms. Negative controls did not give any signal. Future work will expand application of this technique to soil simulants and mineralized rock samples.

  7. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  8. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-08-03

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  9. Investigation on Deformation Behavior of Nickel Aluminum Bronze by Neutron Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hong; Lv, Yuting; Lu, Weijie; Sun, Guangai

    2016-05-01

    The deformation behavior, deformation microstructures, and generated inter-phase stresses of nickel aluminum bronze were investigated by in situ neutron diffraction instrument and transmission electron microscopy in this paper. Lattice strains calculated by both peak shifting and broadening by Gaussian fitting of α and κ phase neutron diffraction peak profiles at both holding stress conditions and unloaded stress conditions were compared. Twining and stacking faults in α matrix were observed after deformed by different tensile stresses. Compressive internal/residual stress in α matrix and tensile internal stress in κ phase in elasto-plastic region were calculated based on neutron diffraction analysis. The piled-up dislocations around hard κ phases increase with increasing the deformation degree, which raise the stress concentration near α/ κ interface and increase the internal stresses.

  10. 4D scanning ultrafast electron microscopy: visualization of materials surface dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Omar F; Yang, Ding-Shyue; Pal, Samir Kumar; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-05-25

    The continuous electron beam of conventional scanning electron microscopes (SEM) limits the temporal resolution required for the study of ultrafast dynamics of materials surfaces. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM) as a time-resolved method with resolutions in both space and time. The approach is demonstrated in the investigation of the dynamics of semiconducting and metallic materials visualized using secondary-electron images and backscattering electron diffraction patterns. For probing, the electron packet was photogenerated from the sharp field-emitter tip of the microscope with a very low number of electrons in order to suppress space-charge repulsion between electrons and reach the ultrashort temporal resolution, an improvement of orders of magnitude when compared to the traditional beam-blanking method. Moreover, the spatial resolution of SEM is maintained, thus enabling spatiotemporal visualization of surface dynamics following the initiation of change by femtosecond heating or excitation. We discuss capabilities and potential applications of S-UEM in materials and biological science.

  11. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  12. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, C; Leon Swisher, C; Fumene Feruglio, P; Giedt, R J; Rousso, D L; Stapleton, S; Weissleder, R

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  13. Slow scan sit detector for x-ray diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milch, J R

    1978-10-18

    A TV-type x-ray detector using a SIT vidicon has been used for biological diffraction studies at the EMBL outstation at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. The detector converts the two-dimensional diffraction pattern to a charge pattern on the vidicon target, which is read out in the slow-scan mode. This detector has high DOE, no count-rate limit, and is simple and inexpensive to construct. Radiation from the storage ring DORIS was used to study the structure of live muscle at various phases of contraction. Typically the count-rate on the detector was 10/sup 6/ x-rays/sec and a total exposure of a few seconds was needed to record the weak diffraction from muscle. This compares with usual exposure times of several hours using a rotating anode generator and film.

  14. Surfaces of III-V semiconductors studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhov, Ilya Yu

    The investigation of semiconductor surfaces on an atomic scale is of key importance for research areas such as the growth of thin films and low-dimensional objects by epitaxial techniques. Surfaces of III-V semiconductors, especially GaAs(001) surface, hold a central position in semiconductor surface science due to their extremely wide use in the growth of heterostructure-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. This work describes the results of experimental studies of (001) surfaces of two III-V semiconductors, GaAs and InAs, using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling luminescence (STL). For STL studies an optical detection system consisting of an optical spectrometer (replacable by a photomultiplier tube), electronics, an IBM PC computer and acquisition software has been added to an existing STM (Omicron). The system is capable of recording luminescence images of surfaces and the acquisition of optical spectra of STM-induced luminescence. Application of STL to GaAs(001) surfaces has revealed that atomic-scale features, such as steps, domain boundaries etc., do not give any contrast in luminescence images, while larger objects, such as arsenic islands, do produce a pronounced contrast. The work in STL has helped to identify several key problems that have to be solved in order to make STL a valuable analytical technique. The STM studies of reconstructions on the GaAs(001) surface, which has a fairly complicated phase diagram, have concentrated on two major phase transitions, from As-rich c(4× 4) to As-rich (2× 4) phase and from As-rich (2× 4) to Ga-rich (4× 2) phase. The first transition has been found to proceed through an intermediate (4× 3)/c(4× 6) phase which has been previously identified as having (2× 3) symmetry. The second transition has been found to involve the formation of (3× 6) and (4× 6) multi-domain phases. The local structure and composition of these phases have been analyzed in detail and a comprehensive dynamic

  15. Cytogenetic Characterization of the TM4 Mouse Sertoli Cell Line. II. Chromosome Microdissection, FISH, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Guttenbach, Martina; Steinlein, Claus; Wanner, Gerhard; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomes and interphase cell nuclei of the permanent mouse Sertoli cell line TM4 were examined by chromosome microdissection, FISH, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The already known marker chromosomes m1-m5 were confirmed, and 2 new large marker chromosomes m6 and m7 were characterized. The minute heterochromatic marker chromosomes m4 and m5 were microdissected and their DNA amplified by DOP-PCR. FISH of this DNA probe on TM4 metaphase chromosomes demonstrated that the m4 and m5 marker chromosomes have derived from the centromeric regions of normal telocentric mouse chromosomes. Ectopic pairing of the m4 and m5 marker chromosomes with the centromeric region of any of the other chromosomes (centromeric associations) was apparent in ∼60% of the metaphases. Scanning electron microscopy revealed DNA-protein bridges connecting the centromeric regions of normal chromosomes and the associated m4 and m5 marker chromosomes. Interphase cell nuclei of TM4 Sertoli cells did not exhibit the characteristic morphology of Sertoli cells in the testes of adult mice as shown by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  16. Ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti (Anoplura, Echinophthiriidae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores del Carmen Castro

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti Werneck, 1955, mainly the external chorionic features of the egg, is described through electronic microscopy techniques. This species was first cited in Argentina, infesting Arctocephalus australis (Zimmermann, 1873. The morphological adaptations of adults and nymphs are described in both species of Proechinophthirus parasitic on Otariidae: P. fluctus (Ferris, 1916 and P. zumpti.

  17. Scanning Probe Microscopy at 650 °C in Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Jacobsen, Torben; Nørgaard, Anne-Mette

    2009-01-01

    The controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope was designed to study the electrical properties of surfaces at elevated temperatures by using the probe as an electrode. The capability of a simultaneous acquisition of topographical and electrical data for the same surface area...

  18. Scanning Emitter Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Spontaneous Emission Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimmer, Martin; Chen, Yuntian; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2011-01-01

    We report an experimental technique to map and exploit the local density of optical states of arbitrary planar nanophotonic structures. The method relies on positioning a spontaneous emitter attached to a scanning probe deterministically and reversibly with respect to its photonic environment while...

  19. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning El...

  20. Apparent Barrier Height in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, L.; Brandbyge, Mads; Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt;

    1996-01-01

    The apparent barrier height phi(ap), that is, the rate of change of the logarithm of the conductance with tip-sample separation in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), has been measured for Ni, Pt, and Au single crystal surfaces. The results show that phi(ap) is constant until point contact...

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of the male genitalia of Sarcophagidae (Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo de Souza Lopes

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available The male genitalia of nine species of Sarcophagidae (Diptera - Goniophyto honsuensis Rohdendorf, 1962, Tricharaea brevicornis (Wiedemann, 1830, Chaetoravinia derelicta (Walker, 1852, Austrohartigia spinigena (Rondani, 1864, Chrysagria duodecimpunctata Townsend, 1935, Boettcheria bisetosa Parker, 1914, Lipoptilocnema lanei Townsend, 1934, L. crispina (Lopes, 1938 and Euboettcheria alvarengai Lopes & Tibana, 1982 - were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM and the main morphological features are descirbed.

  2. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F., E-mail: robert.cook@nist.gov

    2016-04-15

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10{sup −4} in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  3. DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES ON AGING BEHAVIOR OF Zn-Al ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.L. Xu; Z.W. Yu; S.J. Ji; J.C. Sun; Z.K. Hei

    2001-01-01

    Decomposition processes of the quenched Zn-Al alloys were studied by differentiai scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the stabilities of supersaturated solid solution (SSS) of Zn-Al alloy and c' phase formed by quenching would reduce with increasing Zn content and precipitating η-Zn phases even when aging at ambient temperature,so that exothermic precipitation peak in DSC curve would disappear. The activation energy of the η-Zn precipitation and their reaction enthalpy were calculated and measured. The kinetics of α' decomposition or η-Zn formation was determined by XRD.The microstructure change during aging was observed by TEM.

  4. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes as an essential part of their life cycle. While living inside erythrocytes, the parasite remodels the cell's intracellular organization as well as its outer surface. Late trophozoite-stage parasites and schizonts introduce numerous small protrusions on t...... microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion....

  5. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  6. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  7. The use of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, D B; Heuer, A H

    2010-12-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopes are essential and ubiquitous tools in the biological, biochemical and biomedical sciences, and play a similar role to scanning electron microscopes in materials science. However, modern laser scanning confocal microscopes have a number of advantages for the study of materials, in addition to their obvious uses for high resolution reflected and transmitted light optical microscopy. In this paper, we provide several examples that exploit the laser scanning confocal microscope's capabilities of pseudo-infinite depth of field imaging, topographic imaging, photo-stimulated luminescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic imaging. © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Scanning SQUID microscopy in a cryogen-free refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Brian T.; Low, David; Prawiroatmodjo, Guenevere E. D. K.; Nangoi, J. Kevin; Kim, Jihoon; Nowack, Katja C.

    With helium prices rising and supply becoming increasingly uncertain, it has become attractive to use dry cryostats with cryocoolers rather than liquid helium to reach low temperatures. However, a cryocooler introduces vibrations at the sample stage, making scanning probe experiments more challenging. Here, we report our progress on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope implemented for the first time in a compact, cryogen-free 5 K system. Our microscope is designed to reach submicron spatial resolution and a flux sensitivity of approximately 1 μΦ0 /√{ Hz} , where Φ0 is the magnetic flux quantum. To enable height feedback while approaching and scanning samples, we mount the SQUID on a quartz tuning fork. Our system promises to meet the capabilities of similar systems implemented in helium cryostats.

  9. Low voltage scanning electron microscopy of interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Bunch, T. E.; Reilly, T. W.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The resolution of available low-voltage SEM (LVSEM) models used in the characterization of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) is limited by a number of factors including energy spread in the electron source, beam brightness, scanning electron detector geometry, and various lens aberrations. This paper describes an improved model of LVSEM which offers an increased resolution at low voltage. The improvements include a cold cathode FE source which has an extremely low inherent energy spread and high brightness, a second condenser lens to converge the beam and maintain an optimum aperture half-angle, and a detector optimized for low-voltage scanning-electron collection. To reduce lens aberrations, the specimen is immersed in the objective lens field. The features of several IDP samples observed using the images obtained with this LVSEM model are described.

  10. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  11. Low voltage scanning electron microscopy of interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Bunch, T. E.; Reilly, T. W.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The resolution of available low-voltage SEM (LVSEM) models used in the characterization of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) is limited by a number of factors including energy spread in the electron source, beam brightness, scanning electron detector geometry, and various lens aberrations. This paper describes an improved model of LVSEM which offers an increased resolution at low voltage. The improvements include a cold cathode FE source which has an extremely low inherent energy spread and high brightness, a second condenser lens to converge the beam and maintain an optimum aperture half-angle, and a detector optimized for low-voltage scanning-electron collection. To reduce lens aberrations, the specimen is immersed in the objective lens field. The features of several IDP samples observed using the images obtained with this LVSEM model are described.

  12. Near-field scanning microwave microscopy of microwave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahacos, C. P.; Steinhauer, David E.; Dutta, S.; Anlage, S. M.; Wellstood, F. C.; Newman, H.

    1997-03-01

    We have developed a scanning microwave microscope which can presently image features with a spatial resolution of 10-100 μm in the frequency range 5-15 GHz.(C. P. Vlahacos, et al.), Appl. Phys. Lett. 69, 3272 (1996).^,(S. M. Anlage, et al.), IEEE. Trans. Appl. Supercond. (1997). The microscope consists of a resonant section of a coaxial cable which is terminated with a small-diameter open-ended coaxial probe. Images are made by scanning the sample under the probe while recording the induced near-field microwave voltage as a function of sample position. We will present images for several microwave devices, including an X-band microstrip planar ferrite circulator and a high-temperature superconducting microstrip YBa_2Cu_3O_7-δ resonator, and compare them to the calculated field profiles.

  13. Tomographic imaging and scanning thermal microscopy: thermal impedance tomography

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The application of tomographic imaging techniques developed for medical applications to the data provided by the scanning thermal microscope will give access to true three-dimensional information on the thermal properties of materials on a mm length scale. In principle, the technique involves calculating and inverting a sensitivity matrix for a uniform isotropic material, collecting ordered data at several modulation frequencies, and multiplying the inverse of the matrix with the data vector....

  14. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Barnaby D.A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the cu...

  15. Scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of micropatterned copper sulfide (CuxS) thin films fabricated by a wet chemistry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaocui

    2011-01-01

    Patterned copper sulfide (CuxS) microstructures on Si (1 1 1) wafers were successfully fabricated by a relatively simple solution growth method using copper sulfate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate and sodium thiosulfate aqueous solutions as precursors. The CuxS particles were selectively deposited on a patterned self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane regions created by photolithography. To obtain high quality CuxS films, preparative conditions such as concentration, proportion, pH and temperature of the precursor solutions were optimized. Various techniques such as optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were employed to examine the topography and properties of the micro-patterned CuxS films. Optical microscopy and AFM results indicated that the CuxS micro-pattern possessed high selectivity and clear edge resolution. From combined X-ray diffraction analysis and optical band gap calculations we conclude that Cu9S5 (digenite) was the main phase within the resultant CuxS film. Both SECM image and cyclic voltammograms confirmed that the CuxS film had good electrical conductivity. Moreover, from SECM approach curve analysis, the apparent electron-transfer rate constant (k) in the micro-pattern of CuxS dominated surface was estimated as 0.04 cm/s. The SECM current map showed high edge acuity of the micro-patterned CuxS. PMID:21785491

  16. Scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of micropatterned copper sulfide (Cu(x)S) thin films fabricated by a wet chemistry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaocui

    2011-05-30

    Patterned copper sulfide (Cu(x)S) microstructures on Si (1 1 1) wafers were successfully fabricated by a relatively simple solution growth method using copper sulfate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate and sodium thiosulfate aqueous solutions as precursors. The Cu(x)S particles were selectively deposited on a patterned self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane regions created by photolithography. To obtain high quality Cu(x)S films, preparative conditions such as concentration, proportion, pH and temperature of the precursor solutions were optimized. Various techniques such as optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were employed to examine the topography and properties of the micro-patterned Cu(x)S films. Optical microscopy and AFM results indicated that the Cu(x)S micro-pattern possessed high selectivity and clear edge resolution. From combined X-ray diffraction analysis and optical band gap calculations we conclude that Cu(9)S(5) (digenite) was the main phase within the resultant Cu(x)S film. Both SECM image and cyclic voltammograms confirmed that the Cu(x)S film had good electrical conductivity. Moreover, from SECM approach curve analysis, the apparent electron-transfer rate constant (k) in the micro-pattern of Cu(x)S dominated surface was estimated as 0.04 cm/s. The SECM current map showed high edge acuity of the micro-patterned Cu(x)S.

  17. Structural studies of glasses by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashchieva, E.P. [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to present information about the applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) for structural investigations of glasses. TEM investigations have been carried out on some binary and on a large number of ternary borate-telluride systems where glass-forming oxides, oxides of transitional elements and modified oxides of elements from I, II and III groups in the periodic table, are used as third component. The large experimental data given by TEM method allows the fine classification of the micro-heterogeneities. A special case of micro-heterogeneous structure with technological origin occurs near the boundary between the 2 immiscible liquids obtained at macro-phase separation. TEM was also used for the direct observation of the glass structure and we have studied the nano-scale structure of borate glasses obtained at slow and fast cooling of the melts. The ED possesses advantages for analysis of amorphous thin films or micro-pastilles and it is a very useful technique for study in materials containing simultaneously light and heavy elements. A comparison between the possibilities of the 3 diffraction techniques (X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and ED) is presented.

  18. High resolution imaging using scanning ion conductance microscopy with improved distance feedback control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Li; Nicholas Johnson; Victor Ostanin; Andrew Shevchuk; Liming Ying; Yuri Korchev; David Klenerman

    2008-01-01

    Microscopy is an essential technique for observation on living cells. There is currently great interest in applying scanning probe microscopy to image-living biological cells in their natural environment at the nanometer scale. Scanning ion conductance microscopy is a new form of scanning probe microscopy, which enables non-contact high-resolution imaging of living biological cells. Based on a scanned nanopipette in physiological buffer, the distance feedback control uses the ion current to control the distance between the pipette tip and the sample surface. However, this feedback control has difficulties over slopes on convoluted cell surfaces, which limits its resolution. In this study, we present an improved form of feedback control that removes the contribution of up to the third-order slope from the ion current signal, hence providing a more accurate signal for controlling the distance. We show that this allows faster and lower noise topographic high-resolution imaging.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy of acrothoracican cypris larvae (Crustacea, Thecostraca, Cirripedia, Acrothoracica, Lithoglyptidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolbasov, Gregory A.; Høeg, Jens T.; Elfimov, Alexei S.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to provide a full morphological description of cypris morphology in the acrothoracican species Lithoglyptes milis and L. habei (Lithoglyptidae). Special attention was given to lattice organs, antennules, thorax, thoracopods, abdomen, and furcal rami. Cypris larv

  20. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; Es, van P.; Petersen, W.; Leeuwen, van T.G.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  1. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  2. Voltammetric scanning electrochemical cell microscopy: dynamic imaging of hydrazine electro-oxidation on platinum electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.-H.; Jacobse, L.; McKelvey, K.; Lai, S.C.S.; Koper, M.T.M.; Unwin, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Voltammetric scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) incorporates cyclic voltammetry measurements in the SECCM imaging protocol, by recording electrochemical currents in a wide potential window at each pixel in a map. This provides much more information compared to traditional fixed potenti

  3. Supermolecular nanostructurization in natural colloids: scanning probe microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, Y. A.

    2005-02-01

    In this work, features of research of the supermolecular structures of native metacolloids by STM and AFM are presented. The features associated with metastable structures and the polyphasal nature of colloidal products of geological processes are considered. As a result of the researches carried out local and global of characteristics of their supermolecular structures are established. We show qualitative and quantitative superstructural data obtained using a combination of microscopic researches with diffractional and the structural-morphological analysis of received images. From the structural-transformation row of dependence of superstructural features obtained from findings of geological conditions, PT-parameters of processes of formation were established. The multilevel structure of shungite carbon (where supermolecular structure is formed by multilayered fullerene-like globules) is considered. Both chains and compact aggregates were determined in shungites. Possible mechanisms of aggregations of shungites globules were analyzed.

  4. Hybrid wide-field and scanning microscopy for high-speed 3D imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yubo; Chen, Nanguang

    2015-11-15

    Wide-field optical microscopy is efficient and robust in biological imaging, but it lacks depth sectioning. In contrast, scanning microscopic techniques, such as confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy, have been successfully used for three-dimensional (3D) imaging with optical sectioning capability. However, these microscopic techniques are not very suitable for dynamic real-time imaging because they usually take a long time for temporal and spatial scanning. Here, a hybrid imaging technique combining wide-field microscopy and scanning microscopy is proposed to accelerate the image acquisition process while maintaining the 3D optical sectioning capability. The performance was demonstrated by proof-of-concept imaging experiments with fluorescent beads and zebrafish liver.

  5. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ∼10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of erythropoietin-stimulated bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblond, P.F. (Hospital of St. Sacrement, Quebec); Chamberlain, J.K.; Weed, R.I.

    1975-01-01

    This work describes and illustrates the scanning electron microscopic modifications observed in the femoral bone marrow of normal mice 72 hours after a single injection of partly purified sheep erythropoietin and of mice afflicted with a chronic congenital hemolytic anemia analogous to the disease Hereditary Spherocytosis in man. In acordance with previous transmission electron microscopic studies, the observations are consistent with an effect of erythropoietin both on the frequency of cell migration across the normally intact marrow sinus endothelium and on the morphology of sinus adventitial cells. It is suggested that these ultrastructural modifications may be responsible for the greater patency of the marrow-blood barrier under erythropoietin stimulation.

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopy of Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909 (Nematoda: Ascarididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfredi Reinalda Marisa

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909 is a parasitic nematode with its biological cycle still unknown, even though it was found in humans, domestic and silvatic animals. Adult worms, collected by surgical drainage from a human patient from the State of Pará, Brazil, were micrographed using a scanning electron microscope. Morphological aspects of males and females such as cephalic structures, caudal papillae and cuticular patterns were analyzed and compared with the previous descriptions adding new data for the identification of this species.

  8. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples.

  9. [Scanning electron microscopy of heat-damaged bone tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsanyl, L

    1977-02-01

    Parts of diaphyses of bones were exposed to high temperature of 200-1300 degrees C. Damage to the bone tissue caused by the heat was investigated. The scanning electron microscopic picture seems to be characteristic of the temperature applied. When the bones heated to the high temperature of 700 degrees C characteristic changes appear on the periostal surface, higher temperatura on the other hand causes damage to the compact bone tissue and can be observed on the fracture-surface. Author stresses the importance of this technique in the legal medicine and anthropology.

  10. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  11. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  12. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramla Gary

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The gold nanoparticle (GNP aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the detonation soot of high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkarov, A. O.; Pruuel, E. R.; Ten, K. A.; Rubtsov, I. A.; Gerasimov, E. Yu; Zubkov, P. I.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the recovered carbonaceous residue (soot) from the detonation of some high explosives: TNT, a mixture of TNT and RDX (50/50), benzotrifuroxane, and triaminotrinitrobenzene. The use of the same experimental setup allowed a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the detonation products formed under similar conditions. The results clearly show differences in the morphology of graphite-like and diamond inclusions and in the quantitative content of nanodiamonds for the explosives used in this study.

  14. 22 nm node wafer inspection using diffraction phase microscopy and image post-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2013-04-01

    We applied epi-illumination diffraction phase microscopy to measure the amplitude and phase of the scattered field from a SEMATECH 22 nm node intentional defect array (IDA) wafer. We used several imaging processing techniques to remove the wafer's underlying structure and reduce both the spatial and temporal noise and eliminate the system calibration error to produce stretched panoramic amplitude and phase images. From the stretched images, we detected defects down to 20 nm × 160 nm for a parallel bridge, 20 nm × 100 nm for perpendicular bridge, and 35 nm × 70 nm for an isolated dot.

  15. Dual mode diffraction phase microscopy for quantitative functional assessment of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaikova, N. A.; Popov, A. P.; Kalyanov, A. L.; Ryabukho, V. P.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2017-10-01

    A diffraction phase microscopy approach with a combined use of transmission and reflection imaging modes has been developed and applied for non-invasive quantitative assessment of the refractive index of red blood cells (RBCs). We present the theoretical background of signal formation for both imaging modes, accompanied by the results of experimental studies. We demonstrate that simultaneous use of the two modes has great potential for accurate assessment of the refractive index of biological cells, and we perform a reconstruction of spatial distribution of the refractive index of RBC in 3D.

  16. A scanning tunneling microscopy tip with a stable atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong-Cheol; Seidman, David N.

    2004-02-01

    A single stable adatom on a {110}-type plane of a tungsten tip is created via field-evaporation in a field-ion microscope (FIM) operating at room temperature. This single adatom has sufficient surface mobility at room temperature and migrates, in one-dimension, along a -type direction toward an edge of a {110}-type plane, due to the existence of an electric field gradient. The plane edge has a higher local electric field than its center, since it has a higher local geometric curvature. This result implies that the stable position of a single adatom during a scan of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip on a surface is at the edge and not at the center of a {110}-type plane at room temperature. Therefore, the electron wave function of a tip is not symmetric and this fact should be taken into account in a careful analysis of STM images. Also a tip with a dislocation emerging at a {110}-type plane is suggested as an improved STM tip configuration, as the step at the surface, created by the intersection of the dislocation with it, is a perpetual source of single adatoms.

  17. Scanning Probe Microscopy as a Tool Applied to Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fabio Lima; Manzoli, Alexandra; de Herrmann, Paulo Sérgio Paula; Oliveira, Osvaldo Novais; Mattoso, Luiz Henrique Capparelli

    The control of materials properties and processes at the molecular level inherent in nanotechnology has been exploited in many areas of science and technology, including agriculture where nanotech methods are used in release of herbicides and monitoring of food quality and environmental impact. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and related techniques are among the most employed nanotech methods, particularly with the possibility of direct measurements of intermolecular interactions. This chapter presents a brief review of the applications of AFM in agriculture that may be categorized into four main topics, namely thin films, research on nanomaterials and nanostructures, biological systems and natural fibers, and soils science. Examples of recent applications will be provided to give the reader a sense of the power of the technique and potential contributions to agriculture.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of experimental bone hacking trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunni-Perret, Veronique; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Laugier, Jean-Pierre; Lupi-Pégurier, Laurence; Bertrand, Marie-France; Staccini, Pascal; Bolla, Marc; Quatrehomme, Gérald

    2005-07-01

    The authors report on their macro- and microscopy study of bone lesions made by a sharp force instrument (a single blade knife), and a sharp-blunt instrument classified as a chopping weapon (a hatchet). The aim of this work was to attempt to identify the instrument by analyzing the general class characteristics of the cuts. Each weapon was used on human bones. The results indicate that macroscopic analysis is more problematic. The microscopic analysis assessed that characteristics examined were effective in distinguishing sharp from sharp-blunt injury to the bone. The microscope facilitates analysis unachievable with macroscopic methods, some three-dimensional characteristics not visible to the naked eye being clearly defined with its use. Emphasis has been placed on the value of SEM as an anthropologist's tool in bone lesion injuries.

  19. In-situ Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy of Catalytic Solids and Related Nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.; de Smit, E.; van Schooneveld, M.M.; Aramburo, L.R.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present status of in-situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is reviewed, with an emphasis on the abilities of the STXM technique in comparison with electron microscopy. The experimental aspects and interpretation of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are briefly introduced and the e

  20. Applications of scanning electron microscopy to the study of mineral matter in peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Andrejko, M.J.; Bardin, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) have been used for in situ analysis of minerals in peats by combining methods for producing oriented microtome sections of peat with methods for critical point drying. The combined technique allows SEM analysis of the inorganic components and their associated botanical constituents, along with petrographic identification of the botanical constituents. In peat deposits with abundant fluvial- or marine-derived minerals, one may use the above technique and/or medium- or low-temperature ashing followed by x-ray diffraction to readily identify the various mineral components. However, in some freshwater environments the scarcity of non-silica minerals makes the above techniques impractical. By separating the inorganic residues from the peat, one can isolate the non-silica mineral matter in the SEM for analysis by EDS. Furthermore, such separation allows SEM analysis of features and textures of both silica and non-silica mineral particles that might otherwise be unidentifiable. Results indicate the occurrence of detritial minerals in both Okefenokee and Snuggedy Swamp peats, the presence of authigenic or diagenetic minerals growing within peats, and dissolution features on freshwater sponge spicules that may account for the absence of spicules in Tertiary lignites.

  1. Resolution enhancement of digital laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with a dual-lens optical pickup head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Huang, Tai-Ting; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Lo, Feng-Hsiang; Tiao, Golden

    2016-10-01

    The resolution of the cell fluorescence image captured by a digital laser scanning microscopy with a modified dual-lens BD-ROM optical pickup head is enhanced by image registration and double sample frequency. A dual objective lens of red (655 nm) and blue (405 or 488 nm) laser sources with numerical apertures of 0.6 and 0.85 is used for sample focusing and position tracking and cell fluorescence image capturing, respectively. The image registration and capturing frequency are based on the address-coded patterns of a sample slide. The address-coded patterns are designed as a string of binary code, which comprises a plurality of base-straight lands and grooves and data-straight grooves. The widths of the base-straight lands, base-straight grooves, and data-straight grooves are 0.38, 0.38, and 0.76 μm, respectively. The numbers of sample signals in the x-direction are measured at every intersection point by intersecting the base intensity of the push-pull signal of the address-coded patterns, which has a minimum spacing of 0.38 μm. After taking a double sample frequency, the resolution of the measured cell fluorescence image is enhanced from 0.38 μm to the diffraction limit of the objective lens.

  2. Segmentation of scanning electron microscopy images from natural rubber samples with gold nanoparticles using starlet wavelets

    OpenAIRE

    de Siqueira, Alexandre Fioravante; Cabrera, Flavio Camargo [UNESP; Pagamisse, Aylton; Job,Aldo Eloizo

    2016-01-01

    Electronic microscopy has been used for morphology evaluation of different materials structures. However, microscopy results may be affected by several factors. Image processing methods can be used to correct and improve the quality of these results. In this article, we propose an algorithm based on starlets to perform the segmentation of scanning electron microscopy images. An application is presented in order to locate gold nanoparticles in natural rubber membranes. In this application, our...

  3. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruna, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180{\\deg} tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of p...

  4. A nanoscale gigahertz source realized with Josephson scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäck, Berthold, E-mail: b.jaeck@fkf.mpg.de; Eltschka, Matthias; Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Hardock, Andreas [Institut für Theoretische Elektrotechnik, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg, 21079 Hamburg (Germany); Kern, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institut de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-01-05

    Using the AC Josephson effect in the superconductor-vacuum-superconductor tunnel junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we demonstrate the generation of GHz radiation. With the macroscopic STM tip acting as a λ/4-monopole antenna, we first show that the atomic scale Josephson junction in the STM is sensitive to its frequency-dependent environmental impedance in the GHz regime. Further, enhancing Cooper pair tunneling via excitations of the tip eigenmodes, we are able to generate high-frequency radiation. We find that for vanadium junctions, the enhanced photon emission can be tuned from about 25 GHz to 200 GHz and that large photon flux in excess of 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} is reached in the tunnel junction. These findings demonstrate that the atomic scale Josephson junction in an STM can be employed as a full spectroscopic tool for GHz frequencies on the atomic scale.

  5. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Collins, Liam [University College, Dublin; Strelcov, Evgheni [ORNL; Okatan, Mahmut B [ORNL; Belianinov, Alex [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  6. Optimization of the imaging response of scanning microwave microscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardi, G. M.; Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E.; Marcelli, R., E-mail: romolo.marcelli@imm.cnr.it [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Kasper, M.; Gramse, G. [Biophysics Institute, Johannes Kepler University, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Kienberger, F. [Keysight Technologies Austria GmbH, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-20

    In this work, we present the analytical modeling and preliminary experimental results for the choice of the optimal frequencies when performing amplitude and phase measurements with a scanning microwave microscope. In particular, the analysis is related to the reflection mode operation of the instrument, i.e., the acquisition of the complex reflection coefficient data, usually referred as S{sub 11}. The studied configuration is composed of an atomic force microscope with a microwave matched nanometric cantilever probe tip, connected by a λ/2 coaxial cable resonator to a vector network analyzer. The set-up is provided by Keysight Technologies. As a peculiar result, the optimal frequencies, where the maximum sensitivity is achieved, are different for the amplitude and for the phase signals. The analysis is focused on measurements of dielectric samples, like semiconductor devices, textile pieces, and biological specimens.

  7. Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher L.; Oliver, Frederick W.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Meteorites provide a wealth of information about the solar system's formation, since they have similar building blocks as the Earth's crust but have been virtually unaltered since their formation. Some stony meteorites contain minerals and silicate inclusions, called chondrules, in the matrix. Utilizing Moessbauer spectroscopy, we identified minerals in the Murchison meteorite, a carbonaceous chondritic meteorite, by the gamma ray resonance lines observed. Absorption patterns of the spectra were found due to the minerals olivine and phyllosilicate. We used a scanning electron microscope to describe the structure of the chondrules in the Murchison meteorite. The chondrules were found to be deformed due to weathering of the meteorite. Diameters varied in size from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Further enhancement of the microscopic imagery using a digital image processor was used to describe the physical characteristics of the inclusions.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of human cortical bone failure surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Stagni, L

    1997-02-01

    Undecalcified samples extracted from human femoral shafts are fractured by bending and the fracture surfaces are examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The investigation is performed on both dry and wet (hydrated with a saline solution) specimens. SEM micrographs show patterns in many respects similar to those observed in fractography studies of laminated fiber-reinforced synthetic composites. In particular, dry and wet samples behave like brittle and ductile matrix laminates, respectively. An analysis carried out on the basis of the mechanisms that dominate the fracture process of laminates shows that a reasonable cortical bone model is that of a laminated composite material whose matrix is composed of extracellular noncollagenous calcified proteins, and the reinforcement is constituted by the calcified collagen fiber system.

  9. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning......: 2h); G3- four 2-hour exposures to 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure: 8h); G4- two applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide, which was light-activated with halogen lamp at 700mW/cm² during 7min and remained in contact with enamel for 20min (total exposure: 40min). All bleaching treatments adopted...... analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were...

  10. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  11. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rhodes, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Guzman, Anthony D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  12. Crystallographic Characterization of Extraterrestrial Materials by Energy-Scanning X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiya, Kenji; Mikouchi, Takashi; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Hirata, Arashi; Kurokawa, Ayaka; Zolensky, Michael E. (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    We have continued our long-term project using X-ray diffraction to characterize a wide range of extraterrestrial samples. The stationary sample method with polychromatic X-rays is advantageous because the irradiated area of the sample is always same and fixed, meaning that all diffraction spots occur from the same area of the sample, however, unit cell parameters cannot be directly obtained by this method though they are very important for identification of mineral and for determination of crystal structures. In order to obtain the cell parameters even in the case of the sample stationary method, we apply energy scanning of a micro-beam of monochromatic SR at SPring-8.

  13. Possibilities and Challenges of Scanning Hard X-ray Spectro-microscopy Techniques in Material Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Somogyi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scanning hard X-ray spectro-microscopic imaging opens unprecedented possibilities in the study of inhomogeneous samples at different length-scales. It gives insight into the spatial variation of the major and minor components, impurities and dopants of the sample, and their chemical and electronic states at micro- and nano-meter scales. Measuring, modelling and understanding novel properties of laterally confined structures are now attainable. The large penetration depth of hard X-rays (several keV to several 10 keV beam energy makes the study of layered and buried structures possible also in in situ and in operando conditions. The combination of different X-ray analytical techniques complementary to scanning spectro-microscopy, such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray excited optical luminescence, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS and nano-SIMS, provides access to optical characteristics and strain and stress distributions. Complex sample environments (temperature, pressure, controlled atmosphere/vacuum, chemical environment are also possible and were demonstrated, and allow as well the combination with other analysis techniques (Raman spectroscopy, infrared imaging, mechanical tensile devices, etc. on precisely the very same area of the sample. The use of the coherence properties of X-rays from synchrotron sources is triggering emerging experimental imaging approaches with nanometer lateral resolution. New fast analytical possibilities pave the way towards statistically significant studies at multi- length-scales and three dimensional tomographic investigations. This paper gives an overview of these techniques and their recent achievements in the field of material sciences.

  14. Quantitative studies of the nucleation of recrystallization in metals utilizing microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Axel Wright

    is proven to be a good way of determining microstructural parameters, which are important when studying recrystallization dynamics. The nucleation of recrystallizationat triple junctions has been studied by 3 dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD), allowing for the first time the deformed and recrystallized......This thesis covers three main results obtained during the project: A reliable method of performing serial sectioning on metal samples utilizing a Logitech polishing machine has been developed. Serial sectioning has been performed on metal samples in 1 µmsteps utilizing mechanical polishing......, and in 2 µm steps when electrochemical polishing was needed. A method by which reliable EBSP line scans may be performed by scanning three parallel lines has been developed. This method allows lines of the order of 1cm in length to be characterized with a 1 µm or better spatial resolution. The method...

  15. Tribology studies of organic thin films by scanning force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar, G. [Albert-Ludwigs Univ., Freiburg (Germany). Freiburger Materialforschungszentrum; Rubin, S.; Parikh, A.N.; Swanson, B.I.; Zawodzinski, T.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The use of organic thin films as lubricants on solid surfaces is important in many modern technologies including magnetic storage and micromachines. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are attractive candidates for lubricant layers and for model studies of lubrication because of their strong adsorption to the surface. The recent interest on the properties of LB films and SAMs has been also motivated by their potential applications in sensors, non-linear optical devices, lithography and microelectronics. Using the micro-contact printing method the authors prepared patterned SAMs consisting of methyl-terminated alkanethiols of different chain lengths. The samples were characterized using lateral force microscopy (LFM) and the force modulation technique (FMT). In general, higher friction is observed over the short chain regions than over the long chain regions when a low or moderate load is applied to the SFM tip. For such cases the high friction (short chain) regions are also ``softer`` as measured by FMT. A high loads, a reversal of the image contrast is observed and the short chain regions show a lower friction than the long chain regions. This image contrast is reversible upon reduction of the applied load.

  16. Electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy in the characterization of calcium phosphate precipitation from aqueous solutions under biomineralization conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvorova E. I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate precipitation obtained from aqueous solutions at room and body temperature and pH 5.5-7.5 were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, transmission electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Supersaturated solutions of calcium phosphates were prepared by different methods of mixing of the stock solutions: diffusion-controlled mixing in space, convection-controlled mixing on earth and forced mixing on earth and with typical physiological parameters (pH and temperature. Concentrations of the stock solutions, rate of solution mixing and duration of precipitation influence very strongly the chemical composition of the precipitation, the phase composition of individual crystals, their sizes, morphology and structure. Microdiffraction and HRTEM techniques showed an incontestable advantage on other techniques like SEM and XRD in the investigation of small particles and mixtures of calcium phosphates (hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate with different proportions.

  17. Conventional fluorescence microscopy below the diffraction limit with simultaneous capture of two fluorophores in DNA origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Ben J.

    2016-02-01

    A conventional fluorescence microscope was previously constructed for simultaneous imaging of two colors to gain sub-diffraction localization. The system is predicated on color separation of overlapping Airy discs, construction of matrices of Cartesian coordinates to determine locations as well as centers of the point spread functions of fluorophores. Quantum dots that are separated by as little as 10 nm were resolved in the x-y coordinates. Inter-fluorophore distances that vary by 10 nm could also be distinguished. Quantum dots are bright point light source emitters that excite with a single laser and can serve as a label for many biomolecules. Here, alterations in the method are described to test the ability to resolve Atto 488 and Atto 647 dyes attached to DNA origami at ~40 nm spacing intervals. Dual laser excitation is used in tandem with multi-wavelength bandpass filters. Notwithstanding challenges from reduced intensity in Atto labeled DNA origami helical bundles compared to quantum dots, preliminary data show a mean inter-fluorophore distance of 56 nm with a range (14-148 nm). The range closely matches published results with DNA origami with other methods of subdiffraction microscopy. Sub-diffraction simultaneous two-color imaging fluorescence microscopy acronymically christened (SSTIFM) is a simple, readily accessible, technique for measurement of inter-fluorophore distances in compartments less than 40 nm. Preliminary results with so called nanorulers are encouraging for use with other biomolecules.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy investigations regarding Adonis vernalis L. flower morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Neta GOSTIN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The floral morphology of Adonis vernalis L. was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. The investigations are important to clarify some taxonomical problems and also could provide useful diagnostic elements for the identification of this medicinal plant in powdered materials. All floral organs are initiated spirally and centripetally and develop centripetally. The petals (8-12 are shorter than the sepals (5-6 in early developmental stages. The petals are disposed on spiral (with 3-4 whorls. The stamens (numerous are unbranched and reach maturity centripetally; they are free of the perianth. The anther walls consisting of a single layer epidermis in the anther wall surrounding the sporagenous tissue, one row of endothecium, two to four rows of middle layer and one row of tapetum layer. In the anther walls, the tapetal cells, by glandular type, persist later in ontogenesis. Pollen grains are tricolpate with echinate surface. The gynoecium is multiple, apocarpous with distinct carpels. The carpels are ascidiate from the beginning. At the base of each carpel, numerousness short, unicellular, trichomes are present. The stigma differentiates as two crests along the ventral slit of the ovary. Each carpel contains a single ovule inside the ovary cavity. The mature ovule is anatropous, with two integuments. It is almost parallel to the funicle.

  19. A broadband toolbox for scanning microwave microscopy transmission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucibello, Andrea; Sardi, Giovanni Maria; Capoccia, Giovanni; Proietti, Emanuela; Marcelli, Romolo; Kasper, Manuel; Gramse, Georg; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present in detail the design, both electromagnetic and mechanical, the fabrication, and the test of the first prototype of a Scanning Microwave Microscope (SMM) suitable for a two-port transmission measurement, recording, and processing the high frequency transmission scattering parameter S21 passing through the investigated sample. The S21 toolbox is composed by a microwave emitter, placed below the sample, which excites an electromagnetic wave passing through the sample under test, and is collected by the cantilever used as the detector, electrically matched for high frequency measurements. This prototype enhances the actual capability of the instrument for a sub-surface imaging at the nanoscale. Moreover, it allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the material under test obtained through the measurement of the reflection (S11) and transmission (S21) parameters at the same time. The SMM operates between 1 GHz and 20 GHz, current limit for the microwave matching of the cantilever, and the high frequency signal is recorded by means of a two-port Vector Network Analyzer, using both contact and no-contact modes of operation, the latter, especially minded for a fully nondestructive and topography-free characterization. This tool is an upgrade of the already established setup for the reflection mode S11 measurement. Actually, the proposed setup is able to give richer information in terms of scattering parameters, including amplitude and phase measurements, by means of the two-port arrangement.

  20. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  1. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Samples in an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Pokorná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    The high negative bias of a sample in a scanning electron microscope constitutes the “cathode lens” with a strong electric field just above the sample surface. This mode offers a convenient tool for controlling the landing energy of electrons down to units or even fractions of electronvolts with only slight readjustments of the column. Moreover, the field accelerates and collimates the signal electrons to earthed detectors above and below the sample, thereby assuring high collection efficiency and high amplification of the image signal. One important feature is the ability to acquire the complete emission of the backscattered electrons, including those emitted at high angles with respect to the surface normal. The cathode lens aberrations are proportional to the landing energy of electrons so the spot size becomes nearly constant throughout the full energy scale. At low energies and with their complete angular distribution acquired, the backscattered electron images offer enhanced information about crystalline and electronic structures thanks to contrast mechanisms that are otherwise unavailable. Examples from various areas of materials science are presented.

  3. Sub-diffraction imaging on standard microscopes through photobleaching microscopy with non-linear processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, Sebastian; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Sannerud, Ragna; Menchon, Silvia A; Jose, Liya; Heintzmann, Rainer; Verstreken, Patrik; Annaert, Wim

    2012-05-01

    Visualization of organelles and molecules at nanometer resolution is revolutionizing the biological sciences. However, such technology is still limited for many cell biologists. We present here a novel approach using photobleaching microscopy with non-linear processing (PiMP) for sub-diffraction imaging. Bleaching of fluorophores both within the single-molecule regime and beyond allows visualization of stochastic representations of sub-populations of fluorophores by imaging the same region over time. Our method is based on enhancing the probable positions of the fluorophores underlying the images. The random nature of the bleached fluorophores is assessed by calculating the deviation of the local actual bleached fluorescence intensity to the average bleach expectation as given by the overall decay of intensity. Subtracting measured from estimated decay images yields differential images. Non-linear enhancement of maxima in these diffraction-limited differential images approximates the positions of the underlying structure. Summing many such processed differential images yields a super-resolution PiMP image. PiMP allows multi-color, three-dimensional sub-diffraction imaging of cells and tissues using common fluorophores and can be implemented on standard wide-field or confocal systems.

  4. Collagen imaged by Coherent X-ray Diffraction: towards a complementary tool to conventional scanning SAXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Bean, Richard J; Bozec, Laurent; Robinson, Ian K [London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN), University College London (UCL), London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); McCallion, Catriona; Wallace, Kris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (UCL), London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hiller, Jen C; Terrill, Nicholas J, E-mail: f.berenguer@ucl.ac.u [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    Third generation x-ray sources offer unique possibilities for exploiting coherence in the study of materials. New insights in the structure and dynamics of soft condensed matter and biological samples can be obtained by coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD). However, the experimental procedures for applying these methods to collagen tissues are still under development. We present here an investigation for the optimal procedure in order to obtain high quality CXD data from collagen tissues. Sample handling and preparation and adequate coherence defining apertures are among the more relevant factors to take into account. The impact of the results is also discussed, in particular in comparison with the information that can be extracted from conventional scanning small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Images of collagen tissues obtained by CXD reconstructions will give additional information about the local structure with higher resolution and will complement scanning SAXS images.

  5. Environmental scanning electron microscopy of hydrated conditioned/etched dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, F A; van der Vyver, P J; Eick, J D; Dusevich, V M

    2000-11-01

    Various etchants/conditioners are used during dental treatment to affect or remove the smear layer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different treatments on moist dentine, using a field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (FE-ESEM). Twenty freshly extracted, human molar teeth were utilised. The roots and pulps were removed, and the crowns horizontally sectioned with a low speed diamond saw (Isomet) (with cooling in a saline solution) in order to expose superficial dentine. A smear layer was created on these surfaces by using 600 grit silicone carbide paper. Test surfaces were then treated in one of the following ways: 1. 37% phosphoric acid liquid 2. 37% phosphoric acid gel 3. NRC (non-rinse conditioner) without rinsing 4. NRC with rinsing. Shallow grooves were cut on the untreated sides, using a thin diamond bur. This enabled the samples to be split in half when pressure was applied in the grooves. Samples were maintained moist throughout specimen preparation. Samples were examined in the FE-ESEM (Philips XL 30) in such a way that the effect of the treatment could be viewed occlusally, as well as perpendicular to the treated interface. Phosphoric acid liquid and gel removed the smear layer, and demineralised the dentine for approximately 5-10 micrometers. NRC penetrated the smear layer and modified it to a lesser degree. However, washing of the NRC treated surface removed part of the smear layer, and opened up some dentinal tubules. Excellent resolution was possible with the FE-ESEM in both the wet and dry modes.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of hair treated in hard water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Gautham; Chakravarthy Rangachari, Srinivas

    2016-06-01

    Hardness of water is determined by the amount of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4 ) dissolved in it. Hardness of water used for washing hair may damage the hair. The objective of this study is to observe the surface changes due to hard water usage and compare the thickness of hair between hard and soft water treated samples. Ten to 15 hair strands of length 15-20 cm, which were lost during combing, were obtained from 15 healthy female volunteers. Each hair sample was cut into two equal halves to obtain two sets per volunteer. Each hair sample was wrapped around a glass rod. One set of 15 samples was washed with hard water, and the other set was washed with distilled water for 10 minutes on alternate days and air-dried. This procedure was carried out for 30 days. The surface of hair treated in hard and soft water was examined under a scanning electron microscope. The CaCO3 and MgSO4 content of hard and distilled water samples were determined as 212.5 ppm of CaCO3 and 10 ppm of CaCO3 respectively. The mean calcium deposition in hard and distilled water treated hair was determined as 0.804% and 0.26%, respectively. The mean magnesium deposition in hard and distilled water treated hair was determined as 0.34% and 0.078%, respectively. The mean thickness of hair treated in hard water and distilled water were 72.78 and 78.14 μm, respectively. The surface of hard water treated hair has a ruffled appearance with higher mineral deposition and decreased thickness when compared with the surface of distilled water treated hair. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Scanning Capacitance Force Microscopy and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy of Nanostructures Embedded in SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, G.; Spiga, S.; Fanciulli, M.

    Scanning capacitance force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy are used to image Sn nanometer sized structures embedded in silicon oxide thin films. The capacitance variation occurring between probe and sample in presence of a metallic cluster modifies the oscillation amplitude of the AFM probe at twice the frequency of the applied voltage. The extreme localisation of the interaction due to the small geometries involved allows a lateral resolution of few nm. Issues related to the contrast mechanism and the spatial resolution are discussed with the support 2D finite element calculation of the electrostatic field distribution between probe and sample.

  8. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  9. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirm that bone microstructure is similar in osteopenic and osteoporotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Orkun; Atik, O Sahap; Erdoğan, Deniz; Göktaş, Güleser; Elmas, Ciğdem

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to confirm the finding of "Bone microstructure is similar in osteopenic and osteoporotic patients with femoral neck fracture." obtained in previous "light microscopy study", which was new and important data. Fourteen patients (5 males, 9 females) who were admitted with proximal femoral fracture following low energy trauma (patients who participated in the light microscopy study) were included. The patients were divided into two groups based on the bone mineral density (BMD) measurement, including osteopenic group (n=7, mean age 69 years; range 63 to 74 years) and osteoporotic group (n=7, mean age 74.1 years; range 67 to 78 years). Cortical and trabecular bone samples were taken from the patients who underwent endoprosthesis during partial hip arthroplasty and these samples were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluations which are more sophisticated higher resolution techniques. The mean cortical bone thickness was 3622.14 mm in osteopenic group and 2323.14 mm in osteoporotic group (pelectron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluations revealed similar findings for both groups. Although a significant difference in cortical thickness was found between the groups, transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that bone microstructure shared similar characteristics in osteopenic and osteoporotic patients with low-energy femoral neck fracture, as it was in previous light microscopy study.

  10. Fast and reliable method of conductive carbon nanotube-probe fabrication for scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremov, Vyacheslav, E-mail: dremov@issp.ac.ru; Fedorov, Pavel; Grebenko, Artem [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Interdisciplinary Center for Basic Research, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Dolgoprudniy (Russian Federation); Fedoseev, Vitaly [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate the procedure of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) conductive probe fabrication with a single multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) on a silicon cantilever pyramid. The nanotube bundle reliably attached to the metal-covered pyramid is formed using dielectrophoresis technique from the MWNT suspension. It is shown that the dimpled aluminum sample can be used both for shortening/modification of the nanotube bundle by applying pulse voltage between the probe and the sample and for controlling the probe shape via atomic force microscopy imaging the sample. Carbon nanotube attached to cantilever covered with noble metal is suitable for SPM imaging in such modulation regimes as capacitance contrast microscopy, Kelvin probe microscopy, and scanning gate microscopy. The majority of such probes are conductive with conductivity not degrading within hours of SPM imaging.

  11. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  12. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy--the future of cell ultrastructure imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Louise; Hawes, Chris; Monteith, Sandy; Vaughan, Sue

    2014-03-01

    One of the major drawbacks in transmission electron microscopy has been the production of three-dimensional views of cells and tissues. Currently, there is no one suitable 3D microscopy technique that answers all questions and serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fills the gap between 3D imaging using high-end fluorescence microscopy and the high resolution offered by electron tomography. In this review, we discuss the potential of the serial block face SEM technique for studying the three-dimensional organisation of animal, plant and microbial cells.

  13. Pixel timing correction in time-lapsed calcium imaging using point scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Oke, Yoshihiko; Miwakeichi, Fumikazu; Oku, Yoshitaka

    2014-11-30

    In point scanning imaging, data are acquired by sequentially scanning each pixel of a predetermined area. This way of scanning leads to time delays between pixels, especially for lower scanning speed or large scanned areas. Therefore, experiments are often performed at lower framerates in order to ensure a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, even though framerates above 30 frames per second are technically feasible. For these framerates, we suggest that it becomes crucial to correct the time delay between image pixels prior to analyses. In this paper, we apply temporal interpolation (or pixel timing correction) for calcium imaging in two-photon microscopy as an example of fluorescence imaging. We present and compare three interpolation methods (linear, Lanczos and cubic B-spline). We test these methods on a simulated network of coupled bursting neurons at different framerates. In this network, we introduce a time delay to simulate a scanning by point scanning microscopy. We also assess these methods on actual microscopic calcium imaging movies recorded at usual framerates. Our numerical results suggest that point scanning microscopy imaging introduces statistically significant time delays between image pixels at low frequency. However, we demonstrate that pixel timing correction compensates for these time delays, regardless of the used interpolation method.

  14. Artifact mitigation of ptychography integrated with on-the-fly scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Yan, Hanfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Öztürk, Hande; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2017-07-01

    We report our experiences with conducting ptychography simultaneously with the X-ray fluorescence measurement using the on-the-fly mode for efficient multi-modality imaging. We demonstrate that the periodic artifact inherent to the raster scan pattern can be mitigated using a sufficiently fine scan step size to provide an overlap ratio of >70%. This allows us to obtain transmitted phase contrast images with enhanced spatial resolution from ptychography while maintaining the fluorescence imaging with continuous-motion scans on pixelated grids. This capability will greatly improve the competence and throughput of scanning probe X-ray microscopy.

  15. Dimensional comparison between amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy and scanning ion conductance microscopy of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonhui; Choi, MyungHoon; Jung, Goo-Eun; Rahim Ferhan, Abdul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2016-08-01

    The range of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applications for atomic force microscopy (AFM) is expanding in the biological sciences field, reflecting an increasing demand for tools that can improve our fundamental understanding of the physics behind biological systems. However, the complexity associated with applying SPM techniques in biomedical research hampers the full exploitation of its capabilities. Recently, the development of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) has overcome these limitations and enabled contact-free, high resolution imaging of live biological specimens. In this work, we demonstrate the limitation of AFM for imaging biological samples in liquid due to artifacts arising from AFM tip-sample interaction, and how SICM imaging is able to overcome those limitations with contact-free scanning. We also demonstrate that SICM measurements, when compared to AFM, show better fit to the actual dimensions of the biological samples. Our results highlight the superiority of SICM imaging, enabling it to be widely adopted as a general and versatile research tool for biological studies in the nanoscale.

  16. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  17. Observation of Ferroelectricity in a Confined Crystallite Using Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Williams, D. B. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Shin, Junsoo [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    LaBGeO{sub 5} is a model transparent ferroelectric glass-ceramic (TFGC) material, developed as an inexpensive alternative to single-crystal nonlinear optical materials. The optical activity of the TFGC originates from the ferroelectric phase which remains under a hydrostatic pressure exerted by the surrounding glass matrix. A combination of two techniques, electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), is employed to monitor the development of the ferroelectric phase. A method is proposed to theoretically construct PFM amplitude maps from EBSD orientation maps. The theoretical vertical piezoresponse map is compared with the experimental piezoresponse map from PFM. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental maps is observed.

  18. Interferometric phase microscopy using slightly-off-axis reflective point diffraction interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hongyi; Zhong, Zhi; Shan, Mingguang; Liu, Lei; Guo, Lili; Zhang, Yabin

    2017-03-01

    An interferometric phase microscopy (IPM) is proposed using slightly-off-axis reflective point diffraction interferometry for quantitative phase imaging. A retro-reflector consisting two mirrors is used to generate an angle between the object beam and reference beam, and a 45° tilted polarizing beam splitter is used to split the horizontal and vertical components of the both beams. Two carrier interferograms with π/2 phase-shift can be acquired in one shot, and the phase distribution of a thin specimen can be retrieved using a fast reconstruction method. The new IPM without loss in the utilization of the input-plane field of view combines the real time and optimizing detector bandwidth measurement benefit associated with slightly-off-axis method, high stability associated with common path geometry, and simplicity in terms of procedure and setup. Experiments are carried out on both static and dynamic specimens to demonstrate the validity and stability of the proposed method.

  19. Single-molecule chemistry and physics explored by low-temperature scanning probe microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Ingmar; Gross, Leo; Liljeroth, Peter

    2011-08-28

    It is well known that scanning probe techniques such as scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) routinely offer atomic scale information on the geometric and the electronic structure of solids. Recent developments in STM and especially in non-contact AFM have allowed imaging and spectroscopy of individual molecules on surfaces with unprecedented spatial resolution, which makes it possible to study chemistry and physics at the single molecule level. In this feature article, we first review the physical concepts underlying image contrast in STM and AFM. We then focus on the key experimental considerations and use selected examples to demonstrate the capabilities of modern day low-temperature scanning probe microscopy in providing chemical insight at the single molecule level.

  20. Thermal Properties of Materials Characterized by Scanning Electron-Acoustic Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chun-Ming; ZHANG Shu-Yi; ZHANG Zhong-Ning; SHUI Xiu-Ji; JIANG Tao

    2005-01-01

    @@ A modified technique of scanning electron-acoustic microscopy is employed to determine thermal diffusivity of materials. Using the dependence of the electron-acoustic signal on modulation frequency of the electron beam,the thermal diffusivity of materials is characterized based on a simplified thermoelastic theory. The thermal diffusivities of several metals characterized by the modified scanning electron-acoustic microscopy are in good agreement with the referential values of the corresponding materials, which proves that the scanning electronacoustic microscopy can be used to characterize the thermal diffusivity of materials effectively. In addition, for micro-inhomogeneous materials, such as biological tissues, the macro-effective (average) thermal diffusivities are characterized by the technique.

  1. Emulation and design of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy based on virtual pinhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-fa; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    In the practical application of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy, the size of detector pinhole is an important factor that determines the performance of spatial resolution characteristic of the microscopic system. However, the use of physical pinhole brings some inconvenience to the experiment and the adjustment error has a great influence on the experiment result. Through reasonably selecting the parameter of matrix detector virtual pinhole (VPH), it can efficiently approximate the physical pinhole. By using this approach, the difficulty of experimental calibration is reduced significantly. In this article, an imaging scheme of terahertz reflection-mode confocal scanning microscopy that is based on the matrix detector VPH is put forward. The influence of detector pinhole size on the axial resolution of confocal scanning microscopy is emulated and analyzed. Then, the parameter of VPH is emulated when the best axial imaging performance is reached.

  2. Embedding complementary imaging data in laser scanning microscopy micrographs by reversible watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Stanciu, Stefan G; Hristu, Radu; Coanda, Henri-George; Tranca, Denis E; Popescu, Marius; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-04-01

    Complementary laser scanning microscopy micrographs are considered as pairs consisting in a master image (MI) and a slave image (SI), the latter with potential for facilitating the interpretation of the MI. We propose a strategy based on reversible watermarking for embedding a lossy compressed version of the SI into the MI. The use of reversible watermarking ensures the exact recovery of the host image. By storing and/or transmitting the watermarked MI in a single file, the information contained in both images that constitute the pair is made available to a potential end-user, which simplifies data association and transfer. Examples are presented using support images collected by two complementary techniques, confocal scanning laser microscopy and transmission laser scanning microscopy, on Hematoxylin and Eosin stained tissue fragments. A strategy for minimizing the watermarking distortions of the MI, while preserving the content of the SI, is discussed in detail.

  3. Workshop on the coupling of synchrotron radiation IR and X-rays with tip based scanning probe microscopies X-TIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comin, F.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Mundboth, K.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France); Purans, J.; Sammelselg, V. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia); Chevrier, J.; Huant, S. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, LEPES, 38 (France); Hamilton, B. [School of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Manchester (United Kingdom); Saito, A. [Osaka Univ., RIKEN/SPring8 (Japan); Dhez, O. [OGG, INFM/CNR, 38 - Grenoble (France); Brocklesby, W.S. [Southampton Univ., Optoelectronics Research Centre (United Kingdom); Alvarez-Prado, L.M. [Ovieado, Dept. de Fisica (Spain); Kuzmin, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Riga (Latvia); Pailharey, D. [CRMC-N - CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Tonneau, D. [CRMCN - Faculte des sciences de Luminy, 13 - Marseille (France); Chretien, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Cricenti, A. [ISM-CNR, Rome (Italy); DeWilde, Y. [ESPCI, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The coupling of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) with synchrotron radiation is attracting increasing attention from nano-science community. By combining these 2 tools one can visualize, for example, the sample nano-structure prior to any X-ray characterization. Coupled with focusing devices or independently, SPM can provide spatial resolution below the optical limits. Furthermore, the possibility of employing SPM to manipulate nano-objects under X-ray beams is another exciting perspective. This document gathers the transparencies of 6 of the presentations made at the workshop: 1) the combination of atomic force microscopy and X-ray beam - experimental set-up and objectives; 2) the combination of scanning probe microscope and X-rays for detection of electrons; 3) towards soft X-ray scanning microscopy using tapered capillaries and laser-based high harmonic sources; 4) near-field magneto-optical microscopy; 5) near-field scanning optical microscopy - a brief overview -; and 6) from aperture-less near-field optical microscopy to infra-red near-field night vision. 4 posters entitled: 1) development of laboratory setup for X-ray/AFM experiments, 2) towards X-ray diffraction on single islands, 3) nano-XEOL using near-field detection, and 4) local collection with a STM tip of photoelectrons emitted by a surface irradiated by visible of UV laser beam, are included in the document.

  4. Investigation of lithiated carbons by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, T D; Song, X Y; Kinoshita, K

    2000-10-26

    The microstructures of lithiated synthetic graphite and carbon black were studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Information about the crystal structure of carbon containing various Li compositions can provide useful insights to our understanding of the Li storage mechanism in carbonaceous materials. Samples with compositions of Li{sub 0.93}C{sub 6} or Li{sub 0.45}C{sub 6} were found to contain both stage-one and stage-two compounds. These observations are consistent with XRD data. The changes in sample microstructure as the results of lithiation and exposure to electron irradiation were observed by TEM and recorded over several minutes in the microscope environment. Selected area electron diffraction patterns indicated that the lithiated samples quickly changed composition to LiC{sub 24}, which appeared to dominate during the brief analysis period. The layer planes in the lattice image of a disordered carbon black after Li insertion are poorly defined, and changes in the microstructure of these lithiated carbons was not readily apparent. Observations on these lithium intercalation compounds as well as the limitation of the experimental procedure will be presented.

  5. Applications of confocal laser scanning microscopy in research into organic semiconductor thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiek, Manuela; Balzer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    At the center of opto-electronic devices are thin layers of organic semiconductors, which need to be sandwiched between planar electrodes. With the growing demand for opto-electronic devices now and in the future, new electrode materials are needed to meet the requirements of organic semiconductors...... laser scanning microscopy has emerged as a versatile tool for optical metrology while atomic force microscopy adds detailed structural information....

  6. Correlation of live-cell imaging with volume scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Miriam S; Günthert, Maja; Bittermann, Anne Greet; de Marco, Alex; Wepf, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Live-cell imaging is one of the most widely applied methods in live science. Here we describe two setups for live-cell imaging, which can easily be combined with volume SEM for correlative studies. The first procedure applies cell culture dishes with a gridded glass support, which can be used for any light microscopy modality. The second approach is a flow-chamber setup based on Ibidi μ-slides. Both live-cell imaging strategies can be followed up with serial blockface- or focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. Two types of resin embedding after heavy metal staining and dehydration are presented making best use of the particular advantages of each imaging modality: classical en-bloc embedding and thin-layer plastification. The latter can be used only for focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy, but is advantageous for studying cell-interactions with specific substrates, or when the substrate cannot be removed. En-bloc embedding has diverse applications and can be applied for both described volume scanning electron microscopy techniques. Finally, strategies for relocating the cell of interest are discussed for both embedding approaches and in respect to the applied light and scanning electron microscopy methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apedo, K.L., E-mail: apedo@unistra.fr [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 2 rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Munzer, C.; He, H. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Montgomery, P. [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Serres, N. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Fond, C. [ICube, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, 2 rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Feugeas, F. [ICube, INSA de Strasbourg, CNRS, 24 Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France)

    2015-02-15

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied.

  8. A reverse pendulum bath cryostat design suitable for low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, M.; Thielsch, G.; Rust, H.-P.; Freund, H.-J.

    2005-03-01

    A new low temperature, ultrahigh vacuum cryostat design has been developed for atomic force and scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements. A microscope can be operated at 5 K in ultrahigh vacuum. The microscope body is thermally connected to a reverse pendulum and completely surrounded by a radiation shield. The design allows in situ dosing and irradiation of the sample as well as for easy access of tip and sample. The temperature performance and the vibrational properties of the reverse pendulum design are demonstrated in detail. A brief overview of low temperature instrumentation in scanning probe microscopy is given.

  9. Thin films of metal oxides on metal single crystals: Structure and growth by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, Heather Claire [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Detailed studies of the growth and structure of thin films of metal oxides grown on metal single crystal surfaces using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) are presented. The oxide overlayer systems studied are iron oxide and titanium oxide on the Pt(III) surface. The complexity of the metal oxides and large lattice mismatches often lead to surface structures with large unit cells. These are particularly suited to a local real space technique such as scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, the symmetry that is directly observed with the STM elucidates the relationship of the oxide overlayers to the substrate as well as distinguishing, the structures of different oxides.

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of the human endolymphatic sac: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galey, F R; House, W F

    1980-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy has been used to examine and compare one normal endolymphatic sac with one endolymphatic sac from a patient with Meniere's disease. The surgical procedure for obtaining these specimens and their preparation for scanning electron microscopy are described. The luminal surface of the rugose portion of both specimens was lined with two populations of epithelial cells: one with a dome-shaped apical surface, the other with a flattened polygonal surface. The surface of dome-shaped cells in both specimens was covered with microvilli. Neither specimen had observable loss of epithelial integrity or fibrosis.

  11. Scanning tunneling microscopy I general principles and applications to clean and adsorbate-covered surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy I provides a unique introduction to a novel and fascinating technique that produces beautiful images of nature on an atomic scale. It is the first of three volumes that together offer a comprehensive treatment of scanning tunneling microscopy, its diverse applications, and its theoretical treatment. In this volume the reader will find a detailed description of the technique itself and of its applications to metals, semiconductors, layered materials, adsorbed molecules and superconductors. In addition to the many representative results reviewed, extensive references to original work will help to make accessible the vast body of knowledge already accumulated in this field.

  12. Sub-micron imaging of buried integrated circuit structures using scanning confocal electron microscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, S. P.; Levine, Z.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Materials Science Division; Northern Arizona Univ.; NIST

    2002-09-09

    Two-dimensional images of model integrated circuit components were collected using the technique of scanning confocal electron microscopy. For structures embedded about 5 {mu}m below the surface of a silicon oxide dielectric, a lateral resolution of 76{+-}9 nm was measured. Elemental mapping via x-ray emission spectrometry is demonstrated. A parallax analysis of images taken for various tilt angles to the electron beam allowed determination of the spacing between two wiring planes. The results show that scanning confocal electron microscopy is capable of probing buried structures at resolutions that will be necessary for the inspection of next-generation integrated circuit technology.

  13. Heterodyne method of apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy on periodic gold nanowells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J. E.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Gray, S. K.; Chang, S.-H.; Jeon, S.; Rogers, J. A.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Technology at Troyes; Inst. of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering

    2007-04-02

    Heterodyne detection for apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy was used to study periodic gold nanowell arrays. Optical near-field amplitude and phase signals were obtained simultaneously with the topography of the gold nanowells and with different polarizations. Theoretical calculations of the near-fields were consistent with the experiments; in particular, the calculated amplitudes were in especially good agreement. The heterodyne method is shown to be particularly effective for these types of periodic photonic structures and other highly scattering media, which can overwhelm the near-field scattered signal when conventional apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy is used.

  14. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped...... of the characteristic details of the images. A large proportion of the observed noise may be explained by the scanning actions of the feedback circuitry while a minor fraction of the image details may be explained by surface drift phenomena. As opposed to the method of deconvolution, conventional methods of filtering......Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...

  15. Local analysis of semiconductor nanoobjects by scanning tunneling atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Lashkova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The features of the current–voltage (I–V measurements in local regions of semiconductor nanostructures by conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM are discussed. The standard procedure of I–V measurements in conductive AFM leads not infrequently to the thermomechanical stresses in the sample and, as a consequence, nonreproducibility and unreliability of measurements. The technique of obtaining reproducible current–voltage characteristics is proposed. According to the technique, a series of measurements of the selected scanning area in the mode of conducting AFM should be taken, each at the certain value of the potential. According to a series of scans I–V curve at a particular point (for any point of the scan was plotted. The program is realized in the LabVIEW software. The proposed method extends the capabilities of scanning probe microscopy in the diagnosis of nanostructured semiconductor materials.

  16. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudo Jacome, L., E-mail: leonardo.agudo@bam.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Eggeler, G., E-mail: gunther.eggeler@ruhr-uni-bochum.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Dlouhy, A., E-mail: dlouhy@ipm.cz [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-11-15

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy of the surfaces of ion implanted SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malherbe, Johan B., E-mail: johan.malherbe@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, N.G. van der; Kuhudzai, R.J.; Hlatshwayo, T.T.; Thabethe, T.T.; Odutemowo, O.S.; Theron, C.C.; Friedland, E. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Botha, A.J. [Laboratory for Microscopy & Microanalysis, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Wendler, E. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    This paper gives a brief review of radiation damage caused by particle (ions and neutrons) bombardment in SiC at different temperatures, and its annealing, with an expanded discussion on the effects occurring on the surface. The surface effects were observed using SEM (scanning electron microscopy) with an in-lens detector and EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction). Two substrates were used, viz. single crystalline 6H-SiC wafers and polycrystalline SiC, where the majority of the crystallites were 3C-SiC. The surface modification of the SiC samples by 360 keV ion bombardment was studied at temperatures below (i.e. room temperature), just at (i.e. 350 °C), or above (i.e. 600 °C) the critical temperature for amorphization of SiC. For bombardment at a temperature at about the critical temperature an extra step, viz. post-bombardment annealing, was needed to ascertain the microstructure of bombarded layer. Another aspect investigated was the effect of annealing of samples with an ion bombardment-induced amorphous layer on a 6H-SiC substrate. SEM could detect that this layer started to crystalize at 900 °C. The resulting topography exhibited a dependence on the ion species. EBSD showed that the crystallites forming in the amorphized layer were 3C-SiC and not 6H-SiC as the substrate. The investigations also pointed out the behaviour of the epitaxial regrowth of the amorphous layer from the 6H-SiC interface.

  18. Morphological aspects of Angiostrongylus costaricensis by light and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Karina M; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Chagas-Moutinho, Vanessa A; Mota, Ester M; Perales, Jonas; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C; Oliveira-Menezes, Aleksandra; Lenzi, Henrique

    2013-09-01

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a parasitic nematode that can cause severe gastrointestinal disease, known as abdominal angiostrongiliasis, in humans. This paper presents the characterization of first- and third-stage larvae and male and female adult worms of A. costaricensis by scanning electron and light microscopy. Several novel anatomical structures were identified by scanning electron microscopy, including details of the cuticular striations of the spicules in male worms and a protective flap of the cuticle covering the vulvar aperture in female worms. Other taxonomic features revealed by light microscopy include the gubernaculum and the esophageal-intestinal valve. The use of two microscopy techniques allowed a detailed characterization of the morphology of this nematode. A number of previously identified taxonomic features, such as the striated nature of the spicules and the lateral alae were confirmed; however, the use of scanning electron microscopy resulted in a reassessment of the correct number of papillae distributed around the oral opening and behind the cloacal opening. These observations, in combination with light microscopy-based characterization of the gubernaculum and esophageal valves, have allowed a more detailed description of this nematode taxonomy.

  19. Correlative Light and Scanning X-Ray Scattering Microscopy of Healthy and Pathologic Human Bone Sections

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, C.; D. Siliqi; Bunk, O.; Beraudi, A.; Ladisa, M.; Altamura, D.; Stea, S.; Baruffaldi, F.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning small and wide angle X-ray scattering (scanning SWAXS) experiments were performed on healthy and pathologic human bone sections. Via crystallographic tools the data were transformed into quantitative images and as such compared with circularly polarized light (CPL) microscopy images. SWAXS and CPL images allowed extracting information of the mineral nanocrystalline phase embedded, with and without preferred orientation, in the collagen fibrils, mapping local changes at sub-osteon res...

  20. Gene sequencing by scanning molecular excitation microscopy. Progress report, June 1990--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopelman, R.

    1993-07-01

    We propose to complete the development of scanning molecular excitation microscopy to rapidly sequence DNA. This new type of scanned-tip microscopy is specifically designed to map individual DNA bases in a non-destructive fashion. Base recognition is based on the external heavy atom effect between a heavy atom label on a specific DNA base and a fluorescent sensor molecule at the end of a scanned optical tip. As the tip is scanned very close to the heavy atom its emissions will change intensity and wavelength. For sequencing, heavy-atom labeled single-stranded DNA molecules will be synthesized and oriented on a flat substrate such as mica. An optical tag an one end of each DNA molecule will be rapidly located at low resolution using conventional fluorescence or scanning near-field optical microscopy. Scanning with the same optical tip, the low-resolution path of the DNA will be mapped using long-range interactions such as attractive van der Waals forces or Forester energy transfer. Subsequently, the labeled bases will be mapped at better than 5{Angstrom} resolution with the same tip using the external heavy atom effect, and the coordinates stored and processed by computer. The proposed microscope could be automated to quickly sequence intact lambda clones, YACK, or genomic Not I fragments, making genomic sequencing much more rapid and economical.

  1. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigmentparticles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu Y. S.; Chen B.; Zhang F.; Berenguer F.; Bean R.; Kewish C.; Vila-Comamala J.; Rodenburg J.; Robinson I.

    2011-10-19

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  2. High-resolution diffraction microscopy using the plane-wave field of a nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beam

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Furukawa, Hayato; Mimura, Hidekazu; MATSUYAMA, Satoshi; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-01-01

    X-ray waves in the center of the beam waist of nearly diffraction limited focused x-ray beams can be considered to have amplitude and phase that are both almost uniform, i.e., they are x-ray plane waves. Here we report the results of an experimental demonstration of high-resolution diffraction microscopy using the x-ray plane wave of the synchrotron x-ray beam focused using Kirkpatrik-Baez mirrors. A silver nanocube with an edge length of ∼100 nm is illuminated with the x-ray beam focused to ...

  3. Two-axis water-immersible microscanning mirror for scanning optics and acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Zou, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Fast multiaxis scanning is useful for not only optical but also acoustic microscopic imaging. Although they have been used for optical scanning, the application of (MEMS) scanning mirrors in acoustic microscopy is still very limited due to their small mirror plate size, and more importantly, inability to operate in liquids (as ultrasound coupling media). A microfabricated two-axis water-immersible scanning mirror for optical and acoustic microscopy is reported. It has an optical and acoustically reflective mirror plate (6 mm×4 mm) to provide numerical aperture for ultrasound beam steering. Electromagnetic and mechanical analysis and simulation were conducted to estimate the mechanical tilting angle and resonance frequency of both fast and slow axes, which matches well with the measurement results. The fast axis has a resonant frequency of 320 Hz in air and 220 Hz in water, which is more than 10 times higher than that of the slow axis (24 Hz in air and 14 Hz in water). Under a 100-mA driving current, the scanning angles of the fast axis reached ±9.5 deg in both air and water at the resonance frequency, respectively. The scanning angles of the slow axis reached ±15 deg in air and ±12.5 deg in water at resonant frequencies, respectively. Raster scanning of a collimated laser beam was achieved by driving both axes simultaneously close to their own resonance frequencies. The feasibility of using the two-axis water-immersible scanning mirror in scanning acoustic microscopy was also demonstrated.

  4. In situ surface reduction of a NiO-YSZ-alumina composite using scanning probe microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Jacobsen, Torben; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune

    2014-01-01

    In situ surface reductions of NiO-YSZ-Al2O3 composites into Ni-YSZ-Al2O3 cermets were carried out at 312–525 °C in a controlled atmosphere high-temperature scanning probe microscope (CAHT-SPM) in dry and humidified 9 % H2 in N2. The reduction of NiO was followed by contact mode scanning...... dependent and followed the Arrhenius equation. For samples reduced in dry hydrogen, the Arrhenius plot showed two regions with different activation energies. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed a difference in microstructure between these temperature regimes. A strong retarding effect of steam (H2O...

  5. Development of a fast electromagnetic shutter for compressive sensing imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Béché, Armand; Freitag, Bert; Verbeeck, Jo

    2015-01-01

    The concept of compressive sensing was recently proposed to significantly reduce the electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) while still maintaining the main features in the image. Here, an experimental setup based on an electromagnetic shutter placed in the condenser plane of a STEM is proposed. The shutter blanks the beam following a random pattern while the scanning coils are moving the beam in the usual scan pattern. Experimental images at both medium scale and high resolution are acquired and then reconstructed based on a discrete cosine algorithm. The obtained results confirm the predicted usefulness of compressive sensing in experimental STEM even though some remaining artifacts need to be resolved.

  6. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  7. Morphologic differences observed by scanning electron microscopy according to the reason for pseudophakic IOL explantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Buenaga, Roberto; Alio, Jorge L.; Ramirez, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare variations in surface morphology, as studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), of explanted intraocular lenses (IOLs) concerning the cause leading to the explantation surgery. Methods In this prospective multicenter study, explanted IOLs were analyzed by SEM and energy-dis...

  8. Covalently Immobilised Cytochrome C Imaged by In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Olesen, Klaus G.; Danilov, Alexey I.

    1997-01-01

    In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging of cytochrome c (cyt c) on polycrystalline Pt surfaces and on Au(lll) was achieved first by covalent immobilisation of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS) brought to react with oxide present on the Pt surfaces. Covalently bound 3-APTS forms a...

  9. Calibration-free quantitative surface topography reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, E.T.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Mansilla, C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new approach to obtain reliable surface topography reconstructions from 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. In this method a set of images taken at different tilt angles are compared by means of digital image correlation (DlC). It is argued that the strength of the met

  10. Dental wax impressions of plant tissues for viewing with scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, Anke; Hülskamp, Martin

    2010-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a valuable method for examining surface structures. Taking wax impressions of plant structures, such as leaves, is a nondestructive procedure that makes it possible to view changes in surface structures over time, such as during development. This protocol describes a method for making dental wax impressions of plant tissues.

  11. Chemical Silver Coating of Fiber Tips in Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Chandra S.; Witherow, William K.

    1998-01-01

    We report what is believed to be the first experimental demonstration of silver coating by a wet chemical process on tapered fiber tips used in near-field scanning optical microscopy. The process is at room temperature and pressure and takes only a few minutes to complete. Many tips can be simultaneously coated.

  12. Stochastic and photochromic switching of diarylethenes studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, S.J. van der; Vegte, H. van der; Kudernac, T.; Amin, I.; Feringa, B.L.; Wees, B.J. van

    2006-01-01

    We investigate switching of photochromic, thiophene-substituted diarylethene switches on gold. For this, the conjugated isomer is inserted in a dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer. This layer is subsequently scanned by tunnelling microscopy. First, we study the statistics of stochastic switching

  13. Visualisation of biopolymer mixtures using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and covalent labelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van de F.; Weinbreck, F.; Edelman, M.W.; Linden, van der E.; Tromp, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has been used to study the behaviour of mixtures of proteins, gelatine, whey proteins and ß-lactoglobulin, and polysaccharides, dextran, gellan gum, carrageenan, gum Arabic, and starch. CSLM proved to be a suitable technique to visualise the microstructure o

  14. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, Amirmehdi; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the ad

  15. Developments in application of light and scanning electron microscopy techniques for cell wall degradation studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, F.M.

    1996-01-01

    The results of recent technological developments in light and scanning electron microscopy closely used for research on forage cell wall degradation in ruminants, are reviewed. The indigestibility of forages by rumen microorganisms used to be ascribed mainly to an overall presence of lignin in the p

  16. Second-Harmonic Generation Scanning Microscopy on Domains in Al Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning optical second-harmonic generation microscopy has been used to investigate domains in the surface of polycrystaline Al. Strong contrast among the crystalline grains is obtained due to variations in their crystallographic orientations and thus also nonlinear response. The origin of the co...

  17. CONFOCAL SCANNING LASER MICROSCOPY OF MITOCHONDRIA - A POSSIBLE TOOL IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF MITOCHONDRIAL DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RUITERS, MHJ; VANSPRONSEN, EA; SKJELDAL, OH; STROMME, P; SCHOLTE, HR; PZYREMBEL, H; SMIT, GPA; RUITENBEEK, W; AGSTERIBBE, E

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive method for the study of mitochondrial morphology in cultured human skin fibroblasts by confocal scanning laser microscopy after staining the mitochondria with 2-[4-(dimethyl-aminostyryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide. This method is applied to compare mitochondria in

  18. Elastic Changes of Capsule in a Rat Knee Contracture Model Assessed by Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Y.; Chimoto, E.; Ando, A.; Saijo, Y.; Itoi, E.

    Sound speed of a capsule in a rat knee contracture model was measured by scanning acoustic microscopy. There was no statistical significant difference in the anterior capsule compared with the control group. However, the sound speed of the posterior capsule was significantly greater compared with the control group after prolonged immobilization.

  19. Batch fabrication of scanning microscopy probes for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarajlic, Edin; Vermeer, Rolf; Delalande, M.Y.; Siekman, Martin Herman; Huijink, R.; Fujita, H.; Abelmann, Leon

    2010-01-01

    We present a process for batch fabrication of a novel scanning microscopy probe for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four freestanding silicon

  20. Imaging inclusion complex formation in starch granules using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    The tendency of amylose to form inclusion complexes with guest molecules has been an object of wide interest due to its fundamental role in food processing. Here we investigated the features of starch granules from several botanical sources using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and uncover

  1. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines important physical properties of the yogurt and hereby partly its quality. Imaging this protein network using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has shown good results, and CSLM has become a standard measuring technique for fermente...

  2. Comparative study of four species of Trichuris roederer, 1761 (Nematoda, Trichurinae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinalda Marisa Lanfredti

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available A comparative morphological study of Trichuris travassosi, T. vulpis, T. discolor and T. suis was perfomed using scanning electron microscopy. Cuticular inflation associated with the bacillar band, vulva and male external genital appendages were analyzed. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of these structures were made for each species; they are of taxonomic value.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy applied to mycelial phase of sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thibaut

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy applied to the mycelial phase of Sporothrix schenckii shows a matted mycelium with conidia of a regular pattern. X-Ray microanalysis applied in energy dispersive spectroscopy and also in wavelength dispersive spectroscopy reveals the presence of several elements of Mendeleef's classification.

  4. A MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF SECONDARY ELECTRON AND BACKSCATTERED ELECTRON IMAGES IN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.M. Li; Z.J. Ding

    2005-01-01

    A new parallel Monte Carlo simulation method of secondary electron (SE) and backscattered electron images (BSE) of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for a complex geometric structure has been developed. This paper describes briefly the simulation method and the modification to the conventional sampling method for the step length. Example simulation results have been obtained for several artificial structures.

  5. Morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Bettina; Huss, Hans Henrik; Bresciani, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi in vitro at pH 3.5 and 7.0 is described using light and scanning electron microscopy. Only vegetative growth was observed. At pH 3.5, hyphal growth was seen. The hyphae of I. hoferi are characterized by evacuated hyphal walls with the cytoplasm migrating...

  6. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-21

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) Procedure for HE Powders on a LEO 438VP System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, Fowzia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2016-03-08

    This method describes the characterization of HE powders by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). HE particles are dispersed onto an aluminum standard SEM specimen mount. Electron micrographs are collected at various magnifications (150 to 10,000 X) depending on HE particle size.

  8. Meniscus confined fabrication of multidimensional conducting polymer nanostructures with scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; O'Connell, Michael A; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-04-14

    Scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) is demonstrated as a new approach for the construction of extended multi-dimensional conducting polymer (polyaniline) nanostructures, making use of a mobile dual-channel theta pipette cell to control and monitor the location, rate and extent of electropolymerisation.

  9. Nano-tomography of porous geological materials using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yang; King, Helen E.; van Huis, Marijn A.; Drury, Martyn R.; Plümper, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Tomographic analysis using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) provides three-dimensional information about solid materials with a resolution of a few nanometres and thus bridges the gap between X-ray and transmission electron microscopic tomography techniques. This contribution

  10. Nanoscale investigation of polarization retention loss in ferroelectric thin films via scanning force microscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, S.; Auciello, O.; Gruverman, A.; Prakash, S. A.; Ramesh, R.; Tokumoto, H.

    1998-02-12

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) was applied to direct nanoscale investigation of the mechanism of retention loss in ferroelectric thin films. Experiments were conducted by performing local polarization reversal within an individual grain with subsequent imaging of a resulting domain structure at various time intervals. A conductive SFM tip was used for domain switching and imaging in the SFM piezoresponse mode.

  11. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the

  12. Observation of microporous cesium salts of 12-tungstosilicic acid using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyoshi, Norihito; Kamiya, Yuichi

    2015-06-21

    Heteropolyanions and their arrays in microporous cesium salts of 12-tungstosilicic acid, Cs2.5H1.5[SiW12O40] and Cs4.0[SiW12O40], were observed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Microstructures that form micropores in the polyoxometalates were visualized.

  13. Musculature of Notholca acuminata (Rotifera : Ploima : Brachionidae) revealed by confocal scanning laser microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.V.; Funch, P.; Hooge, M.

    2003-01-01

    The body-wall and visceral musculature of Notholca acuminata was visualized using phalloidin-linked fluorescent dye under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The body-wall musculature includes dorsal, lateral, and ventral pairs of longitudinally oriented body retractor muscles, two pairs of head...

  14. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with a vital stain has been used to study apoptosis in organogenesis-stage mouse embryos. In order to achieve optical sectioning through embryos, it was necessary to use low power objectives and to prepare the sample appropriately. Mous...

  15. Musculature of Notholca acuminata (Rotifera: Ploima: Brachionidae) revealed by confocal scanning laser microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.V.; Funch, P.; Hooge, M.

    2003-01-01

    he body-wall and visceral musculature of Notholca acuminata was visualized using phalloidin-linked fluorescent dye under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The body-wall musculature includes dorsal, lateral, and ventral pairs of longitudinally oriented body retractor muscles, two pairs of head...

  16. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the ad

  17. Imaging inclusion complex formation in starch granules using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria A.

    The tendency of amylose to form inclusion complexes with guest molecules has been an object of wide interest due to its fundamental role in food processing. Here we investigated the features of starch granules from several botanical sources using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and

  18. Second-Harmonic Generation Scanning Microscopy on Domains in Al Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning optical second-harmonic generation microscopy has been used to investigate domains in the surface of polycrystaline Al. Strong contrast among the crystalline grains is obtained due to variations in their crystallographic orientations and thus also nonlinear response. The origin of the co...

  19. A development in the preparation of sharp scanning tunneling microscopy tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, J. P.; Pryds, N. H.; Glejbøl, K.;

    1993-01-01

    An improved and reliable method for making sharp scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips is described. It is based on the widely used drop-off electrochemical etching procedure, here modified to improve the control of the tip shape. A second etching is applied not only to remove the oxide layer...

  20. Preparation of Chemically Etched Tips for Ambient Instructional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccardi, Margot J.; Winkelmann, Kurt; Olson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    A first-year laboratory experiment that utilizes concepts of electrochemical tip etching for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is described. This experiment can be used in conjunction with any STM experiment. Students electrochemically etch gold STM tips using a time-efficient method, which can then be used in an instructional grade STM that…

  1. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Topological Insulators Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Qikun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We summarize our recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM study of topological insulator thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE, which includes the observation of electron standing waves on topological insulator surface and the Landau quantization of topological surface states. The work has provided valuable information to the understanding of intriguing properties of topological insulators, as predicted by theory.

  2. Durability of polymeric materials in space : Application of scanning thermal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.; Semprimoschnig, C.O.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, a new method, the scanning thermal microscopy method, is applied to study the durability of polymeric materials for space applications. The method was applied to study ground-tested as well as space-retrieved materials. Space-grade silicones, high-temperature polyimides, and the well-k

  3. Dynamics of decanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) studied by Scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Hairong; Sotthewes, Kai; Kumar, Avijit; Vancso, Gyula J.; Schön, Peter Manfred; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of decanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) surfaces using time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy at room temperature. The expected ordered phases (β, δ, χ*, and ) and a disordered phase (ε) were observed. Current–time traces with the feedback loop disabled

  4. Characterizing individual particles on tree leaves using computer automated scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. L. Johnson; D. J. Nowak; V. A. Jouraeva

    1999-01-01

    Leaves from twenty-three deciduous tree species and five conifer species were collected within a limited geographic range (1 km radius) and evaluated for possible application of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis techniques of individual particle analysis (IPA). The goal was to identify tree species with leaves suitable for the automated...

  5. Visualization of magnetic dipolar interaction based on scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtori, Hiroyuki; Iwano, Kaoru; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Takeichi, Yasuo; Yano, Masao; Kato, Akira; Miyamoto, Noritaka; Shoji, Tetsuya; Manabe, Akira; Ono, Kanta

    2014-04-01

    Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), in this report we visualized the magnetic dipolar interactions in nanocrystalline Nd-Fe-B magnets and imaged their magnetization distributions at various applied fields. We calculated the magnetic dipolar interaction by analyzing the interaction between the magnetization at each point and those at the other points on the STXM image.

  6. In-situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy of catalytic materials under reaction conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smit, E.; Creemer, J.F.; Zandbergen, H.W.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; de Groot, F.M.F.

    2009-01-01

    In-situ Scanning X-ray Transmission Microscopy (STXM) allows the measurement of the soft X-ray absorption spectra with 10 to 30 nm spatial resolution under realistic reaction conditions. We show that STXM-XAS in combination with a micromachined nanoreactor can image a catalytic system under relevant

  7. Dual-detection confocal microscopy: high-speed surface profiling without depth scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new method for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging without depth scanning that we refer to as the dual-detection confocal microscopy (DDCM). Compared to conventional confocal microscopy, DDCM utilizes two pinholes of different sizes. DDCM generates two axial response curves which have different stiffness according to the pinhole diameters. The two axial response curves can draw the characteristics curve of the system which shows the relationship between the axial position of the sample and the intensity ratio. Utilizing the characteristic curve, the DDCM reconstructs a 3-D surface profile with a single 2-D scanning. The height of each pixel is calculated by the intensity ratio of the pixel and the intensity ratio curve. Since the height information can be obtained directly from the characteristic curve without depth scanning, a major advantage of DDCM over the conventional confocal microscopy is a speed. The 3-D surface profiling time is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, DDCM can measure 3-D images without the influence of the sample condition since the intensity ratio is independent of the quantum yield and reflectance. We present two types of DDCM, such as a fluorescence microscopy and a reflectance microscopy. In addition, we extend the measurement range axially by varying the pupil function. Here, we demonstrate the working principle of DDCM and the feasibility of the proposed methods.

  8. Recommendations for the design and the installation of large laser scanning microscopy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, P. Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has since the inventions of the Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CLSM) and the Multi Photon Laser Scanning Microscope (MPLSM) developed into an essential tool in contemporary life science and material science. The market provides an increasing number of turn-key and hands-off commercial LSM systems, un-problematic to purchase, set up and integrate even into minor research groups. However, the successful definition, financing, acquisition, installation and effective use of one or more large laser scanning microscopy systems, possibly of core facility character, often requires major efforts by senior staff members of large academic or industrial units. Here, a set of recommendations is presented, which are helpful during the process of establishing large systems for confocal or non-linear laser scanning microscopy as an effective operational resource in the scientific or industrial production process. Besides the description of technical difficulties and possible pitfalls, the article also illuminates some seemingly "less scientific" processes, i.e. the definition of specific laboratory demands, advertisement of the intention to purchase one or more large systems, evaluation of quotations, establishment of contracts and preparation of the local environment and laboratory infrastructure.

  9. Growth of Cu Films on Si(111)-7 × 7 Surfaces at Low Temperature: A Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Quan-Tong; SUN Guo-Feng; LI Wen-Juan; DONG Guo-Cai; HAN Tie-Zhu; MA Da-Yan; SUN Yu-Jie; JIA Jin-Feng; XUE Qi-Kun

    2007-01-01

    Morphologies of Cu(111) Rims on Si(111)-7×7 surfaces prepared at low temperature are investigated by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). At the initial growth stage, Cu 61ms are Bat due to the formation of silicide at the interface that decreases the mismatch between Cu films and the Si substrate. Different from the usual multilayer growth of Cu/Cu(111), on the silicide layer a layer-by-layer growth is observed. The two dimensional (2D) growth is explained by the enhanced high island density at low deposition temperature. Increasing deposition rate produces films with different morphologies, which is the result of Ostwald ripening.

  10. Strongly compressed Bi (111) bilayer films on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L.; Jia, Jin-Feng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-09-21

    Ultra-thin Bi films show exotic electronic structure and novel quantum effects, especially the widely studied Bi (111) film. Using reflection high-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we studied the structure and morphology evolution of Bi (111) thin films grown on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. A strongly compressed, but quickly released in-plane lattice of Bi (111) is found in the first three bilayers. The first bilayer of Bi shows a fractal growth mode with flat surface, while the second and third bilayer show a periodic buckling due to the strong compression of the in-plane lattice. The lattice slowly changes to its bulk value with further deposition of Bi.

  11. Ultra-fast 3D scanning and holographic illumination in non-linear microscopy using acousto-optic deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akemann, Walther; Ventalon, Cathie; Léger, Jean-François; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Blochet, Baptiste; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Decoding of information in the brain requires the imaging of large neuronal networks using e.g. two-photon microscopy (TPM). Fast control of the focus in 3D can be achieved with phase shaping of the light beam using acoustooptic deflectors (AODs). However, beam shaping using AODs is not straightforward because of non-stationary of acousto-optic diffraction. Here, we demonstrated a new stable AOD-based phase modulator, which operates at a rate of up to about hundred kHz. It provides opportunity for 3D scanning in TPM with the possibility to correct aberrations independently for every focus position or to achieve refocusing of scattered photons in rapidly decorrelating tissues.

  12. EDITORIAL: Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Three decades ago, with a tiny tip of platinum, the scientific world saw the real space imaging of single atoms with unprecedented spatial resolution. This signalled the birth of one of the most versatile surface probes, based on the physics of quantum mechanical tunnelling: the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Invented in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer of IBM, Zurich, it led to their award of the 1986 Nobel Prize. Atoms, once speculated to be abstract entities used by theoreticians for mere calculations, can be seen to exist for real with the nano-eye of an STM tip that also gives real-space images of molecules and adsorbed complexes on surfaces. From a very fundamental perspective, the STM changed the course of surface science and engineering. STM also emerged as a powerful tool to study various fundamental phenomena relevant to the properties of surfaces in technological applications such as tribology, medical implants, catalysis, sensors and biology—besides elucidating the importance of local bonding geometries and defects, non-periodic structures and the co-existence of nano-scale phases. Atom-level probing, once considered a dream, has seen the light with the evolution of STM. An important off-shoot of STM was the atomic force microscope (AFM) for surface mapping of insulating samples. Then followed the development of a flurry of techniques under the general name of scanning probe microscopy (SPM). These techniques (STM, AFM, MFM, PFM etc) designed for atomic-scale-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, have led to brand new developments in surface analysis. All of these novel methods enabled researchers in recent years to image and analyse complex surfaces on microscopic and nanoscopic scales. All of them utilize a small probe for sensing the surface. The invention of AFM by Gerd Binnig, Calvin Quate and Christopher Gerber opened up new opportunities for characterization of a variety of materials, and various industrial applications could be

  13. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvis, J. A. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencias Naturales Facultad de Ingeniería Universidad Central, Bogotá (Colombia); Herrera, E.; Buendía, A. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Facultad de Ciencias Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada de Bajas Temperaturas y Altos Campos Magnéticos, UAM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; García-Hernandez, M. [Unidad Asociada de Bajas Temperaturas y Altos Campos Magnéticos, UAM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMM-CSIC), Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-01-15

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi{sub 2}Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  14. Carbon fibre tips for scanning probe microscopy based on quartz tuning fork force sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos-Gomez, A; Agrait, N; Rubio-Bollinger, G, E-mail: gabino.rubio@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (C-III), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-04-09

    We report the fabrication and the characterization of carbon fibre tips for use in combined scanning tunnelling and force microscopy based on piezoelectric quartz tuning fork force sensors. We find that the use of carbon fibre tips results in a minimum impact on the dynamics of quartz tuning fork force sensors, yielding a high quality factor and, consequently, a high force gradient sensitivity. This high force sensitivity, in combination with high electrical conductivity and oxidation resistance of carbon fibre tips, make them very convenient for combined and simultaneous scanning tunnelling microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Interestingly, these tips are quite robust against occasionally occurring tip crashes. An electrochemical fabrication procedure to etch the tips is presented that produces a sub-100-nm apex radius in a reproducible way which can yield high resolution images.

  15. In-situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy of catalytic solids and related nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Frank M F; de Smit, Emiel; van Schooneveld, Matti M; Aramburo, Luis R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2010-04-01

    The present status of in-situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is reviewed, with an emphasis on the abilities of the STXM technique in comparison with electron microscopy. The experimental aspects and interpretation of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are briefly introduced and the experimental boundary conditions that determine the potential applications for in-situ XAS and in-situ STXM studies are discussed. Nanoscale chemical imaging of catalysts under working conditions is outlined using cobalt and iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts as showcases. In the discussion, we critically compare STXM-XAS and STEM-EELS (scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy) measurements and indicate some future directions of in-situ nanoscale imaging of catalytic solids and related nanomaterials.

  16. In-situ Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy of Catalytic Solids and Related Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Groot, F.; Smit, E; van Schooneveld, M; Aramburo, L; Weckhuysen, W

    2010-01-01

    The present status of in-situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) is reviewed, with an emphasis on the abilities of the STXM technique in comparison with electron microscopy. The experimental aspects and interpretation of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are briefly introduced and the experimental boundary conditions that determine the potential applications for in-situ XAS and in-situ STXM studies are discussed. Nanoscale chemical imaging of catalysts under working conditions is outlined using cobalt and iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts as showcases. In the discussion, we critically compare STXM-XAS and STEM-EELS (scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy) measurements and indicate some future directions of in-situ nanoscale imaging of catalytic solids and related nanomaterials.

  17. Strain and lattice orientation distribution in SiN/Ge complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatible light emitting microstructures by quick x-ray nano-diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahine, G. A.; Schülli, T. U. [European Synchrotron ESRF, Grenoble 38043 (France); Zoellner, M. H.; Guha, S.; Reich, C.; Zaumseil, P.; Capellini, G. [IHP-Leibniz Institute for Innovative Microelectronics, Frankfurt (Germany); Richard, M.-I. [European Synchrotron ESRF, Grenoble 38043 (France); Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IM2NP UMR 7334, Marseille 13397 (France); Schroeder, T. [IHP-Leibniz Institute for Innovative Microelectronics, Frankfurt (Germany); Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Brandenburg Technical University, Cottbus 03046 (Germany)

    2015-02-16

    This paper presents a study of the spatial distribution of strain and lattice orientation in CMOS-fabricated strained Ge microstripes using high resolution x-ray micro-diffraction. The recently developed model-free characterization tool, based on a quick scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy technique can image strain down to levels of 10{sup −5} (Δa/a) with a spatial resolution of ∼0.5 μm. Strain and lattice tilt are extracted using the strain and orientation calculation software package X-SOCS. The obtained results are compared with the biaxial strain distribution obtained by lattice parameter-sensitive μ-Raman and μ-photoluminescence measurements. The experimental data are interpreted with the help of finite element modeling of the strain relaxation dynamics in the investigated structures.

  18. Transfer doping of single isolated nanodiamonds, studied by scanning probe microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Asaf; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi

    2014-09-26

    The transfer doping of diamond surfaces has been applied in various novel two-dimensional electronic devices. Its extension to nanodiamonds (ND) is essential for ND-based applications in many fields. In particular, understanding the influence of the crystallite size on transfer doping is desirable. Here, we report the results of a detailed study of the electronic energetic band structure of single, isolated transfer-doped nanodiamonds with nanometric resolution using a combination of scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy measurements. The results show how the band gap, the valence band maximum, the electron affinity and the work function all depend on the ND's size and nanoparticle surface properties. The present analysis, which combines information from both scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy, should be applicable to any nanoparticle or surface that can be measured with scanning probe techniques.

  19. Transfer doping of single isolated nanodiamonds, studied by scanning probe microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Asaf; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi

    2014-09-01

    The transfer doping of diamond surfaces has been applied in various novel two-dimensional electronic devices. Its extension to nanodiamonds (ND) is essential for ND-based applications in many fields. In particular, understanding the influence of the crystallite size on transfer doping is desirable. Here, we report the results of a detailed study of the electronic energetic band structure of single, isolated transfer-doped nanodiamonds with nanometric resolution using a combination of scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy measurements. The results show how the band gap, the valence band maximum, the electron affinity and the work function all depend on the ND’s size and nanoparticle surface properties. The present analysis, which combines information from both scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy, should be applicable to any nanoparticle or surface that can be measured with scanning probe techniques.

  20. Note: Development of a wideband amplifier for cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Jeon, Hoyeon; Oh, Myungchul; Lee, Minjun; Kim, Sungmin; Yi, Sunwouk; Lee, Hanho; Zoh, Inhae; Yoo, Yongchan; Kuk, Young

    2017-06-01

    A wideband cryogenic amplifier has been developed for low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The amplifier consisting of a wideband complementary metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors operational amplifier together with a feedback resistor of 100 kΩ and a capacitor is mounted within a 4 K Dewar. This amplifier has a wide bandwidth and is successfully applied to scanning tunneling microscopy applications at low temperatures down to ˜7 K. The quality of the designed amplifier is validated by high resolution imaging. More importantly, the amplifier has also proved to be capable of performing scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements, showing the detection of the Shockley surface state of the Au(111) surface and the superconducting gap of Nb(110).

  1. Investigation of optical nanostructures for photovoltaics with near-field scanning microscopy; Untersuchung optischer Nanostrukturen fuer die Photovoltaik mit Nahfeldmikroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Thomas

    2011-09-26

    Textured and rough surfaces are known to increase light trapping in solar cells significantly. The development and optimization of these nano-structures is essential to improve the energy conversion efficiency of thin-film solar cells. In the past, first research approaches covered classical and macroscopic investigations, e.g. determining the haze or angularly resolved scattering. These methods do not provide precise explanation for the optical improvement of the devices, because layer thicknesses and structure sizes in thin-film solar cells are smaller than the wavelength of visible light. The impact of local nano-structures and their contribution to the local absorption enhancement is not resolved by macroscopic measurements. In this thesis, near-field scanning optical microscopy is introduced as first near-field investigations of nano-structures for photovoltaics. This provides an insight into local optical effects for relevant surfaces of photovoltaic devices. Investigating the distribution of the electric fields in layer stacks is crucial to understand the absorption in solar cells. Evanescent fields, which occur due to total internal reflection at the interfaces, are measurable by near-field scanning optical microscopy and yield important information about local light trapping. Within the framework of this thesis, correlations between local surface structures and optical near-field effects are shown. In this case structure features of randomly textured surfaces, which optimize local light trapping, are identified. It paves the way to connect microscopic optical effects on the surface with the macroscopic performance of thin-film solar cells. Moreover, the measurement yields a 3D illustration of the electric field distribution over the sample surface. It is an important criterion to prove the results of rigorous diffraction theory. An excellent agreement between experiment and simulation is found. The simulations provide an insight into the material, which is

  2. An endolithic microbial community in dolomite rock in central Switzerland: characterization by reflection spectroscopy, pigment analyses, scanning electron microscopy, and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horath, T; Neu, T R; Bachofen, R

    2006-04-01

    A community of endolithic microorganisms dominated by phototrophs was found as a distinct band a few millimeters below the surface of bare exposed dolomite rocks in the Piora Valley in the Alps. Using in situ reflectance spectroscopy, we detected chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycobilins, carotenoids, and an unknown type of bacteriochlorophyll-like pigment absorbing in vivo at about 720 nm. In cross sections, the data indicated a defined distribution of different groups of organisms perpendicular to the rock surface. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of pigments extracted with organic solvents confirmed the presence of two types of bacteriochlorophylls besides chlorophylls and various carotenoids. Spherical organisms of varying sizes and small filaments were observed in situ with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (one- and two-photon technique). The latter allowed visualization of the distribution of phototrophic microorganisms by the autofluorescence of their pigments within the rock. Coccoid cyanobacteria of various sizes predominated over filamentous ones. Application of fluorescence-labeled lectins demonstrated that most cyanobacteria were embedded in an exopolymeric matrix. Nucleic acid stains revealed a wide distribution of small heterotrophs. Some biological structures emitting a green autofluorescence remain to be identified.

  3. Confocal scanning laser microscopy and its application in biomedical health sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaxis, Nicholas J.

    1999-07-01

    The confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) is an exciting new tool in microscopy. It offers improved rejection of out- of-focus `noise' and greater resolution than conventional imaging. By integrating a computer into the system and generating digital image data files, a rapid way of storing, processing, and analyzing images is available to the user. The production of 3D reconstruction representations is easy and effective. The technique of optical sectioning and confocal optics has revolutionized epifluorescence microscopy, the CSLM providing a highly desirable link between conventional light microscopy and electron microscopy. The use of the CSLM in biomedical health sciences is considered in this paper and the functional basics of the instrument are discussed with reference to several important applications in research and diagnostic work, with illustrations from the numerous and continually increasing publications in the area. It is veritably a `solution in search of problems' as this short review demonstrates.

  4. Application of confocal technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics in three-dimensional diffraction scanning analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stxbeijing@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Liu, Hehe; Liu, Zhiguo; Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Sun, Weiyuan; Luo, Ping; Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-03-15

    The confocal technology based on a polycapillary focusing X-ray lens in the excitation channel and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens in the detection channel was used to perform three-dimensional energy dispersive X-ray diffraction scanning analysis of a copper film on a silicon substrate. A theoretical model of correcting the intensity of the diffracted X-rays from different parts of the sample in the confocal volume was designed. The point-to-point 3D diffraction information of the sample was obtained.

  5. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasl, J.; Mikmeková, Š.; Jandová, D.

    2014-03-01

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures.

  6. Numerical descriptors for the analysis of wear surfaces using laser scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anamalay, R.V. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia); Kirk, T.B. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia); Panzera, D. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    Machinery wear is a major cost to industry and its minimisation would result in significant savings. In order to do this, it is important to understand the mechanisms of wear. Techniques have to be developed to enable the detailed measurement and analysis of wear surfaces. Conventional methods of surface measurement have involved profilometers. Profilometers, however, have severe limitations in terms of the surface features detectable and difficulties arise when 3D data sets of surfaces are required. Alternative methods that have been explored are stereo microscopy, reflected light interference microscopy (RLIM) and scanning electron microscopy. But these methods have proven to be severely limited either by the depth of field that can be obtained, difficulties associated with obtaining and interpreting images or the prohibitive costs involved. Laser scanning confocal microscopes (LSCM), however, have the capabilities to record surface features quickly and conveniently. LSCM techniques allow the determination and analysis of the true surface topography of a sample surface. LSCM has no depth of field limitations, is significantly cheaper than scanning electron microscopy, requires minimal sample preparation and provides images of sufficient quality for engineering purposes. Better measurement techniques facilitate the use of new surface parameters, in addition to the traditional parameters (all of which can be measured using LSCM techniques). In this paper, parameters developed for the measurement and analysis of surfaces using LSCM techniques are discussed. A comparison is made between surface analysis using LSCM techniques and conventional profilometer methods. (orig.)

  7. Stimulated-emission pumping enabling sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleff, C.; Gross, P.; Fallnich, C.; Offerhaus, H.L.; Herek, J.L.; Kruse, K.; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, C.J.; Boller, K-J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of stimulated emission pumping to achieve sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. A pair of control light fields is used to prepopulate the Raman state involved in the CARS process prior to the CARS

  8. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Morris, Kyle L; Serpell, Louise C;

    2015-01-01

    of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure...

  9. Suppression of resonance Raman scattering via ground state depletion towards sub-diffraction-limited label-free microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieger, S.; Fischedick, M.; Boller, K-J.; Fallnich, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of the suppression of spontaneous Raman scattering via ground state depletion. The concept of Raman suppression can be used to achieve sub-diffraction-limited resolution in label-free microscopy by exploiting spatially selective signal suppression wh

  10. Quantitating morphological changes in biological samples during scanning electron microscopy sample preparation with correlative super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Huang, Tao; Jorgens, Danielle M; Nickerson, Andrew; Lin, Li-Jung; Pelz, Joshua; Gray, Joe W; López, Claudia S; Nan, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to biological electron microscopy (EM), and there have been continuous efforts on optimizing the procedures to best preserve structures of interest in the sample. However, a quantitative characterization of the morphological changes associated with each step in EM sample preparation is currently lacking. Using correlative EM and superresolution microscopy (SRM), we have examined the effects of different drying methods as well as osmium tetroxide (OsO4) post-fixation on cell morphology during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) sample preparation. Here, SRM images of the sample acquired under hydrated conditions were used as a baseline for evaluating morphological changes as the sample went through SEM sample processing. We found that both chemical drying and critical point drying lead to a mild cellular boundary retraction of ~60 nm. Post-fixation by OsO4 causes at least 40 nm additional boundary retraction. We also found that coating coverslips with adhesion molecules such as fibronectin prior to cell plating helps reduce cell distortion from OsO4 post-fixation. These quantitative measurements offer useful information for identifying causes of cell distortions in SEM sample preparation and improving current procedures.

  11. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsuiker, L; VAN Es, P; Petersen, W; VAN Leeuwen, T G; Terstappen, L W M M; Otto, C

    2011-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample preparation protocol was developed to enable imaging of cells and gold nanoparticles with a conventional below lens scanning electron microscopes. The negative influence of 'charging' on the quality of scanning electron microscopes' images could be limited by deposition of biological cells on a conductive (gold) surface. The novel protocol enabled high-resolution scanning electron microscopes' imaging of small clusters and individual gold nanoparticles on uncoated cell surfaces. Gold nanoparticles could be counted on cancer cells with automated routines.

  12. Comparison of calcium imaging in dorsal root ganglion neurons by using laser scanning confocal and two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Shen, Xiuqiu; Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Xie, Shusen

    2012-03-01

    As one of the most important second messengers, calcium in nerve cells plays a critical role in neuronal processes, including excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity. Modulation of the calcium concentration is an important means of regulating diverse neuronal functions. To evaluate the role of calcium, quantitative measurement of cytosolic free calcium concentrations is necessary. There are several optical techniques that are available for measurement of calcium in live cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy are two prevalent techniques for their advantage in spatial resolution. In this paper, calcium in dorsal root ganglion neurons was imaged by laser scanning confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy with Fluo-3, a calcium specific fluorescence probe. Both of spatial resolution and photobleaching, two common limitations of optical image modality, were compared between laser scanning confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, respectively. Three dimension images showed that laser scanning confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy had not only similar lateral resolution but also parallel vertical resolution. However, Laser scanning confocal microscopy had an advantage over the two-photon microcopy in photobleaching. These results indicated that laser scanning confocal microscopy was more suitable than two-photon microscopy to be applied in imaging calcium in dorsal root ganglion neurons with Fluo-3.

  13. Intrinsic structure and friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets studied by scanning probe microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan-Huai Ding; Hu-Ming Ren; Fei-Hu Chang; Ping Zhang; Yong Jiang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, atomic structure of single-layered graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) nanosheets was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelingmicroscopy (AFM and STM). Furthermore, friction properties of the graphene and GO nanosheets were studied by frictional force microscopy (FFM). STM imaging provided direct evidence and the morphology was influenced by oxygen-containing groups and defects. The atomic scale structural disorder in a hexagonal two-dimensional network of carbon atoms changes the surface condition, which also caused the frictional property variations of the samples.

  14. Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzerara, K.; /Paris U., VI-VII, LMCP; Tyliszczak, T.; /LBNL, ALS; Brown, G.E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-03

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were combined to characterize various samples of geomicrobiological interest down to the nanometer scale. An approach based on energy-filtered imaging was used to examine microbe-mineral interactions and the resulting biominerals, as well as biosignatures in simplified laboratory samples. This approach was then applied to natural samples, including natural biofilms entombed in calcium carbonate precipitates and bioweathered silicates and facilitated location of bacterial cells and provided unique insights about their biogeochemical interactions with minerals at the 30-40 nm scale.

  15. In Situ Scanning Probe Microscopy and New Perspectives in Analytical Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    1999-01-01

    The resolution of scanning probe microscopies is unpresedented but the techniques are fraught with limitations as analytical tools. These limitations and their relationship to the physical mechanisms of image contrast are first discussed. Some new options based on in situ STM, which hold prospects...... for molecular- and mesoscopic-scale analytical chemistry, are then reviewed. They are illustrated by metallic electro-crystallisation and -dissolution, and in situ STM spectroscopy of large redox molecules. The biophysically oriented analytical options of in situ atomic force microscopy, and analytical chemical...... perspectives for the new microcantilever sensor techniques are also discussed....

  16. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications.

  17. Development of an add-on kit for scanning confocal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaikai; Zheng, Guoan

    2017-03-01

    Scanning confocal microscopy is a standard choice for many fluorescence imaging applications in basic biomedical research. It is able to produce optically sectioned images and provide acquisition versatility to address many samples and application demands. However, scanning a focused point across the specimen limits the speed of image acquisition. As a result, scanning confocal microscope only works well with stationary samples. Researchers have performed parallel confocal scanning using digital-micromirror-device (DMD), which was used to project a scanning multi-point pattern across the sample. The DMD based parallel confocal systems increase the imaging speed while maintaining the optical sectioning ability. In this paper, we report the development of an add-on kit for high-speed and low-cost confocal microscopy. By adapting this add-on kit to an existing regular microscope, one can convert it into a confocal microscope without significant hardware modifications. Compared with current DMD-based implementations, the reported approach is able to recover multiple layers along the z axis simultaneously. It may find applications in wafer inspection and 3D metrology of semiconductor circuit. The dissemination of the proposed add-on kit under $1000 budget could also lead to new types of experimental designs for biological research labs, e.g., cytology analysis in cell culture experiments, genetic studies on multicellular organisms, pharmaceutical drug profiling, RNA interference studies, investigation of microbial communities in environmental systems, and etc.

  18. Scanning tunneling microscopy of initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) surface with radical nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, R; Ikeda, H; Sakashita, M; Sakai, A; Yasuda, Y; Nakatsuka, O; Zaima, S

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) with radical nitrogen at a substrate temperature of 850degC using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). It is found that the thin oxide layer suppresses the changes of original Si step structures during nitridation, and this effect critically depends on the growth conditions of the oxide layer. Comparison of the nitride island morphology to the case of the clean surface suggests that the migration of the precursor during nitridation is suppressed by the oxygen in the layer. (author)

  19. New approach towards imaging -DNA using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shirshendu Dey; Sushama Pethkar; Suguna D Adyanthaya; Murali Sastry; C V Dharmadhikari

    2008-06-01

    A new methodology to anchor -DNA to silanized -Si(111) surface using Langmuir Blodget trough was developed. The -Si (111) was silanized by treating it with low molecular weight octyltrichlorosilane in toluene. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image of -DNA on octyltrichlorosilane deposited Si substrate shows areas exhibiting arrayed structures of 700 nm length and 40 nm spacing. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) at different stages depict a broad distribution of defect states in the bandgap region of -Si(111) which presumably facilitates tunneling through otherwise insulating DNA layer.

  20. Correlative Light and Scanning X-Ray Scattering Microscopy of Healthy and Pathologic Human Bone Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, C.; Siliqi, D.; Bunk, O.; Beraudi, A.; Ladisa, M.; Altamura, D.; Stea, S.; Baruffaldi, F.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning small and wide angle X-ray scattering (scanning SWAXS) experiments were performed on healthy and pathologic human bone sections. Via crystallographic tools the data were transformed into quantitative images and as such compared with circularly polarized light (CPL) microscopy images. SWAXS and CPL images allowed extracting information of the mineral nanocrystalline phase embedded, with and without preferred orientation, in the collagen fibrils, mapping local changes at sub-osteon resolution. This favorable combination has been applied for the first time to biopsies of dwarfism syndrome and Paget's disease to shed light onto the cortical structure of natural bone in healthy and pathologic sections. PMID:22666538

  1. Mono-Cycle Photonics and Optical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Route to Femtosecond Ångstrom Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Yamashita, Mikio; Morita, Ryuji

    2005-01-01

    "Mono-Cycle Photonics and Optical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy" deals with both the ultrashort laser-pulse technology in the few- to mono-cycle region and the laser-surface-controlled scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) extending into the spatiotemporal extreme technology. The former covers the theory of nonlinear pulse propagation beyond the slowly-varing-envelope approximation, the generation and active chirp compensation of ultrabroadband optical pulses, the amplitude and phase characterization of few- to mono-cycle pulses, and the feedback field control for the mono-cycle-like pulse generation. In addition, the wavelength-multiplex shaping of ultrabroadband pulse is described. The latter covers the CW-laser-excitation STM, the femtosecond-time-resolved STM and atomic-level surface phenomena controlled by femtosecond pulses.

  2. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Pinkard

    Full Text Available Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM, the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems.

  3. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of a fuel-cell electrocatalyst deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucernak, A.R.; Chowdhury, P.B.; Wilde, C.P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemistry; Kelsall, G.H. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Huxley School; Zhu, Y.Y.; Williams, D.E. [University College London, (United Kingdom). Department of Chemistry

    2000-07-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been examined on a platinum electrocatalysts (Johnson Matthey HSA platinum black) dispersed onto a flat highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrode using an atomic force microscope (AFM) modified to perform scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). For both STM and SECM experiments the same Pt/Ir tips produced by electrochemical etching of Pt/Ir wire followed by coating with varnish have been used. The coating process leaves only the very end of the tip exposed. Positioning the SECM tip 42 nm from one of the particles allows monitoring of hydrogen evolution from that particle as a function of substrate potential. In a separate experiment the substrate has been polarized at a potential at which hydrogen evolution occurs and the SECM tip rastered over the surface to obtain images of the local concentration of hydrogen. This map indicates the activity of hydrogen production as a function of position. (author)

  4. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of experimental bone hacking trauma of the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunni-Perret, Véronique; Borg, Cybèle; Laugier, Jean-Pierre; Bertrand, Marie-France; Staccini, Pascal; Bolla, Marc; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Muller-Bolla, Michèle

    2010-12-01

    The authors report on a macroscopic and microscopic study of human mandible bone lesions achieved by a single-blade knife and a hatchet. The aim of this work was to complete the previous data (scanning electron microscopy analysis of bone lesions made by a single-blade knife and a hatchet, on human femurs) and to compare the lesions of the femur with those of the mandible. The results indicate that the mandible is a more fragile bone, but the features observed on the mandible are quite similar to those previously observed on the femur. This work spells out the main scanning electron microscopy characteristics of sharp (bone cutting) and blunt (exerting a pressure on the bone) mechanisms on human bone. Weapon characteristics serve to explain all of these features.

  5. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM), the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems.

  6. In vivo visualization of microneedle conduits in human skin using laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, S.; Kruithof, A. C.; Liebl, H.; Tomerius, M.; Bouwstra, J.; Lademann, J.; Meinke, M.

    2010-03-01

    Solid microneedles enhance the penetration of drugs into the viable skin but little is known about the geometry of the conduits in vivo. Therefore, laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize the conduits of a microneedle system with needles at a length of 300 μm in 6 healthy subjects over a period of time. The model drug, a fluorescent dye was applied before and after piercing. Laser scanning microscopy was evaluated as being an excellent method to monitor the geometry and closure of the conduits over time. The used microneedle system was evaluated as suitable to enhance the transport of model drugs into the viable epidermis without bleeding and a short closure time of the conduits at the skin surface.

  7. Visualization of Aspergillus fumigatus biofilms with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Variable Pressure-Scanning Electron Microscopy: A comparison of processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Ferreira, Jose Ag; Stevens, David A; Nazik, Hasan; Cegelski, Lynette

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus biofilms consist of a three-dimensional network of cellular hyphae and extracellular matrix. They are involved in infections of immune-compromised individuals, particularly those with cystic fibrosis. These structures are associated with persistence of infection, resistance to host immunity, and antimicrobial resistance. Thorough understanding of structure and function is imperative in the design of therapeutic drugs. Optimization of processing parameters, including aldehyde fixation, heavy metal contrasting, drying techniques and Ionic Liquid treatment, was undertaken for an ultrastructural approach to understand cellular and extracellular biofilm components. Conventional and Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy were applied to analyze the structure of biofilms attached to plastic and formed at an air-liquid interface.

  8. Characterization of thin film semiconductors by scanning probe microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gichuhi, Anthony

    We have used scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, tunneling spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy and electrochemistry to study the electrosynthesis of II-VI compound semiconductors with special emphasis on ZnS, CdS, and HgS. This dissertation will focus mainly on the electrochemical and scanning probe (STM and AFM) applications to these compounds, in addition to novel materials such as CoSb. We hope to understand the structural, as well optical properties of these materials. Finally, we hope to develop a recipe for the electrosynthesis of high quality semiconductor films. In Chapter 2, we report an electrochemical, scanning probe microscopic and Raman spectroscopic investigation of thin US films grown by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) aimed at understanding the role played by the order of deposition on film quality. In Chapter 3, we report a study of electrosynthesized CdS-HgS heterojunctions using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), and electrochemistry. US thin films were grown by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy onto Au(111) substrates and were terminated with a single HgS monolayer. In Chapter 4, the structure and chemical composition of electrosynthesized ZnS thin films on Au(111) substrates grown by alternating underpotential deposition and oxidative adsorption cycles of S and Zn from solution precursors was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In Chapter 5, conditions for the growth of. stable mercury sulfide (HgS) monolayers on Au(111) surfaces using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. HgS thin films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Chapter 6: This chapter describes the use of resonance Raman spectroscopy to characterize thin films of the II-VI compound semiconductors electrosynthesized on metal surfaces. We describe how resonance

  9. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales - from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. The discussion presents the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  10. Ultra structural studies of the surface of Hymenolepis nana by scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzakham, A A; Romia, S A; Hegazi, M M

    1990-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of the surface of Hymenolepis nana indicated that dense populations of microtriches occur on scolex proper, suckers and strobila, with an average density of 20/micron2. The excellent preservation of microtriches proves the efficacy of the critical point drying method for preparing cestodes for study of SEM. The cytological structure of the tegument of H. nana corresponds in general to that of other tapeworms.

  11. Resolution of Internal Total Reflection Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Huayong; GUO Qizhi; TAN Weihan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the probe-sample interaction equation based on Mie′s scattering theory is derived, and the resolution of scanning near field optical microscopy is calculated numerically. The results show that the offset of far-field component to near-field component in total field plays an important role in the resolution and the size of samples also has influence on resolution.

  12. Direct control and characterization of a Schottky barrier by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L. D.; Kaiser, W. J.; Hecht, M. H.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) methods are used to directly control the barrier height of a metal tunnel tip-semiconductor tunnel junction. Barrier behavior is measured by tunnel current-voltage spectroscopy and compared to theory. A unique surface preparation method is used to prepare a low surface state density Si surface. Control of band bending with this method enables STM investigation of semiconductor subsurface properties.

  13. Histometric data obtained by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altmeyer Peter

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It would be a benefit if time-saving, non-invasive methods could give hints for diagnosing systemic sclerosis. To investigate the skin of patients with systemic sclerosis using confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo and to develop histometric parameters to describe characteristic cutaneous changes of systemic sclerosis observed by this new technique, we conducted an exploratory study. Materials and Methods Fifteen patients with systemic sclerosis treated with extracorporal photopheresis were compared with 15 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with other disorders also treated with extracorporal photopheresis. All subjects were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Results Micromorphologic characteristics of skin of patients with systemic sclerosis and measuring parameters for melanisation, epidermal hypotrophy, and fibrosis for dislocation of capillaries by collagen deposits in the papillary dermis were evaluated. An interesting finding was an increased thickness of the tissue in the dermal papillae superior to the first dermal papilla vessel. It was also possible to reproduce characteristic histologic features by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Histometric parameters for fibrosis and vascular features developed in this study showed significant differences in patients with systemic sclerosis compared to controls. Conclusions Although the predominant histopathological features in systemic sclerosis are findings of the reticular dermis and the subcutis, and in histopathological investigation the epidermis seems to remain unaffected by the disease, we have demonstrate some characteristic differences in the epidermis and papillary dermis by confocal laser scanning microscopy in vivo. Some of them have not been described so far. However, to use this technique as a tool for diagnosis and/or staging of systemic sclerosis, further studies are needed investigating the sensitivity and

  14. Scanning electron microscopy and calcification in amelogenesis imperfecta in anterior and posterior human teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M. C.; Ceballos, G.; García, J. M.; Rodriguez, I. A.; Gómez de Ferraris, M. E.; Campos, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Teeth fragments from members of a famil? clinically and genetically diagnosed as having amelogenesis imperfecta were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microprobe analysis to establish the morphological patterns and the quantitative concentration of calcium in the enamel of anterior (canine, incisor) and posterior (premolar and molar) teeth. The prism patterns in the enamel of teeth from both regions were parallel or irregularly decussate, with ...

  15. Ferroelectric Domain Imaging Mechanism in High-Vacuum Scanning Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hua-Rong; YU Han-Feng; CHU Rui-Qing; LI Guo-Rong; YIN Qing-Rui

    2005-01-01

    @@ High-vacuum scanning force microscopy of the domain structures in PMN-PT single crystals is investigated. It has been shown that under high vacuum conditions, the polarization charges are not effectively compensated for by intrinsic screening charges from the ferroelectrics. This result suggests that the electrostatic tip-sample interaction plays a great contribution to the domain imaging mechanism in PMN-PT ferroelectric single crystals under high vacuum conditions.

  16. Pulse Plating on Gold Surfaces Studied by In Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    Deposition of bulk copper on thin film gold surfaces is carried out by computer-aided pulse plating. It is demonstrated that the morphology of the copper deposit can be studied by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy both in potentiostatic experiments and in galvanostatic experiments. Optimized...... procedures for obtaining smooth deposits by pulse plating are explained in terms of a levelling effect. Possible non-faradaic processes observed in measurements with high frequency pulse plating are discussed....

  17. Endolithic algae and micrite envelope formation in Bahamian oolites as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, S.; Rex, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Examination of Holocene Bahamian ooelites by scanning electron and light microscopy has revealed the morphology and orientation of aragonite crystals in the lamellar ooelitic envelope, and their modification by the boring activities of endolithic algae. The voids produced by these algae are found in progressive stages of being lined and filled with precipitated microcrystalline aragonite, which is similar to the process of micrite envelope formation in molluscan and other skeletal carbonate grains.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of lunar regolith from the Sea of Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoshin, M. K.; Ilin, N. P.; Spivak, G. V.

    1974-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used in studying the morphology and cathodoluminescence of lunar regolith particles. Surface and structure of two groups of particles are differentiated: (1) Crystalline with well defined facets and spalling surfaces, which are grains of minerals and rock fragments: and (2) amorphous, fused, and partially or entirely glazed particles. Local melting of particles and the round openings on their surfaces are attributed to secondary influence on the regolith of factors of lunar weathering and above all micrometeoric impacts.

  19. Impact of adsorption on scanning electrochemical microscopy voltammetry and implications for nanogap measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Sze-yin; Zhang, Jie; Bond, Alan M.; Macpherson, Julie V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a powerful tool that enables quantitative measurements of fast electron transfer (ET) kinetics when coupled with modeling predictions from finite-element simulations. However, the advent of nanoscale and nanogap electrode geometries that have an intrinsically high surface area-to-solution volume ratio realizes the need for more rigorous data analysis procedures, as surface effects such as adsorption may play an important role. The oxidation of fer...

  20. Pulse Plating on Gold Surfaces Studied by In Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    Deposition of bulk copper on thin film gold surfaces is carried out by computer-aided pulse plating. It is demonstrated that the morphology of the copper deposit can be studied by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy both in potentiostatic experiments and in galvanostatic experiments. Optimized...... procedures for obtaining smooth deposits by pulse plating are explained in terms of a levelling effect. Possible non-faradaic processes observed in measurements with high frequency pulse plating are discussed....